WorldWideScience

Sample records for blood stains

  1. Whole Blood Cell Staining Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Clift, Vaughan L.; McDonald, Kelly E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for staining particular cell markers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a flexible tube that is reversibly pinched into compartments with one or more clamps. Each compartment of the tube contains a separate reagent and is in selective fluid communication with adjoining compartments.

  2. Improved Whole-Blood-Staining Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Crucian, Brian; Paul, Bonnie; Melton, Shannon; Guess, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic improvements have been made in NASA s Whole Blood Staining Device (WBSD) since it was last described in "Whole-Blood-Staining Device," NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 23, No. 10 (October 1999), page 64. The new system has a longer shelf life, a simpler and more effective operational procedure, improved interface with instrumentation, and shorter processing time. More specifically, the improvements have targeted bag and locking clip materials, sampling ports, and air pocket prevention. The WBSD stains whole blood collected during spaceflight for subsequent flow cytometric analysis. In short, the main device stains white blood cells by use of monoclonal antibodies conjugated to various fluorochromes, followed by lysing and fixing of the cells by use of a commercial reagent that has been diluted according to NASA safety standards. This system is compact, robust, and does not require electric power, precise mixing, or precise incubation times. Figure 1 depicts the present improved version for staining applications, which is a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) bag with a Luer-lock port and plastic locking clips. An InterLink (or equivalent) intravenous- injection port screws into the Luer-lock port. The inflatable/collapsible nature of the bag facilitates loading and helps to minimize the amount of air trapped in the fully loaded bag. Some additional uses have been identified for the device beyond whole blood staining. The WBSD has been configured for functional assays that require culture of live cells by housing sterile culture media, mitogens, and fixatives prior to use [Figure 2(a)]. Simple injection of whole blood allows cell-stimulation culture to be performed in reduced gravity conditions, and product stabilization prior to storage, while protecting astronauts from liquid biohazardous materials. Also, the improved WBSD has reconstituted powdered injectable antibiotics by mixing them with diluent liquids [Figure 2(b)]. Although such mixing can readily be performed on

  3. The challenges of analysing blood stains with hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuula, J.; Puupponen, H.-H.; Rinta, H.; Pölönen, I.

    2014-06-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a potential noninvasive technology for detecting, separating and identifying various substances. In the forensic and military medicine and other CBRNE related use it could be a potential method for analyzing blood and for scanning other human based fluids. For example, it would be valuable to easily detect whether some traces of blood are from one or more persons or if there are some irrelevant substances or anomalies in the blood. This article represents an experiment of separating four persons' blood stains on a white cotton fabric with a SWIR hyperspectral camera and FT-NIR spectrometer. Each tested sample includes standardized 75 _l of 100 % blood. The results suggest that on the basis of the amount of erythrocytes in the blood, different people's blood might be separable by hyperspectral analysis. And, referring to the indication given by erythrocytes, there might be a possibility to find some other traces in the blood as well. However, these assumptions need to be verified with wider tests, as the number of samples in the study was small. According to the study there also seems to be several biological, chemical and physical factors which affect alone and together on the hyperspectral analyzing results of blood on fabric textures, and these factors need to be considered before making any further conclusions on the analysis of blood on various materials.

  4. Age estimation of blood stains by hemoglobin derivative determination using reflectance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H. Bremmer; A. Nadort; T.G. van Leeuwen; M.J.C. van Gemert; M.C.G. Aalders

    2011-01-01

    Blood stains can be crucial in reconstructing crime events. However, no reliable methods are currently available to establish the age of a blood stain on the crime scene. We show that determining the fractions of three hemoglobin derivatives in a blood stain at various ages enables relating these ti

  5. Comparative study of subculture, Gram staining and acridine orange staining for early detection of positive blood cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Mascart, G; Bertrand, F.; Mascart, P.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the importance of a rapid aetiological diagnosis in septicaemia, we compared the results of subculture, Gram staining and acridine orange staining in the detection of positive blood cultures. The study was based on 1013 blood cultures of which 138 were positive by culture. The three techniques were applied 12 h after the specimen was taken in 210 instances, at 24 h in 540 instances and after 48 h in 525. We were able to demonstrate the value of direct examination. Staining with acr...

  6. Development of a preparation and staining method for fetal erythroblasts in maternal blood : Simultaneous immunocytochemical staining and FISH analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, JC; Mesker, WE; Ouwerkerk-van Velzen, MCM; Knepfle, CFHM; Wiesmeijer, KC; van den Burg, MJM; Beverstock, GC; Bernini, LF; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Kanhai, HHH; Tanke, HJ

    1998-01-01

    In order to detect fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) in maternal blood, a protocol was developed which aimed at producing a reliable staining method for combined immunocytochemical and FISH analysis. The technique had to be suitable for eventual automated screening of slides. Chorionic villi w

  7. 9 CFR 147.3 - The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 147.3 Section 147.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Blood Testing Procedures § 147.3 The stained-antigen, rapid, whole-blood test. 3 3 The...

  8. Comparison of algorithms for blood stain detection applied to forensic hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Messinger, David W.; Mathew, Jobin J.; Dube, Roger R.

    2016-05-01

    Blood stains are among the most important types of evidence for forensic investigation. They contain valuable DNA information, and the pattern of the stains can suggest specifics about the nature of the violence that transpired at the scene. Early detection of blood stains is particularly important since the blood reacts physically and chemically with air and materials over time. Accurate identification of blood remnants, including regions that might have been intentionally cleaned, is an important aspect of forensic investigation. Hyperspectral imaging might be a potential method to detect blood stains because it is non-contact and provides substantial spectral information that can be used to identify regions in a scene with trace amounts of blood. The potential complexity of scenes in which such vast violence occurs can be high when the range of scene material types and conditions containing blood stains at a crime scene are considered. Some stains are hard to detect by the unaided eye, especially if a conscious effort to clean the scene has occurred (we refer to these as "latent" blood stains). In this paper we present the initial results of a study of the use of hyperspectral imaging algorithms for blood detection in complex scenes. We describe a hyperspectral imaging system which generates images covering 400 nm - 700 nm visible range with a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Three image sets of 31 wavelength bands were generated using this camera for a simulated indoor crime scene in which blood stains were placed on a T-shirt and walls. To detect blood stains in the scene, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Subspace Reed Xiaoli Detection (SRXD), and Topological Anomaly Detection (TAD) algorithms were used. Comparison of the three hyperspectral image analysis techniques shows that TAD is most suitable for detecting blood stains and discovering latent blood stains.

  9. [Modification of DNA typing of blood stains by textile stain carriers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheithauer, R; Weisser, H J

    1991-01-01

    Samples of 20 microliters blood were applicated von 55 different textiles, containing all usual materials for clothes, straight from the fabric and after thorough washing. DNA profiling was influenced only by blue jeans and blue terry towel straight from the fabric; in some of these samples there was an inhibition of the restriction enzyme digest that could not be prevented by an additional dialysis step.

  10. 2D Source area prediction based on physical characteristics of a regular, passive blood drip stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Nabanita; Bandyopadhyay, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Violent criminal acts are often accompanied by dynamic blood shedding events. Bloodstain pattern analysis particularly deals with estimation of the dynamic blood shedding events from the static bloodstain patterns that have been left at the scene. Of all the stain patterns present at a crime scene, drip stain patterns are common stain patterns one would expect to document at a violent crime scene. The paper documents statistically significant correlations between different physical parameters, such as fall height, total number of spines associated with each stain. Statistical significant correlation between the angle of impact and the total number of spines associated with each stain pattern has been established in this work. The paper propounds that the breadth of a regular drip stain is particularly significant in making predictions empirically as also statistically about the surface area from which blood has dripped leading to the formation of a particular drip stain. A data model has been developed using machine learning techniques to predict the range of surface radius from which blood has dripped and lead to the formation of a particular drip stain (Accuracy: 97.53%, Sensitivity=0.9481, Specificity=1). PMID:27295073

  11. Developmental validation of a novel lateral flow strip test for rapid identification of human blood (Rapid Stain Identification--Blood).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweers, Brett A; Old, Jennifer; Boonlayangoor, P W; Reich, Karl A

    2008-06-01

    Human blood is the body fluid most commonly encountered at crime scenes, and blood detection may aid investigators in reconstructing what occurred during a crime. In addition, blood detection can help determine which items of evidence should be processed for DNA-STR testing. Unfortunately, many common substances can cause red-brown stains that resemble blood. Furthermore, many current human blood detection methods are presumptive and prone to false positive results. Here, the developmental validation of a new blood identification test, Rapid Stain Identification--Blood (RSID--Blood), is described. RSID--Blood utilizes two anti-glycophorin A (red blood cell membrane specific protein) monoclonal antibodies in a lateral flow strip test format to detect human blood. We present evidence demonstrating that this test is accurate, reproducible, easy to use, and highly specific for human blood. Importantly, RSID--Blood does not cross-react with ferret, skunk, or primate blood and exhibits no high-dose hook effect. Also, we describe studies on the sensitivity, body fluid specificity, and species specificity of RSID--Blood. In addition, we show that the test can detect blood from a variety of forensic exhibits prior to processing for DNA-STR analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that RSID--Blood is effective and useful for the detection of human blood on forensic exhibits, and offers improved blood detection when compared to other currently used methods.

  12. Applicability of three commercially available kits for forensic identification of blood stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horjan, Ivana; Barbaric, Lucija; Mrsic, Gordan

    2016-02-01

    Various commercially available one-step immunoassays for detection of human (primate) blood have been developed. This study evaluated two hemoglobin tests, ABAcard(®) HemaTrace(®) and HemDirect Hemoglobin against glycophorin A test-RSID™-Blood for following parameters: sensitivity, specificity, effectiveness using various substrates, stain remover and aged blood stains. The highest blood detection limit was observed if HemaTrace(®) was used. When compared with HemaTrace(®), ten times lower sensitivity was observed for HemDirect Hemoglobin test. No false positives were obtained for HemDirect Hemoglobin while ABAcard(®) HemaTrace(®), probably due to its extreme sensitivity, showed high percent of false positives with saliva. The lowest sensitivity and 40% of false positives with saliva was exhibited by RSID™-Blood. In addition, this test encountered the lowest efficacy if aged blood-stains or blood treated with stain remover were used. As expected, none of the tested substrates (wood, metal, brick, and soil), influenced on blood testing, although soil substrate affected STR amplification. Conducted studies established HemDirect Hemoglobin test as more reliable for evaluated parameters than ABAcard(®) HemaTrace(®) and RSID™-Blood.

  13. Applicability of three commercially available kits for forensic identification of blood stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horjan, Ivana; Barbaric, Lucija; Mrsic, Gordan

    2016-02-01

    Various commercially available one-step immunoassays for detection of human (primate) blood have been developed. This study evaluated two hemoglobin tests, ABAcard(®) HemaTrace(®) and HemDirect Hemoglobin against glycophorin A test-RSID™-Blood for following parameters: sensitivity, specificity, effectiveness using various substrates, stain remover and aged blood stains. The highest blood detection limit was observed if HemaTrace(®) was used. When compared with HemaTrace(®), ten times lower sensitivity was observed for HemDirect Hemoglobin test. No false positives were obtained for HemDirect Hemoglobin while ABAcard(®) HemaTrace(®), probably due to its extreme sensitivity, showed high percent of false positives with saliva. The lowest sensitivity and 40% of false positives with saliva was exhibited by RSID™-Blood. In addition, this test encountered the lowest efficacy if aged blood-stains or blood treated with stain remover were used. As expected, none of the tested substrates (wood, metal, brick, and soil), influenced on blood testing, although soil substrate affected STR amplification. Conducted studies established HemDirect Hemoglobin test as more reliable for evaluated parameters than ABAcard(®) HemaTrace(®) and RSID™-Blood. PMID:26748240

  14. Spectral feature characterization methods for blood stain detection in crime scene backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Mathew, Jobin J.; Dube, Roger R.; Messinger, David W.

    2016-05-01

    Blood stains are one of the most important types of evidence for forensic investigation. They contain valuable DNA information, and the pattern of the stains can suggest specifics about the nature of the violence that transpired at the scene. Blood spectral signatures containing unique reflectance or absorption features are important both for forensic on-site investigation and laboratory testing. They can be used for target detection and identification applied to crime scene hyperspectral imagery, and also be utilized to analyze the spectral variation of blood on various backgrounds. Non-blood stains often mislead the detection and can generate false alarms at a real crime scene, especially for dark and red backgrounds. This paper measured the reflectance of liquid blood and 9 kinds of non-blood samples in the range of 350 nm - 2500 nm in various crime scene backgrounds, such as pure samples contained in petri dish with various thicknesses, mixed samples with different colors and materials of fabrics, and mixed samples with wood, all of which are examined to provide sub-visual evidence for detecting and recognizing blood from non-blood samples in a realistic crime scene. The spectral difference between blood and non-blood samples are examined and spectral features such as "peaks" and "depths" of reflectance are selected. Two blood stain detection methods are proposed in this paper. The first method uses index to denote the ratio of "depth" minus "peak" over"depth" add"peak" within a wavelength range of the reflectance spectrum. The second method uses relative band depth of the selected wavelength ranges of the reflectance spectrum. Results show that the index method is able to discriminate blood from non-blood samples in most tested crime scene backgrounds, but is not able to detect it from black felt. Whereas the relative band depth method is able to discriminate blood from non-blood samples on all of the tested background material types and colors.

  15. [Morphology of low-velocity impact stains produced from single drops of blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benecke, Mark; Reibe, Saskia; Baumjohann, Kristina; Gulinski, Sarah; Wetzel, Waltraud; Schmidt, Kira; Pressler, Katharina; Lebküchner, Isabell; Streckenbach, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Systematic variation of blood droplet volume, the distance fallen and the surface (paper, wood, plastics, tiles) led to the conclusion that the size and the shape of the stains ("fingers", satellites) allowed to deduce the distance fallen but only if the actual surface structure was known. We found that detailed photography at the crime scene was necessary, yet experiments have to be performed due to the extreme influence of the actual surface texture on all characteristics (size, spines, peripheral spatter) of the blood stains. PMID:22924278

  16. Visualization of latent blood stains using visible reflectance hyperspectral imaging and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Gerda J; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C

    2015-01-01

    The detection of latent traces is an important aspect of crime scene investigation. Blood stains on black backgrounds can be visualized using chemiluminescence, which is invasive and requires a darkened room, or near-infrared photography, for which investigators need to change filters manually to optimize contrast. We demonstrated the performance of visible reflectance hyperspectral imaging (400-720 nm) for this purpose. Several processing methods were evaluated: single wavelength bands, ratio images, principal component analysis (PCA), and "SIMPLe-to-use Interactive Self-modeling Mixture Analysis" (SIMPLISMA). Using these methods, we were able to enhance the contrast between blood stains and 12 different fabrics. On black cotton, blood dilutions were visible with a minimal concentration of 25% of whole blood. The hyperspectral camera system used in this study is portable and wireless, which makes it suitable for crime scene use. The described technique is noncontact and nondestructive, so all traces are preserved for further analysis. PMID:25382735

  17. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Claus; Hanson, E; Anjos, M J;

    2014-01-01

    The European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) organized a fourth and fifth collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling. The task was to identify dried menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains using specific RNA biomarkers, and additionally test 3...... housekeeping genes for their suitability as reference genes. Six menstrual blood and six vaginal secretion stains, two dilution series (1/4-1/64 pieces of a menstrual blood/vaginal swab) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework samples of human or non-human origin were analyzed by 24 participating...... laboratories, using RNA extraction or RNA/DNA co-extraction methods. Two novel menstrual blood mRNA multiplexes were used: MMP triplex (MMP7, MMP10, MMP11) and MB triplex (MSX1, LEFTY2, SFRP4) in conjunction with a housekeeping gene triplex (B2M, UBC, UCE). Two novel mRNA multiplexes and a HBD1 singleplex were...

  18. Blood culture gram stain, acridine orange stain and direct sensitivity-based antimicrobial therapy of bloodstream infection in patients with trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behera B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to ascertain if the simple practice of Gram stain, acridine orange stain and direct sensitivity determination of positive blood culture bottles could be used to guide early and appropriate treatment in trauma patients with clinical suspicion of sepsis. The study also aimed to evaluate the error in interpreting antimicrobial sensitivity by direct method when compared to standard method and find out if specific antibiotic-organism combination had more discrepancies. Findings from consecutive episodes of blood stream infection at an Apex Trauma centre over a 12-month period are summarized. Materials and Methods: A total of 509 consecutive positive blood cultures were subjected to Gram staining. AO staining was done in BacT/ALERT-positive Gram-stain negative blood cultures. Direct sensitivity was performed from 369 blood culture broths, showing single type of growth in Gram and acridine orange staining. Results of direct sensitivity were compared to conventional sensitivity for errors. Results: No ′very major′ discrepancy was found in this study. About 5.2 and 1.8% minor error rates were noted in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively, while comparing the two methods. Most of the discrepancies in gram-negative bacteria were noted in β lactam - β lactamase inhibitor combinations. Direct sensitivity testing was not reliable for reporting of methicillin and vancomycin resistance in Staphylococci. Conclusions: Gram stain result together with direct sensitivity testing is required for optimizing initial antimicrobial therapy in trauma patients with clinical suspicion of sepsis. Gram staining and AO staining proved particularly helpful in the early detection of candidaemia.

  19. Blood stains of the Turin Shroud 2015: beyond personal hopes and limitations of techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Minno, Giovanni; Scala, Rosanna; Ventre, Itala; de Gaetano, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    In the early '80s, evidence was provided that, rather than a dye (red okra), hemoglobin was indeed responsible for the alleged blood stains of the Turin Shroud. Such stains were shown to belong to an MNS positive individual of the AB group, and the halos surrounding the blood stains were compatible with serum containing trace amounts of bilirubin, albumin and immunoglobulins. However, being only based on indirect and circumstantial evidence, most of these data were challenged. In the late '90s, together with the evidence of the gene coding β-globin, contamination between male and female DNA was documented on the Turin Shroud. Although the presence of male was more noticeable than female DNA, these data were considered null and void. These days, to establish that blood indisputably belongs to an MNS positive individual of the AB group, and to exclude DNA contamination, high-specificity techniques with monoclonal antibodies and molecular studies on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA are needed. Indeed, consistent with DNA contamination on the Turin Shroud, sequences from multiple subjects of different ethnic origins have been recently detected on the human mitochondrial genome extracted from dust particles of the linen. Innovative concepts are likely to come up using modern research approaches to evaluate the issue of blood stains of the Turin Shroud. Nor can we rule out the possibility that religious implications of the new findings on the Turin Shroud might be envisaged. Conceivably enough, the ongoing debate will be fierce and passionate, especially in the media. PMID:27001889

  20. New markers for old stains: Stable mRNA markers for blood and saliva identification from up to 16-year-old stains

    OpenAIRE

    Zubakov, D.; Kokshoorn, M.; Kloosterman, A.; Kayser, M

    2009-01-01

    In forensic science, the unequivocal identification of the cellular origin of crime scene samples used for DNA profiling can provide crucial information for crime scene reconstruction. We have previously shown that various mRNA markers from genes with expression patterns specific for blood and saliva can be established from whole-genome expression analysis of time-wise degraded samples and were stable enough to specifically identify blood and saliva stains up to 180 days of age. Here, we show...

  1. Blood flow dynamics after laser therapy of port wine stain birthmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chih; Tran, Nadia; Ross, E. Victor; Shumaker, Peter R.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Kelly, Kristen; Choi, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    During laser therapy of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks, regions of persistent perfusion may exist. We hypothesize that such regions, which are not readily visible, exist even during laser surgery performed by highly experienced clinicians. The objective of this study was to use objective feedback to assess the acute vascular response to laser therapy. We have developed a clinic-friendly laser speckle imaging (LSI) instrument to provide the clinician with real-time images of blood flow during laser therapy. We acquired images from patients undergoing laser therapy of PWS birthmarks at Scripps Clinic and Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic. We extracted blood flow maps from the acquired imaging data. Collectively, we have observed two regimes of patient response to therapy: 1) an immediate increase in perfusion within minutes after laser therapy; and 2) an overall decrease in blood perfusion approximately one hour after laser therapy, with distinct regions of persistent perfusion apparent in the majority of post-treatment blood-flow images. A comparison of blood flow in PWS and adjacent normal skin demonstrated that PWS blood flow can be greater than or sometimes equivalent to that of normal skin. Regions of persistent perfusion frequently exist immediately after laser therapy of PWS birthmarks. Existence of these regions may be correlated to the need for multiple treatment sessions to improve substantially PWS skin appearance. With the use of intraoperative LSI, immediate retreatment of these regions may improve the outcome of each session.

  2. Blood vessel staining in the myocardium for 3D visualization down to the smallest capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood vessels formed after medical interventions such as radiofrequency treatment have to be visualized down to the capillary level with diameters of about 5 μm to validate neo-vascularization. Synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography (SRμCT) provides the necessary spatial resolution. Since both the vessels and the surrounding tissue mainly consist of water the difference in absorption is extremely weak. Therefore, it is necessary to search for appropriate contrast agents and to develop suitable staining protocols, which finally allow segmenting the vessel tree. Among the contrast agents used in medicine lyophilic salts with a mean particle diameter of 1.5 μm such as CaSO4, SrSO4 and BaSO4 are most appropriate to stain the vessels. The combination of these salts with a commercially available embedding kit (JB-4, Polysciences Inc.) allows tissue fixation and long-term storage in solid state. Intensity-based segmentation algorithms enable the vessel tree extraction in selected parts of the stained myocardium using the SRμCT data

  3. Traumatic ghost cell glaucoma with successful resolution of corneal blood staining following pars Plana vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Alamri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cell glaucoma (GCG was first described in 1976. It is a type of a secondary open angle glaucoma, which occurs following long-standing vitreous hemorrhage. The ghost cells are rigid and less pliable than fresh red blood cells; therefore, they may cause direct obstruction of the trabecular meshwork and secondary increase in the intraocular pressure (IOP. This case report presents the diagnosis and management of a rare case of traumatic GCG after vitreous hemorrhage in a phakic child. Pars plana vitrectomy was done after unsuccessful medical therapy and the diagnosis was confirmed by cytopathology. Surprisingly, spontaneous resolution of the corneal blood staining occurred. The outcome in this case was favorable with controlled IOP in the affected eye.

  4. RNA/DNA co-analysis from blood stains--Results of a second collaborative EDNAP exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, C.; Hanson, E.; Anjos, M.J.;

    2012-01-01

    RNA profiling to confirm the presence of blood and to obtain autosomal STR profiles from the blood stain donors. The positive identification of blood and good quality DNA profiles were also obtained from old and compromised casework samples. The method proved to be reproducible and sensitive using different......A second collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling was organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP). Six human blood stains, two blood dilution series (5-0.001 [mu]l blood) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework samples of human...... or non-human origin were analyzed by the participating laboratories using a RNA/DNA co-extraction or solely RNA extraction method. Two novel mRNA multiplexes were used for the identification of blood: a highly sensitive duplex (HBA, HBB) and a moderately sensitive pentaplex (ALAS2, CD3G, ANK1, SPTB...

  5. The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadd, Samuel; Li, Bo; Beveridge, Peter; O'Hare, William T; Campbell, Andrew; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-01

    Blood is one of the most commonly encountered types of biological evidence found at scenes of violent crime and one of the most commonly observed fingerprint contaminants. Current visualisation methods rely on presumptive tests or chemical enhancement methods. Although these can successfully visualise ridge detail, they are destructive, do not confirm the presence of blood and can have a negative impact on DNA sampling. A novel application of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has been used for the detection and positive identification of blood stained fingerprints in a non-contact and non-destructive manner on white ceramic tiles. The identification of blood was based on the unique visible absorption spectrum of haemoglobin between 400 and 500 nm. HSI has been used to successfully visualise ridge detail in blood stained fingerprints to the ninth depletion. Ridge detail was still detectable with diluted blood to 20-fold dilutions. Latent blood stains were detectable to 15,000-fold dilutions. Ridge detail was detectable for fingerprints up to 6 months old. HSI was also able to conclusively distinguish blood stained fingerprints from fingerprints in six paints and eleven other red/brown media with zero false positives.

  6. Cytoplasm enhancement operator of peripheral blood smear images that are instable-stained and overexposed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xin; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Nucleus and cytoplasm are both essential for white blood cell recognition but the edges of cytoplasm are too blurry to be detected because of instable staining and overexposure. This paper aims at proposing a cytoplasm enhancement operator (CEO) to achieve accurate convergence of the active contour model. The CEO contains two parts. First, a nonlinear over-exposure enhancer map is yielded to correct over-exposure, which suppresses background noise while preserving details and improving contrast. Second, the over-exposed regions of cytoplasm in particular is further enhanced by a tri- modal histogram specification based on the scale-space filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed CEO and its corresponding GVF snake is superior to other unsupervised segmentation approaches.

  7. A Historical Review of the Characterization of Blood and Secretion Stains in the Forensic Science Laboratory Part One: Bloodstains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, P H

    1993-06-01

    Laboratory tests were established during the latter part of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century that determined whether or not a stain was blood and, if so, from which species it originated. A few years after the discovery of the ABO blood groups in 1900, it was possible to detect these groups in bloodstains using the absorption-inhibition (A/I) technique. However, in the 1960s a new technique emerged that was more sensitive and quicker than A/I - the absorbtion-elution (A/E) method. Furthermore, it could be adapted to grouping semen and saliva stains. The biochemical technique of electrophoresis allowed the study of polymorphic forms of serum proteins and red cell enzymes in bloodstains. By 1980 it was theoretically possible to type a bloodstain in at least 16 different blood group systems. Even if a smaller number of these systems was identified in a stain, often very high levels of discrimination were achieved. Fewer blood grouping systems were applicable to secretion stains. The latest development of DNA profiling, however, allows the determination of the source of a stain from blood or semen with a degree of certainty never before attained. Technical success has nevertheless brought problems both for the laboratory and the courts, some of which are addressed here.

  8. Investigation of a novel approach to scoring Giemsa-stained malaria-infected thin blood films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholzen Anja

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Daily assessment of the percentage of erythrocytes that are infected ('percent-parasitaemia' across a time-course is a necessary step in many experimental studies of malaria, but represents a time-consuming and unpopular task among researchers. The most common method is extensive microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained thin blood-films. This study explored a method for the assessment of percent-parasitaemia that does not require extended periods of microscopy and results in a descriptive and permanent record of parasitaemia data that is highly amenable to subsequent 'data-mining'. Digital photography was utilized in conjunction with a basic purpose-written computer programme to test the viability of the concept. Partial automation of the determination of percent parasitaemia was then explored, resulting in the successful customization of commercially available broad-spectrum image analysis software towards this aim. Lastly, automated discrimination between infected and uninfected RBCs based on analysis of digital parameters of individual cell images was explored in an effort to completely automate the calculation of an accurate percent-parasitaemia.

  9. Infrared tomography for diagnostic imaging of port wine stain blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The objective of this work is the development of Infrared Tomography (IRT) for detecting and characterizing subsurface chromophores in human skin. Characterization of cutaneous chromophores is crucial for advances in the laser treatment of pigmented lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks and tatoos). Infrared tomography (IRT) uses a fast infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) to detect temperature rises in a substrate induced by pulsed radiation. A pulsed laser is used to produce transient heating of an object. The temperature rise, due to the optical absorption of the pulsed laser light, creates an increase in infrared emission which is measured by the IR-FPA. Although the application of IRT to image subsurface cracks due to metal fatigue is a topic of great interest in the aircraft industry, the application to image subsurface chromophores in biological materials is novel. We present an image recovery method based on a constrained conjugate gradient algorithm that has obtained the first ever high quality images of port wine blood vessels.

  10. A simple, efficient and inexpensive method for malaria parasites' DNA catching from fixed Giemsa-stained blood slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandarian, Abbas Ali; Moradi, Sara; Abedi, Saeed

    2016-09-01

    As parasitological or microscopic method is the gold standard and the best method for diagnosis of malaria, so fixed Geimsa-stained blood slides in the form of thick and thin blood smears are the most important data collections of malaria, especially historical slides. The parasites are dead but their DNA is valuable for many molecular biologic researches. A simple and efficient method for catching and extraction malaria parasites' DNA with a desired yield from dried and stained blood on slides is the first and major step. Introduction of an applicable, efficient and inexpensive DNA catching method and assessment of its performance in following molecular applications  was the main objective of present study. PMID:27605792

  11. Hemostatic, milk clotting and blood stain removal potential of cysteine proteases from Calotropis gigantea (L. R. Br. Latex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omana Sukumaran Bindhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plant latex is a natural source of biologically active compounds and several hydrolytic enzymes responsible for their diverse health benefits. Recent past has witnessed substantial progress in understanding their supplementary industrial and pharmaceutical utility. Calotropis gigantea is one of the important latex producing plants belonging to asclepediaceae family with wide ethnopharmacological applications and is rich in proteolytic enzymes. Present study investigates hemostatic, milk clotting and blood stain removal potential of C. gigantea latex proteases. Materials and Methods: The protease activity of crude enzyme (CE, obtained by centrifugation followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation and dialysis, was assayed using casein as the substrate. Effect of pH, temperature and specific inhibitors on protease activity was determined. Native PAGE and in gel protease activity of CE was performed. Hemostatic (Fibrinogen polymerization, fibrinogen agarose plate and blood clot lysis assays, milk clotting and blood stain removal efficacies of CE were determined. Results: CE exhibited high caseinolytic activity. Enzyme activity was optimum at 37-50ºC and pH 8.0. Fibrinogen polymerization assay showed concentration dependent increase in turbidity indicating thrombin like activity which was further confirmed by fibrinogen agarose plate assays. Clot lysis assay indicated 92.41% thrombolysis by CE in 90 min. CE also revealed significantly high ratio of milk clotting to protease activity (Milk Clotting Index, MCI = 827.59 ± 1.52. Complete destaining of blood stained fabric was observed when incubated with 1% detergent incorporated with 0.1mg/ml CE. The study highlights and validates the compound application potential of latex cysteine proteases from C. gigantea.

  12. False positive gel-acetylcholinesterase results in blood-stained amniotic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, R D; Cuckle, H S; Wald, N J; Rodeck, C H

    1982-10-01

    The effect of blood contamination on the gel-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) test used in the diagnosis of fetal open neural-tube defects was studied with amniotic fluid samples artificially contaminated with fetal or maternal blood in concentrations covering a range exceeding that usually found in clinical practice. Amniotic fluid samples contaminated with maternal blood gave negative gel-AChE results at all concentrations. Contamination with fetal blood yielded positive results if the erythrocyte concentration was greater than about 60 x 10(6) cells/ml. Thus contamination of amniotic fluid with blood is only likely to cause false positive gel-AChE results if this critical concentration is exceeded. Such samples will occur only rarely in clinical practice but when they do the diagnosis should be made with caution. PMID:7126503

  13. The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadd, Samuel; Li, Bo; Beveridge, Peter; O'Hare, William T; Campbell, Andrew; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-01

    Biological samples, such as blood, are regularly encountered at violent crime scenes and successful identification is critical for criminal investigations. Blood is one of the most commonly encountered fingerprint contaminants and current identification methods involve presumptive tests or wet chemical enhancement. These are destructive however; can affect subsequent DNA sampling; and do not confirm the presence of blood, meaning they are susceptible to false positives. A novel application of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has been used for the non-contact, non-destructive detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints across a range of coloured substrates of varying porosities. The identification of blood was based on the Soret γ band absorption of haemoglobin between 400 nm and 500 nm. Ridge detail was successfully visualised to the third depletion across light coloured substrates and the stain detected to the tenth depletion on both porous and non-porous substrates. A higher resolution setup for blood stained fingerprints on black tiles, detected ridge detail to the third depletion and the stain to the tenth depletion, demonstrating considerable advancements from previous work. Diluted blood stains at 1500 and 1000 fold dilutions for wet and dry stains respectively were also detected on pig skin as a replica for human skin. PMID:27162017

  14. Comparing Leishman and Giemsa staining for the assessment of peripheral blood smear preparations in a malaria-endemic region in India

    OpenAIRE

    Sathpathi, Sanghamitra; Mohanty, Akshaya K; Satpathi, Parthasarathi; Mishra, Saroj K.; Behera, Prativa K.; Patel, Goutam; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microscopy of peripheral blood thin and thick films remains the reference for malaria diagnosis. Although Giemsa staining is most commonly used, the Leishman staining method provides better visualization of the nuclear chromatin pattern of cells. It is less well known whether accuracy of parasitaemia assessment is equally accurate with the latter method. Methods Peripheral blood thin and thick smears from consecutive febrile patients admitted to Ispat General hospital, Rourkela, Od...

  15. A comparison of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging and Acid Black 1 for the detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadd, Samuel; Li, Bo; Beveridge, Peter; O Hare, William T; Campbell, Andrew; Islam, Meez

    2016-07-01

    Bloodstains are often encountered at scenes of violent crime and have significant forensic value for criminal investigations. Blood is one of the most commonly encountered types of biological evidence and is the most commonly observed fingerprint contaminant. Presumptive tests are used to test blood stain and blood stained fingerprints are targeted with chemical enhancement methods, such as acid stains, including Acid Black 1, Acid Violet 17 or Acid Yellow 7. Although these techniques successfully visualise ridge detail, they are destructive, do not confirm the presence of blood and can have a negative impact on DNA sampling. A novel application of visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is used for the non-contact, non-destructive detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints on white tiles both before and after wet chemical enhancement using Acid Black 1. The identification was obtained in a non-contact and non-destructive manner, based on the unique visible absorption spectrum of haemoglobin between 400 and 500nm. Results from the exploration of the selectivity of the setup to detect blood against ten other non-blood protein contaminants are also presented. A direct comparison of the effectiveness of HSI with chemical enhancement using Acid Black 1 on white tiles is also shown. PMID:27320396

  16. Labelling of T cell subsets under field conditions in tropical countries. Adaptation of the immuno-alkaline phosphatase staining method for blood smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I M; Whittle, H; Aaby, P;

    1990-01-01

    Immuno-alkaline phosphatase (AP) staining for T cell subsets (CD4 and CD8) of smears from fingerprick blood functioned well under tropical climatic conditions when smears were stored frozen with silica gel before being labelled. Unlabelled smears were stored for up to 12 months and could be trans......Immuno-alkaline phosphatase (AP) staining for T cell subsets (CD4 and CD8) of smears from fingerprick blood functioned well under tropical climatic conditions when smears were stored frozen with silica gel before being labelled. Unlabelled smears were stored for up to 12 months and could...

  17. New markers for old stains: Stable mRNA markers for blood and saliva identification from up to 16-year-old stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Zubakov; M. Kokshoorn; A. Kloosterman; M. Kayser

    2009-01-01

    In forensic science, the unequivocal identification of the cellular origin of crime scene samples used for DNA profiling can provide crucial information for crime scene reconstruction. We have previously shown that various mRNA markers from genes with expression patterns specific for blood and saliv

  18. Port-wine stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many treatments have been tried for port-wine stains, including freezing, surgery, radiation, and tattooing. Laser therapy is most successful in eliminating port-wine stains. It is the only method that can destroy the tiny blood vessels in the skin ...

  19. A Case of Disseminated Histoplasmosis Detected in Peripheral Blood Smear Staining Revealing AIDS at Terminal Phase in a Female Patient from Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Mandengue Ebenye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is endemic in the American continent and also in Sub-Saharan Africa, coexisting with the African histoplasmosis. Immunosuppressed patients, especially those with advanced HIV infection develop a severe disseminated histoplasmosis with fatal prognosis. The definitive diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis is based on the detection of Histoplasma capsulatum from patient’ tissues samples or body fluids. Among the diagnostic tests peripheral blood smear staining is not commonly used. Nonetheless a few publications reveal that Histoplasma capsulatum has been discovered by chance using this method in HIV infected patients with chronic fever and hence revealed AIDS at the terminal phase. We report a new case detected in a Cameroonian woman without any previous history of HIV infection. Peripheral blood smear staining should be commonly used for the diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis in the Sub-Saharan Africa, where facilities for mycology laboratories are unavailable.

  20. A Case of Disseminated Histoplasmosis Detected in Peripheral Blood Smear Staining Revealing AIDS at Terminal Phase in a Female Patient from Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Mandengue Ebenye

    2012-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is endemic in the American continent and also in Sub-Saharan Africa, coexisting with the African histoplasmosis. Immunosuppressed patients, especially those with advanced HIV infection develop a severe disseminated histoplasmosis with fatal prognosis. The definitive diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis is based on the detection of Histoplasma capsulatum from patient' tissues samples or body fluids. Among the diagnostic tests peripheral blood smear staining is not commonly u...

  1. Comparative analysis of Gram's stain, PNA-FISH and Sepsityper with MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of yeast direct from positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorton, Rebecca L; Ramnarain, P; Barker, K; Stone, N; Rattenbury, S; McHugh, T D; Kibbler, C C

    2014-10-01

    Fungaemia diagnosis could be improved by reducing the time to identification of yeast from blood cultures. This study aimed to evaluate three rapid methods for the identification of yeast direct from blood cultures; Gram's stain analysis, the AdvanDX Peptide Nucleic Acid in Situ Hybridisation Yeast Traffic Light system (PNA-FISH YTL) and Bruker Sepsityper alongside matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Fifty blood cultures spiked with a known single yeast strain were analysed by blinded operators experienced in each method. Identifications were compared with MALDI-TOF MS CHROMagar Candida culture and ITS rRNA sequence-based identifications. On first attempt, success rates of 96% (48/50) and 76% (36/50) were achieved using PNA-FISH YTL and Gram's stain respectively. MALDI-TOF MS demonstrated a success rate of 56% (28/50) when applying manufacturer's species log score thresholds and 76% (38/50) using in-house parameters, including lowering the species log score threshold to >1.5. In conclusion, PNA-FISH YTL demonstrated a high success rate successfully identifying yeast commonly encountered in fungaemia. Sepsityper(™) with MALDI-TOF MS was accurate but increased sensitivity is required. Due to the misidentification of commonly encountered yeast Gram's stain analysis demonstrated limited utility in this setting.

  2. Typing of Plasmodium falciparum DNA from 2 years old Giemsa-stained dried blood spots using nested polymerase chain reaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D; Dhiman, S; Rabha, B; Goswami, D; Yadav, K; Deka, M; Veer, V; Baruah, I

    2016-01-01

    A panel of 129 Giemsa-stained thick blood spots (TBS) confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum infection having different levels of parasite density were collected from a malaria endemic area. DNA was extracted and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed to amplify P. falciparum DNA. Nested PCR assay successfully amplified P. falciparum DNA at a very low parasitaemia of ~10 parasites/μl of blood. Current PCR assay is very simple and can be used retrospectively to monitor the invasion and prevalence of different Plasmodium species in endemic areas. PMID:27080775

  3. Immunoglobulin and enzyme-conjugated dextran polymers enhance u-PAR staining intensity of carcinoma cells in peripheral blood smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werther, K; Normark, M; Hansen, B F;

    1999-01-01

    The presence of disseminated carcinoma cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood has prognostic importance in patients with carcinomas. Much evidence indicates that dissemination of tumor cells may depend on activation of a variety of degradative enzymes. A strong positive correlation has been...... color reaction was developed with diaminobenzidine as chromogen. In the second step, the cells were incubated with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated murine monoclonal antibodies against a common cytokeratin epitope and a red color reaction was developed with new fuchsin as substrate. This method allows...

  4. Immunoglobulin and enzyme-conjugated dextran polymers enhance u-PAR staining intensity of carcinoma cells in peripheral blood smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werther, K; Normark, M; Hansen, B F;

    1999-01-01

    phenotyping of disseminated carcinoma cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood smears. In the first step, the cells were incubated with antibodies against urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) and subsequently with secondary antibodies conjugated to peroxidase-labeled dextran polymers. A brown...... color reaction was developed with diaminobenzidine as chromogen. In the second step, the cells were incubated with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated murine monoclonal antibodies against a common cytokeratin epitope and a red color reaction was developed with new fuchsin as substrate. This method allows...

  5. Port-Wine Stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Port-Wine Stain A parent's guide for infants and babies ... a three-month-old infant with a port-wine stain. Overview A port-wine stain is a ...

  6. Double staining immunohistochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Chen; Dan-Bi Cho; Ping-Chang Yang

    2010-01-01

    This article summarized immunohistochemistry methods generally used in research laboratories and clinic including direct immune staining, indirect immune staining, enzyme method, fluorescence method, APC method and PAP method.

  7. Endocervical gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endocervical Gram stain is a method to identify bacteria on tissue from the cervix using a special series of stains. ... a slide. A series of stains called a Gram stain is applied to the ... presence of bacteria. The color, size, and shape of the cells ...

  8. Staining Proteins in Gels

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Sean; Chakavarti, Deb

    2008-01-01

    Following separation by electrophoretic methods, proteins in a gel can be detected by several staining methods. This unit describes protocols for detecting proteins by four popular methods. Coomassie blue staining is an easy and rapid method. Silver staining, while more time consuming, is considerably more sensitive and can thus be used to detect smaller amounts of protein. Fluorescent staining is a popular alternative to traditional staining procedures, mainly because it is more sensitive th...

  9. Meconium stained amniotic fluid neonatal umbilical arterial blood gas value of Apgar score and clinical observation%羊水胎粪污染新生儿脐动脉血气pH值与Apgar评分临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高建国; 孙庆霞; 于普丽; 宋燕玲; 胡美莲

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between meconium stained amniotic fluid and the degree of asphyxia of newborn hypoxia. Methods Umbilical arterial blood gas analysis and Apgar score were pH value detection method of meconium stained amniotic fluid 1 degrees in 160 cases, 135 cases of meconium stained amniotic fluidⅡ°Ⅲ°, meconium stained amniotic fluid of 189 cases of newborn. Results the difference of umbilical artery blood gas index pH value and Apgar score significantly, and the amniotic fluid meconium pollution degree and umbilical artery blood gas index pH value and Apgar score proportional relationship, namely, the more serious pollution of neonatal asphyxia hypoxic severity. Conclusion Meconium stained amniotic fluid and the degree of asphyxia of newborn anoxic degree, and the problem of Neonatology, obstetrics, puts forward positive prevention interventions.%目的:探讨羊水胎粪污染程度与新生儿窒息缺氧的相关性。方法对羊水胎粪污染Ⅰ度160例、羊水胎粪污染Ⅱ度135例、羊水胎粪污染Ⅲ度189例新生儿的脐动脉血气pH值及Apgar评分结果进行分析。结果3组脐动脉血血气指标pH值及Apgar评分差异显著,且羊水胎粪污染程度与脐动脉血血气指标pH值及Apgar评分成正比关系,即污染程度越严重新生儿窒息缺氧程度越重。结论羊水胎粪污染程度与新生儿窒息缺氧的程度有密切联系,产科、新生儿科应积极给予预防干预措施。

  10. Port-Wine Stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Port-Wine Stains KidsHealth > For Parents > Port-Wine Stains Print ... español Manchas de vino de oporto About Port-Wine Stains About 3 out of every 1,000 ...

  11. Black stain - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronay, Valerie; Attin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarise the fundamentals about black stain, its diagnosis and possible differential diagnoses as well as its microbiology and therapy. In addition, various studies investigating the relationship between black stain and dental caries are examined. Many studies report lower caries prevalence in children with black stain, but this finding could not be confirmed by all authors. Also, a negative relation between degree of staining and caries severity has been described. Reasons for these results are not yet clear but it was speculated that they are related to the specific oral microflora described in black stain-affected individuals. PMID:21594205

  12. Evolution of Pap Stain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyani Raju

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pap stain was first developed by Dr GN Papanicoloau in 1947 and since then it has been used successfully to screen cervical cancer. In fact it has reduced the incidence of cervical cancer by 70% especially in developed countries having well planned screening programmes. However the stain has undergone various modifications from regressive conventional method to progressive rapid Pap staining where the time taken for staining was reduced. Further the stain was modified as ultrafast Papanocoloau stain and modified ultrafast Pap stain where air dried cervical smears were used and staining time was reduced. Later the other modifications were Enviro-Pap stain which was environmentally friendly with results similar to conventional method; REAP stain which was rapid and economical and Cytocolor developed by Merck where isopropyl alcohol is replaced by Propanol. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Hence laboratories should develop their own protocol and standardize the staining technique. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(2.000: 490-500

  13. Stable RNA markers for identification of blood and saliva stains revealed from whole genome expression analysis of time-wise degraded samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Zubakov (Dmitry); E.E. Hanekamp (Eline); M. Kokshoorn (Mieke); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHuman body fluids such as blood and saliva represent the most common source of biological material found at a crime scene. Reliable tissue identification in forensic science can reveal significant insights into crime scene reconstruction and can thus contribute toward solving crimes. Lim

  14. 去血渍多酶洗涤剂在手术器械清洗上的应用研究%Application of blood stain removal detergent formulated with multiple enzymes for cleaning of surgical operation apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红艳; 马齐; 张强; 岳淑宁; 张树琴

    2013-01-01

    通过去血渍多酶洗涤剂在染血手术器械清洗上的应用研究,结合卡方检验的统计学方法得到了去血渍多酶洗涤剂清洗手术器械的较佳浸泡条件,洗涤剂质量分数为0.5%,在40C下浸泡10 min,洗涤剂用量和浸泡温度的实验组间结果差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05),浸泡时间的实验组间结果差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);较佳清洗方式为超声波+多酶洗涤剂浸洗,试纸检测法的A-B,A-C,A-D以及B-D的两两组间清洗合格率差异具有统计学意义;试纸检测法比放大镜目测法更适合用于染血手术器械清洗质量的判断,且自配去血渍多酶洗涤剂的性价比要优于其他5种市售加酶洗涤剂.%Optimum soaking conditions for application of blood stain removal detergent formulated with multiple enzymes for cleaning of surgical operation apparatus were obtained via study of experimental test results in combination with chi - square test statistical method. Mass fraction of the detergent is 0.5%. Soaking temperature is 40 ℃ and soaking time is 10 min. Deviation of experimental results from different test groups for detergent dosage as well as for soaking temperature has statistical significance (P 0. 05 ). Optimum cleaning method is soaking using detergent formulated with multiple enzymes and assisted by ultrasonic wave. Cleaning quality was inspected by test paper method. Difference between inspection results from groups A-B,A-C,A-DandB-D obtained by test paper method has statistical significance. Test paper method is more suitable for inspection of cleaning quality of biood stain removal on surgical operation apparatus than method via visual observation with magnifier. The blood stain removal detergent formulated in laboratory is better as comparison with five kinds of detergent product bought from market in view of performance price ratio.

  15. Gram stain of tissue biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003453.htm Gram stain of tissue biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gram stain of tissue biopsy test involves using crystal violet stain to test ...

  16. Application of Megakaryocyte Immunohistochemical Staining in Various Blood Diseases%巨核细胞免疫组化染色在各类血液病中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马巍娜; 沈建良; 黄友章; 宫立众; 岑坚; 向丹

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解巨核细胞免疫组化染色碱性磷酸酶-抗碱性磷酸酶(APAAP)法在各类血液病鉴别诊断中的意义.方法 各类血液病患者均列为研究对象.用APAAP法染色患者骨髓涂片,显微镜下计数巨核细胞并进行分类.结果 多(双)核巨核、单圆核小巨核、多(双)圆核小巨核均可不同程度见于白血病[如急性髓系白血病(AML),急、慢性淋巴细胞白血病(A/CLL),慢性粒细胞白血病急变等],骨髓增生异常综合症(MDS),特发性血小板减少性紫癜(ITP),骨髓增殖性疾病MPD[包括原发性血小板增多症(ET)、骨髓纤维化(MF)、真性红细胞增多症(PV)],淋巴瘤,多发性骨髓瘤(MM),各种原因引起的贫血等病人骨髓涂片中,再生障碍性贫血(AA)未见巨核细胞.淋巴样小巨核仅见于MDS.结论 用APAAP法检查各类血液病骨髓涂片中的巨核细胞,有助于各类血液病的鉴别诊断.%Objective To understand the megakaryocytes immunohistochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase-anti-alka-line phosphatase (APAAP) method in the differential diagnosis of various blood diseases significance. Methods The various types of blood ill patients who had as their research object. APAAP staining bone marrow of patients with smear, megakaryocytes counted under a microscope and classified. Results Multiple (double) nuclear giant nuclear .single round of nuclear small megakaryocytes,multiple (double) round of nuclear small megakaryocytes could be different levels found in leukemia (such as acute myeloid leukemia AML, acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia A/CLL. Chronic myeloid Leukemia, CML,etc. ),myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS),idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP),myeloproliferative disorders MPD (including,essential thrombocythemia ET,myelofibrosis MF.polycythemia vera PV),lymphoma,multiple myeloma (MM),a variety of causes bone marrow smears in patients with anemia,aplastic anemia (AA) no megakaryocytes. Lymphoid found only in small

  17. 本院1724份血培养病原菌的分布及耐药性分析%Distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic stains in blood culture with 1724 samples in our hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱君娜; 郄春花; 吴红章

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide evidence for rationally selection of an-tibiotic agents, we investigated the distribution and antibiotic susceptibili-ty of pathogenic stains in blood culture in Tianjin Second People′s Hospi-tal.Methods Blood specimens were cultured with BacT/Alert 3D.The pathogenic bacterial confirmatory and antibiotic susceptibility tests were carried out with VETEK -2 COMPACT.Results From June 2011 to May 2013 , 225 strains of pathogenic bacteria were isolated from 1724 clinic blood specimens, of which 155 strains were gram-negative cocci, acounting for 68.9%;69 strains were gram-positive cocci,acounting for 30.7%;1 strains were fungi, acounting for 0.4%.The sensitivity of Gram-negative bacteria to imipenem was the highest.The sensitivity of Gram -positive bacteria to vancomycin and linezolid was the highest.Escherichia coli is highly resistant to ampicillin, with the resistance rate of 80.1%.Staphylococcus aureus resistance of penicillin with resistant rate of 57.1%.Conclusion It is important for the clinicals to get the results of distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogenic stains in blood culture in order to select the antibiotics rationally and decrease nosocomial infections.%目的:分析血培养标本中病原菌的分布及细菌耐药性。方法用BacT/ALERT 3D血培养仪进行血培养,阳性株用VETEK-2 COMPACT系统进行菌种鉴定和药物敏感试验。用STATA12.0统计软件进行数据分析。结果共送检血培养标本1724份,分离出病原菌225株,其中革兰氏阴性菌155株,占68.9%;革兰氏阳性菌69株,占30.7%;真菌1株,占0.4%。血培养致病菌前3位为大肠埃希菌,肺炎克雷伯菌和人葡萄球菌。对革兰氏阴性菌敏感性最好为亚胺培南,对革兰氏阳性球菌敏感性最好的为万古霉素和利奈唑胺。大肠埃希菌对氨苄西林耐药率为80.1%;金黄色葡萄球菌对苄青霉素耐药率为57.1%。结论了解血培养病原

  18. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  19. Stained-Glass Pastels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Shirley

    2009-01-01

    The author has always liked the look of stained-glass windows. Usually the designs are simplified and the shapes are easier for younger students to draw. This technique seemed to be the perfect place for her fifth-graders to try their hand at color mixing. The smaller spaces and simple shapes were just what she needed for this group. Her students…

  20. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  1. Antigenotoxic and Apoptotic Activity of Green Tea Polyphenol Extracts on Hexavalent Chromium-Induced DNA Damage in Peripheral Blood of CD-1 Mice: Analysis with Differential Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen García-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the modulating effects of green tea polyphenols on genotoxic damage and apoptotic activity induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI] in CD-1 mice. Animals were divided into the following groups: (i injected with vehicle; (ii treated with green tea polyphenols (30 mg/kg via gavage; (iii injected with CrO3 (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally; (iv treated with green tea polyphenols in addition to CrO3. Genotoxic damage was evaluated by examining micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCEs obtained from peripheral blood at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment. Induction of apoptosis and cell viability were assessed by differential acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB staining. Treatment of green tea polyphenols led to no significant changes in the MN-PCEs. However, CrO3 treatment significantly increased MN-PCEs at 24 and 48 h after injection. Green tea polyphenols treatment prior to CrO3 injection led to a decrease in MN-PCEs compared to the group treated with CrO3 only. The average of apoptotic cells was increased at 48 h after treatment compared to control mice, suggesting that apoptosis could contribute to eliminate the DNA damaged cells induced by Cr (VI. Our findings support the proposed protective effects of green tea polyphenols against the genotoxic damage induced by Cr (VI.

  2. Investigation of a modified gallocyanin chrome alum staining technique in cytology compared to thionine and haematoxylin as nuclear stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, E

    1988-01-01

    The present paper describes the staining characteristics of a modified Gallocyanin-chrome alum stain as compared to the original gallocyanin stain. Thionine, haematoxylin and the Feulgen reaction were used as controls. Tissue imprints of rabbit liver and spleen and smears of human venous blood were stained and controlled microscopically. Nuclear extinction was measured with the image analysis system IBAS 2000. Both GCA variants were examined by spectrophotometry and thin layer chromatography. The most striking difference between the GCA variants is the short staining time required for the modified stain (4 min) as compared to the original method (24 h). Both stains are stoichiometric for nucleic acids; the staining pattern, hue and intensity of nuclear colour and spectrophotometric and chromatographic data were absolutely consistent for both GCA-stains. These results and preliminary data from the analysis of the structure of the dye molecules seem to indicate that the molecular structure of the modified GCA is not changed by treatment with concentrated sulphuric acid. Differences in the staining kinetics might be due to differences in solubility. As nuclear chromatin texture after GCA staining is well appropriate for computerized image analysis the modified GCA-stain can be recommended as a simple and reproducible nuclear stain for automated feature extraction in cytology. PMID:2471227

  3. Pericardial fluid Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin of the chest is cleaned with antibacterial soap. A trained physician, often a cardiologist, inserts a ... of the pericardium or heart. Blood tests and bacterial culture can help identify the specific organism causing ...

  4. Lasers or light sources for treating port-wine stains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Olesen, Anne Braae; Leonardi-Bee, Jo;

    2011-01-01

    Port-wine stains are birthmarks caused by malformations of blood vessels in the skin. Port-wine stains manifest themselves in infancy as a flat, red mark and do not regress spontaneously but may, if untreated, become darker and thicker in adult life. The profusion of various lasers and light...... sources makes it difficult to decide which equipment is the best for treating port-wine stains....

  5. Lasers or light sources for treating port-wine stains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Olesen, Anne Braae; Leonardi-Bee, Jo;

    2011-01-01

    Port-wine stains are birthmarks caused by malformations of blood vessels in the skin. Port-wine stains manifest themselves in infancy as a flat, red mark and do not regress spontaneously but may, if untreated, become darker and thicker in adult life. The profusion of various lasers and light...

  6. Compositions for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  7. Photodynamic therapy for port wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junheng

    1998-11-01

    Previous therapies for port wine stains usually cause unacceptable scarring or obtain poor effect. Because port wine is a congenital vasculopathy consisting of an abnormal network of capillaries in the upper dermis with an overlying normal epidermis and the researchers found the tumor blood vessels were occluded accompanying the necrosis of the tumor after PDT. The author and his colleagues started a series of animal and clinical studies since 1991 about photodynamic therapy for port wine stain an they established the method of PDT for PWS. The clinical studies of over 1500 cases proved that PWS can be cured by PDT without scar formation because there is no thermal effect involved. No relapse was found within a maximum follow-up of six years.

  8. DNA Comet Giemsa Staining for Conventional Bright-Field Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Andreyan Osipov; Ekaterina Arkhangelskaya; Alexei Vinokurov; Nadezhda Smetaninа; Alex Zhavoronkov; Dmitry Klokov

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the compatibility of Giemsa staining protocol with the comet assay. We showed, for the first time, that DNA comets can be visualized and analyzed using Giemsa staining. We generated DNA damage dose response curves for human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to X-ray radiation using the comet assay with either SybrGreen I or Giemsa stain. The dose response curves were fitted by linear regressions (R2 > 0.977). The SybrGreen I results showed only ~1.2...

  9. Rapid diagnosis of bacteremia in adults using acridine orange stained buffy coat smears

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Mark; Mendelson, Jack

    1990-01-01

    The use of acridine orange stained buffy coat smears was assessed as a rapid screening test for bacteremia in adults. A total of 356 consecutive blood cultures were submitted with simultaneous anticoagulated blood samples, from which a buffy coat smear was prepared and stained with acridine orange (100 mg/L; pH 3.0). Forty-one of 356 blood samples (12%) yielded organisms in the blood culture system. Compared to blood culture, the overall sensitivity of acridine orange stained buffy coat smear...

  10. Optical Monte Carlo modeling of a true portwine stain anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Welch, Ashley J.; Smithies, Derek J.; Nelson, Jerry; van Gemert, Martin J.

    1998-04-01

    A unique Monte Carlo program capable of accommodating an arbitrarily complex geometry was used to determine the energy deposition in a true port wine stain anatomy. Serial histologic sections taken from a biopsy of a dark red, laser therapy resistant stain were digitized and used to create the program input for simulation at wavelengths of 532 and 585 nm. At both wavelengths, the greatest energy deposition occurred in the superficial blood vessels, and subsequently decreased with depth as the laser beam was attenuated. However, more energy was deposited in the epidermis and superficial blood vessels at 532 nm than at 585 nm.

  11. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated. PMID:21041399

  12. Automated single-slide staining system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, S. M.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus developed to Gram-stain single slides automatically is flexible enough to accommodate other types of staining procedures. Method frees operator and eliminates necessity for subjective evaluations as to length of staining or decolorizing time.

  13. Considering the effect of stem-loop reverse transcription and real-time PCR analysis of blood and saliva specific microRNA markers upon mixed body fluid stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimoto, Mari L; Beasley, Emma; Coult, Natalie; Omelia, Emma J; World, Damian; Williams, Graham

    2013-07-01

    Forensic RNA analysis is gathering pace with reports of messenger RNA analysis being used in case work, and with microRNA being increasingly researched. Such techniques address a fundamental issue in body fluid identification, namely increased specificity over existing chemical tests, and the incorporation of additional body fluids such as vaginal material. The use of RNA analysis will be of particular value to sex offences, where there can be a mixture of multiple body fluids from different people. The aim of this study was to determine whether microRNA based body fluid identification tests can be applied to mixed body fluid samples. Blood and saliva were acquired from volunteers and underwent total RNA extraction. Mixed samples were prepared using a range of ratios from 1:1 to 10:1. Each mixed sample then underwent a blood-saliva differentiation test developed in-house, which includes stem-loop reverse transcription and real-time PCR analysis. Aliquots following mixture preparation also underwent standard STR analysis, utilising Quantiplex and Next Generation Multiplex kits. Data relating to the development of an in-house blood-saliva differentiation test is presented, in which it has been demonstrated that such a test has a lower limit of detection than the enzymatic equivalent. It has been shown that not only is it possible to determine the presence of more than one body fluid, it is also possible to determine the major body fluid contributor as well as the minor contributor.

  14. Salt stains from evaporating droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Shahidzadeh; M.F.L. Schut; J. Desarnaud; M. Prat; D. Bonn

    2015-01-01

    The study of the behavior of sessile droplets on solid substrates is not only associated with common everyday phenomena, such as the coffee stain effect, limescale deposits on our bathroom walls, but also very important in many applications such as purification of pharmaceuticals, deicing of airplan

  15. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  16. Accelerated staining technique using kitchen microwave oven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Mukunda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Histopathological diagnosis of specimens is greatly dependent on good sample preparation and staining. Both of these processes is governed by diffusion of fluids and dyes in and out of the tissue, which is the key to staining. Diffusion of fluids can be accelerated by the application of heat that reduces the time of staining from hours to the minute. We modified an inexpensive model of kitchen microwave oven for staining. This study is an attempt to compare the reliability of this modified technique against the tested technique of routine staining so as to establish the kitchen microwave oven as a valuable diagnostic tool. Materials and Methods: Sixty different tissue blocks were used to prepare 20 pairs of slides for 4 different stains namely hematoxylin and eosin, Van Gieson′s, 0.1% toluidine blue and periodic acid-Schiff. From each tissue block, two bits of tissues were mounted on two different slides. One slide was stained routinely, and the other stained inside a microwave. A pathologist evaluated the stained slides and the results so obtained were analyzed statistically. Results: Microwave staining considerably cut down the staining time from hours to seconds. Microwave staining showed no loss of cellular and nuclear details, uniform-staining characteristics and was of excellent quality. Interpretation and Conclusion: The cellular details, nuclear details and staining characteristics of microwave stained tissues were better than or equal to the routine stained tissue. The overall quality of microwave-stained sections was found to be better than the routine stained tissue in majority of cases.

  17. Use of urinary gram stain for detection of urinary tract infection in childhood.

    OpenAIRE

    ARSLAN, Sükrü; Caksen, Hüseyin; Rastgeldi, Levent; Uner, Abdurrahman; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabaş, Dursun

    2002-01-01

    In this study, urinary culture, urinary Gram stain, and four tests within the urinalysis, leukocyte esterase, nitrite, microscopyfor bacteria, and microscopyforpyuria, were examined in 100 children with symptoms suggesting urinary tract infection. Our purpose was to determine the validity of the urinary Gram stain compared with a combination of pyuria plus Gram stain and overall urinalysis (positiveness of nitrite, leukocyte esterase, microscopy for bacteria, or microscopy for white blood cel...

  18. In Vitro Study of Amniotic Fluid Gram Stain: Effect of Centrifugation

    OpenAIRE

    Gauthier, Daniel W.; Wilfredo Torres; Meyer, William J.; Lewis, Barbara G.; Vernon, Michael O.; Janda, William M.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: Gram stain of amniotic fluid (AF) is used to detect intraamniotic infection. The purpose of this study was to determine if centrifugation improved the ability of AF Gram stain to detect bacteria. Methods: AF obtained by amniocentesis from patients with preterm labor (PTL) or preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) was pooled. Individual AF samples as well as the pooled sample had a negative Gram stain for microorganisms or white blood cells (WBCs) and negative cultures. With...

  19. Golgi-Cox Staining Step by Step

    OpenAIRE

    Zaqout, Sami; Kaindl, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo. Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating. Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field.

  20. Golgi-Cox staining step by step

    OpenAIRE

    Sami eZaqout; Kaindl, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Golgi staining remains a key method to study neuronal morphology in vivo. Since most protocols delineating modifications of the original staining method lack details on critical steps, establishing this method in a laboratory can be time-consuming and frustrating. Here, we describe the Golgi-Cox staining in such detail that should turn the staining into an easily feasible method for all scientists working in the neuroscience field.

  1. Methods of biological dosimetry employing chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  2. Heparin reduces nonspecific eosinophil staining artifacts in mass cytometry experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Adeeb H; Tordesillas, Leticia; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of heterogeneous cell samples by mass cytometry (CyTOF) relies on the assumption that metal labeled antibodies accurately bind to their target antigens. We report a previously unappreciated experimental artifact of non-specific antibody binding by eosinophils during intracellular CyTOF analysis of human whole blood samples. We hypothesized that this non-specific binding results from a charge-based interaction between the metal-labeled antibodies and highly cationic proteins found in eosinophillic granules and found that this non-specific staining artifact could be reduced to background levels with a simple blocking protocol using heparin as a competing anionic protein. This protocol eliminates a potential source of erroneous data interpretation in all experiments involving intracellular staining of human whole blood samples, and allows accurate assessment of dynamic changes in intracellular proteins in eosinophils by CyTOF. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27061608

  3. Imaging port wine stains by fiber optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shiyong; Gu, Ying; Xue, Ping; Guo, Jin; Shen, Tingmei; Wang, Tianshi; Huang, Naiyan; Zhang, Li; Qiu, Haixia; Yu, Xin; Wei, Xunbin

    2010-05-01

    We develop a fiber optical coherence tomography (OCT) system in the clinical utility of imaging port wine stains (PWS). We use our OCT system on 41 patients with PWS to document the difference between PWS skin and contralateral normal skin. The system, which operates at 4 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 10 and 9 μm, respectively, in the skin tissue, can clearly distinguish the dilated dermal blood vessels from normal tissue. We present OCT images of patients with PWS and normal human skin. We obtain the structural parameters, including epidermal thickness and diameter and depth of dilated blood vessels. We demonstrate that OCT may be a useful tool for the noninvasive imaging of PWS. It may help determine the photosensitizer dose and laser parameters in photodynamic therapy for treating port wine stains.

  4. "Blood Stains" on Tethys: Evidence for Recent Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, P.

    2015-12-01

    Distinctive set of arcuate, reddish-colored lineaments has been identified on Tethys. These markings are slightly darker than adjacent cratered terrains but have a flatter green-IR spectral slope. There are at least three prominent sets in the northern hemisphere centered on the anti-Saturn meridian. Each set consists of ~5-10 parallel lineations a few kilometers across and 50-250 km long. The lineations are remarkably curvilinear (i.e., non-sinuous) and not deflected by major impact structures: they cross uninterrupted the floor of 400-km-diameter, 10-km-deep Odysseus impact basin. In one area (~25° N, 185°W), high-resolution mapping at ~90-125 m/pixel shows no discrete scarp, ridge, or other tectonic manifestation along the feature. Instead, only a faint discoloration and ~25 small dark spots 200-800 m in diameter have been identified. These spots are characterized by very low albedos, sharp boundaries, and no evidence of raised rims expected with impact origin. Of these, ~60% (15) are at the bottom of small craters. The IR lineaments show remarkable symmetry centered on the tidal axis with Saturn. Exogenic mechansims are ruled out by geometry and geology, hence we explore possible endogenic origins. Stress mechanisms being tested include non-synchronous rotation (considered unlikely for a cold, triaxial body like Tethys), tidal recession and true polar wander. The lack of obvious tectonic deformation despite the strong color signature is unusual (although structures may exist below the current resolution limit). Though unlikely, the lineaments could be reactivated ancient fractures, producing a temporal discoloration. If tectonic, the lineaments might be still forming, with deformation only on a scale below that which we can resolve. The coloration, global pattern and collocated dark spots are consistent with recent/active alteration of the surface, given that E-ring accumulation is expected to remove intrinsic color signatures in a geologically short time period. Low-volume but persistent outgassing/deposition of volatiles from the interior, the colors of which are distinct from the evolved surface and/or result from exposure to space, may be responsible. High-resolution color and IR mapping is planned for November.

  5. Negative staining and Cryo-negative Staining of Macromolecules and Viruses for TEM

    OpenAIRE

    De Carlo, Sacha; Harris, J Robin

    2010-01-01

    In this review we cover the technical background to negative staining of biomolecules and viruses, and then expand upon the different possibilities and limitations. Topics range from conventional air-dry negative staining of samples adsorbed to carbon support films, the variant termed the “negative staining-carbon film” technique and negative staining of samples spread across the holes of holey carbon support films, to a consideration of dynamic/time-dependent negative staining. For each of t...

  6. Acetic orcein staining of prefixed tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C; Lillie, R D

    1978-05-01

    Acetic orcein stains formol- and Carnoy-fixed tissues, coloring mast cells, nuclei, basophilic cytoplasm, cerebral corpora amylacea, and cartilage strongly; keratin and erythrocytes moderately; muscle and collagen weakly. Guinea pig Brunner gland and rat colonic goblet cell mucins did not stain. The red nuclear stain contrasts well with the Prussian blue reaction of hemosiderin and the ferric ferricyanide (Turnbull's blue) reaction of enterochromaffin. A weak (0.01%) fast-green FCF stain changes collagen and sometimes smooth muscle to green, without impairing nucleic acid or mast cell staining. Picroindigocarmine gives blue collagen, yellow muscle, and red elastin, nucleic acids and mast cells. Picro-methyl blue tends to override the red nuclear stain. Carnoy fixation is somewhat better for nuclei, formol for basophil cytoplasms.

  7. Tissue Staining (Chromoscopy of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Brian Fennerty

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue staining, or chomoscopy, is used as an adjunctive technique during gastrointestinal endoscopy. Chemical agents are applied to the gastrointestinal mucosal surface to identify specific epithelia or to enhance the mucosal surface characteristics of the gastrointestinal epithelium. This aids in the recognition of subtle lesions (ie, polyps or allows directed targeting of biopsies (ie, sprue or Barrett’s esophagus to increase the yield of endoscopic diagnostic accuracy. The four endoscopic tissue-staining techniques in use are vital staining, contrast staining (chromoscopy, reactive staining and tattooing. Some of the agents used for endoscopic tissue staining and the uses of chromoscopy in identifying pathology of the esophagus, stomach, small bowel and colon during endoscopy are discussed.

  8. Aggrandizing oral submucous fibrosis grading using an adjunct special stain: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF is graded according to various histological factors which include the epithelial changes and the connective tissue changes. These features though could be identified in routine hematoxylin and eosin (H and E staining; they could be better appreciated in special stains. This pilot study is an attempt to identify a single special stain that can act as an adjunct to H and E stain to help grade this potentially malignant disease. Aims and Objectives: To assess if special stains can improvise on differentiating the various histological changes seen in OSMF and to accordingly grade OSMF cases. Materials and Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of OSMF-10 cases of each grade (n = 30. Three special stains: Van-Gieson, Mallory′s trichrome and Masson trichrome. Statistical Analysis: The results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. Observations and Results: The thickness and degree of keratinization were best detected in Mallory′s stain (100% and were statistically significant; the subepithelial changes were better detected using special stains, especially Mallory′s stain (100%. The changes in collagen fibers were better visualized in all three special stains but were not statistically significant. The changes in blood vessels were better detected in Van-Gieson′s and Mallory′s stain; the obtained results were statistically significant. The degree of fibrosis between muscle bundles could be detected in all the three special stains, but when compared the results were not statistically significant. The questionable areas of muscle degeneration, especially in deeper connective tissue were better detected in Mallory′s (43% and Masson′s stain (43% as compared to Van-Gieson stain (14% and the results obtained were statistically significant. The inflammatory cells and dysplastic features are better visualized in routine H and E stains. Conclusion

  9. Standardization of the Papanicolaou stain. I. A comparison of five nuclear stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, E; Wittekind, D

    1990-06-01

    The staining characteristics of five nuclear stains used in a Papanicolaou staining procedure were investigated. Alcohol-fixed cervical smears were stained with a modified Papanicolaou procedure using hematoxylin, alcoholic thionin bromide, alcoholic Victoria blue B, gallocyanin or the thionin Feulgen reagent (thionin-SO2) as the nuclear stain. The same anionic counterstain was used for all slides, and the optical densities of cell nuclei and cytoplasm were measured with the IBAS 2000 image analyzer. Alcoholic thionin gave the most intense nuclear stain, with a very high reproducibility of the staining pattern. Hematoxylin showed the highest coefficient of variation of the staining intensity. Both hematoxylin and gallocyanin gave some nonspecific cytoplasmic staining. Thionin-SO2 allowed a quantitative assessment of DNA, but gave a low staining intensity. Staining with the metal complex dyes interfered with subsequent staining with the pararosaniline Feulgen reagent. Alcoholic thioinin is thus recommended as a nuclear stain for cervical cytology in the Papanicolaou procedure, both for image analysis and for visual microscopy. PMID:1695100

  10. Efficiency of staining hair with indocyanine green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyabina, Tatyana V.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.

    2005-06-01

    The efficiency of staining hair with indocyanine green (ICG) solution depending on type of hair, natural color, staining time and other parameters was investigated. Bonding ICG with hair material occurs due to interaction between ICG molecules and keratinocyte albumin. The penetration of ICG dye into hair meets with difficulties owing to surface protective layer.

  11. Immunofluorescent Staining of Mouse Intestinal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Rourke, Kevin P.; Dow, Lukas E; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-01-01

    Immunofluorescent staining of organoids can be performed to visualize molecular markers of cell behavior. For example, cell proliferation marked by incorporation of nucleotide (EdU), or to observe markers of intestinal differentiation including paneth cells, goblet cells, or enterocytes (see Figure 1). In this protocol we detail a method to fix, permeabilize, stain and mount intestinal organoids for analysis by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy.

  12. Properties of blue-stained wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Humar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Discoloration of wood is frequently caused by blue-stain fungi. Among them Aureobasidium pullulans and Sclerophoma pithyophila are reported as the most important staining organism. In previous researches, it was generally considered that blue-stain fungi do not influence mechanical properties. However, there were some opposite results published as well. In order to elucidate this issue, specimens made of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris sapwood were exposed to two blue stain fungi A. pullulans and S. pithyophila for periods between two and eight weeks. FTIR, weight, colour and non-destructive modulus of elasticity measurements were performed before and after exposure. The results showed that blue stain fungi, besides considerable discoloration, do not cause any significant damage to wood. Surprisingly the non-destructive MoE analysis showed that modulus of elasticity even slightly increase after fungal exposure.

  13. Stain Detection in Video with Background Restructured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, multimedia, especially video, is used widely in many domains. But camera lens are easily stained because they are always outside, such as in traffic and monitoring. Admittedly, the video from these cameras is out of action because it cannot provide clear frames. In this paper, we provide a detecting method from video with background restructure. This method is presented to detect stains in video. Firstly, the first video frame is used as a pseudo-background because original cameras are clear with no stains. Then, background is constructed by the pseudo-background and the continuous frames which are from the video. Moreover, with training in the frames, we restructure background by dropped moving objects in it. Finally, after background restructured, we detect stains in camera lenses by the restructured background, and provide positions of stained area. Experimental results show its robustness and practicability

  14. Stain Free Total Protein Staining is a Superior Loading Control to β-Actin for Western Blots

    OpenAIRE

    Gilda, Jennifer E.; Aldrin V. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Semi-Quantification of proteins using Western blots typically involves normalization against housekeeping genes such as β-actin. More recently, ponceau S and Coomassie blue staining have both been shown to be suitable alternatives to housekeeping genes as loading controls. Stain free total protein staining offers the advantage of no staining or destaining steps. Evaluation of the use of Stain free staining as an alternative to β-actin or the protein stain ponceau S showed that Stain free stai...

  15. Surface staining of small intestinal biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1977-01-01

    Small intestinal biopsies are most often by routine examined under a stereo-microscope, prior to embedding for histological examination. This is done in order to get a view of the appearance of the mucosal pattern, especially villus configuration. The distinctness of the surface pattern however......, is improved considerably if the biopsies are stained with Alcian Green and/or PAS before they are examined. In the present paper a detailed description is given of staining of small intestinal biopsies as whole mounts. The difference between the unstained and the stained biopsies is illustrated by a few...

  16. Photodynamic therapy of port wine stain: preliminary clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. Stuart

    1993-07-01

    The broad, long term objective of this work is the development of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for application in the clinical management of patients with port wine stain (PWS). PDT involves the use of an exogenous drug which is concentrated in a targeted tissue. When irradiated at wavelengths specifically absorbed by the drug, selective destruction of the targeted tissue, without the production of heat, occurs. The results of this preliminary study demonstrate in human PWS patients that a photosensitizer, such as PHOTOFRINR, activated by red light at the appropriate therapeutic wavelength, can cause destruction of subsurface blood vessels in the skin with a high degree of specificity, and further study appears warranted.

  17. Gram staining apparatus for space station applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, T. C.; Brown, H. D.; Irbe, R. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    A self-contained, portable Gram staining apparatus (GSA) has been developed for use in the microgravity environment on board the Space Station Freedom. Accuracy and reproducibility of this apparatus compared with the conventional Gram staining method were evaluated by using gram-negative and gram-positive controls and different species of bacteria grown in pure cultures. A subsequent study was designed to assess the performance of the GSA with actual specimens. A set of 60 human and environmental specimens was evaluated with the GSA and the conventional Gram staining procedure. Data obtained from these studies indicated that the GSA will provide the Gram staining capability needed for the microgravity environment of space.

  18. Silver staining of proteins in polyacrylamide gels

    OpenAIRE

    Chevallet, Mireille; Luche, Sylvie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    International audience Silver staining is used to detect proteins after electrophoretic separation on polyacrylamide gels. It combines excellent sensitivity (in the low nanogram range) with the use of very simple and cheap equipment and chemicals. It is compatible with downstream processing, such as mass spectrometry analysis after protein digestion. The sequential phases of silver staining are protein fixation, then sensitization, then silver impregnation and finally image development. Se...

  19. Gram staining apparatus for space station applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, T C; Brown, H. D.; Irbe, R M; Pierson, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    A self-contained, portable Gram staining apparatus (GSA) has been developed for use in the microgravity environment on board the Space Station Freedom. Accuracy and reproducibility of this apparatus compared with the conventional Gram staining method were evaluated by using gram-negative and gram-positive controls and different species of bacteria grown in pure cultures. A subsequent study was designed to assess the performance of the GSA with actual specimens. A set of 60 human and environme...

  20. New Grocott Stain without Using Chromic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We established a new “ecological” Grocott stain for demonstrating fungi, based upon a 4R principle of refusal, reduction, reuse, and recycle of waste management. Conventional Grocott stain employs environmentally harsh 5% chromic acid for oxidization. Initially, we succeeded in reducing the concentration of chromic acid from 5% to 1% by incubating the solution at 60°C and using five-fold diluted chromic acid solution at which point it was reusable. Eventually, we reached the refusal level where 1% periodic acid oxidization was efficient enough, when combined with preheating of sections in the electric jar, microwave oven, or pressure pan. For convenience sake, we recommend pressure pan heating in tap water for 10 min. Stainability of fungi in candidiasis and aspergillosis was comparable with conventional Grocott stain, while Mucor hyphae showed enhanced staining. The modified sequence was further applicable to detecting a variety of mycotic pathogens in paraffin sections. Our environmentally-friendly Grocott stain also has the advantage of avoiding risk of human exposure to hexavalent chromium solution in the histopathology laboratory. The simple stain sequence is can be easily applied worldwide

  1. New Grocott Stain without Using Chromic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiogama, Kazuya; Kitazawa, Kayo; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Onouchi, Takanori; Inada, Ken-Ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    We established a new "ecological" Grocott stain for demonstrating fungi, based upon a 4R principle of refusal, reduction, reuse, and recycle of waste management. Conventional Grocott stain employs environmentally harsh 5% chromic acid for oxidization. Initially, we succeeded in reducing the concentration of chromic acid from 5% to 1% by incubating the solution at 60°C and using five-fold diluted chromic acid solution at which point it was reusable. Eventually, we reached the refusal level where 1% periodic acid oxidization was efficient enough, when combined with preheating of sections in the electric jar, microwave oven, or pressure pan. For convenience sake, we recommend pressure pan heating in tap water for 10 min. Stainability of fungi in candidiasis and aspergillosis was comparable with conventional Grocott stain, while Mucor hyphae showed enhanced staining. The modified sequence was further applicable to detecting a variety of mycotic pathogens in paraffin sections. Our environmentally-friendly Grocott stain also has the advantage of avoiding risk of human exposure to hexavalent chromium solution in the histopathology laboratory. The simple stain sequence is can be easily applied worldwide.

  2. A Modified Verhoeff-Van Gieson Elastin Histochemical Stain to Enable Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Model Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, K.R.; Radi, Z.A.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal histochemical staining is critical to ensure excellent quality stained sections to enable light microscopic and histomorphometric image analysis. Verhoeff-van Gieson is the most widely used histochemical stain for the visualization of vascular elastic fibers. However, it is notoriously difficult to differentiate fine elastic fibers of small vasculature to enable histomorphometric image analysis, especially in organs such as the lung. A tissue fixation procedure of 10% neutral buffered formalin with subsequent fixation in 70% ethanol further compounds the problem of small vessel staining and identification. Therefore, a modified Verhoeff’s elastin stain was developed as a reliable method to optimally highlight the internal and external elastic laminae of small arteries (50-100 µm external diameter) and intra-acinar vessels (10-50 µm external diameter) in 3 µm thick lung tissue sections from models of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This modified Verhoeff’s elastin stain demonstrated well-defined staining of fine elastic fibers of pulmonary blood vessels enabling subsequent histomorphometric image analysis of vessel wall thickness in small arteries and intra-acinar vessels. In conclusion, modification of the standard Verhoeff-van Gieson histochemical stain is needed to visualize small caliber vessels’ elastic fibers especially in tissues fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin followed by additional fixation in 70% ethanol. PMID:26972717

  3. Gallocyanin chromalum as a nuclear stain in cytology. I. A cytophotometric comparison of the Husain-Watts Gallocyanin chromalum staining protocol with the Feulgen procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, E K; Lyon, H; Prento, P

    1991-05-01

    In the present study, the staining characteristics of the Gallocyanin chromalum technique devised by Husain and Watts are compared with the Feulgen reaction. Liver imprints, blood smears, and cervical smears were fixed in ethanol and stained with either the Husain and Watts Gallocyanin chromalum reagent or the Feulgen-Schiff reagent. The slides were then post-treated with 70% ethanol-HCl pH 1.0, or with phosphotungstic acid for 0.5-30 min. The integrated optical density of cell nuclei was measured with a VIDAS image analyzer. In the material stained with the Husain and Watts procedure, some Gallocyanin chromalum was removed from the nuclei in the early phase (5 min) of all the post-treatment steps, followed by a plateau phase where the integrated optical density remained constant for 30 min. In this phase, the nuclear absorbance was highly reproducible and of the same size regardless of the post-treatment. Both the Husain and Watts procedure and the Feulgen-reaction gave quantitative staining of DNA. The Gallocyanin chromalum stain after Husain and Watts is a quick staining procedure for quantitative evaluation of DNA in cytological material. Proper rinsing of the slides is necessary for a good reproducibility of results. PMID:1723725

  4. NOTE: Modelling multiple laser pulses for port wine stain treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkruysse, Wim; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Smithies, Derek J.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-12-01

    Many port wine stains (PWS) are still resistant to pulsed dye laser treatment. However, anecdotal information suggests that multiple-pulse laser irradiation improves patient outcome. Our aims in this note are to explain the underlying mechanism and estimate the possible thermal effects of multiple pulses in vascular structures typical of PWS. Based on linear response theory, the linear combination of two thermal contributions is responsible for the total increase in temperature in laser irradiated blood vessels: direct light absorption by blood and direct bilateral thermal heat conduction from adjacent blood vessels. The latter contribution to the increase in temperature in the targeted vessel can be significant, particularly if some adjacent vessels are in close proximity, such as in cases of optical shielding of the targeted vessel, or if the vessels are relatively distant but many in number. We present evidence that multiple-pulse laser irradiation targets blood vessels that are optically shielded by other vessels. Therefore, it may be a means of enhancing PWS therapy for lesions that fail to respond to single-pulse dye laser treatment.

  5. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1999-09-21

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  6. News from the biological stain commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiernan, J.A.; Lyon, Hans Oluf

    2008-01-01

    In the three earlier editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of "Regulatory affairs," the BSC's International Affairs Committee reported on the work of Technical Committee 212, Clinical Laboratory Testing and in Vitro Diagnostic Test Systems of the Internati......In the three earlier editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of "Regulatory affairs," the BSC's International Affairs Committee reported on the work of Technical Committee 212, Clinical Laboratory Testing and in Vitro Diagnostic Test Systems...

  7. Laser treatment of port-wine stains

    OpenAIRE

    Brightman LA; Geronemus RG; Reddy KK

    2015-01-01

    Lori A Brightman,1 Roy G Geronemus,1 Kavitha K Reddy2 1Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Port-wine stains are a type of capillary malformation affecting 0.3% to 0.5% of the population. Port-wine stains present at birth as pink to erythematous patches on the skin and/or mucosa. Without treatment, the patches typically darken with age and may eventually develop nodular thicke...

  8. Automated single-slide staining device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A simple apparatus and method is disclosed for making individual single Gram stains on bacteria inoculated slides to assist in classifying bacteria in the laboratory as Gram-positive or Gram-negative. The apparatus involves positioning a single inoculated slide in a stationary position and thereafter automatically and sequentially flooding the slide with increments of a primary stain, a mordant, a decolorizer, a counterstain and a wash solution in a sequential manner without the individual lab technician touching the slide and with minimum danger of contamination thereof from other slides.

  9. Corneal staining after treatment with topical tetracycline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Lapid-Gortzak; C.P. Nieuwendaal; A.R. Slomovic; L. Spanjaard

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report a case of corneal staining after treatment with topical tetracycline. Methods: A patient with crystalline keratopathy caused by Streptococcus viridans after corneal transplantation was treated topically with tetracycline eye drops, based on results of

  10. The Language of Stained-Glass Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Charl Anne

    2010-01-01

    The splendor and beauty of stained glass punctuates any room. In this article, the author describes a cross-curriculum project which incorporated the French classes' research and written study of France in the Middle Ages. For the project the author suggested Sainte-Chapelle which is considered a reliquary and was built by Louis IX to house the…

  11. Method for copper staining of germanium crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    Proper conditions for copper staining of germanium crystals include a low solution temperature of 3 degrees C, illumination of the sample by infrared light, and careful positioning of the light source relative to the sample so as to minimize absorption of the infrared light.

  12. Photoacoustic imaging of port-wine stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G.M.; Mulder, Miranda J.; Glade, Conrad P.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Leeuwen, van Ton G.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objective: To optimize laser therapy of port-wine stains (PWSs), information about the vasculature as well as lesion depth is valuable. In this study we investigated the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) to obtain this information. - Study Design/Materials and Methods: PAI uses puls

  13. News from the Biological Stain Commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Kiernan, J A

    2008-01-01

    In the three earlier editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of "Regulatory affairs," the BSC's International Affairs Committee reported on the work of Technical Committee 212, Clinical Laboratory Testing and in Vitro Diagnostic Test Systems of the Internati...

  14. X-ray induction of micronuclei in human lymphocyte subpopulations differentiated by immunoperoxidase staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we sought to confirm the radiosensitivity of human peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations using a micronucleus assay. Mononucleated cells isolated from peripheral blood were irradiated with X rays. After being cultured for 3 days, cells were fixed and stained using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. Lymphocyte subpopulations were characterized by means of the monoclonal antibodies Leu4 (CD3), Leu2a (CD8), and Leu19 (CD56). Dose-response curves were obtained by scoring the number of micronuclei in binucleated cells that reacted with a specific antibody and were then stained. The dose response of CD8+ (suppressor/cytotoxic) cells was quite similar to that of CD3+ (pan T) cells. In comparison, CD56+ (natural killer) cells were significantly less sensitive, although scorable binucleated CD56+ cells made up less than 4 % of the total number of binucleated cells. (author)

  15. 21 CFR 864.1850 - Dye and chemical solution stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dye and chemical solution stains. 864.1850 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Biological Stains § 864.1850 Dye and chemical solution stains. (a) Identification. Dye and chemical solution stains for medical purposes are mixtures...

  16. 7 CFR 28.442 - Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.442 Section 28.442... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Yellow Stained Cotton § 28.442 Middling Yellow Stained Color. Middling Yellow Stained Color is American Upland cotton which in color is deeper...

  17. 7 CFR 28.441 - Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. 28.441 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Yellow Stained Cotton § 28.441 Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color. Strict Middling Yellow Stained Color is color which is deeper...

  18. Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    2003-07-22

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  19. Tissue Staining (Chromoscopy) of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Fennerty, M. Brian

    1999-01-01

    Tissue staining, or chomoscopy, is used as an adjunctive technique during gastrointestinal endoscopy. Chemical agents are applied to the gastrointestinal mucosal surface to identify specific epithelia or to enhance the mucosal surface characteristics of the gastrointestinal epithelium. This aids in the recognition of subtle lesions (ie, polyps) or allows directed targeting of biopsies (ie, sprue or Barrett’s esophagus) to increase the yield of endoscopic diagnostic accuracy. The four endoscop...

  20. Flavonoid-specific staining of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, J J; Rechnitz, G A

    1992-12-01

    Crop yields may be threatened by increases in UV-B radiation resulting from depletion of the ozone layer. In higher plants, the presence of flavonols provides a protective mechanism, and we report a novel staining procedure for the visualization of such protectants in plant tissue. It is shown that the proposed technique provides sensitive and specific fluorescence of flavonoids in chlorophyll-bleached tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:1282347

  1. Two-colour immunocytochemical staining of gamma (gamma) and epsilon (epsilon) type haemoglobin in fetal red cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesker, WE; Velzen, MCMOV; Oosterwijk, JC; Bernini, LF; Golbus, MS; Kanhai, HHH; Van Ommen, GJB; Tanke, HJ

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a two-colour immunocytochemical staining method for the detection of fetal and embryonic haemoglobin in erythroid cells. The method was applied to study these haemoglobin types in fetal red cells. Specimens from fetal blood (10 weeks), cord blood and fetal liver (14 weeks) as well

  2. Aptamer Stainings for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Maria Angela Gomes; Rammner, Burkhard; Opazo, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an invaluable tool to visualize molecules in their biological context with ease and flexibility. However, studies using conventional light microscopy have been limited to the resolution that light diffraction allows (i.e., ~200 nm). This limitation has been recently circumvented by several types of advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques, which have achieved resolutions of up to ~10 nm. The resulting enhanced imaging precision has helped to find important cellular details that were not visible using diffraction-limited instruments. However, it has also revealed that conventional stainings using large affinity tags, such as antibodies, are not accurate enough for these imaging techniques. Since aptamers are substantially smaller than antibodies, they could provide a real advantage in super-resolution imaging. Here we compare the live staining of transferrin receptors (TfnR) obtained with different fluorescently labeled affinity probes: aptamers, specific monoclonal antibodies, or the natural receptor ligand transferrin. We observed negligible differences between these staining strategies when imaging is performed with conventional light microscopy (i.e., laser scanning confocal microscopy). However, a clear superiority of the aptamer tag over antibodies became apparent in super-resolved images obtained with stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy.

  3. Laser treatment of port-wine stains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brightman LA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lori A Brightman,1 Roy G Geronemus,1 Kavitha K Reddy2 1Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Port-wine stains are a type of capillary malformation affecting 0.3% to 0.5% of the population. Port-wine stains present at birth as pink to erythematous patches on the skin and/or mucosa. Without treatment, the patches typically darken with age and may eventually develop nodular thickening or associated pyogenic granuloma. Laser and light treatments provide improvement through selective destruction of vasculature. A variety of vascular-selective lasers may be employed, with the pulsed dye laser being the most common and well studied. Early treatment produces more optimal results. Advances in imaging and laser treatment technologies demonstrate potential to further improve clinical outcomes. Keywords: laser, port-wine stain, capillary vascular malformation, vascular birthmark, selective photothermolysis, photodynamic therapy, intense pulsed light

  4. Newer applications of the histological stain prepared from Pterocarpus santalinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, P C; Mukherjee, A K

    1981-03-01

    A histological stain prepared from the heartwood of Pterocarpus santalinus Linn. has been found to be an excellent nuclear stain for various cells of animal and plant origin. As an elastic tissue stain, the results are comparable to standard elastic tissue stains. The striations of voluntary muscle fibers are well shown. The Nissl granules and fibers of cranial nerves in the pons are visualized. When counterstained with light green, it differentially stains muscle and fibrous tissue. The stain can be used as counterstain with certain histochemical procedures with satisfactory results. The preparation and use of this versatile stain are described. PMID:6166099

  5. Evaluation of lanthanide salts as alternative stains to uranyl acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogi, Naoki; Nishioka, Hideo; Nakakoshi, Masamichi

    2015-12-01

    Uranyl acetate (UAc) has been generally used not only as a superb staining reagent for ultrathin sections of plastic-embedded biological materials, but also as high-contrast negative stains for biological macromolecules such as particles of protein or virus. However, the use and purchase of radioactive UAc have been restricted. In this study, we determine the performance of ytterbium triacetate, lutetium triacetate, samarium triacetate and gadolinium triacetate as new staining reagents for biological electron microscopy. We observed chemically fixed spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves stained with these reagents. Ultrathin sections were stained with these reagents. Some of them were counterstained with lead citrate. The transmission electron microscopy contrast of spinach organelles was evaluated in sections exposed to the conventional stain and new stains. We show acetate salts of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium and lutetium could be excellent substitutes for UAc for thin section staining and for negative staining. In addition, each reagent showed appreciable negative-staining effects. PMID:26374081

  6. The Luna stain, an improved selective stain for detection of microsporidian spores in histologic sections

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Feist, Stephen W.; Kent, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Microsporidia in histologic sections are most often diagnosed by observing spores in host tissues. Spores are easy to identify if they occur in large aggregates or xenomas when sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). However, individual spores are not frequently detected in host tissues with conventional H&E staining, particularly if spores are scattered within the tissues, areas of inflammation or small spores in nuclei (i.e., Nucleospora salmonis). Hence, a variety of selecti...

  7. The application of special staining in neuropathological diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-juan FU; PIAO Yue-shan; LU De-hong

    2014-01-01

    Special staining plays an important role in the clinical neuropathological diagnosis. Some special staining is used to distinguish the specific structure of neuron, such as Nissl staining for Nissl body. It can distinguish neuron from other cells, and can be used to judge the degree of neuron injury. Some special staining is used as the assistance of pathological diagnosis of some nervous system diseases. For example, in the primary demyelinating disease, Luxol Fast Blue staining is used to m...

  8. STAINING SECTIONS OF WATER-MISCIBLE RESINS .2. EFFECTS OF STAINING-REAGENT LIPOPHILICITY ON THE STAINING OF GLYCOL-METHACRYLATE-EMBEDDED TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOROBIN, RW; GERRITS, PO; WRIGHT, DJ

    1992-01-01

    Glycol methacrylate (GMA) sections of animal tissues were stained with a group of twenty-seven reagents of very varied chemical characteristics. The artefactual background staining of the resin was found to be dependent on the hydrophilic/lipophilic character of the staining reagent, as estimated fr

  9. Staining-free malaria diagnostics by multispectral and multimodality light-emitting-diode microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdasa, Aboma; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Svanberg, Sune; Zoueu, Jeremie T.

    2013-03-01

    We report an accurate optical differentiation technique between healthy and malaria-infected erythrocytes by quasi-simultaneous measurements of transmittance, reflectance, and scattering properties of unstained blood smears using a multispectral and multimode light-emitting diode microscope. We propose a technique for automated imaging, identification, and counting of malaria-infected erythrocytes for real-time and cost-effective parasitaemia diagnosis as an effective alternative to the manual screening of stained blood smears, now considered to be the gold standard in malaria diagnosis. We evaluate the performance of our algorithm against manual estimations of an expert and show a spectrally resolved increased scattering from malaria-infected blood cells.

  10. Monitoring laser treatment of port wine stains using phase-resolved optical Doppler tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher E.; de Boer, Johannes F.; Majaron, Boris; Verkruysse, Wim; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-04-01

    We used a novel phase-resolved optical Doppler tomographic (ODT) technique, with very high flow velocity sensitivity and high spatial resolution, to image blood flow in port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks in human skin. The variance of blood flow velocity is used to locate the PWS vessels in addition to the regular ODT images. Our device combines an ODT system and laser so that PWS blood flow can be monitored in situ before and after treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical application of ODT to provide a fast semi-quantitative evaluation of the efficacy of PWS laser therapy in situ and in real-time.

  11. Isolation, Culture, and Staining of Single Myofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallot, Yann Simon; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Mann, Aman K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle regeneration is orchestrated by a specialized population of adult stem cells called satellite cells, which are localized between the basal lamina and the plasma membrane of myofibers. The process of satellite cell-activation, proliferation, and subsequent differentiation that occurs during muscle regeneration can be recapitulated ex vivo by isolation of single myofibers from skeletal muscles and culturing them under suspension conditions. Here, we describe an improved protocol to evaluate ex vivo satellite cells activation through isolation of single myofibers from extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of mice and culturing and staining of myofiber-associated satellite cells with the markers of self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation.

  12. Detecting the apoptosis of dopamine neurons with immunohistochemical staining and double-staining technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiguo Zhang; Jing Zhang; Feng Zhang; Yunsheng Gao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is proved that the onset of Parkinson disease companies with neuronal apoptosis of dopamine in substantia nigra of midbrain. Previous researches on neuronal apoptosis of dopamine were analyzed on their consecutive tissue sections with immunohistochemical single-labeling method, immunofluorescence and electron microscope, and there are significant differences.OBJECTIVE: To observe the feasibility of neuronal apoptosis of dopamine with in situ end labeling and tyrosine-hydroxylase antibody immunohistochemical double-labeling staining technique.DESIGN: Controlled study.SETTING: College of Pharmacology of Taishan Medical College; College of Management of Taishan Medical College.MATERIALS: Wistar rats with 2 weeks old and of clean grade were provided by the Animal Center of Taishan Medical College. In situ end labeling kit (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, mixed reactive solution of nucleotide, transfusion-POD), monoclonal antibody of rat antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase (Boehriuser).METHODS: The experiment was completed at the Pharmacological Laboratory of Taishan Medical College from February to December 2005. Tissue from midbrain of rats was taken out to make paraffin sections to observe the neuronal apoptosis of dopamine under microscope with in situ end labeling and tyrosine-hydroxylase antibody immunohistochemical double-labeling staining technique.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neuronal apoptosis of dopamine with in situ end labeling and tyrosine-hydroxylase antibody immunohistochemical double-labeling staining technique.RESULTS:① After double-labeling staining,two kinks of positive products were observed in neurons of dopamine which were suffered from apoptosis. One stained with tyrosine hydroxylase was hyacinthine, and the other stained with in situ end labeling was buffy. Cells of positive products stained with in situ end labeling shaped as strap and bend and was distributed in clustering.Cytoplasm was hyacinthine, staining was symmetrical

  13. Chemical enhancement of fingermark in blood on thermal paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungwook; Seo, Jin Yi

    2015-12-01

    Chemical enhancement methods for fingermark in blood deposited on the surface of a thermal paper substrate were examined. The blood-sensitive reagents compared were LCV (leuco crystal violet), Amido black and Hungarian red. Fingermark in blood on the surface of thermal paper can be fixed with 2% 5-sulfosalicylic acid solution. LCV was found as an inadequate blood staining reagent because of bubbling, diffusion, and blurring on the surface of thermal paper. Hungarian red was also an inadequate blood staining reagent because excess Hungarian red on the surface of thermal paper was not washed away in the de-staining procedure. Amido black was the best staining reagent among three staining reagents compared. The maximum dilution ratio visible to the naked eye after Amido black staining was 1 in 80 for the thermally sensitive surface and 1 in 20 for the thermally non-sensitive surface.

  14. Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Index A-Z Blood Clots Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood that can be stationary (thrombosis) ... treated? What are blood clots? Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood. Normally, blood flows freely through ...

  15. Port wine stain on a child's face (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port wine stains are always present at birth. In an infant, they are flat, pink, vascular lesions. Common locations ... may be present anywhere on the body. Port wine stains may appear in association with other syndromes.

  16. Laser therapy in plastic surgery: decolorization in port wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peszynski-Drews, Cezary; Wolf, Leszek

    1996-03-01

    For the first time laserotherapy is described as a method of port wine stain decolorization in plastic surgery. The authors present their 20-year experience in the treatment of port wine stains with the argon laser and dye laser.

  17. Several staining techniques to enhance the visibility of Acanthamoeba cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Hikal, Wafaa Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Acanthamoeba is one of the most common free-living amoebae. It is widespread in the environment and can infect humans causing keratitis. Delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis leads to extensive corneal inflammation and profound visual loss. Therefore, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis is essential for successful treatment and good prognosis. This study was designed to use different staining techniques to facilitate the identification of Acanthamoeba cysts. Acanthamoeba cysts were isolated by cultivation of either corneal scraping specimens or tap water samples onto non-nutrient agar plates seeded with Escherichia coli. Subcultures were done from positive cultures until unique cysts were isolated. Acanthamoeba cysts were stained temporarily using iodine, eosin, methylene blue, and calcofluor white (CFW) stains and as permanent slides after processing for mounting using modified trichrome, Gimenez and Giemsa staining. These stains were compared on the basis of staining quality including clarity of morphological details, differentiation between cytoplasm and nuclei, color and contrast, and also other characteristics of the staining techniques, including ease of handling, time taken for the procedure, and cost effectiveness. The cysts of Acanthamoeba were recognized in the form of double-walled cysts: the outer wall (ectocyst) that was being differentiated from the variably stained surrounding background and the inner wall (endocyst) that was sometimes stellated, polygonal, round, or oval and visualized as separate from the spherical, sometimes irregular, outline of the ectocyst. Regarding the temporary stains, it was found that they were efficient for visualizing the morphological details of Acanthamoeba cysts. In CFW staining, Acanthamoeba cysts appeared as bluish-white or turquoise oval halos although the internal detail was not evident. On the other hand, the results of permanent-stained slides showed the most consistent stain for identification of

  18. Dye purity and dye standardization for biological staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2002-01-01

    separating, identifying and assaying dye components. In the second part of the review, descriptions are given of the standardized staining method approach using standard staining methods for assessing stains, and practical responses to stain impurity including commercial quality control, third-party quality...... control and standardization of reagents, protocols and documentation. Finally, reference is made to the current state of affairs in the dye field....

  19. Improved method for combination of immunocytochemistry and Nissl staining

    OpenAIRE

    Kádár, Andrea; Wittmann, Gábor; Liposits, Zsolt; Fekete, Csaba

    2009-01-01

    Nissl-staining is a widely used method to study morphology and pathology of neural tissue. After standard immunocytochemistry, the Nissl-staining labels only the nucleus of neurons and the characteristic staining of the neuronal perikarya is absent or very weak. We hypothesized that the RNA degradation during the immunocytochemical treatment results in the loss of cytoplasmic staining with Nissl-dyes. To test this hypothesis, we used RNAse-free conditions for all steps of immunostaining. To f...

  20. Scrub typhus hepatitis confirmed by immunohistochemical staining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong-Hoon Chung; Sung-Chul Lim; Na-Ra Yun; Sung-Heui Shin; Choon-Mee Kim; Dong-Min Kim

    2012-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an acute febrile disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi (O.tsutsugamushi).We report herein the case of a woman who presented with fever and elevated serum levels of liver enzymes and who was definitively diagnosed with scrub typhus by histopathological examination of liver biopsy specimens,serological tests and nested polymerase chain reaction.Immunohistochemical staining using a monoclonal anti-O.tsutsugamushi antibody showed focally scattered positive immunoreactions in the cytoplasm of some hepatocytes.This case suggests that scrub typhus hepatitis causes mild focal inflammation due to direct liver damage without causing piecemeal necrosis or interface hepatitis.Thus,scrub typhus hepatitis differs from acute viral hepatitis secondary to liver damage due to host immune responses,which causes severe Iobular disarray with diffuse hepatocytic degeneration,necrosis and apoptosis as well as findings indicative of hepatic cholestasis,such as hepatic bile plugs or brown pigmentation of hepatocytes.

  1. Comparative analysis of H&E and Prussian blue staining in a mouse model of cerebral microbleeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuo; Grigoryan, Mher Mahoney; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Sumbria, Rachita K; Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Cribbs, David H; Fisher, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are microscopic hemorrhages with deposits of blood products in the brain, which can be visualized with MRI and are implicated in cerebrovascular diseases. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Perl's Prussian blue are popular staining methods used to localize cerebral microbleeds in pathology. This paper compared these two staining techniques in a mouse model of cerebral microbleeds. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cerebral microhemorrhages. C57B6 mice were treated with LPS (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at baseline and at 24 hr. The brains were extracted 48 hr after the first injection and adjacent coronal sections were stained with H&E and Prussian blue to compare the effectiveness of the two staining techniques. H&E-positive stains were increased with LPS treatment and were correlated with grossly visible microhemorrhages on the brain surface; Prussian blue-positive stains, by comparison, showed no significant increase with LPS treatment and did not correlate with either H&E-positive stains or surface microhemorrhages. H&E staining is thus a more reliable indicator of acute bleeding events induced by LPS in this model within a short time span.

  2. Purpose and Criteria for Blood Smear Scan, Blood Smear Examination, and Blood Smear Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gulati, Gene; Song, Jinming; Florea, Alina Dulau; Gong, Jerald

    2012-01-01

    A microscopic examination of an appropriately prepared and well-stained blood smear by a knowledgeable laboratory professional is necessary and clinically useful in a number of circumstances and for a variety of reasons. In this article, an attempt is made to delineate the purpose and criteria for blood smear examination in a variety of circumstances that are encountered in everyday laboratory hematology practice. A blood smear scan serves to at least (a) verify the flagged automated hematolo...

  3. Haemodialysis related osteomalacia: a staining method to demonstrate aluminium

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Malcolm RC; Ihle, Benno U; Dunn, Cheryl M

    1981-01-01

    A slight modification in tissue processing and staining technique enables a previously described method for staining aluminium to be used to demonstrate aluminium in osteomalacia associated with haemodialysis. The stain appears to be accurate in diagnosing this condition and may assist in establishing the diagnosis before severe osteomalacia develops.

  4. Techniques for controlling variability in gram staining of obligate anaerobes.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, M. J.; Thatcher, E; Cox, M E

    1995-01-01

    Identification of anaerobes recovered from clinical samples is complicated by the fact that certain gram-positive anaerobes routinely stain gram negative; Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, Eubacterium plautii, Clostridium ramosum, Clostridium symbiosum, and Clostridium clostridiiforme are among the nonconformists with regard to conventional Gram-staining procedures. Accurate Gram staining of American Type Culture Collection strains of these anaerobic bacteria is possible by implementing fi...

  5. FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION COMBINED WITH IMMUNOFLUORESCENT STAINING FOR RAPID DETECTION OF Nmyc AMPLIFICATION IN NEUROBLASTOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei王伟; Marianne Ifversen; ZHAO Chun-ting赵春亭; WANG Hong-yi汪洪毅; ZHAO Hong-guo赵洪国

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish a method to improve the detection of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood samples of neuroblastoma patients and analysis of cytogenetic aberration. Methods: Immunofluorescent staining was performed using a cocktail of primary monoclonal neuroblastoma antibodies (14.G2a, 5.1H11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied with fluorescent probes specific for Nmyc genes afterwards. A novel computer assisted scanning system for automatic search, image analysis and repositioning of these positive cells was developed. Fifty-six bone marrow and peripheral blood samples from 7 patients were evaluated by this method. Results: Fluorescence in situ hybridization can be combined with immunofluorescent staining in detecting Nmyc amplification in neuroblastoma patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization results correlated well with data obtained by conventional cytogenetic procedures. Conclusion: The technique described allows search of tumor cells in the bone marrow as well as detection of Nmyc amplification in interphase nuclei.

  6. Erbium doped stain etched porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, B. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38204 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Diaz-Herrera, B. [Departamento de Energia Fotovoltaica, Instituto Tecnologico de Energias Renovables (ITER), Poligono Industrial de Granadilla, 38611 S/C Tenerife (Spain); Guerrero-Lemus, R. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38204 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: rglemus@ull.es; Mendez-Ramos, J.; Rodriguez, V.D. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Experimental Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38204 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Hernandez-Rodriguez, C. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38204 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Martinez-Duart, J.M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    In this work a simple erbium doping process applied to stain etched porous silicon layers (PSLs) is proposed. This doping process has been developed for application in porous silicon solar cells, where conventional erbium doping processes are not affordable because of the high processing cost and technical difficulties. The PSLs were formed by immersion in a HF/HNO{sub 3} solution to properly adjust the porosity and pore thickness to an optimal doping of the porous structure. After the formation of the porous structure, the PSLs were analyzed by means of nitrogen BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) area measurements and scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the PSLs were immersed in a saturated erbium nitrate solution in order to cover the porous surface. Then, the samples were subjected to a thermal process to activate the Er{sup 3+} ions. Different temperatures and annealing times were used in this process. The photoluminescence of the PSLs was evaluated before and after the doping processes and the composition was analyzed by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy.

  7. Electrostatic control of the coffee stain effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Alex; Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    The ``coffee stain effect,'' as first explained by Deegan et al. 1997, has received a great deal of attention amongst modellers and experimentalists in recent years, perhaps due in part to its obvious casual familiarity. However, it maintains interest because of its intriguing reliance on an interplay of a trio of effects: contact line pinning, inhomogeneous mass flux, and resulting capillarity-driven flow. What is more, the effect, and especially its suppression or reversal, find applications in fields as diverse as sample recovery, mass spectroscopy and the printing of Organic LEDs. We examine the motion a nanoparticle-laden droplet deposited on a precursor film, incorporating the effects of capillarity, concentration-dependent rheology, together with a heated substrate and resultant mass flux and Marangoni effects. We allow the substrate to act as an electrode and incorporate a second electrode above the droplet. The potential difference together with a disparity in electrical properties between the two regions results in electrical (Maxwell) stresses at the interface. We show via lubrication theory and via direct numerical simulations that the ring effect typically observed may be suppressed or augmented via appropriate use of electric fields. EPSRC DTG

  8. Differential staining of interspecific chromosomes in somatic cell hybrids by alkaline Giemsa stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, K K; Chen, S; Ruddle, F H

    1976-03-01

    Staining of chromosome preparations of Chinese hamster-human hybrid cells and mouse-chimpanzee hybrids with alkaline Giemsa has yielded color differentiation of the interspecific chromosomes. Bicolor chromosomes, indicating apparent translocations also are observed for each of these hybrids. The specific color differences observed provide a rapid means of recognizing and aiding in the identification of the interspecific chromosomes and apparent translocations in these somatic cell hybrids. PMID:1028166

  9. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called homologous blood donation. Many communities have a blood bank at which any healthy person can donate blood. ... need to arrange with your hospital or local blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. ...

  10. AUTOFLUORESCENCE IN PAP STAIN IN THE SPUTUM OF SUSPECTED PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS AND COMPARE WITH OTHER AFB STAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis. It primarily affect lungs and can also affect intestine, meninges, bones and Joints, lymph node, skin and other tissues of the body. There are various methods for the diagnosis of tuberculosis, such as sputum examination of tubercular bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen staining, demonstration of tubercular bacilli by Auramine–Rhodamine staining and culture in LJ medium. Papanicolaou stain is widely used in routine cytological evaluation of samples derived from the respiratory tract and eosin to be responsible for the autofluorescence. MATERIAL AND METHOD Present study was done clinically suspected tubercular patients from January to July 2015. On all received samples ZN stain, fluorescent stain and PAP stain was applied. RESULT Among the clinically suspected patients 650 (35.35% was diagnosed with tuberculosis. Male-to-female ratio was 2.76:1, Tuberculosis was diagnosed in 315 (16.75% cases with Ziehl-Neelsen staining with fluorescent staining in 611 (32.79% cases and Autofluorescence in 650 (35.35% cases. CONCLUSION In present study, fever was chief clinical complaint. Males are more diagnosed with tuberculosis than females. Autofluorescent staining is slightly more sensitive than the Auramine–Rhodamine and more ZN staining in demonstration of AFB in the samples.

  11. Critical evaluation of monoclonal antibody staining in breast carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Parham, D M; Coghill, G; Robertson, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The immunoperoxidase staining of 84 primary invasive breast carcinomas with four monoclonal antibodies (BRST-1, HMFG1, EMA, B72.3) was evaluated by semiquantitative light microscopical examination and quantitative image analysis. Major differences in the staining of the tumours for each of the monoclonal antibodies was observed. Correlation between monoclonal antibody staining and patient age, survival, histological grade, tumour diameter and cellularity was also carried out. This showed a si...

  12. TREATMENTS TO MINIMIZE EXTRACTIVES STAIN IN WESTERN RED CEDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Stirling,

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Under certain conditions involving uneven exposure to weather, stains related to the extractives can reduce the aesthetic appeal of western red cedar in exterior applications such as fence boards, siding, and sidewall shingles. Selected chemical treatments were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the formation of extractives stain. DDACarbonate, alkyl amine oxide, and combinations thereof delayed extractives stain formation in an accelerated field test, with higher loadings having greater effect.

  13. Laser-induced primary and secondary hemostasis dynamics and mechanisms in relation to selective photothermolysis of port wine stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Heger; I.I. Salles; R. Bezemer; M.A. Cloos; S.R. Mordon; S. Bégu; H. Deckmyn; J.F. Beek

    2011-01-01

    Superficial vascular anomalies such as port wine stains are commonly treated by selective photothermolysis (SP). The endovascular laser-tissue interactions underlying SP are governed by a photothermal response (thermocoagulation of blood) and a hemodynamic response (thrombosis). Currently it is not

  14. 3D reconstruction of multiple stained histology images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Three dimensional (3D tissue reconstructions from the histology images with different stains allows the spatial alignment of structural and functional elements highlighted by different stains for quantitative study of many physiological and pathological phenomena. This has significant potential to improve the understanding of the growth patterns and the spatial arrangement of diseased cells, and enhance the study of biomechanical behavior of the tissue structures towards better treatments (e.g. tissue-engineering applications. Methods: This paper evaluates three strategies for 3D reconstruction from sets of two dimensional (2D histological sections with different stains, by combining methods of 2D multi-stain registration and 3D volumetric reconstruction from same stain sections. Setting and Design: The different strategies have been evaluated on two liver specimens (80 sections in total stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E, Sirius Red, and Cytokeratin (CK 7. Results and Conclusion: A strategy of using multi-stain registration to align images of a second stain to a volume reconstructed by same-stain registration results in the lowest overall error, although an interlaced image registration approach may be more robust to poor section quality.

  15. Programmable Colored Illumination Microscopy (PCIM): A practical and flexible optical staining approach for microscopic contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Programmable colored illumination microscopy (PCIM) has been proposed as a flexible optical staining technique for microscopic contrast enhancement. In this method, we replace the condenser diaphragm of a conventional microscope with a programmable thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD). By displaying different patterns on the LCD, numerous established imaging modalities can be realized, such as bright field, dark field, phase contrast, oblique illumination, and Rheinberg illuminations, which conventionally rely on intricate alterations in the respective microscope setups. Furthermore, the ease of modulating both the color and the intensity distribution at the aperture of the condenser opens the possibility to combine multiple microscopic techniques, or even realize completely new methods for optical color contrast staining, such as iridescent dark-field and iridescent phase-contrast imaging. The versatility and effectiveness of PCIM is demonstrated by imaging of several transparent colorless specimens, such as unstained lung cancer cells, diatom, textile fibers, and a cryosection of mouse kidney. Finally, the potentialities of PCIM for RGB-splitting imaging with stained samples are also explored by imaging stained red blood cells and a histological section.

  16. Morphology and staining behavior of neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleyer, Martina; Curths, Christoph; Dahlmann, Franziska; Wichmann, Judy; Bauer, Natali; Moritz, Andreas; Braun, Armin; Knauf, Sascha; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Gruber-Dujardin, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are frequently used as translational animal models for human diseases. However, a comparative study of cytological and histochemical detection methods as well as morphometric and ultrastructural characterization of neutrophils and eosinophils in this species is lacking. Blood samples of house dust mite sensitized and allergen challenged as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged marmosets were analyzed with different cytological and histological staining methods. Furthermore, cell size and number of nuclear segments were compared between neutrophils and eosinophils. Electron microscopy was performed to characterize the ultrastructure of granulocytes. Of all applied cytological stains, three allowed differentiation of eosinophils and neutrophils and, thus, reliable quantification in blood smears: May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain, Congo Red and Naphthol AS-D Chloroacetate-Esterase. For histology, Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) could not demonstrate clear differences, whereas Sirius Red, Congo Red, and Naphthol AS-D Chloroacetate Esterase showed capable results for identification of eosinophils or neutrophils in lung tissue. Morphometry revealed that marmoset neutrophils have more nuclear segments and are slightly larger than eosinophils. Ultrastructurally, eosinophils presented with large homogeneous electron-dense granules without crystalloid cores, while neutrophils were characterized by heterogeneous granules of different size and density. Additionally, sombrero-like vesicles were detected in tissue eosinophils of atopic marmosets, indicative for hypersensitivity-related piecemeal degranulation. In conclusion, we provide a detailed overview of marmoset eosinophils and neutrophils, important for phenotypic characterization of marmoset models for human airway diseases. PMID:27165445

  17. Variasjon mellom optikerstudenters vurdering og gradering av corneal staining og konjunktival staining ved bruk av Efron graderingsska

    OpenAIRE

    Børretzen, Jeanne Marie; Gjervik, Sissel; Heim, Anette; Løwø, Kjetil; Reinfjord, Bertil

    2012-01-01

    Målsetting: Målsetting med denne undersøkelse med tverrsnittsdesign var å samle inn og analysere data om variasjoner mellom optikerstudenters vurdering og gradering av corneal staining og konjunktival staining ved bruk av Efron graderingsskalaer Metode: Fem operatører graderte til sammen førti øyne med èn gjennomsnittligverdi på både corneal staining og konjunktival staining etter Efron graderingsskala. Skalaen går fra null til fire med 0,1-trinn. Deretter ble data analysert i MS Excel. ...

  18. Alcian blue-stained particles in a eutrophic lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, J.; Søndergaard, Morten

    1998-01-01

    We used a neutral solution of Alcian Blue to stain transparent particles in eutrophic Lake Frederiksborg Slotss0, Denmark. Alcian Blue-stained particles (ABSP) appeared to be similar to the so-called transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) identified with an acidic solution of Alcian Blue. Our...

  19. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Horobin, R W

    2012-01-01

    The 11th issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) provides our first impressions of the REACH and ECHA programs. We intend to give a more thorough account of what these important programs actually mean in later editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission. Under the heading...

  20. News from the Biological Stain Commission no. 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2013-01-01

    In the 13(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the first plenary meeting of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Clinical...

  1. News from the Biological Stain Commission, No. 17

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2016-01-01

    In the 17(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the 20(th) meeting of ISO/TC 212 Clinical laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test...

  2. News from the Biological Stain Commission no. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Horobin, R W

    2014-01-01

    In the 15(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the plenary meetings of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Clinical...

  3. News from the Biological Stain Commission no. 12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2012-01-01

    In this 12(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the meetings of ISO/TC 212/WG 1 Quality and competence in the medical laboratory and ISO...

  4. THIONIN STAINING OF PARAFFIN AND PLASTIC EMBEDDED SECTIONS OF CARTILAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; DRUKKER, J; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of thionin for staining cartilage sections embedded in glycol methacrylate (GMA) and the effect of decalcification on cartilage sections embedded in paraffin and GMA were assessed. Short decalcification periods using 5% formic acid or 10% EDTA did not influence the staining properties

  5. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O

    2011-01-01

    In the 10th issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of Regulatory affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the meeting of ISO/TC 212/WG 1 held in London, UK, on 16-17 November 2009. Furthermore...

  6. Pyogenic granuloma, port-wine stain and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodins, Karl; Gramp, Dallas; James, Daniel; Kumar, Sandeep

    2011-11-01

    We present a novel case of pyogenic granuloma occurring within a port-wine stain in two sequential pregnancies at different sites. There was no history of precipitating events such as trauma. We discuss why a pyogenic granuloma may occur within a port-wine stain and how pregnancy may increase the likelihood of this occurring.

  7. The effect of selected staining techniques on bull sperm morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszewska, Dorota; Andraszek, Katarzyna; Czubaszek, Magdalena; Biesiada-Drzazga, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Sperm morphometry has some value as an indicator of reproductive capacity in males. In laboratory practice a variety of slide-staining methods are used during morphological evaluation of semen to predict male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of staining of semen using four different techniques on the morphometry of the bull sperm cell. The material for the study consisted of semen collected from test bulls of the Black-and-White variety of Holstein-Friesians. The results obtained in the study indicate differences in the dimensions of bull sperm heads when different slide staining techniques were used. The most similar results for sperm head dimensions were obtained in the case of SpermBlue(®) and eosin+gentian violet complex, although statistically significant differences were found between all the staining techniques. Extreme values were noted for the other staining techniques - lowest for the Papanicolaou and highest for silver nitrate, which may indicate more interference in the cell by the reagents used in the staining process. However, silver nitrate staining was best at identifying the structures of the sperm cell. Hence it is difficult to determine which of the staining methods most faithfully reveals the dimensions and shape of the bull sperm.

  8. Automatic macroscopic density artefact removal in a Nissl-stained microscopic atlas of whole mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W; Li, A; Wu, J; Yang, Z; Meng, Y; Wang, S; Gong, H

    2013-08-01

    Acquiring a whole mouse brain at the micrometer scale is a complex, continuous and time-consuming process. Because of defects caused by sample preparation and microscopy, the acquired image data sets suffer from various macroscopic density artefacts that worsen the image quality. We have to develop the available preprocessing methods to improve image quality by removing the artefacts that effect cell segmentation, vascular tracing and visualization. In this study, a set of automatic artefact removal methods is proposed for images obtained by tissue staining and optical microscopy. These methods significantly improve the complicated images that contain various structures, including cells and blood vessels. The whole mouse brain data set with Nissl staining was tested, and the intensity of the processed images was uniformly distributed throughout different brain areas. Furthermore, the processed image data set with its uniform brightness and high quality is now a fundamental atlas for image analysis, including cell segmentation, vascular tracing and visualization.

  9. Mapping stain distribution in pathology slides using whole slide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Cheng Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whole slide imaging (WSI offers a novel approach to digitize and review pathology slides, but the voluminous data generated by this technology demand new computational methods for image analysis. Materials and Methods: In this study, we report a method that recognizes stains in WSI data and uses kernel density estimator to calculate the stain density across the digitized pathology slides. The validation study was conducted using a rat model of acute cardiac allograft rejection and another rat model of heart ischemia/reperfusion injury. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was conducted to label ED1 + macrophages in the tissue sections and the stained slides were digitized by a whole slide scanner. The whole slide images were tessellated to enable parallel processing. Pixel-wise stain classification was conducted to classify the IHC stains from those of the background and the density distribution of the identified IHC stains was then calculated by the kernel density estimator. Results: The regression analysis showed a correlation coefficient of 0.8961 between the number of IHC stains counted by our stain recognition algorithm and that by the manual counting, suggesting that our stain recognition algorithm was in good agreement with the manual counting. The density distribution of the IHC stains showed a consistent pattern with those of the cellular magnetic resonance (MR images that detected macrophages labeled by ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide or micron-sized iron-oxide particles. Conclusions: Our method provides a new imaging modality to facilitate clinical diagnosis. It also provides a way to validate/correlate cellular MRI data used for tracking immune-cell infiltration in cardiac transplant rejection and cardiac ischemic injury.

  10. Investigations of significance of blood smear results in diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Potkonjak Aleksandar; Lako Branislav; Belić Branislava; Milošević Nikolina; Stevančević Ognjen; Cincović Marko; Lako Bjanka

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic examination of stained smears of peripheral blood is of vital significance in the speedy diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases, in particular during the stage of infection when the cause is present in the blood, or blood cells. It is sometimes possible to make a definitive diagnosis of an infectious or parasitic disease following an examination of a stained smear of the peripheral blood. Since microscopic examinations of a peripheral blood smear are applied increasi...

  11. New tool for biological dosimetry: Reevaluation and automation of the gold standard method following telomere and centromere staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M’kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Maalouf, Elie E.L. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Str. 6, 68804 Altlussheim (Germany); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, 61 Rue Erlanger, 75016 Paris (France); Cuceu, Corina; Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have applied telomere and centromere (TC) staining to the scoring of dicentrics. • TC staining renders the scoring of dicentrics more rapid and robust. • TC staining allows the scoring of not only dicentrics but all chromosomal anomalies. • TC staining has led to a reevaluation of the radiation dose–response curve. • TC staining allows automation of the scoring of chromosomal aberations. • Automated scoring of dicentrics after TC staining was as efficient as manual scoring. - Abstract: Purpose: The dicentric chromosome (dicentric) assay is the international gold-standard method for biological dosimetry and classification of genotoxic agents. The introduction of telomere and centromere (TC) staining offers the potential to render dicentric scoring more efficient and robust. In this study, we improved the detection of dicentrics and all unstable chromosomal aberrations (CA) leading to a significant reevaluation of the dose–effect curve and developed an automated approach following TC staining. Material and methods: Blood samples from 16 healthy donors were exposed to {sup 137}Cs at 8 doses from 0.1 to 6 Gy. CA were manually and automatically scored following uniform (Giemsa) or TC staining. The detection of centromeric regions and telomeric sequences using PNA probes allowed the detection of all unstable CA: dicentrics, centric and acentric rings, and all acentric fragments (with 2, 4 or no telomeres) leading to the precise quantification of estimated double strand breaks (DSB). Results: Manual scoring following TC staining revealed a significantly higher frequency of dicentrics (p < 10{sup −3}) (up to 30%) and estimated DSB (p < 10{sup −4}) compared to uniform staining due to improved detection of dicentrics with centromeres juxtaposed with other centromeres or telomeres. This improvement permitted the development of the software, TCScore, that detected 95% of manually scored dicentrics compared to 50% for

  12. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  13. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  14. Blood Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Group Links Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Basics Blood is a specialized body fluid. It ... about 9 pints. Jump To: The Components of Blood and Their Importance Many people have undergone blood ...

  15. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart contracts, which ... as it relaxes, which is called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure ...

  16. Homogeneous luminescent stain etched porous silicon elaborated by a new multi-step stain etching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajji, M., E-mail: mhajji2001@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopôle de Borj-Cédria BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Institut Supérieur d’Electronique et de Communication de Sfax, route Menzel Chaker Km 0.5, BP 868, Sfax 3018 (Tunisia); Khalifa, M.; Slama, S. Ben; Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaïque, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l’Energie, Technopôle de Borj-Cédria BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method to produce porous silicon which derived from the conventional stain etching (SE) method. But instead of one etching step that leads to formation of porous layer, the substrate is subjected to an initial etching step with a duration Δt{sub 0} followed by a number of supplementary short steps that differs from a layer to another. The duration of the initial step is just the necessary time to have a homogenous porous layer on the whole surface of the substrate. It was found that this duration is largely dependent of the doping type and level of the silicon substrate. The duration of supplementary steps was kept as short as possible to prevent the formation of bubbles on the silicon surface during silicon dissolution which leads generally to inhomogeneous porous layers. It is found from surface investigation by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that multistep stain etching (MS-SE) method allows to produce homogeneous porous silicon nanostructures compared to the conventional SE method. The chemical composition of the obtained porous layers has been evaluated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows that porous layers produced by SE and MS-SE methods have comparable spectra indicating that those layers are composed of nanocrystallites with comparable sizes. But the intensity of photoluminescence of layer elaborated by MS-SE method is higher than that elaborated by the SE method. Total reflectance characteristics show that the presented method allows the production of porous silicon layers with controllable thicknesses and optical properties. Results for porous silicon layers elaborated on heavily doped n-type silicon show that the reflectance can be reduced to values less than 3% in the major part of the spectrum.

  17. Novel Process for Laser Stain Removal from Archaeological Oil Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nadi, Lotfia; El-Feky, Osama; Abdellatif, Galila; Darwish, Sawsan

    2013-03-01

    Some samples of oil paintings (5 × 5 cm) were prepared on wooden panel with four types of fungi commonly encountered on oil paintings were selected for this study. Each of the fungi is associated with different colored stains. Fungus Alternaria tenuis is associated by a dense black stain, Chetomium globosum by a brownish gray stain, Aspergillus flavus by a yellowish stain, and Fusaruim oxysporum by a pinkish stain. Fungi growing on oil paintings affect the surface characteristics by forming a variety of colored patches typically composed of many complex chemical substances that are produced during metabolic processes. These colored stains may be encrusted in spores, present in mycelium or secreted to a substance such as oil paintings surfaces. While the fungal stains can sometimes be extracted with appropriate solvents, there are some stains that resist solvent extraction entirely. Developing new solvent system that might attack the paint structure, and is time consuming and requires a great deal of trial and error. Mechanical stain removal is also problematic in that it often produces abrasion of the surface, markedly deteriorating the artwork, and is extra ordinarily fine and tedious. For these reasons, we decided to examine an alternative physical technique as a new approach to deal with stain removal. Since the stains are due to the existence of fungi, we thought it a good idea to remove them by singlet oxygen. We applied the photo dynamic process through which the fungi stains were covered with organic dye derivatives in solution under controlled illumination in the lab. The samples were then irradiated by low power Laser light from a He-Ne laser, the dye will be photodecomposed and produce singlet oxygen. We report in this work the results obtained as a function of: - The concentration and types of the organic dye in solution, - The presence of certain amounts of liquids added to the solution, - The scanning speed of the laser beam on the sample surface

  18. Silver and Cyanine Staining of Oligonucleotides in Polyacrylamide Gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhong Tang

    Full Text Available To explore why some oligonucleotides in denaturing polyacrylamide gel could not be silver-stained, 134 different oligonucleotides were analyzed using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis stained with silver and asymmetric cyanine. As a result, we found that the sensitivity of oligos (dA, (dC, (dG and (dT to silver staining could be ranged as (dA > (dG > (dC > (dT from high to low. It was unexpected that oligo (dT was hard to be silver-stained. Moreover, the silver staining of an oligonucleotide containing base T could be partially or completely inhibited by base T. The inhibition of silver staining by base T was a competitive inhibition which could be affected by the amounts of the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, the cis-distance between the argyrophil nucleobase and base T, and the gel concentration. The changes of the intensity of an oligonucleotide band caused by the changes of DNA base composition were diverse and interesting. The intensity of some oligonucleotide bands would significantly change when the changes of DNA base composition accumulated to a certain extent (usually ≥ 4 nt. The sensitivity of cyanine staining of ≤ 11-nt long oligonucleotides could be enhanced about 250-fold by fixing the gels with methanol fixing solution.

  19. Microscopic analysis of MTT stained boar sperm cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. van den Berg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of sperm cells to develop colored formazan by reduction of MTT was used earlier to develop a spectrophotometric assay to determine the viability of sperm cells for several mammalian species. It was the objective of the present study to visualize microscopically the location of the formazan in boar sperm cells. The MTT staining process of boar sperm cells can be divided into a series of morphological events. Incubation of the sperm cells in the presence of MTT resulted after a few min in a diffuse staining of the midpiece of the sperm cells. Upon further incubation the staining of the midpiece became more intense, and gradually the formation of packed formazan granules became more visible. At the same time, a small formazan stained granule appeared medially on the sperm head, which increased in size during further incubation. After incubation for about 1 h the midpiece granules were intensely stained and more clearly distinct as granules, while aggregation of sperm cells occurred. Around 90% of the sperm cells showed these staining events. At the end of the staining the formazan granules have disappeared from both the sperm cells and medium, whereas formazan crystals appeared as thin crystal threads, that became heavily aggregated in the incubation medium. It was concluded that formazan is taken up by lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Further, the use of the MTT assay to test for sperm viability should be regarded as a qualitative assay, whereas its practical use at artificial insemination (AI Stations is limited.

  20. Western Blot of Stained Proteins from Dried Polyacrylamide Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Claudia; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    1996-01-01

    Western blotting of proteins is customarily performed following their separation on polyacrylamide gels, either prior to staining (1) or, as recently reported, following staining (2). We describe here Western blotting with stained gels, which had been dried and some of which had been stored for years. This procedure permits immunological analysis of proteins, to which antisera may have become available only later, or where the application of newly developed sensitive detection methods is desired. Once rehydration of the gels is achieved, proteins can be-transferred to blotting membranes by any appropriate protocol. Proteins stained with Coomassie Blue have to be detected with a non-chromogenic method, such as the film-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL)2) procedure (3). Silver stained proteins, which transfer in the colorless form, may be visualized by any detection method, although, because of the usually very low amounts of proteins, detection by ECL is preferable. Blotting of stained proteins from rehydrated gels is as rapid and as quantitative as from freshly prepared gels, in contrast to blotting from wet stained gels, which requires extensive washing and results in low transfer efficiency (2). Together with a photographic record of the gel pattern, unambiguous identification of immunoreactive proteins from complex mixtures is possible. Some further applications of this work are discussed.

  1. C4d staining as immunohistochemical marker in inflammatory myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of an inflammatory myopathy is often established based on basic histologic studies. Additional immunohistochemical studies are sometimes required to support the diagnosis and the classification of inflammatory myopathies. Staining for major histocompatibility complex 1 (MHC1) often shows increased sarcolemmal labeling in inflammatory myopathies. Endomysial capillary staining C5b-9 (membrane attack complex) is a feature that is reported as frequently associated with dermatomyositis. Immunohistochemical staining for C4d is widely used for various applications including the assessment of antibody-mediated rejection after solid organ transplantation. In the context of dermatomyositis, C4d staining has been described in skin biopsies but not in muscle biopsies. A total of 32 muscle biopsy specimens were examined. The hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were reviewed, and immunohistochemical studies for MHC1, C5b-9, and C4d were conducted. The staining observed for C5b-9 and C4d was compared. Overall, the staining pattern for C4d mirrored the one observed for C5b-9 in the examined muscle biopsy specimens. There was high and statistically significant (P<0.0001) correlation between the staining seen with these 2 antibodies. Both antibodies labeled the cytoplasm of degenerating necrotic myofibers. In addition, both antibodies showed distinct endomysial capillary labeling in a subset of dermatomyositis. Areas with perifascicular atrophy often exhibited the most prominent vascular labeling for C4d and C5b-9. In conclusion, C4d and C5b-9 show similar expression patterns in muscle biopsies of patients with inflammatory myopathies and both highlight the presence of vascular labeling associated with dermatomyositis. C4d antibodies are widely used and may offer an alternative for C5b-9 staining.

  2. Black Stain and Dental Caries: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Żyła; Beata Kawala; Joanna Antoszewska-Smith; Maciej Kawala

    2015-01-01

    Black stain is characterized as a dark line or an incomplete coalescence of dark dots localized on the cervical third of the tooth. Over the last century, the etiology of black stain has been the subject of much debate. Most of the studies concerning this issue were conducted in pediatric population. According to the reviewed articles published between 2001 and 2014, the prevalence of black stain varies from 2.4% to 18% with equal sex distribution. The majority of the authors confirm the corr...

  3. Still leaving stains on teeth—the legacy of minocycline?

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond, James; Cook, David

    2015-01-01

    Minocycline is widely used as a first-line agent for papulopustular acne, and has previously been reported as causing stains on teeth that are still forming. This article reports a case of staining to only the crowns of unerupted third molars in a girl prescribed minocycline at age 16 for papulopustular acne. We review the literature in the area of minocycline teeth staining, consider the role of minocycline as a first-line agent for papulopustular acne, and outline strategies on the preventi...

  4. Standardization in biological staining. The influence of dye manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of biological staining is to obtain specimens of biological material that can be assessed in the microscope. These specimens are influenced by all processes from removal from the intact organism to mounting on the microscopic slide. To achieve comparable results with various techniques...... for biological staining, standardization of all procedures and reagents is mandatory. In this paper, I focus particularly on dyes and consider the possibilities for obtaining standardized dyes. In general practice, most biological staining takes place with available commercial dyes. These dyes may or may...... not have been subjected to quality assessment either internally by the producer or vendor or externally by independent investigators or organizations such as the Biological Stain Commission. Concerted attempts at standardization in Europe are discussed. The latest results of this work, the European...

  5. The electrical conduction variation in stained carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Wei Fan, Jun; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes become stained from coupling with foreign molecules, especially from adsorbing gas molecules. The charge exchange, which is due to the orbital hybridization, occurred in the stained carbon nanotube induces electrical dipoles that consequently vary the electrical conduction of the nanotube. We propose a microscopic model to evaluate the electrical current variation produced by the induced electrical dipoles in a stained zigzag carbon nanotube. It is found that stronger orbital hybridization strengths and larger orbital energy differences between the carbon nanotube and the gas molecules help increasing the induced electrical dipole moment. Compared with the stain-free carbon nanotube, the induced electrical dipoles suppress the current in the nanotube. In the carbon nanotubes with induced dipoles the current increases as a result of increasing orbital energy dispersion via stronger hybridization couplings. In particular, at a fixed hybridization coupling, the current increases with the bond length for the donor-carbon nanotube but reversely for the acceptor-carbon nanotube.

  6. A ‘Magnetic’ Gram Stain for Bacterial Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Ghyslain; Chung, Hyun Jung; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic stain. Bacteria are often classified into Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains by their visual staining properties using crystal violet (CV), a triarylmethane dye. Here we show, that bioorthogonal modification of crystal violet with transcyclooctene (TCO) can be used to render Gram-positive bacteria magnetic with magneto-nanoparticles-Tetrazine (MNP-Tz). This allows for class specific automated magnetic detection, magnetic separation or other magnetic manipulations.

  7. Gram Staining for the Treatment of Peritonsillar Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Yukinori Takenaka; Kazuya Takeda; Tadashi Yoshii; Michiko Hashimoto; Hidenori Inohara

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether Gram staining can influence the choice of antibiotic for the treatment of peritonsillar abscess. Methods. Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 57 cases of peritonsillar abscess were analyzed with regard to cultured bacteria and Gram staining. Results. Only aerobes were cultured in 16% of cases, and only anaerobes were cultured in 51% of cases. Mixed growth of aerobes and anaerobes was observed in 21% of cases. The cultured bacteria were mainly aerobic Streptococcus,...

  8. Optimalization Of Port-Wine Stain Treatment With Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, C. T.; van Gemert, M. J.; Henning, J. P. H.

    1985-03-01

    To optimalize laser-parameters for therapy of port-wine stains temperature calculations have been performed on a skin model. The optimal values of these numerically evaluated variables are: wavelength λ= 415,577 or 540 nm., pulse-time t1 a few milliseconds and beam radius wi> 0.1 mm. Based on these theoretical results some experiments have been carried out which confirm the calculations. Thus laser-therapy for port-wine stains can be ameliorated.

  9. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    OpenAIRE

    Feilzer, A.J.; Özcan, M.; Kleverlaan, C. J.; Scholtanus, J.D. (Hans)

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and attributed to penetration of corrosion products, is an adequate substrate for bonding resin composite restorations. Previous studies revealed tin and zinc as main metals from amalgam in stained dentin and...

  10. Black stain and dental caries: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyła, Tomasz; Kawala, Beata; Antoszewska-Smith, Joanna; Kawala, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Black stain is characterized as a dark line or an incomplete coalescence of dark dots localized on the cervical third of the tooth. Over the last century, the etiology of black stain has been the subject of much debate. Most of the studies concerning this issue were conducted in pediatric population. According to the reviewed articles published between 2001 and 2014, the prevalence of black stain varies from 2.4% to 18% with equal sex distribution. The majority of the authors confirm the correlation between the presence of black stain and lower caries experience. The microflora of this deposit is dominated by Actinomyces spp. and has lower cariogenic potential than nondiscolored dental plaque. Iron/copper and sulfur complexes are thought to be responsible for the dark color. In patients with black stain saliva has higher calcium concentrations and higher buffering capacity. Factors such as dietary habits, socioeconomic status, and iron supplementation may be contributing to the formation of black stain. PMID:25802850

  11. Black Stain and Dental Caries: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Żyła

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Black stain is characterized as a dark line or an incomplete coalescence of dark dots localized on the cervical third of the tooth. Over the last century, the etiology of black stain has been the subject of much debate. Most of the studies concerning this issue were conducted in pediatric population. According to the reviewed articles published between 2001 and 2014, the prevalence of black stain varies from 2.4% to 18% with equal sex distribution. The majority of the authors confirm the correlation between the presence of black stain and lower caries experience. The microflora of this deposit is dominated by Actinomyces spp. and has lower cariogenic potential than nondiscolored dental plaque. Iron/copper and sulfur complexes are thought to be responsible for the dark color. In patients with black stain saliva has higher calcium concentrations and higher buffering capacity. Factors such as dietary habits, socioeconomic status, and iron supplementation may be contributing to the formation of black stain.

  12. Chromatin and Cell Wall Staining of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeasts grow by tip extension, maintaining a constant width until they reach a critical size threshold and divide. Division by medial fission-which gives these yeast their name-generates a new end that arises from the site of cytokinesis. The old end, which was produced during the previous cell cycle, initiates progression of the new cell cycle, and in G2, the new end is activated in a process termed new-end takeoff (NETO). In this protocol, the fluorescent stains calcofluor and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) are used to give a rapid and informative assessment of morphogenesis and cell-cycle progression in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Calcofluor reveals the timing of NETO because it stains the birth scars that are generated at new ends by cytokinesis less efficiently than the rest of the cell wall. Intense calcofluor staining of the septum and measurement of cell length are also widely used to identify dividing cells and to gauge the timing of mitotic commitment. Staining nuclei with DAPI identifies mono- and binucleated cells and complements the calcofluor staining procedure to evaluate the stages of the cell cycle and identify mitotic errors. Equally simple DAPI staining procedures reveal chromatin structure in higher resolution, facilitating more accurate staging of mitotic progression and characterization of mitotic errors. PMID:27250942

  13. Gram Staining for the Treatment of Peritonsillar Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinori Takenaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine whether Gram staining can influence the choice of antibiotic for the treatment of peritonsillar abscess. Methods. Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 57 cases of peritonsillar abscess were analyzed with regard to cultured bacteria and Gram staining. Results. Only aerobes were cultured in 16% of cases, and only anaerobes were cultured in 51% of cases. Mixed growth of aerobes and anaerobes was observed in 21% of cases. The cultured bacteria were mainly aerobic Streptococcus, anaerobic Gram-positive cocci, and anaerobic Gram-negative rods. Phagocytosis of bacteria on Gram staining was observed in 9 cases. The bacteria cultured from these cases were aerobic Streptococcus, anaerobic Gram-positive cocci, and anaerobic Gram-negative rods. The sensitivity of Gram staining for the Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods was 90% and 64%, respectively. The specificity of Gram staining for the Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative rods was 62% and 76%, respectively. Most of the Gram-positive cocci were sensitive to penicillin, but some of anaerobic Gram-negative rods were resistant to penicillin. Conclusion. When Gram staining shows only Gram-positive cocci, penicillin is the treatment of choice. In other cases, antibiotics effective for the penicillin-resistant organisms should be used.

  14. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI, BIOPSY SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT GASTRIC LESIONS WITH TRIPLE STAINING AND MODIFIED GIEMSA STAINING

    OpenAIRE

    Pavan Kumar Pindi

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori are associated with most of the disorders of gastro-duodenal tract, such as gastritis, gastric ulcers, dyspepsia and gastric carcinoma. Many staining methods have been developed for the detection of these bacteria from gastric biopsies. However most of the methods adopted were shown to be more expensive, less sensitive, time consuming with less background information. In view of this, the present study was carried out to check the validity of triple staining method against...

  15. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Types KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Types Print A A ... or straight hair instead of curly. ...Make Eight Blood Types The different markers that can be found in ...

  16. Immunoelectrophoresis - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    IEP - serum; Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - blood; Gamma globulin electrophoresis; Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis ... A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

  17. Quantification of tumour vasculature and hypoxia by immunohistochemical staining and HbO2 saturation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B M; Paoni, S F; Lee, J; Koch, C J; Lord, E M

    1999-02-01

    Despite the possibility that tumour hypoxia may limit radiotherapeutic response, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. A new methodology has been developed in which information from several sophisticated techniques is combined and analysed at a microregional level. First, tumour oxygen availability is spatially defined by measuring intravascular blood oxygen saturations (HbO2) cryospectrophotometrically in frozen tumour blocks. Second, hypoxic development is quantified in adjacent sections using immunohistochemical detection of a fluorescently conjugated monoclonal antibody (ELK3-51) to a nitroheterocyclic hypoxia marker (EF5), thereby providing information relating to both the oxygen consumption rates and the effective oxygen diffusion distances. Third, a combination of fluorescent (Hoechst 33342 or DiOC7(3)) and immunohistological (PECAM-1/CD31) stains is used to define the anatomical vascular densities and the fraction of blood vessels containing flow. Using a computer-interfaced microscope stage, image analysis software and a 3-CCD colour video camera, multiple images are digitized, combined to form a photo-montage and revisited after each of the three staining protocols. By applying image registration techniques, the spatial distribution of HbO2 saturations is matched to corresponding hypoxic marker intensities in adjacent sections. This permits vascular configuration to be related to oxygen availability and allows the hypoxic marker intensities to be quantitated in situ. PMID:10027314

  18. VITRAIL: Acquisition, Modeling, and Rendering of Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanikachalam, Niranjan; Baboulaz, Loic; Prandoni, Paolo; Trumpler, Stefan; Wolf, Sophie; Vetterli, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Stained glass windows are designed to reveal their powerful artistry under diverse and time-varying lighting conditions; virtual relighting of stained glass, therefore, represents an exceptional tool for the appreciation of this age old art form. However, as opposed to most other artifacts, stained glass windows are extremely difficult if not impossible to analyze using controlled illumination because of their size and position. In this paper, we present novel methods built upon image based priors to perform virtual relighting of stained glass artwork by acquiring the actual light transport properties of a given artifact. In a preprocessing step, we build a material-dependent dictionary for light transport by studying the scattering properties of glass samples in a laboratory setup. We can now use the dictionary to recover a light transport matrix in two ways: under controlled illuminations the dictionary constitutes a sparsifying basis for a compressive sensing acquisition, while in the case of uncontrolled illuminations the dictionary is used to perform sparse regularization. The proposed basis preserves volume impurities and we show that the retrieved light transport matrix is heterogeneous, as in the case of real world objects. We present the rendering results of several stained glass artifacts, including the Rose Window of the Cathedral of Lausanne, digitized using the presented methods. PMID:27416590

  19. Differentiation between Viable and Dead Cryptosporidium Oocysts Using Fluorochrome Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, Tatsuya; Rai, Shiba Kumar; Uga, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    The use of nucleic acid staining with a fluorochrome dye to differentiate viable and dead (heat-killed) Cryptosporidium oocysts was assessed. The specificities (percentage of unstained viable oocysts) and sensitivities (percentage of stained dead oocysts) of the seven tested dyes (SYTO-17® and SYTO-59® to 64®) ranged from 65 to 76% (average 71%) and 83 to 95% (average 91%), respectively. SYTO-59 and SYTO-17 imparted greater color (4+) intensity than the other dyes (2+ or less). Of these two dyes, SYTO-17 exhibited more brightness and slower discoloration and was selected for use in further experiments. The optimum staining time for SYTO-17 at 37℃ was one hour or more (sensitivity of 96%). Dye concentrations of 20 and 30 µM resulted in maximal color intensity, and no further improvement was observed with further increases in dye concentration. Staining a mixture of viable and dead oocysts (1:1 ratio) with 20 µM dye at 37℃ for one hour yielded the expected results (approximately 50%), but no remarkable increase in the percent staining with time (up to 8 hours) was observed. In this study, no ghost oocysts were observed. The present study indicated that the fluorogenic nucleic acid dye SYTO-17 could be used to discriminate between live and dead Cryptosporidium oocysts. PMID:27363397

  20. Detection of lipopolysaccharides by ethidium bromide staining after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kido, N; Ohta, M; Kato, N

    1990-01-01

    A rapid and easy method for staining lipopolysaccharides with ethidium bromide is described. Lipopolysaccharides could be visualized by ethidium bromide with almost the same sensitivity as found with the silver-staining method in less than 30 min. The ethidium bromide-staining method was particularly suitable for staining lipopolysaccharides possessing acidic O-specific polysaccharides, which were poorly visualized by silver staining.

  1. Stain-free histopathology by programmable supercontinuum pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Marjanovic, Marina; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Chaney, Eric J.; Zhao, Youbo; You, Sixian; Wilson, William L.; Xu, Bingwei; Dantus, Marcos; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-08-01

    The preparation, staining, visualization and interpretation of histological images of tissue is well accepted as the gold standard process for the diagnosis of disease. These methods have a long history of development, and are used ubiquitously in pathology, despite being highly time- and labour-intensive. Here, we introduce a unique optical imaging platform and methodology for label-free multimodal multiphoton microscopy that uses a novel photonic-crystal fibre source to generate tailored chemical contrast based on programmable supercontinuum pulses. We demonstrate the collection of optical signatures of the tumour microenvironment, including evidence of mesoscopic biological organization, tumour cell migration and (lymph-) angiogenesis collected directly from fresh ex vivo mammary tissue. Acquisition of these optical signatures and other cellular or extracellular features, which are largely absent from histologically processed and stained tissue, combined with an adaptable platform for optical alignment-free programmable-contrast imaging, offers the potential to translate stain-free molecular histopathology into routine clinical use.

  2. Sperm viability staining in ecology and evolution: potential pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2009-01-01

    The causes and consequences of variation in sperm quality, survival and ageing are active areas of research in ecology and evolution. In order to address these topics, many recent studies have measured sperm viability using fluorescent staining. Although sperm viability staining has produced...... a number of interesting results, it has some potential pitfalls that have rarely been discussed. In the present paper, I review the major findings of ecology and evolution studies employing sperm viability staining and outline the method's principle limitations. The key problem is that the viability assay...... may itself kill sperm, which is likely to confound many common experimental designs in addition to producing artificially low estimates of sperm viability. I further suggest that sperm number should be routinely measured in sperm viability studies, as it may be an important but overlooked source...

  3. Staining of palatal torus secondary to long term minocycline therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddula Aravind

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Minocycline and other tetracycline analogs are well known to cause discoloring of alveolar bone, teeth and other tissues. The present case reports palatine torus discoloring, in a 91-year-old patient, after long term minocycline therapy. The patient was presented with staining of the palatal torus resulting from prior minocycline use for three-and-a-half years. The diagnosis of minocycline staining of palatal torus was done during a routine hygiene examination. The patient was informed that the bluish appearance of the palatal torus was the result of long term minocycline use. The patient was not willing to discontinue the antibiotic and was not concerned about the appearance. The clinician should inform patients on long term minocycline therapy about the possible side effects of staining of the alveolar bone, teeth and other soft tissue.

  4. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  5. Analyzing Cell Death by Nuclear Staining with Hoechst 33342.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    The nuclei of healthy cells are generally spherical, and the DNA is evenly distributed. During apoptosis the DNA becomes condensed, but this process does not occur during necrosis. Nuclear condensation can therefore be used to distinguish apoptotic cells from healthy cells or necrotic cells. Dyes that bind to DNA, such as Hoechst 33342 or 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), can be used to observe nuclear condensation. These dyes fluoresce at 461 nm when excited by ultraviolet light and can therefore be visualized using conventional fluorescent microscopes equipped with light sources that emit light at ∼350 nm and filter sets that permit the transmission of light at ∼460 nm. This protocol describes staining and visualization of cells stained with Hoechst 33342, but it can be adapted for staining with DAPI or other dyes. PMID:27587774

  6. Chemical aspects of santalin as a histological stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, A; Mukherjee, A K

    1981-03-01

    Recent research on the chemical nature of the red dyes isolated from Pterocarpus santalinus and certain West African plants, viz., Baphia nitida, Pterocarpus osun and Pterocarpus soyauxii, have been reviewed. P. santalinus contains santalins A, B and C, but no santarubin. Santalins and santarubins have been found in P. osun, P. soyauxii and B. nitida. The structural formulae of the santalins are presented and their differences from santarubins indicated. Santalins A and B have some similarities in structure with hematein. This is probably responsible for their staining properties; the possible mechanism of staining is discussed. PMID:6166100

  7. Determination of firing distance using the rhodizonate staining technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, W; Sigrist, T; Wyler, D

    2002-02-01

    The histological staining technique using rhodizonate is also effective for the determination of the firing distance by examining the distribution and intensity of the staining reaction. The differentiation between absolute close-range shots and long-range shots is generally possible without any doubt. The method is not recommended for routine examinations but it is very useful for cases lacking the possibility to investigate smoke and powder deposits in a criminalistic manner, i.e. surgical skin biopsies of hospitalised victims and skin highly altered by the effects of fire, water or by post-mortem decomposition. PMID:11924700

  8. Recurrent oral pyogenic granuloma in port-wine stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Alessandra Dutra; Silva, Carolina Amália Barcellos; de Camargo Moraes, Paulo; Thomaz, Luiz Alexandre; Furuse, Cristiane; de Araújo, Vera Cavalcanti

    2011-11-01

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a benign inflammatory lesion, nonneoplastic in nature, which occurs in the oral cavity and skin. This lesion arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritations, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. Recently, in some cases, the occurrence of recurrent PGs in skin associated with vascular lesions, such as port-wine stains, has been described. It has been postulated that this association is promoted by arteriovenous anastomoses in the vascular lesions, leading to the development of PG. The authors discuss 2 cases of recurrent PG in patients with a port-wine stain, and the treatment options adopted. PMID:22134277

  9. [Technical recommendations and best practice guidelines for May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining: literature review and insights from the quality assurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaton, Eric; Fabre, Monique; Goubin-Versini, Isabelle; Bretz-Grenier, Marie-Françoise; Courtade-Saïdi, Monique; Vincent, Serge; Belleannée, Geneviève; Thivolet, Françoise; Boutonnat, Jean; Debaque, Hervé; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Vielh, Philippe; Cochand-Priollet, Béatrix; Egelé, Caroline; Bellocq, Jean-Pierre; Michiels, Jean-François

    2015-08-01

    May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) stain is a Romanowsky-type, polychromatic stain as those of Giemsa, Leishman and Wright. Apart being the reference method of haematology, it has become a routine stain of diagnostic cytopathology for the study of air-dried preparations (lymph node imprints, centrifuged body fluids and fine needle aspirations). In the context of their actions of promoting the principles of quality assurance in cytopathology, the French Association for Quality Assurance in Anatomic and Cytologic Pathology (AFAQAP) and the French Society of Clinical Cytology (SFCC) conducted a proficiency test on MGG stain in 2013. Results from the test, together with the review of literature data allow pre-analytical and analytical steps of MGG stain to be updated. Recommendations include rapid air-drying of cell preparations/imprints, fixation using either methanol or May-Grünwald alone for 3-10minutes, two-step staining: 50% May-Grünwald in buffer pH 6.8 v/v for 3-5minutes, followed by 10% buffered Giemsa solution for 10-30minutes, and running water for 1-3minutes. Quality evaluation must be performed on red blood cells (RBCs) and leukocytes, not on tumour cells. Under correct pH conditions, RBCs must appear pink-orange (acidophilic) or buff-coloured, neither green nor blue. Leukocyte cytoplasm must be almost transparent, with clearly delineated granules. However, staining may vary somewhat and testing is recommended for automated methods (slide stainers) which remain the standard for reproducibility. Though MGG stain remains the reference stain, Diff-Quik(®) stain can be used for the rapid evaluation of cell samples. PMID:26188673

  10. Black stain and dental caries in Filipino schoolchildren.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinrich-Weltzien, R.; Monse, B.; Palenstein Helderman, W.H. van

    2009-01-01

    Black stain is defined as dark pigmented exogenous substance in lines or dots parallel to the gingival margin and firmly adherent to the enamel at the cervical third of the tooth crowns in the primary and permanent dentition. OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of black sta

  11. Risk factors for meconium stained amniotic fluid and its implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Sundaram

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: Meconium stained amniotic fluid is associated with a higher incidence of operative deliveries resulting in an increased maternal morbidity. It is also associated with an increased neonatal morbidity due to birth asphyxia and respiratory depression at birth and a significant risk of neonatal mortality due to meconium aspiration syndrome. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000: 2503-2506

  12. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Dapson, R W

    2009-01-01

    In this fifth issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of Regulatory Affairs, the BSC's International Affairs Committee provides more information from the meeting of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Committee that took place on June 2-4, 2008 at...

  13. Alternate gram staining technique using a fluorescent lectin.

    OpenAIRE

    Sizemore, R K; Caldwell, J J; Kendrick, A S

    1990-01-01

    Fluorescence-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binds specifically to N-acetylglucosamine in the outer peptidoglycan layer of gram-positive bacteria. The peptidoglycan layer of gram-negative bacteria is covered by a membrane and is not labeled by the lectin. By exploiting this phenomenon, an alternative Gram staining technique has been developed.

  14. A conservative approach to esthetically treat stained arrested caries lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Angari, Sarah S; Hara, Anderson T

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic treatment of stained arrested caries lesions (ACLs) has mostly been done using invasive restorative techniques. The aim of this paper was to propose and report the efficacy of a conservative approach based on dental bleaching to esthetically treat these lesions, both experimentally (extracted teeth) and clinically. In a laboratory experiment, ten extracted human teeth with stained ACLs in either pit and fissure or smooth surface were selected and treated with 15% carbamide peroxide gel, 4 h per day, for a total of 6 days. The second part of the paper reports a clinical case of pit and fissure-stained ACLs in four posterior teeth, which were treated with 40% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching. Digital photographs were taken in both parts to document the efficacy of the treatment. The lesions showed noticeable increase in color lightness indicating the efficacy and suitability of the proposed approach. By using the conservative clinical technique presented, the esthetics of most stained ACLs could be improved, eliminating the need for invasive restorative treatments. PMID:27092359

  15. Analysis of Oxiclean: An Interesting Comparison of Percarbonate Stain Removers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Jeffrey D.; Tietz, David

    2005-01-01

    The study focuses on percarbonate-based stain removers since the percarbonate can be heated to produce additional sodium carbonate. An experiment that provides general chemistry students an opportunity to apply their knowledge of basic stoichiometry to solve a relevant, real-world problem is described.

  16. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Scholtanus

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and attribu

  17. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, Hans O

    2013-01-01

    In the 14(th) issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) the BSC's International Affairs Committee presents information from the meetings of ISO/TC 212/WG 3, In vitro diagnostic products, and from the final plenary meeting of ISO/TC 212, Clinical laboratory testing and in vitro diag...

  18. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  19. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osmotic fragility ) Deficiency of an enzyme called lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase Abnormalities of hemoglobin , the protein in ... sickle and Pappenheimer Red blood cells, target cells Formed elements of blood References Bain BJ. The peripheral ...

  20. Damage to microvessels during pused laser treatment of port-wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svaasand, Lars O.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Stopps, E. K. S.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    Selective photothermolysis with pulsed lasers is presumably the most successful therapy for port wine stain birthmarks (flammeus nevi). Selectivity is obtained by using an optical wavelength corresponding to high absorption in blood together with small absorption in tissue. Further on, the pulse length is selected to be long enough to allow heat to diffuse into the vessel wall, but simultaneously short enough to prevent thermal damage to perivascular tissues. The optimal wavelength and pulse length are therefore dependent on vessel diameter, vessel wall thickness and depth in dermis. The present work, that is based on analytical mathematical modeling, demonstrates that in the case of a 0.45 ms long pulse at 585 nm wavelength vessels of diameter in the range of 40 - 60 micrometers require minimum optical fluence. Smaller vessels require higher fluence because the amount of heat needed to heat the wall then becomes a substantial fraction of the absorbed optical energy, and larger vessels require higher dose because the attenuation of light is blood prevents the blood in central part of the lumen to participate in the heating process. Further on, it is shown that the commonly used dose in the range of 6 - 7 J/cm2 is expected to inflict vessel rupture rather than thermolysis is superficially located vessels. The present analysis might serve to draw guide lines for a protocol where the optical energy, wavelength and pulse length are optimized with respect to vessel diameter and depth.

  1. Multispectral Enhancement Method to Increase the Visual Differences of Tissue Structures in Stained Histopathology Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinky A. Bautista

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we proposed a multispectral enhancement scheme in which the spectral colors of the stained tissue-structure of interest and its background can be independently modified by the user to further improve their visualization and color discrimination. The colors of the background objects are modified by transforming their N-band spectra through an NxN transformation matrix, which is derived by mapping the representative samples of their original spectra to the spectra of their target colors using least mean square method. On the other hand, the color of the tissue structure of interest is modified by modulating the transformed spectra with the sum of the pixel’s spectral residual-errors at specific bands weighted through an NxN weighting matrix; the spectral error is derived by taking the difference between the pixel’s original spectrum and its reconstructed spectrum using the first M dominant principal component vectors in principal component analysis. Promising results were obtained on the visualization of the collagen fiber and the non-collagen tissue structures, e.g., nuclei, cytoplasm and red blood cells (RBC, in a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stained image.

  2. Optimization of spermatozoa detection using immunofluorescent staining and laser micro-dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Yueh Shyang; Chan, Xavier Liang Shun; Goh, Sze Kae; Syn, Christopher Kiu Choong

    2015-10-01

    The present study evaluated the use of an immunofluorescence-based assay for the microscopic detection of human spermatozoa, following which the fluorescence-labelled spermatozoa could be excised with a laser micro-dissection system. The Sperm Hy-Liter™ PI kit was able to detect spermatozoa from as little as 20nL of semen. No interference or non-specificity were observed when the kit was used on semen mixed with various body fluids such as blood and urine, as well as when semen was spiked onto different types of fabric. Good results could also be obtained with rectal samples which contain auto-fluorescent fecal materials through the use of dual FITC/PI filters. We also developed a method for concurrent testing of two protein biomarkers of semen (semenogelin and prostate-specific antigen) and detection of spermatozoa. This approach would maximize the evidential value from a single piece of sexual assault exhibit. The results also showed that staining by Sperm Hy-Liter™ PI does not interfere with DNA recovery, facilitating the generation of clear male DNA profiles from dissected spermatozoa, thereby making profile interpretation less complex. In summary, Sperm Hy-Liter™ PI staining was demonstrated to be sensitive, robust and specific. PMID:26338669

  3. High-resolution melt analysis of DNA methylation to discriminate semen in biological stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Joana; Silva, Deborah S B S; Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Duncan, George; Alho, Clarice S; McCord, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a method for the detection of semen in biological stains using high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis and DNA methylation. To perform this task, we used an epigenetic locus that targets a tissue-specific differentially methylated region for semen. This specific locus, ZC3H12D, contains methylated CpG sites that are hypomethylated in semen and hypermethylated in blood and saliva. Using this procedure, DNA from forensic stains can be isolated, processed using bisulfite-modified polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and detected by real-time PCR with HRM capability. The method described in this article is robust; we were able to obtain results from samples with as little as 1 ng of genomic DNA. Samples inhibited by humic acid still produced reliable results. Furthermore, the procedure is specific and will not amplify non-bisulfite-modified DNA. Because this process can be performed using real-time PCR and is quantitative, it fits nicely within the workflow of current forensic DNA laboratories. As a result, it should prove to be a useful technique for processing trace evidence samples for serological analysis.

  4. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia developing within a port wine stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manton, Robert N; Itinteang, Tinte; de Jong, Sophie; Brasch, Helen D; Tan, Swee T

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male with a port wine stain on the base of his neck presented with a 5-month history of gradual thickening of the involved skin which interfered with clothing and caused repeated bleeding. The lesion was excised and histopathologic examination revealed angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) arising from the pre-existing port wine stain - a rare finding with only one previously reported case. Additionally the lesion was associated with elevated serum renin levels which virtually normalized following excision of the lesion. We further demonstrated the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptors 1 and 2 by the lesion and discuss the possible role of the renin-angiotensin system in this condition. PMID:26010041

  5. Identification of active fluorescence stained bacteria by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Mario; Beyer, Beatrice; Pietsch, Christian; Radt, Benno; Harz, Michaela; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2008-04-01

    Microorganisms can be found everywhere e.g. in food both as useful ingredients or harmful contaminations causing food spoilage. Therefore, a fast and easy to handle analysis method is needed to detect bacteria in different kinds of samples like meat, juice or air to decide if the sample is contaminated by harmful microorganisms. Conventional identification methods in microbiology require always cultivation and therefore are time consuming. In this contribution we present an analysis approach to identify fluorescence stained bacteria on strain level by means of Raman spectroscopy. The stained bacteria are highlighted and can be localized easier against a complex sample environment e.g. in food. The use of Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrical methods allows the identification of single bacteria within minutes.

  6. Cement line staining in undecalcified thin sections of cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, S. D.; Impeduglia, T. M.; Rubin, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for demonstrating cement lines in thin, undecalcified, transverse sections of cortical bone has been developed. Cortical bone samples are processed and embedded undecalcified in methyl methacrylate plastic. After sectioning at 3-5 microns, cross-sections are transferred to a glass slide and flattened for 10 min. Sections of cortical bone are stained for 20 sec free-floating in a fresh solution of 1% toluidine blue dissolved in 0.1% formic acid. The section is dehydrated in t-butyl alcohol, cleared in xylene, and mounted with Eukitt's medium. Reversal lines appear as thin, scalloped, dark blue lines against a light blue matrix, whereas bone formation arrest lines are thicker with a smooth contour. With this technique cellular detail, osteoid differentiation, and fluorochrome labels are retained. Results demonstrate the applicability of a one-step staining method for cement lines which will facilitate the assessment of bone remodeling activity in thin sections of undecalcified cortical bone.

  7. Standard test method for determination of resistance to staining

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method is intended to determine the resistance to staining of ceramic tile surfaces. 1.2 The resistance to staining is determined by maintaining test solutions in contact with ceramic tile surfaces for a specified period of time. After exposure, the surface is cleaned in a defined manner, and the test specimens are inspected visually for change. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Lectins stain cells differentially in the coral, Montipora capitata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Farah, Yael

    2014-01-01

    A limitation in our understanding of coral disease pathology and cellular pathogenesis is a lack of reagents to characterize coral cells. We evaluated the utility of plant lectins to stain tissues of a dominant coral, Montipora capitata, from Hawaii. Of 22 lectins evaluated, nine of these stained structures in the upper or basal body wall of corals. Specific structures revealed by lectins that were not considered distinct or evident on routine hematoxylin and eosin sections of coral tissues included apical and basal granules in gastrodermis and epidermis, cnidoglandular tract and actinopharynx cell surface membranes, capsules of mature holotrichous isorhizas, and perivitelline and periseminal cells. Plant lectins could prove useful to further our understanding of coral physiology, anatomy, cell biology, and disease pathogenesis.

  9. Selection of Ovine Oocytes by Brilliant Cresyl Blue Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheep oocytes derived from the ovaries collected from the slaughterhouse are often used for research on in vitro embryo production, animal cloning, transgenesis, embryonic stem cells, and other embryo biotechnology aspects. Improving the in vitro culture efficiency of oocytes can provide more materials for similar studies. Generally, determination of oocyte quality is mostly based on the layers of cumulus cells and cytoplasm or cytoplasm uniformity and colors. This requires considerable experience to better identify oocyte quality because of the intense subjectivity involved (Gordon (2003, Madison et al. (1992 and De Loos et al. (1992. BCB staining is a function of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity, an enzyme synthesized in developing oocytes, which decreases in activity with maturation. Therefore, unstained oocytes (BCB− are high in G6PD activity, while the less mature oocytes stains are deep blue (BCB+ due to insuffcient G6PD activity to decolorize the BCB dye.

  10. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia developing within a port wine stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manton, Robert N; Itinteang, Tinte; de Jong, Sophie; Brasch, Helen D; Tan, Swee T

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male with a port wine stain on the base of his neck presented with a 5-month history of gradual thickening of the involved skin which interfered with clothing and caused repeated bleeding. The lesion was excised and histopathologic examination revealed angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) arising from the pre-existing port wine stain - a rare finding with only one previously reported case. Additionally the lesion was associated with elevated serum renin levels which virtually normalized following excision of the lesion. We further demonstrated the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II receptors 1 and 2 by the lesion and discuss the possible role of the renin-angiotensin system in this condition.

  11. An Eco-friendly, Scaled-down Gram Stain Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Gyure

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, flushing large volumes of Gram stain reagents into sanitary sewage systems is no longer acceptable. These chemical wastes are highly regulated and must be collected, labeled, and disposed of in a responsible manner, usually by paying a commercial service to remove them to an authorized off-site facility. Such services are costly and, as expected, costs are proportional to volume of collected waste. This “old” method of Gram staining, even if effluent is collected, generates a high volume of liquid waste which is unnecessarily diluted with additional large volumes of water from the rinsing steps. The purpose of using this scaled-down and eco-friendly protocol is to dramatically reduce the amount of liquid waste produced without sacrificing quality of results. This protocol is flexible, practical, and easy to implement. It does not require students to work at a bench sink, reduces user cost, and lowers environmental impact overall.

  12. Hirschsprung's disease diagnosis: Comparison of immunohistochemical, hematoxilin and eosin staining

    OpenAIRE

    Memarzadeh, Mehrdad; Talebi, Ardeshir; Edalaty, Masod; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad; Vahidi, Nasrin

    2009-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease (HD) is based on the absence of ganglion cells. In hemotoxilin and eosin (H and E) as well as acetylcholine esterase staining there are limitations in the diagnosis of immature ganglion cells in neonates. Methods: In this prospective study, 54 biopsies taken from suspected HD patients (five mucosal specimens and 49 full thickness specimens) were studied. In the laboratory, after preparing sections of paraffin embedded tissues, H and E staini...

  13. Cell Type Related Differences in Staining with Pentameric Thiophene Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; Bäck, Marcus; Magnusson, Karin; Vilas Jain, Mayur; Rafat, Mehrdad; Ghavami, Saeid; Nilsson, Peter R.; Los, Marek Jan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent compounds capable of staining cells selectively without affecting their viability are gaining importance in biology and medicine. Recently, a new family of optical dyes, denoted luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), has emerged as an interesting class of highly emissive molecules for studying various biological phenomena. Properly functionalized LCOs have been utilized for selective identification of disease-associated protein aggregates and for selective detection of dis...

  14. Cervicovaginal microbial flora in methenamine silver staining method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Afshar Moghaddam

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vagina like all other mucosal organs owns its especial bacterial/microbial flora. Though may be pathogen in other circumstances, members of vaginal normal flora do not cause disease on healthy vaginal mucosa. In this study, we tried to determine the relationship between microscopic findings on Methenamine silver stained cervicovaginal smears and clinical symptoms. METHODS: A total of 389 cervicovaginal smears were examined cytologically from April to August 2005, among which 103 satisfactory smears of patients who were normally menstruating were subsequently selected. The originally Papanicolaou–stained smears were stained with Methenamine silver method. The cervicovaginal flora in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients was classified into four groups. The relationship between the type of genital flora and the presence of Candida or Actinomyces spp was also determined. Data were analyzed with SPSS software using Chi–square test. RESULTS: In 103 evaluated patients, 46 (44.7% were symptomatic and the rest were asymptomatic. The most prevalent genital microbial flora in both symptomatic (21.7% and asymptomatic (37.9% patients was type II (Lactobacilli. Microbial frequency differences were significant for types II (P = 0.034 and III (P = 0.039 in both groups. Coexistence of microbial flora of type I (P = 0.02 and type IV (P = 0.033 with Candida was statistically significant. Coexistence of all types of microbial flora with Actinomyces was not proved significant. CONCLUSIONS: Symptomatic women, except those with potential pathogens, tend to have Lactobacillus flora. Therefore, it is advisable that all Lactobacilli types be investigated through microbiological methods in symptomatic patients. In silver stained slides, there was a clear relationship between the type of vaginal microbial flora and the presence of Candida spp. KEY WORDS: Microbial flora, cervicovaginal smears, methenamine silver, symptomatic, asymptomatic.

  15. Dye staining and excavation of a lateral preferential flow network

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, A.E.; Weiler, M.; Alila, Y.; R. O. Hudson

    2008-01-01

    International audience Preferential flow features have been found to be important for runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability in many areas around the world. Although many studies have identified the particular characteristics of individual features and measured the runoff generation and solute transport within hillslopes, no studies have determined how individual features are hydraulically connected at a hillslope scale. In this study, we used dye staining and excavation ...

  16. Human Blood Identification: A Forensic Science Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Francis X.; Kobilinsky, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments (involving immunological and serological techniques) in which a stained fabric is analyzed to determine if blood is present, and if so, whether it is of human origin. The experiments can be performed without expensive or sophisticated equipment and require only a minimal expenditure on consumable supplies. (JN)

  17. The simulation of light distribution in photodynamic therapy for port wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Yu; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Ya

    2014-11-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is regarded as the best treatment for port wine stains, which has the main adverse effect of various degrees of pain (mild to moderate) during the illumination. Though the cooling and cold water have been used to reduce such pain, there is still no scientific evidence for these relief. In this paper, a realistic skin model is built to simulate the distribution of light under treatment, which helps control the light dose and temperature, and improve the clinical results. Comparing with the general parallel skin model, a curving stratum basale layer is used in this paper, and various blood vessel configurations such as single and multiple vessels with horizontally and vertically oriented, curve vessels, various vessel diameter and various radius of curvature of stratum basale layer are simulated. The results shows a more realistic modeling for the thermal damage and help to relief the pain in the treatment.

  18. Meibomian orifices and Marx's line. Studied by triple vital staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, M

    1985-12-01

    The ciliary margins of the lower lids have been vital stained by the lipid-specific Sudan III powder, fluorescein 0.1% and the bottom of the lacrimal river (Marx's line) by lissamine green 1% in 100 cases. The Meibomian orifices are situated in a straight row just in front of the Marx's line in the lipid phase. With increasing age (greater than 50 years) the orifices are more often displaced and also discharge their lipid in the depth of the aqueous phase. The number averaged 21.5 in the lipid phase and 1.7 in the aqueous phase. Active orifices staining with lipid were found in 45% of all orifices in normals, independent of age, and were increased in conjunctivitis in the lipid phase. Lissamine green-stained orifices were independent of age, phase and diagnosis. The anterior edge of Marx's line may run an irregular course in elderly normals (greater than 50 years), significantly more often in conjunctivitis and blepharitis.

  19. Technique and Feasibility of a Dual Staining Method for Estrogen Receptors and AgNORs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Günther

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A new staining method for dual demonstration of Estrogen receptors (ER and argyrophilc Nucleolus‐Organizer Regions (AgNORs was developed. To rule out possible reciprocal effects, serial slides of 10 invasive ductale breast cancers were stained with either the single staining method or the simultaneous ER/AgNOR‐staining method and investigated comparatively. By measuring the slides with the image analysis system AMBA, reciprocal effects could be excluded. It was proven that dual staining of both markers results in a reproducible and specific staining result. We concluded that it is justified to measure AgNORs in immunohistochemically stained cells.

  20. Evaluation of port-wine stain treatment outcomes using multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Krol, Alfons L.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2012-02-01

    Port-wine Stain (PWS) is a vascular malformation characterized by ectasia of superficial dermal capillaries. The flash-lamp pumped pulsed dye laser (PDL) treatment has been the mainstay of PWS for the last decade. Despite the success of the PDL in significantly fading the PWS, the overall cure rate is less than 10%. The precise efficacy of an individual PDL treatment is hard to evaluate and the treatment outcome is measured by visual observation of clinical fading. A hand-held multi-spectral imaging system was developed to image PWS before and after PDL treatment. In an NIH-funded pilot study multi-spectral camera was used to image PWS in children (2- 17 years). Oxygen saturation (S) and blood content (B) of PWS before and after the treatment was determined by analysis of the reflectance spectra. The outcome of the treatment was evaluated during follow up visits of the patients. One of the major causes of failure of laser therapy of port-wine stains (PWS) is reperfusion of the lesion after laser treatment. Oxygen saturation and blood content maps of PWS before and after treatment can predict regions of reperfusion and subsequent failure of the treatment. The ability to measure reperfusion and to predict lesions or areas susceptible to reperfusion, will help in selection of patients/lesions for laser treatment and help to optimize laser dosimetry for maximum effect. The current studies also should provide a basis for monitoring of future alternative therapies or enhancers of laser treatment in resistant cases.

  1. Comparison of p63 staining intensity between re-cut sections andde-stained sections of patient specimens with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Ghahremani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 6 Mar, 2008; Accepted 18 Apr, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Several studies have been carried out on re-cut and de-stained sections regarding prostate biopsies and cytologic specimens of squamous cell carcinoma. However, few studies on lung biopsy are done. Due to small size of lung biopsies and for the prevention of lung rebiopsy, in this study P63 staining intensity between re-cut and de-stained slides of patients, specimens with lung cancer is researched.Materials and methods: This cross section study was performed on 100 patient specimens with lung cancer. We compared p63 staining intensity between re-cut and de-stained sections in lung cancer through 2 month intervals, until the 10th. Month after lung biopsy by immuno-histochemistry methods. Chi-square test was used for comparing the differences and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Technical tissue fall in the slide was not seen. 93.93 % of SCC was stained by p63. None of small cell carcinoma was stained by p63. In the first 2 months, 53.34% of de-stained section’s had similar staining intensity, compared with re-cut sections, and 46.66% were decreased in staining intensity and none of them were negative. During 2 to 10 months of storing, 38.98% of de-stained section’s had similar staining intensity, 45, (77% were decreased in staining intensity, while 15.25% were negative.Conclusion: With respect to results of this study and other studies, staining of p63 on re-cut and de-stained sections of lung cancer specimens in the first two months can be helpful. However, in the specimens which were stored for more than 2 months, we found no significant results.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(69: 1-6 (Persian

  2. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  3. Technique and Feasibility of a Dual Staining Method for Estrogen Receptors and AgNORs

    OpenAIRE

    Günther, Lukas; Hufnagl, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A new staining method for dual demonstration of Estrogen receptors (ER) and argyrophilc Nucleolus‐Organizer Regions (AgNORs) was developed. To rule out possible reciprocal effects, serial slides of 10 invasive ductale breast cancers were stained with either the single staining method or the simultaneous ER/AgNOR‐staining method and investigated comparatively. By measuring the slides with the image analysis system AMBA, reciprocal effects could be excluded. It was proven that dual staining of ...

  4. Evaluation of a Fluorescent Lectin-Based Staining Technique for Some Acidophilic Mining Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Fife, Dee Jay; Bruhn, Debby F.; Miller, Karen S.; Stoner, Daphne L.

    2000-01-01

    A fluorescence-labeled wheat germ agglutinin staining technique (R. K. Sizemore et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:2245–2247, 1990) was modified and found to be effective for staining gram-positive, acidophilic mining bacteria. Bacteria identified by others as being gram positive through 16S rRNA sequence analyses, yet clustering near the divergence of that group, stained weakly. Gram-negative bacteria did not stain. Background staining of environmental samples was negligible, and pyrite an...

  5. The effect of corrosion on stained glass windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laissner, Johanna

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Stained glass windows belong to the most important cultural heritage of Europe. Within the last decades a disastrous deterioration took place. The wonderful stained glass windows and their glass paintings as pieces of art are acutely menaced by environmental corrosive influences. This corrosion process is a very complex reaction which is not only influenced by temperature and humidity changes but also by gaseous pollutants like sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides or ozone, by dust and air, microorganisms as well as synergetic interactions. Strongly affected by these environmental attacks are medieval stained glasses due to their chemical composition. They have a low content in silica and high contents of modifier ions (e.g. potassium and calcium. The corrosion phenomena can range from predominantly pitting on the surface to the formation of thick corrosion crusts which are turning the panel opaque and thus reducing strongly the transparency of the windows. In order to set up a conservation and restoration concept, it is necessary to know about the environmental conditions to which the stained glass windows are exposed. For this purpose very corrosion sensitive model glasses (so called glass sensors were developed which have a similar chemical composition as historic stained glasses. They exhibit the same corrosion reactions but react much faster, and are now widely used to estimate corrosive stresses on stained glass windows to give basic information about the corrosive impacts which work on the historic glasses. In this paper principle corrosion mechanisms of stained glass windows and their enhancing factors are discussed. For the evaluation of the environmental impact, the application of glass sensors is demonstrated.

    Las vidrieras coloreadas pertenecen al legado cultural más importante de Europa. En las últimas décadas se ha producido en ellas un desastroso deterioro. Las maravillosas vidrieras coloreadas y sus policromías est

  6. Blood / Money

    OpenAIRE

    Strong, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Marilyn Strathern has argued that "nature" in Euro-American culture has appeared as constraint; it has figured the givens of existence on which human artifice is seen to construct "society" or "culture."(5) Among those givens is the notion that human beings are naturally individuals. And blood, too, images individuality: "The very thought of blood, individual blood, touches the deepest feelings in man about life and death" ([RIchard Titmuss] 16.) Transfusion medicine, then, draws on a series ...

  7. Salt and pepper staining patterns for LAT, ZAP-70 and MUM-1 in a vasculitic bullousallergic drug eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu Velez Ana Maria

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The term bullous drug eruption refers to clinically adverse drug reactions that result in fluid-filled blisters or bullae. Blistering can be elicited by multiple medications, prescribed or over-the-counter, natural or synthetic. Case Report: A 78-year-old female was evaluated for the presence of a rapidly appearing, diffuse rash with vesicles, bullae and abdominal edema. Methods: Skin biopsies for hematoxylin and eosin examination, as well as for direct immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed. Results: H&E staining demonstrated a subepidermal blistering disorder. Within the dermis, a mild, superficial, perivascular infiltrate of lymphocytes, histiocytes and eosinophils was seen. No frank leukocytoclastic vasculitis was appreciated. Direct immunofluorescence revealed a strong presence of Complement/C3, IgM and fibrinogen in the upper dermal blood vessels. Staining with LAT, MUM-1, and ZAP-70 was identified in the inflamed vessels, in a delicate salt and pepper pattern. Conclusions: In bullous drug eruptions, inflammation of the dermal blood vessels without frank leuckocytoclasis is often noted; vascular alterations subjacent to the blisters are frequently described as nonspecific. We document specific activation markers of the T cell immune response; further secondary cell signaling pathway molecules are overexpressed in dermal blood vessels, indicative of a complex immune response in these patients

  8. IMPACT OF MECONIUM STAINED AMNIOTIC FLUID ON EARLY NEONATAL OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To find out the incidence, neonatal outcome and associated maternal antepartum & intrapartum risk factors of meconium stained amniotic fluid (MSAF. DESIGN: Prospective St udy. SETTINGS: Neonatal Unit of Hospital and PNC Ward. SUBJECTS & METHODS: Prospective Study was conducted including 100 babies born with meconium stained amniotic fluid who are admitted in NICU and with mother in PNC ward in a period of six months (April 2012 - October 2012 excluding those who born with congenital abnormalities. Detail history of babies and mother with MSAF noted with emphasis on antepartum and intrapartum risk factors and outcome in terms of morbidity and mortality. RESULTS: Incidence of M SAF in the study was 8. 98%. Out of 100, 24 babies were admitted to NICU with most common indications being birth asphyxia (16% and Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS (6%. Majority babies were delivered through thin Meconium Stained Liquor (MSL (44% fo llowed by thick (35% and moderate (21%. Total number of deaths were 9 and all these babies had thick meconium with severe birth asphyxia. Ninety one babies were born at >37 weeks of gestation and 57 had birth weight over 2. 5 Kg. Nineteen percent were no n vigorous requiring tracheal suctioning and positive pressure ventilation at birth. Common mode of delivery was emergency Cesarean in 83% patients. Common maternal and fetal risk factors were fetal distress (30% followed by Oligohydramnios (30%, Pregnan cy induced hypertension (PIH (24%, anemia (14%, severe anemia (5%, Antepartum hemorrhage (4% and Antepartum eclampsia (4%. CONCLUSIONS: Oligohydramnios, PIH, anemia and fetal distress were common antenatal and intranatal factors associated with MSAF. Major morbidity and indication for NICU admission was Birth asphyxia and non vigorous babies. Mortality rate was 9% which is commonly associated with thick meconium and severe birth asphyxia.

  9. Color stability and staining of silorane after prolonged chemical challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jesus, Vivian CBR; Martinelli, Nata Luiz; Poli-Frederico, Regina Célia;

    methacrylate (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE; Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE; Master Fill, Biodinâmica) or silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE) composite materials. Initial color was registered in a spectrophotometer. Specimens were divided in four groups and individually stored at 37°C in 0.02N citric acid, 0.02N phosphoric...... perceptible after immersion in water, citric acid, phosphoric acid or ethanol up to 21 days (¿E... of the immersion medium (pacid or citric acid did not influence the color stability or staining susceptibility of the investigated...

  10. Machine vision system for automated detection of stained pistachio nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Tom C.

    1995-01-01

    A machine vision system was developed to separate stained pistachio nuts, which comprise of about 5% of the California crop, from unstained nuts. The system may be used to reduce labor involved with manual grading or to remove aflatoxin contaminated product from low grade process streams. The system was tested on two different pistachio process streams: the bi- chromatic color sorter reject stream and the small nut shelling stock stream. The system had a minimum overall error rate of 14% for the bi-chromatic sorter reject stream and 15% for the small shelling stock stream.

  11. Indirect porcelain veneer technique for restoring intrinsically stained teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutbirth, S T

    1992-01-01

    Indirect porcelain veneers are often the ideal restoration for intrinsically stained teeth. This article details a step-by-step procedure for esthetically restoring discolored teeth. Porcelain laminate veneers are often indicated when teeth bleaching or direct composite bonding procedures cannot provide the desired esthetic result. Veneers are more appealing to many patients than full coverage crowns because of the more conservative tooth preparation required. If technique details are followed meticulously and cases are appropriately selected, porcelain veneers are not only durable but also promote marvelous gingival health and may be the most esthetic anterior dental restoration.

  12. Weathering effects on materials from historical stained glass windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Heras, M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of materials (stained glasses, lead cames, support elements and putty from historical stained glass windows of different periods (13th-19th centuries have been studied. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were used as characterization techniques. Degradation of historical stained glass windows is due to the particular chemical composition oftlie materials used for their production: stained glasses, lead network, metallic support elements and refilling putty. However, the presence of a given chemical composition is not the only factor involved in the degradation process. It is necessary the occurrence of other external factors that contribute to the development and progress of alteration problems in the materials mentioned above. The presence of gaseous pollution in the air produces a negative interaction with the surface of the stained glass windows materials. Firstly, the stained glasses and the grisailles begin a dealkalinisation process and a silica gel layer is formed during the early contact between the glasses and the wet environment. After that, insoluble salt deposits and corrosion crusts are formed as a consequence of a deeper chemical attack which results in a depolymerisation of the glass network. The lead cames and the metallic support elements are also altered by weathering. Such materials are oxidized and both pits and crusts appear on their surfaces. The transport of ions and other substances from the corrosion crusts of the metallic elements gives rise new deposits upon the stained glasses, which could intensify their own degradation processes. The putty experiments a noticeable shrinkage and cracking. Likewise, adverse environmental conditions favour the transport of putty substances towards the other materials of the stained glass window, thereby increasing the crusts thickness and adding elements that contribute to the total alteration of the

  13. Improved avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattoretti, G; Berti, E; Schiró, R; D'Amato, L; Valeggio, C; Rilke, F

    1988-02-01

    A considerable intensification of the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining system (ABC) was obtained by sequentially overlaying the sections to be immunostained with an avidin-rich and a biotin-rich complex. Each sequential addition contributed to the deposition of horseradish peroxidase on the immunostained site and allowed the subsequent binding of a complementary complex. With this technique a higher dilution of the antisera could be used and minute amounts of antigen masked by the fixative could be demonstrated on paraffin sections.

  14. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab and Imaging Tests Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts SHARE: Print Glossary Blood cell counts give ... your blood that's occupied by red cells. Normal Blood Counts Normal blood counts fall within a range ...

  15. Evaluation of Rapid Stain IDentification (RSID™ Reader System for Analysis and Documentation of RSID™ Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravatchai W. Boonlayangoor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to detect the presence of body fluids is a crucial first step in documenting and processing forensic evidence. The Rapid Stain IDentification (RSID™ tests for blood, saliva, semen and urine are lateral flow immunochromatographic strip tests specifically designed for forensic use. Like most lateral flow strips, the membrane components of the test are enclosed in a molded plastic cassette with a sample well and an observation window. No specialized equipment is required to use these tests or to score the results seen in the observation window; however, the utility of these tests can be enhanced if an electronic record of the test results can be obtained, preferably by a small hand-held device that could be used in the field under low light conditions. Such a device should also be able to “read” the lateral flow strips and accurately record the results of the test as either positive, i.e., the body fluid was detected, or negative, i.e., the body fluid was not detected. Here we describe the RSID™ Reader System—a ruggedized strip test reader unit that allows analysis and documentation of RSID™ lateral flow strip tests using pre-configured settings, and show that the RSID™ Reader can accurately and reproducibly report and record correct results from RSID™ blood, saliva, semen, and urine tests.

  16. Blood donation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A blood donation is organised by the Cantonal Hospital of Geneva On Thursday 19 March 2009 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT 2 Number of donations during the last blood donations :135 donors in July 2008 122 donors in November 2008 Let’s do better in 2009 !!! Give 30 minutes of your time to save lives...

  17. BLOOD DONATION

    CERN Document Server

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A blood donation, organized by EFS (Etablissement Français du Sang) of Annemasse will take place On Wednesday 12 November 2008, from 8:30 to 16:00, at CERN Restaurant 2 If possible, please, bring your blood group Card.

  18. Color stability of ceramic brackets immersed in potentially staining solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Coser Guignone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the color stability of five types of ceramic brackets after immersion in potentially staining solutions.METHODS: Ninety brackets were divided into 5 groups (n = 18 according to brackets commercial brands and the solutions in which they were immersed (coffee, red wine, coke and artificial saliva. The brackets assessed were Transcend (3M/Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA, Radiance (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA, Mystique (GAC International Inc., Bohemia, NY, USA and Luxi II (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, CO, USA. Chromatic changes were analyzed with the aid of a reflectance spectrophotometer and by visual inspection at five specific time intervals. Assessment periods were as received from the manufacturer (T0, 24 hours (T1, 72 hours (T2, as well as 7 days (T3 and 14 days (T4 of immersion in the aforementioned solutions. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction, as well as to a multivariate profile analysis for independent and paired samples with significance level set at 5%.RESULTS: The duration of the immersion period influenced color alteration of all tested brackets, even though these changes could not always be visually observed. Different behaviors were observed for each immersion solution; however, brackets immersed in one solution progressed similarly despite minor variations.CONCLUSIONS: Staining became more intense over time and all brackets underwent color alterations when immersed in the aforementioned solutions.

  19. Vestibular schwannoma or tanycytic ependymoma: Immunohistologic staining reveals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Divito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cerebellopontine angle (CPA is a common location for primary tumors, most often vestibular schwannomas, and also meningiomas, dermoids, and a host of other neoplasms. Our case report illustrates how radiologic and histopathologic presentations of an unusual variant of ependymal neoplasm can be diagnostically challenging and how accurate diagnosis can affect treatment protocols. Case History: Our patient had a CPA mass that was a variant of ependymoma known as tanycytic ependymoma that mimicked vestibular schwannoma radiologically and during intraoperative pathologic examination. Diagnosis as a World Health Organization (WHO grade II tanycytic ependymoma was supported by its appearance on evaluation of the permanent sections, its diffuse immunoreactivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and the perinuclear dot-and-ring-like staining for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA. Conclusions: Our patient′s CPA mass initially believed to be a vestibular schwannoma on preoperative evaluation, surgical appearance, and intraoperative pathologic consultation was then correctly diagnosed as a WHO grade II tanycytic ependymoma on permanent histologic sections with the assistance of immunohistochemical stains, including EMA. After this definitive diagnosis, our patient′s adjuvant treatment was adjusted. Earlier diagnosis could have provided guidance for goals of resection and prompt initiation of adjuvant treatment.

  20. Common leukocyte antigen staining of a primitive sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J M; Beschorner, W E; Kuhajda, F P; deMent, S H

    1987-04-15

    A 4-year-old boy presented with symptoms of tracheal obstruction and was found to have a polypoid tracheal mass, which was studied by biopsy. Light microscopy showed a tumor composed of small cells with round to oval dark nuclei, clumped chromatin, one to two nucleoli, and small, variable amounts of indistinct pink cytoplasm. In other areas the tumor had a loose, spindle appearance, with some cells showing more elongated nuclei, and fibrillar pink cytoplasm consistent with strap cells. Cross striations were not found. Electron microscopy showed desmosomes and 7 to 10 nm cytoplasmic filaments forming dense bodies. The findings are most consistent with a primitive sarcoma, probably rhabdomyosarcoma. Immunoperoxidase with three monoclonal antibodies for common leukocyte antigen showed diffuse membraneous staining with fresh-frozen tissue. All other lymphocyte and monocyte marker studies were negative. We believe that this case of anticommon leukocyte antigen staining, a rhabdomyosarcoma, represents the first report of a false positive reaction with monoclonal antibody to common leukocyte antigen.

  1. Dye staining and excavation of a lateral preferential flow network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Anderson

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Preferential flow features have been found to be important for runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability in many areas around the world. Although many studies have identified the particular characteristics of individual features and measured the runoff generation and solute transport within hillslopes, no studies have determined how individual features are hydraulically connected at a hillslope scale. In this study, we used dye staining and excavation to determine the morphology and spatial pattern of a preferential flow network over a large scale (30 m. We explore the feasibility of extending small-scale dye staining techniques to the hillslope scale. We determine the lateral preferential flow features that are active during the steady state flow conditions and their interaction with the surrounding soil matrix. We also calculate the velocities of the flow through each cross-section of the hillslope and compare them to hillslope scale applied tracer measurements. Finally, we investigate the relationship between the contributing area and the characteristics of the preferential features. The experiment revealed that larger contributing areas coincided with highly developed and hydraulically connected preferential features that had flow with little interaction with the surrounding soil matrix. We found evidence of subsurface erosion and deposition of soil and organic material laterally and vertically within the soil. These results are important because they add to the understanding of the runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability of these types of hillslopes.

  2. Dye staining and excavation of a lateral preferential flow network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Anderson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Preferential flow paths have been found to be important for runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability in many areas around the world. Although many studies have identified the particular characteristics of individual features and measured the runoff generation and solute transport within hillslopes, very few studies have determined how individual features are hydraulically connected at a hillslope scale. In this study, we used dye staining and excavation to determine the morphology and spatial pattern of a preferential flow network over a large scale (30 m. We explore the feasibility of extending small-scale dye staining techniques to the hillslope scale. We determine the lateral preferential flow paths that are active during the steady-state flow conditions and their interaction with the surrounding soil matrix. We also calculate the velocities of the flow through each cross-section of the hillslope and compare them to hillslope scale applied tracer measurements. Finally, we investigate the relationship between the contributing area and the characteristics of the preferential flow paths. The experiment revealed that larger contributing areas coincided with highly developed and hydraulically connected preferential flow paths that had flow with little interaction with the surrounding soil matrix. We found evidence of subsurface erosion and deposition of soil and organic material laterally and vertically within the soil. These results are important because they add to the understanding of the runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability of preferential flow-dominated hillslopes.

  3. Analysis of surface stains on modern gold coins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corregidor, V., E-mail: vicky.corregidor@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Cruz, J. [Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); CFNUL, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-216 Caparica (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    It is a mandatory practice in the European Mint Houses to provide a certificate of guarantee of their products specially when issuing commemorative gold or silver coins. This practise should assure satisfaction and trust both for the mint house and for the demanding numismatic collector. For these reasons the Mint Houses follow a strict quality control in all the production steps in order to ensure a no-defect, fully supervised output. In spite of all the undertaken precautions, different surface stains with diverse origin on gold coins recently minted in Europe were observed. Those were compositionally studied by means of IBA techniques at the end-stage nuclear microprobe installed at IST/ITN. From this study it was possible to identify several possible sources for these stains. The presence of defects at the surface of these commemorative coins address the need of improving the quality control system and the results here presented point out where these improvements should occur, in order to reduce/eliminate them and give the customer a product that with time probably will be revalued.

  4. Tainted blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Ida; Sheikh, Zainab Afshan; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    study of the historical rise and current workings of safety practices in the Danish blood system. Here, we identify a strong focus on contamination in order to avoid 'tainted blood', at the expense of working with risks that could be avoided through enhanced blood monitoring practices. Of further...... significance to this focus are the social dynamics found at the heart of safety practices aimed at avoiding contamination. We argue that such dynamics need more attention, in order to achieve good health outcomes in transfusion medicine. Thus, we conclude that, to ensure continuously safe blood systems, we...... need to move beyond the bifurcation of the social and medical aspects of blood supply as two separate issues and approach social dynamics as key medical safety questions....

  5. Gram negative septicaemia diagnosed on peripheral blood smear appearances.

    OpenAIRE

    Fife, A; D. Hill; Barton, C.; Burden, P

    1994-01-01

    Buffy coat smears from febrile patients may contain visible bacteria and therefore detect bacteraemia before conventional blood cultures become positive. However, it is unusual to see micro-organisms in an otherwise untreated peripheral blood smear. The case of a febrile neutropenic patient is reported. A Wright's stained peripheral blood smear contained bacterial elements, thus making earlier diagnosis of septicaemia and identification of the causative bacterium possible.

  6. STAINING SECTIONS OF WATER-MISCIBLE RESINS .1. EFFECTS OF THE MOLECULAR-SIZE OF THE STAIN, AND OF RESIN CROSS-LINKING, ON THE STAINING OF GLYCOL METHACRYLATE EMBEDDED TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERRITS, PO; HOROBIN, RW; WRIGHT, DJ

    1990-01-01

    Penetration of hydrophilic acid and basic dyes into sections cut from glycol methacrylate (GMA)-embedded tissues was studied; as were the effects on such staining of superficial coatings of thin layers of GMA. Dye size was a major factor in controlling penetration of resin and staining of tissues. '

  7. In Vitro Study of Amniotic Fluid Gram Stain: Effect of Centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Gauthier

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gram stain of amniotic fluid (AF is used to detect intraamniotic infection. The purpose of this study was to determine if centrifugation improved the ability of AF Gram stain to detect bacteria.

  8. Microscopic observation of progressive immobilization of leishmania promastigotes in acridine orange stain.

    OpenAIRE

    G.S. Barreca; Berlinghieri, M C; F. Foti; G. Matera; Foca, A

    1997-01-01

    To rapidly isolate Leishmania donovani promastigotes in samples from Novy-MacNeal-Nicolle (NNN) cultures, a method of staining with acridine orange was developed. Such vital staining combines the advantages of direct microscopic examination (e.g., observation of motility) with more accurate cytological and structural imaging of the stained parasites (usually obtained by Giemsa staining). Progressive immobilization of Leishmania promastigotes associated with a change in fluorescence color was ...

  9. Maternal and fetal characteristics associated with meconium-stained amniotic fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balchin, Imelda; Whittaker, John C; Lamont, Ronald F;

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the rates of meconium-stained amniotic fluid (AF) and adverse outcome in relation to gestational age and racial group, and to investigate the predictors of meconium-stained AF.......To estimate the rates of meconium-stained amniotic fluid (AF) and adverse outcome in relation to gestational age and racial group, and to investigate the predictors of meconium-stained AF....

  10. Photometric Application of the Gram Stain Method To Characterize Natural Bacterial Populations in Aquatic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Saida, H; Ytow, N.; Seki, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Gram stain method was applied to the photometric characterization of aquatic bacterial populations with a charge-coupled device camera and an image analyzer. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were used as standards of typical gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, respectively. A mounting agent to obtain clear images of Gram-stained bacteria on Nuclepore membrane filters was developed. The bacterial stainability by the Gram stain was indicated by the Gram stain index (GSI), which ...

  11. Indirect immunofluorescence staining of Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions in microculture plates with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, M. (Manuel); Chernesky, M; Mahony, J

    1984-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence (IF) staining, using a monoclonal antibody, detected two- to fourfold more inclusions than did iodine staining. Of 274 clinical specimens, 53 (19.3%) were positive by IF on passage 1 as compared with 33 (12%) by iodine staining (P less than 0.005). IF-stained inclusions in McCoy cells in the bottom of microculture wells were readily viewed with a long-focal-length objective at a magnification of 250 X.

  12. Identification of dentin phosphophoryn localization by histochemical stainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Y; Fujisawa, R; Sasaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Phosphophoryn, the most abundant of the dentin non-collagenous proteins, has been considered to be related in function to the mineralization process. In the present study, identification of dentin phosphophoryn localization was attempted using newly developed, precautionary histological methods by which phosphophoryn was retained in the sections during the specimen preparation and stained selectively in situ. Phosphophoryn was found to be present widely in all of the calcified dentin except the mantle dentin, the external, first-formed portion of dentin, but was not found in the predentin, the inner, uncalcified layer of dentin. These results indicate that phosphophoryn is apparently related to the mineral phase of calcified dentin and that the mineralization process of mantle dentin, which is formed before the odontoblasts are fully differentiated, may be different from that of circumpulpal dentin. PMID:2421974

  13. Conjugates of a photoactivated rhodamine with biopolymers for cell staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Sergei Yu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail N; Solovyeva, Daria O; Solovyeva, Valeria V; Rizvanov, Albert A

    2014-01-01

    Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids) are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD) has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan ("Chitosan-PFD") and histone H1 ("Histone H1.3-PFD"). The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK). Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes ("caged" dyes) for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized "Chitosan-PFD" and "Histone H1-PFD" have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy.

  14. Conjugates of a Photoactivated Rhodamine with Biopolymers for Cell Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Sergei Yu.; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail N.; Solovyeva, Daria O.; Solovyeva, Valeria V.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids) are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD) has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan (“Chitosan-PFD”) and histone H1 (“Histone H1.3-PFD”). The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK). Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes (“caged” dyes) for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized “Chitosan-PFD” and “Histone H1-PFD” have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy. PMID:25383365

  15. Conjugates of a Photoactivated Rhodamine with Biopolymers for Cell Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Yu. Zaitsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan (“Chitosan-PFD” and histone H1 (“Histone H1.3-PFD”. The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK. Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes (“caged” dyes for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized “Chitosan-PFD” and “Histone H1-PFD” have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy.

  16. Identification of homogeneously staining regions in leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heydarian Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneously staining regions (HSR or double minute chromosomes (dmin are autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal elements that are frequently associated with gene amplification in a variety of cancers. The diagnosis of leukemia patients was based on characterization of the leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow cytogenetics. This study report two cases, one with Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia without maturation (AML-M1, aged 23-year-old female, and the other with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-blast crisis, a 28-year-old female associated with double minute chromosomes. Most cases of acute myeloid leukemia with dmin in the literature (including our cases have been diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia.

  17. Effect of droplet shape on ring stains from dried liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Melvin; Brown, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh

    A landmark experimental paper on coffee stains by Deegan et al included a simple theoretical analysis of circular droplets. The analysis was based on a model informally called the Maxwell House equations. It describes the evolving height profile of the droplet, the evaporation of the solvent and the outflow of solute to the rim of the droplet. Since typical droplets are not circles, here we extend the analysis to more general shapes. We find that for thin droplets the height profile may be determined by solving Poisson's equation in a domain corresponding to the footprint of the droplet. Evaporation is treated in a simple approximation via an electrostatic analogy and is dominated by the sharp edges of the droplet. Assuming zero vorticity allows us to analyze the solvent flow in droplets of arbitrary shape. We compare circular droplets to other shapes including long linear droplets, ring shaped droplets and droplets with an elliptical footprint

  18. Evaporation of a sessile droplet: inside the coffee stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteloot, Guillaume; Hoang, Anna; Daerr, Adrian; Kavehpour, H Pirouz; Lequeux, Francois; Limat, Laurent

    2012-03-15

    We have investigated experimentally, for the first time at microscopic level, the growth of the deposit left around a drop of colloids drying on a solid surface ("coffee stain effect"). Direct observations show that there are several distinct phases of growth, the later ones exhibiting surprising pattern formations with spatial modulation of the deposit. In addition, fluorescence reveals that the initial growth phase is governed by a single length scale, increasing with time as t(23). We show that this exponent is a direct consequence of the divergence of evaporation near contact line evidenced by Deegan et al. We propose a simple ballistic model that allows us to calculate both this exponent and the prefactor, in agreement with yet available more complex descriptions. This model also opens the possibility to include effects neglected up to now. PMID:22284570

  19. Mouse Karyotype Obtained by Combining DAPI Staining with Image Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this study, mitotic metaphase chromosomes in mouse were identified by a new chromosome fluorescence banding technique combining DAPI staining with image analysis. Clear 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) multiple bands like G-bands could be produced in mouse. The MetaMorph software was then used to generate linescans of pixel intensity for the banded chromosomes from short arm to long arm. These linescans were sufficient not only to identify each individual chromosome but also analyze the physical sites of bands in chromosome. Based on the results, the clear and accurate karyotype of mouse metaphase chromosomes was established. The technique is therefore considered to be a new method for cytological studies of mouse.

  20. Multi-stained whole slide image alignment in digital pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déniz, Oscar; Toomey, David; Conway, Catherine; Bueno, Gloria

    2015-03-01

    In Digital Pathology, one of the most simple and yet most useful feature is the ability to view serial sections of tissue simultaneously on a computer monitor. This enables the pathologist to evaluate the histology and expression of multiple markers for a patient in a single review. However, the rate limiting step in this process is the time taken for the pathologist to open each individual image, align the sections within the viewer, with a maximum of four slides at a time, and then manually move around the section. In addition, due to tissue processing and pre-analytical steps, sections with different stains have non-linear variations between the two acquisitions, that is, they will stretch and change shape from section to section. To date, no solution has come close to a workable solution to automatically align the serial sections into one composite image. This research work address this problem to obtain an automated serial section alignment tool enabling the pathologists to simply scroll through the various sections in a single viewer. To this aim a multi-resolution intensity-based registration method using mutual information as a similarity metric, an optimizer based on an evolutionary process and a bilinear transformation has been used. To characterize the performance of the algorithm 40 cases x 5 different serial sections stained with hematoxiline-eosine (HE), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Ki67 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2), have been considered. The qualitative results obtained are promising, with average computation time of 26.4s for up to 14660x5799 images running interpreted code.

  1. A Comparison of Heat versus Methanol Fixation for Gram Staining Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnerath, Jeanne M.; Roland, Jenna M.; Rossi, Lucas C.; Weishalla, Steven R.; Wolf, Melissa M.

    2009-01-01

    Gram staining bacteria is a fundamental technique introduced in general biology and microbiology laboratory courses. Two common problems students encounter when Gram staining bacteria are (1) having a difficult time locating bacterial cells on the microscope slide and (2) over-decolorizing bacterial cells during the staining procedure such that…

  2. A comparative study of quantitative stains for DNA in image cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel, U V; Becker, R L

    1991-08-01

    In this study we examined the reproducibility of several stains used to measure nuclear DNA by image cytometry. The specimens were touch preparations of liver and testis from mouse and liver, intestine and brain from rat, fixed in either neutral formalin or Carnoy's solution. The tested stains included four Feulgen methods (pararosaniline, azure-A, thionin and acriflavine), the gallocyanine-chromalum stain and two fluorescent stains (acridine orange and propidium iodide). Absorbance measurements employed a video image analysis system; fluorescence measurements were from a scanning microspectrophotometer. The acriflavine-Feulgen stain was analyzed for both absorbance and fluorescence. All seven stains were quantitative for DNA and gave reproducible results. The absorbance measurements had a lower coefficient of variation (CV) than the fluorescence values. In a nested analysis of variance of the pararosaniline Feulgen stains, cell-to-cell variability accounted for 67% of the total variance; slide-to-slide, 9%; and batch-to-batch, 24%. These values did not change significantly when the staining was performed in an automatic staining machine. For DNA analysis using image cytometry, we conclude that the Feulgen staining technique is the most useful. In particular, acriflavine-Feulgen-stained cells fixed in Carnoy's fluid give the least variation between measurement values and the most accurate ratios between the separate ploidy groups. For fluorescence cytometry we recommend Carnoy's fixation and the acriflavine-Feulgen stain because of its narrow CV as compared to acridine orange and propidium iodide. PMID:1718295

  3. Complete staining of human spermatozoa and immature germ cells combined with phase contrast microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, A Y; Drejer, J O; Bagger, P V;

    1987-01-01

    A method combining Janus green B and Thymol blue stains the anterior part of the head, the nuclear membrane, middle piece, and tail of spermatozoa light green and the nucleus deep purple. The method provides excellent stained preparations for the evaluation of sperm morphology by phase contrast...... microscopy. It produces significantly less abnormal spermatozoa compared with the Papanicolaou stain....

  4. Usefulness of Leifson Staining Method in Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Piccolomini, Raffaele; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Neri, Matteo; Di Girolamo, Arturo; Catamo, Giovanni; Pizzigallo, Eligio

    1999-01-01

    The Leifson staining method was used to diagnose Helicobacter pylori infection and was compared to histology, culture, and the rapid urease test (RUT). Histology gave the best sensitivity (98%), compared to Leifson staining (97%), culture (92%), and RUT (85%) (P < 0.005). Leifson staining is a sensitive, rapid, economical method for diagnosis of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients.

  5. Application and staining patterns of commercial anti-Pneumocystis carinii monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Elvin, K; Linder, E.

    1993-01-01

    Commercially available monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii were compared with respect to immunofluorescence staining patterns of human immunodeficiency virus-inactivated smears. Only the indirect staining kits were suitable for application to ethanol-inactivated samples. When antibodies from Dakopatts and Northumbria were compared, the staining of cysts and trophozoites showed different patterns.

  6. Digital simulation of staining in histopathology multispectral images: enhancement and linear transformation of spectral transmittance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Pinky A; Yagi, Yukako

    2012-05-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is currently the most popular for routine histopathology staining. Special and/or immuno-histochemical (IHC) staining is often requested to further corroborate the initial diagnosis on H&E stained tissue sections. Digital simulation of staining (or digital staining) can be a very valuable tool to produce the desired stained images from the H&E stained tissue sections instantaneously. We present an approach to digital staining of histopathology multispectral images by combining the effects of spectral enhancement and spectral transformation. Spectral enhancement is accomplished by shifting the N-band original spectrum of the multispectral pixel with the weighted difference between the pixel's original and estimated spectrum; the spectrum is estimated using M transformed to the spectral configuration associated to its reaction to a specific stain by utilizing an N × N transformation matrix, which is derived through application of least mean squares method to the enhanced and target spectral transmittance samples of the different tissue components found in the image. Results of our experiments on the digital conversion of an H&E stained multispectral image to its Masson's trichrome stained equivalent show the viability of the method.

  7. Moving blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelis, K

    1997-01-01

    Our internationally acclaimed journalist Sanguinia has returned safely from her historic assignment. Travelling from Homeric Greece to British Romanticism, she was witness to blood drinking, letting, bathing, and transfusion. In this report, she explores connections between the symbolic and the sadistic; the mythic and the medical--all in an effort to appreciate the layered meanings our culture has given to the movement of blood between our bodies. PMID:9407636

  8. Biology of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mail Facebook TwitterTitle Google+ LinkedIn Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Medical Dictionary Also ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  9. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of donor blood. Many communities have a blood bank where healthy people can donate blood. This blood ... need to arrange with your hospital or local blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. ...

  10. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ... Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood Clots ...

  11. Catecholamine blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norepinephrine -- blood; Epinephrine -- blood; Adrenalin -- blood; Dopamine -- blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... the test. This is especially true if both blood and urine catecholamines are to be measured. You ...

  12. Blood (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Print A A A ... about the mysterious, life-sustaining fluid called blood. Blood Basics Two types of blood vessels carry blood ...

  13. Blood Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Blood > Blood Facts and Statistics Printable Version Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts ... about American Red Cross Blood Services Facts about blood needs Every two seconds someone in the U.S. ...

  14. Negative staining of mycobacteria - A clue to the diagnosis in cytological aspirates: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S.B.R Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of lipids present in the cell wall of mycobacteria render them impermeable to dyes used in routine stains. Special staining techniques like Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN, Auromine Rhodamine are needed to demonstrate them. However, they may appear as negatively stained ghosts in Leishman, Giemsa, Hematoxylin and Eosin stain (H and E and Gram stained smears. Awareness of this feature prompts one to look for mycobacteria by special techniques, even in the absence of cytological features of tuberculous infection like epithelioid granulomas and caseous necrosis. In this paper, we aim to present two cases showing negatively stained images in the lymphnode aspirates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive patients. A study has been done of two cases of HIV positive patients with cervical lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC was carried out for them from the enlarged lymph nodes which revealed purulent material. Smears of FNAC material were prepared for histopathological examination. Fixed smears were stained with Papanicolaou stain and air dried smears were stained with Giemsa and ZN-stain and studied. Smear study showed scant cellularity, cells composed of neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages. Background was necrotic. Giemsa stained smears showed, in addition to cells mentioned, negatively stained ghostly rod shaped structures in the cytoplasm of macrophages and also in the background. ZN-stain showed numerous acid fast bacilli. Both the aspirates were signed out as tuberculous lymphadenitis. In both the cases, cultures grew Mycobacterium avium Intracellulare. Classical cytological features of tuberculosis may not be present in immunocompromised patients and on the contrary there may be suppuration rich in neutrophils or sheets of histiocytes in tuberculosis. One may miss these cases if mycobacteria are not looked for specifically by special stains. Negatively stained ghost images of Tuberculous bacilli on

  15. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Maalouf, Elie [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Terzoudi, Georgia [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems, Altlussheim (Germany); Karachristou, Ionna [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, Paris (France); Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Pantelias, Gabriel [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  16. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to 60Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw

  17. A new vital stain for visualizing vacuolar membrane dynamics and endocytosis in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We have used a lipophilic styryl dye, N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4- (p-diethylaminophenyl-hexatrienyl) pyridinium dibromide (FM 4-64), as a vital stain to follow bulk membrane-internalization and transport to the vacuole in yeast. After treatment for 60 min at 30 degrees C, FM 4- 64 stained the vacuole membrane (ring staining pattern). FM 4-64 did not appear to reach the vacuole by passive diffusion because at 0 degree C it exclusively stained the plasma membrane (PM). The PM staining decre...

  18. Argyrophilic nucleolar organiser region (AgNOR) staining in normal bone marrow cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nikicicz, E P; Norback, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    Fifteen normal bone marrow aspirates were stained with the agyrophilic nucleolar organiser region (AgNOR) method. The results of the specific staining AgNORs as well as nuclear and cytoplasmic staining were analysed. A system was devised to characterise precisely the AgNORs present in the nuclei of bone marrow cells. Particular types of bone marrow cells had a characteristic AgNOR and non-AgNOR staining pattern. The bone marrow cells were identified easily and reliably with AgNOR staining and...

  19. Managing your blood sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperglycemia - control; Hypoglycemia - control; Diabetes - blood sugar control; Blood glucose - managing ... Know how to: Recognize and treat low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Recognize and treat high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) ...

  20. Methyl green-pyronin Y staining of nucleic acids: studies on the effects of staining time, dye composition and diffusion rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentø, P; Lyon, H O

    2003-01-01

    Since the introduction of the methyl green-pyronin Y procedure as a differential histological stain more than 100 years ago, the method has become a histochemical procedure for differential demonstration of DNA and RNA. Numerous variants of the procedure have been suggested, and a number of...... hypotheses have been put forward concerning kinetics and binding mechanisms. Using both filter paper models containing DNA, RNA or heparin and histological sections, we have attempted to evaluate the kinetics of staining and the role of staining time for methyl green and pyronin Y by applying the dyes...... individually, simultaneously and sequentially. The results are presented as color charts approximating the observed staining patterns using a computerized palette. Our results indicate unequivocally that the differential staining is not time-dependent, but that it is dictated by the relative concentrations of...

  1. Van Gieson's picrofuchsin. The staining mechanisms for collagen and cytoplasm, and an examination of the dye diffusion rate model of differential staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentø, P

    1993-01-01

    diffusion rates and differences in the permeability of tissue components cannot be invoked to explain the differential staining result. Model experiments with dissolved proteins demonstrated a positive relationship between protein concentration and uptake of picric acid (PA) from picrofuchsin. From......The staining mechanism of van Gieson's picrofuchsin was studied by use of simple protein model systems and tissue sections, and by spectrophotometry and dialysis experiments. At the endpoint of the staining reaction (equilibrium) cytoplasm is yellow. Dye dilution experiments demonstrated...... that the highest affinity in the tissue section--picrofuchsin system is between binding sites in cytoplasmic protein and acid fuchsin. Nevertheless sections that were first stained in acid fuchsin (AcF) and then in picrofuchsin ended up with cytoplasm stained yellow. It was concluded that differences in the dye...

  2. Improving our ability to diagnose infections associated with central venous catheters: value of Gram's staining and culture of entry site swabs.

    OpenAIRE

    McGeer, A.; Righter, J

    1987-01-01

    We prospectively studied 45 central venous catheters to determine whether Gram's staining and culture of skin swabs from the entry site could be used to predict catheter-related infection. Data were collected from insertion site swabs, intracutaneous and intravascular catheter segments, and blood cultures. Surveillance site cultures at the time of dressing changes showed that bacterial growth, once established, persisted until removal of the catheter but that the time of onset of infection wa...

  3. A novel contrast stain for the rapid diagnosis of pityriasis versicolor: A comparison of Chicago Sky Blue 6B stain, potassium hydroxide mount and culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Lodha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mycological study of pityriasis versicolor is usually done by potassium hydroxide (KOH mount and culture. However, KOH mount lacks a color contrast and requires a trained eye to interpret, while culture is difficult to perform, time consuming and has low sensitivity. Chicago Sky Blue 6B (CSB is a new contrast stain that highlights the fungal hyphae and spores, blue against a purplish background. Aims and Objectives: This study was done to compare the utility of a novel contrast stain (CSB stain with KOH mount and culture. Materials and Methods: Skin scrapings from the lesions of 100 clinically diagnosed cases of P. versicolor were subjected to (1 KOH mount and CSB stain for direct microscopic examination and (2 culture using Sabouraud′s dextrose agar. The statistical analysis of CSB stain and culture was done using KOH mount as the reference method, as it is the most commonly performed and practical diagnostic test available for P. versicolor. An interrater reliability analysis using the Cohen′s Kappa statistic was performed to determine consistency (agreement among the different modalities. Observations and Results: Direct microscopy with CSB stain, KOH mount and mycological culture showed positive results in 98 (98%, 92 (92% and 56 (56% patients, respectively. Using KOH mount as the reference method, CSB stain had a sensitivity of 100% which was significantly higher than culture (60.9%. Statistically significant fair agreement was found between CSB stain and KOH mount (94% with κ=0.38, P < 0.001. Negligible agreement was found between CSB stain and culture (66%, κ=0.199, P = 0.001 as well as between KOH mount and culture (64%, κ=0.051, P = 0.107. Conclusion: CSB staining of skin scrapings is the most sensitive method for the diagnosis of pityriasis versicolor. Due to the distinct contrast provided by CSB, it is easy to perform, rapid and qualitatively superior to KOH mount.

  4. Comparison of dark- and light-adapted carp retinas with NADPH diaphorase staining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶冰; 杨雄里

    1996-01-01

    The carp retina was examined by NADPH diaphorase histochemistry to determine if the staining pattern of retinal cells was changed depending on the adaptation state of the retina. When dark-adapted for 5 h, ellipsoids of inner segments of both rods and cones and some horizontal cells were heavily stained. Staining was also found in subpopulations of amacrine cells and ganglion cells. In addition, Muller cells were strongly positive for NADPH diaphorase. When light-adapted for 5h, ellipsoids of photoreceptors and ganglion cells were less intensely stained, whereas Muller cells and horizontal cells became negative for NADPH diaphorase. Furthermore, rod ON-center bipolar cells were clearly stained. The difference of staining of amacrine cells between dark- and light-adapted retinas was not significant. The differences in diaphorase-staining pattern between dark- and light-adapted retinas suggest that Muller cells, some horizontal cells and rod ON-center bipolar cells contain inducible nitric oxide synthase,

  5. Morphological Analysis of Cell Death by Cytospinning Followed by Rapid Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Identifying and characterizing different forms of cell death can be facilitated by staining internal cellular structures with dyes such as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). These dyes stain the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively, and optimized reagents (e.g., Rapi-Diff, Rapid Stain, or Quick Dip) are commonly used in pathology laboratories. Fixing and staining adherent cells with these optimized reagents is a straightforward procedure, but apoptotic cells may detach from the culture plate and be washed away during the fixing and staining procedure. To prevent the loss of apoptotic cells, cells can be gently centrifuged onto glass slides by cytospinning before fixing and staining. In addition to apoptotic cells, this procedure can be used on cells in suspension, or adherent cells that have been trypsinized and removed from the culture dish. This protocol describes cytospinning followed by Rapi-Diff staining for morphological analysis of cell death. PMID:27587773

  6. In situ staining of the primo vascular system in the ventricles and subarachnoid space of the brain by trypan blue injection into the lateral ventricle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingxing Dai; Byung-Cheon Lee; Ping An; Zhendong Su; Rongmei Qu; Ki Hoon Eom; Kwang-Sup Soh

    2011-01-01

    We examined a new method for visualization of the primo vascular system in the rat brain in-volving lateral ventricle injection of trypan blue. Results showed that the primo vascular system in the lateral ventricles and arachnoid mater of the brain were preferentially stained relative to blood vessels and fascia. The primo-vessels along blood vessels in the brain were clearly ex-hibited. In addition, the primo vascular system was evident between the fourth ventricle and the quadrigeminal cistern. Our experimental findings indicate that this new technique of lateral ventricle injection of trypan blue can visualize the primo vascular system in lateral ventricles and arachnoid mater of rats in situ.

  7. Image-based Water Level Measurement Method under Stained Ruler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae-do KIM; Young-joon HAN; Hern-soo HAHN

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes the water level measuring method based on the image,while the ruler used to indicate the water level is stained.The contamination of the ruler weakens or eliminates many features which are required for the image processing.However,the feature of the color difference between the ruler and the water surface are firmer on the environmental change compare to the other features.As the color differences are embossed,only the region of the ruler is limited to eliminate the noise,and the average image is produced by using several continuous frames.A histogram is then produced based on the height axis of the produced intensity average image.Local peaks and local valleys are detected,and the section between the peak and valley which have the greatest change is looked for.The valley point at this very moment is used to detect the water level.The detected water level is then converted to the actual water level by using the mapping table.The proposed method is compared to the ultrasonic based method to evaluate its accuracy and efficiency on the various contaminated environments.

  8. The Application of Molecular Diagnostics to Stained Cytology Smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Maja H; Adler, Esther; Hakima, Laleh; Grunblatt, Eli; Pieri, Evan; Seymour, Andrew; Khader, Samer; Cajigas, Antonio; Suhrland, Mark; Goswami, Sumanta

    2016-05-01

    Detection of mutational alterations is important for guiding treatment decisions of lung non-small-cell carcinomas and thyroid nodules with atypical cytologic findings. Inoperable lung tumors requiring further testing for staging and thyroid lesions often are diagnosed using only cytology material. Molecular diagnostic tests of these samples typically are performed on cell blocks; however, insufficient cellularity of cell blocks is a limitation for test performance. In addition, some of the fixatives used while preparing cell blocks often introduces artifacts for mutation detection. Here, we applied qClamp xenonucleic technology and quantitative RT-PCR to cells microdissected directly from stained cytology smears to detect common alterations including mutations and translocations in non-small-cell carcinomas and thyroid lesions. By using this approach, we achieved a 1% molecular alteration detection rate from as few as 50 cells. Ultrasensitive methods of molecular alteration detection similar to the one described here will be increasingly important for the evaluation of molecular alterations in clinical scenarios when only tissue samples that are small are available. PMID:26921541

  9. Epidemiology of meningitis with a negative CSF Gram stain: under-utilization of available diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesher, L; Hadi, C M; Salazar, L; Wootton, S H; Garey, K W; Lasco, T; Luce, A M; Hasbun, R

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis with a negative cerebrospinal fluid Gram stain (CSF-GS) poses a diagnostic challenge as more than 50% of patients remain without an aetiology. The introduction of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and arboviral serologies have increased diagnostic capabilities, yet large scale epidemiological studies evaluating their use in clinical practice are lacking. We conducted a prospective observational study in New Orleans between November 1999 and September 2008 (early era) when PCR was not widely available, and in Houston between November 2008 and June 2013 (modern era), when PCR was commonly used. Patients presenting with meningitis and negative CSF-GS were followed for 4 weeks. All investigations, PCR used, and results were recorded as they became available. In 323 patients enrolled, PCR provided the highest diagnostic yield (24·2%) but was ordered for 128 (39·6%) patients; followed by serology for arboviruses (15%) that was ordered for 100 (31%) of all patients. The yield of blood cultures was (10·3%) and that of CSF cultures was 4%; the yield for all other tests was viral pathogens, 8·3% and 26·3% (P meningitis and a negative CSF-GS, but both tests are being under-utilized.

  10. Determination of thermal and physical properties of port-wine stain lesions using pulsed photothermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Jacques, Steven L.; Wright, William H.

    1992-06-01

    A method for quantitative characterization of port wine stain (PWS) is presented. Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) uses a non-invasive infrared radiometry system to measure changes in surface temperature induced by pulsed radiation. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a PWS, an initial temperature jump (T-jump) is seen due to the heating of the epidermis as a result of melanin absorption. Subsequently, heat generated in the subsurface blood vessels due to hemoglobin absorption is detected by PPTR as a delayed thermal wave as the heat diffuses toward the skin surface. The time delay and magnitude of the delayed PPTR signal indicate the depth and thickness of the PWS. In this report, we present an initial clinical study of PPTR measurements on PWS patients. Computer simulations of various classes of PWS illustrate how the PPTR signal depends on the concentration of epidermal melanin, and depth and thickness of the PWS. The goal of this research is to provide a means of characterizing PWS before initiating therapy, guiding laser dosimetry, and advising the patient as to the time course and efficacy of the planned protocol.

  11. Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to infections including those we develop from our vaccinations (such as poliovirus antibodies, which are made by ... the Transfusion Medicine Unit, Blood Bank, and Stem Cell Storage Facility University of Rochester Medical ... and health educators who are available by phone Monday through Friday, 9 am to 9 pm ( ...

  12. Analysis of the Microbiota of Black Stain in the Primary Dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Fangfei; Liu, Ruoxi; Liu, He; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Black tooth stain is a characteristic extrinsic discoloration commonly seen on the cervical enamel following the contour of the gingiva. To investigate the relationship between black tooth stain and the oral microbiota, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to compare the microbial composition of dental plaque and saliva among caries-free children with and without black stain. Dental plaque and saliva, as well as black stain, were sampled from 10 children with and 15 children without black stain. Data were analyzed using the pipeline tool MOTHUR. Student's t-test was used to compare alpha diversities and the Mann-Whitney U test to compare the relative abundances of the microbial taxa. A total of 10 phyla, 19 classes, 32 orders, 61 families and 102 genera were detected in these samples. Shannon and Simpson diversity were found to be significantly lower in saliva samples of children with black stain. Microbial diversity was reduced in the black stain compared to the plaque samples. Actinomyces, Cardiobacterium, Haemophilus, Corynebacterium, Tannerella and Treponema were more abundant and Campylobacter less abundant in plaque samples of children with black stain. Principal component analysis demonstrated clustering among the dental plaque samples from the control group, while the plaque samples from the black stain group were not and appeared to cluster into two subgroups. Alterations in oral microbiota may be associated with the formation of black stain. PMID:26340752

  13. Analysis of the Microbiota of Black Stain in the Primary Dentition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Li

    Full Text Available Black tooth stain is a characteristic extrinsic discoloration commonly seen on the cervical enamel following the contour of the gingiva. To investigate the relationship between black tooth stain and the oral microbiota, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to compare the microbial composition of dental plaque and saliva among caries-free children with and without black stain. Dental plaque and saliva, as well as black stain, were sampled from 10 children with and 15 children without black stain. Data were analyzed using the pipeline tool MOTHUR. Student's t-test was used to compare alpha diversities and the Mann-Whitney U test to compare the relative abundances of the microbial taxa. A total of 10 phyla, 19 classes, 32 orders, 61 families and 102 genera were detected in these samples. Shannon and Simpson diversity were found to be significantly lower in saliva samples of children with black stain. Microbial diversity was reduced in the black stain compared to the plaque samples. Actinomyces, Cardiobacterium, Haemophilus, Corynebacterium, Tannerella and Treponema were more abundant and Campylobacter less abundant in plaque samples of children with black stain. Principal component analysis demonstrated clustering among the dental plaque samples from the control group, while the plaque samples from the black stain group were not and appeared to cluster into two subgroups. Alterations in oral microbiota may be associated with the formation of black stain.

  14. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... BMP) Blood Test: Complete Blood Count Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Getting a Blood Test (Video) Blood Test: ...

  15. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Patients Blood Disorders Blood Clots Blood Clotting & Pregnancy If you are pregnant, or you have just ... The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is increased by the following: Previous blood clots ...

  16. Blood Count Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your blood contains red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in your blood. This helps doctors check on your overall health. ...

  17. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  18. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Transfusions Print A ... United States get blood transfusions. A Bit About Blood As blood moves throughout the body, it carries ...

  19. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor prescribes it, medicine. What Is Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood flow inside ... Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you won't ...

  20. Blood Pressure Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  1. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right away. continue How Do Doctors Measure Blood Pressure? Blood pressure readings are fast and painless. Blood pressure ... same age, height, and gender have lower blood pressure. Blood pressure between 90% and 95% of the normal ...

  2. Perilesional Inflammation in Neurocysticercosis - Relationship Between Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Evans Blue Staining and Histopathology in the Pig Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cangalaya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease manifestations in neurocysticercosis (NCC are frequently due to inflammation of degenerating Taenia solium brain cysts. Exacerbated inflammation post anthelmintic treatment is associated with leakage of the blood brain barrier (BBB using Evans blue (EB staining. How well EB extravasation into the brain correlates with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI using gadolinium (Gd enhancement as a contrast agent and pericystic inflammation was analyzed in pigs harboring brain cysts of Taenia solium.Three groups of 4 naturally infected pigs were assessed. The first and second groups were treated with both praziquantel plus albendazole and sacrificed two and five days post treatment, respectively. A third untreated group remained untreated. Pigs were injected with EB two hours prior to evaluation by Gd-enhanced T1-MRI, and euthanized. The EB staining for each cyst capsule was scored (EB grades were 0: 0%; 1: up to 50%; 2: over 50% but less than 100%; 3: 100%. Similarly, the Gd enhancement around each cyst was qualitatively and quantitatively scored from the MRI. The extent of pericystic inflammation on histology was scored in increasing severity as IS1, IS2, IS3 and IS4. Grade 3 EB staining and enhancement was only seen in treated capsules. Also, treated groups had higher Gd intensity than the untreated group. Grades of enhancement correlated significantly with Gd enhancement intensity. EB staining was correlated with Gd enhancement intensity and with IS4 in the treated groups. These correlations were stronger in internally located cysts compared to superficial cysts in treated groups.EB staining and Gd enhancement strongly correlate. The intensity of enhancement determined by MRI is a good indication of the degree of inflammation. Similarly, EB staining highly correlates with the degree of inflammation and may be applied to study inflammation in the pig model of NCC.

  3. Perilesional Inflammation in Neurocysticercosis - Relationship Between Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Evans Blue Staining and Histopathology in the Pig Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Javier A.; Calcina, Juan; Vargas-Calla, Ana; Suarez, Diego; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Chacaltana, Juan; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E.; García, Hector H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease manifestations in neurocysticercosis (NCC) are frequently due to inflammation of degenerating Taenia solium brain cysts. Exacerbated inflammation post anthelmintic treatment is associated with leakage of the blood brain barrier (BBB) using Evans blue (EB) staining. How well EB extravasation into the brain correlates with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium (Gd) enhancement as a contrast agent and pericystic inflammation was analyzed in pigs harboring brain cysts of Taenia solium. Methodology/Principal Findings Three groups of 4 naturally infected pigs were assessed. The first and second groups were treated with both praziquantel plus albendazole and sacrificed two and five days post treatment, respectively. A third untreated group remained untreated. Pigs were injected with EB two hours prior to evaluation by Gd-enhanced T1-MRI, and euthanized. The EB staining for each cyst capsule was scored (EB grades were 0: 0%; 1: up to 50%; 2: over 50% but less than 100%; 3: 100%). Similarly, the Gd enhancement around each cyst was qualitatively and quantitatively scored from the MRI. The extent of pericystic inflammation on histology was scored in increasing severity as IS1, IS2, IS3 and IS4. Grade 3 EB staining and enhancement was only seen in treated capsules. Also, treated groups had higher Gd intensity than the untreated group. Grades of enhancement correlated significantly with Gd enhancement intensity. EB staining was correlated with Gd enhancement intensity and with IS4 in the treated groups. These correlations were stronger in internally located cysts compared to superficial cysts in treated groups. Significance EB staining and Gd enhancement strongly correlate. The intensity of enhancement determined by MRI is a good indication of the degree of inflammation. Similarly, EB staining highly correlates with the degree of inflammation and may be applied to study inflammation in the pig model of NCC. PMID:27459388

  4. Unsupervised color normalisation for H and E stained histopathology image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Raúl; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    In histology, each dye component attempts to specifically characterise different microscopic structures. In the case of the Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) stain, universally used for routine examination, quantitative analysis may often require the inspection of different morphological signatures related mainly to nuclei patterns, but also to stroma distribution. Nevertheless, computer systems for automatic diagnosis are often fraught by color variations ranging from the capturing device to the laboratory specific staining protocol and stains. This paper presents a novel colour normalisation method for H&E stained histopathology images. This method is based upon the opponent process theory and blindly estimates the best color basis for the Hematoxylin and Eosin stains without relying on prior knowledge. Stain Normalisation and Color Separation are transversal to any Framework of Histopathology Image Analysis.

  5. Specimen block counter-staining for localization of GUS expression in transgenic arabidopsis and tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. K.; Choi, J-W; Jeon, J-H; Franceschi, V. R.; Davin, L. B.; Lewis, N. G.

    2002-01-01

    A simple counter-staining procedure has been developed for comparative beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression and anatomical localization in transgenic herbaceous arabidopsis and tobacco. This protocol provides good anatomical visualization for monitoring chimeric gene expression at both the organ and tissue levels. It can be used with different histochemical stains and can be extended to the study of woody species. The specimens are paraffin-embedded, the block is trimmed to reveal internal structure, safranin-O staining solution is briefly applied to the surface of the block, then washed off and, after drying, a drop of immersion oil is placed on the stained surface for subsequent photographic work. This gives tissue counter-staining with good structural preservation without loss of GUS staining product; moreover, sample observation is rapid and efficient compared to existing procedures.

  6. Kola nut (cola acuminata extract as a substitute to histological tissue stain eosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamman L sonfada

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of natural dyes for staining of various biological tissues from an alternative source will decrease the expense for purchasing the synthetic dye and reduce their effects on human and environment. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the extraction of natural dye from Cola nut (Cola acuminata using various solvents and its staining property on the rat tissues. The cola nut was pulvized using pestle and mortar, 5gram was used to make 5% of aqueous extract. The rat tissues were processed for paraffin embedding technique and sectioned at 5 μm thicknesses. The sections were stained with haematoxylin and the extracts as secondary stain. The results showed that the natural extract from Cola acuminata stained the cytoplasm of various tissues with yellowish-brown colouration. This finding suggests that Cola acuminata can be used as an alternative dye for histological staining.

  7. Can examination of tissue stained with Oil red O be postponed up to three months?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffersen Simone Dorthea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As far as we know, there are no known studies on the durability of frozen tissue stained with Oil Red O. The purpose of this study was to examine if the lipid drops in Oil Red O stained tissue keep the original position and color over time (3 months. Further we examined if storage position of the stained tissue makes a difference. Method: We used ten frozen kidney sections stained with Oil Red O. Half of the samples were stored vertically and the other half horizontally, and photos of the same areas were taken within the first 24 hours after staining, and then after 48 hours, 72 hours, 7 days, 14 days, 1 month, 2 months and 3 months respectively. Results and conclusion: No changes in position of the lipids were observed. The color of the staining faded somewhat over time, but it was still possible to distinguish the positive sites from the negative.

  8. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF SEGMENTED POLYURETHANES WITH RUTHENIUM TETROXIDE AS A STAINING AGENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fengfei; CHEN Shouxi; JIN Yongze; SHI Lianghe; XU Mao

    1991-01-01

    Microphase separation and lamellar structure of segmented polyether- and polyester-polyurethanes have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy with the ruthenium tetroxide staining technique. The results show that the RuO4 staining technique is simpler and may give better image contrast than other staining methods for this polymer. Microphase separation and lamellar structure of segmented polyether- and polyester-polyurethanes were directly observed and discussed.

  9. Decay and stain fungi of north American conifers with special reference to the Prairie provinces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, P.

    1995-12-31

    Describes a comprehensive literature review of major decay (white rot, brown rot, heart rot, butt rot, and root rot) and stain of conifer trees caused by various species of wood decay and stain fungi in North America, with special emphasis on the Prairie Provinces. Includes descriptions of each type of decay and characteristics of decay and stain causing fungi to aid in identification. The appendix includes a list of fungal cultures deposited at the Northern Forestry Centre in Edmonton.

  10. Studies on the origin of human amniotic fluid cells by immunofluorescent staining of keratin filaments.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    Cultivated cells obtained by amniocentesis for antenatal diagnosis were examined for the presence of keratin filaments by immunofluorescent staining techniques. In primary cultures, cells in fibroblast type colonies do not possess keratin filaments whereas cells in epithelial type colonies show positive staining of keratin fibres. The majority of cells in amniotic fluid type colonies also stain positively with antikeratin antibody. After the primary cells have been subcultured, most of them a...

  11. Epithelial membrane antigen in cells from the uterine cervix: immunocytochemical staining of cervical smears.

    OpenAIRE

    Valkova, B; Ormerod, M G; Moncrieff, D.; Coleman, D V

    1984-01-01

    Smears made from cervical scrapes have been stained immunocytochemically for epithelial membrane antigen using a polyclonal antiserum and two monoclonal antibodies. With the polyclonal antiserum malignant cells and those showing dysplasia consistently expressed the antigen. Normal cells were generally negative, with the exception of some metaplastic cells. The monoclonal antibodies, although they stained the abnormal cells less consistently, gave the same pattern of staining. All three antibo...

  12. Fluorescent Staining Technique for Nucleoid Regions of Streptosporangium albidum and Streptosporangium brasiliense

    OpenAIRE

    Speth, J. L.; Nash, C H

    1980-01-01

    Fluorescent staining procedures were developed for elucidating the nucleoid region in Streptosporangium albidum and Streptosporangium brasiliense. In these procedures, plugs of nutrient agar were inoculated with the microorganims and then covered with a sterile glass slide. The growing cells adhered to the surface of the slide and remained attached throughout the staining procedures. Two separate staining methods were utilized, one with bisbenzimid H33258 and the other with auramine O. Fluore...

  13. Fluorescein Punctate Staining Traced to Superficial Corneal Epithelial Cells by Impression Cytology and Confocal Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtarzadeh, Maryam; Casey, Richard; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2011-01-01

    Punctate fluorescein staining is an important sign in ocular surface disease but its basis is controversial. The common view is that the spots reflect small epithelial defects. In this study, clinicocytologic and histopathologic correlation of punctate stains in dry eye disease was performed. The hyperfluorescent spots were traced from slit lamp examination to confocal microscopy of tissue to reveal that fluorescent superficial epithelial cells are basis of punctate staining.

  14. Targeted alteration of real and imaginary refractive index of biological cells by histological staining

    OpenAIRE

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Subramanian, Hariharan; Stoyneva, Valentina; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Yang, Seungmoo; Damania, Dhwanil; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Various staining techniques are commonly used in biomedical research to investigate cellular morphology. By inducing absorption of light, staining dyes change the intracellular refractive index due to the Kramers-Kronig relationship. We present a method for creating 2-D maps of real and imaginary refractive indices of stained biological cells using their thickness and absorptance. We validate our technique on dyed polystyrene microspheres and quantify the alteration in refractive index of sta...

  15. Double-Staining Method for Differentiation of Morphological Changes and Membrane Integrity of Campylobacter coli Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Jose L.; Mascellaro, Salvatore; Moreno, Yolanda; Ferrús, María A.; Hernández, Javier

    2002-01-01

    We developed a double-staining procedure involving NanoOrange dye (Molecular Probes, Eugene, Oreg.) and membrane integrity stains (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit; Molecular Probes) to show the morphological and membrane integrity changes of Campylobacter coli cells during growth. The conversion from a spiral to a coccoid morphology via intermediary forms and the membrane integrity changes of the C. coli cells can be detected with the double-staining procedure. Our data indicate that young or actively...

  16. Improved silver staining of nucleolar organiser regions in paraffin wax sections using an inverted incubation technique.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A new simple modification to the silver staining of nucleolar organiser regions (AgNORs) was devised which, by performing the incubation with the slide inverted, results in minimal undesirable background staining, a persistent problem. Inverted incubation is facilitated by the use of a commercially available plastic coverplate. This technique has several additional advantages over other published staining protocols. In particular, the method is straightforward, fast, and maintains a high degr...

  17. Large-volume en-bloc staining for electron microscopy-based connectomics

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Yunfeng; Laserstein, Philip; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale connectomics requires dense staining of neuronal tissue blocks for electron microscopy (EM). Here we report a large-volume dense en-bloc EM staining protocol that overcomes the staining gradients, which so far substantially limited the reconstructable volumes in three-dimensional (3D) EM. Our protocol provides densely reconstructable tissue blocks from mouse neocortex sized at least 1 mm in diameter. By relaxing the constraints on precise topographic sample targeting, it makes the...

  18. Staining characteristics of six commercially available monoclonal immunofluorescence reagents for direct diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Cles, L D; Bruch, K; Stamm, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using purified elementary bodies of 14 Chlamydia trachomatis serovars in an in vitro assay, we compared the staining characteristics of six commercially available monoclonal antibody reagents used for direct immunofluorescent staining of patient smears. Considerable variation in the degree of brightness, consistency of staining, and specificity of the six reagents was found. Monoclonal antibodies against the major outer membrane proteins of C. trachomatis produced brighter fluorescence, more ...

  19. New Tetrachromic VOF Stain (Type III-G.S) for Normal and Pathological Fish Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Sarasquete, C.; Gutiérrez, M.

    2005-01-01

    A new VOF Type III-G.S stain was applied to histological sections of different organs and tissues of healthy and pathological larvae, juvenile and adult fish species (Solea senegalensis; Sparus aurata; Diplodus sargo; Pagrus auriga; Argyrosomus regius and Halobatrachus didactylus). In comparison to the original Gutiérrez VOF stain, more acid dyes of contrasting colours and polychromatic/metachromatic properties were incorporated as essential constituents of the tetrachromic VOF stain. This fa...

  20. An improved silver staining procedure for schizodeme analysis in polyacrylamide gradient gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Gonçalves

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple protocol is described for the silver staining of polyacrylamide gradient gels used for the separation of restriction fragments of kinetoplast DNA [schizodeme analysis of trypanosomatids (Morel et al., 1980]. The method overcomes the problems of non-uniform staining and strong background color which are frequently encountered when conventional protocols for silver staining of linear gels. The method described has proven to be of general applicability for DNA, RNA and protein separations in gradient gels.

  1. Amazonian açai and food dyes for staining arbuscular- micorrhizal fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Lourdes Martins Silva; Marcos Diones Ferreira Santana; John César de Jesus Pereira; Milena Pupo Raimam; Ulisses Brigatto Albino

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae microscopy requires differential staining of typical structures. Dyes employed, such as trypan blue, pose risks to health and environment. Alternative dyes such as pen ink and aniline have variable coloring efficiency. In this work, Brachiaria decumbens roots, discolored with caustic soda (NaOH), were stained with açai, annatto, saffron, trypan blue and pen inks. There were significant differences among dyes regarding stained mycorrhizal structures and pictures quality....

  2. [Development of a novel Francisella tularensis antigen stained with tetrazolium-blue for tularemia microagglutination test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2013-07-01

    The isolation of Francisella tularensis in cultures is the reference method for the laboratory diagnosis of tularemia. However, due to the limitations such as the low sensitivity and need for high safety level and equipped laboratories, serologic methods are frequently used as diagnostic tools. F.tularensis-specific antibodies may be demonstrated by several methods, however microagglutination test (MA) remains the most common method with its high sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to develop a novel MA test antigen prepared from whole F.tularensis cells and stained with tetrazolium-blue for more clear and easier evaluation. F.tularensis NCTC 10857 strain was cultured on the cysteine heart agar supplemented with 9% sheep blood and bacterial cells were harvested by scraping, collected in physiological saline (PS) and centrifuged at 1500 rpm for 10 minutes. For preparing stock antigen suspension cell concentration was adjusted to OD600=1.5, spectrophotometrically. Tetrazolium-blue solution (BTC [3,3'-(3,3'-Dimethoxy[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-diyl) bis [2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium dichloride], T4375 Sigma-Aldrich) at the final concentration of 1% was added to cell suspension and incubated at 37°C for 5 hours for absorption. Then, the living cells were chemically inactivated by formaldehyde. Repeating centrifugations were performed to discard excess dye and formaline, then 0.4% formaline saline was added on the sediment. Optimum concentration of this novel antigen (BTC-Ag) for MA test was determined by plate titration method by using standard serum sample with a known MA titer (1/128). The performance of BTC-Ag in MA test was evaluated by using 100 patient sera positive for F.tularensis antibodies, and 100 tularemia negative patient sera (of them 50 were seropositive for brucellosis). All of the results were compared with standard MA test in which safranin-O stained antigen (SO-Ag) was used. There was 100% agreement between the two tests performed with

  3. Histochemical stains as promising means for the laser histochemical surgery of a number of pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piruzyan, L. A.; Mikhailovskiy, Ye. M.; Piruzyan, A. L.

    1999-12-01

    The directions of laboratory and clinical studies oriented to experimental confirmation of the priority concept of `laser histochemical surgery' are presented. The goal of the studies is reproduction on experimental model of a number of pathologies (in vivo and in vitro) of the `sensitization to laser radiation by staining' effect. Testing of the histochemical stains as sensitizers to laser irradiation of their `address substrates', i.e. vitally stained intracellular structures which participate in the pathologic processes evolution is under planning. The processes include: (a) metabolic disorders in the brain cells, i.e. disseminated sclerosis; (b) generalized metabolic disorders- -mucopolysaccharidosis and collagenosises (periarteritis nodosa, rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, sclerodermia); (3) metabolic disorders in individual organs--vessel atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, cardiosclerosis, caries and parodontosis. The conditions of the studies are detailed in the recommendations along the positions: (1) disease name; (2) disease characteristics: (a) pathomorphologic, (b) biochemical; (3) stains revealing the disease signs and recommended for testing; (4) `address substrates' of the stains that are targets for laser radiation; (5) lasers recommended for the testing after the cells staining in vivo in the corresponding pathology; (6) experimental models of the pathologies suggested for the testing; (7) criteria of the stain efficiency as target sensitizer to the laser light (criteria of the `laser sensitization by staining' efficiency). Possible perspectives for the experimental clinical medicine are indicated of common histochemical stains and lasers use and of practice introduction of the `laser histochemical surgery' in the case the described concept is confirmed in experiments and clinically.

  4. Comparison of methods of microvascular staining and quantification in prostate carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Borre, Michael; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2002-01-01

    prostate carcinoma. Anti-CD34 antibodies stained microvessels in all 51 tumors, whereas anti-vWF antibodies in 6 tumors resulted in intense background staining causing omission of these. Anti-CD34 antibodies highlighted significantly more microvessels than anti-vWF antibodies, and the anti-CD34 vascular...... scores with either of the counting methods were significantly correlated, which was not the case with vWF. Both grids used on anti-CD34-stained sections resulted in vascular scores that could separate the tumors into prognostic groups. This was not possible using the Chalkley grid on vWF-stained tumors...

  5. Detection of Entamoeba histolytica in experimentally induced amoebic liver abscess:comparison of three staining methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Zi Ning; Wong Weng Kin; Shaymoli Mustafa; Arefuddin Ahmed; Rahmah Noordin; Tan Gim Cheong; Olivos-Garcia Alfonso; Lim Boon Huat

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of three different tissue stains, namely haematoxylin and eosin (H&E), periodic-acid Schiff (PAS) and immunohistochemical (IHC) stains for detection of Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) trophozoites in abscessed liver tissues of hamster.Methods:Amoebic liver abscess was experimentally induced in a hamster by injecting 1 × 106 of axenically cultured virulent E. histolytica trophozoites (HM1-IMSS strain) into the portal vein. After a week post-inoculation, the hamster was sacrificed and the liver tissue sections were stained with H&E, PAS and IHC stains to detect the amoebic trophozoite. Results: The three stains revealed tissue necrosis and amoebic trophozoites, but with varying clarity. H&E and PAS stained the trophozoites pink and magenta, respectively, however it was difficult to differentiate the stained trophozoites from the macrophages because of their similarity in size and morphology. On the other hand, IHC stain revealed distinct brown appearance of the trophozoites in the infected liver tissues. Conclusions: It can be concluded that out of the three stains, IHC is the best for identification of E. histolytica trophozoites in tissue sections.

  6. Effect of staining agents on color change of composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Rodrigues Tonetto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Composite resins are materials that can present color changing when exposed to pigments. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the color changing of composites after immersion in different substances for different periods. Material and methods: Two microhybrid composite resins: Charisma (Heraeus – Kulzer and Opallis (FGM were used. Red wine and acai pulp were also used as immersion medium. For this study, 32 specimens with 10 mm of diameter and 2 mm of thickness were used, divided into 4 groups: Group 1 – Opallis composite immersed in red wine solution; Group 2 – Opallis composite immersed in acai berry pulp solution; Group 3 – Charisma composite immersed in red wine solution; Group 4 – Charisma composite immersed in acai berry pulp solution. The specimens were evaluated in the following time periods: T0 – baseline, T1 – 24 hours, T2 – 48 hours, T3 – 72 hours and T4 – 96 hours. For the assessment of staining, a spectrophotometer for colorimetry was used (Color Guide 45 / 0, PCB 6807 BYK-Gardner Gerestsried GmBH, Germany, and the values obtained were transferred to a computer and recorded according to CIELAB system. Results: The data were evaluated using Kruskal- Wallis non-parametric tests with the following �E mean values for the immersion periods of 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours, respectively: G1 – 7.35, 7.84, 9.04,10.48; G2 – 2.92, 4.15, 4.30, 4.64; G3 – 3.14, 7.35, 8.13, 8.43, G4 – 4.49, 5.99, 6.92, 6.76. Conclusion: Red wine showed a higher tendency toward altering the composite color than acai berry pulp. In addition, no significant difference was found concerning to the behavior of the two composite resins. Concerning to the immersion time periods, significant differences were only observed among the groups in the 24 hour time period.

  7. Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique can diagnose paragonimiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Slesak

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We evaluated the Ziehl-Neelsen staining (ZNS technique for the diagnosis of paragonimiasis in Laos and compared different modifications of the ZNS techniques. METHODOLOGY: WE APPLIED THE FOLLOWING APPROACH: We (1 examined a paragonimiasis index case's sputum with wet film direct examination (WF and ZNS; (2 re-examined stored ZNS slides from two provinces; (3 compared prospectively WF, ZNS, and formalin-ether concentration technique (FECT for sputum examination of patients with chronic cough; and (4 compared different ZNS procedures. Finally, we assessed excess direct costs associated with the use of different diagnostic techniques. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Paragonimus eggs were clearly visible in WF and ZNS sputum samples of the index case. They appeared brownish-reddish in ZNS and were detected in 6 of 263 archived ZNS slides corresponding to 5 patients. One hundred sputum samples from 43 patients were examined with three techniques, which revealed that 6 patients had paragonimiasis (13 positive samples. Sensitivity per slide of the FECT, ZNS and the WF technique was 84.6 (p = 0.48, 76.9 (p = 0.25 and 61.5% (p = 0.07, respectively. Percentage of fragmented eggs was below 19% and did not differ between techniques (p = 0.13. Additional operational costs per slide were 0 (ZNS, 0.10 US$ (WF, and 0.79 US$ (FECT. ZNS heated for five minutes contained less eggs than briefly heated slides (29 eggs per slide [eps] vs. 42 eps, p = 0.01. Bloodstained sputum portions contained more eggs than unstained parts (3.3 eps vs. 0.7 eps, p = 0.016. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Paragonimus eggs can easily be detected in today's widely used ZNS of sputum slides. The ZNS technique appears superior to the standard WF sputum examination for paragonimiasis and eliminates the risk of tuberculosis transmission. Our findings suggest that ZNS sputum slides should also be examined routinely for Paragonimus eggs. ZNS technique has potential in epidemiological research on

  8. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Preben D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low. The hypothesis of this study was that equine MSCs could be isolated from fresh whole equine cord blood. Results Cord blood was collected from 7 foals immediately after foaling. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated by Ficoll density centrifugation and cultured in a DMEM low glucose based media at 38.5°C in humidified atmosphere containing 5% CO2. In 4 out of 7 samples colonies with MSC morphology were observed. Cellular morphology varied between monolayers of elongated spindle-shaped cells to layered cell clusters of cuboidal cells with shorter cytoplasmic extensions. Positive Alizarin Red and von Kossa staining as well as significant calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity confirmed osteogenesis. Histology and positive Safranin O staining of matrix glycosaminoglycans illustrated chondrogenesis. Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets confirmed adipogenesis. Conclusion We here report, for the first time, the isolation of mesenchymal-like stem cells from fresh equine cord blood and their differentiation into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. This novel isolation of equine cord blood MSCs and their preliminary in vitro differentiation positions the horse as the ideal pre-clinical animal model for proof-of-principle studies of cord blood derived MSCs.

  9. The use of the differential staining of sister chromatids in the study of the cytogenetic radiation effects in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential staining of sister chromatides is performed, cells of the 1-st and the following mitoses are identified, chromosome aberrations are accounted, and statistic processing of data is performed. Venous blood of healthy donors is used as material for analysis. It is irradiated in flasks by 60Co gamma-quanta in the doses of 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 Gy. Lymphocytes of the peripheral blood are cultivated at 37 deg C in the medium containing antibiotics, phytohemaggluninin and 5-bromiurnedeoxyidine (BDU). The observed distributions of dicentrics in cells are compared with theoretic Poisson distribution. The dependence of frequency of dicentrics on radiation dose is studied by the method of regressive analysis. The importance of applying this technique in radiation cytogenetic investigations to increase the accuracy of chromosome aberration account in stimulated phytohemagglutinin cultures of lymphocytes of human peripheral blood and to study regularities of their elimination after cells pass the 1-st and the second mitoses, is shown

  10. Evaluation of Intestinal Protozoan Morphology in Human Fecal Specimens Preserved in EcoFix: Comparison of Wheatley’s Trichrome Stain and EcoStain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lynne S.; Shimizu, Robyn Y.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of disposal problems related to the use of mercury compounds, many laboratories have switched from mercuric chloride-based Schaudinn’s and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) stool preservatives to other, non-mercury-based preservatives. A comparison of organism recoveries and morphologies of the intestinal protozoa was undertaken with PVA containing the EcoFix zinc-based Schaudinn’s preservative (Meridian Diagnostics, Inc.); both Wheatley’s modification of Gomori’s trichrome stain (WT) and EcoStain (ES) were used to stain 51 human fecal specimens. Morphology, clarity of nuclear and cytoplasmic detail, overall color differences, and the ease or difficulty in detecting intestinal protozoa in fecal debris were assessed for the two permanent stained smears. Overall, organism morphology of the intestinal protozoa stained with WT and that of protozoa stained with ES were not equal in nuclear and cytoplasmic detail or range of color. However, the same organisms were identified in stained fecal smears with either WT or ES, with the exception of situations in which organism numbers were characterized as rare. Included were 67 protozoan challenges (number of organisms): Entamoeba histolytica-Entamoeba dispar (5), Entamoeba coli (9), Entamoeba hartmanni (6), Endolimax nana (12), Iodamoeba bütschlii (8), Blastocystis hominis (19), Giardia lamblia (6), Dientamoeba fragilis (2), yeast (2), and leukocytes (2). Five specimens were negative for parasites but contained fecal debris that was compared for morphologic detail and color range. The ES produces a more gray-green monotone with very little pink or red tone; contrast among the various colors is less than that seen with WT. Stain intensity for all organisms was acceptable, and there were no problems with stain deposition. The quality of the protozoan morphology with ES was often comparable to that with WT (36 of 67 [53.7%]) and, in some cases, better (24 of 67 [35.8%]). Organisms on the WT-stained smear exhibited

  11. Evaluation of intestinal protozoan morphology in human fecal specimens preserved in EcoFix: comparison of Wheatley's trichrome stain and EcoStain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, L S; Shimizu, R Y

    1998-07-01

    As a result of disposal problems related to the use of mercury compounds, many laboratories have switched from mercuric chloride-based Schaudinn's and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) stool preservatives to other, non-mercury-based preservatives. A comparison of organism recoveries and morphologies of the intestinal protozoa was undertaken with PVA containing the EcoFix zinc-based Schaudinn's preservative (Meridian Diagnostics, Inc.); both Wheatley's modification of Gomori's trichrome stain (WT) and EcoStain (ES) were used to stain 51 human fecal specimens. Morphology, clarity of nuclear and cytoplasmic detail, overall color differences, and the ease or difficulty in detecting intestinal protozoa in fecal debris were assessed for the two permanent stained smears. Overall, organism morphology of the intestinal protozoa stained with WT and that of protozoa stained with ES were not equal in nuclear and cytoplasmic detail or range of color. However, the same organisms were identified in stained fecal smears with either WT or ES, with the exception of situations in which organism numbers were characterized as rare. Included were 67 protozoan challenges (number of organisms): Entamoeba histolytica-Entamoeba dispar (5), Entamoeba coli (9), Entamoeba hartmanni (6), Endolimax nana (12), Iodamoeba bütschlii (8), Blastocystis hominis (19), Giardia lamblia (6), Dientamoeba fragilis (2), yeast (2), and leukocytes (2). Five specimens were negative for parasites but contained fecal debris that was compared for morphologic detail and color range. The ES produces a more gray-green monotone with very little pink or red tone; contrast among the various colors is less than that seen with WT. Stain intensity for all organisms was acceptable, and there were no problems with stain deposition. The quality of the protozoan morphology with ES was often comparable to that with WT (36 of 67 [53.7%]) and, in some cases, better (24 of 67 [35.8%]). Organisms on the WT-stained smear exhibited better

  12. Blood vessels in subcaruncular and intercaruncular bovine endometriun possess oxytocin receptors (ORT) and express otr mRNA during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Anna-Ritta; Balvers, Marga; Ivell, Richard;

    2002-01-01

    is taking place; marked changes were observed with advancing pregnancy. The epithelial cells of the trophoblast were strongly stained for ir OTR and OTR mRNA, as reported last year, but the fetal connective tissue and blood vessels within the trophoblast did not show any stain for ir OTR or OTR m...... placentation because episodic secretion of OT occurs throughout bovine pregnancy...

  13. Optical coherence tomography: a potential tool for prediction of treatment response for port wine stain after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jie; Wang, Chengming; Wang, Ying; Chen, Defu; Gu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Response of port wine stain (PWS) to photodynamic therapy treatment (PDT) is variable and depends on treatment setting used and anatomic sites as well as on size and depth of ectatic vessels. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-destructive imaging modality which can reveal the layered structure of the upper part of the skin. The structural features of the PWS skin such as the diameter and depth of the blood vessels in different anatomic sites can be showed in the OCT images. In this study, the possible role of PWS skin structure in the response to PDT is assessed. 82 positions from 43 patients with PWS underwent OCT evaluation in cheek, zygomatic aera, preauricular and temporal region before and 3~4 months after the first PDT when treatment outcomes were also evaluated. After analyzing the structural features in different anatomic sites and the therapeutic effect of them, we found that the ectatic vessels diameter was obvious bigger in the cheek which had slightly poorer outcomes than other areas. Some typical structures had poor or good outcomes after first PDT. These can help the clinic doctors predict the response of some patients which have typical structures after PDT treatment. The OCT will be a potential tool for prediction of treatment response for port wine stain after photodynamic therapy.

  14. Ultrastructural study of Chlamydia trachomatis surface antigens by immunogold staining with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, C C; Chi, E Y

    1987-01-01

    Surface antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis were studied by immunogold staining with monoclonal antibodies and by electron microscopy. The serovar- and subspecies-specific epitopes were the most surface accessible. The species- and genus-specific epitopes were the least surface exposed. Similar serological specificity as that in the microimmunofluorescence test was demonstrated by immunogold staining.

  15. Tear staining in pigs: a potential tool for welfare assessment on commercial farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tear staining or chromodacryorrhea refers to a dark stain below the inner corner of the eye, caused by porphyrin-pigmented secretion from the Harderian gland. It been shown to be a consistent indicator of stress in rats, and recently it has been shown to correlate with social stress and a barren env...

  16. Improved method for silver staining of glycoproteins in thin sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J; Poulsen, J H

    1995-01-01

    A method for detection of glycoproteins in thin sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels was developed by a combination of (i) initial periodic acid oxidation/Alcian blue staining and (ii) subsequent staining with silver nitrate. The procedure allowed detection of as little as 1.6 ng of alpha 1...

  17. The diagnostic utility of the minimal carcinoma triple stain in breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dara S; Liu, Yi-Fang; Pipa, Jennifer; Shin, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    Pathologists are expected to accurately diagnose increasingly smaller breast carcinomas. Correct classification (ie, lobular vs ductal or in situ vs invasive) directly affects subsequent management, especially when the focus is near a surgical margin or present in a needle core biopsy and is further challenging if the lesion is morphologically ambiguous. We assessed the diagnostic utility of a multiplex, trichromogen immunostain of 3 commonly employed antibodies (CK7, p63, and E-cadherin) developed in our laboratory to evaluate these small lesions. Of the 147 specimens containing minimal (defined as ≤3 mm in size) invasive carcinoma, 81 also contained in situ carcinoma. In each case, the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was prepared with a parallel H&E-stained slide. Observations of staining characteristics in the focus of interest were recorded. The Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was diagnostically useful in all but 1 case. In a case of invasive lobular carcinoma in an excisional biopsy, the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain stained only the surrounding breast tissue (appropriately) and not the focus of interest. Also, a subset of 29 of 81 excisional biopsies had minimal invasive carcinoma located 2 mm or less from the inked surgical margin, in which in all cases the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was fully interpretable despite morphologic distortion due to concomitant cautery artifact and tissue disruption in some cases. The Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain offers an accurate and tissue-conserving method to diagnose small, morphologically problematic foci of breast carcinoma while ideally leaving more tissue for additional adjunctive studies.

  18. Analysis of Staining Observed on Structures in the Georgetown, South Carolina Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Govier, R. Dale

    2002-05-01

    Beginning around 1970, the Georgetown, SC, community complained about black dust and red stains collecting on houses, cars, boats, and other structures. The community, through the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), seeks to identify the source or cause of the staining and ways to reduce or eliminate it in the future.

  19. A study on karyotype of Small-toothed palm civet, Arctogalidia trivirgata (Carnivora, Viverridae by using conventional staining method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumnui, S.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was the first karyotypic study of Small-toothed palm civet (Arctogalidia trivirgata. Blood samples were taken from two males and two females kept in Dusit Zoo, Bangkok. After the standard whole blood lymphocyte culture at 37ºC for 72 hr. in presence of Colchicine, the metaphase spreads were performed on microscopic slides and air-dried. Conventional Giemsa's staining were applied to stain the chromosome. The results showed that the number of diploid chromosome of Small-toothed palm civet was 2n = 40, the fundamental number (NF was 66 in both male and female. The type of autosomes were 2 large metacentric, 2 large submetacentric, 8 large acrocentric, 4 large telocentric, 4 medium submetacentric, 4 medium telocentric, 4 small metacentric, 2 small submetacentric, 2 small acrocentric and 6 small telocentric chromosomes. In addition, chromosome 17 showed a clearly observable satellite. X-chromosome was the large metacentric and Y chromosome was the smallest acrocentric chromosome.The karyotype formula for the male Small-toothed palm civet (Arctogalidia trivirgata is as follows:2n (40 = Lm 2+Lsm 2+La 8+Lt 4+Msm 4+Mt 4+Sm 4+Ssm 2+Sa 2+St 6+X+Y = Lm 3+Lsm 2+La 8+Lt 4+Msm 4+Mt 4+Sm 4+Ssm 2+Sa 3+St 6The karyotype formula for the female Small-toothed palm civet (Arctogalidia trivirgata is as follows:2n (40 = Lm 2+Lsm 2+La 8+Lt 4+Msm 4+Mt 4+Sm 4+Ssm 2+Sa 2+St 6+X+X = Lm 4+Lsm 2+La 8+Lt 4+Msm 4+Mt 4+Sm 4+Ssm 2+Sa 2+St 6

  20. Simplified heavy metal staining techniques demonstrated with Fast Plant leaf tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HARRISJOSEPHB; THOMASG.GUILLIAMS; 等

    1992-01-01

    Fast Plant (Brassica rapa,Cruciferae)leaf tissue fixed in glutaradehyde-acrolein and post-fixed in osmium,was examined for response to several easilyprepared heavy metal stains.Lead and uranium,separately and in combination,gave typical results across the spectrum of cell orgeanelles.As s single stain following osmium,bismuth produced images seemingly equivalent to lead and uranium.Phosphotungstic acid produced very good membrane delineation but produced a washed-out background image similar to that from lead staining .Carbohydrate compounds were especially responsive to ruthenium;the cytoplasm and the matrix of all organelles were also stained very well.The procedures were no more demanding than traditional staining methods and may be easily used in research and teaching .Fast Plant materials are a reliable,quick nand easy source of living material.

  1. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall......Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  2. Supravital dithizone staining in the isolation of human and rat pancreatic islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, W A; Christie, M R; Kahn, R;

    1989-01-01

    stain red on incubation with dithizone solution. Tissue selected on the basis of dithizone staining was shown to contain insulin-positive cells and to accumulate insulin in the medium during a subsequent period in tissue culture. Experiments with rat islets indicated that the dithizone treatment had no...... effect on insulin release in tissue culture, on acute responses to stimulatory glucose concentrations or on the insulin content of cells. These results suggest that dithizone staining can assist in the identification of islets from the human pancreas and may prove to be a useful tool in developing......Dithizone, a zinc chelating agent, is known to selectively stain the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. In the present study, we have used this stain to aid the identification of islets in material obtained by collagenase digestion of human pancreas. Islets were shown to rapidly and reversibly...

  3. A Versatile Method for Immunofluorescent Staining of Cells Cultured on Permeable Membrane Inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Jenni L; Anyah, Anwuli; Taylor, John M; Marlin, Jerry W; Taylor, Tracey A H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obtaining high-quality images of cellular structures via immunofluorescence staining is critical for cellular localization studies. Often, these studies cannot be performed in parallel with certain oncology, virology, pharmacokinetic, and drug absorption studies due to model system technicalities requiring the cells to be cultured on porous membranes rather than glass or plastic. MATERIAL AND METHODS Here, we report a method of immunofluorescent staining of cells cultured on permeable membranes. RESULTS As proof of principle, HeLa cells grown on Transwell® membrane supports were stained with fluorescently labeled antibodies using this modified immunofluorescence staining method and visualized by fluorescent microscopy. CONCLUSIONS This protocol is a convenient alternative to staining cells on glass coverslips, thereby expanding the scope and applications of this important research tool. PMID:27616137

  4. An improved Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB R-250) staining to proteins in gels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An improved CBB staining with higher sensitivity than that of the typical CBB staining was reported. The main improvement was using a fixing step of 25% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) before CBB staining. For most proteins studied, the sensitivity of the improved CBB staining was about twice as high as that of the typical method. For basic and low molecular weight proteins such as ribosomal proteins, the sensitivity of this improved staining method was about 3.5-28 times that of the typical method. It was speculated that the improved procedure would be suitable for exact quantitative analysis of proteins fractionated by SDS-PAGE, especially for basic and low molecular weight proteins. On the other hand, this new modified method might be also applied to multidisciplinary studies, such as biological researches and nuclear sciences.

  5. An improved Coomassie Brilliant Blue(CBB R—250) Staining To proteins in gels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUZhi-Dong; LIUWang-Yi; 等

    2002-01-01

    An improved CBB staining with higher sensitivity than that of the typical CBB staining was reported.The main improvement was using a fixing step of 25% trichloroacetic acid(TCA) before CBB staining.For most proteins studied,the sensitivity of the improved CBB staining was about twice as high as that of the typical method.For basic and low molecular weight proteins such as ribosomal proteins,the sensitivity of this improved staining method was about 3.5-28 times that of the typical method.It was speculated that the improved procedure would be suitable for exact quantitative analysis of proteins fractionated by SDS-PAGE,especially for basic and low molecular weight proteins.On the other hand,this new modified method might be also applied to multidisciplinary studies,such as biological researches and nuclear sciences.

  6. Porcine intestinal mast cells. Evaluation of different fixatives for histochemical staining techniques considering tissue shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rieger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Staining of mast cells (MCs, including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkage-differences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from

  7. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 6, 2016, San Diego, CA Abstracts Registration Housing Travel Information Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood ... Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and Travel DVT Myths vs. Facts Blood Detectives Find a ...

  8. Where to Donate Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... zip code using the Blood Bank Locator below: Blood Bank Locator City: State/Province: ZIP Code: Country: Show ... safety and care. The Association sets standards for blood banks and transfusion services, and accredits member blood banks ...

  9. High blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you are at risk for: Bleeding from the aorta, the large blood vessel that supplies blood to ... tests Blood pressure check Blood pressure References American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes-2015 ...

  10. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... may be used to puncture the skin. The blood collects in a small glass tube called a ...

  11. Types of Blood Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Double Red Cell Plasma Platelets Red Cells What blood donation type is best for me? **If you do not ... blood type, a whole blood donation is recommended** Blood Donation Types: Volunteer Donations The standard or most common type ...

  12. Blood Type Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Blood Type Game Printable Version Blood Type Game This feature requires version 6 or later ... many points as possible by matching the appropriate blood type of a donor to the blood type of ...

  13. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or parts of blood ... liver failure or a severe infection. Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as ...

  14. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Transfusions Print A ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. ...

  15. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is the AHA recommendation for healthy blood pressure? This blood pressure chart reflects categories defined by the American ... unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare providers will want to get ...

  16. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Housing Travel Information Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances ... reflect the most recent scientific research View all publications For Patients Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding ...

  17. Age estimation of blood stains using different analytical techniques and the in-situ identification of proteins using BCA

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Waseeh

    2014-01-01

    The issue of establishing a correct timeline in terms of body fluids has always been an important aspect in any forensic investigation. The techniques currently being used have all proved to work quite well but have certain limitations. One of the main problems with these techniques is their invasiveness to the sample in question. This is a major problem as, in most cases, the sample analysed is quite small and the destruction of it via the use of one technique can limit it being used for oth...

  18. Anti-human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Antibody Selection for Immunohistochemical Staining of Proliferating Blood Vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van der Loos; L.B. Meijer-Jorna; M.E.C. Broekmans; H.P.H.M. Ploegmakers; P. Teeling; O.J. de Boer; A.C. van der Wal

    2010-01-01

    Nine commercially available VEGF antibodies are investigated for their ability to immunostain vascular malformations (VM) with or without immature capillary proliferation. First, all antibodies were optimized for their performance in immunohistochemistry with placenta and colon adenocarcinoma as pos

  19. Types of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » Blood Transfusion » Types of Blood Transfusions Explore Blood Transfusion What Is... ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Blood Transfusions Blood is transfused either as whole blood ( ...

  20. Cord blood testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to evaluate the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH levels) Blood sugar level Blood type and Rh Complete blood count ( ... means you have a blood infection (septicemia). High levels of blood sugar (glucose) in the cord blood may be found ...

  1. A novel cytologic sampling technique to diagnose subclinical endometritis and comparison of staining methods for endometrial cytology samples in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascottini, O B; Dini, P; Hostens, M; Ducatelle, R; Opsomer, G

    2015-11-01

    The present article describes a study of the diagnosis of subclinical endometritis in dairy cows having two principal aims: first, to validate a novel technique for taking endometrial cytology samples to diagnose subclinical endometritis in dairy cows. Second, to compare the percentage of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) in cytology samples stained with Diff-Quik versus a specific staining method for PMNs, naphthol-AS-D-chloroacetate-esterase (CIAE). In the first experiment, Holstein-Friesian cows (n = 204) were used to take two cytology samples at the same time using the conventional cytobrush (CB) and the new cytotape (CT). Both devices were assembled within the same catheter allowing sampling at the same time, and approximately at the same location. Cytotape consisted of a 1.5-cm piece of paper tape rolled on the top of an insemination catheter covered with a double guard sheet. Parameters used to evaluate both methods were: PMNs percentage, total cellularity, quality of the smears, and red blood cell contamination. The concordance correlation coefficient analysis was used to assess agreement between continuous and Pearson chi-square tests for categorical variables. Agreement between the percentage of PMNs in both methods was good ρ = 0.84 (0.79, 0.87) with a minor standard error of 2%. Both methods yielded similar total cellularity (P = 0.62). Cytotape yielded better quality smears with more intact cells (P < 0.01) while samples that were taken by CB were more likely to be bloody (P < 0.01). Hence, CT and CB methods yielded smears with a similar PMNs percentage and a total number of cells, but CT provided smears with higher quality and significantly less blood contamination. For the second experiment, 114 duplicate cytology slides were stained using both Diff-Quik and CIAE. Agreement between PMNs percentage in both staining techniques was good ρc = 0.84 (0.78, 0.89) with a standard error of only 2%. Hence, Diff-Quik was confirmed as an easy, fast

  2. Cavitation damage in blood clots under HIFU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hope; Ahadi, Golnaz; Hoelscher, Thilo; Szeri, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to accelerate thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, in vitro and in vivo, for treatment of ischemic stroke. Cavitation in sonothrombolysis is thought to play an important role, although the mechanisms are not fully understood. The damage to a blood clot associated with bubble collapses in a HIFU field is studied. The region of damage caused by a bubble collapse on the fibrin network of the blood clot exposed to HIFU is estimated, and compared with experimental assessment of the damage. The mechanical damage to the network caused by a bubble is probed using two independent approaches, a strain based method and an energy based method. Immunoflourescent fibrin staining is used to assess the region of damage experimentally.

  3. Tracking living decapod larvae: mass staining of eggs with neutral red prior to hatching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øresland, V; Horobin, R W

    2012-04-01

    Mass staining of decapod females carrying eggs, with subsequent identification of hatched larvae in the environment, is a research tool with great potential for field ecologists wishing to track the movements of larvae. For this to be achieved, however, numerous requirements must be met. These include adequate dye solubility, short staining time, dye penetration through different tissues, dye retention within the organism, absence of toxic and behavioral effects, low visibility to predators of stained larvae, no loss of staining owing to preservatives and low cost. The dye, neutral red, appears to meet most of these requirements. This dye was used in aliquots of 0.7 g/770 ml seawater applied to the females of Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) and European lobster (Homarus gammarus) for 10 min. This procedure stained lobster eggs and embryos so that hatched larvae could be distinguished easily by fluorescence microscopy from larvae that hatched from unstained eggs. Stained larvae that were preserved in 4% formaldehyde in seawater were still stained after 1 year. Larvae should not come in contact with ethanol, because it extracts the dye rapidly.

  4. Helicobacter pylori detection in chronic gastritis: a comparison of staining methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori is an important cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulceration and gastric malignancies as gastric carcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Its definitive diagnosis is based on histopathology. Routine H and E stain is not very effective in its detection, immune-stains and fluorescent stains are costly. Need for simple cheap and sensitive stain has always been a topic of hot debate and extensive research. Method: paraffin embedded blocks of all adult patients diagnosed as chronic gastritis/gastric ulceration with no accompanying gastric pathology as hypertrophic gastropathys, and neoplasias were taken into study. Three sections of 4 micron were cut and stained with routine H and E, Giemsa, and Cresyl fast violet. Results: Total number of patients was 50. Out of these 37 (74%) were males and 13 (26%) were females. Mean age of the patients was 50.4 years. Thirty-four percent (34%) were positive in normal H and E stain, 68% were positive in Giemsa and 76% were positive in Cresyl fast violet. Conclusion: Cresyl fast violet is a good stain for diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis. (author)

  5. Acridine orange staining reaction as an index of physiological activity in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFeters, G. A.; Singh, A.; Byun, S.; Callis, P. R.; Williams, S.

    1991-01-01

    The assumption that the acridine orange (AO) color reaction may be used as an index of physiological activity was investigated in laboratory grown Escherichia coli. Spectrofluorometric observations of purified nucleic acids, ribosomes and the microscopic color of bacteriophage-infected cells stained with AO confirmed the theory that single-stranded nucleic acids emit orange to red fluorescence while those that are double-stranded fluoresce green in vivo. Bacteria growing actively in a rich medium could be distinguished from cells in stationary phase by the AO reaction. Cells from log phase appeared red, whereas those in stationary phase were green. However, this differentiation was not seen when the bacteria were grown in a minimal medium or when a variation of the staining method was used. Also, shifting bacteria in stationary phase to starvation conditions rapidly changed their AO staining reaction. Boiling and exposure to lethal concentrations of azide and formalin resulted in stationary-phase cells that appeared red after staining but bacteria killed with chlorine remained green. These findings indicate that the AO staining reaction may be suggestive of physiological activity under defined conditions. However, variables in staining and fixation procedures as well as uncertainties associated with mixed bacterial populations in environmental samples may produce results that are not consistent with the classical interpretation of this reaction. The importance of validating the putative physiological implications of this staining reaction is stressed.

  6. Tracking living decapod larvae: mass staining of eggs with neutral red prior to hatching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øresland, V; Horobin, R W

    2012-04-01

    Mass staining of decapod females carrying eggs, with subsequent identification of hatched larvae in the environment, is a research tool with great potential for field ecologists wishing to track the movements of larvae. For this to be achieved, however, numerous requirements must be met. These include adequate dye solubility, short staining time, dye penetration through different tissues, dye retention within the organism, absence of toxic and behavioral effects, low visibility to predators of stained larvae, no loss of staining owing to preservatives and low cost. The dye, neutral red, appears to meet most of these requirements. This dye was used in aliquots of 0.7 g/770 ml seawater applied to the females of Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) and European lobster (Homarus gammarus) for 10 min. This procedure stained lobster eggs and embryos so that hatched larvae could be distinguished easily by fluorescence microscopy from larvae that hatched from unstained eggs. Stained larvae that were preserved in 4% formaldehyde in seawater were still stained after 1 year. Larvae should not come in contact with ethanol, because it extracts the dye rapidly. PMID:22149046

  7. A procedure for Alcian blue staining of mucins on polyvinylidene difluoride membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weijie; Matsuno, Yu-ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2012-10-16

    The isolation and characterization of mucins are critically important for obtaining insight into the molecular pathology of various diseases, including cancers and cystic fibrosis. Recently, we developed a novel membrane electrophoretic method, supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME), which separates mucins on a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane impregnated with a hydrophilic polymer. Alcian blue staining is widely used to visualize mucopolysaccharides and acidic mucins on both blotted membranes and SMME membranes; however, this method cannot be used to stain mucins with a low acidic glycan content. Meanwhile, periodic acid-Schiff staining can selectively visualize glycoproteins, including mucins, but is incompatible with glycan analysis, which is indispensable for mucin characterizations. Here we describe a novel staining method, designated succinylation-Alcian blue staining, for visualizing mucins on a PVDF membrane. This method can visualize mucins regardless of the acidic residue content and shows a sensitivity 2-fold higher than that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, a fluorescent periodate Schiff-base stain. Furthermore, we demonstrate the compatibility of this novel staining procedure with glycan analysis using porcine gastric mucin as a model mucin. PMID:22950532

  8. Tobacco Stained Fingers and Its Association with Death and Hospital Admission: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor John

    Full Text Available Among smokers, the presence of tobacco stains on fingers has recently been associated with a high prevalence of tobacco related conditions and alcohol abuse.we aimed to explore tobacco stains as a marker of death and hospital readmission.Seventy-three smokers presenting tobacco-tar staining on their fingers and 70 control smokers were followed during a median of 5.5 years in a retrospective cohort study. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the log-rank test to compare mortality and hospital readmission rates among smokers with and smokers without tobacco stains. Multivariable Cox models were used to adjust for confounding factors: age, gender, pack-year unit smoked, cancer, harmful alcohol use and diabetes. The number of hospital admissions was compared through a negative binomial regression and adjusted for the follow-up time, diabetes, and alcohol use.Forty-three patients with tobacco-stained fingers died compared to 26 control smokers (HR 1.6; 95%CI: 1.0 to 2.7; p 0.048. The association was not statistically significant after adjustment. Patients with tobacco-stained fingers needed a readmission earlier than smokers without stains (HR 2.1; 95%CI: 1.4 to 3.1; p<0.001, and more often (incidence rate ratio (IRR 1.6; 95%CI: 1.1 to 2.1. Associations between stains and the first hospital readmission (HR 1.6; 95%CI: 1.0 to 2.5, and number of readmissions (IRR 1.5; 95%CI: 1.1 to 2.1 persisted after adjustment for confounding factors.Compared to other smokers, those presenting tobacco-stained fingers have a high unadjusted mortality rate and need early and frequent hospital readmission even when controlling for confounders.

  9. Investigations of significance of blood smear results in diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkonjak Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic examination of stained smears of peripheral blood is of vital significance in the speedy diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases, in particular during the stage of infection when the cause is present in the blood, or blood cells. It is sometimes possible to make a definitive diagnosis of an infectious or parasitic disease following an examination of a stained smear of the peripheral blood. Since microscopic examinations of a peripheral blood smear are applied increasingly rarely in clinical practice, due to the development of other methods for the diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs, as well as the lack of knowledge of the morphology of the numerous causes that can be present in the blood, we carried out an investigation into the presence and spread of infections whose causes can be present in dog blood. The investigations covered 100 dogs from which peripheral blood smears were taken and then stained with a Giemsa solution according to the standard protocol and examined under a microscope with an immersion lens. The examination of peripheral blood smears stained according to Giemsa resulted in the identification of the presence of an Ehrlichia spp. morula in a neutrophil granulocyte in one dog. The presence of hemotropic mycoplasmas was established in erythrocytes of eleven dogs, while the presence of the protozoa Babesia canis in erythrocytes was identified in five dogs included in the investigations. A microscopic examination of dog peripheral blood smears stained according to Giemsa was shown as a speedy, practical, simple, and inexpensive method for making a definitive etiological diagnosis of these infections, and it should be included regularly in standard protocols for the diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases.

  10. Application of immunoperoxidase staining to more rapid detection and identification of rubella virus isolates.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, N J; Ho, H H; Chin, J

    1981-01-01

    Efforts were made to shorten the time required for detection of rubella virus in clinical materials through the use of immunoperoxidase (IP) staining. Comparative studies were performed in which specimens were inoculated in parallel into BHK-21 hamster kidney cells, which were examined by IP staining at 5 days, and into BK-13 and BS-C-1 cells, which were examined in two ways, viz., by subpassage at 7 days into BHK-21 cells and IP staining 3 days later and by subpassage at 7 days into BS-C-1 c...

  11. Combined epiretinal and internal limiting membrane peeling facilitated by high dilution indocyanine green negative staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark M Kaehr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the utilization of indocyanine green (ICG dye to facilitate combined/en bloc removal of epiretinal membranes (ERM along with internal limiting membranes (ILM. The method utilizes a highly diluted preparation of ICG in dextrose water solvent (D5W. Elimination of fluid air exchange step facilitating staining in the fluid phase and low intensity lighting help minimize potential ICG toxicity. The technique demonstrates how ICG facilitates negative staining of ERMs and how ILM peeling concomitantly can allow complete and efficient ERM removal minimizing surgical time and the necessity for dual or sequential staining.

  12. [A standardized AgNOR stain method for formalin fixed and paraffin embedded material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, D; Bankfalvi, A; Riehemann, K; Böcker, W; Schmid, K W

    1994-08-01

    Visualization of proteins associated with nucleolar organizer regions proteins (AgNORs) on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archival tissues is substantially improved after application of wet autoclave pretreatment. Silver staining results are comparable to those obtained on tissues processed in alcohol based fixatives, illustrating AgNORs as substructures of the nucleoli without any staining artefacts. A highly reproducible staining quality was achieved irrespective of tissue origin or duration of formalin fixation. As a result of this novel and simple method, the grounds have been prepared for standardized AgNOR quantification on archival material.

  13. A novel staining method for quantification and 3D visualisation of capillaries and muscle fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Cebasek

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to introduce a combined fluorescent staining that clearly demonstrates capillaries and distinguishes them from the basal lamina of muscle fibres in skeletal muscle tissue. The triple staining with CD31, Griffonia (Bandeira simplicifolia lectin (GSL I and laminin efficiently distinguishes vascular endothelium from the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fibres in physiological and pathological conditions. The presented triple staining method has several advantages, which facilitate quantitative analysis of the capillary network, and its relation to individual muscle fibres.

  14. Amazonian açai and food dyes for staining arbuscular- micorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lourdes Martins Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizae microscopy requires differential staining of typical structures. Dyes employed, such as trypan blue, pose risks to health and environment. Alternative dyes such as pen ink and aniline have variable coloring efficiency. In this work, Brachiaria decumbens roots, discolored with caustic soda (NaOH, were stained with açai, annatto, saffron, trypan blue and pen inks. There were significant differences among dyes regarding stained mycorrhizal structures and pictures quality. Acai was considered the best alternative dye, with similar results to trypan blue.

  15. Recent advances in laser therapy for the treatment of port wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Sean W.

    2004-09-01

    The pulsed dye laser is the preferred laser for treating port wine stains. It is relatively effective with a low incidence of side effects. However, although considerable lightening of a port wine stain is likely to occur with treatment, complete clearance is achieved in the minority. There has been a number of therapeutic advances over the last few years in the laser treatment of port wine stains. These have come from modification of the original pulsed dye laser, use of other lasers and light sources and a greater understanding of laser - port wine interactions. All of these developments will be discussed in this review.

  16. Autologous blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2004-01-01

    Although preoperative autologous blood donation is employed in elective surgery, this is declining because of the increasingly safe allogeneic blood supply. However, it continues to be used because of the public's perception of allogeneic blood risks and increasing blood shortages. Patients may donate a unit of blood (450 ± 45 ml) as often as twice weekly, up to 72 hours before surgery. Preoperative autologous blood is most beneficial in procedures that cause significant blood loss. It has be...

  17. Studies on Morphology and Cytochemistry in Blood Cells of Ayu Plecoglossus altivelis altivelis

    OpenAIRE

    NAKADA, Kojin; FUJISAWA, Kuniyasu; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peripheral blood cells from ayu, Plecoglossus altivelis altivelis, were separated using a density gradient. Blood cells were then smeared using Shandon Cytospin and subjected to cytochemical staining. Blood cells were categorized based on morphological and cytochemical characteristics, and the density fractionation range and nucleus area/cell area ratio were observed. Lymphocytes are distinguished from neutrophils by their basophilic cytoplasm and Golgi-like field. The features of ch...

  18. Immunofluorescence of bovine virus diarrhea viral antigen in white blood cells from experimentally infected immunocompetent calves.

    OpenAIRE

    Bezek, D M; Baker, J. C.; Kaneene, J B

    1988-01-01

    A study to evaluate the detection of bovine virus diarrhea viral antigen using immunofluorescence testing of white blood cells was conducted. Five colostrum-deprived calves were inoculated intravenously with a cytopathic strain of the virus. Lymphocyte and buffy coat smears were prepared daily for direct immunofluorescent staining for detection of antigen. Lymphocytes were separated from heparinized blood using a Ficoll density procedure. Buffy coat smears were prepared from centrifuged blood...

  19. Basement membrane changes in breast cancer detected by immunohistochemical staining for laminin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, R; Nielsen, M; Wewer, U;

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin was studied by the immunoperoxidase technique in benign and malignant human breast tissue and in axillary lymph nodes from patients with breast cancer. An antiserum prepared against rat laminin was used. The specificity...... with molecular weights of 400,000 and 200,000 of rat laminin in sodium dodecyl sulfate:polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The neoplastic cells in malignant breast tissues showed strong cytoplasmic staining for laminin, and a positive reaction was aslo found in lymph node metastases. In some cases in which only...... micrometastases were present, these cells also stained strongly for laminin. In nonmalignant breast tissues, the epithelial cells of the duct were positive for laminin, but the staining was weaker than in the carcinomas. Pretreatment of the fixed tissue sections with trypsin markedly enhanced the staining...

  20. Embedding, serial sectioning and staining of zebrafish embryos using JB-4 resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Brown, Jessica; Bisher, Margaret E; Burdine, Rebecca D

    2011-01-01

    Histological techniques are critical for observing tissue and cellular morphology. In this paper, we outline our protocol for embedding, serial sectioning, staining and visualizing zebrafish embryos embedded in JB-4 plastic resin-a glycol methacrylate-based medium that results in excellent preservation of tissue morphology. In addition, we describe our procedures for staining plastic sections with toluidine blue or hematoxylin and eosin, and show how to couple these stains with whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization. We also describe how to maintain and visualize immunofluorescence and EGFP signals in JB-4 resin. The protocol we outline-from embryo preparation, embedding, sectioning and staining to visualization-can be accomplished in 3 d. Overall, we reinforce that plastic embedding can provide higher resolution of cellular details and is a valuable tool for cellular and morphological studies in zebrafish.

  1. Chromogens in Multiple Immunohistochemical Staining Used for Visual Assessment and Spectral Imaging: The Colorful Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van der Loos

    2010-01-01

    For the chromogenic visualization of immunohistochemical enzymatic reaction products, only a limited series of different enzymatic activities and chromogens are available. Consequently, combinations of two chromogens for double immunohistochemical staining are even more limited for visual assessment

  2. What Poisoned the Apple Juice? A Gram Staining and Selective Media Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Paul; Brown, Nikole; Hauser, Doug; Pomart, Katrina; Karcher, Sue; Balschweid, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Introduces an inquiry-based laboratory experiment in which students identify an unknown bacterial species by using techniques such as Gram staining. Uses an authentic problem solving approach in a scenario entitled, "What poisoned the apple juice?" (YDS)

  3. Staining pattern classification of antinuclear autoantibodies based on block segmentation in indirect immunofluorescence images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqian Li

    Full Text Available Indirect immunofluorescence based on HEp-2 cell substrate is the most commonly used staining method for antinuclear autoantibodies associated with different types of autoimmune pathologies. The aim of this paper is to design an automatic system to identify the staining patterns based on block segmentation compared to the cell segmentation most used in previous research. Various feature descriptors and classifiers are tested and compared in the classification of the staining pattern of blocks and it is found that the technique of the combination of the local binary pattern and the k-nearest neighbor algorithm achieve the best performance. Relying on the results of block pattern classification, experiments on the whole images show that classifier fusion rules are able to identify the staining patterns of the whole well (specimen image with a total accuracy of about 94.62%.

  4. Application of Prussian blue staining in the diagnosis of ocular siderosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen; Yang; Xiao-Li; Yang; Li-Shuai; Xu; Le; Dai; Mei-Chao; Yi

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To explore the value of Prussian blue staining in the diagnosis of ocular siderosis.METHODS:Between January 2012 and January 2013,the Prussian blue stain used in anterior lens capsule and vitreous liquid after centrifugation from patients with definitive diagnosis and suspicious diagnosed of ocular siderosis. At the same time, give a negative control.RESULTS:Anterior lens capsule membrane and liquid of vitreous cavity from patients with definitive diagnosis and suspicious diagnosed of ocular siderosis revealed ferric ions that stained positively with Prussian blue. In the control group, there is no positive reaction.CONCLUSION:Prussian blue staining in the diagnosis of ocular siderosis has a very significant worth,suspected cases can be definitive diagnosed.

  5. Under-air staining of the anterior capsule using Trypan blue with a 30 G needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammaria, Daniele; Giannotti, Michele; Scopelliti, Angelo; Pellegrini, Giacomo; Giannotti, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    The original technique of staining the anterior capsule of the lens with Trypan blue involves the injection of an air bubble in the anterior chamber. A drawback of this technique is the possible instability of the anterior chamber caused by the sudden exit of air when the dye is injected with the cannula through the side-port incision. Other staining techniques that use viscoelastic substances to increase the stability of the anterior chamber and to dose the injected dye have been described. The authors present an under-air staining technique of the anterior capsule using one drop of Trypan blue injected with a 30 G needle through the peripheral cornea. This procedure prevents the air bubble from escaping the anterior chamber and allows fast and selective staining of the capsule. PMID:23386783

  6. Silver stained core-like structures in chinese hamster metaphase Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiserman, M Z; Burkholder, G D

    1980-01-01

    Chinese hamster metaphase chromosomes, subjected to prolonged hypotonic pretreatment and subsequently stained with ammoniacal silver, contained a darkly-stained core-like structure in each chromatid, surrounded by a halo of dispersed chromatin which was pale yellow to brown in color. The core was variable in its appearance, ranging from a continuous linear configuration to a spiral structure or a discontinuous, particulate structure. Within the centromeric regions, the cores frequently appeared more intensely stained than elsewhere in the chromosome. The nucleolus organizers also stained darkly and appeared to be attached to the core-like structures. It remains to be determined whether the cores represent a real component of metaphase chromosome structure, or whether they are artifacts resulting from abnormal chromatin aggregation arising at the time of chromosome preparation. PMID:6165446

  7. Pollen viability of Polygala paniculata L. (Polygalaceae) using different staining methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frescura, Viviane Dal-Souto; Laughinghouse, Haywood Dail; do Canto-Dorow, Thais Scotti; Tedesco, Solange Bosio

    2012-12-01

    Polygala paniculata L. is a medicinal plant that grows in the Brazilian Atlantic coast, known as 'barba-de-São-João', 'barba-de-bode', 'vassourinha branca', and 'mimosa'. In this study, pollen viability was estimated by three different staining methods: 2% acetic orcein, 2% acetic carmine, and Alexander's stain. The young inflorescences of twenty accessions were collected and fixed in a solution of ethanol: acetic acid (3:1) for 24 hours, then stored in ethanol 70% under refrigeration. Six slides per plant, two for each stain, were prepared by squashing, and 300 pollen grains per slide were analyzed. Pollen viability was high (> 70%) for most accessions of P. paniculata using the Alexander's stain, which proved the most adequate method to estimate pollen viability.

  8. Application of Luxol Fast Blue staining in locating the corticospinal tract in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Liu; Guangyu Shen; Guangming Lü; Xiaosong Gu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many methods for myelin staining,mordant,or the special reaction of osmic acid with lipoid is used according to different principles.The commonly used methods are classic Well staining ,classic lithium carbonate-haematine staining,fast green staining,silver staining ,etc.Luxol Fast Blue can brightly stain myelin sheath,and has certain specificity .The background can be very clean if there is proper differentiation,whereas Luxol Fast Blue is cheap and convenient to operate,thus it is an ideal staining reagent for routine myelin sheath.OBJECTIVE: To show the coricospinal tract of normal adult rats with Luxol Fast Blue shaining method.DESIGN:A repetitive measurement design.SETTINGS: Institute of Nuerobiology,Nantong University;Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University.MATERIALS: Six healthy adult male SD rats of clean dergree,weighing averagely 300 g.were provided by the experimental animal center of Nantong University.1 g/L Luxol Fast Blue solution was provided by Sigma Company;Leica CM1900 cryostat microtome by Leica Company;Leica DMR microscope by Leica Company.METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Staff Room of Human Anatomy,Nantong University in May 2005.The rats were given intraperitoneal injection of combined anesthetic(2 mL/kg),then the chest was open for perfusing saline and phosphate buffer containing formamint via heart. Brain and spinal cord were removed after 1 hour then fixed,then changed to phosphate buffer(pH 7.4)containing 300 g/L saccharu at 4 ℃.and stayed overnight,tissue blocks at pyramid,decussation of pyramid and cervical,thoracic,lumbar and sacral segments of spinal cord were removed to prepare continuous horizontal frozen sections(30 μm) after sedimentation,the sections were dried at room temperature.The corticospinal tract of normal adult rats were shown with Luxol Fast Blue staining method,and observed under Leica DMR microscope.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Positive fibers in

  9. Concentration-Dependent Staining of Lactotroph Vesicles by FM 4-64

    OpenAIRE

    Stenovec, Matjaž; Poberaj, Igor; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Hormones are released from neuroendocrine cells by passing through an exocytotic pore that forms after vesicle and plasma membrane fusion. An elegant way to study this process at the single-vesicle level is to use styryl dyes, which stain not only the membrane, but also the matrix of individual vesicles in some neuroendocrine cells. However, the mechanism by which the vesicle matrix is stained is not completely clear. One possibility is that molecules of the styryl dye in the bath solution di...

  10. Differential vital staining of normal fibroblasts and melanoma cells by an anionic conjugated polyelectrolyte

    OpenAIRE

    Magnusson, Karin; Appelqvist, Hanna; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; Wigenius, Jens; Karlsson, Thommie; Los, Marek Jan; Kågedal, Bertil; Jonasson, Jon; Nilsson, K.P

    2015-01-01

    Molecular probes for imaging of live cells are of great interest for studying biological and pathological processes. The anionic luminescent conjugated polythiophene (LCP) polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA), has previously been used for vital staining of cultured fibroblasts as well as transformed cells with results indicating differential staining due to cell phenotype. Herein, we investigated the behavior of PTAA in two normal and five transformed cells lines. PTAA fluorescence in normal cell...

  11. Nile Red staining of phytoplankton neutral lipids: species-specific fluorescence kinetics in various solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Natunen, Katariina; Seppälä, Jukka; Schwenk, Dagmar; Rischer, Heiko; Spilling, Kristian; Tamminen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Nile Red (NR) staining potentially offers a simple method for monitoring lipid accumulation in microalgal cultivation. However, variable staining efficiencies and methods have been reported. The effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol (EG) and glycerol on NR penetration with four different phytoplankton species representing different taxonomical groups was studied. Treatment with the solvents enhanced the NR fluorescence of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum during kinetic fluo...

  12. Adherence of Candida albicans to oral epithelial cells differentiated by Papanicolaou staining.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, D. W.; Walker, R; Lewis, M.A.; Allison, R T; Potts, A J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relative adherence of Candida albicans to oral epithelial cells differentiated by Papanicolaou staining. METHODS: Oral epithelial cells were collected from 10 healthy adults (five male, five female) and counted. Equal volumes of oral epithelial cells and candida were mixed and incubated. The epithelial cells from this mix were collected by filtration through 10 microns polycarbonate membrane filters. Cells retained on the membrane filters were stained with crystal vi...

  13. Herlant’s Tetrachrome Staining, a Useful Tool for Pituitary Adenoma Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Chinezu; Jacqueline Trouillas; Andrada Loghin; Angela Borda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The morphologic diagnosis of pituitary adenomas (PA) is based on immunohistochemistry (IHC). In Romania, IHC diagnosis of PA is restricted, all of the specific antibodies being very expensive. A histochemical staining, Herlant’s tetrachrome (HTCS), was described several years ago, but it was not widely used for diagnostic purposes because of technical difficulties. The aim of this paper is to bring into discussion this staining, to highlight its benefits, to improve the technica...

  14. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Duobin Chao; Shitan Ni

    2016-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation i...

  15. PAS staining of bronchoalveolar lavage cells for differential diagnosis of interstital lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zabel Peter; Hauber Hans P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a useful diagnostic tool in interstitial lunge diseases (ILD). However, differential cell counts are often non specific and immunocytochemistry is time consuming. Staining of glyoproteins by periodic acid Schiff (PAS) reaction may help in discriminating different forms of ILD. In addition, PAS staining is easy to perform. BAL cells from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 8), sarcoidosis (n = 9), and extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EA...

  16. Acid-Fast Staining and Petroff Hausser Chamber Counting of Mycobacterial Cells in Liquid Suspension

    OpenAIRE

    Treuer, Robin; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and rapid cell counts of mycobacterial species in culture are difficult to obtain. Here, a method using modified Kinyoun acid-fast staining was adapted for use with a Petroff-Hausser sperm and bacteria cell counting chamber by using a liquid suspension staining technique. Cell counts obtained by this method were compared to viable cell counts by agar plate counting, revealing accurate correlation.

  17. Detection of alkali-silica reaction swelling in concrete by staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1998-01-01

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and rhodamine B is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  18. Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by direct gram stain of vaginal fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegel, C A; Amsel, R; Holmes, K K

    1983-01-01

    To determine whether bacterial vaginosis (BV), also known as nonspecific vaginitis, could be diagnosed by evaluating a Gram stain of vaginal fluid, we examined samples from 60 women of whom 25 had clinical evidence of BV and 35 had candidal vaginitis or normal examinations. An inverse relationship between the quantity of the Lactobacillus morphotype (large gram-positive rods) and of the Gardnerella morphotype (small gram-variable rods) was noted on Gram stain (P less than 0.001). When Gram st...

  19. B-Amyloid Precursor Protein Staining of the Brain in Sudden Infant and Early Childhood Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Banner, Jytte; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm;

    2013-01-01

    To develop and validate a scoring method for assessing β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) staining in cerebral white matter and to investigate the occurrence, amount and deposition pattern based on the cause of death in infants and young children.......To develop and validate a scoring method for assessing β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) staining in cerebral white matter and to investigate the occurrence, amount and deposition pattern based on the cause of death in infants and young children....

  20. Intrapartum Amnioinfusion in Meconium Stained Amniotic Fluid- A Randomized Control Study In a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ashvin D Vachhani, Jitesh M Shah, Garima S Goel, Meghana N Mehta, Archish I Desai, Malati T Dalal

    2015-01-01

    "Objectives: The study was un-dertaken to evaluate maternal and Perinatal outcomes follow-ing transcervical intrapartum amnioinfusion in women with moderate to thick meconium stained amniotic fluid. Methods: A randomized control study was conducted on 200 women with moderate to thick meconium stained amniotic flu-id during labor. Group A (study group) of 100 cases received am-nioinfusion. Group B (control group) of 100 cases received standard obstetric care. Fetal heart rate monitori...

  1. Quantitative Comparison of Immunohistochemical Staining Intensity in Tissues Fixed in Formalin and Histochoice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Geoffrey Vince

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde fixatives have traditionally been used to preserve tissues as they impart excellent morphological preservation. Formaldehyde fixes tissue by cross linking, a process which can reduce the antigenicity of tissue and weakens the intensity of immunohistochemical stains. Preliminary studies have shown that Histochoice tissue fixative offers equal or greater staining intensity than neutral buffered formalin (NBF. This study compares these fixatives quantitatively and presents the results in unambiguous statistical terms.

  2. Kola nut (cola acuminata) extract as a substitute to histological tissue stain eosin

    OpenAIRE

    Mamman L sonfada; Sunday Akau Hena; Ibrahim M Wiam; Abubakar A Umar; Abubakar Danmaigoro; Sani A Shehu

    2012-01-01

    The application of natural dyes for staining of various biological tissues from an alternative source will decrease the expense for purchasing the synthetic dye and reduce their effects on human and environment. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the extraction of natural dye from Cola nut (Cola acuminata) using various solvents and its staining property on the rat tissues. The cola nut was pulvized using pestle and mortar, 5gram was used to make 5% of aqueous extract. ...

  3. A versatile new mineralized bone stain for simultaneous assessment of tetracycline and osteoid seams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, A R; Lundin, K D

    1989-05-01

    A versatile mineralized bone stain (MIBS) for demonstrating osteoid seams and tetracycline fluorescence simultaneously in thin or thick undecalcified sections has been developed. Bone specimens are fixed in 70% ethanol, but 10% buffered formalin is permissible. Depending upon one's preference, these specimens can be left unstained or be prestained before plastic embedding. Osteoid seams are stained green to jade green, or light to dark purple. Mineralized bone matrix is unstained or green. Osteoblast and osteoclast nuclei are light to dark purple, cytoplasm varies from slightly gray to pink. The identification of osteoid seams by this method agrees closely with identification by in vivo tetracycline uptake using the same section from the same biopsy. The method demonstrates halo volumes, an abnormal, lacunar, low density bone around viable osteocytes in purple. This phenomenon is commonly seen in vitamin D-resistant rickets, fluorosis, renal osteodystrophy, hyperparathyroidism, and is sometimes seen in fluoride treated osteoporotic patients. In osteomalacic bone, most osteoid seams are irregularly stained as indicated by the presence of unmineralized osteoid between mineralized lamellae. The method has been used effectively in staining new bone formation in hydroxyapatite implants and bone grafts. Old, unstained, plastic embedded undecalcified sections are stained as well as fresh sections after removal of the coverslip. This stain also promises to be valuable in the study of different metabolic bone diseases from the point of view of remodeling, histomorphometry, and pathology. PMID:2480003

  4. Rimmed vacuoles and the added value of SMI-31 staining in diagnosing sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, M F; Hoogendijk, J E; Moons, K G; Veldman, H; Badrising, U A; Wokke, J H

    2001-07-01

    Problems in diagnosing sporadic inclusion body myositis may arise if all clinical features fit a diagnosis of polymyositis, but the muscle biopsy shows some rimmed vacuoles. Recently, immunohistochemistry with an antibody directed against phosphorylated neurofilament (SMI-31) has been advocated as a diagnostic test for sporadic inclusion body myositis. The aims of the present study were to define a quantitative criterion to differentiate sporadic inclusion body myositis from polymyositis based on the detection of rimmed vacuoles in the haematoxylin-eosin staining and to evaluate the additional diagnostic value of the SMI-31 staining. Based on clinical criteria and creatine kinase levels in patients with endomysial infiltrates, 18 patients complied with the diagnosis of sporadic inclusion body myositis, and 17 with the diagnosis of polymyositis. A blinded observer counted the abnormal fibres in haematoxylin-eosin-stained sections and in SMI-31-stained sections. The optimal cut-off in the haematoxylin-eosin test was 0.3% vacuolated fibres. Adding the SMI-31 staining significantly increased the positive predictive value from 87 to 100%, but increased the negative predictive value only to small extent. We conclude that (1) patients with clinical and laboratory features of polymyositis, including response to treatment, may show rimmed vacuoles in their muscle biopsy and that (2) adding the SMI-31 stain can be helpful in differentiating patients who respond to treatment from patients who do not.

  5. Comparison between morphological and staining characteristics of live and dead eggs of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK Sarvel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni eggs are classified, according to morphological characteristics, as follows: viable mature and immature eggs; dead mature and immature eggs, shells and granulomas. The scope of this study was to compare the staining characteristics of different morphological types of eggs in the presence of fluorescent labels and vital dyes, aiming at differentiating live and dead eggs. The eggs were obtained from the intestines of infected mice, and put into saline 0.85%. The fluorescent labels were Hoechst 33258 and Acridine Orange + Ethidium Bromide and vital dyes (Trypan Blue 0.4% and Neutral Red 1%. When labelled with the probe Hoechst 33258, some immature eggs, morphologically considered viable, presented fluorescence (a staining characteristic detected only in dead eggs; mature eggs did not present fluorescence, and the other types of dead eggs, morphologically defined, showed fluorescence. As far as Acridine Orange + Ethidium Bromide are concerned, either the eggs considered to be live, or the dead ones, presented staining with green color, and only the hatched and motionless miracidium was stained with an orange color. Trypan Blue was not able to stain the eggs, considered to be dead but only dead miracidia which had emerged out of the shell. Neutral Red stained both live and dead eggs. Only the fluorescent Hoechst 33258 can be considered a useful tool for differentiation between dead and live eggs.

  6. Staining of Platyhelminthes by herbal dyes: An eco-friendly technique for the taxonomist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An environment compatible technique to stain Platyhelminthes, Fasciola gigantica, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Taenia solium, and Moniezia expansa using aqueous and alcoholic extract of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris, China rose (Hibiscus rosasinensis, and red rose (Rosa hybrida were described to minimized the deleterious effects of the synthetic dyes. Materials and Methods: Aqueous/ethanolic extracts of roses were extracted from the flowers while red beet was extracted from the roots. Results: Stained helminthes acquired a comparable level of pigmentation with the distinction of their internal structure in these natural dyes. The flukes (liver and rumen internal structure, oral and ventral/posterior sucker, cirrus sac, gravid uterus, testes, ovary, and vitallaria were appeared pink color in aqueous and alcoholic extract of either China or red rose and yellow to brown color in sugar beet stain. The interior of the proglottid of T. solium and M. expansa took yellow to brown color with good contrast in sugar beet stain and of pink to pink-red in China and red rose stain. Conclusion: The extract of roses (red rose followed by China rose followed by red beet possess the potential to replace the conventional stains in the taxonomic study of Platyhelminthes parasites.

  7. Periodic Acid-Schiff Staining Parallels the Immunoreactivity Seen By Direct Immunofluorescence in Autoimmune Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu Velez, Ana Maria; Upegui Zapata, Yulieth Alexandra; Howard, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Background: In many countries and laboratories, techniques such as direct immunofluorescence (DIF) are not available for the diagnosis of skin diseases. Thus, these laboratories are limited in the full diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases, vasculitis, and rheumatologic diseases. In our experience with these diseases and the patient's skin biopsies, we have noted a positive correlation between periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and immunofluorescence patterns; however, these were just empiric observations. In the current study, we aim to confirm these observations, given the concept that the majority of autoantibodies are glycoproteins and should thus be recognized by PAS staining. Aims: To compare direct immunofluorescent and PAS staining, in multiple autoimmune diseases that are known to exhibit specific direct immunofluorescent patterns. Materials and Methods: We studied multiple autoimmune skin diseases: Five cases of bullous pemphigoid, five cases of pemphigus vulgaris, ten cases of cutaneous lupus, ten cases of autoimmune vasculitis, ten cases of lichen planus (LP), and five cases of cutaneous drug reactions (including one case of erythema multiforme). In addition, we utilized 45 normal skin control specimens from plastic surgery reductions. Results: We found a 98% positive correlation between DIF and PAS staining patterns over all the disease samples. Conclusion: We recommend that laboratories without access to DIF always perform PAS staining in addition to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, for a review of the reactivity pattern. PMID:27114972

  8. Medications and Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Medications and Blood Pressure Updated:Jul 6,2016 When your blood pressure ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  9. Exploring the applicability of equine blood to bloodstain pattern analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Bethany A J; Banks, Craig E

    2016-07-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis (BPA) is the forensic application of the interpretation of distinct patterns which blood exhibits during a bloodletting incident, providing key evidence with its ability to map the sequence of events. Here, we explore the use of equine blood and investigate its suitability within the field of BPA. Blood is a complex fluid, and finding a suitable safe substitute to human blood that encompasses all of its characteristics has been the focus of many investigations. Animal blood has been concluded as the closest and therefore the most suitable alternate. However, it seems that currently only porcine blood is most prominently utilised.In this study, equine blood was investigated, using two different anti-clotting methods, where blood impacts were explored over a typical range of varying impact velocities upon a selection of commonly encountered surfaces. Key BPA parameters, such as the diameters of the resulting bloodstains, number of spines and area of origin were measured, which were subsequently applied into previously derived BPA equations.We find that defibrinated equine blood is a suitable alternative and offers the same conclusive outcomes to human blood. This gives bloodstain pattern investigators and researchers an additional choice of blood which can be of benefit when certain bloods are difficult to attain or when the activity involves the usage of a large quantity of blood. Additionally we explore the effect on BPA of aged blood, which revealed a significant decrease in stain diameter of up to 12.78 % when blood has been left for 57 days. A shelf life of no more than 12 days is recommended when blood is refrigerated at 4℃. PMID:25013163

  10. Blood vessels, circulation and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series, describes the vessels of the body's blood and lymphatic circulatory systems. Blood pressure and its regulatory systems are examined. The causes and management of hypertension are also explored. It is important that nurses and other healthcare professionals understand the various mechanisms involved in the regulation of blood pressure to prevent high blood pressure or ameliorate its damaging consequences.

  11. Fractal characteristics of May-Grunwald-Giemsa stained chromatin are independent prognostic factors for survival in multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela P Ferro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of computerized image analysis for the study of nuclear texture features has provided important prognostic information for several neoplasias. Recently fractal characteristics of the chromatin structure in routinely stained smears have shown to be independent prognostic factors in acute leukemia. In the present study we investigated the influence of the fractal dimension (FD of chromatin on survival of patients with multiple myeloma. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed 67 newly diagnosed patients from our Institution treated in the Brazilian Multiple Myeloma Study Group. Diagnostic work-up consisted of peripheral blood counts, bone marrow cytology, bone radiograms, serum biochemistry and cytogenetics. The International Staging System (ISS was used. In every patient, at least 40 digital nuclear images from diagnostic May-Grünwald-Giemsa stained bone marrow smears were acquired and transformed into pseudo-3D images. FD was determined by the Minkowski-Bouligand method extended to three dimensions. Goodness-of-fit of FD was estimated by the R(2 values in the log-log plots. The influence of diagnostic features on overall survival was analyzed in Cox regressions. Patients that underwent autologous bone marrow transplantation were censored at the day of transplantation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Median age was 56 years. According to ISS, 14% of the patients were stage I, 39% were stage II and 47% were stage III. Additional features of a bad prognosis were observed in 46% of the cases. When stratifying for ISS, both FD and its goodness-of-fit were significant prognostic factors in univariate analyses. Patients with higher FD values or lower goodness-of-fit showed a worse outcome. In the multivariate Cox-regression, FD, R(2, and ISS stage entered the final model, which showed to be stable in a bootstrap resampling study. CONCLUSIONS: Fractal characteristics of the chromatin texture in routine cytological preparations revealed relevant prognostic

  12. Diabetic Albuminuria Is Due to a Small Fraction of Nephrons Distinguished by Albumin-Stained Tubules and Glomerular Adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Kralik, Patricia M.; Long, Yunshi; Song, Ye; Yang, Lu; Wei, Haiyang; Coventry, Susan; Zheng, Shirong; Epstein, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    OVE26 diabetic mice develop severe albuminuria. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a pattern of intense albumin staining in a small subset of OVE26 tubules. Immunostaining was strikingly heterogeneous; some tubules stained intensely for albumin, but most tubules had weak or no staining. Serial sectioning showed that staining patterns were distinctive for each nephron. Electron microscopy revealed that albumin accumulated in villi and at the base of the brush border. Tubule cell injury, as ...

  13. Equivocal p16 Immunostaining in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Staining Patterns are Suggestive of HPV Status

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhongchuan Will; Weinreb, Ilan; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Perez-Ordoñez, Bayardo

    2012-01-01

    p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) is commonly used as a surrogate marker for human papillomavirus (HPV) detection in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). However, the HPV status of tumors not staining strongly for p16 is difficult to interpret and may require the use of PCR, not available in all laboratories, as a final arbiter. We aim to determine if staining pattern in equivocal p16 staining and correlation to the percentage of positively stained tumor cells is predictive of ...

  14. Fite-Faraco staining in combination with multiplex polymerase chain reaction: A new approach to leprosy diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Hena Hasanoor Reja; Nibir Biswas; Supratik Biswas; Sarbani Dasgupta; Imran Hussain Chowdhury; Surajita Banerjee; Tapas Chakraborty; Pijush Kumar Dutta; Basudev Bhattacharya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is not always an easy disease to diagnose, and patients can remain undiagnosed for longtime, not only at the peripheral clinics but also even at places with higher medical facilities, so, there is an urgent need for rapid and definitive modalities for leprosy diagnosis. This prospective study evaluates the ability of Fite-Faraco staining (FF staining) and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) over hematoxylin and eosin staining (H and E staining) and Ziehl-Neelsen stai...

  15. Tobacco-stained fingers: a clue for smoking-related disease or harmful alcohol use? A case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    John, Gregor; Pasche, Sephora; Rothen, Nicole; Charmoy, Alexia; Delhumeau-Cartier, Cécile; Genné, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Tobacco stain on fingers is frequent. However, there is scarce description of this clinical sign. We aimed to explore tobacco stain on fingers as a marker of tobacco-related disease independent of cumulative tobacco exposure, and to find behavioural and environmental characteristics associated with those stains. Design Case–control study. Setting A Swiss community hospital of 180 beds. Participants 49 adults presenting tobacco-tars staining on fingers were matched to 49 control smok...

  16. Lack of Methylene Blue Staining in Superficial Epithelia as a Possible Marker for Superficial Lateral Spread of Bile Duct Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Maetani

    1996-01-01

    epithelia. The cancerous epithelia stained significantly less often than either the normal (p = 0.000005 or the metaplastic (p = 0.001 epithelia. Evaluation of methylene blue staining during PTCS revealed that this stain was absorbed by the cholangial epithelia, not superficially stuck to it. The difference in methylene blue staining properties between the cancerous and normal epithelia could be helpful to clarify the boundary of superficial lateral spread of bile duct cancer.

  17. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  18. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  19. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is increased by the following: Previous blood clots A genetic predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) Multiple ...

  20. CEA blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinoembryonic antigen blood test ... A blood sample is needed . ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. ...

  1. Ketones blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight ... there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  2. Magnesium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  3. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  4. Blood Type Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Presents a blood type puzzle that provides a visual, hands-on mechanism by which students can examine blood group reactions. Offers students an opportunity to construct their own knowledge about blood types. (JRH)

  5. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics . ...

  6. What Is Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Member Blood Centers Our Partners What is blood? PUBLICATIONS EDUCATION PRESS ROOM BLOG CAREERS CONTACT ABC ... for patients who need it. One unit of blood can be separated into the following components: Nearly ...

  7. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... facts about high blood pressure [PDF-255K] . High Blood Pressure in the United States About 70 million ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... back to top How are Blood Clots in Pregnant Women Treated? Typically, blood clots are treated with ... you think you have one. If you are pregnant and have concerns about blood clots, talk with ...

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms include the following: High blood glucose High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased ... you should check and what your blood glucose levels should be. Checking your blood and then treating ...

  10. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure and should be taken seriously. Over time, consistently high blood pressure weakens and damages ... of landmark NIH blood pressure study confirm that lower blood pressure target can reduce ...

  11. Money for Blood and Markets for Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derpmann, Simon; Quante, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Ontario's Bill 178 proposing a Voluntary Blood Donations Act declares the offer or acceptance of payment for the donation of blood a legal offence and makes it subject to penalty. The bill reinvigorates a fundamental debate about the ethical problems associated with the payment of money for blood. Scarcity of blood donors is a recurring problem in most health systems, and monetary remuneration of the willingness to donate blood is regularly discussed--and sometimes practiced--as a means to overcome scarcity in blood. However, making blood an object of economic exchange has long aroused ethical concerns that often refer to the specific meaning of blood. From the perspective of a modern understanding of money as a metric of economic value, the exchange of money for blood--shed or given--is seen as ethically troubling, because it appears to imply a commensurability of the value of human life and economic wealth. In this paper, we begin with a general taxonomy of the types of arguments that speak in favour or against compensating donors for giving blood. We then describe the context in which the discussion about payment for blood arises, and of the specific aims and concerns that are brought forward in this context. This is used to reconstruct the normative background that supports the rejection of payment for blood as it is envisaged in Bill 178 and the aims of the proposal. We then argue that while a payment indeed changes the nature of a blood donation in an ethically considerable way, we do not believe that decisive arguments against the monetary remuneration of blood donations can be substantiated, at least not independently of assuming specific societal circumstances. Thus it may be possible to establish a stable and safe blood supply through just gratification while at the same time taking strong provisions against social disconnection, injustice, exploitation or heteronomy.

  12. Detection of Wolbachia endobacteria in Culex quinquefasciatus by Gimenez staining and confirmation by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muniaraj, R. Paramasivan, I.P. Sunish, N. Arunachalam, T. Mariappan, S. Victor Jerald Leo & K.J. Dhananjeyan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Wolbachia are common intracellular bacteria that are found in arthropods and nematodes.These endosymbionts are transmitted vertically through host eggs and alter host biology in diverse ways, includingthe induction of reproductive manipulations, such as feminization, parthenogenesis, male killing and sperm-eggincompatibility. Since they can also move horizontally across species boundaries, Wolbachia is gaining importancein recent days as it could be used as a biological control agent to control vector mosquitoes or for paratransgenicapproaches. However, the study of Wolbachia requires sophisticated techniques such as PCR and cell culturefacilities which cannot be affordable for many laboratories where the diseases transmitted by arthropod vectorsare common. Hence, it would be beneficial to develop a simple method to detect the presence of Wolbachia inarthropods.Method: In this study, we described a method of staining Wolbachia endobacteria, present in the reproductivetissues of mosquitoes. The reliability of this method was compared with Gram staining and PCR based detection.Results: The microscopic observation of the Gimenez stained smear prepared from the teased ovary of wildcaught and Wolbachia (+ Cx. quinquefasciatus revealed the presence of pink coloured pleomorphic cells ofWolbachia ranging from cocci, comma shaped cells to bacillus and chain forms. The ovaries of Wolbachia (–cured mosquito did not show any cell. Although Gram’s staining is a reliable differential staining for the otherbacteria, the bacterial cells in the smears from the ovaries of wild caught mosquitoes did not take the stain properlyand the cells were not clearly visible. The PCR amplified product from the pooled remains of wild caught andWolbachia (+ Cx. quinquefasciatus showed clear banding, whereas, no banding was observed for the negativecontrol (distilled water and Wolbachia (– Cx. quinquefasciatus.Interpretation & conclusion: The

  13. Comparison of urine Gram stain and urine culture to diagnose urinary tract infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Utami Putri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infection (are due to pathogen invasion of the urinary tract. The upper or lower tract may be affected, depending on the presence of infection in the kidney, or bladder and urethra. Infection of urinary tract affect up to 10% of children and are the most common bacterial infection in infants and young children worldwide. The prevalence of UTI is 3-5% in girls and 1% in boys. Urine culture is considered to be the gold standard diagnostic test for UTI. However, Gram stains of uncentrifuged urine have been done in rural health centers and laboratories in peripheral areas that lack facilities to evaluate urine specimens. Gram stains of urine may be an effective method for ruling out UTI in rural health center patients, thus saving time and money in impoverished settings.Objective To compare urine Gram stain and urine culture as diagnostic tests for in children.Methods This cross-sectional study was held in H. Adam Malik Hospital from May to June 2010. The 54 participants were aged 0 - 14 years, suspected to have UTI and recruited by consecutive sampling. Uurine was collected after the external urethral orifice was cleaned. A drop of the urine specimen was Gram stained and examined by a light microscope, while the remainder of the specimen was used for laboratory urine cultures. If Gram negative bacteria were observed by Gram stain, we considered the subject to have UTI.Results The sensitivity and specificity of urine Gram stain compared to urine culture were 88% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were 100% and 90%, respectively.Conclusion Uurine Gram stain may be a good alternative to urine culture for diagnosing UTI in children living in areas with limited health care facilities. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:121-4.].

  14. Comparison of urine Gram stain and urine culture to diagnose urinary tract infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Utami Putri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infection (are due to pathogen invasion of the urinary tract. The upper or lower tract may be affected, depending on the presence of infection in the kidney, or bladder and urethra. Infection of urinary tract affect up to 10% of children and are the most common bacterial infection in infants and young children worldwide. The prevalence of UTI is 3-5% in girls and 1% in boys. Urine culture is considered to be the gold standard diagnostic test for UTI. However, Gram stains of uncentrifuged urine have been done in rural health centers and laboratories in peripheral areas that lack facilities to evaluate urine specimens. Gram stains of urine may be an effective method for ruling out UTI in rural health center patients, thus saving time and money in impoverished settings. Objective To compare urine Gram stain and urine culture as diagnostic tests for in children. Methods This cross-sectional study was held in H. Adam Malik Hospital from May to June 2010. The 54 participants were aged 0 - 14 years, suspected to have UTI and recruited by consecutive sampling. Uurine was collected after the external urethral orifice was cleaned. A drop of the urine specimen was Gram stained and examined by a light microscope, while the remainder of the specimen was used for laboratory urine cultures. If Gram negative bacteria were observed by Gram stain, we considered the subject to have UTI. Results The sensitivity and specificity of urine Gram stain compared to urine culture were 88% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were 100% and 90%, respectively. Conclusion Uurine Gram stain may be a good alternative to urine culture for diagnosing UTI in children living in areas with limited health care facilities. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:121-4.].

  15. Tear staining in pigs: a potential tool for welfare assessment on commercial farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telkänranta, H; Marchant-Forde, J N; Valros, A

    2016-02-01

    Tear staining or chromodacryorrhea refers to a dark stain below the inner corner of the eye, caused by porphyrin-pigmented secretion from the Harderian gland. It has been shown to be a consistent indicator of stress in rats and to correlate with social stress and a barren environment in pigs. The current study was, to our knowledge, the first to test it on commercial pig farms as a potential welfare indicator. The study was carried out on three commercial farms in Finland, in connection to a larger study on the effects of different types of manipulable objects on tail and ear biting and other behavioural parameters. Farm A was a fattening farm, on which 768 growing-finishing pigs were studied in 73 pens. Farm B had a fattening unit, in which 656 growing-finishing pigs were studied in 44 pens, and a farrowing unit, in which 29 sows and their litters totalling 303 piglets were studied in 29 pens. Farm C was a piglet-producing farm, on which 167 breeder gilts were studied in 24 pens. Data collection included individual-level scoring of tear staining; scoring of tail and ear damage in the growing-finishing pigs and breeder gilts; a novel object test for the piglets; and a novel person test for the growing-finishing pigs on Farm B and the breeder gilts on Farm C. On Farm A, tear staining was found to correlate with tail damage scores (n=768, rs=0.14, Ppigs on Farm B, tear staining of the left eye correlated with tail damage (n=656, rs=0.12, Ptail and ear damage were low, it was concluded that tear staining has promising potential as a new, additional welfare indicator for commercial pig farming. Further research is needed on the mechanisms of tear staining. PMID:26303891

  16. Evaluation of immunoperoxidase staining technique in the diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Savitri

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We describe a simple procedure of Immunoperoxidase (IP technique, using indigenously raised antibody, to screen corneal scrapings for Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites. This study sought to determine the utility of this test in the diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Methods: A high titre polyclonal antibody against a local clinical isolate (axenic of Acanthamoeba species (trophozoite lysate antigen was raised in rabbits and used for standardization of IP technique for corneal scrapings. Twenty two smears of corneal scrapings, collected from patients showing Acanthamoeba cysts in corneal scrapings stained with calcofluorwhite (pool-1 and patients showing no cysts in similar scrapings (pool-2, were coded and stained by IP technique by a masked technician. All 22 patients had also been tested for bacteria, fungus, and Acanthamoeba in their corneal scrapings by smears and cultures. IP stained smears were examined for organisms including cysts and trophozoites of Acanthamoeba and background staining by two observers masked to the results of other smears and cultures. The validity of the IP test in detection of Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites was measured by sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value in comparison (McNemar test for paired comparison with calcofluor white staining and culture. Results: Based on the readings of observer 1 and compared to calcofluor white staining, the IP test had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 94%, positive predictive value of 80% and negative predictive value of 100%. When compared to culture, the values were 83%, 100%, 100% and 94% respectively. Trophozoites missed in calcofluor white stained smears, were detected in 2 out of 6 cases of culture-positive Acanthamoeba keratitis. The Kappa coefficient of interobserver agreement was determined as fair (30.4%. Conclusion: The immunoperoxidase technique is a simple and useful test in the diagnosis of

  17. Staining potential of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF foam on dental restorations in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the staining potential of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF foam on restorations in vitro. Materials and Methods: Two hundred ovine molars were used. Except 40 teeth remained unrestored as the controls, each was randomly selected to receive one of four restorative materials including preparation without restoration, glass ionomer cement (GIC, resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC, or composite resin (CR. Following the procedure, topical APF was applied with a predetermined frequency. Staining formation was then evaluated. Results: APF-treated teeth and restorations appeared with a darker shade, an orange-colored surface and/or a brown margin. The staining rates on GIC, RMGIC, and CR were 50%, 27.5%, and 17.5%, respectively. GIC had a higher staining potential than RMGIC (χ2 = 4.266, df = 1, P = 0.039 and CR (χ2 = 9.448, df = 1, P = 0.002, whereas the difference between RMGIC and CR was indiscernible (χ2 = 1.147, df = 1, P = 0.284. Repeated applications of topical APF increased the risk of staining on RMGIC (χ2 = 8.436 df = 1, P = 0.004 and CR (χ2 = 6.873, df = 1, P = 0.009 but not on GIC (χ2 = 0, df = 1, P = 1 and the controls (χ2 = 4.051, df = 3, P = 0.256. Conclusions: APF-foam-related staining was confirmed in vitro. GIC was more susceptible to fluoride staining. This study suggested aesthetic implications when applying fluorides to restored teeth.

  18. MicroCT for comparative morphology: simple staining methods allow high-contrast 3D imaging of diverse non-mineralized animal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metscher Brian D

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative, functional, and developmental studies of animal morphology require accurate visualization of three-dimensional structures, but few widely applicable methods exist for non-destructive whole-volume imaging of animal tissues. Quantitative studies in particular require accurately aligned and calibrated volume images of animal structures. X-ray microtomography (microCT has the potential to produce quantitative 3D images of small biological samples, but its widespread use for non-mineralized tissues has been limited by the low x-ray contrast of soft tissues. Although osmium staining and a few other techniques have been used for contrast enhancement, generally useful methods for microCT imaging for comparative morphology are still lacking. Results Several very simple and versatile staining methods are presented for microCT imaging of animal soft tissues, along with advice on tissue fixation and sample preparation. The stains, based on inorganic iodine and phosphotungstic acid, are easier to handle and much less toxic than osmium, and they produce high-contrast x-ray images of a wide variety of soft tissues. The breadth of possible applications is illustrated with a few microCT images of model and non-model animals, including volume and section images of vertebrates, embryos, insects, and other invertebrates. Each image dataset contains x-ray absorbance values for every point in the imaged volume, and objects as small as individual muscle fibers and single blood cells can be resolved in their original locations and orientations within the sample. Conclusion With very simple contrast staining, microCT imaging can produce quantitative, high-resolution, high-contrast volume images of animal soft tissues, without destroying the specimens and with possibilities of combining with other preparation and imaging methods. Such images are expected to be useful in comparative, developmental, functional, and quantitative studies of

  19. Diagnostic value of immunohistochemical staining of GP73, GPC3, DCP, CD34, CD31, and reticulin staining in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuzhe; Zhang, Jianping; Chen, Haiyan; Sheng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Zhiyan; Zhang, Cuijuan

    2013-09-01

    It has been reported that Golgi protein-73 (GP73), glypican-3 (GPC3), and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) could serve as serum markers for the early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to evaluate a panel of immunostaining markers (including GP73, GPC3, DCP, CD34, and CD31) as well as reticulin staining to distinguish HCC from the mimickers. Our results revealed that CD34 immunostaining and reticulin staining were highly sensitive for the diagnosis of HCC. A special immunoreaction pattern of GP73--a diffuse coarse-block pattern in a perinuclear region or a concentrated cluster-like or cord-like pattern in a certain part of the cytoplasm--was observed in HCC cells, in contrast to the cytoplasmic fine-granular pattern in surrounding non-tumor cells and non-malignant nodules. This coarse-block pattern correlated significantly with less differentiated HCC. In comparison, GPC3 displayed a good advantage in diagnosing well-differentiated HCC. In our study, DCP and CD31 showed little diagnostic value for HCC as an immunostaining marker. When GP73, GPC3, and CD34 were combined, the specificity improved to 96.6%. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the immunohistochemical panel of GP73, GPC3, and CD34 as well as reticulin staining is highly specific for the pathological diagnosis of HCC. PMID:23686365

  20. Diagnostic value of immunohistochemical staining of GP73, GPC3, DCP, CD34, CD31, and reticulin staining in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuzhe; Zhang, Jianping; Chen, Haiyan; Sheng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Zhiyan; Zhang, Cuijuan

    2013-09-01

    It has been reported that Golgi protein-73 (GP73), glypican-3 (GPC3), and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) could serve as serum markers for the early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to evaluate a panel of immunostaining markers (including GP73, GPC3, DCP, CD34, and CD31) as well as reticulin staining to distinguish HCC from the mimickers. Our results revealed that CD34 immunostaining and reticulin staining were highly sensitive for the diagnosis of HCC. A special immunoreaction pattern of GP73--a diffuse coarse-block pattern in a perinuclear region or a concentrated cluster-like or cord-like pattern in a certain part of the cytoplasm--was observed in HCC cells, in contrast to the cytoplasmic fine-granular pattern in surrounding non-tumor cells and non-malignant nodules. This coarse-block pattern correlated significantly with less differentiated HCC. In comparison, GPC3 displayed a good advantage in diagnosing well-differentiated HCC. In our study, DCP and CD31 showed little diagnostic value for HCC as an immunostaining marker. When GP73, GPC3, and CD34 were combined, the specificity improved to 96.6%. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the immunohistochemical panel of GP73, GPC3, and CD34 as well as reticulin staining is highly specific for the pathological diagnosis of HCC.

  1. Pattern of distribution of blood group antigens on human epidermal cells during maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Buschard, Karsten; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh

    1984-01-01

    The distribution in human epidermis of A, B, and H blood group antigens and of a precursor carbohydrate chain, N-acetyl-lactosamine, was examined using immunofluorescence staining techniques. The material included tissue from 10 blood group A, 4 blood group B, and 9 blood group O persons. Murine...... on the lower spinous cells whereas H antigen was seen predominantly on upper spinous cells or on the granular cells. Epithelia from blood group A or B persons demonstrated A or B antigens, respectively, but only if the tissue sections were trypsinized before staining. In such cases A or B antigens were found...... monoclonal antibodies were used to identify H antigen (type 2 chain) and N-acetyl-lactosamine. Human antisera were used to identify A and B antigens. In all groups N-acetyl-lactosamine and H antigen were found on the cell membranes of the spinous cell layer. N-acetyl-lactosamine was present mainly...

  2. Gram Stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea . Gram-positive bacilli— Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) can cause skin infections or pneumonia (also a bioterrorism agent ); Listeria monocytogenes can cause foodborne ... an AFB (acid-fast bacillus) smear and culture may be ordered on a ...

  3. Wood stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NERVOUS SYSTEM Brain damage Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Lightheadedness SKIN Burn Holes in the skin or tissues under the ... by IV) Hemodialysis (kidney machine) Surgery to remove burned skin Tube through the mouth into the stomach to ...

  4. Characterisation of medieval yellow silver stained glass from Convento de Cristo in Tomar, Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellow decoration effects in stained glasses using silver staining were first applied in the beginning of the 14th century. The glass piece being decorated was usually painted on its side intended to be facing the exterior environment, and then fired to temperatures between 500 and 650 oC, resulting in colours ranging from pale lemon to deep orange. Stained glass fragments painted by this process and belonging to the Convento de Cristo, in Tomar, Portugal, were characterised using micro-PIXE, and complemented with other analytical techniques, namely UV-Vis spectroscopy and XRF. Preliminary analysis showed that a mixture of Ag and Cu was used for the production of the yellow staining. In order to understand this staining process and the influence of the firing temperature on the resulting colours, several soda and potash glasses with compositions similar to those of medieval glasses were produced and characterised. The role played by the addition of Cu in the final colours was also investigated.

  5. Specific in vivo staining of astrocytes in the whole brain after intravenous injection of sulforhodamine dyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Appaix

    Full Text Available Fluorescent staining of astrocytes without damaging or interfering with normal brain functions is essential for intravital microscopy studies. Current methods involved either transgenic mice or local intracerebral injection of sulforhodamine 101. Transgenic rat models rarely exist, and in mice, a backcross with GFAP transgenic mice may be difficult. Local injections of fluorescent dyes are invasive. Here, we propose a non-invasive, specific and ubiquitous method to stain astrocytes in vivo. This method is based on iv injection of sulforhodamine dyes and is applicable on rats and mice from postnatal age to adulthood. The astrocytes staining obtained after iv injection was maintained for nearly half a day and showed no adverse reaction on astrocytic calcium signals or electroencephalographic recordings in vivo. The high contrast of the staining facilitates the image processing and allows to quantify 3D morphological parameters of the astrocytes and to characterize their network. Our method may become a reference for in vivo staining of the whole astrocytes population in animal models of neurological disorders.

  6. R-phycoerythrin-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myun Soo; Kim, Tae Sung

    2013-05-01

    Phycoerythrin (PE) is a type of phycobiliproteins found in cyanobacteria and red algae. PE-conjugated antibodies are broadly used for flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Because nonspecific binding of antibodies results in decreased analytic accuracy, numerous efforts have been made to unveil cases and mechanisms of nonspecific bindings. However, nonspecific binding of specific cell types by a fluorescent dye-conjugated form of antibody has been rarely reported. In the present study, we discovered that PE-conjugated antibodies, but not FITC- or APC-antibodies, selectively stained lamina propria plasma cells (LP-PCs) from the murine small intestine after membrane permeabilization. We demonstrated that LP-PC-selective staining with PE-antibodies was not due to interactions of antibody-epitope or antibody-Fc receptor. This unexpected staining by PE-antibody was not dependent on the mouse strain of LP-PCs, experimental methods, or origin species of the antibody, but dependent on PE itself. This phenomenon was also observed in plasma cells isolated from bone marrow, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, in vitro activated B cells and in vivo generated LP-PCs were also selectively stained by PE-conjugated antibodies. Taken together, these results show that PE-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

  7. Characterisation of medieval yellow silver stained glass from Convento de Cristo in Tomar, Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, J. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Vilarigues, M. [Dep. de Conservacao e Restauro, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); VICARTE, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Ruivo, A. [VICARTE, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); REQUIMTE, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Corregidor, V.; Silva, R.C. da [Unidade de Fisica e Aceleradores, LFI, ITN, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); CFNUL, Av., Prof. Gama Pinto n 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, L.C., E-mail: lcalves@itn.pt [Unidade de Fisica e Aceleradores, LFI, ITN, E.N.10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); CFNUL, Av., Prof. Gama Pinto n 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    Yellow decoration effects in stained glasses using silver staining were first applied in the beginning of the 14th century. The glass piece being decorated was usually painted on its side intended to be facing the exterior environment, and then fired to temperatures between 500 and 650 {sup o}C, resulting in colours ranging from pale lemon to deep orange. Stained glass fragments painted by this process and belonging to the Convento de Cristo, in Tomar, Portugal, were characterised using micro-PIXE, and complemented with other analytical techniques, namely UV-Vis spectroscopy and XRF. Preliminary analysis showed that a mixture of Ag and Cu was used for the production of the yellow staining. In order to understand this staining process and the influence of the firing temperature on the resulting colours, several soda and potash glasses with compositions similar to those of medieval glasses were produced and characterised. The role played by the addition of Cu in the final colours was also investigated.

  8. [Is amalgam stained dentin a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D

    2016-06-01

    After the removal of amalgam restorations, black staining of dentin is often observed, which is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from amalgam. A study was carried out to determine whether this amalgam stained dentin is a proper substrate for bonding resin composites. A literature study and an in vitro study showed that Sn and Zn in particular are found in amalgam stained dentin, and this was the case only in demineralised dentin. In vitro, demineralised dentin acted as porte d'entrÈe for amalgam corrosion products. Bond strength tests with 5 adhesive strategies showed no differences between bond strengths to amalgam stained and to sound dentin, but did show different failure types. A clinical study showed good survival of extensive cusp replacing resin composite restorations. No failures were attributed to inadequate adhesion. It is concluded that staining of dentin by amalgam corrosion products has no negative effect upon bond strength of resin composite. It is suggested that Sn and Zn may have a beneficial effect upon dentin, thus compensating the effects of previous carious attacks, preparation trauma and physico-chemical challenges during clinical lifetime. PMID:27275662

  9. Toxic effects of Hoechst staining and UV irradiation on preimplantation development of parthenogenetically activated mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versieren, Karen; Heindryckx, Björn; Qian, Chen; Gerris, Jan; De Sutter, Petra

    2014-02-01

    Parthenogenetic activation of oocytes is a helpful tool to obtain blastocysts, of which the inner cell mass may be used for derivation of embryonic stem cells. In order to improve activation and embryonic development after parthenogenesis, we tried to use sperm injection and subsequent removal of the sperm head to mimic the natural Ca2+ increases by release of the oocyte activating factor. Visualization of the sperm could be accomplished by Hoechst staining and ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. To exclude negative effects of this treatment, we examined toxicity on activated mouse oocytes. After activation, oocytes were incubated in Hoechst 33342 or 33258 stain and exposed to UV irradiation. The effects on embryonic development were evaluated. Our results showed that both types of Hoechst combined with UV irradiation have toxic effects on parthenogenetically activated mouse oocytes. Although activation and cleavage rate were not affected, blastocyst formation was significantly reduced. Secondly, we used MitoTracker staining for removal of the sperm. Sperm heads were stained before injection and removed again after 1 h. However, staining was not visible anymore in all oocytes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. In case the sperm could be removed, most oocytes died after 1 day. As MitoTracker was also not successful, alternative methods for sperm identification should be investigated.

  10. Vertebral angiography of cerebellar astrocytoma. Tumor stain, tumor circulation, CT and angiography in diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitaoka, K.; Ito, T.; Tashiro, K.; Abe, H.; Tsuru, M.; Miyasaka, K. (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-05-01

    Thirteen cases of cerebellar astrocytoma were examined primarily for tumor stain and pathological tumor circulation by angiography and CT. Tumor stain was observed in only one case by cerebral angiogram. A tumor was demonstrated as an avascular mass in the remaining 12 cases. It is suggested that mural nodules of cystic lesions should have certain weight and sizes so that they could be demonstrated as tumor stain. In the supratentorial region, five of the 12 low-grade astrocytoma exhibited abnormal tumor stain and tumor circulation by cerebral angiogram. It is considered that supratentorial and posterior fossa astrocytoma must usually exhibit different pathological tumor circulation by cerebral angiogram, since each group has distinctive clinical and biological characteristics. CT was performed in 7 of 13 cases. It appeared to be more useful than cerebral angiography in the morphological diagnosis. Especially in cystic tumors, CT produced minute information concerning peritumoral edema, enhancement of margin of cystic astrocytoma after intravenous contrast medium, and marginal enhancement with layering in the dependent part of the cyst. Neuroradiological differential diagnosis of cerebellar astrocytoma and cerebellar hemagioblastoma by CT was difficult in the cases of tumors. However, both tumors were differentiated from each other with ease by tumor stain and tumor circulation in cerebral angiography. Thus, it is concluded that cerebral angiography is superior to CT in differential diagnosis between cerebellar astrocytoma and cerebellar hemangioblastoma.

  11. Temporal variation of VOC emission from solvent and water based wood stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Loiotile, Annamaria Demarinis; Fracchiolla, Roberta; Palmisani, Jolanda; Saracino, Maria Rosaria; Tutino, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Solvent- and water-based wood stains were monitored using a small test emission chamber in order to characterize their emission profiles in terms of Total and individual VOCs. The study of concentration-time profiles of individual VOCs enabled to identify the compounds emitted at higher concentration for each type of stain, to examine their decay curve and finally to estimate the concentration in a reference room. The solvent-based wood stain was characterized by the highest Total VOCs emission level (5.7 mg/m3) that decreased over time more slowly than those related to water-based ones. The same finding was observed for the main detected compounds: Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Xylenes, Styrene, alpha-Pinene and Camphene. On the other hand, the highest level of Limonene was emitted by a water-based wood stain. However, the concentration-time profile showed that water-based product was characterized by a remarkable reduction of the time of maximum and minimum emission: Limonene concentration reached the minimum concentration in about half the time compared to the solvent-based product. According to AgBB evaluation scheme, only one of the investigated water-based wood stains can be classified as a low-emitting product whose use may not determine any potential adverse effect on human health.

  12. Under-air staining of the anterior capsule using Trypan blue with a 30 G needle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giammaria D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Daniele Giammaria,1 Michele Giannotti,2 Angelo Scopelliti,1 Giacomo Pellegrini,1 Bruno Giannotti11Azienda Ospedaliera Ospedali Riuniti Marche Nord, Fano, Italy; 2Catholic University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: The original technique of staining the anterior capsule of the lens with Trypan blue involves the injection of an air bubble in the anterior chamber. A drawback of this technique is the possible instability of the anterior chamber caused by the sudden exit of air when the dye is injected with the cannula through the side-port incision. Other staining techniques that use viscoelastic substances to increase the stability of the anterior chamber and to dose the injected dye have been described. The authors present an under-air staining technique of the anterior capsule using one drop of Trypan blue injected with a 30 G needle through the peripheral cornea. This procedure prevents the air bubble from escaping the anterior chamber and allows fast and selective staining of the capsule.Keywords: Trypan blue, staining technique, dye, cataract surgery, capsulorhexis

  13. Effect of sodium hexanitrocobaltate (III) decomposition on its staining of intracellular potassium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D B; Dodge, S M; Lee, J R; Tallman, G

    1990-01-01

    The effect was examined of the chemical decomposition of the potassium stain sodium hexanitrocobaltate (III) (SHC), on its ability to produce stain granules of consistent size that could be used to estimate the K+ contents of stomatal guard cells. Stomata in detached epidermis from leaves of Vicia faba (fava bean) were stimulated to accumulate K+ by treating them with fusicoccin. Stomatal apertures and the fraction of guard cell area covered by K+ precipitate granules (K+ score) were measured by digitizing photographic enlargements, and K+ scores were correlated with the age of stain that had been stored either in open or closed containers. The ability of stain aged in open containers to produce consistent fractional cell coverage was compared to 1) the ability of identically treated stain to precipitate K+ from solutions of KCI, and to 2) the kinetics of decomposition of SHC. It was found that the fractional coverage of guard cells of stomata opened to the same apertures decreased with a first order rate constant of 2.3 x 10(-5)/sec. The mass of precipitate formed by treatment of KCl solutions was unchanged for 2 hr after initial preparation of the SHC, and decreased thereafter with a first order rate constant of 1.0 x 10(-5)/sec. When stored in tightly sealed containers, nearly 100 hr were required for an occasionally opened bottle of SHC to decay to the same efficacy as a solution left open to the air for 8 hr. PMID:1694311

  14. Optimal iodine staining of cardiac tissue for X-ray computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Butters

    Full Text Available X-ray computed tomography (XCT has been shown to be an effective imaging technique for a variety of materials. Due to the relatively low differential attenuation of X-rays in biological tissue, a high density contrast agent is often required to obtain optimal contrast. The contrast agent, iodine potassium iodide ([Formula: see text], has been used in several biological studies to augment the use of XCT scanning. Recently I2KI was used in XCT scans of animal hearts to study cardiac structure and to generate 3D anatomical computer models. However, to date there has been no thorough study into the optimal use of I2KI as a contrast agent in cardiac muscle with respect to the staining times required, which has been shown to impact significantly upon the quality of results. In this study we address this issue by systematically scanning samples at various stages of the staining process. To achieve this, mouse hearts were stained for up to 58 hours and scanned at regular intervals of 6-7 hours throughout this process. Optimal staining was found to depend upon the thickness of the tissue; a simple empirical exponential relationship was derived to allow calculation of the required staining time for cardiac samples of an arbitrary size.

  15. Combined alcian blue and silver staining of subnanogram quantities of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J; Heinegård, D; Poulsen, J H

    1993-01-01

    Proteoglycans stain weakly in polyacrylamide gels by traditional protein stains such as coomassie brilliant blue or silver. In the present work preparations of large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage were used to evaluate a convenient staining method based on successive...... staining with alcian blue and neutral silver. The method is developed for sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; with ultrathin minigels in a semiautomated electrophoresis system, takes 1 1/2 h, and uses stable reagents. Preparations, electrophoresis, and staining of up to 24 samples...

  16. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: In vitro assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarroz, M.O. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010-180 Natal, RN (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: adenilso@uerj.br; Rocha, G.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Frydman, J.N.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010-180 Natal, RN (Brazil); Rocha, V.C.; Pereira, M.O. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99 m({sup 99m}Tc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  17. Usefulness of quantitative buffy coat blood parasite detection system in diagnosis of malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto M; Rodrigues S; Desouza R; Verenkar M

    2001-01-01

    A rapid test for diagnosis of malaria based on acridine orange staining of centrifuged blood samples in a microhematocrit tube (QBC) was compared with thick and thin peripheral blood smears in 2274 samples. Malaria was diagnosed in 239 (10.5%) patients by Leishman′s staining technique and QBC method. The QBC method allowed detection of an additional 89 (3.9%) cases. Thus the prevalence rate of malaria during the study was 14.4%. In 1946 patients who were negative b...

  18. BUN - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood urea nitrogen ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health ... if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this ...

  19. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how often you should check and what your blood glucose levels should be. Checking your blood and then treating ... I Treat Hyperglycemia? You can often lower your blood glucose level by exercising. However, if your blood glucose is ...

  20. Silver methenamine staining for scanning electron microscopy of bone sections containing biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayssinet, P; Hanker, J S; Rouquet, N; Primout, I; Giammara, B

    1999-01-01

    Sections of tissue containing orthopedic materials are currently used to study the compatibility of those materials and to perform electron probe microanalysis at the material-tissue interface. Identification of the cells in contact with the material by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is of interest. We have developed a method for staining cells and tissue structures embedded in polymethyl methacrylate with silver methenamine once the sections have been obtained. Sections were prepared by grinding, and the silver methenamine was applied after oxidation with periodic acid. The procedure was carried out in a microwave oven. Backscatter SEM showed staining of the cell nucleus membrane, chromatin, the nuclear organizers, and the chromosomes of dividing cells. The cytoplasm and the cytoplasmic membrane were also stained. Collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix and the mineralized matrix of bone were labeled. Material particles in the macrophages were easily recognizable and Energy-Dispersive Spectrometer were not impaired by the presence of silver in the preparation. PMID:10190255

  1. Enamel susceptibility to red wine staining after 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Bittencourt Berger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been expressed regarding the staining of enamel surface by different beverages after bleaching. This study investigated the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on enamel surface stained with wine after whitening treatments. Flat and polished bovine enamel surfaces were submitted to two commercially available 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents or kept in 100% humidity, as a control group (n = 10. Specimens of all groups were immersed in red wine for 48 h at 37°C, immediately, 24 h or 1 week after treatments. All specimens were ground into powder and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. Data were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test at 5% significance level. The amount of wine pigments uptake by enamel submitted to bleaching treatments was statistically higher than that of control group, independently of the evaluation time. Results suggested that wine staining susceptibility was increased by bleaching treatments.

  2. Study of van Gieson's picrofuchsin staining on second-harmonic generation in type I collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanping Liu; Zhengfei Zhuang; Lingling Zhao; Junle Qu; Xiaoyuan Deng

    2008-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is a recently developed nonlinear optical imaging modality for imaging tissue structures with submicron resolution and is a potent tool for visualizing pathological effects of diseases. In this letter, we present our investigation on the influence of van Gieson's (VG) alcoholic picrofuchsin staining on SHG in type I collagen (from tendon-rich C57BL/6). Multi-channel imaging and spectra analysis show that the strong SHG signal produced in fresh collagen type I fiber has been greatly suppressed after VG staining, which indicates that staining may induce the structural or characteristic changes of SHG-dependent crystal formed by collagen constituents, such as glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline.

  3. Intraoperative immunohistochemistry staining of sentinel nodes in breast cancer: Clinical and economical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.; Paaschburg, B.; Balslev, E.;

    2008-01-01

    .0001) for isolated tumor cell metastasis, from 56 to 36.4% (p < 0.02) for micrometastasis, and from 16 to 5% (p < 0.01) for macrometastasis. The surgical procedures were slightly prolonged for lumpectomies but not for mastectomies after introducing intraoperative IHC staining. The cost analysis showed an......The study aimed to evaluate intraoperative immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining of sentinel nodes in primary breast cancer surgery. We analysed retrospectively 1209 consecutive sentinel node procedures and compared the rate of late positive metastases in sentinel node biopsy (SNB) and the duration...... of the surgical procedures before (n = 706) and after (n = 503) introducing intraoperatice IHC on frozen section. We also did a cost analysis. Intraoperative IHC staining led to a lowering of the late positive SNB rate. Introducing IHC gave a decrease in the late positive rate from 93 to 52% (p < 0...

  4. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-05-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi–related studies.

  5. Automatic segmentation and classification of tendon nuclei from IHC stained images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuok, Chan-Pang; Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I.-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2015-12-01

    Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining is commonly used for detecting cells in microscopy. It is used for analyzing many types of diseases, e.g. breast cancer. Dispersion problem often exist at cell staining which will affect the accuracy of automatic counting. In this paper, we introduce a new method to overcome this problem. Otsu's thresholding method is first applied to exclude the background, so that only cells with dispersed staining are left at foreground, and then refinement will be applied by local adaptive thresholding method according to the irregularity index of the segmented shape at foreground. The segmentation results are also compared to the refinement results using Otsu's thresholding method. Cell classification based on the shape and color indices obtained from the segmentation result is applied to determine the cell condition into normal, abnormal and suspected abnormal cases.

  6. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  7. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  8. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine-Zn(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low-cost non-precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine-Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine-Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine-Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi-related studies. PMID:27198968

  9. Double side multicrystalline silicon passivation by one step stain etching-based porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Seifeddine Belhadj; Ben Rabha, Mohamed; Bessais, Brahim [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of stain etching-based porous silicon on the double side multicrystalline silicon. Special attention is given to the use of the stain etched PS as an antireflection coating as well as for surface passivating capabilities. Stain etching of double side multicrystalline silicon leads to the formation of PS nanostructures, that dramatically decrease the surface reflectivity from 30% to about 7% and increase the effective lifetime from 1 {mu}s to 10 {mu}s at a minority carrier density ({Delta}n) of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. These results let us correlate the rise of the lifetime values to the photoluminescence intensity to the hydrogen and oxide passivation as shown by FTIR analysis. This low-cost PS formation process can be applied in the photovoltaic cell technology as a standard procedure (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Staining of Langerhans Cells with Monoclonal Antibodies to Macrophages and Lymphoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Kathleen A.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Springer, Timothy A.; Gigli, Irma; Thorbecke, G. Jeanette

    1983-06-01

    Langerhans cells are Ia-bearing antigen-presenting cells in the epidermis that share many functions with macrophages. We have used monoclonal antibodies to the macrophage antigens, Mac-2 and -3, Ia antigen, Fc fragment receptor, and the common leukocyte antigen CLA to compare the cell surface antigens of these cells with those of interdigitating and follicular dendritic cells and of macrophages in lymphoid tissues. Immunoperoxidase staining was carried out with epidermal sheets from BALB/c mice and epidermal cell suspensions enriched for Langerhans cells by Fc rosetting. Langerhans cells stained for all of these antigens. Comparison with the staining properties of other dendritic cells and macrophages, in combination with previous observations, indicates a close relationship of Langerhans cells to the interdigitating cells of lymphoid tissues.

  11. Digital staining for histopathology multispectral images by the combined application of spectral enhancement and spectral transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Pinky A; Yagi, Yukako

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduced a digital staining method for histopathology images captured with an n-band multispectral camera. The method consisted of two major processes: enhancement of the original spectral transmittance and the transformation of the enhanced transmittance to its target spectral configuration. Enhancement is accomplished by shifting the original transmittance with the scaled difference between the original transmittance and the transmittance estimated with m dominant principal component (PC) vectors;the m-PC vectors were determined from the transmittance samples of the background image. Transformation of the enhanced transmittance to the target spectral configuration was done using an nxn transformation matrix, which was derived by applying a least square method to the enhanced and target spectral training data samples of the different tissue components. Experimental results on the digital conversion of a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained multispectral image to its Masson's trichrome stained (MT) equivalent shows the viability of the method.

  12. Evaluation of the staining potential of a caries infiltrant in comparison to other products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Nicolas; Benbachir, Nacer; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated in vitro the staining susceptibility of an infiltration resin (Icon, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) and compared it with several marketed bonding systems. Fifty 1-mm-thick disk-shaped specimens were prepared for Icon and for each bonding material. Initial specimen color was assessed by a spectrophotometer. Specimens in each group were then randomly divided into five sub-groups and stored in an incubator at 37˚C in the dark for 60 days. Groups 4 and 5 were used as negative controls by being stored dry and in tap water respectively. Test groups were stored in (1) coffee, (2) tea, or (3) red wine. After 60 days of storage, new spectrophotometric measurements were performed and dE (color difference) was calculated to determine color change. Icon showed higher staining susceptibility. The clinician should be aware of the staining potential of infiltration resins over time. PMID:24492117

  13. Specific staining of nuclei with aqueous solutions of celestin blue B and gallocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, M K

    1982-09-01

    This paper presents methods for specific staining of nuclei with aqueous solutions of celestin blue B and gallocyanine in tissue sections from which RNA has been extracted selectively with concentrated phosphoric acid at 5 degrees C for 20 min or by hydrolysis in 6 N HCl at 28 degrees C for 15 min. It has been found that pH of the freshly prepared celestin blue B dye solution is 3.0 and that of an aqueous solution of gallocyanine is 2.8. These pHs can be lowered to 1.5 with concentrated sulphuric or nitric acid and at this pH staining of the nuclei is possible. But with concentrated sulphuric or nitric acid and at this pH staining of the nuclei is possible. But if the pHs are lowered with concentrated hydrochloric or phosphoric acid, effective use of these dyes is not possible. It has been suggested that some dispersion of the two dyes takes place with concentrated sulphuric or nitric acid which are used to lower the pH. Staining of the nuclei is also possible with an aqueous solution of celestin blue B at pH 3.0 but the same is not possible with gallocyanine at pH 2.8. The absorption spectra of nuclei stained with an aqueous solution of celestin blue B at pH 1.5 and 3.0 are fairly identical, the peak of maximum absorption being at 620 nm. Those of nuclei stained with an aqueous solution of gallocyanine reveal irregular peaks. Possible implications of these findings have been discussed. PMID:6183561

  14. Peri-stent contrast staining, major evaginations and severe malapposition after biolimus-eluting stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2014-01-01

    Peri-stent contrast staining and late acquired malapposition represent pathological vessel wall healing patterns following percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation. Earlier studies have described these abnormal vessel wall responses commonly present after implantation of first......-generation drug-eluting stents. These coronary vascular changes can cause flow disturbance and thereby dispose for later thrombotic events. This case report, based on coronary optical frequency domain imaging, describes peri-stent contrast staining, major evaginations and severe malapposition occurring 18months...... after third-generation biolimus-eluting stent implantation....

  15. X-gal staining of canine skin tissues: A technique with multiple possible applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pati, Soumyaranjan; Jain, Sumeet; Behera, Monalisa; Acharya, Aditya Prasad; Susen K Panda; Senapati, Shantibhusan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Estimation of β-galactosidase (βgal) activity in human cells and tissues indicate its possible use as a marker of senescence. Objectives: This study was done to detect senescence-associated βgal (SA-βgal) activity in canine skin tissue by using its substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl β-D-galactosidase (X-gal). Materials and Methods: Skin samples were collected through rapid necropsy process. The X-gal staining was done by altering different factors of the staining procedure like ...

  16. Order-to-disorder transition in ring-shaped colloidal stains

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Álvaro G; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco

    2011-01-01

    A colloidal dispersion droplet evaporating from a surface, such as a drying coffee drop, leaves a distinct ring-shaped stain. Although this mechanism is frequently used for particle self-assembly, the conditions for crystallization have remained unclear. Our experiments with monodisperse colloidal particles reveal a structural transition in the stain, from ordered crystals to disordered packings. We show that this sharp transition originates from a temporal singularity of the flow velocity inside the evaporating droplet at the end of its life. When the deposition speed is low, particles have time to arrange by Brownian motion, while at the end, high-speed particles are jammed into a disordered phase.

  17. Vancomycin sensitivity and koh string test as an alternative to gram staining of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthi K

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and eighteen bacterial isolates obtained from various clinical samples were subjected to Gram stain by conventional method. For all the isolates potassium hydroxide (KOH string test and sensitivity to vancomycin were done. Gram positive bacteria showed 100% sensitivity to vancomycin as also 100% negativity for string test. Of the gram negative bacteria, 99.42% were resistant to vancomycin while 98.85% were positive for the string test. KOH and vancomycin tests are simple, inexpensive and can be used in addition to Gram staining for rapid identification of bacterial cultures.

  18. Detection of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in acid mine environments by indirect fluorescent antibody staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, W A; Dugan, P R; Filppi, J A; Rheins, M S

    1976-07-01

    An indirect fluorescent antibody (FA) staining technique was developed for the rapid detection of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The specificity of the FA stain for T. ferrooxidans was demonstrated with both laboratory and environmental samples. Coal refuse examined by scanning electron microscopy exhibited a rough, porous surface, which was characteristically covered by water-soluble crystals. Significant numbers of T. ferrooxidans were detected in the refuse pores. A positive correlation between numbers of T. ferrooxidans and acid production in coal refuse in the laboratory was demonstrated with the FA technique. PMID:61736

  19. The Utility of Amnioinfusion in the Prophylaxis of Meconium-Stained Amniotic Fluid Infectious Morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Adair

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the utility of intrapartum amnioinfusion (AI in reducing the infectious morbidity of patients with meconium-stained fluid (MSF. Previous studies have shown increased intraamniotic infection (IAI and postpartum endometritis (PPE rates in patients with MSF. Intraamniotic infection has been reduced with the prophylactic administration of ampicillin–sulbactam in MSF. Intraamniotic infection and PPE have been reduced with the use of AI in patients with clear fluid. No investigators have specifically examined the efficacy of AI in reducing meconium-stained, amniotic-fluid-associated infectious morbidity.

  20. A Novel Image Cytometric Method for Quantitation of Immunohistochemical Staining of Cytoplasmic Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guillaud

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of molecular markers by immunohistochemical labelling of tissue sections has traditionally been performed by qualitative assessment by trained pathologists. For those markers with a staining component present outside of the nucleus, there has been no image histometric method available to reliably and consistently define cell interfaces within the tissue. We present a new method of approximating cellular boundaries to define cellular regions within which quantitative measurements of staining intensity may be made. The method is based upon Voronoi tessellation of a defined region of interest (ROI, and requires only the position of the nuclear centroids within the ROI.