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Sample records for blood specimen collection

  1. Effectiveness of a Novel Specimen Collection System in Reducing Blood Culture Contamination Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary; Bogar, Catherine; Plante, Jessica; Rasmussen, Kristen; Winters, Sharon

    2018-04-20

    False-positive blood-culture results due to skin contamination of samples remain a persistent problem for health care providers. Our health system recognized that our rates of contamination across the 4 emergency department campuses were above the national average. A unique specimen collection system was implemented throughout the 4 emergency departments and became the mandatory way to collect adult blood cultures. The microbiology laboratory reported contamination rates weekly to manage potential problems; 7 months of data are presented here. There was an 82.8% reduction in false positives with the unique specimen collection system compared with the standard method (chi-squared test with Yates correction, 2-tailed, P = 0.0001). Based on the historical 3.52% rate of blood-culture contamination for our health facilities, 2.92 false positives were prevented for every 100 blood cultures drawn, resulting from adoption of the unique specimen collection system as the standard of care. This unique collection system can reduce the risk of blood culture contamination significantly and is designed to augment, rather than replace, the standard phlebotomy protocol already in use in most health care settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a PCR Assay to Detect Low Level Trypanosoma cruzi in Blood Specimens Collected with PAXgene Blood DNA Tubes for Clinical Trials Treating Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo; Chen, Lei; Kibukawa, Miho; Kang, John; Waskin, Hetty; Marton, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasitic infection of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). The STOP CHAGAS clinical trial was initiated in 2011 to evaluate posaconazole in treating Chagas disease, with treatment success defined as negative qualitative PCR results of detecting the parasites in blood specimens collected post-treatment. PAXgene Blood DNA tubes were utilized as a simple procedure to collect and process blood specimens. However, the PAXgene blood specimens challenged published T. cruzi PCR methods, resulting in poor sensitivity and reproducibility. To accurately evaluate the treatment efficacy of the clinical study, we developed and validated a robust PCR assay for detecting low level T. cruzi in PAXgene blood specimens. The assay combines a new DNA extraction method with a custom designed qPCR assay, resulting in limit of detection of 0.005 and 0.01 fg/μl for K98 and CL Brener, two representative strains of two of T. cruzi's discrete typing units. Reliable qPCR standard curves were established for both strains to measure parasite loads, with amplification efficiency ≥ 90% and the lower limit of linearity ≥ 0.05 fg/μl. The assay successfully analyzed the samples collected from the STOP CHAGAS study and may prove useful for future global clinical trials evaluating new therapies for asymptomatic chronic Chagas disease.

  3. Blood Meal Identification of the Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Specimens Belong to Culex pipiens Complex that were Collected from Kayseri Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Seval; Yıldırım, Alparslan; Düzlü, Önder; Çiloğlu, Arif; Önder, Zuhal; İnci, Abdullah

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the host preferences in blood meal of specimens belonging to Culex pipiens complex. A total of 1284 female mosquitos were morphologically examined, and genomic DNA isolations were individually performed on 376 (28.4%) specimens that were determined to be Cx. pipiens complex. PCR was performed with primers to specifically amplify the avian and mammalian mitochondrial cytochrome b (mt-cytb) gene region. Amplicons were cloned, and the obtained plasmids were sequenced to determine host species. Of 376 specimens, 148 (39.4%) were positive for the avian and/or mammalian blood meal. Among the positive specimens, 43, 98, and seven were determined to be positive for only mammalian, avian, and both avian and mammalian blood, respectively. Avian host preference in blood meal of the specimens belonging to Cx. pipiens was found to be significant. Of 15 avian blood positive isolates, nine, three, two, and one were designated as blood meal from avian species in Passeriformes, Accipitriformes, Columbiformes, and Strigiformes orders, respectively. While six, four, three, and two out of 15 mammalian blood-positive specimens were found to be positive for human, cattle, sheep, and dog blood, respectively. Molecular data regarding the host preferences of the Cx. pipiens species complex in blood meal were revealed for the first time in Turkey with this study.

  4. Specimen Collection and Submission Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    local, approved medical treatment facility collection procedures. Superficial wounds and abscesses Sterile swab Follow local, approved medical...Tests May Include: West Nile virus (WNV), Eastern equine encephalitis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus... Wound Botulism Acceptable Specimens Required Volume/Comments Toxin Assay (T) or Culture (C) Performed Serum (priority sample type) 5 ml (less

  5. Field Evaluation of Capillary Blood Samples as a Collection Specimen for the Rapid Diagnosis of Ebola Virus Infection During an Outbreak Emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, Thomas; Palyi, Bernadett; Ellerbrok, Heinz; Jonckheere, Sylvie; de Clerck, Hilde; Bore, Joseph Akoi; Gabriel, Martin; Stoecker, Kilian; Eickmann, Markus; van Herp, Michel; Formenty, Pierre; Di Caro, Antonino; Becker, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    Reliable reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based diagnosis of Ebola virus infection currently requires a blood sample obtained by intravenous puncture. During the current Ebola outbreak in Guinea, we evaluated the usability of capillary blood samples collected from fingersticks of patients suspected of having Ebola virus disease (EVD) for field diagnostics during an outbreak emergency. A total of 120 venous and capillary blood samples were collected from 53 patients admitted to the Ebola Treatment Centre in Guéckédou, Guinea, between July and August 2014. All sample specimens were analyzed by RT-PCR using the RealStar Filovirus Screen RT-PCR Kit 1.0 from altona Diagnostics (Germany). We compared samples obtained by venipuncture and those obtained by capillary blood sampling absorbed onto swab devices. The resulting sensitivity and specificity of tests performed with capillary blood samples were 86.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 71.9%-95.6%; 33/38 patients) and 100% (95% CI, 84.6%-100%; 22/22 patients), respectively. Our data suggest that capillary blood samples could serve as an alternative to venous blood samples for the diagnosis of EVD in resource-limited settings during a crisis. This can be of particular advantage in cases when venipuncture is difficult to perform-for example, with newborns and infants or when adult patients reject venipuncture for cultural or religious reasons. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  6. Impact of the phlebotomy training based on CLSI/NCCLS H03-a6 - procedures for the collection of diagnostic blood specimens by venipuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2012-01-01

    The activities involving phlebotomy, a critical task for obtaining diagnostic blood samples, are poorly studied as regards the major sources of errors and the procedures related to laboratory quality control. The aim of this study was to verify the compliance with CLSI documents of clinical laboratories from South America and to assess whether teaching phlebotomists to follow the exact procedure for blood collection by venipuncture from CLSI/NCCLS H03-A6 - Procedures for the Collection of Diagnostic Blood Specimens by Venipuncture might improve the quality of the process. A survey was sent by mail to 3674 laboratories from South America to verify the use of CLSI documents. Thirty skilled phlebotomists were trained with the CLSI H03-A6 document to perform venipuncture procedures for a period of 20 consecutive working days. The overall performances of the phlebotomists were further compared before and after the training program. 2622 from 2781 laboratories that did answer our survey used CLSI documents to standardize their procedures and process. The phlebotomists' training for 20 days before our evaluation completely eliminated non-conformity procedures for: i) incorrect friction of the forearm, during the cleaning of the venipuncture site to ease vein location; ii) incorrect sequence of vacuum tubes collection; and iii) inadequate mixing of the blood in primary vacuum tubes containing anticoagulants or clot activators. Unfortunately the CLSI H03-A6 document does not caution against both unsuitable tourniquet application time (i.e., for more than one minute) and inappropriate request to clench the fist repeatedly. These inadequate procedures were observed for all phlebotomists. We showed that strict observance of the CLSI H03-A6 document can remarkably improve quality, although the various steps for collecting diagnostic blood specimens are not a gold standard, since they may still permit errors. Tourniquet application time and forearm clench should be verified by

  7. Effect of collection, transport, processing and storage of blood specimens on the activity of lysosomal enzymes in plasma and leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Burin

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of different conditions of collection, transport and storage on the quality of blood samples from normal individuals in terms of the activity of the enzymes ß-glucuronidase, total hexosaminidase, hexosaminidase A, arylsulfatase A and ß-galactosidase. The enzyme activities were not affected by the different materials used for collection (plastic syringes or vacuum glass tubes. In the evaluation of different heparin concentrations (10% heparin, 5% heparin, and heparinized syringe in the syringes, it was observed that higher doses resulted in an increase of at least 1-fold in the activities of ß-galactosidase, total hexosaminidase and hexosaminidase A in leukocytes, and ß-glucuronidase in plasma. When the effects of time and means of transportation were studied, samples that had been kept at room temperature showed higher deterioration with time (72 and 96 h before processing, and in this case it was impossible to isolate leukocytes from most samples. Comparison of heparin and acid citrate-dextrose (ACD as anticoagulants revealed that ß-glucuronidase and hexosaminidase activities in plasma reached levels near the lower normal limits when ACD was used. In conclusion, we observed that heparin should be used as the preferable anticoagulant when measuring these lysosomal enzyme activities, and we recommend that, when transport time is more than 24 h, samples should be shipped by air in a styrofoam box containing wet ice.

  8. Wildlife specimen collection, preservation, and shipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. LeAnn; Dusek, Robert J.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Specimens are used to provide supporting information leading to the determination of the cause of disease or death in wildlife and for disease monitoring or surveillance. Commonly used specimens for wildlife disease investigations include intact carcasses, tissues from carcasses, euthanized or moribund animals, parasites, ingested food, feces, or environmental samples. Samples from live animals or the environment (e.g., contaminated feed) in the same vicinity as a mortality event also may be helpful. The type of specimen collected is determined by availability of samples and biological objectives. Multiple fresh, intact carcasses from affected species are the most useful in establishing a cause for a mortality event. Submission of entire carcasses allows observation of gross lesions and abnormalities, as well as disease testing of multiple tissues. Samples from live animals may be more appropriate when sick animals cannot be euthanized (e.g., threatened or endangered species) or for research and monitoring projects examining disease or agents circulating in apparently healthy animals or those not exhibiting clinical signs. Samples from live animals may include collections of blood, hair, feathers, feces, or ectoparasites, or samples obtained by swabbing lesions or orifices. Photographs and videos are useful additions for recording field and clinical signs and conveying conditions at the site. Collection of environmental samples (e.g., feces, water, feed, or soil) may be appropriate when animals cannot be captured for sampling or the disease agent may persist in the environment. If lethal collection is considered necessary, biologists should refer to the policies, procedures, and permit requirements of their institution/facility and the agency responsible for species management (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or State natural resource agency) prior to use in the field. If threatened or endangered species are found dead, or there is evidence of illegal take, field

  9. Bloody Fast Blood Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brummelen, Samuel Pieter Josephus

    2017-01-01

    This thesis consists of four parts: The first part contains an introduction, the second presents approaches for the evaluation of waiting times at blood collection sites, the third uses these to present approaches that improve waiting times at blood collection sites. The final part shows the

  10. [Peripheral specimen collecting centers. Preanalytical control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boixés Saña, D; Badia Mallorquí, M

    1998-03-01

    The progressive decentralization in the process of sample drawing and collection of biological samples has produced a socio-economical improvement for the general public and for health systems specifically even though this requires a higher degree of control to avoid pre-analytical errors derived from this procedure by the laboratories receiving these aforementioned samples. This study is based on 372,243 drawings, taken from June 1994 until December 1996 at 74 sample drawing centers and the systematic recording of any errors committed during the drawing, conservation and transportation of the diverse biological samples drawn. The results indicate an overall incident rate of 1.5% broken down by year as 1.3% in 1994, 1.3% in 1995 and 1.9% in 1996 and broken down by type as 0.7% in blood samples, 0.7% in urine samples, and 0.07% due to other errors such as transportation. 1. The incident rate is slightly lower than that obtained in a prior study of similar characteristics. 2. The small increase in the incident rate which occurred in 1996 is attributed to an improvement in the error recording system. 3. We recommend continuing applying strategies which permit one to detect, limit, and if possible, reduce these types of errors. These strategies include periodical meetings and professional development.

  11. Microbiological studies of blood specimen from presumptively ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and fifteen blood samples were obtained from presumptively diagnosed typhoid patients who were referred for Widal Serological test at four diagnostic centres. The blood samples were subjected to bacteriological investigations. Salmonella and non-Salmonella organisms isolated were identified according ...

  12. Drone Transport of Microbes in Blood and Sputum Laboratory Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amukele, Timothy K; Street, Jeff; Carroll, Karen; Miller, Heather; Zhang, Sean X

    2016-10-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) could potentially be used to transport microbiological specimens. To examine the impact of UAVs on microbiological specimens, blood and sputum culture specimens were seeded with usual pathogens and flown in a UAV for 30 ± 2 min. Times to recovery, colony counts, morphologies, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identifications of the flown and stationary specimens were similar for all microbes studied. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Peripheral blood collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franken, Carmen; Remy, Sylvie; Lambrechts, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    - and glucocorticoid-mediated networks, and specifically interleukin-8 (IL-8). These findings suggest that even short bench times affect gene expression, requiring to carry out blood collection in a strictly standardized way. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.......A crucial challenge for gene expression analysis in human biomonitoring studies on whole blood samples is rapid sample handling and mRNA stabilization. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of short bench times (less than 30 min) on yield, quality and gene expression of m......RNA in the presence of different stabilization buffers (TempusTM Blood RNA tube and RNAlater® Stabilization Reagent). Microarray analyzes showed significant changes over short periods of time in expression of a considerate part of the transcriptome (2356 genes) with a prominent role for NFкB-, cancer...

  14. Evaluation of a new venous catheter blood draw device and its impact on specimen hemolysis rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Ruth; Wand, Cara; Doyle, Kelly; Noguez, Jaime H

    2018-03-01

    Blood collections from peripheral intravenous catheters offer several benefits to patients, including reduced needle punctures and patient discomfort, but they risk reducing the quality of blood specimens analyzed by the laboratory. In an effort to balance analytical quality of test results with patient-centered care initiatives, a needle-less blood collection device called PIVO™ was evaluated at two institutions. The primary objective of this study was to assess the ability of the PIVO™ device to provide high-quality blood specimens for laboratory testing compared to current blood collection methods. Blood specimens drawn using the PIVO™ device were prospectively flagged. A retrospective review was performed comparing the degree and rate of hemolysis for PIVO™ blood collections to both concurrent and historical hemolysis rates for other collection methods. Approximately 7600 PIVO™ blood draws were performed across the two institutions. The hemolysis rates of samples collected with PIVO™ were evaluated using 2380 flagged collections, containing approximately 1200 test orders requiring hemolysis index measurements. The hemolysis rate of PIVO™-flagged samples (1.8%) was statistically superior to the venipuncture and central line blood collection methods (3.3%), reducing the risk of hemolysis during a venous blood draw by 39%. PIVO™ collections facilitated improvement in the rate and degree of sample hemolysis when compared to venipuncture and central line blood collections. These findings suggest that PIVO™ is capable of delivering samples that are superior to current blood collection methods in terms of hemolysis rate as well as reducing the number of invasive venipunctures required for laboratory testing.

  15. Innovation for reducing blood culture contamination: initial specimen diversion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Richard G; Schmitt, Timothy

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesized that diversion of the first milliliter of venipuncture blood-the initial specimen diversion technique (ISDT)-would eliminate incompletely sterilized fragments of skin from the culture specimen and significantly reduce our blood culture contamination rate (R). We studied our hypothesis prospectively beginning with our control culture (C) definition: one venipuncture with two sequentially obtained specimens, 10 ml each, the first specimen (M1) for aerobic and the second (M2) for anaerobic media. The test ISDT culture (D) was identical, with the exception that each was preceded by diverting a 1-ml sample (DS) from the same venipuncture. During the first of two sequential 9-month periods, we captured D versus C data (n=3,733), where DMXR and CMXR are R for D and C specimens. Our hypothesis predicted DS would divert soiled skin fragments from DM1, and therefore, CM1R would be significantly greater than DM1R. This was confirmed by CM1R (30/1,061 [2.8%]) less DM1R (37/2,672 [1.4%]; P=0.005), which equals 1.4%. For the second 9-month follow-up period, data were compiled for all cultures (n=4,143), where ADMXR is R for all (A) diversion specimens, enabling comparison to test ISDT. Our hypothesis predicted no significant differences for test ISDT versus all ISDT. This was confirmed by DM1R (37/2,672 [1.4%]) versus ADM1R (42/4,143 [1.0%]; P=0.17) and DM2R (21/2,672 [0.80%]) versus ADM2R (39/4,143 [0.94%]; P=0.50). We conclude that our hypothesis is valid: venipuncture needles soil blood culture specimens with unsterilized skin fragments and increase R, and ISDT significantly reduces R from venipuncture-obtained blood culture specimens.

  16. Description of Specimens in the Marine Mammal Osteology Reference Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML) Marine Mammal Osteology Collection consists of approximately 2500 specimens (skulls...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 219 - Post-Accident Testing Specimen Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the transfer of the blood tubes on the second line of STEP 5 (the chain of custody block). E. Collect... (the chain of custody block). F. Seal the Individual Employee Kit a. The blood and urine specimens have... railroad representatives handling the box shall document chain of custody of the shipping box and shall...

  18. Comparison of three methods of collecting nasal specimens for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nasopharyngeal aspiration (NPA) is used widely in the collection of nasal specimens for respiratory virus diagnosis. The method has limitations in relation to technical expertise, patient anxiety, and apparatus dependence. Nasal washing (NW) offers an alternative approach. Objective: To identify the merits of ...

  19. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Specimen Data (includes physical specimens, collection information, status, storage locations, and laboratory results associated with individual specimens)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes physical specimens, paper logs and Freezerworks database of all logged information on specimens collected from Hawaiian monk seals since 1975....

  20. 21 CFR 866.2900 - Microbiological specimen collection and transport device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices... microbiological specimen collection and transport device is a specimen collecting chamber intended for medical...

  1. Preparing for Ebolavirus disease: specimen collection, packaging and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Sheena; Wilson, Roger; James, Greg

    2015-08-01

    Ebolavirus is classified by Standards Australia as a Risk Group 4 pathogen for handling in laboratories. Specimens known or reasonably expected to contain Ebolavirus are classified by the United Nations as Dangerous Goods Infectious Substances Category A, UN 2814, which if transported by air must comply with International Air Transport Association (IATA) Hazard Class 6.2 and Packing Instruction 620 and Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) Regulations. As such high risk pathogens are rarely encountered in pathology laboratories in Australia, the possibility of an imported case of Ebolavirus disease occurring in NSW during the current ongoing outbreak which began in West Africa in 2014 prompted a review and rapid implementation of specific risk management protocols for Ebolavirus testing. Here we describe and report on the management of specimen collection, packaging and transport by public and private pathology laboratories agreed by a task force led by NSW Health Pathology and Health Protection NSW.

  2. Effectiveness of Specimen Collection Technology in the Reduction of Collection Turnaround Time and Mislabeled Specimens in Emergency, Medical-Surgical, Critical Care, and Maternal Child Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saathoff, April M; MacDonald, Ryan; Krenzischek, Erundina

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of specimen collection technology implementation featuring computerized provider order entry, positive patient identification, bedside specimen label printing, and barcode scanning on the reduction of mislabeled specimens and collection turnaround times in the emergency, medical-surgical, critical care, and maternal child health departments at a community teaching hospital. A quantitative analysis of a nonrandomized, pre-post intervention study design evaluated the statistical significance of reduction of mislabeled specimen percentages and collection turnaround times affected by the implementation of specimen collection technology. Mislabeled specimen percentages in all areas decreased from an average of 0.020% preimplementation to an average of 0.003% postimplementation, with a P Collection turnaround times longer than 60 minutes decreased after the implementation of specimen collection technology by an average of 27%, with a P collection and identification errors are a significant problem in healthcare, contributing to incorrect diagnoses, delayed care, lack of essential treatments, and patient injury or death. Collection errors can also contribute to an increased length of stay, increased healthcare costs, and decreased patient satisfaction. Specimen collection technology has structures in place to prevent collection errors and improve the overall efficiency of the specimen collection process.

  3. Reducing error in feline platelet enumeration by addition of Iloprost to blood specimens: comparison to prostaglandin E1 and EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvedten, Harold W; Bäcklund, Kerstin; Lilliehöök, Inger E

    2015-06-01

    Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and Iloprost inhibit platelet aggregation and should prevent or minimize preanalytic error with feline platelet enumeration. The objective was to compare the relative effectiveness in reducing errors in platelet enumeration by adding Iloprost to feline EDTA blood specimens in comparison to adding PGE1 or EDTA alone. In addition, a grading system for platelet aggregation in blood smears was evaluated for effectiveness in predicting prominent errors and compared to ADVIA's PLT-CLM flag. Finally, the use of plateletcrit in feline blood with platelet aggregation was evaluated. Blood specimens from 35 cats were included. Blood was collected into EDTA tubes with or without Iloprost or PGE1, and was rapidly mixed. Platelet count (PLT), plateletcrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV), and platelet flags were determined with an ADVIA 2120. Manual PLT was performed with a Leucoplate stain. PLT was determined by an IDEXX VetAutoread hematology analyzer (QBC). Neither addition of Iloprost nor PGE1 to EDTA blood specimens completely prevented platelet aggregation. Iloprost-treated specimens had the least severe aggregation. PGE1 was better than EDTA alone. Significant errors in PLT results were consistently identified by the grading system. ADVIA's PLT-CL flag usually predicted significant errors in PLT. QBC PLT results showed high imprecision. Manual PLT error was smaller than ADVIA PLT in EDTA specimens with aggregation. Adding Iloprost to feline blood specimens improved platelet enumeration accuracy. A grading system for severity of platelet aggregation and usually the ADVIA's PLT-CL alarm predicted specimens with significant errors in platelet enumeration. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  4. Common criteria among States for storage and use of dried blood spot specimens after newborn screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Petrini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological samples collected in biobanks are a resource with significant research potential. The Italian Joint Group cNB - cNBBSV (National committee of Bioethics - National committee for Biosecurity, Biotechnologies and Life Sciences published a document reporting recommendations on storage and use of dried blood spot (DBS and on the development of a National Network of Regional Newborn Screening Repositories for collection of residual DBS. Several ethical questions (about consent, possible use of genetic information, unanticipated possible usages for research purposes rise from residual newborn screening specimens collections. Moreover, legal and ethical controversies are accentuated by the conflicts between the interests of sample donors, biobank holders, researchers and the public. To overcome these difficulties the identification of a few criteria for storage and research usage of DBS is crucial.

  5. Stability of HIV-1 RNA in blood during specimen handling and storage prior to amplification by NASBA-QT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruisten, S. M.; Oudshoorn, P.; van Swieten, P.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.; van Aarle, P.; Tondreau, S. P.; Cuypers, H. T.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of different storage temperatures and anticoagulation conditions on the HIV-1 RNA load as measured by NASBA-QT was examined. Blood specimens from 14 HIV-1 infected individuals were processed within 2 h after collection. The HIV-1 RNA load remained stable for at least 6 months when

  6. Swab and aspiration specimen collection methods and antibiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic suppurative otitis media is a very common otologic problem in our environment. Appropriate methods for obtaining sample specimens for specific bacteria isolation has generated a lot of controversy. The simplest method available in our environment is the traditional swab method which, however, has ...

  7. Review of forensically important entomological specimens collected from human cadavers in Malaysia (2005-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, Rajagopal; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad; Tan, Tian Chye; Lee, Han Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian

    2013-07-01

    Forensic entomological specimens collected from human decedents during crime scene investigations in Malaysia in the past 6 years (2005-2010) are reviewed. A total of 80 cases were recorded and 93 specimens were collected. From these specimens, 10 species of cyclorrphagic flies were identified, consisting of Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) -38 specimens (40.86%), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) -36 specimens (38.70%), Chrysomya villeneuvi (Patton) -2 specimens (2.15%), Chrysomya nigripes (Aubertin) -2 specimens (2.15%), Chrysomya pinguis (Walker) -1 specimen (1.08%), Hermetia illucens (Linnaeus) -1 specimen (1.08%), Hemipyrellia liguriens (Wiedemann) -5 specimens (5.37%), Synthesiomyia nudiseta (Wulp) -1 specimen (1.08%), Megaselia scalaris (Loew)-1 specimen (1.08%) and Sarcophaga ruficornis (Fabricius) -4 specimens (4.30%). In two specimens (2.15%), the maggots were not identifiable. Ch. megacephala and Ch. rufifacies were the commonest species found in human decedents from three different ecological habitats. S. nudiseta is an uncommon species found only on human cadavers from indoors. A total of 75 cases (93.75%) had a single fly infestation and 5 cases (6.25%) had double fly infestation. In conclusion, although large numbers of fly species were found on human decedents, the predominant species are still those of Chrysomya. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  8. 49 CFR 40.49 - What materials are used to collect urine specimens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What materials are used to collect urine specimens? 40.49 Section 40.49 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.49 What materials are used to collect urine specimens? For each DOT...

  9. Comparison of serum and whole-blood specimens for the detection of Candida DNA in critically ill, non-neutropenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, L; Fairley, D J; Coyle, P V; Hay, R J; Hedderwick, S; McCloskey, B; O'Neill, H J; Webb, C H; McMullan, R

    2008-10-01

    In contrast to the multitude of studies on fungal PCR assay methods, little work has been reported evaluating Candida PCR performance when using whole blood compared with serum in candidaemic patients. Here, a comparison of the performance of whole-blood and serum specimens using a set of real-time PCR Candida species assays is described. Specimens were collected prospectively from non-neutropenic adults who were recruited to a diagnostic clinical trial, the primary purpose of which was to verify the performance of the assays using serum; in all, 104 participants also had whole-blood specimens submitted for analysis in addition to the serum specimen. Of these participants, 10 had laboratory-confirmed candidaemia and 94 were categorized as being 'unlikely' to have invasive Candida infection. PCR results from the whole-blood specimens are presented here and compared with the results from serum specimens in this subgroup among whom both specimen types were obtained contemporaneously. All participants with candidaemia were PCR-positive from serum samples; however, only seven were PCR-positive from whole blood. All specimens from patients in the 'unlikely' category were PCR-negative in both types of specimen. Moreover, DNA extraction from serum required 1 h; extraction from whole blood required approximately 3 h. These data tentatively suggest that, overall, serum is an appropriate specimen for Candida PCR for detection of candidaemia in non-neutropenic adults.

  10. Abnormal urinalysis results are common, regardless of specimen collection technique, in women without urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazee, Bradley W; Enriquez, Kayla; Ng, Valerie; Alter, Harrison

    2015-06-01

    Voided urinalysis to test for urinary tract infection (UTI) is prone to false-positive results for a number of reasons. Specimens are often collected at triage from women with any abdominal complaint, creating a low UTI prevalence population. Improper collection technique by the patient may affect the result. At least four indices, if positive, can indicate UTI. We examine the impact of voided specimen collection technique on urinalysis indicators of UTI and on urine culture contamination in disease-free women. In this crossover design, 40 menstrual-age female emergency department staff without UTI symptoms collected urine two ways: directly in a cup ("non-clean") and midstream clean catch ("ideal"). Samples underwent standard automated urinalysis and culture. Urinalysis indices and culture contamination were compared. The proportion of abnormal results from samples collected by "non-clean" vs. "ideal" technique, respectively, were: leukocyte esterase (>trace) 50%, 35% (95% confidence interval for difference -6% to 36%); nitrites (any) 2.5%, 2.5% (difference -2.5 to 2.5%); white blood cells (>5/high-powered field [HPF]) 50%, 27.5% (difference 4 to 41%); bacteria (any/HPF) 77.5%, 62.5%, (difference -7 to 37%); epithelial cells (>few) 65%, 30% (difference 13 to 56%); culture contamination (>1000 colony-forming units of commensal or >2 species) 77%, 63% (difference -5 to 35%). No urinalysis index was positively correlated with culture contamination. Contemporary automated urinalysis indices were often abnormal in a disease-free population of women, even using ideal collection technique. In clinical practice, such false-positive results could lead to false-positive UTI diagnosis. Only urine nitrite showed a high specificity. Culture contamination was common regardless of collection technique and was not predicted by urinalysis results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Good practices in collecting umbilical cord and placental blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Auer Lopes

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to identify the factors related to the quality of umbilical cord and placental blood specimens, and define best practices for their collection in a government bank of umbilical cord and placental blood. Method: this was a descriptive study, quantitative approach, performed at a government umbilical cord and placental blood bank, in two steps: 1 verification of the obstetric, neonatal and operational factors, using a specific tool for gathering data as non-participant observers; 2 definition of best practices by grouping non-conformities observed before, during and after blood collection. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the following statistical software: Statistica(r and R(r. Results: while there was a correlation with obstetrical and neonatal factors, there was a larger correlation with operational factors, resulting in the need to adjust the professional practices of the nursing staff and obstetrical team involved in collecting this type of blood. Based on these non-conformities we defined best practices for nurses before, during and after blood collection. Conclusion: the best practices defined in this study are an important management tool for the work of nurses in obtaining blood specimens of high cell quality.

  12. A technique for collecting botanical specimens in rain forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyland, B.P.M.

    1972-01-01

    I. Introduction — The need for a simple method of collecting botanical material from rain-forest trees became evident during the construction of a field key to the rain-forest trees of North Queensland. Many collecting techniques have been developed, e.g. throwing sticks and stones, severing

  13. Comparison between Plasma and Whole Blood Specimens for Detection of Aspergillus DNA by PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Juergen; Hebart, Holger; Brauchle, Ulrike; Schumacher, Ulrike; Einsele, Hermann

    2000-01-01

    Ninety-six plasma and whole blood specimens from nine selected patients were analyzed for the presence of Aspergillus DNA. Nineteen specimens from three patients with proven aspergillosis were PCR positive in both materials, whereas an additional 22 were PCR positive in whole blood only. All 36 samples from six patients without signs of aspergillosis were negative in both assays. We conclude that although plasma and whole blood spiked with Aspergillus conidia showed an identical lower detection limit (10 CFU), the sensitivity of plasma PCR was lower than that of PCR performed on whole blood samples. PMID:11015412

  14. Juvenile Swordfish (Xiphias gladius) Specimens Collected from 1991-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Juvenile swordfish caught throughout the Pacific Ocean collected by Hawaii longline observers, aboard the Thomas Cromwell research vessel, and donated by various...

  15. Effect of the initial specimen diversion technique on blood culture contamination rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkhamis, Khalifa; Forward, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    The initial specimen diversion technique (ISDT) was first described by Patton and Schmitt (J. Clin. Microbiol. 48:4501-4503, 2010, doi:10.1128/JCM.00910-10). This study looked at the effect of implementation of the ISDT on blood culture contamination rates at our center. We found a reduction of 30.34% in potential blood culture contaminants.

  16. 10 CFR 707.12 - Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... drug testing. 707.12 Section 707.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.12 Specimen collection, handling and laboratory analysis for drug testing... screening specimens to determine whether they are negative or positive for a specific drug, consistent with...

  17. Pre-analytical variation in glucose concentration due to atmospheric temperature and clot in blood specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, T.; Masud, K.; Khan, J.A.; Bhatti, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of temperature and contact of clot with serum on laboratory results of glucose concentration in blood. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: December 2014 to August 2015 at the laboratory of Shoaib Hospital, Fateh Jang, Attock Pakistan. Material and Methods: Samples were collected for estimation of blood glucose (Random) concentration from patients reporting to the hospital. Blood specimens (n=94) of such volunteers were analyzed for glucose level. Each sample was put up in five tubes. When the blood clotted the serum from tube-1 was analyzed for glucose level within 30 minutes. In tube-2 and tube-3 serum was kept for 24 hours at room temperature and refrigerator temperature respectively before glucose estimation. In tube-4 and tube-5 serum was not separated from clot and kept at room temperature and refrigerator temperature respectively before glucose estimation. The value of tube 1 was taken as reference value for comparison with other parts of the specimen. The equipment used for blood glucose level estimation was semi auto chemistry analyzer (Rayto, China). The kit used for analysis was Glucose - Liquizyme (Germany). Results: The difference between the mean reference value (tube-1) and refrigerated serum without clot (tube-3) was 4.63 mg/100 ml while that of unrefrigerated portion (tube-2) had a difference of 10.68 mg/100 ml. The mean of unrefrigerated (tube-4) and refrigerated (tube-5) portions of serum kept with the clot had difference of 42.05 mg/100 ml and 25.84 mg/100 ml respectively. The fall in the blood glucose level in all (n=94) the samples in the tube number 3 (serum separated and kept at refrigerated temperature) was 4.63 mg/100 ml +- 3.68 (Mean +- SD) and it ranged from 0 to 20 mg/100 ml whereas fall was maximum in the tube number 4 (serum with clotted blood and kept at room temperature) was 42.04 mg/100 ml +- 10.61 (Mean +- SD) and it ranged from 13 to 82 mg/100 ml. The sample in

  18. Biobanking human endometrial tissue and blood specimens: standard operating procedure and importance to reproductive biology research and diagnostic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Elizabeth; Vo, Kim Chi; McIntire, Ramsey A; Aghajanova, Lusine; Zelenko, Zara; Irwin, Juan C; Giudice, Linda C

    2011-05-01

    To develop a standard operating procedure (SOP) for collection, transport, storage of human endometrial tissue and blood samples, subject and specimen annotation, and establishing sample priorities. The SOP synthesizes sound scientific procedures, the literature on ischemia research, sample collection and gene expression profiling, good laboratory practices, and the authors' experience of workflow and sample quality. The National Institutes of Health, University of California, San Francisco, Human Endometrial Tissue and DNA Bank. Women undergoing endometrial biopsy or hysterectomy for nonmalignant indications. Collecting, processing, storing, distributing endometrial tissue and blood samples under approved institutional review board protocols and written informed consent from participating subjects. Standard operating procedure. The SOP addresses rigorous and consistent subject annotation, specimen processing and characterization, strict regulatory compliance, and a reference for researchers to track collection and storage times that may influence their research. The comprehensive and systematic approach to the procurement of human blood and endometrial tissue in this SOP ensures the high quality, reliability, and scientific usefulness of biospecimens made available to investigators by the National Institutes of Health, University of California, San Francisco, Human Endometrial Tissue and DNA Bank. The detail and perspective in this SOP also provides a blueprint for implementation of similar collection programs at other institutions. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Impact of specimen collection and storage consumable products on trace element quantitative analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan-shuang; Gu, Yong-en; Ba, Te; Zhai, Min; Pu, Ji; Shen, Zhen-lin; Tang, Shi-chuan; Jia, Guang

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of specimen collection and storage consumable products on trace element quantitative analysis. Devices and consumable products of different brands used in specimen collection or storage were selected and treated separately as below:urine collection and storage tubes (Brand A, B, C and D, 2 samples for each brand) were treated with 1% of HNO(3) volume fraction for 2 - 4 h; blood taking device (Brand O, P and Q, 3 samples for each brand) were used for ultra-pure water samples collecting as simulation of blood sampling;dust sampling filters (Brand X, Y and Z, 2 samples for each brand) were cold digested by nitric acid for 12 h, followed by microwave digestion. Then cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, selenium, stannum, titanium, vanadium and zinc concentrations in the solutions obtained during the course of collect or storage were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. For the urine collection and storage consumable products, background values of elements were described as mean of parellel samples. The consentration of 14 quantified elements were relatively low for 5 ml cryogenic vials (brand B) with background values range of 0.001 - 0.350 ng/ml. The background values of copper of 50 ml centrifuge tubes (brand A), chromium of 5 ml cryogenic vials (brand C) and zinc of 1.5 ml centrifuge tubes (brand D) were relatively high, which were 1.900, 1.095 and 1.368 ng/ml, respectively. Background values of elements in blood sampling devices were described as x(-) ± s. Background values of chromium for brand O, P and Q were (0.120 ± 0.017), (0.337 ± 0.093) and (0.360 ± 0.035) ng/ml; for copper were (0.050 ± 0.001), (0.017 ± 0.012) and (0.103 ± 0.015) ng/ml; for lead were (0.057 ± 0.072), (0.183 ± 0.118) and (0.347 ± 0.006) ng/ml; for titanium were (7.883 ± 0.145), (8.863 ± 0.190) and (8.613 ± 0.274) ng/ml; zinc were (2.240 ± 0.573), (42.140 ± 22.756) and (8

  20. Ion suppression from blood collection devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Sejr Gothelf, Aase

    Terumo, S-monovette from Sarstedt, Vacuette from Greiner Bio-One and three BD Vacutainer serum tubes from BD. These seven different blood collection devices were used to withdraw blood from five healthy drug free donors (n=35) in random order. The samples were centrifuged and serum from each sample......The aim of the study was to examine the variation in ion suppression in ultra high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS-MS) methods when using different blood collection devices. Three different methods measuring 18 antidepressants and antipsychotics in total were...... studied. The blood collection devices were all designed to activate clot formation. They were made of glass with or without silicone coating or plastic containing silicate particles, thrombin or polystyrene particles coated with kaolin. The blood collection devises Venoject and Venosafe were supplied from...

  1. Comparison of Hepatitis C Virus RNA and antibody detection in dried blood spots and plasma specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokubo, E Kainne; Evans, Jennifer; Winkelman, Valerie; Cyrus, Sherri; Tobler, Leslie H; Asher, Alice; Briceno, Alya; Page, Kimberly

    2014-04-01

    Current diagnostic tests for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) involve phlebotomy and serologic testing for HCV antibodies (anti-HCV) and RNA, which are not always feasible. Dried blood spots (DBS) present a minimally invasive sampling method and are suitable for sample collection, storage and testing. To assess the utility of DBS in HCV detection, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of DBS for anti-HCV and HCV RNA detection compared to plasma specimens. This cross-sectional validation study was conducted in the context of an existing prospective study of HCV in young injection drug users. Blood samples were collected by venipuncture into serum separator tubes (SST) and via finger stick onto Whatman 903(®) protein-saver cards. Plasma samples and eluates from the DBS were tested for anti-HCV using either a third generation enzyme-linked or chemiluminescent immunoassay (IA), and HCV RNA using discriminatory HCV transcription-mediated amplification assay (dHCV TMA). DBS results were compared to their corresponding plasma sample results. 148 participants were tested for anti-HCV and 132 participants were tested for HCV RNA. For anti-HCV, the sensitivity of DBS was 70%, specificity was 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) was 100%, negative predictive value (NPV) was 76% and Kappa was 0.69. For HCV RNA, the sensitivity of DBS was 90%, specificity was 100%, PPV was 100%, NPV was 94% and Kappa was 0.92. DBS are sensitive and very specific in detecting anti-HCV and HCV RNA, demonstrate good correlation with plasma results, and have potential to facilitate diagnosis of HCV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Relevance of EDTA carryover during blood collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadamuro, Janne; Felder, Thomas Klaus; Oberkofler, Hannes; Mrazek, Cornelia; Wiedemann, Helmut; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth

    2015-07-01

    The order of draw is regarded as a preanalytical issue to prevent carryover of additives during blood collection. Our objective was to prove the theory of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) carryover for a closed vacuum system and the influence of EDTA on concentrations of selected biomarkers. To test the carryover of EDTA, a blood collection with tripotassium EDTA (K3EDTA) and subsequent non-additive tubes was simulated using distilled water as substitute for blood. EDTA concentrations were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Then we added increasing concentrations of EDTA to heparinized blood and measured routine biomarkers, thereby simulating a carryover of EDTA whole blood and pure EDTA, respectively. Additionally, we tested for EDTA contamination and biomarker alteration in samples collected from 10 healthy volunteers by a syringe with subsequent transfer into sample tubes. No EDTA contamination was detected in samples collected subsequent to a K3EDTA tube when adhering to guidelines of blood sampling. Magnesium, calcium, and potassium levels were altered by artificial K3EDTA whole-blood contamination as well as when adding 1 μL pure K3EDTA. Iron values were altered at EDTA concentrations of 4.4 mmol/L. All other parameters remained unaffected. A slight EDTA carryover was observed in syringe collection and subsequent transfer into EDTA and heparin tubes, however, without any biomarker alteration. An EDTA carryover during blood collection using a closed vacuum system is highly unlikely. Even if carryover of EDTA whole blood occurs, an absolute volume larger than 10 μL would be necessary to alter test results. However, contamination of samples with preloaded pure K3EDTA solution by severe neglect of current recommendations in blood collection may significantly alter testing results.

  3. Blechschmidt Collection: Revisiting specimens from a historical collection of serially sectioned human embryos and fetuses using modern imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Reina; Makishima, Haruyuki; Männer, Jörg; Sydow, Hans-Georg; Uwabe, Chigako; Takakuwa, Tetsuya; Viebahn, Christoph; Yamada, Shigehito

    2017-11-03

    Along with the Carnegie Collection in the United States and the Kyoto Collection in Japan, the Blechschmidt Collection (Georg-August-University of Göttingen, Germany) is a major historical human embryo and fetus collection. These collections are of enormous value to human embryology; however, due to the nature of the historical histological specimens, some stains are fading in color, and some glass slides are deteriorating over time. To protect these specimens against such degradation and ensure their future usefulness, we tried to apply modern image scanning and computational reconstruction. Samples of histological specimens of the Blechschmidt Collection were digitized into images using commercial flatbed scanners with a resolution of 4800 pixels per inch. Two specimens were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) images by using modern techniques to vertically stack two-dimensional images of the slices into 3D blocks. The larger specimen of crown-rump length (CRL) 64.0 mm, a series of very large histological sections in human embryology, was reconstructed clearly, with its central nervous system segmented before stacking. The smaller specimen of CRL 17.5 mm was also reconstructed into 3D images. The outer surface of the embryo was intact, and its development was classified according to the widely used Carnegie stages (CSs). The CS of the specimen was identified as the later half of CS 20. The invaluable Blechschmidt Collection can be revisited for further research with modern techniques such as digital image scanning and computational 3D reconstruction. © 2017 Japanese Teratology Society.

  4. Modeling and simulation of blood collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Edgar; Xie, Xiaolan; Augusto, Vincent; Garraud, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    This paper addresses the modeling and simulation of blood collection systems in France for both fixed site and mobile blood collection with walk in whole blood donors and scheduled plasma and platelet donors. Petri net models are first proposed to precisely describe different blood collection processes, donor behaviors, their material/human resource requirements and relevant regulations. Petri net models are then enriched with quantitative modeling of donor arrivals, donor behaviors, activity times and resource capacity. Relevant performance indicators are defined. The resulting simulation models can be straightforwardly implemented with any simulation language. Numerical experiments are performed to show how the simulation models can be used to select, for different walk in donor arrival patterns, appropriate human resource planning and donor appointment strategies.

  5. Pediatric blood sample collection from a pre-existing peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braniff, Heather; DeCarlo, Ann; Haskamp, Amy Corey; Broome, Marion E

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to minimize pain in a hospitalized child, the purpose of this observational study was to describe characteristics of blood samples collected from pre-existing peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheters in pediatric patients. One hundred and fifty blood samples were reviewed for number of unusable samples requiring a specimen to be re-drawn. Success of the blood draw and prevalence of the loss of the PIV following blood collection was also measured. Findings included one clotted specimen, success rate of 91.3%, and 1.3% of PIVs becoming non-functional after collection. Obtaining blood specimens from a pre-existing PIV should be considered in a pediatric patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Creating & using specimen images for collection documentation, research, teaching and outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demouthe, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    In this age of digital media, there are many opportunities for use of good images of specimens. On-line resources such as institutional web sites and global sites such as PaleoNet and the Paleobiology Database provide venues for collection information and images. Pictures can also be made available to the general public through popular media sites such as Flickr and Facebook, where they can be retrieved and used by teachers, students, and the general public. The number of requests for specimen loans can be drastically reduced by offering the scientific community access to data and specimen images using the internet. This is an important consideration in these days of limited support budgets, since it reduces the amount of staff time necessary for giving researchers and educators access to collections. It also saves wear and tear on the specimens themselves. Many institutions now limit or refuse to send specimens out of their own countries because of the risks involved in going through security and customs. The internet can bridge political boundaries, allowing everyone equal access to collections. In order to develop photographic documentation of a collection, thoughtful preparation will make the process easier and more efficient. Acquire the necessary equipment, establish standards for images, and develop a simple workflow design. Manage images in the camera, and produce the best possible results, rather than relying on time-consuming editing after the fact. It is extremely important that the images of each specimen be of the highest quality and resolution. Poor quality, low resolution photos are not good for anything, and will often have to be retaken when another need arises. Repeating the photography process involves more handling of specimens and more staff time. Once good photos exist, smaller versions can be created for use on the web. The originals can be archived and used for publication and other purposes.

  7. Umbilical Cord Blood: Counselling, Collection, and Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armson, B Anthony; Allan, David S; Casper, Robert F

    2015-09-01

    To review current evidence regarding umbilical cord blood counselling, collection, and banking and to provide guidelines for Canadian health care professionals regarding patient education, informed consent, procedural aspects, and options for cord blood banking in Canada. Selective or routine collection and banking of umbilical cord blood for future stem cell transplantation for autologous (self) or allogeneic (related or unrelated) treatment of malignant and non-malignant disorders in children and adults. Cord blood can be collected using in utero or ex utero techniques. Umbilical cord blood counselling, collection, and banking, education of health care professionals, indications for cord blood collection, short- and long-term risk and benefits, maternal and perinatal morbidity, parental satisfaction, and health care costs. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and PubMed beginning in September 2013 using appropriate controlled MeSH vocabulary (fetal blood, pregnancy, transplantation, ethics) and key words (umbilical cord blood, banking, collection, pregnancy, transplantation, ethics, public, private). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date limits, but results were limited to English or French language materials. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to September 2014. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Umbilical cord blood is a readily available source of hematopoetic stem cells used with increasing frequency as an alternative to

  8. Digitizing specimens in a small herbarium: A viable workflow for collections working with limited resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kari M; Marsico, Travis D

    2017-04-01

    Small herbaria represent a significant portion of herbaria in the United States, but many are not digitizing their collections. At the Arkansas State University Herbarium (STAR), we have created a viable workflow to help small herbaria begin the digitization process, including suggestions for publishing data on the Internet. We calculated hourly rates of each phase of the digitization process. We also mapped accessions at the county level to determine geographic strengths in the collection. All 17,678 accessioned flowering plant specimens at STAR are imaged, databased in Specify, and available electronically on the herbarium's website. Students imaged the specimens at a mean rate of 145/h. We found differences in databasing rates between the graduate student leading the project (47/h) and undergraduate assistants (25/h). The majority of specimens at STAR were collected within the counties neighboring the institution. With this workflow, we estimate that one person can digitize a 20,000-specimen collection in less than 2.5 yr by working only 10 h/wk. Because STAR is a small herbarium with limited resources, the application of the workflow described should assist curators of similar-sized collections as they contemplate and undertake the digitization process.

  9. Digitizing specimens in a small herbarium: A viable workflow for collections working with limited resources1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kari M.; Marsico, Travis D.

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Small herbaria represent a significant portion of herbaria in the United States, but many are not digitizing their collections. Methods: At the Arkansas State University Herbarium (STAR), we have created a viable workflow to help small herbaria begin the digitization process, including suggestions for publishing data on the Internet. We calculated hourly rates of each phase of the digitization process. We also mapped accessions at the county level to determine geographic strengths in the collection. Results: All 17,678 accessioned flowering plant specimens at STAR are imaged, databased in Specify, and available electronically on the herbarium’s website. Students imaged the specimens at a mean rate of 145/h. We found differences in databasing rates between the graduate student leading the project (47/h) and undergraduate assistants (25/h). The majority of specimens at STAR were collected within the counties neighboring the institution. Discussion: With this workflow, we estimate that one person can digitize a 20,000-specimen collection in less than 2.5 yr by working only 10 h/wk. Because STAR is a small herbarium with limited resources, the application of the workflow described should assist curators of similar-sized collections as they contemplate and undertake the digitization process. PMID:28439474

  10. Epidemiology of blood collection in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson-Ayayi, S.; Salmi, L.R.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the cross-sectional study (EpiCoS) were to describe, at different stages, volunteers offering their blood, and to characterize various ways of collecting blood. From 15 September 1996 to 31 December 1996, individuals presenting at fixed or mobile sessions in one of 11 randomly selected blood banks were included after they had a medical examination. Variables studied were relative to type of collection, individuals, medical examination, patterns of blood letting, use of collected donations and if unused, reasons for discarding. Sixty four thousand and ninety two volunteers, aged 17-66 years old were included. The proportion of exclusion during medical examination was 10.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 10.6-11.0%). Exclusions were more frequent among new volunteers and were mostly related to the safety of recipients. Most of the 57,003 donations were whole blood (94.0%) and collected in mobile sessions (89.9%). Five percent of collected donations were discarded; 3.5% (95% CI: 3.4-3.7%) of donations discarded for biological abnormalities, including 1.5% only for initial screen reactions to infectious disease markers (HBs antigen, anti-HBc antibodies, anti-HCV antibodies, anti-HIV antibodies, anti-HTLV antibodies, malaria antibodies and anti-syphilitic antibodies). The most frequent biological abnormality was a high alanine aminotransferase level. A follow-up of these indicators, within the French haemovigilance system, should allow further identification of risk factors and high-risk contexts, and planning means of optimizing blood collection in France

  11. 21 CFR 640.4 - Collection of the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of the blood. 640.4 Section 640.4 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Whole Blood § 640.4 Collection of the blood. (a) Supervision. Blood shall be drawn from the donor by a qualified physician or under his supervision by...

  12. 21 CFR 640.13 - Collection of the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of the blood. 640.13 Section 640.13...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.13 Collection of the blood. (a) The source blood shall be collected as prescribed in § 640.4. (b) Source blood may also be...

  13. Next-generation sequencing of dried blood spot specimens: a novel approach to HIV drug-resistance surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hezhao; Li, Yang; Graham, Morag; Liang, Ben Binhua; Pilon, Richard; Tyson, Shari; Peters, Geoff; Tyler, Shaun; Merks, Harriet; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Soto-Ramirez, Luis; Sandstrom, Paul; Brooks, James

    2011-01-01

    HIV drug-resistance (DR) surveillance in resource-limited settings can be performed using dried blood spots (DBS) because of ease of collection, transportation and storage. Analysis of pooled specimens on next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based platforms, such as the 454 pyrosequencing, is an efficient sequencing method for determining HIV DR rates. In this study, we conducted HIV DR surveillance on DBS using NGS and identified minority variants in individual patients. A total of 48 extracts of DBS from an HIV DR surveillance study in Mexico City were re-amplified using primers tagged with multiplex identifiers, pooled and pyrosequenced. Consensus sequences were generated for each specimen with mixtures identified at positions where >20% of the reads contained a variant. Individual consensus sequences were then analysed for DR mutations and compared with those derived from Sanger sequencing. DBS analysed with tagged pooled pyrosequencing (TPP) were highly concordant with Sanger sequencing genotypes from matching plasma and DBS (99.21% and 99.51%, respectively). An exception was an M184I mutation only detected with TPP of DBS at a frequency of 20.4%. Multiple specimens had minority variant reads below the 20% mixture threshold. TPP using DBS is an effective method for HIV DR surveillance. TPP for genotyping results in cost savings of 40% over conventional in-house methods. The effect of low-abundance DR mutations, undetectable by conventional methods, remains to be determined. This technology might be applied to any HIV specimen (plasma/serum) and can also be used for other diagnostic assays where DNA sequencing is required. © 2011 International Medical Press

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Sequences from Osteomyelitic Specimens of a Pathological Bone Collection from Pre-Antibiotic Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Flux

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen causing osteomyelitis, amongst other diseases, and its methicillin-resistant form (MRSA in particular poses a huge threat to public health. To increase our knowledge of the origin and evolution of S. aureus, genetic studies of historical microorganisms may be beneficial. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether osteomyelitic skeletal material (autopsy specimens collected from the mid 19th century until the 1920s is suitable for detecting historical S. aureus DNA sequences. We established a PCR-based analysis system targeting two specific genes of S. aureus (nuc and fib. We successfully amplified the historical S. aureus nuc and fib sequences for six and seven pre-antibiotic, osteomyelitic bone specimens, respectively. These results encourage further investigations of historical S. aureus genomes that may increase our understanding of pathogen evolution in relation to anthropogenically introduced antibiotics.

  15. “Cleansing” anatomical collections: The politics of removing specimens from German anatomical and medical collections 1988–92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weindling, Paul

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In 1989–90 an intense debate erupted in the Federal Republic of Germany over the status of anatomical specimens from the period of National Socialism. Pressure was brought on the German universities and research institutes to remove body parts. The solution was deemed rapid burial of all specimens whose provenance was in doubt. A range of options was considered, and the eventual decision to bury cremated remains was deemed the best way to draw a line under an uncomfortable past of Nazi medical atrocities. The aim was to achieve closure on this issue by a rapid “cleansing” of collections. However, identification of victims was left unresolved amidst the heated debates at the time. PMID:22445542

  16. Collection, warehousing and dissemination of specimen information: an added value for theriological collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Preatoni

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent achievements in the technologies for information management and sharing would allow to make more available and exploitable the wealth of data represented by theriological museum collections. Anyway, the scarce diffusion of Information Technology knowledge in the theriological field hinders the transition towards digital cataloguing of collections, often leading to the creation of data bases unable to last through time and without coherent information management policies. The aim of this contribute is to present a concise review of the existing practices and technologies used to design and implement information systems, in order to promote the increasing application of such technologies in the theriological and, in general, in the natural resource conservation field. Riassunto Raccolta e condivisione delle informazioni sui reperti: un valore aggiunto per le collezioni teriologiche. I recenti sviluppi delle tecnologie per la gestione e la condivisione delle informazioni rendono oggi possibile una maggiore fruibilità e disponibilità del patrimonio costituito dalle collezioni teriologiche. Tuttavia, la scarsa diffusione nel contesto teriologico e museologico delle conoscenze nel campo dell’Information Technology rende difficoltosa la transizione verso la catalogazione in formato digitale, portando spesso alla creazione di banche dati che non garantiscono una ragionevole durata nel tempo né la necessaria coerenza nell’organizzazione delle complesse informazioni concernenti il catalogo di una collezione. Il presente contributo offre una concisa rassegna dei principi di base e delle pratiche più comuni nello sviluppo di sistemi informativi, con l’obiettivo di favorire una loro sempre maggiore applicazione nel campo della teriologia e della conservazione delle risorse naturali in generale.

  17. Improved Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection by Culturing Periprosthetic Tissue Specimens in Blood Culture Bottles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha N. Peel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite known low sensitivity, culture of periprosthetic tissue specimens on agars and in broths is routine. Culture of periprosthetic tissue samples in blood culture bottles (BCBs is potentially more convenient, but it has been evaluated in a limited way and has not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of inoculation of periprosthetic tissue specimens into blood culture bottles with standard agar and thioglycolate broth culture, applying Bayesian latent class modeling (LCM in addition to applying the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection. This prospective cohort study was conducted over a 9-month period (August 2013 to April 2014 at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and included all consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty. Overall, 369 subjects were studied; 117 (32% met IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection, and 82% had late chronic infection. Applying LCM, inoculation of tissues into BCBs was associated with a 47% improvement in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of conventional agar and broth cultures (92.1 versus 62.6%, respectively; this magnitude of change was similar when IDSA criteria were applied (60.7 versus 44.4%, respectively; P = 0.003. The time to microorganism detection was shorter with BCBs than with standard media (P < 0.0001, with aerobic and anaerobic BCBs yielding positive results within a median of 21 and 23 h, respectively. Results of our study demonstrate that the semiautomated method of periprosthetic tissue culture in blood culture bottles is more sensitive than and as specific as agar and thioglycolate broth cultures and yields results faster.

  18. Agreement between self- and clinician-collected specimen results for detection and typing of high-risk human papillomavirus in specimens from women in Gugulethu, South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Heidi E.; Allan, Bruce R.; van de Wijgert, Janneke H. H. M.; Altini, Lydia; Taylor, Sylvia M.; de Kock, Alana; Coetzee, Nicol; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2007-01-01

    We assessed the agreement in detection of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), as well as specific HPV types, between self- and clinician-obtained specimens for 450 women over 18 years of age attending a community health center in Gugulethu, South Africa. Both self-collected swabs and tampons had

  19. Assessment of different methods of bovine oocytes collection, maturation and in vitro fertilization of abattoir specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Saleh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is designed to evaluate the best methods for cow oocytes collection from abattoir specimens which is the cheapest, easily obtained and bulky number. Forty five fresh cow genitalia specimens and testicle were collected directly after slaughter from Al-Shoáalla abattoir north-west of Baghdad the capital early morning, transported in cool box under (4-8 °C to the laboratory of theriogenology in the College of Veterinary Medicine/Baghdad University during the period from November 2016 to February 2017. Ovaries were separated from the surrounding tissues, washed thoroughly with dis. water repeatedly, then with normal saline and finally with MEM medium containing Antibiotics and Nystatin for contaminant elimination. Oocytes were collected with four methods aspiration, slashing, slicing after aspiration and slicing. The result showed that; the collected oocytes were 55, 68, 87 and 106 oocytes respectively; slicing methods yield more oocytes count. Period of time between slaughtering and samples processing significantly affect oocytes collected percentage and quality, periods as 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours yield 75%, 68%, 61% and 55% oocytes counts of good, fair, poor to aged and bad quality oocytes respectively. Two hours period yield an elevated oocytes count with good quality. Maturation index of oocytes according to the type of collected methods showed 44, 37, 39 and 42 with 12, 8, 6 and 6 good oocyte quality for the four methods respectively. In conclusion slicing methods yield more oocytes count with a moderate quality and embryos production while aspiration methods yield a moderate oocytes count with an elevated quality and good embryos production.

  20. A Comparison of Dacron versus Flocked Nylon Swabs for Anal Cytology Specimen Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Julia C.; Ghosh, Arpita; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Follansbee, Stephen; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Gravitt, Patti E.; Grabe, Niels; Lahrmann, Bernd; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We compared the performance of commonly used Dacron versus flocked nylon swabs for anal cytology. Study Design From 23 HIV-positive men screened at Kaiser Permanente San Francisco (San Francisco, Calif., USA), 2 anal specimens were collected, 1 with each swab in random order, and placed into liquid cytology medium. Specimens were tested for cellularity by quantifying a genomic DNA (erv-3). The number of cells was assessed from prepared slides by automated image analysis. Performance was compared between swabs using 2-sample t tests and standard crossover trial analysis methods accounting for period effect. Results Flocked swabs collected slightly more erv-3 cells than Dacron for the first sample although not significantly (p = 0.18) and a similar number of erv-3 cells for the second sample (p = 0.85). Flocked swabs collected slightly more cells per slide than the Dacron swabs at both time periods although this was only significant in the second time period (p = 0.42 and 0.03 for first and second periods, respectively). In crossover trial analysis, flocked swabs outperformed Dacron for cell count per slide based on slide imaging (p = 0.03), but Dacron and flocked swabs performed similarly based on erv-3 quantification (p = 0.14). Conclusions Further studies should determine whether flocked swabs increase the representation of diagnostically important cells compared to Dacron. PMID:21791907

  1. The collection of Bathynellacea specimens of MNCN (CSIC Madrid: microscope slices and DNA extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Camacho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the first published database of a Bathynellacea Chappuis, 1915 collection of slices and DNA extracts. It includes all data of bathynellaceans (Crustacea: Syncarida collected in the last 48 years (1968 to 2016 on the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Islands, studied since 1984. It also includes specimens studied across many countries of Europe (Portugal, Romania, France, Italy, Slovenia, Bulgaria, and England, as well as some specimens obtained from samples of North America (Montana, Washington, Alaska and Texas, South America (Brazil, Chile and Argentina, Asia (China, Thailand, Vietnam, Mongolia and India, Africa (Morocco and Chad and Australia (New South Wales –NSW- and Queensland. The samples come from groundwater (caves, springs, wells and hyporrheic habitat associated with rivers obtained from both, sampling campaigns and occasional sampling efforts. The data set includes 3399 records (2657 slices and 742 DNA extracts corresponding to three families (Parabathynellidae Noodt, 1965, Leptobathynellidae Noodt, 1965 and Bathynellidae Grobben, 1905 of the order Bathynellacea; the existence of three families is accepted, but this is a controversial issue and here is not the appropriate context to address this problem; 52 genera and 92 species formally described, in addition to 30 taxa under study and, thus, still unpublished. This represents more than half of all the genera known worldwide (80 and almost one third of the species currently known in the world (329, which increases every year. This dataset contains especially relevant collection that includes holotypes and type series of 43 new species of Bathynellacea (33 from the Parabathynellidae and ten from the Bathynellidae described by Ana I. Camacho (AIC hereinafter; eleven of these are the type species for new genera described from all around the world, ten belonging to the Parabathynellidae and one from the Bathynellidae. As previously mentioned, these new species come from all

  2. The collection of Bathynellacea specimens of MNCN (CSIC) Madrid: microscope slices and DNA extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Ana I.; Dorda, Beatriz A.; Chillón, Begoña Sánchez; Rey, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This is the first published database of a Bathynellacea Chappuis, 1915 collection of slices and DNA extracts. It includes all data of bathynellaceans (Crustacea: Syncarida) collected in the last 48 years (1968 to 2016) on the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Islands, studied since 1984. It also includes specimens studied across many countries of Europe (Portugal, Romania, France, Italy, Slovenia, Bulgaria, and England), as well as some specimens obtained from samples of North America (Montana, Washington, Alaska and Texas), South America (Brazil, Chile and Argentina), Asia (China, Thailand, Vietnam, Mongolia and India), Africa (Morocco and Chad) and Australia (New South Wales –NSW- and Queensland). The samples come from groundwater (caves, springs, wells and hyporrheic habitat associated with rivers) obtained from both, sampling campaigns and occasional sampling efforts. The data set includes 3399 records (2657 slices and 742 DNA extracts) corresponding to three families (Parabathynellidae Noodt, 1965, Leptobathynellidae Noodt, 1965 and Bathynellidae Grobben, 1905) of the order Bathynellacea; the existence of three families is accepted, but this is a controversial issue and here is not the appropriate context to address this problem; 52 genera and 92 species formally described, in addition to 30 taxa under study and, thus, still unpublished. This represents more than half of all the genera known worldwide (80) and almost one third of the species currently known in the world (329, which increases every year). This dataset contains especially relevant collection that includes holotypes and type series of 43 new species of Bathynellacea (33 from the Parabathynellidae and ten from the Bathynellidae) described by Ana I. Camacho (AIC hereinafter); eleven of these are the type species for new genera described from all around the world, ten belonging to the Parabathynellidae and one from the Bathynellidae. As previously mentioned, these new species come from all

  3. Museums are biobanks: unlocking the genetic potential of the three billion specimens in the world's biological collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, David K; Zwick, Andreas; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2016-12-01

    Museums and herbaria represent vast repositories of biological material. Until recently, working with these collections has been difficult, due to the poor condition of historical DNA. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing technology, and subsequent development of techniques for preparing and sequencing historical DNA, have recently made working with collection specimens an attractive option. Here we describe the unique technical challenges of working with collection specimens, and innovative molecular methods developed to tackle them. We also highlight possible applications of collection specimens, for taxonomy, ecology and evolution. The application of next-generation sequencing methods to museum and herbaria collections is still in its infancy. However, by giving researchers access to billions of specimens across time and space, it holds considerable promise for generating future discoveries across many fields. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Musci austro-africani II. Bryophyte collections in southern Africa and southern African type specimens in the National Herbarium, Pretoria

    OpenAIRE

    R. E. Magill

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of bryological collections and collectors in southern Africa introduces a catalogue of southern African type specimens housed in the National Herbarium, Pretoria. The type catalogue, arranged alphabetically by basionym, includes correct names, type status and label data.

  5. Multiplex tandem PCR: a novel platform for rapid detection and identification of fungal pathogens from blood culture specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna; Sorrell, Tania C; Chen, Sharon; Stanley, Keith; Iredell, Jonathan; Halliday, Catriona

    2008-09-01

    We describe the first development and evaluation of a rapid multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) assay for the detection and identification of fungi directly from blood culture specimens that have been flagged as positive. The assay uses a short-cycle multiplex amplification, followed by 12 simultaneous PCRs which target the fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 region, elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1-alpha), and beta-tubulin genes to identify 11 fungal pathogens: Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata, Candida guilliermondii, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis complex, Candida tropicalis, Cryptococcus neoformans complex, Fusarium solani, Fusarium species, and Scedosporium prolificans. The presence or absence of a fungal target was confirmed by melting curve analysis. Identification by MT-PCR correlated with culture-based identification for 44 (100%) patients. No cross-reactivity was detected in 200 blood culture specimens that contained bacteria or in 30 blood cultures without microorganisms. Fungi were correctly identified in five specimens with bacterial coinfection and in blood culture samples that were seeded with a mixture of yeast cells. The MT-PCR assay was able to provide rapid (detection and identification of fungal pathogens directly from blood culture specimens.

  6. Automatic collection of bovine blood samples | Hale | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A technique is described which allows automatic collection of jugular venous blood from tethered cows. In this system, blood is pumped continuously from an intravenous cannula which has a double lumen while an anticoagulant is pumped through the second opening. Diluted blood is collected in a fraction collector which ...

  7. Assessment of the stability of DNA in specimens collected under conditions for drug testing-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert M; Mitchell, John M; Hart, E Dale; Evans, Amy; Meaders, Meredith; Norsworthy, Sarah E; Hayes, Eugene D; Flegel, Ron; Maha, George C; Shaffer, Megan D; Hall, Erin M; Rogers, Kelley

    2018-02-01

    For forensic biological sample collections, the specimen donor is linked solidly to his or her specimen through a chain of custody (CoC) sometimes referenced as a chain of evidence. Rarely, a donor may deny that a urine or oral fluid (OF) specimen is his or her specimen even with a patent CoC. The goal of this pilot study was to determine the potential effects of short-term storage on the quality and quantity of DNA in both types of specimen under conditions that may be encountered with employment-related drug testing specimens. Fresh urine and freshly collected oral fluid all produced complete STR profiles. For the "pad" type OF collectors, acceptable DNA was extractable both from the buffer/preservative and the pad. Although fresh urine and OF produced complete STR profiles, partial profiles were obtained after storage for most samples. An exception was the DNA in the Quantisal OF collector, from which a complete profile was obtained for both freshly collected OF and stored OF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Response of the Emit II amphetamine/methamphetamine assay to specimens collected following use of Vicks inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poklis, A; Jortani, S A; Brown, C S; Crooks, C R

    1993-09-01

    The possible cross-reactivity of l-methamphetamine (desoxyephedrine) to the Syva Emit II amphetamine/methamphetamine assay was evaluated in urine specimens collected from seven subjects using Vicks Inhalers. The subjects were six males and one female ranging from 24 to 47 years of age. Four subjects used the inhaler every two waking hours for five consecutive days, while three subjects inhaled hourly for three consecutive days. All urine voids were collected, totaling 150 specimens. All specimens were analyzed by the Emit II assay on a Hitachi 717 automatic analyzer with a 1000-ng/mL d-methamphetamine cutoff calibrator. None of the inhaler specimens produced an Emit II response equal to or greater than the cutoff calibrator; all were negative. Specimens producing the highest rates were further analyzed by chiral GC/MS. The highest concentrations of l-methamphetamine were observed in urines from two subjects inhaling hourly: 1390, 1290, and 740 ng/mL. These specimens were collected the evenings of the second and third day. When used as directed or even with double the daily dose, Vicks Inhalers did not cause false-positive results in urine tested with the Emit II Amphetamine/Methamphetamine assay.

  9. The collection of type specimens of the family Carabidae (Coleoptera deposited in the Natural History Museum of Barcelona, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viñolas, A.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The type collection of the family Carabidae (Coleoptera deposited in the Natural History Museum of Barcelona, Spain, has been organised, revised and documented. It contains 430 type specimens belonging to 155 different taxa. Of note are the large number of hypogean species, the species of Cicindelidae from Asenci Codina’s collection, and the species of Harpalinae extracted from Jacques Nègre’s collection. In this paper we provide all the available information related to these type specimens. We therefore provide the following information for each taxon, species or subspecies: the original and current taxonomic status, original citation of type materials, exact transcription of original labels, and preservation condition of specimens. Moreover, the differences between original descriptions and labels are discussed. When a taxonomic change has occurred, the references that examine those changes are included at the end of the taxa description.

  10. Collection and Transfusion of Blood in Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was embarked on to investigate the pattern of blood collection and transfusion in Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), Jos between 2000 and 2005 in the face of the present human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic. Methodology: Blood bank records of blood donors and transfusions were ...

  11. Specimen Collection for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research: Harmonizing the Approach to Informed Consent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Justin; Lipnick, Scott; Rao, Mahendra

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have elicited excitement in both the scientific and ethics communities for their potential to advance basic and translational research. They have been hailed as an alternative to derivation from embryos that provides a virtually unlimited source of pluripotent stem cells for research and therapeutic applications. However, research with iPSCs is ethically complex, uniquely encompassing the concerns associated with genomics, immortalized cell lines, transplantation, human reproduction, and biobanking. Prospective donation of tissue specimens for iPSC research thus requires an approach to informed consent that is constructed for this context. Even in the nascent stages of this field, approaches to informed consent have been variable in ways that threaten the simultaneous goals of protecting donors and safeguarding future research and translation, and investigators are seeking guidance. We address this need by providing concrete recommendations for informed consent that balance the perspectives of a variety of stakeholders. Our work combines analysis of consent form language collected from investigators worldwide with a conceptual balancing of normative ethical concerns, policy precedents, and scientific realities. Our framework asks people to consent prospectively to a broad umbrella of foreseeable research, including future therapeutic applications, with recontact possible in limited circumstances. We argue that the long-term goals of regenerative medicine, interest in sharing iPSC lines, and uncertain landscape of future research all would be served by a framework of ongoing communication with donors. Our approach balances the goals of iPSC and regenerative medicine researchers with the interests of individual research participants. PMID:23197820

  12. Specimen collection for induced pluripotent stem cell research: harmonizing the approach to informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Justin; Lipnick, Scott; Rao, Mahendra; Hull, Sara Chandros

    2012-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have elicited excitement in both the scientific and ethics communities for their potential to advance basic and translational research. They have been hailed as an alternative to derivation from embryos that provides a virtually unlimited source of pluripotent stem cells for research and therapeutic applications. However, research with iPSCs is ethically complex, uniquely encompassing the concerns associated with genomics, immortalized cell lines, transplantation, human reproduction, and biobanking. Prospective donation of tissue specimens for iPSC research thus requires an approach to informed consent that is constructed for this context. Even in the nascent stages of this field, approaches to informed consent have been variable in ways that threaten the simultaneous goals of protecting donors and safeguarding future research and translation, and investigators are seeking guidance. We address this need by providing concrete recommendations for informed consent that balance the perspectives of a variety of stakeholders. Our work combines analysis of consent form language collected from investigators worldwide with a conceptual balancing of normative ethical concerns, policy precedents, and scientific realities. Our framework asks people to consent prospectively to a broad umbrella of foreseeable research, including future therapeutic applications, with recontact possible in limited circumstances. We argue that the long-term goals of regenerative medicine, interest in sharing iPSC lines, and uncertain landscape of future research all would be served by a framework of ongoing communication with donors. Our approach balances the goals of iPSC and regenerative medicine researchers with the interests of individual research participants.

  13. Zika Virus Infection and Prolonged Viremia in Whole-Blood Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuy, Jean Michel; Mengelle, Catherine; Pasquier, Christophe; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Delobel, Pierre; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume; Izopet, Jacques

    2017-05-01

    We tested whole-blood and plasma samples from immunocompetent patients who had had benign Zika virus infections and found that Zika virus RNA persisted in whole blood substantially longer than in plasma. This finding may have implications for diagnosis of acute symptomatic and asymptomatic infections and for testing of blood donations.

  14. Good practices in collecting umbilical cord and placental blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lauren Auer; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Crozeta, Karla; Guimarães, Paulo Ricardo Bittencourt

    2016-08-18

    to identify the factors related to the quality of umbilical cord and placental blood specimens, and define best practices for their collection in a government bank of umbilical cord and placental blood. this was a descriptive study, quantitative approach, performed at a government umbilical cord and placental blood bank, in two steps: 1) verification of the obstetric, neonatal and operational factors, using a specific tool for gathering data as non-participant observers; 2) definition of best practices by grouping non-conformities observed before, during and after blood collection. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the following statistical software: Statistica(r) and R(r). while there was a correlation with obstetrical and neonatal factors, there was a larger correlation with operational factors, resulting in the need to adjust the professional practices of the nursing staff and obstetrical team involved in collecting this type of blood. Based on these non-conformities we defined best practices for nurses before, during and after blood collection. the best practices defined in this study are an important management tool for the work of nurses in obtaining blood specimens of high cell quality. identificar fatores relacionados à qualidade das amostras do sangue de cordão umbilical e placentário e definir boas práticas para sua coleta em um banco público de sangue de cordão umbilical e placentário. pesquisa descritiva, abordagem quantitativa, realizada em um banco público de sangue de cordão umbilical e placentário, desenvolvida em duas etapas: 1) verificação dos fatores obstétricos, neonatais e operacionais, obtidos por coleta em instrumento próprio e observação não participante; 2) definição das boas práticas, por meio do agrupamento de não-conformidades observadas antes, durante e após a coleta do sangue. Os dados foram analisados por meio da estatística descritiva, utilizando-se dos softwares Statistica(r) e R(r). houve

  15. The order of draw of blood specimens into additive containing tubes not affect potassium and calcium measurements.

    OpenAIRE

    Majid, A; Heaney, D C; Padmanabhan, N; Spooner, R

    1996-01-01

    The effect of order of draw when taking blood into tubes containing additive was investigated in 47 medical inpatients; 12 of these patients acted as a control group. The samples were analysed in the order in which they were withdrawn. The results of potassium and calcium concentrations did not differ significantly between groups. Manufacturers recommend a specific order of draw when taking blood using vacuum based blood collection systems, which are routinely used in many hospitals. The resu...

  16. Comparison of blood agar, ampicillin blood agar, MacConkey-ampicillin-Tween agar, and modified cefsulodin-Irgasan-novobiocin agar for isolation of Aeromonas spp. from stool specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M T; Stroh, E M; Jessop, J

    1988-09-01

    The performance of four media for the isolation of Aeromonas strains from stool specimens, the importance of ampicillin-susceptible Aeromonas strains in the selection of culture media, and the usefulness of beta-hemolysis in screening blood-containing media for Aeromonas strains were evaluated in two phases. In the first phase, 36 of 1,672 stool specimens yielded Aeromonas isolates. Ninety-seven percent of the isolates were detected on blood agar containing 20 micrograms of ampicillin per ml (ABA), and 47% were detected on MacConkey agar containing 100 micrograms of ampicillin per ml and 1% Tween 80. In the second phase of the study, 43 of 1,924 stool specimens yielded Aeromonas isolates. Fifty-one percent of the isolates were detected on blood agar and on modified cefsulodin-Irgasan-novobiocin agar, and 84% were detected on ABA. The combination of ABA and modified cefsulodin-Irgasan-novobiocin agar provided 100% recovery of the Aeromonas isolates encountered. All of the Aeromonas isolates detected on blood agar were also detected on ABA, and 89% of the Aeromonas isolates detected on these media were beta-hemolytic. These results suggest that ABA is superior to the other media evaluated for the isolation of Aeromonas strains from stool specimens, but optimal recovery of the organism may require the use of more than one medium. The results also suggest that the occurrence of ampicillin-susceptible strains is not a limitation on the use of ABA, but at least 10% of Aeromonas isolates will be missed if beta-hemolysis is used to screen ABA plates for these organisms.

  17. Type specimens of Heteroptera (Insecta: Hemiptera) collected from North Korea and adjacent regions deposited at Insect Collections of Chungnam National University (CNU) in Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunghoon; Kim, Junggon; Oh, Sumin; Heiss, Ernst

    2015-07-06

    A list of type specimens of Heteroptera (Insecta: Hemiptera) collected from North Korea (mostly by the late Dr. Michail Josifov, Sofia, Bulgaria) acquired earlier by E. Heiss, now donated to and deposited in the insect collections of Chungnam National University (CNU), Deajeon, Korea, is presented. A total of 31 holotypes and 694 paratypes of 41 species and 1 subspecies in 6 families and 9 subfamilies are presented: Miridae (Deraeocorinae, Mirinae, Orthotylinae, Phylinae), Tingidae (Tinginae), Piesmatidae (Piesmatinae), Berytidae (Metacanthinae), Cymidae (Cyminae), Pentatomidae (Asopinae).

  18. Recovery and Stability of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Using the Oral-Eze® Oral Fluid Collection System and Intercept® Oral Specimen Collection Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samano, Kimberly L; Anne, Lakshmi; Johnson, Ted; Tang, Kenneth; Sample, R H Barry

    2015-10-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is increasingly used for clinical, forensic and workplace drug testing as an alternative to urine. Uncertainties surrounding OF collection device performance, drug stability and testing reproducibility may be partially responsible for delays in the implementation of OF testing in regulated drug testing programs. Stability of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) fortified and authentic specimens was examined after routine collection, transport and laboratory testing. Acceptable recovery and stability were observed when THC-fortified OF (1.5 and 4.5 ng/mL) was applied to Oral-Eze devices. Neat OF samples collected with Oral-Eze, processed per the package insert, and fortified with THC (3 and 6 ng/mL) were stable (±20%) at room temperature (21-25°C), refrigerated (2-8°C) and frozen (-25 to -15°C) conditions up to 1 month, while samples collected with Intercept devices showed decreases at refrigerated and room temperatures. After long-term refrigerated or frozen storage, maximum reductions in THC concentrations were 42% for Oral-Eze and 69% for Intercept. After ≥1 year frozen storage, 80.7% of laboratory specimens positive for THC (3 ng/mL cut-off) by GC-MS were reconfirmed positive (within 25%), with an average THC decrease of 4.2%. Specimens (n = 47) processed with Oral-Eze (diluted) and tested via enzyme immunoassay were concordant with LC-MS-MS results and showed 100% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Paired specimens collected with Oral-Eze and Intercept exhibited 98% overall agreement between the immunoassay test systems. Collectively, these data demonstrate consistent and reproducible recovery and stability of THC in OF after collection, transport and laboratory testing using the Oral-Eze OF Collection System. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Detection of Norovirus in Swab Specimens of Restrooms and Kitchens Collected for Investigation of Suspected Food Poisoning Outbreaks in Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somura, Yoshiko; Kimoto, Kana; Oda, Mayuko; Nagano, Miyuki; Okutsu, Yuta; Mori, Kohji; Akiba, Tetsuya; Sadamasu, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    During 2015-2016, we examined norovirus (NoV) RNA in swab specimens collected for investigation of suspected food poisoning outbreaks in Tokyo by real-time RT-PCR. Of 1,726 swab samples, 65 (3.8%) were NoV-positive and all positive swab samples were derived from NoV-positive outbreaks. Swab specimens were positive in 41 of 181 (22.7%) NoV outbreaks, while no positive swabs were detected in NoV-negative outbreaks. PCR fragments amplified from 32 swabs were sequenced, and all of them displayed complete homology with sequences from clinical and food samples. Though the results of swabs may be useful for determining the causative agent and infection route in some outbreaks, there was no case in which the results of swabs alone could elucidate the cause of food poisoning. Swabs may be useful in food poisoning investigations, if the results are interpreted in conjunction with epidemiological findings and clinical data. Swab samples are often collected several days after an outbreak, and the influence of disinfection should be taken into consideration. In NoV outbreaks, 55 out of 640 (8.6%) restroom swab specimens were NoV-positive whereas six of 618 (1.0%) were positive among kitchen swab specimens. In the restroom, the toilet bowl (43.6%) showed the highest positive rate and next was the toilet seat (14.5%). Additionally, NoV was detected at various sites in the restroom, including doorknob and floor. Since NoV-positive swab specimens may suggest that sanitation management is not performed properly in the facility, swab results may be utilized as a basis for hygiene guidance.

  20. The Impact of an Electronic Ordering System on Blood Bank Specimen Rejection Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Stefanie K; Shirazi, Maryam; Wu-Gall, Charlotte; Stotler, Brie A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the impact that an electronic ordering system has on the rate of rejection of blood type and screen testing samples and the impact on the number of ABO blood-type discrepancies over a 4-year period. An electronic ordering system was implemented in May 2011. Rejection rates along with reasons for rejection were tracked between January 2010 and December 2013. A total of 40,104 blood samples were received during this period, of which 706 (1.8%) were rejected for the following reasons: 382 (54.0%) unsigned samples, 235 (33.0%) mislabeled samples, 57 (8.0%) unsigned requisitions, 18 (2.5%) incorrect tubes, and 14 (1.9%) ABO discrepancies. Of the samples, 2.5% were rejected in the year prior to implementing the electronic ordering system compared with 1.2% in the year following implementation ( P  blood sample rejection. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. A catalog of bird specimens associated with Prince Maximilian of Wied-Neuwied and potential type material in the natural history collection in Wiesbaden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Dorothee; Geller-Grimm, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Bird specimens collected by 19(th) century explorer and ornithologist Prince Maximilian of Wied-Neuwied form one of the foundation collections of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. However, parts of his collection remained in Germany and came to the Museum Wiesbaden. Since Wied described numerous new species without designating types, some of these specimens might be type material. Here we present a catalog of the 30 Wiesbaden specimens associated with him and discuss their potential type status. We conclude that 17 individuals in 11 species are potential type specimens that should be considered in future taxonomic work.

  2. The order of draw of blood specimens into additive containing tubes not affect potassium and calcium measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, A; Heaney, D C; Padmanabhan, N; Spooner, R

    1996-12-01

    The effect of order of draw when taking blood into tubes containing additive was investigated in 47 medical inpatients; 12 of these patients acted as a control group. The samples were analysed in the order in which they were withdrawn. The results of potassium and calcium concentrations did not differ significantly between groups. Manufacturers recommend a specific order of draw when taking blood using vacuum based blood collection systems, which are routinely used in many hospitals. The results of this study, however, show that order of draw has no effect on calcium or potassium concentrations.

  3. Collection, transport and general processing of clinical specimens in Microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Romero, M Isabel; García-Lechuz Moya, Juan Manuel; González López, Juan José; Orta Mira, Nieves

    2018-02-06

    The interpretation and the accuracy of the microbiological results still depend to a great extent on the quality of the samples and their processing within the Microbiology laboratory. The type of specimen, the appropriate time to obtain the sample, the way of sampling, the storage and transport are critical points in the diagnostic process. The availability of new laboratory techniques for unusual pathogens, makes necessary the review and update of all the steps involved in the processing of the samples. Nowadays, the laboratory automation and the availability of rapid techniques allow the precision and turn-around time necessary to help the clinicians in the decision making. In order to be efficient, it is very important to obtain clinical information to use the best diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Blood product collection and supply: a matter of money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kort, W; Wagenmans, E; van Dongen, A; Slotboom, Y; Hofstede, G; Veldhuizen, I

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that countries with a low or medium Human Development Index (HDI) transfuse far fewer blood products than countries with a high HDI. HDI comprises both economical and non-economical elements. We considered the hypothesis that non-economical, cultural differences may be additional factors in understanding blood donation and blood supply differences. We quantified the explained variance, r(2), in: the number of donors, the number of whole blood collections and the number of red blood cell units supplied to hospitals for 25 European countries. Candidate predictors were Hofstede's cultural dimensions, the demographic factor Old Age Dependency Ratio and the three components of HDI: Gross National Income, Life Expectancy and the Educational Development Index. The cultural dimension Power Distance was the best sole predictor of whole blood collection (r(2) = 56.8%) and the number of donors (r(2) = 25.1%). The Educational Development Index best predicted the number of red blood cell units (r(2) = 45.0%). Multivariable models including the cultural dimension Power Distance and the Educational Development Index gave the best results in predicting the number of whole blood collections and red blood cell units supplied and, to a lesser extent, the number of donors, with adjusted r(2) values of 63.6%, 51.9% and 28.6%, respectively. In contrast, Gross National Income made no significant predictive contribution to any of the multivariable models. Neither did the other cultural dimensions, Life Expectancy or Old Age Dependency Ratio. The effects of education level and cultural aspects should be taken into account as influencers on donation behaviour. The concept of power distance, in particular, presents a challenge to blood donor managers in cross-cultural and multi-cultural donor management contexts.

  5. Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historically important Albany Museum collection. Part 1: Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, Werner; Branch, William R; Watson, Gillian

    2015-03-18

    The Port Elizabeth Museum houses the consolidated herpetological collections of three provincial museums of the Eastern Cape, South Africa: the Port Elizabeth Museum (Port Elizabeth), the Amatole (previously Kaffarian) Museum (King Williams Town), and the Albany Museum (Grahamstown). Under John Hewitt, Albany Museum was the main centre of herpetological research in South Africa from 1910-1940, and he described numerous new species, many based on material in the museum collection. The types and other material from the Albany Museum are now incorporated into the Port Elizabeth Museum Herpetology collection (PEM). Due to the vague typification of much of Hewitt's material, the loss of the original catalogues in a fire and the subsequent deterioration of specimen labels, the identification of this type material is often troublesome. Significant herpetological research has been undertaken at the PEM in the last 35 years, and the collection has grown to be the third largest in Africa. During this period, numerous additional types have been deposited in the PEM collection, generated by active taxonomic research in the museum. As a consequence, 43 different amphibian taxa are represented by 37 primary and 151 secondary type specimens in the collection. This catalogue provides the first documentation of these types. It provides the original name, the original publication date, journal number and pagination, reference to illustrations, current name, museum collection number, type locality, notes on the type status, and photographs of all holotypes and lectotypes. Where necessary to maintain nomenclatural stability, and where confused type series are housed in the PEM collection, lectotypes and paralectotypes are nominated.

  6. Effects of blood collection conditions on ovarian cancer serum markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Thorpe

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating diagnostic and early detection biomarkers requires comparing serum protein concentrations among biosamples ascertained from subjects with and without cancer. Efforts are generally made to standardize blood processing and storage conditions for cases and controls, but blood sample collection conditions cannot be completely controlled. For example, blood samples from cases are often obtained from persons aware of their diagnoses, and collected after fasting or in surgery, whereas blood samples from some controls may be obtained in different conditions, such as a clinic visit. By measuring the effects of differences in collection conditions on three different markers, we investigated the potential of these effects to bias validation studies.We analyzed serum concentrations of three previously studied putative ovarian cancer serum biomarkers-CA 125, Prolactin and MIF-in healthy women, women with ovarian cancer undergoing gynecologic surgery, women undergoing surgery for benign ovary pathology, and women undergoing surgery with pathologically normal ovaries. For women undergoing surgery, a blood sample was collected either in the clinic 1 to 39 days prior to surgery, or on the day of surgery after anesthesia was administered but prior to the surgical procedure, or both. We found that one marker, prolactin, was dramatically affected by collection conditions, while CA 125 and MIF were unaffected. Prolactin levels were not different between case and control groups after accounting for the conditions of sample collection, suggesting that sample ascertainment could explain some or all of the previously reported results about its potential as a biomarker for ovarian cancer.Biomarker validation studies should use standardized collection conditions, use multiple control groups, and/or collect samples from cases prior to influence of diagnosis whenever feasible to detect and correct for potential biases associated with sample collection.

  7. Blood collection from the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Peter; Conrad, Mara

    2008-10-13

    The horseshoe crab has the best-characterized immune system of any long-lived invertebrate. The study of immunity in horseshoe crabs has been facilitated by the ease in collecting large volumes of blood and from the simplicity of the blood. Horseshoe crabs show only a single cell type in the general circulation, the granular amebocyte. The plasma has the salt content of sea water and only three abundant proteins, hemocyanin, the respiratory protein, the C-reactive proteins, which function in the cytolytic destruction of foreign cells, including bacterial cells, and alpha2-macroglobulin, which inhibits the proteases of invading pathogens. Blood is collected by direct cardiac puncture under conditions that minimize contamination by lipopolysaccharide (a.k.a., endotoxin, LPS), a product of the Gram-negative bacteria. A large animal can yield 200 - 400 mL of blood. For the study of the plasma, blood cells are immediately removed from the plasma by centrifugation and the plasma can then be fractionated into its constituent proteins. The blood cells are conveniently studied microscopically by collecting small volumes of blood into LPS-free isotonic saline (0.5 M NaCl) under conditions that permit direct microscopic examination by placing one of more LPS-free coverglasses on the culture dish surface, then mounting those coverglasses in simple observation chambers following cell attachment. A second preparation for direct observation is to collect 3 - 5 mL of blood in a LPS-free embryo dish and then explanting fragments of aggregated amebocytes to a chamber that sandwiches the tissue between a slide and a coverglass. In this preparation, the motile amebocytes migrate onto the coverglass surface, where they can readily be observed. The blood clotting system involves aggregation of amebocytes and the formation of an extracellular clot of a protein, coagulin, which is released from the secretory granules of the blood cells. Biochemical analysis of washed blood cells requires

  8. On the improvement of blood sample collection at clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasas, Alex; Ramalhinho, Helena; Pessoa, Luciana S; Resende, Mauricio G C; Caballé, Imma; Barba, Nuria

    2014-01-09

    Blood samples are usually collected daily from different collection points, such hospitals and health centers, and transported to a core laboratory for testing. This paper presents a project to improve the collection routes of two of the largest clinical laboratories in Spain. These routes must be designed in a cost-efficient manner while satisfying two important constraints: (i) two-hour time windows between collection and delivery, and (ii) vehicle capacity. A heuristic method based on a genetic algorithm has been designed to solve the problem of blood sample collection. The user enters the following information for each collection point: postal address, average collecting time, and average demand (in thermal containers). After implementing the algorithm using C programming, this is run and, in few seconds, it obtains optimal (or near-optimal) collection routes that specify the collection sequence for each vehicle. Different scenarios using various types of vehicles have been considered. Unless new collection points are added or problem parameters are changed substantially, routes need to be designed only once. The two laboratories in this study previously planned routes manually for 43 and 74 collection points, respectively. These routes were covered by an external carrier company. With the implementation of this algorithm, the number of routes could be reduced from ten to seven in one laboratory and from twelve to nine in the other, which represents significant annual savings in transportation costs. The algorithm presented can be easily implemented in other laboratories that face this type of problem, and it is particularly interesting and useful as the number of collection points increases. The method designs blood collection routes with reduced costs that meet the time and capacity constraints of the problem.

  9. Biomonitoring of ciguatoxin exposure in mice using blood collection cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottein Dechraoui, M-Yasmine; Wang, Zhihong; Turquet, Jean; Chinain, Mireille; Darius, Taiana; Cruchet, Philippe; Radwan, Faisal F Y; Dickey, Robert W; Ramsdell, John S

    2005-09-01

    Ciguatera is a human food poisoning caused by consumption of tropical and subtropical fish that have, through their diet, accumulated ciguatoxins in their tissues. This study used laboratory mice to investigate the potential to apply blood collection cards to biomonitor ciguatoxin exposure. Quantitation by the neuroblastoma cytotoxicity assay of Caribbean ciguatoxin (C-CTX-1) spiked into mice blood was made with good precision and recovery. The blood collected from mice exposed to a sublethal dose of Caribbean ciguatoxic extract (0.59 ng/g C-CTX-1 equivalents) was analyzed and found to contain detectable toxin levels at least 12 h post-exposure. Calculated concentration varied from 0.25 ng/ml at 30 min post-exposure to 0.12 ng/ml at 12 h. A dose response mice exposure revealed a linear dose-dependent increase of ciguatoxin activity in mice blood, with more polar ciguatoxin congeners contributing to 89% of the total toxicity. Finally, the toxin measurement in mice blood exposed to toxic extracts from the Indian Ocean or from the Pacific Ocean showed that the blood collection card method could be extended to each of the three known ciguatoxin families (C-CTX, I-CTX and P-CTX). The low matrix effect of extracted dried-blood samples (used at 1:10 or 1:20 dilution) and the high sensitivity of the neuroblastoma assay (limit of detection 0.006 ng/ml C-CTX-1), determined that the blood collection card method is suitable to monitor ciguatoxin at sublethal doses in mice and opens the potential to be a useful procedure for fish screening, environmental risk assessment or clinical diagnosis of ciguatera fish poisoning in humans or marine mammals.

  10. Blood Collection from the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus Polyphemus

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Peter; Conrad, Mara

    2008-01-01

    The horseshoe crab has the best-characterized immune system of any long-lived invertebrate. The study of immunity in horseshoe crabs has been facilitated by the ease in collecting large volumes of blood and from the simplicity of the blood. Horseshoe crabs show only a single cell type in the general circulation, the granular amebocyte. The plasma has the salt content of sea water and only three abundant proteins, hemocyanin, the respiratory protein, the C-reactive proteins, which function in ...

  11. The specimens of Parulidae from the Neotropics in the collection of the Zoological Museum Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Tineke G.

    1992-01-01

    The Parulidae form a group of little dainty birds with slender bills consisting of 126 species. The family is confined to the New World, the largest number of species and genera being found in North and Central America. Neotropical material of 35 species is represented in the collection of the

  12. Detection of oral HPV infection - Comparison of two different specimen collection methods and two HPV detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Marjorie M A; Hartel, Gunter; Whiteman, David C; Antonsson, Annika

    2018-04-01

    Very little is known about the natural history of oral HPV infection. Several different methods exist to collect oral specimens and detect HPV, but their respective performance characteristics are unknown. We compared two different methods for oral specimen collection (oral saline rinse and commercial saliva kit) from 96 individuals and then analyzed the samples for HPV by two different PCR detection methods (single GP5+/6+ PCR and nested MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ PCR). For the oral rinse samples, the oral HPV prevalence was 10.4% (GP+ PCR; 10% repeatability) vs 11.5% (nested PCR method; 100% repeatability). For the commercial saliva kit samples, the prevalences were 3.1% vs 16.7% with the GP+ PCR vs the nested PCR method (repeatability 100% for both detection methods). Overall the agreement was fair or poor between samples and methods (kappa 0.06-0.36). Standardizing methods of oral sample collection and HPV detection would ensure comparability between future oral HPV studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors associated with nursing students' adherence to venous blood collection practice guidelines - A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Karin; Brulin, Christine; Grankvist, Kjell; Juthberg, Christina

    2017-03-01

    Venous blood specimen collection is a common procedure that nursing students perform during pre-registration courses, and training for such collections takes place on campus as well as at clinical placements. However, levels of adherence to practice guidelines are still suboptimal among both nursing students and healthcare staff. We aimed to explore nursing students' adherence to the Swedish national venous blood specimen collection practice guidelines regarding patient identification and test request management and how this adherence is related to clinical experience, capability beliefs, research use, and the perceived social climate in clinical contexts. A survey with a cross-sectional design was conducted among 305 nursing students at a medium-sized university in Sweden. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used for data analysis. The survey showed that 82% of the students adhered to patient identification guideline practices and 80% to test request management practices. Factors associated with correct patient identification procedures were semester and frequency of research use. Factors associated with correct test request management were previous healthcare work experience, semester, and capability beliefs regarding academic abilities and evidence-based practice. We conclude that there is a need to develop educational tools to train students in research use and evidence-based practice in order to enhance guideline practice adherence and improve patient safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Response rates for providing a blood specimen for HIV testing in a population-based survey of young adults in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dube Hazel M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine differences among persons who provided blood specimens for HIV testing compared with those who did not among those interviewed for the population-based Zimbabwe Young Adult Survey (YAS. Methods Chi-square analysis of weighted data to compare demographic and behavioral data of persons interviewed who provided specimens for anonymous testing with those who did not. Prevalence estimation to determine the impact if persons not providing specimens had higher prevalence rates than those who did. Results Comparing those who provided specimens with those who did not, there was no significant difference by age, residence, education, marital status, perceived risk, sexual experience or number of sex partners for women. A significant difference by sexual experience was found for men. Prevalence estimates did not change substantially when prevalence was assumed to be two times higher for persons not providing specimens. Conclusion When comparing persons who provided specimens for HIV testing with those who did not, few significant differences were found. If those who did not provide specimens had prevalence rates twice that of those who did, overall prevalence would not be substantially affected. Refusal to provide blood specimens does not appear to have contributed to an underestimation of HIV prevalence.

  15. Diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STI) using self-collected non-invasive specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2004-01-01

    Paramount in control of transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is their prompt recognition and appropriate treatment. In countries where definitive diagnoses are difficult, a 'syndromic approach' to management of STIs is recommended and practiced, yet many STIs have common symptoms or are asymptomatic and therefore go undetected and untreated. This is of particular concern with the recognition that HIV transmission is increased with co-existent STIs: the attributable risk for each STI varying with the prevalence within a particular population. Hence, HIV public health prevention approaches must include STI preventative strategies to be effective. Even then, microbiological screening is incorporated into STI control strategies; lack of access to appropriate services (especially in rural and remote areas), reluctance of at-risk populations to attend for treatment, fear of invasive genital examinations, and lower sensitivities of conventional diagnostic assays reduces the effectiveness of such programmes. Therefore, accurate, cost-effective, reliable diagnostic assays (preferably those which can be used in the field) are needed to impact on the incidence of the various STIs, as well as HIV. With the advent of molecular technologies, including target and signal amplification methods, diagnoses of STIs have been revolutionised and allow the use of non or minimally invasive sampling techniques, some of which are self-collected by the patient, e.g. first-void urine, cervico-vaginal lavage, low vaginal swabs, and tampons. Most studies evaluating such self-sampling with molecular diagnostic techniques have demonstrated an equivalent or superior detection of STIs as compared to conventional sampling and detection methods. These sampling methods can also be used to determine prevalence of STIs in various populations, but particularly those with difficult access to medical care. In this article, the utility of self-sampling collection devices for detection of

  16. High Antipredatory Efficiency of Insular Lizards: A Warning Signal of Excessive Specimen Collection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delibes, Miguel; Blázquez, María del Carmen; Soriano, Laura; Revilla, Eloy; Godoy, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We live-captured lizards on islands in the Gulf of California and the Baja California peninsula mainland, and compared their ability to escape predation. Contrary to expectations, endemic lizard species from uninhabited islands fled from humans earlier and more efficiently than those from peninsular mainland areas. In fact, 58.2% (n = 146) of the lizards we tried to capture on the various islands escaped successfully, while this percentage was only 14.4% (n = 160) on the peninsular mainland. Separate evidence (e.g., proportion of regenerated tails, low human population at the collection areas, etc.) challenges several potential explanations for the higher antipredatory efficiency of insular lizards (e.g., more predation pressure on islands, habituation to humans on the peninsula, etc.). Instead, we suggest that the ability of insular lizards to avoid predators may be related to harvesting by humans, perhaps due to the value of endemic species as rare taxonomic entities. If this hypothesis is correct, predation-related behavioral changes in rare species could provide early warning signals of their over-exploitation, thus encouraging the adoption of conservation measures. PMID:22216244

  17. High antipredatory efficiency of insular lizards: a warning signal of excessive specimen collection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Delibes

    Full Text Available We live-captured lizards on islands in the Gulf of California and the Baja California peninsula mainland, and compared their ability to escape predation. Contrary to expectations, endemic lizard species from uninhabited islands fled from humans earlier and more efficiently than those from peninsular mainland areas. In fact, 58.2% (n=146 of the lizards we tried to capture on the various islands escaped successfully, while this percentage was only 14.4% (n=160 on the peninsular mainland. Separate evidence (e.g., proportion of regenerated tails, low human population at the collection areas, etc. challenges several potential explanations for the higher antipredatory efficiency of insular lizards (e.g., more predation pressure on islands, habituation to humans on the peninsula, etc.. Instead, we suggest that the ability of insular lizards to avoid predators may be related to harvesting by humans, perhaps due to the value of endemic species as rare taxonomic entities. If this hypothesis is correct, predation-related behavioral changes in rare species could provide early warning signals of their over-exploitation, thus encouraging the adoption of conservation measures.

  18. Identification of host blood from engorged mosquitoes collected in western Uganda using cytochrome oxidase I gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Mary B; Kading, Rebekah C; Mutebi, John-Paul; Lutwama, Julius J; Miller, Barry R

    2013-07-01

    Emerging infectious disease events are frequently caused by arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) that are maintained in a zoonotic cycle between arthropod vectors and vertebrate wildlife species, with spillover to humans in areas where human and wildlife populations interface. The greater Congo basin region, including Uganda, has historically been a hot spot for emergence of known and novel arboviruses. Surveillance of arthropod vectors is a critical activity in monitoring and predicting outbreaks of arboviral disease, and identification of blood meals in engorged arthropods collected during surveillance efforts provides insight into the ecology of arboviruses and their vectors. As part of an ongoing arbovirus surveillance project we analyzed blood meals from engorged mosquitoes collected at five sites in western Uganda November 2008-June 2010. We extracted DNA from the dissected and triturated abdomens of engorged mosquito specimens. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequence was amplified by PCR and sequenced to identify the source of the mosquito host blood. Blood meals were analyzed from 533 engorged mosquito specimens; 440 of these blood meals were successfully identified from 33 mosquito species. Species identifications were made for 285 of the 440 identified specimens with the remainder identified to genus, family, or order. When combined with published arbovirus isolation and serologic survey data, our results suggest possible vector-reservoir relationships for several arboviruses, including Rift Valley fever virus and West Nile virus.

  19. 21 CFR 864.9125 - Vacuum-assisted blood collection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. 864.9125... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9125 Vacuum-assisted blood collection system. (a) Identification. A vacuum-assisted blood collection system is a device intended for medical purposes that uses a vacuum to...

  20. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma shall...

  1. Impact of blood collection and processing on peripheral blood gene expression profiling in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Linda; Fuhlbrigge, Rebecca; Atkinson, Mark A; Fathman, C Garrison

    2017-08-18

    The natural history of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is challenging to investigate, especially as pre-diabetic individuals are difficult to identify. Numerous T1D consortia have been established to collect whole blood for gene expression analysis from individuals with or at risk to develop T1D. However, with no universally accepted protocol for their collection, differences in sample processing may lead to variances in the results. Here, we examined whether the choice of blood collection tube and RNA extraction kit leads to differences in the expression of genes that are changed during the progression of T1D, and if these differences could be minimized by measuring gene expression directly from the lysate of whole blood. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of 901 genes is highly influenced by sample processing using the PAXgene versus the Tempus system. These included a significant number of lymphocyte-specific genes and genes whose expression has been reported to differ in the peripheral blood of at-risk and T1D patients compared to controls. We showed that artificial changes in gene expression occur when control and T1D samples were processed differently. The sample processing-dependent differences in gene expression were largely due to loss of transcripts during the RNA extraction step using the PAXgene system. The majority of differences were not observed when gene expression was measured in whole blood lysates prepared from blood collected in PAXgene and Tempus tubes. We showed that the gene expression profile of samples processed using the Tempus system is more accurate than that of samples processed using the PAXgene system. Variation in sample processing can result in misleading changes in gene expression. However, these differences can be minimized by measuring gene expression directly in whole blood lysates.

  2. Blood venous sample collection: Recommendations overview and a checklist to improve quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavarina, Davide; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2017-07-01

    The extra-analytical phases of the total testing process have substantial impact on managed care, as well as an inherent high risk of vulnerability to errors which is often greater than that of the analytical phase. The collection of biological samples is a crucial preanalytical activity. Problems or errors occurring shortly before, or soon after, this preanalytical step may impair sample quality and characteristics, or else modify the final results of testing. The standardization of fasting requirements, rest, patient position and psychological state of the patient are therefore crucial for mitigating the impact of preanalytical variability. Moreover, the quality of materials used for collecting specimens, along with their compatibility, can guarantee sample quality and persistence of chemical and physical characteristics of the analytes over time, so safeguarding the reliability of testing. Appropriate techniques and sampling procedures are effective to prevent problems such as hemolysis, undue clotting in the blood tube, draw of insufficient sample volume and modification of analyte concentration. An accurate identification of both patient and blood samples is a key priority as for other healthcare activities. Good laboratory practice and appropriate training of operators, by specifically targeting collection of biological samples, blood in particular, may greatly improve this issue, thus lowering the risk of errors and their adverse clinical consequences. The implementation of a simple and rapid check-list, including verification of blood collection devices, patient preparation and sampling techniques, was found to be effective for enhancing sample quality and reducing some preanalytical errors associated with these procedures. The use of this tool, along with implementation of objective and standardized systems for detecting non-conformities related to unsuitable samples, can be helpful for standardizing preanalytical activities and improving the quality of

  3. Multi-Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Profiling of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates from Blood Cultures and Gallbladder Specimens from Makassar, South-Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatta, M.; Pastoor, R.; Scheelbeek, P.F.D.; Sultan, A.R.; Dwiyanti, R.; Labeda, I.; Smits, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis differentiated 297 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi blood culture isolates from Makassar in 76 genotypes and a single unique S. Typhi genotype was isolated from the cholecystectomy specimens of four patients with cholelithiasis. The high diversity

  4. Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat profiling of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from blood cultures and gallbladder specimens from Makassar, South-Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatta, Mochammad; Pastoor, Rob; Scheelbeek, Pauline F. D.; Sultan, Andi R.; Dwiyanti, Ressy; Labeda, Ibrahim; Smits, Henk L.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis differentiated 297 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi blood culture isolates from Makassar in 76 genotypes and a single unique S. Typhi genotype was isolated from the cholecystectomy specimens of four patients with cholelithiasis. The high diversity

  5. 75 FR 36060 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Blood and Tissue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... Collection; Blood and Tissue Collection at Slaughtering and Rendering Establishments AGENCY: Animal and Plant... collection associated with regulations for blood and tissue collection at slaughtering and rendering... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For information on regulations for blood and tissue collection at...

  6. Catalogue of the type specimens in the fish collection of the National Zoological Museum, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Enqi; Xing, Yingchun; Zhang, Chunguang; Zhao, Yahui

    2015-05-22

    A checklist of type specimens housed in the National Zoological Museum, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, is presented for research and scientific communication. Included are 80 holotypes, 1 lectotype, 1 neotype, 402 paratypes and 17 syntypes of 99 species belonging to 28 families and 12 orders. With 60 species, Cypriniformes has the largest representation. All of the specimens were collected in China and neighboring countries in the past 90 years.

  7. Redescription of Parapercis okamurai Kamohara, 1960 (Perciformes: Pinguipedidae), based on specimens newly collected from Taiwan and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2014-09-01

    A rare species of sandperch, Parapercis okamurai, is redescribed based on 2 types and 15 specimens newly collected from Taiwan and Japan. The species is unique in having cycloid scales on the parietal, opercle and subopercle, except for few large ctenoid scale that covers the base of the opercular spine; body color yellowish dorsally, with 10 or 11 faint yellow bands on lateral body and pale ventrally; and black spots on inner side of upper pectoral fin base. It can also be distinguished from congeners by having a combination of the following characters: dorsal-fin rays V, 23; anal-fin rays I, 19; pectoral-fin rays 18; pored lateral-line scales 59-64; medial predorsal scales 9-10; transverse scale rows 4.5-5.5/14-15; circumpeduncular scales 20-21; gill raker4-5+9-10=13-16; -4 pairs of canine teeth at front of lower jaw; 2-4 rows of teeth on vomer; 2 rows of teeth on palatines; scales on cheek moderately large, each half embedded; and body color yellowish dorsally and a prominent ocellus at upper caudal-fin base.

  8. Blood collection and the labile blood components: what should the regulators ask for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniatis, A; Adamides, E

    1998-01-01

    Efforts to promote the quality and safety of blood collection are underway in most European Union (EU) member states but the level of quality management continues to differ significantly not only between countries but also among Blood Collection Establishments (BCE's) within a country. The European Commission has asked for blood safety and self-sufficiency in the Community and has initiated action in this direction. What is sought is harmonization of practices in the transfusion chain but such cannot be accomplished solely through recommendations and directives given the sociocultural and economic differences among EU member states. Active support for the development of common standards and a common quality system as well as an inspection and accreditation system would certainly help. The goal of self-sufficiency should certainly be emphasized but may be difficult to achieve, given the unpredictability of factors that may affect demand and supply. Through bipartisan initiatives however, between the USA and EU, consensus regarding the issue of blood safety, could be reached.

  9. An Analysis of and Recommendations for the Peruvian Blood Collection and Transfusion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul E; Vidal, Julio; Garcia, Patricia J

    2016-05-01

    Peru experienced a crisis in its blood collection and supply system in the mid-2000s, as contaminated blood led to several transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI), occurring in the backdrop of extremely low voluntary donation rates and a national blood supply shortage. Thus, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MINSA) implemented a national investigation on the safety and quality of the Peruvian blood collection/transfusion network. Every Peruvian blood bank was evaluated by MINSA from 2007-2008. These evaluations consisted of an update of the national registry of blood banks and visits to each blood bank from MINSA oversight teams. Information was collected on the condition of the blood bank personnel, equipment, supplies, and practices. Further, previously-collected blood at each blood bank was randomly selected and screened for TTI-causing pathogens. Uncovered in this investigation was a fragmented, under-equipped, and poorly-staffed blood collection and transfusion network, consisting of 241 independent blood banks and resulting in suboptimal allocation of resources. Further, blood with evidence of TTI-causing pathogens (including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and syphilis) and set for transfusion was discovered at three separate blood banks as part of the random screening process. Using the successful reorganizations of national blood supply systems in other Latin American countries as examples, Peru would be well-served to form large, high-volume, regional blood collection and transfusion centers, responsible for blood collection and screening for the entire country. The small, separate blood banks would then be transformed into a network of blood transfusion centers, not responsible for blood collection. This reorganization would allow Peru to better utilize its resources, standardize the blood collection and transfusion process, and increase voluntary donation, resulting in a safer, more abundant national blood product.

  10. Annotated catalogue of recent Echinoderm type specimens in the collection of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie at Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jangoux, M.; Ridder, de C.

    1987-01-01

    The Leiden Museum houses 82 type specimens of recent echinoderms representing 59 nominal species, one nominal subspecies and one variety. Each species, subspecies or variety is presented (original name, current status, Museum characteristics, brief bibliography, and eventual remarks).

  11. Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat profiling of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from blood cultures and gallbladder specimens from Makassar, South-Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochammad Hatta

    Full Text Available Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis differentiated 297 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi blood culture isolates from Makassar in 76 genotypes and a single unique S. Typhi genotype was isolated from the cholecystectomy specimens of four patients with cholelithiasis. The high diversity in S. Typhi genotypes circulating in Makassar indicates that the number of carriers could be very large, which may complicate disease prevention and control.

  12. A tailored within-community specimen collection strategy increased uptake of cervical cancer screening in a cross-sectional study in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awua, Adolf K; Wiredu, Edwin K; Afari, Edwin A; Tijani, Ahmad S; Djanmah, Gabriel; Adanu, Richard M K

    2017-08-01

    The implementation of cervical cancer screening strategies has reported different rates of success in different countries due to population specific factors that limit women's participation. We report observations and the development of a community-based specimen collection strategy which resulted from interactions with women in the study communities, following an initial low response to a hospital based cervical cancer screening strategy. Women were recruited by a house survey and invited to report at a hospital either within a week or after a week for self and health-personnel specimen collections. However, due to the very low response and subsequent interactions with the women of the communities, another strategy was developed that required recruited women report at a central location within their respective communities for specimen collections at times that did not interfere with their daily routines. For specimen collection, of the 156 participants who opted to report after a week at the hospital, 60 (38.5%) reported. Of the 118 participants who opted to report within 1 week at the hospital, 55 (46.6%) reported. Of the 103 participants were invited to report at a specified location within the community, 98 (95.1%) reported. An overall response rate of 60.4% was attained. Almost 89.7% (226 of 253) of the women performed both self and health personnel sample collection. The community-based strategy with self-specimen collection and HPV testing holds great potential for increasing women's participation in cervical cancer screening in Ghana as compared to the hospital based strategy.

  13. Technical note: Discard the specimen collection swab directly at point of care to improve extensive automated processing in clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Manuela; Grosso, Shamanta; Bruschetta, Graziano; Camporese, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    We compared, in terms of microorganisms recovery, the discard of specimen collection swab, after swirling into its medium, directly at point of care, with its placing into the medium and vortexing on arrival in the laboratory. Our results show that these two procedures are overlapped in terms of bacterial recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of the eSwab collection and transportation system to an amies gel transystem for Gram stain of clinical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pivonkova Jana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first step in routine microbiology laboratory procedures is the collection and safe transportation of swab samples. This can be accomplished using ESwab Collection and Transport System (Copan Italia, Brescia -Italy. The aim of the present study was to compare the results of microscopic examination of gram stain smears prepared directly from clinical specimens, collected and transported in the ESwab, with those obtained using Amies Agar gel Transystem without charcoal (Copan. Findings Specimens were collected from 80 patients (32 vaginal swabs, 27 cervical swabs, 11 urethral swabs and 10 wound swabs. Two swabs were in random order collected from each patient, one using the conventional Amies gel Transystem, the other using ESwab. One slide was prepared for each specimen using the conventional swab and two sets of slides were prepared from the specimens collected with the ESwab: one using 100 μl and one using 50 μl of the Amies medium. All slides were gram stained using an automated Gram stainer. Microscopic examination of 240 slides (80 with conventional and 160 with ESwab showed that the quality of smear preparation from the ESwab system, allowed for easier identification of human cells and identification of greater number of microorganisms. Microscopic examination of additional slides prepared from ESwab at 24 or 72 hours after initial collection were equivalent to those prepared when received in the laboratory within 2 hours of collection. Conclusion Microscopic examination performed using ESwab, especially when preparing the slides with 100 μl, shows superior results to those obtained using the Amies gel Transystem.

  15. The type specimens of mosquitoes (Diptera, Culicidae deposited in the entomological collection of the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Marchon-Silva

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available A list of type specimens of 100 mosquito species deposited in the Entomological collection of the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz is presented. It includes five holotypes belonging to the subfamily Anophelinae; 56 holotypes of Culicinae and two of Toxorhynchitinae. A lectotype is designated for Toxorhynchites fluminensis. The holotypes of six nominal species - Psorophora chiquitana, Psorophora circunflava, Psorophora melanota, Psorophora lanei, Wyeomyia brucei and Uranotaenia noctivaga - previously considered non existent or of unknown location were found in the collection.

  16. NASA Biological Specimen Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonigal, K. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Johnson, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Biological Specimen Repository (NBSR) was established in 2006 to collect, process, preserve and distribute spaceflight-related biological specimens from long duration ISS astronauts. This repository provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning may missions. The NBSR collects blood and urine samples from all participating ISS crewmembers who have provided informed consent. These biological samples are collected once before flight, during flight scheduled on flight days 15, 30, 60, 120 and within 2 weeks of landing. Postflight sessions are conducted 3 and 30 days after landing. The number of in-flight sessions is dependent on the duration of the mission. Specimens are maintained under optimal storage conditions in a manner that will maximize their integrity and viability for future research The repository operates under the authority of the NASA/JSC Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects to support scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment. The NBSR will institute guidelines for the solicitation, review and sample distribution process through establishment of the NBSR Advisory Board. The Advisory Board will be composed of representatives of all participating space agencies to evaluate each request from investigators for use of the samples. This process will be consistent with ethical principles, protection of crewmember confidentiality, prevailing laws and regulations, intellectual property policies, and consent form language. Operations supporting the NBSR are scheduled to continue until the end of U.S. presence on the ISS. Sample distribution is proposed to begin with selections on investigations beginning in 2017. The availability of the NBSR will contribute to the body of knowledge about the diverse factors of spaceflight on human physiology.

  17. Optimization of microCT imaging and blood vessel diameter quantitation of preclinical specimen vasculature with radiopaque polymer injection medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio X Vasquez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vascular networks within a living organism are complex, multi-dimensional, and challenging to image capture. Radio-angiographic studies in live animals require a high level of infrastructure and technical investment in order to administer costly perfusion mediums whose signals metabolize and degrade relatively rapidly, diminishing within a few hours or days. Additionally, live animal specimens must not be subject to long duration scans, which can cause high levels of radiation exposure to the specimen, limiting the quality of images that can be captured. Lastly, despite technological advances in live-animal specimen imaging, it is quite difficult to minimize or prevent movement of a live animal, which can cause motion artifacts in the final data output. It is demonstrated here that through the use of postmortem perfusion protocols of radiopaque silicone polymer mediums and ex-vivo organ harvest, it is possible to acquire a high level of vascular signal in preclinical specimens through the use of micro-computed tomographic (microCT imaging. Additionally, utilizing high-order rendering algorithms, it is possible to further derive vessel morphometrics for qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  18. Annotated Catalogue of recent echinoderm type specimen in the collection of the Zoölogisch Museum Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jangoux, Michel

    1991-01-01

    The Amsterdam Museum houses 2,047 type specimens of recent echinoderms representing 441 nominal species, 5 nominal subspecies, and 11 nominal varieties. Each species, subspecies or variety is presented (original name, current status, museum characteristics, brief bibliography, and eventual remarks).

  19. Mycobacterium grossiae sp. nov., a rapidly growing, scotochromogenic species isolated from human clinical respiratory and blood culture specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto Enrique; Greninger, Alexander L; Ladutko, Lynn; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Jakubiec, Wesley; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Wallace, Richard J; Simmon, Keith E; Dunn, Bruce E; Jackoway, Gary; Vora, Surabhi B; Quinn, Kevin K; Qin, Xuan; Campbell, Sheldon

    2017-11-01

    A previously undescribed, rapidly growing, scotochromogenic species of the genus Mycobacterium (represented by strains PB739 T and GK) was isolated from two clinical sources - the sputum of a 76-year-old patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, history of tuberculosis exposure and Mycobacterium avium complex isolated years prior; and the blood of a 15-year-old male with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia status post bone marrow transplant. The isolates grew as dark orange colonies at 25-37 °C after 5 days, sharing features in common with other closely related species. Analysis of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequence (1492 bp) of strain PB739 T demonstrated that the isolate shared 98.8 % relatedness with Mycobacterium wolinskyi. Partial 429 bp hsp65 and 744 bp rpoB region V sequence analyses revealed that the sequences of the novel isolate shared 94.8 and 92.1 % similarity with those of Mycobacterium neoaurum and Mycobacterium aurum, respectively. Biochemical profiling, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, HPLC/gas-liquid chromatography analyses and multilocus sequence typing support the taxonomic status of these isolates (PB739 T and GK) as representatives of a novel species. Both isolates were susceptible to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended antimicrobials for susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria including amikacin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, doxycycline/minocycline, imipenem, linezolid, clarithromycin and trimethropin/sulfamethoxazole. Both isolates PB739 T and GK showed intermediate susceptibility to cefoxitin. We propose the name Mycobacterium grossiae sp. nov. for this novel species and have deposited the type strain in the DSMZ and CIP culture collections. The type strain is PB739 T (=DSM 104744 T =CIP 111318 T ).

  20. Adjustment of Cell-Type Composition Minimizes Systematic Bias in Blood DNA Methylation Profiles Derived by DNA Collection Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwa, Yuh; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryohei; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Kudo, Hisaaki; Hata, Jun; Hozawa, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Matsuda, Koichi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Tanno, Kozo; Yamaji, Taiki; Wakai, Kenji; Hitomi, Jiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Differences in DNA collection protocols may be a potential confounder in epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) using a large number of blood specimens from multiple biobanks and/or cohorts. Here we show that pre-analytical procedures involved in DNA collection can induce systematic bias in the DNA methylation profiles of blood cells that can be adjusted by cell-type composition variables. In Experiment 1, whole blood from 16 volunteers was collected to examine the effect of a 24 h storage period at 4°C on DNA methylation profiles as measured using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Our statistical analysis showed that the P-value distribution of more than 450,000 CpG sites was similar to the theoretical distribution (in quantile-quantile plot, λ = 1.03) when comparing two control replicates, which was remarkably deviated from the theoretical distribution (λ = 1.50) when comparing control and storage conditions. We then considered cell-type composition as a possible cause of the observed bias in DNA methylation profiles and found that the bias associated with the cold storage condition was largely decreased (λ adjusted = 1.14) by taking into account a cell-type composition variable. As such, we compared four respective sample collection protocols used in large-scale Japanese biobanks or cohorts as well as two control replicates. Systematic biases in DNA methylation profiles were observed between control and three of four protocols without adjustment of cell-type composition (λ = 1.12-1.45) and no remarkable biases were seen after adjusting for cell-type composition in all four protocols (λ adjusted = 1.00-1.17). These results revealed important implications for comparing DNA methylation profiles between blood specimens from different sources and may lead to discovery of disease-associated DNA methylation markers and the development of DNA methylation profile-based predictive risk models.

  1. Adjustment of Cell-Type Composition Minimizes Systematic Bias in Blood DNA Methylation Profiles Derived by DNA Collection Protocols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh Shiwa

    Full Text Available Differences in DNA collection protocols may be a potential confounder in epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS using a large number of blood specimens from multiple biobanks and/or cohorts. Here we show that pre-analytical procedures involved in DNA collection can induce systematic bias in the DNA methylation profiles of blood cells that can be adjusted by cell-type composition variables. In Experiment 1, whole blood from 16 volunteers was collected to examine the effect of a 24 h storage period at 4°C on DNA methylation profiles as measured using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. Our statistical analysis showed that the P-value distribution of more than 450,000 CpG sites was similar to the theoretical distribution (in quantile-quantile plot, λ = 1.03 when comparing two control replicates, which was remarkably deviated from the theoretical distribution (λ = 1.50 when comparing control and storage conditions. We then considered cell-type composition as a possible cause of the observed bias in DNA methylation profiles and found that the bias associated with the cold storage condition was largely decreased (λ adjusted = 1.14 by taking into account a cell-type composition variable. As such, we compared four respective sample collection protocols used in large-scale Japanese biobanks or cohorts as well as two control replicates. Systematic biases in DNA methylation profiles were observed between control and three of four protocols without adjustment of cell-type composition (λ = 1.12-1.45 and no remarkable biases were seen after adjusting for cell-type composition in all four protocols (λ adjusted = 1.00-1.17. These results revealed important implications for comparing DNA methylation profiles between blood specimens from different sources and may lead to discovery of disease-associated DNA methylation markers and the development of DNA methylation profile-based predictive risk models.

  2. Short Communication Effect of age and blood collection site on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fulvia

    Abstract. The serum metabolic profile of ostriches was studied in relation to the blood collection site (jugular vs. wing vein) and age (1 vs. 2 years) on 20 male birds. Blood was collected from the birds in the morning, after. 12 h of fasting. Different collection site did not affect the examined parameters, but some statistically.

  3. A gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method for helium detection in postmortem blood and tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaff, Jason E; Karas, Roman P; Marinetti, Laureen

    2012-03-01

    In cases of death by inert gas asphyxiation, it can be difficult to obtain toxicological evidence supporting assignment of a cause of death. Because of its low mass and high diffusivity, and its common use as a carrier gas, helium presents a particular challenge in this respect. We describe a rapid and simple gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method to qualitatively screen a variety of postmortem biological specimens for the presence of helium. Application of this method is demonstrated with three case examples, encompassing an array of different biological matrices.

  4. New aspects of blood collection and handling procedures for the assessment of t-PA and PAI-1 variables after the introduction of acid blood collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, P.; Kret, R.; Bloetjes, P.T.M.; Rosen, S.; Kluft, C.

    1994-01-01

    Blood collection and handling procedures for t-PA activity have thusfar been rather strict and have restrained the use in clinical practice. We evaluated simplifications in the procedures for specifically the use of Stabilyte® vacutainers with respect to time before centrifugation of blood, storage

  5. Investigation of Fossil Insect Systematics of Specimens Collected at the Clare Quarry Site in the Florissant Fossil Beds, Florissant, Colorado from 1996 to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancellare, J. A.; Villalobos, J. I.; Lemone, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Clare Quarry is located in the town of Florissant, Teller County, Colorado, approximately 30 miles west of Colorado Springs on State Highway 27. The elevation at the quarry face is 2500 meters ASL. Ar40/Ar39 dating of the upper beds of the Florissant Formation indicates an age of 34.07 +/- 0.10 Ma.An Oreodont fossil jaw and other mammalian fossils place the formation in the Chadronian Age.The basin in which the formation lies is undergirded by Wall Mountain Tuff dated at 37Ma, which sits on Pike's Peak Granite, which is dated at1080 Ma. In the Late Eocene the Florissant region was lacustrine in nature due to the damning of the river valley which runs north into Florissant. The ash and lahars from volcanic eruptions from the Thirty-nine Mile Volcano Field formed impoundments that produced shallow lakes for what is thought to been a period for 5000 years. Repeated ash falls placed plant matter and insect material in the lakes and streams that were formed intermittently during the period. The ash layers in the Florissant Formation are very fine grained, and contain diatomaceous mats that formed on the lake deposited ash layers aiding in the preservation of plant and insects material. Previous work on Florissant Fossils has been done by Lesquereaux (plants) 1878, Scudder (insects) 1890, and Mc Ginitie (plants) 1953. This project began 17 years ago and has consisted of collection trips ranging from one to eight days in the summers at a proprietary quarry owned land adjacent to The Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. The collection consists of 2700 catalogued plants, insects, and fish fossils. Of this number, 513 are insect fossils (19% of the total collection). Quality of preservation ranges from very poor to very good with the average qualitative evaluation between poor to fair. The largest series identied to family are Tipulids (Craneflies) with 23 specimens in the series. In this series wing venation is often incomplete and smaller characters including

  6. Development and Validation of a GC-MS Method for the Detection and Quantification of Clotiapine in Blood and Urine Specimens and Application to a Postmortem Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Mannocchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Clotiapine is an atypical antipsychotic of the dibenzothiazepine class introduced in a few European countries since 1970, efficient in treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients. There is little published data on the therapeutic and toxic concentrations of this drug. Aims. The aim of the present study is the development and validation of a method that allows the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine specimens by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Methods. Validation was performed working on spiked postmortem blood and urine samples. Samples were extracted with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE technique at pH 8.5 with n-hexane/dichloromethane (85/15 v/v and analysis was followed by GC-MS. Methadone-d9 was used as internal standard. Results. The limit of detection (LOD was 1.2 and 1.3 ng/mL for urine and blood, respectively, while the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ was 3.9 and 4.3 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity, precision, selectivity, accuracy, and recovery were also determined. The method was applied to a postmortem case. The blood and urine clotiapine concentrations were 1.32 and 0.49 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusions. A reliable GC-MS method for the detection and quantification of clotiapine in blood and urine samples has been developed and fully validated and then applied to a postmortem case.

  7. Good agreements between self and clinician-collected specimens for the detection of human papillomavirus in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lopes Mandu de Campos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Women infected with human papillomavirus (HPV are at a higher risk of developing cervical lesions. In the current study, self and clinician-collected vaginal and cervical samples from women were processed to detect HPV DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with PGMY09/11 primers. HPV genotypes were determined using type-specific PCR. HPV DNA detection showed good concordance between self and clinician-collected samples (84.6%; kappa = 0.72. HPV infection was found in 30% women and genotyping was more concordant among high-risk HPV (HR-HPV than low-risk HPV (HR-HPV. HPV16 was the most frequently detected among the HR-HPV types. LR-HPV was detected at a higher frequency in self-collected; however, HR-HPV types were more frequently identified in clinician-collected samples than in self-collected samples. HPV infections of multiple types were detected in 20.5% of clinician-collected samples and 15.5% of self-collected samples. In this study, we demonstrated that the HPV DNA detection rate in self-collected samples has good agreement with that of clinician-collected samples. Self-collected sampling, as a primary prevention strategy in countries with few resources, could be effective for identifying cases of HR-HPV, being more acceptable. The use of this method would enhance the coverage of screening programs for cervical cancer.

  8. Sibling species of the Anopheles funestus group, and their infection with malaria and lymphatic filarial parasites, in archived and newly collected specimens from northeastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derua, Yahya A; Alifrangis, Michael; Magesa, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    vectors of both malaria and lymphatic filariasis. METHODS: Archived (from 2005-2012) and newly collected (from 2014) specimens of the An. funestus group collected indoors using CDC light traps in villages in northeastern Tanzania were analysed. They were identified to sibling species by PCR based......-parasite dynamics in the area, and to allow for appropriate adjustment of control activities, the present study examined the composition, and malaria and lymphatic filarial infection, of sibling species of the Anopheles funestus group. Similar to the An. gambiae complex, the An. funestus group contains important...

  9. Evaluation of a novel dried blood spot collection device (HemaSpot™) to test blood samples collected from dogs for antibodies to Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Pick, Leanne D; Hernandez, Jaime O Esquivel; Lindsay, David S

    2014-09-15

    Collection of blood samples from veterinary and wildlife patients is often challenging because the samples have to be collected on farm or in the wild under various environmental conditions. This poses many technical problems associated with venipuncture materials, their safe use and disposal, transportation and processing of collected samples. Dried blood spot (DBS) sample collection techniques offer a simple and practical alternative to traditional blood collection methods to obtain blood samples from animals for parasite antibody evaluation. The DBS collection devices are compact, simple to use, and are particularly useful for large number of samples. Additionally, DBS samples take up less space and they are easier to transport than traditional venipuncture-collected blood samples. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a potentially fatal parasitic disease of dogs and humans and it is frequently diagnosed by antibody tests. Immunochromatographic tests (ICT) for antibodies to Leishmania infantum are commercially available for dogs and they produce qualitative results in minutes. Measurement of canine antibodies to L. infantum with the ICT using traditional venipuncture has been validated previously, but the use of DBS samples has not been evaluated using this method. The purpose of the present study was to determine the ability of DBS samples to detect antibodies to L. infantum in dogs using a commercial ICT assay. One hundred plasma samples from dogs experimentally infected with the LIVT-1 strain of L. infantum were collected by venipuncture and frozen. Individual samples were thawed, and then 80 μl plasma (2 drops) was aliquotted onto the 8-spoked disk pad on individual DBS sample collection devices (HemaSpot™, Spot-On Sciences, Austin, TX), dried, and stored in the dark at room temperature. After one month and six months, respectively, 2 spokes of the 8 spokes of the disk pad of each DBS sample were removed and eluted in 200 μl PBS. The eluate was used to test

  10. Increased Patient Satisfaction and a Reduction in Pre-Analytical Errors Following Implementation of an Electronic Specimen Collection Module in Outpatient Phlebotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantartjis, Michalis; Melanson, Stacy E F; Petrides, Athena K; Landman, Adam B; Bates, David W; Rosner, Bernard A; Goonan, Ellen; Bixho, Ida; Tanasijevic, Milenko J

    2017-08-01

    Patient satisfaction in outpatient phlebotomy settings typically depends on wait time and venipuncture experience, and many patients equate their experiences with their overall satisfaction with the hospital. We compared patient service times and preanalytical errors pre- and postimplementation of an integrated electronic health record (EHR)-laboratory information system (LIS) and electronic specimen collection module. We also measured patient wait time and assessed patient satisfaction using a 5-question survey. The percentage of patients waiting less than 10 minutes increased from 86% preimplementation to 93% postimplementation of the EHR-LIS (P ≤.001). The median total service time decreased significantly, from 6 minutes (IQR, 4-8 minutes), to 5 minutes (IQR, 3-6 minutes) (P = .005). The preanalytical errors decreased significantly, from 3.20 to 1.93 errors per 1000 specimens (P ≤.001). Overall patient satisfaction improved, with an increase in excellent responses for all 5 questions (P ≤.001). We found several benefits of implementing an electronic specimen collection module, including decreased wait and service times, improved patient satisfaction, and a reduction in preanalytical errors. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. Cord blood collection for banking and the risk of maternal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat, Lluís; Sabrià, Joan; Martínez, Eva; Rodríguez, Núria L; Querol, Sergio; Lailla, Josep M

    2011-09-01

    We determined the effect of cord blood collection before placental expulsion on postpartum maternal blood loss in a retrospective study between a group of cord blood donors and a group of non-donors. The study was conducted in a university hospital blood bank and obstetric services and included Spanish women entered in a European study project (EUPHRATES) and who had consented to donate cord blood for public banking purposes. We measured blood volume lost during delivery by a bag collection method, as well as the need for transfusion and postpartum anemia symptoms. Deliveries at which cord blood was collected presented a significant increase in blood loss (321 ± 273 vs. 255 ± 237 ml, p=0.02). Instrumental deliveries were associated with higher postpartum blood loss than spontaneous deliveries. Cord blood collection can increase intrapartum blood loss, especially at instrumental deliveries. Additional staff who handle the collection are required to allow the leading clinician to focus on maternal care. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert TV Assay for Detection of Trichomonas vaginalis with Prospectively Collected Specimens from Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebke, Jane R; Gaydos, C A; Davis, T; Marrazzo, J; Furgerson, D; Taylor, S N; Smith, B; Bachmann, L H; Ackerman, R; Spurrell, T; Ferris, D; Burnham, C A; Reno, H; Lebed, J; Eisenberg, D; Kerndt, P; Philip, S; Jordan, J; Quigley, N

    2018-02-01

    Trichomoniasis is the most prevalent curable sexually transmitted disease (STD). It has been associated with preterm birth and the acquisition and transmission of HIV. Recently, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) have been FDA cleared in the United States for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in specimens from both women and men. This study reports the results of a multicenter study recently conducted using the Xpert TV ( T. vaginalis ) assay to test specimens from both men and women. On-demand results were available in as little as 40 min for positive specimens. A total of 1,867 women and 4,791 men were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. In women, the performance of the Xpert TV assay was compared to the patient infected status (PIS) derived from the results of InPouch TV broth culture and Aptima NAAT for T. vaginalis The diagnostic sensitivities and specificities of the Xpert TV assay for the combined female specimens (urine samples, self-collected vaginal swabs, and endocervical swabs) ranged from 99.5 to 100% and 99.4 to 99.9%, respectively. For male urine samples, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 97.2% and 99.9%, respectively, compared to PIS results derived from the results of broth culture for T. vaginalis and bidirectional gene sequencing of amplicons. Excellent performance characteristics were seen using both female and male specimens. The ease of using the Xpert TV assay should result in opportunities for enhanced screening for T. vaginalis in both men and women and, hopefully, improved control of this infection. Copyright © 2018 Schwebke et al.

  13. Performance of the cobas HPV Test for the Triage of Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance Cytology in Cervical Specimens Collected in SurePath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Devansu; Novak-Weekley, Susan; Hong, Christina; Aslam, Shagufta; Behrens, Catherine M

    2017-11-02

    Determine performance of the cobas human papillomavirus (HPV) test for triage of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) in SurePath. Women presenting for routine screening had cervical specimens collected in SurePath and specimen transport medium (STM); those with ASC-US cytology underwent colposcopy. Performance of cobas HPV in SurePath specimens that had undergone a preanalytic procedure to reverse possible cross-linking of HPV DNA was compared with Hybrid Capture 2 (hc2) specimens in STM. Among 856 women, HPV prevalence was 45.8%; HPV 16 and HPV 18 prevalences were lower than expected in the 21- to 29-year-old group in this highly vaccinated population. cobas HPV performance in SurePath was comparable to hc2 in STM. Sensitivity and specificity for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse were 87.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 71.9%-95.2%) and 55.5% (95% CI, 52.1%-58.9%) for cobas and 85.3% (95% CI, 69.9%-93.6%) and 54.7% (95% CI, 51.4%-57.9%) for hc2. Sensitivity was negatively affected by random biopsies performed at colposcopy; comparable sensitivities were achieved in the nonvaccinated and vaccinated populations with disease determined by directed biopsy only. Performance of cobas HPV for ASC-US triage in pretreated SurePath specimens meets criteria for validation. Preliminary data indicate reliable performance of HPV testing in a highly vaccinated population. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. The revision of specimens of the Cladonia pyxidata-chlorophaea group (lichenized Ascomycota from northeastern Poland deposited in the herbarium collections of University in Bialystok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Matwiejuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In northeastern Poland, the chemical variation of the Cladonia chlorophaea-pyxidata group was much neglected, as TLC has not been used in delimitation of species differing in the chemistry. As a great part of herbal material of University in Bialystok from NE Poland was misidentified, I found my studies to be necessary. Based on the collection of 123 specimens deposited in Herbarium of University in Bialystok, nine species of the C. pyxidata-chlorophaea group are reported from NE Poland. The morphology, secondary chemistry, and ecology of examined lichens are presented and the list of localities is provided. The results revealed that C. fimbriata is the most common species in the northeastern Poland, comprising around 33% of the studied specimens. Cladonia conista, C. cryptochlorophaea, and C. merochlorophaea are known only from very few locations. This study shed light on the role of the lichens substances to diagnosis of the species of C. pyxidata-chlorophaea group.

  15. Chlamydia trachomatis antibody detection in home-collected blood samples for use in epidemiological studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderboom, B M; van Ess, E F; van den Broek, I V F; van Loo, I H M; Hoebe, C J P A; Ouburg, S; Morré, S A

    Capillary blood collected in serum tubes was subjected to centrifugation delay while stored at room temperature. Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) IgG concentrations in aliquoted serum of these blood samples remained stable for seven days after collection. CT IgG concentrations can reliably be measured in

  16. Hybridization Capture Using RAD Probes (hyRAD, a New Tool for Performing Genomic Analyses on Collection Specimens.

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    Tomasz Suchan

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many protocols aimed at reproducibly sequencing reduced-genome subsets in non-model organisms have been published. Among them, RAD-sequencing is one of the most widely used. It relies on digesting DNA with specific restriction enzymes and performing size selection on the resulting fragments. Despite its acknowledged utility, this method is of limited use with degraded DNA samples, such as those isolated from museum specimens, as these samples are less likely to harbor fragments long enough to comprise two restriction sites making possible ligation of the adapter sequences (in the case of double-digest RAD or performing size selection of the resulting fragments (in the case of single-digest RAD. Here, we address these limitations by presenting a novel method called hybridization RAD (hyRAD. In this approach, biotinylated RAD fragments, covering a random fraction of the genome, are used as baits for capturing homologous fragments from genomic shotgun sequencing libraries. This simple and cost-effective approach allows sequencing of orthologous loci even from highly degraded DNA samples, opening new avenues of research in the field of museum genomics. Not relying on the restriction site presence, it improves among-sample loci coverage. In a trial study, hyRAD allowed us to obtain a large set of orthologous loci from fresh and museum samples from a non-model butterfly species, with a high proportion of single nucleotide polymorphisms present in all eight analyzed specimens, including 58-year-old museum samples. The utility of the method was further validated using 49 museum and fresh samples of a Palearctic grasshopper species for which the spatial genetic structure was previously assessed using mtDNA amplicons. The application of the method is eventually discussed in a wider context. As it does not rely on the restriction site presence, it is therefore not sensitive to among-sample loci polymorphisms in the restriction sites

  17. Evaluation Of Blood Collected From Clinically Diagnosed Typhoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood culture revealed that 216 (42.8%) bacterial pathogens were isolated from the Widal positive patients yielded out of which 101 (46.8%) isolates were of ... fatal illness such as malaria and other parasitaemia, non-typhoid salmonellosis, endocarditis and other gastro-intestinal infections may have been responsible.

  18. The Relevance of a Novel Quantitative Assay to Detect up to 40 Major Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes Directly in Clinical Nasopharyngeal and Blood Specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melina Messaoudi

    Full Text Available For epidemiological and surveillance purposes, it is relevant to monitor the distribution and dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. Conventional serotyping methods do not provide rapid or quantitative information on serotype loads. Quantitative serotyping may enable prediction of the invasiveness of a specific serotype compared to other serotypes carried. Here, we describe a novel, rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification and quantification of the 40 most prevalent pneumococcal serotypes and the assay impacts in pneumonia specimens from emerging and developing countries. Eleven multiplex PCR to detect 40 serotypes or serogroups were optimized. Quantification was enabled by reference to standard dilutions of known bacterial load. Performance of the assay was evaluated to specifically type and quantify S. pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal and blood samples from adult and pediatric patients hospitalized with pneumonia (n = 664 from five different countries. Serogroup 6 was widely represented in nasopharyngeal specimens from all five cohorts. The most frequent serotypes in the French, South African, and Brazilian cohorts were 1 and 7A/F, 3 and 19F, and 14, respectively. When both samples were available, the serotype in blood was always present as carriage with other serotypes in the nasopharynx. Moreover, the ability of a serotype to invade the bloodstream may be linked to its nasopharyngeal load. The mean nasopharyngeal concentration of the serotypes that moved to the blood was 3 log-fold higher than the ones only found in the nasopharynx. This novel, rapid, quantitative assay may potentially predict some of the S. pneumoniae serotypes invasiveness and assessment of pneumococcal serotype distribution.

  19. Four to seven random casual urine specimens are sufficient to estimate 24-h urinary sodium/potassium ratio in individuals with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahori, T; Ueshima, H; Torii, S; Saito, Y; Fujiyoshi, A; Ohkubo, T; Miura, K

    2016-05-01

    This study was done to clarify the optimal number and type of casual urine specimens required to estimate urinary sodium/potassium (Na/K) ratio in individuals with high blood pressure. A total of 74 individuals with high blood pressure, 43 treated and 31 untreated, were recruited from the Japanese general population. Urinary sodium, potassium and Na/K ratio were measured in both casual urine samples and 7-day 24-h urine samples and then analyzed by correlation and Bland-Altman analyses. Mean Na/K ratio from random casual urine samples on four or more days strongly correlated with the Na/K ratio of 7-day 24-h urine (r=0.80-0.87), which was similar to the correlation between 1 and 2-day 24-h urine and 7-day 24-h urine (r=0.75-0.89). The agreement quality for Na/K ratio of seven random casual urine for estimating the Na/K ratio of 7-day 24-h urine was good (bias: -0.26, limits of agreements: -1.53-1.01), and it was similar to that of 2-day 24-h urine for estimating 7-day 24-h values (bias: 0.07, limits of agreement: -1.03 to 1.18). Stratified analyses comparing individuals using antihypertensive medication and individuals not using antihypertensive medication showed similar results. Correlations of the means of casual urine sodium or potassium concentrations with 7-day 24-h sodium or potassium excretions were relatively weaker than those for Na/K ratio. The mean Na/K ratio of 4-7 random casual urine specimens on different days provides a good substitute for 1-2-day 24-h urinary Na/K ratio for individuals with high blood pressure.

  20. The effectiveness of acetic acid wash protocol and the interpretation patterns of blood contaminated cervical cytology ThinPrep® specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora K Frisch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: ThinPrep® (TP cervical cytology, as a liquid-based method, has many benefits but also a relatively high unsatisfactory rate due to debris/lubricant contamination and the presence of blood. These contaminants clog the TP filter and prevent the deposition of adequate diagnostic cells on the slide. An acetic acid wash (AAW protocol is often used to lyse red blood cells, before preparing the TP slides. Design: From 23,291 TP cervical cytology specimens over a 4-month period, 2739 underwent AAW protocol due to initial unsatisfactory smear (UNS with scant cellularity due to blood or being grossly bloody. Randomly selected 2739 cervical cytology specimens which did not undergo AAW from the same time period formed the control (non-AAW group. Cytopathologic interpretations of AAW and non-AAW groups were compared using the Chi-square test. Results: About 94.2% of the 2739 cases which underwent AAW were subsequently satisfactory for evaluation with interpretations of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS 4.9% (135, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL 3.7% (102, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL 1% (28. From the 2739 control cases, 96.3% were satisfactory with ASCUS 5.5% (151, LSIL 5.1% (139, and HSIL 0.7% (19. The prevalence of ASCUS interpretations was similar (P = 0.33. Although there were 32% more HSIL interpretations in the AAW group (28 in AAW vs. 19 in non-AAW, the difference was statistically insignificant (P = 0.18. AAW category; however, had significantly fewer LSIL interpretations (P = 0.02. The percentage of UNS cases remained higher in the AAW group with statistical significance (P < 0.01. Conclusions: While AAW had a significantly higher percent of UNS interpretations, the protocol was effective in rescuing 94.2% of specimens which otherwise may have been reported unsatisfactory. This improved patient care by avoiding a repeat test. The prevalence of ASCUS and HSIL

  1. Staphylococci with markers of antibiotic resistance collected from blood cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Focarelli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood culture is still the gold standard for the detection of the causative agent of sepsis. Especially in intensive care patients and those with vascular catheters, the most common organisms isolated are coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS and Staphylococcus aureus, both characterized by multidrug resistance. Purposes of our work are the study of the incidence of markers of resistance in staphylococci and evaluation of potential changes over the years. Materials and methods: In the period January 2008-June 2011 5239 blood cultures were analyzed.They were mainly obtained from the departments of Intensive Care, Cardiology, Hematology, General Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Oncology, Pulmonology and Pediatric Hematoncology. The vials containing the blood were incubated in the BACTEC 9120 automated tool of Becton Dickinson and susceptibility testing performed with the Phoenix instrument of the same company. Results:Within a total of 5239 blood cultures, 3967 (75.7% were negative and 1272 (24.3% positive. Fungi were isolated in 6.2% (79 of the positive ones, Gram-negative bacteria in 24.6% (313 and Gram-positive bacteria in 69.2% (880. Within the latter, 187 (21.2% were not staphylococcal isolates, 693 (78.8% were stafiloccocci mainly represented by S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus and S. saprophyticus. Of the 693 staphylococcal isolates, 436 (62.9% were b lactamase producers, and between them 336 (77.1% were methicillin resistant, while only 3 of 436 (0.69% were S. aureus resistant to vancomycin as well.The incidence of markers of resistance was very high, especially in patients in intensive care and cardiac surgery, who are usually subjected to combined antibiotic therapy. In the three years studied there were no statistically significant differences in the resistance of staphylococci. Conclusions: The data show an alarming high number of multi-resistant staphylococci, which is often a

  2. Chromogenic culture media or rapid immunochromatographic test: Which is better for detecting Klebsiella pneumoniae that produce OXA-48 and can they be used in blood and urine specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Ozlem; Aksu, Evrim

    2018-04-18

    Our goal was to compare a rapid test (OXA-48K-SeT) and four different chromogenic media (CHROMagar KPC, CHROMagar mSuperCARBA, ChromID Carba and ChromID OXA-48) for the detection of OXA-48 producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates and spiked urine/blood samples with these bacteria. In total 100 K.pneumoniae isolates, including 60 OXA-48 positive, 15 other carbapenemase producing, 15 Extended spectrum betalactamases (ESBL) positive and 10 carbapenem sensitive K.pneumoniae were included in the study. After all samples were inoculated into all chromogenic media, temocillin discs were placed onto the media. OXA-48K-SeT was studied according to the manufacturer's instructions and the lower detection limit was determined. Sensitivities and specificities of all chromogenic media and rapid test were detected as 100%. All of the OXA-48 producers were found resistant to temocillin on all chromogenic media. The lower detection limit of the rapid assay was determined as 10 6 in both direct bacterial samples and in spiked urine/blood samples. As a result, four chromogenic culture media and OXA-48 K-SeT can be used safely for detection of OXA-48 positive K.pneumoniae isolates. Although direct clinical specimens were not used, our study suggests that this media and OXA-48 K-SeT may be used in patient samples like blood and urine. Further studies are needed to assess this suggestion. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Development of a quantitative Real-Time PCR for micrometastasis detection using CEA in peripheral blood and bone marrow specimens of gastric cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dardaei Alghalandis L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Gastric adenocarsinoma is the first leading fatal malignancy in Iran. Despite advances in novel therapeutics approaches for gastric cancer (GC patient, tumor dissemination via blood stream to distant organ is still the major cause of death. Therefore, there is urgent need to establish sensitive methods for early detection of disseminated tumor cells in peripheral blood (PB and bone marrow (BM specimens of gastric cancer patients. "n"nMethods: In the present study, we use Carcinoma Embryonic Antigen (CEA as a tumor marker and Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH as an internal control to detection and quantification of disseminated tumor cells in PB and BM specimens of affected individuals. Total RNA was extracted from AGS (gastric cancer cell line and CEA and GAPDH fragments were generated by reverse transcription. The amplified fragments were cloned into pTZ57R/T vector separately. Double cloning of these genes has done into one pTZ57R/T vector. Serial dilution of this recombinant plasmid is used to construct standard curve, each containing a known amount of input copy number. Total RNA was extracted from BP and BM specimens of 35 GC patients. cDNA of the specimens were synthesized by reverse

  4. National ethics guidance in Sub-Saharan Africa on the collection and use of human biological specimens: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchi, Francis; Little, Madison T

    2016-10-22

    Ethical and regulatory guidance on the collection and use of human biospecimens (HBS) for research forms an essential component of national health systems in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rapid advances in genetic- and genomic-based technologies are fueling clinical trials involving HBS and the establishment of large-scale biobanks. An extensive multi-level search for publicly available ethics regulatory guidance was conducted for each SSA country. A second review documented active trials listed in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform as of January 2015 in which HBS collection was specified in the protocol. Findings were combined to determine the extent to which countries that are study sites for HBS-related research are supported by regulatory guidance language on the collection, use, ownership and storage of biospecimens. Of the 49 SSA countries, 29 had some form of national ethics guidance, yet only 17 provided language relating to HBS-related research, with specific guidance on consent (14), ownership (6), reuse (10), storage (9), and export/import/transfer (13). Ten countries accounted for 84 % of the active clinical trials involving the collection of HBS in SSA. All except one of these countries were found to have some national guidance in the form of regulations, codes of ethics, and/or standard operating procedures; however, only seven of the ten offered any language specific to HBS. Despite the fact that the bulk of registered clinical trials in SSA involving HBS, as well as existing and proposed sites for biorepositories under the H3Africa Initiative, are currently situated in countries with the most complete ethics and regulatory guidance, variability in the regulations themselves may create challenges for planned and future pan-African collaborations and may require legislative action at the national level to revise. Countries in SSA that still lack regulatory guidance on HBS will require extensive health system strengthening in

  5. Validation studies on blood collection from the jugular vein of conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Kikuchi, Miho; Imamura, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2012-05-01

    A method for blood collection from the jugular vein of mice without anesthesia was compared with a tail-incision technique. Jugular vein blood collection allowed withdrawal of almost 15% of the circulating blood volume at a time in less than 1 min. Hemolysis, hematocrit, and plasma thrombin-antithrombin complexes (a marker of blood coagulation) were higher in samples collected from the tail vein than the jugular vein. Mice produced similar plasma corticosterone levels after serial blood collection by either method. Tail incision led to a slight but significant increase in C-reactive protein levels. Using the jugular venipuncture technique, we then performed a pharmacokinetic study and an oral glucose tolerance test. Plasma concentrations of levofloxacin, an antimicrobial agent, were dose-dependently elevated after oral administration, and linear increases in C(max) and AUC were observed. We also confirmed that overall glucose excursion is significantly decreased in mice treated with exendin 4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 agonist. These results indicate that the jugular venipuncture is a useful technique from the point of view of no requirement for anesthetics, serial blood collection at short intervals, large volume of blood collection, quality of sample and animal welfare. This technique is of particular interest for studies that examine time-dependent changes in blood variables.

  6. Study on chromosome aberrations test determinated by micro-whole blood culture in vacuum blood collection tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Zhihong; Han Fang'an; Ge Qinjuan; Wu Xiao; Chen Juan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To develop an easier and efficient method of culturing the chromosome and analyzing the aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes. Methods: Micro whole was cultured for 54 hours in home-made vacuum blood collection tube, and then collection, slice-making, microscopy detection for the chromosome aberrations was done. The difference of the results was analysed by comparing with the common method. Results: For 60 radiologists and 30 contrasts, the chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes were examed by this system, the lymphocytes and chromosome were clear and alive and easier to analyse. Compared with the common method, there was no significantly difference between the two analyzing results. Conclusion: The chromosome aberrations test by micro whole blood culture in vacuum blood collection tube is easier and efficient, and is worthy of being widely popularized. (authors)

  7. Efficacy of intraoperative blood collection and reinfusion in revision total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarin, Jeffrey; Grosvenor, David; Schurman, David; Goodman, Stuart

    2003-11-01

    Patients undergoing revision total hip arthroplasty frequently require perioperative blood transfusion, increasing the risk for blood-borne disease and anaphylactic and hemolytic reactions. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of intraoperative blood collection and reinfusion on net blood loss in patients undergoing revision hip arthroplasty. The medical records of 126 patients who had had a revision total hip arthroplasty with intraoperative blood salvage, with use of a collection and reinfusion device, during a twenty-eight-month period were reviewed. For comparison, the medical records of ninety-six patients who had undergone revision hip arthroplasty without intraoperative blood salvage were reviewed. Each of the 222 patients was categorized into a group on the basis of the type of revision. Patients who had a revision of the femoral and acetabular components (Group C) had significantly higher mean intraoperative and total blood loss than did those who had a revision of the femoral component only (Group A [p = 0.009 and p = 0.02, respectively]) or a revision of the acetabular component only (Group B [p = 0.0001 for both]). Total blood loss was not significantly different between Groups A and B. The mean amount of blood reinfused intraoperatively was 356 mL for the patients in Group A, 374 mL for the patients in Group B, and 519 mL for the patients in Group C. Regression analysis showed a significant decrease in net blood loss with intraoperative collection and reinfusion in Groups B (p = 0.002) and C (p = 0.0001) but not in Group A. Intraoperative collection and reinfusion substantially decreased net perioperative blood loss in patients who had a revision of both components (Group C) and in those who had a revision of the acetabular component (Group B). The use of intraoperative blood collection and reinfusion appears to be a valuable method of preserving blood volume in the perioperative period.

  8. Blood collection procedures in hematology: knowledge and practice among laboratory personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sujata; Suri, Vaishali; Pant, Ishita; Rusia, Usha

    2006-07-01

    Blood collection is an important preanalytical component of haematological testing. This questionnaire based study was conducted on laboratory personnel to elicit their knowledge and practice regarding blood collection procedures for haematological testing. Questionnaire comprised of 37 multiple choice questions, of which 10 questions each were related to essential and desirable knowledge, 10 to practice and 7 to educational and job profile. Ninety four laboratory personnel participated in the study. Analysis was done on SPSS software. Percentages of unsatisfactory scores were 42.6%, 4.3%, 17% and 6% in the essential knowledge, desirable knowledge, practice and total scoring respectively. 91.5%, however, had a satisfactory total score. Importance needs to be given to blood collection procedures both, individually and collectively. The study highlights the deficient areas which need to addressed by all laboratorians. Such studies should also be conducted among nursing and resident staff- the other groups concerned with blood collection.

  9. Factors influencing platelet clumping during peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Gagan; Mott, Sarah L; Collins, Laura; Nelson, Gail A; Knudson, C Michael; Schlueter, Annette J

    2017-05-01

    Platelet clumping is a common occurrence during peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) collection using the Spectra Optia mononuclear cell (MNC) protocol. If clumping persists, it may prevent continuation of the collection and interfere with proper MNC separation. This study is the first to report the incidence of clumping, identify precollection factors associated with platelet clumping, and describe the degree to which platelet clumping interferes with HSC product yield. In total, 258 HSC collections performed on 116 patients using the Optia MNC protocol were reviewed. Collections utilized heparin in anticoagulant citrate dextrose to facilitate large-volume leukapheresis. Linear and logistic regression models were utilized to determine which precollection factors were predictive of platelet clumping and whether clumping was associated with product yield or collection efficiency. Platelet clumping was observed in 63% of collections. Multivariable analysis revealed that a lower white blood cell count was an independent predictor of clumping occurrence. Chemotherapy mobilization and a lower peripheral blood CD34+ cell count were predictors of the degree of clumping. Procedures with clumping had higher collection efficiency but lower blood volume processed on average, resulting in no difference in collection yields. Citrate toxicity did not correlate with clumping. Although platelet clumping is a common technical problem seen during HSC collection, the total CD34+ cell-collection yields were not affected by clumping. WBC count, mobilization approach, and peripheral blood CD34+ cell count can help predict clumping and potentially drive interventions to proactively manage clumping. © 2017 AABB.

  10. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I; Kinggaard Holm, D; Galea, G; Aranko, K; Korhonen, M; Nordstrom, K

    2013-11-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB) and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in order to identify different practices and to explore whether recommendations can be made for harmonization. An online questionnaire was used for data collection in 2011, and 43 replies were received covering 71 product answers from 13 countries. Estimated percentages of tissue and cell banking covered by EBA member blood banks as a proportion of all collections of each individual country varied markedly. There were also major differences in the amounts of products collected and discarded and in proportions tissues provided for grafting. However, discarding of certain collections also reflects the practice of increasing the likelihood of the very best units being used for transplantation. Harmonization of possible practices should focus on matching supply with demand and on identifying the most efficient operators. This could allow for the development of practices for minimizing unnecessary collections. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. Differential acetyl cholinesterase inhibition by volatile oils from two specimens of Marlierea racemosa (Myrtaceae) collected from different areas of the Atlantic Rain Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Amanda; Silva, Michelle C; Cardoso-Lopes, Elaine M; Cordeiro, Inês; Sobral, Marcos E G; Young, Maria Cláudia M; Moreno, Paulo R H

    2009-08-01

    The volatile oil composition and anti-acetyl cholinesterase activity were analyzed in two specimens of Marlierea racemosa growing in different areas of the Atlantic Rain Forest (Cananéia and Caraguatatuba, SP, Brazil). Component identifications were performed by GC/MS and their acetyl cholinesterase inhibitory activity was measured through colorimetric analysis. The major constituent in both specimens was spathulenol (25.1% in Cananéia and 31.9% in Caraguatatuba). However, the first one also presented monoterpenes (41.2%), while in the Carguatatuba plants, this class was not detected. The oils from the plants collected in Cananéia were able to inhibit the acetyl cholinesterase activity by up to 75%, but for oils from the other locality the maximal inhibition achieved was 35%. These results suggested that the monoterpenes are more effective in the inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase activity than sesquiterpenes as these compounds are present in higher amounts in the M. racemosa plants collected in Cananéia.

  12. Donor verification using Short Tandem Repeat (STR) analysis directly from blood collected in PAXgene RNA tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Victoria R; Jones, Susan P; Sammartino, Holly L; Arocena, Dennis Ian S; Madore, Steven J

    2014-06-01

    Biorepository processing includes nucleic acid extractions in batch mode from a large number of blood samples from many different donors. Handling such a large number of biospecimens presents the challenge of ensuring that samples are not switched or mislabeled during processing. One approach for confirming donor identity from DNA samples is the use of multiplexed fluorescent PCR for detecting Short Tandem Repeat (STR) allelic-size polymorphisms for a set of common autosomal loci. While donor identity of DNA extracted directly from blood collected in standard tubes containing anticoagulants can be easily verified by generating STR profiles, RNA from blood collected in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes (PAXgene RNA tubes) is depleted of DNA and is not amenable to STR fingerprinting for donor identity verification. We investigated the feasibility of isolating DNA directly from blood collected in PAXgene RNA tubes for use as template for STR DNA fingerprinting for blood donor identity verification. We determined that DNA extraction can be performed manually with the QIAamp DNA Blood Minikit or on the QIAxtractor instrument with minimal pre-processing protocol additions, and that DNA isolated from blood collected in PAXgene RNA tubes is of sufficient quantity and quality for successful STR fingerprint analysis. Adaptation of quality assurance methods such as the PAXgene RNA tube DNA extraction/STR fingerprinting assay described here is a good practice that ensures that biobanking collections provide scientists with high quality, donor-verified biomaterial.

  13. Human blood RNA stabilization in samples collected and transported for a large biobank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duale Nur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa is a nation-wide population-based pregnancy cohort initiated in 1999, comprising more than 108.000 pregnancies recruited between 1999 and 2008. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of integrating RNA analyses into existing MoBa protocols. We compared two different blood RNA collection tube systems – the PAXgene™ Blood RNA system and the Tempus™ Blood RNA system - and assessed the effects of suboptimal blood volumes in collection tubes and of transportation of blood samples by standard mail. Endpoints to characterize the samples were RNA quality and yield, and the RNA transcript stability of selected genes. Findings High-quality RNA could be extracted from blood samples stabilized with both PAXgene and Tempus tubes. The RNA yields obtained from the blood samples collected in Tempus tubes were consistently higher than from PAXgene tubes. Higher RNA yields were obtained from cord blood (3 – 4 times compared to adult blood with both types of tubes. Transportation of samples by standard mail had moderate effects on RNA quality and RNA transcript stability; the overall RNA quality of the transported samples was high. Some unexplained changes in gene expression were noted, which seemed to correlate with suboptimal blood volumes collected in the tubes. Temperature variations during transportation may also be of some importance. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that special collection tubes are necessary for RNA stabilization and they should be used for establishing new biobanks. We also show that the 50,000 samples collected in the MoBa biobank provide RNA of high quality and in sufficient amounts to allow gene expression analyses for studying the association of disease with altered patterns of gene expression.

  14. Human blood RNA stabilization in samples collected and transported for a large biobank

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) is a nation-wide population-based pregnancy cohort initiated in 1999, comprising more than 108.000 pregnancies recruited between 1999 and 2008. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of integrating RNA analyses into existing MoBa protocols. We compared two different blood RNA collection tube systems – the PAXgene™ Blood RNA system and the Tempus™ Blood RNA system - and assessed the effects of suboptimal blood volumes in collection tubes and of transportation of blood samples by standard mail. Endpoints to characterize the samples were RNA quality and yield, and the RNA transcript stability of selected genes. Findings High-quality RNA could be extracted from blood samples stabilized with both PAXgene and Tempus tubes. The RNA yields obtained from the blood samples collected in Tempus tubes were consistently higher than from PAXgene tubes. Higher RNA yields were obtained from cord blood (3 – 4 times) compared to adult blood with both types of tubes. Transportation of samples by standard mail had moderate effects on RNA quality and RNA transcript stability; the overall RNA quality of the transported samples was high. Some unexplained changes in gene expression were noted, which seemed to correlate with suboptimal blood volumes collected in the tubes. Temperature variations during transportation may also be of some importance. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that special collection tubes are necessary for RNA stabilization and they should be used for establishing new biobanks. We also show that the 50,000 samples collected in the MoBa biobank provide RNA of high quality and in sufficient amounts to allow gene expression analyses for studying the association of disease with altered patterns of gene expression. PMID:22988904

  15. Remote blood collection in reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wiklund

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Automatic blood sampling equipment (ABSE was used successfully to collect blood samples from two reindeer. During blood sampling, two methods of restraint were applied which caused no short term changes in plasma concentrations of urea, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase or total protein. Plasma Cortisol concentrations were significantly elevated by the two restraint techniques. The value of ABSE in studies of stress in reindeer is discussed.

  16. Early collection of saliva specimens from Bell's palsy patients: quantitative analysis of HHV-6, HSV-1, and VZV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turriziani, Ombretta; Falasca, Francesca; Maida, Paola; Gaeta, Aurelia; De Vito, Corrado; Mancini, Patrizia; De Seta, Daniele; Covelli, Edoardo; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of facial paralysis. Although it has been associated with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pregnancy, and preeclampsia, the etiology of Bell's palsy remains unknown. The reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella-zoster virus (VZV) with subsequent inflammation and entrapment of the facial nerve in the narrow labyrinthine segment has been implicated as a cause of facial paralysis, but the active role of these viruses in Bell's palsy is still discussed. This study quantified HSV-1 DNA, VZV DNA, and HHV-6 DNA in 95 saliva samples collected from patients within 48 hr from the onset of paralysis. HSV-1, VZV, and HHV-6 were detected in 13%, 3%, and 61% of patients, respectively. The detection rate did not differ significantly between patients and a control group of healthy donors. Interestingly, however, the value of HHV-6 DNA copies was significantly higher than that detected in healthy donors. In addition, the mean value of HHV-6 DNA recorded in patients who had at least a one grade improvement of palsy at the first visit was significantly lower than that detected in patients who showed no change in facial palsy grade or an increase of at least one grade. These findings call into question the role of HSV-1 and VZV in the etiology of Bell's palsy, and suggest that HHV-6 may be involved in the development of the disease or that the underlying disease mechanism might predispose patients to HHV-6 reactivation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Descriptions of marine mammal specimens in Marine Mammal Osteology Reference Collection, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 1938-01-01 to 2015-12-05 (NCEI Accession 0140937)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NMFS Alaska Fisheries Science Center National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML) Marine Mammal Osteology Collection consists of approximately 2500 specimens (skulls...

  18. Improved detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei from non-blood clinical specimens using enrichment culture and PCR: narrowing diagnostic gap in resource-constrained settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellapragada, Chaitanya; Shaw, Tushar; D'Souza, Annet; Eshwara, Vandana Kalwaje; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic utility of enrichment culture and PCR for improved case detection rates of non-bacteraemic form of melioidosis in limited resource settings. Clinical specimens (n = 525) obtained from patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital of South India with clinical symptoms suggestive of community-acquired pneumonia, lower respiratory tract infections, superficial or internal abscesses, chronic skin ulcers and bone or joint infections were tested for the presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei using conventional culture (CC), enrichment culture (EC) and PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CC and PCR were initially deduced using EC as the gold standard method. Further, diagnostic accuracies of all the three methods were analysed using Bayesian latent class modelling (BLCM). Detection rates of B. pseudomallei using CC, EC and PCR were 3.8%, 5.3% and 6%, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivities and specificities of CC and PCR were 71.4, 98.4% and 100 and 99.4%, respectively in comparison with EC as the gold standard test. With Bayesian latent class modelling, EC and PCR demonstrated sensitivities of 98.7 and 99.3%, respectively, while CC showed a sensitivity of 70.3% for detection of B. pseudomallei. An increase of 1.6% (95% CI: 1.08-4.32%) in the case detection rate of melioidosis was observed in the study population when EC and/or PCR were used in adjunct to the conventional culture technique. Our study findings underscore the diagnostic superiority of enrichment culture and/or PCR over conventional microbiological culture for improved case detection of melioidosis from non-blood clinical specimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. An assessment of various blood collection and transfer methods used for malaria rapid diagnostic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik Fred

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Four blood collection and transfer devices commonly used for malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs were assessed for their consistency, accuracy and ease of use in the hands of laboratory technicians and village health workers. Methods Laboratory technicians and village health workers collected blood from a finger prick using each device in random order, and deposited the blood either on filter paper or into a suitable casette-type RDT. Consistency and accuracy of volume delivered was determined by comparing the measurements of the resulting blood spots/heights with the measurements of laboratory-prepared pipetted standard volumes. The effect of varying blood volumes on RDT sensitivity and ease of use was also observed. Results There was high variability in blood volume collected by the devices, with the straw and the loop, the most preferred devices, usually transferring volumes greater than intended, while the glass capillary tube and the plastic pipette transferring less volume than intended or none at all. Varying the blood volume delivered to RDTs indicated that this variation is critical to RDT sensitivity only when the transferred volume is very low. Conclusion None of the blood transfer devices assessed performed consistently well. Adequate training on their use is clearly necessary, with more development efforts for improved designs to be used by remote health workers, in mind.

  20. Effect of blood collection technique in mice on clinical pathology parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Michael A; Hardy, Christine; Hawley, Melanie; Propert, Kathleen Joy; Wilson, James M

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in normal healthy C57BL/6 mice to determine the effect of method of blood collection on clinical pathology parameters and to provide value ranges for these parameters. Males and females were used and were randomly assigned to treatment groups based upon phlebotomy method. The blood was collected using one of four methods: intracardiac (IC), a single attempt at collection from the caudal vena cava (VC), collection from the caudal vena cava with collection of any extravasated blood from the peritoneum (MC), or retroorbital phlebotomy (RO). Evaluation of blood and serum samples was conducted for a number of serum biochemistries including liver function tests and complete blood count with differentials and platelet counts. Female mice demonstrated higher values for red blood cell number, hemoglobin (p values for platelet counts, specific white blood cell numbers (total, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and eosinophil counts), globulin, amylase, and the BUN/creatinine ratio. Overall, the VC method was associated with the least variation in both sexes and appeared slightly better than the IC method for the parameters evaluated. The largest difference between groups was noted for the transaminase levels. While alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values were similar between the IC and VC groups, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) values were associated with less variation for the VC method. Transaminase levels for the MC and RO groups were associated with relatively large ranges and variation. ALT results from the RO method, the only method amenable to repetitive sample collection used in this evaluation, indicate that this is an acceptable method. The results demonstrate the substantial impact that phlebotomy method has on the assay results and that the VC or IC methods provide the most consistent results. The ranges by collection method and sex provided here can be used to select the preferred method of collection when designing a study and for comparison of data

  1. Blood donor show behaviour after an invitation to donate: The influence of collection site factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, E-M; Zijlstra, B J H; de Kort, W L A M

    2017-10-01

    Show behaviour after invitation to donate varies considerably across donors. More insight into this variation is important for blood banks in achieving stable stocks. This study examined individual factors determining intended show behaviour. Most importantly, however, this study is the first study to account for variation in donor behaviour across different collection sites. We applied a multilevel approach to data from Donor InSight, including 11 889 donors from 257 fixed and mobile collection sites in the Netherlands. The aim of the multilevel models was to account for variance at two levels, that is donors and collection sites. We estimated the likelihood of showing after invitation based on individual predictors, including demographics, donation history and attitude. At the collection site level, we included satisfaction with the blood bank aggregated from individual responses by donors who donate at this site, opening hours and collection site type, that is fixed/mobile. Most importantly, show behaviour varied considerably across collection sites and depended on characteristics of these sites. Moreover, women, older and more experienced donors had higher odds of showing after invitation than men, younger and less experienced donors. Donors higher on warm glow, self-efficacy and donor identity more likely showed after an invitation. Higher aggregate satisfaction and donating at fixed collection sites increased the odds of show. In addition to individual factors, collection site characteristics are important in explaining variation in donor show behaviour, thus presenting clues for blood bank policies and interventions to improve donor show. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  2. Leukodepletion filters reduce Leishmania in blood products when used at collection or at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardo, Lisa J; Salata, Jeanne; Harman, Ronald; Mendez, Juan; Weina, Peter J

    2006-06-01

    Leishmania is an intracellular parasite of monocytes transmissible by transfusion. The feasibility of reducing Leishmania with leukodepletion filters was studied. At collection, infected blood contains the amastigote form of Leishmania within monocytes. Amastigotes cause the rupture of monocytes releasing free amastigotes that convert to promastigotes, which exist extracellularly at blood storage temperatures. Leukodepletion filters were tested at various time points in this process. Blood products were infected with Leishmania organisms and then filtered with whole-blood filters at collection, with bedside filters after storage, and to determine whether free promastigotes could be eliminated. Filtration at collection reduced Leishmania by 3 to 4 log or to the level of detection. Filtration of infected red cells after 2 weeks of storage showed a reduction of Leishmania by 4 log. Filtration resulted in a 6- to 8-log reduction in promastigotes either in the presence or in the absence of white cells within the filter. Filtration at the time of collection and after storage of Leishmania-infected blood resulted in a substantial reduction of free and intracellular organisms. There is currently no donor screen for Leishmania. Until adequate testing is developed, the use of leukodepletion filters could add to the safety of the blood supply.

  3. Evaluation of saphenous venipuncture and modified tail-clip blood collection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatan, Omorodola I; Welch, Kathleen B; Nemzek, Jean A

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2 methods of blood collection in unanesthetized mice. The saphenous venipuncture method was compared with a modified tail-clip technique that requires minimal restraint. Mice were evaluated through behavioral observation and plasma corticosterone levels. The results showed that the 2 methods produced similar corticosterone responses and that the tail-clip method produced fewer behavioral reactions. In addition, the effects of saphenous venipuncture method appeared to be dependent on the handler's technical expertise. When a series of 4 blood collections were performed over 1 wk, the 2 methods yielded similar corticosterone levels that did not increase over time. Some of the behavioral signs appeared to increase over the series of blood collections obtained by the saphenous venipuncture method. Serial complete blood counts showed that the tail vessels yielded higher total white blood cell, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts than did the saphenous vein. Neither method appeared to cause stress-associated changes in the leukogram after serial blood collection. Overall, the effects of modified tail-clip method were similar to those of the saphenous venipuncture method in unanesthetized mice.

  4. Blood meal identification and feeding habits of uranotaenia species collected in the ryukyu archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Takako; Miyagi, Ichiro; Tamashiro, Mikako

    2014-09-01

    To know the blood meal in the stomach of Uranotaenia species, blood-fed mosquitoes were collected by 4 methods at different sites in the mountain forest of 3 islands, Amamioshima, Okinawajima, and Iriomotejima in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan from 2005 to 2012. One hundred twenty-four blood-fed Uranotaenia mosquitoes of 7 species (Ur. jacksoni, nivipleura, ohamai, yaeyamana, annandalei, lateralis, and macfarlanei) were collected. The collection rates are 0.26, 0.6, 0.31, and 0.66 by black light trap, black light blue with dry ice trap, frog call trap, and sweeping net, respectively. The blood meals of 107 females (86.3%) were successfully identified by a polymerase chain reaction-based method. All Uranotaenia species fed on cold-blooded animals, especially amphibians (99.1%), and notably on frogs. They would feed readily on available frogs in a given region having no close connection with the breeding (calling) season of each frog. They also fed on reptiles (0.9%), but not on warm-blooded animals.

  5. Microsampling Collection Methods for Measurement of C-peptide in Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charlotte; Dunseath, Gareth J; Lemon, Jessica; Luzio, Stephen D

    2018-03-01

    Microsampling techniques are alternative methods to venous sampling for obtaining blood for measurement of circulating biomarkers, offering the convenience of reduced sample volume and elimination of the need for phlebotomists. Dried blood spot (DBS) microsampling methods have been used for many years while more recently a volumetric absorptive microsampling device (VAMS™) has been introduced. In diabetes mellitus, circulating C-peptide is commonly used as an indicator of endogenous insulin secretion and clinical measurement can aid in diagnosis as well as informing on therapy. This pilot study investigated the effectiveness of microsampling collection of capillary blood for measurement of C-peptide. Capillary blood was collected into capillary tubes and centrifuged for plasma samples. Simultaneous samples were also collected using both microsampling methods (DBS and VAMS). Blood from both microsamplers was extracted prior to assaying for C-peptide alongside the corresponding plasma samples, using specific immunoassays and results obtained from microsampling compared to the reference plasma concentrations. Stability was determined by collecting duplicate DBS and VAMS and assaying both in a single assay after storing one at -20°C immediately and one at room temperature for 48 hours post-collection. Good agreement was observed between C-peptide concentrations in plasma and equivalent DBS and VAMS samples ( R 2 = .929 and .9231, DBS and VAMS, respectively), with mean differences of 75.7 and 8.4 pmol/L observed for DBS and VAMS. Small decreases in C-peptide of 11.6% and 0.1% were observed after 48 hours storage for DBS and VAMS, respectively. C-peptide collected using DBS and VAMS showed good agreement with reference plasma concentrations, suggesting both would be an effective microsampling method for collection and measurement of C-peptide.

  6. Measurements and Counts for Notacanthidae Specimens

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Taxonomic data were collected for specimens of deep-sea spiny eels (Notacanthidae) from the Hawaiian Ridge by Bruce C. Mundy. Specimens were collected off the north...

  7. Blood groups and human groups: collecting and calibrating genetic data after World War Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangham, Jenny

    2014-09-01

    Arthur Mourant's The Distribution of the Human Blood Groups (1954) was an "indispensable" reference book on the "anthropology of blood groups" containing a vast collection of human genetic data. It was based on the results of blood-grouping tests carried out on half-a-million people and drew together studies on diverse populations around the world: from rural communities, to religious exiles, to volunteer transfusion donors. This paper pieces together sequential stages in the production of a small fraction of the blood-group data in Mourant's book, to examine how he and his colleagues made genetic data from people. Using sources from several collecting projects, I follow how blood was encountered, how it was inscribed, and how it was turned into a laboratory resource. I trace Mourant's analytical and representational strategies to make blood groups both credibly 'genetic' and understood as relevant to human ancestry, race and history. In this story, 'populations' were not simply given, but were produced through public health, colonial and post-colonial institutions, and by the labour and expertise of subjects, assistants and mediators. Genetic data were not self-evidently 'biological', but were shaped by existing historical and geographical identities, by political relationships, and by notions of kinship and belonging. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. The type-specimens of Caraboidea beetles (Coleoptera, Adephaga) deposited in the collections of the I.I. Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putshkov, Alexander V; Martynov, Alexander V

    2017-03-01

    A catalogue of type specimens of species and subspecies of caraboid beetles, tiger-beetles here treated as family Cicindelidae, and ground-beetles (Carabidae) of suborder Adephaga deposited in the I.I. Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology NAS of Ukraine is provided. For all type-specimens original photos of each specimen (with label) and label data are given in the original spelling (translated to English if the original label was in Cyrillic alphabet). In some cases data concerning the current status of taxons are discussed. Nominal taxa names are alphabethically listed within each family. Altogether, 372 type specimens of 133 taxa names (species and subspecies) are included in the catalogue: 15 holotypes, 344 paratypes (120 species and subspecies) and 13 specimens (9 taxa) with other type status.

  9. Performance of Xpert MTB/RIF and Alternative Specimen Collection Methods for the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Olivier; Ung, Vibol; Goyet, Sophie; Borand, Laurence; Msellati, Philippe; Tejiokem, Mathurin; Nguyen Thi, Ngoc Lan; Nacro, Boubacar; Cheng, Sokleaph; Eyangoh, Sara; Pham, Thu Hang; Ouedraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Tarantola, Arnaud; Godreuil, Sylvain; Blanche, Stéphane; Delacourt, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children is challenging. We assessed the performance of alternative specimen collection methods for tuberculosis diagnosis in HIV-infected children using Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert). HIV-infected children aged ≤13 years with suspected intrathoracic tuberculosis were enrolled in 8 hospitals in Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, and Vietnam. Gastric aspirates were taken for children aged children aged ≥10 years (standard samples); nasopharyngeal aspirate and stool were taken for all children, and a string test was performed if the child was aged ≥4 years (alternative samples). All samples were tested with Xpert. The diagnostic accuracy of Xpert for culture-confirmed tuberculosis was analyzed in intention-to-diagnose and per-protocol approaches. Of 281 children enrolled, 272 (96.8%) had ≥1 specimen tested with Xpert (intention-to-diagnose population), and 179 (63.5%) had all samples tested with Xpert (per-protocol population). Tuberculosis was culture-confirmed in 29/272 (10.7%) children. Intention-to-diagnose sensitivities of Xpert performed on all, standard, and alternative samples were 79.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 60.3-92.0), 72.4% (95% CI, 52.8-87.3), and 75.9% (95% CI, 56.5-89.7), respectively. Specificities were ≥97.5%. Xpert combined on nasopharyngeal aspirate and stool had intention-to-diagnose and per-protocol sensitivities of 75.9% (95% CI, 56.5-89.7) and 75.0% (95% CI, 47.6-92.7), respectively. The combination of nasopharyngeal aspirate and stool sample is a promising alternative to methods usually recommended by national programs. Xpert performed on respiratory and stools samples enables rapid confirmation of tuberculosis diagnosis in HIV-infected children. The ANRS (Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le Sida) 12229 PAANTHER (Pediatric Asian African Network for Tuberculosis and HIV Research) 01 study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01331811). © The Author 2016

  10. Blood collection from the facial (maxillary)/musculo-cutaneous vein in true frogs (family Ranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzán, María J; Vanderstichel, Raphaël V; Ogbuah, Christopher T; Barta, John R; Smith, Todd G

    2012-01-01

    Collection of blood from amphibians, as in other classes of vertebrate animals, is essential to evaluate parameters of health, diagnose hemoparasitism, identify viral and bacterial pathogens, and measure antibodies. Various methods of blood collection have been described for amphibians. Most can be cumbersome (venipucture of femoral vein, ventral abdominal vein or lingual venus plexus) or result in pain or deleterious health consequences (cardiac puncture and toe-clipping). We describe an easy and practical technique to collect blood from frogs and toads that can be used in multiple species and is minimally invasive. The technique consists of puncturing either the facial or, less commonly, the musculo-cutaneous vein and collecting the blood with a capillary tube. These veins run dorsal and parallel to the maxillary bone and can be accessed by quick insertion and withdrawal of a needle through the skin between the upper jawline and the rostral or caudal side of the tympanum. The needle should be of 27 or 30 gauge for anurans weighing more or less than 25 g, respectively. Although the technique has been used by some amphibian researchers for years, it is little known by others and has never been fully described in a peer-reviewed publication.

  11. Cross-Sectional Study of Hepatitis A Virus Infection in the Pantanal Population before Vaccine Implementation in Brazil: Usage of Non-Invasive Specimen Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourinho, Renata Santos; de Almeida, Adilson José; Villar, Livia Melo; Murat, Paula Guerra; Capelin, Gina Jonasson Mousquer; Motta Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2015-01-01

    Population-based prevalence studies are essential tools for screening of hepatitis A and provide important data on susceptible groups. However, surveillance in isolated communities is difficult because of the limited access to these areas and the need for blood sample collection. This study aimed to determine the anti-HAV prevalence using oral fluid samples to provide an alternative tool for epidemiological studies that might be useful for vaccination-related decisions. The study population was composed of 224 volunteers from South Pantanal, aged 3 to 86 years old. This study was performed using oral fluids, previously standardized for anti-HAV antibody detection, which were collected using a ChemBio device. Eluates were tested using modified commercial EIA to detect anti-HAV antibodies. The overall prevalence was 79.1%, corresponding to 178 reactive EIA tests out of 224 samples. The age stratified data revealed a prevalence of 47.8% between 0–10 years, 84% in 11–20 years and 91.9% in subjects older than 21 years. Results indicate that hepatitis A prevalence was higher in adolescents and adults, corroborating the literature reports. Thus, oral fluid samples could replace serum in HAV epidemiological studies in isolated communities as they are efficient at detecting anti-HAV antibodies. PMID:26133128

  12. Effect of hypergravity on catecholamine levels in telemetrically collected blood of rats during centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Petrak, J.; Mravec, B.; Tillinger, A.; Jurani, M.; Baranovska, M.; Hapala, I.; Frollo, I.

    2005-08-01

    Hypergravity is known to activate the sympathoadrenal system (SAS). Rats subjected to various accelerations (+G) exhibited increased levels of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and partly also norepinephrine (NE). However, the collection of blood was performed after centrifugation finished and therefore plasma NE and EPI levels could have been affected by the process of deceleration. The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma EPI and NE levels in blood collected directly during the centrifugation after reaching different +G, using newly developed remote controlled equipment. Such telemetrically regulated equipment for multiple blood sampling allows us to investigate selective effects of hypergravity during centrifugation. All animals had a polyethylene tubing in the tail artery which was connected to a pre-programmed device for three blood withdrawals (0.6 ml each) into individual syringes, performed at any chosen time intervals. Plasma EPI and NE levels were measured at hypergravity between +1G - +5G. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge, hypergravity dependent increase at the interval of 10-20 min. After the blood collection was completed, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge stopped (10 min). In these samples plasma EPI levels showed a significant reduction compared to the 20 min interval of centrifugation but the EPI levels at 4G-6G were still significantly elevated compared to pre- centrifugation levels. Plasma NE levels showed less pronounced changes (increased after 6G only) with a slower return to control levels.Thus, our data has shown completely different responses of the adrenomedullary (epinephrine) and sympathoneural (norepinephrine) systems to hypergravitation. This data shows that the increased gravitation and not the stressful situations connected with centrifugation is the factor responsible for massive activation of the adrenomedullary system. The mechanism of small activation of the

  13. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Nucleic Acid-Based Device for the Amplification, Detection, and Identification of Microbial Pathogens Directly From Whole Blood Specimens. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is classifying the nucleic acid-based device for the amplification, detection, and identification of microbial pathogens directly from whole blood specimens into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to the device type are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the nucleic acid-based device for the amplification, detection, and identification of microbial pathogens directly from whole blood specimens' classification. We are taking this action because we have determined that classifying the device into class II (special controls) will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. We believe this action will also enhance patients' access to beneficial innovative devices, in part by reducing regulatory burdens.

  14. Use of a simple, inexpensive device for collection of blood during acute normovolaemic haemodilution in a Jehovah's Witness patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunseth, C; Collins, L; Reddy, S; Schlueter, A J

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative anaemia is a concern for patients who refuse blood products or have rare blood types. Acute normovolaemic haemodilution (ANH) is a potential solution for these challenging populations. However, protocols for ANH provide limited detail on preparation of blood collection systems. This report describes a novel protocol for ANH and an example of a patient who clearly benefited from ANH. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  15. Comparison of Two Apheresis Systems of COBE and Optia for Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se Na; Sohn, Ji Yeon; Kong, Jung Hee; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Lee, Hyewon; Kong, Sun Young

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation following myeloablative therapy is a mainstay of treatment for various types of malignancies. This study aimed to evaluate the differences between the Optia MNC and COBE Spectra MNC systems (Terumo BCT, Japan) according to apheresis procedures and the parameters of apheresis, products, and collection. The clinical data of 74 patients who underwent autologous PBSC collection from July 2012 to July 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. The patients comprised 48 (65%) men and 26 (35%) women with a median age of 56 yr (range, 23-66 yr). Of 216 procedures, 111 (51%) and 105 (49%) were processed by using COBE and Optia MNC, respectively. PBSC collection rates, throughput, numbers of stem cells retrieved, collection efficacy, and platelet loss were compared. There were no significant differences in the median CD34+ cell counts of collected products (0.61×10⁸ vs 0.94×10⁸), CD34 collection efficiency (43.5% vs 42.1%), and loss of platelets (40.1% vs 44.7%). The Spectra Optia MNC apheresis system was comparable to the COBE Spectra system in collecting autologous CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and retention of platelets. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine.

  16. Mosquito blood-meal analysis for avian malaria study in wild bird communities: laboratory verification and application to Culex sasai (Diptera: Culicidae) collected in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Soon; Tsuda, Yoshio; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Hirota, Yoshikazu

    2009-10-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments to verify molecular techniques of avian malaria parasite detection distinguishing between an infected mosquito (oocysts on midgut wall) and infective mosquito (sporozoites in salivary glands) in parallel with blood-meal identification from individual blood-fed mosquitoes prior to application to field survey for avian malaria. Domestic fowl infected with Plasmodium gallinaceum was exposed to a vector and non-vector mosquito species, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens pallens, respectively, to compare the time course of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection for parasite between competent and refractory mosquitoes. DNA of the domestic fowl was detectable for at least 3 days after blood feeding. The PCR-based detection of P. gallinaceum from the abdomen and thorax of A. aegypti corresponded to the microscopic observation of oocysts and sporozoites. Therefore, this PCR-based method was considered useful as one of the criteria to assess developmental stages of Plasmodium spp. in mosquito species collected in the field. We applied the same PCR-based method to 21 blood-fed C. sasai mosquitoes collected in Rinshi-no-mori Park in urban Tokyo, Japan. Of 15 blood meals of C. sasai successfully identified, 86.7% were avian-derived, 13.3% were bovine-derived. Plasmodium DNA was amplified from the abdomen of three C. sasai specimens having an avian blood meal from the Great Tit (Parus major), Pale Thrush (Turdus pallidus), and Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). This is the first field study on host-feeding habits of C. sasai in relation to the potential role as a vector for avian malaria parasites transmitted in the Japanese wild bird community.

  17. Thixotropic gel-like composition and sterile blood-collecting and separating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semersky, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    A thixotropic gel-like composition comprising liquid polybutadiene and an inorganic inert filler dispersed therein is adapted for use as a sealing barrier between separated phases of differing densities of a fluid in which said composition has at rest a density intermediate said differing densities, said gel-like composition being substantially resistant to sterilizing radiation. There is also disclosed a pre-packaged blood collecting and separating device which contains a mixture of liquid polybutadiene and an inorganic, inert filler, such as silica, as a thixotropic gel adapted at rest to form a sealing barrier between separated blood phases. The device and gel are subjected to sterilizing radiation to form a substantially sterile device, substantially free of backflow contamination without degradation of the physical properties of the gel. (author)

  18. A new voluntary blood collection method for the Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) and Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Yusuke; Kido, Nobuhide; Omiya, Tomoko; Ono, Kaori; Ueda, Miya; Azumano, Akinori; Tanaka, Sohei

    2015-01-01

    Various training methods have been developed for animal husbandry and health care in zoos and one of these trainings is blood collection. One training method, recently widely used for blood collection in Ursidae, requires setting up a sleeve outside the cage and gives access to limited blood collection sites. A new voluntary blood collection method without a sleeve was applied to the Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) and Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) with access to various veins at the same time. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of this new method and suggests improvements. Two Andean and two Asiatic black bears in Yokohama and Nogeyama Zoological Gardens, respectively, were trained to hold a bamboo pipe outside their cages. We could, thereby, simultaneously access superficial dorsal veins, the dorsal venous network of the hand, the cephalic vein from the carpal joint, and an area approximately 10 cm proximal to the carpal joint. This allowed us to evaluate which vein was most suitable for blood collection. We found that the cephalic vein, approximately 10 cm proximal to the carpal joint, was the most suitable for blood collection. This new method requires little or no modification of zoo facilities and provides a useful alternative method for blood collection. It could be adapted for use in other clinical examinations such as ultrasound examination. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Concordance of mutation detection in circulating tumor DNA in early clinical trials using different blood collection protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B.; Madsen, Mette; Jonson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in a clinical setting. Here we investigate the concordance between standard blood collection for molecular analysis using immediate separation of plasma, compared to the use of collection tubes allowing for delayed processing. Methods: In this study, we measured the fractional abundance of tumor specific...... patients with advanced solid cancers enrolled in early clinical trials. Results: Concordance in the fractional abundance of mutations in ctDNA isolated from blood collected in either K3EDTA or BCT tubes from patients with different solid cancers was observed. Conclusions: This study indicates that BCT...... mutations (BRAF p.V600E and PIK3CA p.H1047R) in ctDNA isolated from blood samples collected in either cell-stabilizing Cell-Free DNA BCT tubes (delayed processing within 72 hours) or standard K3EDTA tubes (immediate processing within 15 minutes). Twenty-five blood sample pairs (EDTA/BCT) were collected from...

  20. Evaluating the optimum rest period prior to blood collection for fractionated plasma free metanephrines analysis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, T.P.

    2016-05-01

    The high diagnostic accuracy of plasma metanephrines (PMets) in the di-agnosis of Phaeochromocytoma\\/Paraganglioma (PPGL) is well established. Considerable controversy exists regarding optimum sampling conditions for PMets. The use of reference intervals that do not compromise diagnostic sensitivity is recommended. However, the optimum rest period prior to sampling has yet to be clearly established. The aim of this study was to evaluate PMets concentrations in paired blood samples collected following 30 and 40 min seated-rest prior to sampling, in patients in whom it was clinically rea-sonable to suspect that PPGL may be present.

  1. [Establishment and Management of Multiple Myeloma Specimen Bank Applied for Molecular Biological Researches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han-Qing; Mei, Jian-Gang; Cao, Hong-Qin; Shao, Liang-Jing; Zhai, Yong-Ping

    2017-12-01

    To establish a multiple myeloma specimen bank applied for molecular biological researches and to explore the methods of specimen collection, transportation, storage, quality control and the management of specimen bank. Bone marrow and blood samples were collected from multiple myeloma patients, plasma cell sorting were operated after the separation of mononuclear cells from bone marrow specimens. The plasma cells were divided into 2 parts, one was added with proper amount of TRIzol and then kept in -80 °C refrigerator for subsequent RNA extraction, the other was added with proper amount of calf serum cell frozen liquid and then kept in -80 °C refrigerator for subsequent cryopreservation of DNA extraction after numbered respectively. Serum and plasma were separated from peripheral blood, specimens of serum and plasma were then stored at -80 °C refrigerator after registration. Meantime, the myeloma specimen information management system was established, managed and maintained by specially-assigned persons and continuous modification and improvement in the process of use as to facilitate the rapid collection, management, query of the effective samples and clinical data. A total of 244 portions plasma cells, 564 portions of serum, and 1005 portions of plasma were collected, clinical characters were documented. A multiple myeloma specimen bank have been established initially, which can provide quality samples and related clinical information for molecular biological research on multiple myeloma.

  2. Specific Skin Lesions of Sarcoidosis Located at Venipuncture Points for Blood Sample Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoval, Joaquim; Penín, Rosa M; Mañá, Juan

    2017-07-08

    It has been suggested that the predilection of sarcoidosis to affect scars is due to the presence of antigens or foreign bodies that can serve as a stimulus for granuloma formation. Several patients with sarcoidosis-specific skin lesions in venous puncture sites have been reported. However, in these patients the pathogenesis of the cutaneous lesions is not clear because the presence of foreign bodies is not to be expected. Our objective was to describe 3 patients who developed specific lesions of sarcoidosis in areas of venipuncture and to discuss their possible pathogenesis. The database of the Sarcoid Clinic of Bellvitge Hospital (an 800-bed university referral center providing tertiary care to approximately 1 million people in Barcelona, Spain) was reviewed to detect those patients with specific cutaneous lesions of systemic sarcoidosis in areas of venipuncture. Three patients with biopsy-proven specific cutaneous lesions of systemic sarcoidosis in areas of venipuncture for blood collection were detected (3 women, mean age 56 years). In one case, the histopathological image shows the hypothetical path of a needle through the skin. In 2 cases, an amorphous birefringent material was detected under polarized light. This material was consistent with silicone. In patients who are developing sarcoidosis, the smallest amount of oil used as lubricant in the needle for sample blood collection may induce the formation of granulomas. In addition to exploring scars, it is advisable to explore the cubital folds to detect specific cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis.

  3. Real-time polymerase chain reaction with melting analysis of positive blood culture specimens in bloodstream infections: diagnostic value and turnaround time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Silvia; Gherardi, Giovanni; De Florio, Lucia; Avola, Alessandra; Crea, Francesca; Riva, Elisabetta; Vitali, Massimiliano Andrea; Galluzzo, Sara; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2013-01-01

    A Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with melting analysis was devised to target bacterial and fungal genes together with the most prevalent antimicrobial resistance genes in 250 positive blood culture broths. This method allowed the blood culture cultivated pathogens to be classified into clinically relevant groups such as Enterobacteriaceae, oxidase-positive bacilli, oxidase-positive coccobacilli, S. aureus and yeast. Enterococci and streptococci could be distinguished from CoNS only by the Gram stain. Gram-positive bacilli were discriminated from Gram-positive cocci by Gram stain. Furthermore, the most important antimicrobial resistant genes such as mecA, vanA, bla TEM , bla SHV and bla CTX-M could be identified. All results were obtained with a turnaround time of three hours from the moment of blood culture positivity compared to 24-72 hours for phenotypic methods. In conclusion, the proposed approach can allow the clinician to implement proper early management of sepsis patients.

  4. Collection and storage of red blood cells with anticoagulant and additive solution with a physiologic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Patrick; Korsten, Herbert; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; de Korte, Dirk; van Bruggen, Robin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A donation of whole blood is most commonly collected in acidic citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) variants with pH 5.2 to 6.2 as anticoagulants. Previously, we have shown that the initial pH after red blood cell (RBC) preparation can have an effect on RBCs during storage. First, we

  5. Cleaning the IceMole: collection of englacial samples from Blood Falls, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikucki, J.; Digel, I.; Chua, M.; Davis, J.; Ghosh, D.; Lyons, W. B.; Welch, K. A.; Purcell, A.; Francke, G.; Feldmann, M.; Espe, C.; Heinen, D.; Dachwald, B.; Kowalski, J.; Tulaczyk, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Minimally Invasive Direct Glacial Access project (MIDGE) used a maneuverable thermoelectric melting probe called the IceMole to collect the first englacial samples of brine from Blood Falls, Antarctica. In order to maintain the scientific integrity of samples collected and minimize impact to this specially protected ecosystem, microbial and chemical contamination of the IceMole needed to be minimized. Guidelines have been established for research in Antarctic subglacial systems by the scientific and regulatory community and have been detailed by the "Code of Conduct for the Exploration and Research of Subglacial Aquatic Environments" put forth by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Action Group, and was submitted to the Antarctic Treaty System. This Code of Conduct (CoC) recognizes the ecological importance and pristine nature of subglacial habitats and recommends a path forward towards clean exploration. Similarly, the US and European space agencies (NASA and ESA) have detailed instrument preparation protocols for the exploration of icy worlds in our solar system for planetary protection. Given the synergistic aims of these two groups we have adopted protocols from both subglacial and space exploration approaches. Here we present our approach to cleaning the IceMole in the field and report on ability to reduce the bioload inherent on the melter. Specifically our protocol reduced the exterior bio-load by an order of magnitude, to levels common in most clean rooms, and 1-3 orders of magnitude below that of Taylor Glacier ice surrounding Blood Falls. Our results indicate that the collection of englacial samples for microbiological analysis is feasible with melting probes.

  6. Finger stick blood collection for gene expression profiling and storage of tempus blood RNA tubes [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darawan Rinchai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With this report we aim to make available a standard operating procedure (SOP developed for RNA stabilization of small blood volumes collected via a finger stick. The anticipation that this procedure may be improved through peer-review and/or readers public comments is another element motivating the publication of this SOP. Procuring blood samples from human subjects can, among other uses, enable assessment of the immune status of an individual subject via the profiling of RNA abundance using technologies such as real time PCR, NanoString, microarrays or RNA-sequencing. It is often desirable to minimize blood volumes and employ methods that are the least invasive and can be practically implemented outside of clinical settings. Finger stick blood samples are increasingly used for measurement of levels of pharmacological drugs and biological analytes. It is a simple and convenient procedure amenable for instance to field use or self-collection at home using a blood sample collection kit. Such methodologies should also enable the procurement of blood samples at high frequency for health or disease monitoring applications.

  7. Performance and safety of femoral central venous catheters in pediatric autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura; Hoffmann, Sandra; Webb, Dawn; Yamada, Chisa; Davenport, Robertson; Choi, Sung Won

    2017-12-01

    Autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell collection (A-HPCC) in children typically requires placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) for venous access. There is scant published data regarding the performance and safety of femoral CVCs in pediatric A-HPCC. Seven-year, retrospective study of A-HPCC in pediatric patients collected between 2009 and January 2017. Inclusion criteria were an age ≤ 21 years and A-HPCC using a femoral CVC for venous access. Femoral CVC performance was examined by CD34 collection rate, inlet rate, collection efficiency (MNC-FE, CD34-FE), bleeding, flow-related adverse events (AE), CVC removal, and product sterility testing. Statistical analysis and graphing were performed with commercial software. A total of 75/119 (63%) pediatric patients (median age 3 years) met study criteria. Only 16% of children required a CVC for ≥ 3 days. The CD34 collect rate and CD34-FE was stable over time whereas MNC-FE decreased after day 4 in 80% of patients. CD34-FE and MNC-FE showed inter- and intra-patient variability over time and appeared sensitive to plerixafor administration. Femoral CVC showed fewer flow-related AE compared to thoracic CVC, especially in pediatric patients (6.7% vs. 37%, P = 0.0005; OR = 0.12 (95%CI: 0.03-0.45). CVC removal was uneventful in 73/75 (97%) patients with hemostasis achieved after 20-30 min of pressure. In a 10-year period, there were no instances of product contamination associated with femoral CVC colonization. Femoral CVC are safe and effective for A-HPCC in young pediatric patients. Femoral CVC performance was maintained over several days with few flow-related alarms when compared to thoracic CVCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Decreases in blood ethanol concentrations during storage at 4 °C for 12 months were the same for specimens kept in glass or plastic tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.W. Jones

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The stability of ethanol was investigated in blood specimens in glass or plastic evacuated tubes after storage in a refrigerator at 4 °C for up to 12 months. Methods: Sterile blood, from a local hospital, was divided into 50 mL portions and spiked with aqueous ethanol (10% w/v to give target concentrations of 0.20, 1.00, 2.00 and 3.00 g/L. Ethanol was determined in blood by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC with an analytical imprecision of <3% (coefficient of variation, CV%. Aliquots of blood were re-analysed after 2, 7, 14, 28, 91, 182 and 364 days of storage at 4 °C. Results: The standard deviation (SD of analysis by HS-GC was 0.0059 g/L at 0.20 g/L and 0.0342 g/L at 3.00 g/L, corresponding to CVs of 2.9% and 1.1%, respectively. The decreases in blood ethanol content were analytically significant after 14–28 days of storage for both glass and plastic tubes The mean (lowest and highest loss of ethanol after 12 months storage was 0.111 g/L (0.084–0.129 g/L for glass tubes and 0.112 g/L (0.088–0.140 g/L for plastic tubes. The corresponding percentage losses of ethanol were 43–45% at a starting concentration of 0.20 g/L and 3.9–4.1% at 3.00 g/L. Conclusion: The concentration of ethanol in blood gradually decreases during storage at 4 °C. After 12 months storage the absolute decrease in concentration was ~0.11 g/L when the starting concentration ranged from 0.20 to 3.0 g/L. Decreases in ethanol content were the same for specimens kept in glass or plastic evacuated tubes. Keywords: Alcohol, Analysis, Blood, Ethanol stability, Plastic vs glass tubes, Storage conditions

  9. Epidemiological study of pathogens collected from blood for a period of a year (2008-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio A. Debbia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. An epidemiological study, addressed to identify the pathogens isolated from blood, and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns, was conducted. Methods. 12 laboratories, homogeneously distributed in a Northern area of Italy, were required to collected all consecutive non-duplicated strains isolated from blood during February 2008 to February 2009 and sent them to the reference laboratory. Results. A total of 1092 microorganisms were collected, including 653 gram-positive, 385 gram-negative and 54 fungi. Escherichia coli 234, Staphylococcus epidermidis 205, S. aureus 142, S. hominis 87, Enterococcus faecalis 47, S. haemolyticus 33, Klebsiella pneumoniae 33, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 32, Candida albicans 28, Enterobacter cloacae 21 were the prevalent microrganisms found. Samples were collected mainly from medicine (255 strains, intensive care units (154, surgery (99, infectious diseases (93, paediatrics (62 and nephrology (62. Antibiotic resistance (in % in staphylococci was 65.7 (methicillin, 33.5 (gentamicin, 61.8 (azithromycin, 59.6 (erythromycin, 45.2 (ciprofloxacin 14.8 (chloramphenicol, 2.0 (teicoplanin, and 24.1 (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole no vancomycin-resistant strain was found. Enterococci showed resistance to vancomycin (10.8, ampicillin (34.4, gentamycin (42.9, ciprofloxacin (42.2 teicoplanin (7.6, erythromycin (54.7 and chloramphenicol (17.5. Enterobacteriaceae exhibited resistance to ciprofloxacin(27.0, ampicillin (74.1, ceftazidime (15.8, cefoxitin (14.7, cefepime (13.3, ceftriaxone (15.0, both imipenem and amikacin (0.95, piperacillin-tazobactam (5.1 and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (32.7. Non fermenting gram negative strains were found resistant to ciprofloxacin (27.3, ceftazidime (9.5, cefepime (14.6, ceftriaxone (81.6, both imipenem and amikacin (18.6, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (65.2, and piperacillin-tazobactam (7.5. Conclusions.These data show a prevalent incidence of gram-positive (59.7 % in comparison to

  10. Specimen labeling errors: a Q-probes analysis of 147 clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, Elizabeth A; Stankovic, Ana K; Raab, Stephen; Nakhleh, Raouf E; Walsh, Molly K

    2008-10-01

    Accurate specimen identification is critical for quality patient care. Improperly identified specimens can result in delayed diagnosis, additional laboratory testing, treatment of the wrong patient for the wrong disease, and severe transfusion reactions. Specimen identification errors have been reported to occur at rates of 0.1% to 5%. To determine the frequency of labeling errors in a multi-institutional survey. Labeling errors were categorized as: (1) mislabeled, (2) unlabeled, (3) partially labeled, (4) incompletely labeled, and (5) illegible label. Blood specimens for routine or stat chemistry, hematology, and coagulation testing were included. Labeling error rates were calculated for each participant and tested for associations with institutional demographic and practice variable information. More than 3.3 million specimen labels were reviewed by 147 laboratories. Labeling errors were identified at a rate of 0.92 per 1000 labels. Two variables were statistically associated with lower labeling error rates: (1) laboratories with current, ongoing quality monitors for specimen identification (P = .008) and (2) institutions with 24/7 phlebotomy services for inpatients (P = .02). Most institutions had written policies for specimen labeling at the bedside or in outpatient phlebotomy areas (96% and 98%, respectively). Allowance of relabeling of blood specimens by primary collecting personnel was reported by 42% of institutions. Laboratories actively engaged in ongoing specimen labeling quality monitors had fewer specimen labeling errors. Also, 24/7 phlebotomy services were associated with lower specimen error rates. Establishing quality metrics for specimen labeling and deploying 24/7 phlebotomy operations may contribute to improving the accuracy of specimen labeling for the clinical laboratory.

  11. DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drábková, Lenka Záveská

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of molecular techniques, the historical collections have become widely used. Studying plant DNA using modern molecular techniques such as DNA sequencing plays an important role in understanding evolutionary relationships, identification through DNA barcoding, conservation status, and many other aspects of plant biology. Enormous herbarium collections are an important source of material especially for specimens from areas difficult to access or from taxa that are now extinct. The ability to utilize these specimens greatly enhances the research. However, the process of extracting DNA from herbarium specimens is often fraught with difficulty related to such variables as plant chemistry, drying method of the specimen, and chemical treatment of the specimen. Although many methods have been developed for extraction of DNA from herbarium specimens, the most frequently used are modified CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit protocols. Nine selected protocols in this chapter have been successfully used for high-quality DNA extraction from different kinds of plant herbarium tissues. These methods differ primarily with respect to their requirements for input material (from algae to vascular plants), type of the plant tissue (leaves with incrustations, sclerenchyma strands, mucilaginous tissues, needles, seeds), and further possible applications (PCR-based methods or microsatellites, AFLP).

  12. Use of self-collected capillary blood samples for islet autoantibody screening in relatives: a feasibility and acceptability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Rafkin, L E; Matheson, D; Henderson, C; Boulware, D; Besser, R E J; Ferrara, C; Yu, L; Steck, A K; Bingley, P J

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using self-collected capillary blood samples for islet autoantibody testing to identify risk in relatives of people with Type 1 diabetes. Participants were recruited via the observational TrialNet Pathway to Prevention study, which screens and monitors relatives of people with Type 1 diabetes for islet autoantibodies. Relatives were sent kits for capillary blood collection, with written instructions, an online instructional video link and a questionnaire. Sera from capillary blood samples were tested for autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen-2, insulin and zinc transporter 8. 'Successful' sample collection was defined as obtaining sufficient volume and quality to provide definitive autoantibody results, including confirmation of positive results by repeat assay. In 240 relatives who returned samples, the median (range) age was 15.5 (1-49) years and 51% were male. Of these samples, 98% were sufficient for glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen-2 and zinc transporter 8 autoantibody testing and 84% for insulin autoantibody testing and complete autoantibody screen. The upper 90% confidence bound for unsuccessful collection was 4.4% for glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen-2 and/or zinc transporter 8 autoantibody assays, and 19.3% for insulin autoantibodies. Despite 43% of 220 questionnaire respondents finding capillary blood collection uncomfortable or painful, 82% preferred home self-collection of capillary blood samples compared with outpatient venepuncture (90% of those aged 18 years). The perceived difficulty of collecting capillary blood samples did not affect success rate. Self-collected capillary blood sampling offers a feasible alternative to venous sampling, with the potential to facilitate autoantibody screening for Type 1 diabetes risk. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  13. Volume-dependent hemodynamic effects of blood collection in canine donors - evaluation of 13% and 15% of total blood volume depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUI R.F. FERREIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no consensus regarding the blood volume that could be safely donated by dogs, ranging from 11 to 25% of its total blood volume (TBV. No previous studies evaluated sedated donors.Aim: To evaluate the hemodynamic effects of blood collection from sedated and non-sedated dogs and to understand if such effects were volume-dependent.Materials and Methods: Fifty three donations of 13% of TBV and 20 donations of 15% TBV were performed in dogs sedated with diazepam and ketamine. Additionally, a total of 30 collections of 13% TBV and 20 collections of 15% TBV were performed in non-sedated dogs. Non-invasive arterial blood pressures and pulse rates were registered before and 15 min after donation. Results: Post-donation pulse rates increased significantly in both sedated groups, with higher differences in the 15% TBV collections. Systolic arterial pressures decreased significantly in these groups, while diastolic pressures increased significantly in 13% TBV donations. Non-sedated groups revealed a slight, but significant, SBP decrease. No clinical signs related to donations were registered.Conclusion: These results suggest that the collection of 15% TBV in sedated donors induces hemodynamic variations that may compromise the harmlessness of the procedure, while it seems to be a safe procedure in non-sedated dogs.

  14. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB) and......) and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in order to identify different practices and to explore whether recommendations can be made for harmonization.......A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB...

  15. A new strategy for umbilical cord blood collection developed at the first Colombian public cord blood bank increases total nucleated cell content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Diana; Triviño, Lady; Galindo, Cristian; Franco, Leidy; Salguero, Gustavo; Camacho, Bernardo; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana-María

    2017-09-01

    The total nucleated cell dosage of umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important factor in determining successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after a minimum human leukocyte antigen donor-recipient match. The northern South American population is in need of a new-generation cord blood bank that cryopreserves only units with high total nucleated cell content, thereby increasing the likelihood of use. Colombia set up a public cord blood bank in 2014; and, as a result of its research for improving high total nucleated cell content, a new strategy for UCB collection was developed. Data from 2933 collected and 759 cryopreserved cord blood units between 2014 and 2015 were analyzed. The correlation of donor and collection variables with cellularity was evaluated. Moreover, blood volume, cell content, CD34+ count, clonogenic capacity, and microbial contamination were assessed comparing the new method, which combines in utero and ex utero techniques, with the conventional strategies. Multivariate analysis confirmed a correlation between neonatal birth weight and cell content. The new collection method increased total nucleated cell content in approximately 26% and did not alter pre-cryopreservation and post-thaw cell recovery, viability, or clonogenic ability. Furthermore, it showed a remarkably low microbial contamination rate (1.2%). The strategy for UCB collection developed at the first Colombian public cord blood bank increases total nucleated cell content and does not affect unit quality. The existence of this bank is a remarkable breakthrough for Latin-American patients in need of this kind of transplantation. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of time, temperature, and specimen storage on in vitro lactate concentrations in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Colin F; Bach, Jonathan F; Walker, Julie M

    2017-06-01

    Lactate concentrations increase significantly under certain storage conditions, except for when glycolysis-arresting agents are used. Evaluation of time and storage conditions on heparinized whole blood lactate concentrations without glycolysis-arresting agents have not been evaluated in dogs. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of preanalytic storage conditions on the in vitro concentration of lactate in heparinized canine venous blood specimens. In this prospective study, blood collected from 30 healthy dogs was aliquoted and stored under different conditions: anaerobic refrigerated (3°C), aerobic refrigerated, anaerobic room temperature (RT), and aerobic RT. Whole blood lactate was analyzed at 15-25, 30-40, 60-70, and 120-130 minutes from time 0 (T0) under all storage conditions. Percent increases from the T0 specimen were calculated. There were significantly increased lactate concentrations at all time points within the anaerobic refrigerated specimens compared to T0, and in the anaerobic RT specimens after 15-25 minutes. The aerobic refrigerated specimens did not have significant changes in lactate when compared to anaerobic refrigerated specimens, while the aerobic RT specimens had significant increases at all time points. Anaerobically refrigerated specimens stored < 40 minutes and aerobically refrigerated specimens stored < 25 minutes had in vitro lactate increases of < 20%. Results support analyzing lactate specimens immediately. If lactate analysis is delayed, anaerobic refrigerated specimens should be analyzed within 40 minutes, and aerobic refrigerated specimens should be analyzed within 25 minutes. Room temperature specimens stored either aerobically or anaerobically should be avoided as lactate concentrations may be falsely increased. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  17. Levels of persistent fluorinated, chlorinated and brominated compounds in human blood collected in Sweden in 1997-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, G.; Kaerrman, A.; Bavel, B. van [MTM Research Centre, Oerebro Univ. (Sweden); Hardell, L. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); Hedlund, B. [Environmental Monitoring Section, Swedish EPA, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Levels of persistent fluorinated, chlorinated and brominated compounds in blood collected from the Swedish population have been determined in connection with several exposure and monitoring studies at the MTM Research Centre. A data base with 631 individual congener specific measurements on halogenated POPs such as dioxins, PCBs, HCB, DDE, chlordanes, PBDEs and PFAs including information on residency, age, BMI, diet, occupation, number of children, smoking habits, immunological status etc. has been compiled from samples collected between 1994 and 2004. A brief overview focusing on levels of some persistent chlorinated, brominated and fluorinated, compounds in blood collected in a background population group (n=83) in 1997-2000 is given here.

  18. Comparison of complete blood counts in samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of standard and microsample blood collection tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Jacqueline C; Flatland, Bente

    2010-08-01

    To compare results of a CBC performed on blood samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of standard and microsample collection tubes. Evaluation study. 29 healthy client-owned animals (14 dogs and 15 cats). A blood sample (3 mL) was collected from each animal; 2.5 mL was transferred into a vacuum tube that contained sodium EDTA, and 0.5 mL was transferred into a microsample tube that contained sodium EDTA. Variables evaluated were total numbers of RBCs and WBCs, hemoglobin concentration, Hct, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean platelet volume, and plasma total protein concentration as well as neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, basophil, and platelet counts. Results for the 2 types of tube in each species were compared by use of Pearson correlation coefficients, Passing-Bablok regression analysis, and Bland-Altman analysis. The Pearson correlation coefficient was low for basophil count in cats and moderate, high, or very high for all other variables. Constant and proportional biases were identified for MCHC in dogs by use of Passing-Bablok regression analysis, although the mean difference between types of blood collection tubes was small. No evidence of constant or proportional bias for any other variable was revealed by regression analysis or Bland-Altman analysis. Samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of microsample blood collection tubes provided clinically equivalent CBC results, compared with results for samples obtained by use of standard blood collection tubes, and minimized the total sample volume collected for diagnostic testing.

  19. Hypergravity-induced increase in plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels in telemetrically collected blood of rats during centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Juraj; Mravec, Boris; Jurani, Marian; Baranovska, Magda; Tillinger, Andrej; Hapala, Ivan; Frollo, Ivan; Kvetnanský, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Rats subjected to various accelerations (+G) exhibited increased levels of plasma epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), and corticosterone. However, the collection of blood was performed after a centrifugation finished, and therefore the levels could be affected by the process of deceleration. The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma EPI, NE, and corticosterone levels in blood collected directly during centrifugation after reaching different G (2-6), using newly developed remote-controlled equipment. Animals placed into the centrifuge cabins had inserted polyethylene tubing in the tail artery, which was connected with a preprogrammed device for blood withdrawals. Plasma EPI, NE, and corticosterone levels were measured at different time intervals of hypergravity of 2-6G. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge, hypergravity-level-dependent increase. After the last blood collection was completed during hypergravity, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge stopped (10 min). In these samples, plasma EPI showed significantly lower levels compared to centrifugation intervals. Plasma NE levels were significantly increased after 6G only. The increase in plasma corticosterone was dependent on level of G, however after the centrifuge stopped, corticosterone levels remained elevated. Thus, our data show that hypergravity highly activates the adrenomedullary and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical systems, whereas the sympathoneural system is activated only at high hypergravity. Immediately after centrifugation is over, EPI levels quickly return to control values. Our technique of blood collection during centrifugation allows assessment of the real hormonal levels at the particular hypergravity value.

  20. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... Normal values depend on the test being performed. Normal results are reported as "no growth" and are a sign ...

  1. Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of adequacy of hematopoietic stem cell collection for autologous transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combariza, Juan F.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to carry out an autologous transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells should be mobilized to peripheral blood and later collected by apheresis. The CD34+ cell count is a tool to establish the optimal time to begin the apheresis procedure. Objective: To evaluate the association between peripheral blood CD34+ cell count and the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Materials and methods: A predictive test evaluation study was carried out to establish the usefulness of peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of successful stem cell collection in patients that will receive an autologous transplantation. Results: 77 patients were included (median age: 49 years; range: 5-66. The predominant baseline diagnosis was lymphoma (53.2 %. The percentage of patients with successful harvest of hematopoietic stem cells was proportional to the number of CD34+cells in peripheral blood at the end of the mobilization procedure. We propose that more than 15 CD34+cells/μL must be present in order to achieve an adequate collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Conclusion: Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count is a useful tool to predict the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells.

  2. The relationship between vacuum and hemolysis during catheter blood collection: a retrospective analysis of six large cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Cornelia; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Wiedemann, Helmut; Krahmer, Florian; Felder, Thomas Klaus; Kipman, Ulrike; Hoppe, Uta; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth; Cadamuro, Janne

    2017-07-26

    Blood collection through intravenous (IV) catheters is a common practice at emergency departments (EDs). This technique is associated with higher in vitro hemolysis rates and may even be amplified by the use of vacuum collection tubes. Our aim was to investigate the association of five different vacuum tubes with hemolysis rates in comparison to an aspiration system under real-life conditions and to propose an equation to estimate the amount of hemolysis, depending on the vacuum collection tube type. We retrospectively evaluated hemolysis data of plasma samples from our ED, where blood is drawn through IV catheters. Over the past 5 years, we compared 19,001 hemolysis index values amongst each other and against the respective vacuum pressure (Pv) of the collection tubes, which were used within the six observational periods. The highest hemolysis rates were associated with full-draw evacuated tubes. Significantly reduced hemolysis was observed for two kinds of partial-draw tubes. The hemolysis rate of one partial-draw blood collection tube was comparable to those of the aspiration system. Regression analysis of Pv and mean free hemoglobin (fHb) values yielded the formula fHb (g/L)=0.0082*Pv2-0.1143*Pv+ 0.5314 with an R2 of 0.99. If IV catheters are used for blood collection, hemolysis rates directly correlate with the vacuum within the tubes and can be estimated by the proposed formula. By the use of partial-draw vacuum blood collection tubes, hemolysis rates in IV catheter collections can be reduced to levels comparable with collections performed by aspiration systems.

  3. [Indirect hemagglutination test for detection of antibodies to cytomegalovirus in blood collected on blotting paper (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabau, N; Duros, C; Ravisé, N; Coulon, M; Boué, A

    1976-10-01

    Indirect hemagglutination test for detection of antibodies to cytomegalovirus is highly sensitive and reproducible, if employed in well-defined conditions. Standardization of the various factors involved is necessary as well as their reciprocal equilibrium : sheep erythrocytes, antigen, dilution of tanin, buffers quality. The hemagglutination test can be performed on small volumes such as blood collection on blotting paper (PKU). Antibody titers were compared in the serum and the blood so collected in 104 subjects : the results were very similar and no "false negative" were found in any case. This way of collecting blood and hemagglutination are technical improvements in epidemiologic studies of cytomegalovirus infection. It can be hoped they will be adapted to other group herpes infections.

  4. Cost analysis of strategies to reduce blood culture contamination in the emergency department: sterile collection kits and phlebotomy teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Wesley H; Talbot, Thomas R; Paul, Barbara R; Collins, Sean P; Ward, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Blood culture collection practices that reduce contamination, such as sterile blood culture collection kits and phlebotomy teams, increase up-front costs for collecting cultures but may lead to net savings by eliminating downstream costs associated with contamination. The study objective was to compare overall hospital costs associated with 3 collection strategies: usual care, sterile kits, and phlebotomy teams. Cost analysis. This analysis was conducted from the perspective of a hospital leadership team selecting a blood culture collection strategy for an adult emergency department (ED) with 8,000 cultures drawn annually. Total hospital costs associated with 3 strategies were compared: (1) usual care, with nurses collecting cultures without a standardized protocol; (2) sterile kits, with nurses using a dedicated sterile collection kit; and (3) phlebotomy teams, with cultures collected by laboratory-based phlebotomists. In the base case, contamination rates associated with usual care, sterile kits, and phlebotomy teams were assumed to be 4.34%, 1.68%, and 1.10%, respectively. Total hospital costs included costs of collecting cultures and hospitalization costs according to culture results (negative, true positive, and contaminated). Compared with usual care, annual net savings using the sterile kit and phlebotomy team strategies were $483,219 and $288,980, respectively. Both strategies remained less costly than usual care across a broad range of sensitivity analyses. EDs with high blood culture contamination rates should strongly consider evidence-based strategies to reduce contamination. In addition to improving quality, implementing a sterile collection kit or phlebotomy team strategy is likely to result in net cost savings.

  5. Bridging the Gap between Sample Collection and Laboratory Analysis: Using Dried Blood Spots to Identify Human Exposure to Chemical Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I; Blake, Thomas A; Perez, Jonas W; Crow, Brian S; Shaner, Rebecca L; Coleman, Rebecca M; Johnson, Rudolph C

    2016-05-13

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  6. Bridging the gap between sample collection and laboratory analysis: using dried blood spots to identify human exposure to chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Blake, Thomas A.; Perez, Jonas W.; Crow, Brian S.; Shaner, Rebecca L.; Coleman, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-05-01

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  7. Nuclear morphometry in histological specimens of canine prostate cancer: Correlation with histological subtypes, Gleason score, methods of collection and survival time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Guido; Laufer-Amorim, Renée; Palmieri, Chiara

    2017-10-01

    Ten normal prostates, 22 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 29 prostate cancer (PC) were morphometrically analyzed with regard to mean nuclear area (MNA), mean nuclear perimeter (MNP), mean nuclear diameter (MND), coefficient of variation of the nuclear area (NACV), mean nuclear diameter maximum (MDx), mean nuclear diameter minimum (MDm), mean nuclear form ellipse (MNFe) and form factor (FF). The relationship between nuclear morphometric parameters and histological type, Gleason score, methods of sample collection, presence of metastases and survival time of canine PC were also investigated. Overall, nuclei from neoplastic cells were larger, with greater variation in nuclear size and shape compared to normal and hyperplastic cells. Significant differences were found between more (small acinar/ductal) and less (cribriform, solid) differentiated PCs with regard to FF (pnuclear morphometric analysis in combination with Gleason score can help in canine prostate cancer grading, thus contributing to the establishment of a more precise prognosis and patient's management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Method and Apparatus for the Collection, Storage, and Real Time Analysis of Blood and Other Bodily Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiitson, Peggy A. (Inventor); Clift, Vaughan L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for separating a blood sample having a volume of up to about 20 milliliters into cellular and acellular fractions. The apparatus includes a housing divided by a fibrous filter into a blood sample collection chamber having a volume of at least about 1 milliliter and a serum sample collection chamber. The fibrous filter has a pore size of less than about 3 microns, and is coated with a mixture including between about 1-40 wt/vol % mannitol and between about 0.1-15 wt/vol % of plasma fraction protein (or an animal or vegetable equivalent thereof). The coating causes the cellular fraction to be trapped by the small pores, leaving the cellular fraction intact on the fibrous filter while the acellular fraction passes through the filter for collection in unaltered form from the serum sample collection chamber.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum malaria associated with ABO blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to investigate the relationship between blood group types and P. falciparum malaria, as well as malaria preventive measures. The venous blood specimens were collected, processed, Giemsa-stained and examined microscopically. ABO groups were determined by agglutination test using ...

  10. Levels of mineral nutrients in fresh- and frozen bulk hydrated biological specimens: a comparison of EDS data collected in the environmental SEM and a conventional cryo-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerton-Warburton, L M; Griffin, B J

    1994-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) was compared in fresh- and frozen bulk hydrated tissues using the Environmental SEM (ESEM) and conventional cryo-SEM, respectively. Analysis of globoid inclusions of Eucalyptus calophylla seed from two soil types demonstrated that higher levels of cations (K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn) occurred in seeds from soils containing higher levels of Al, while EDS-detectable levels of S and P were dependent upon the techniques utilised. Cumulative changes in ESEM-EDS-detectable levels of S and P were characterized by collecting cumulative spectra from nutrient standards and compared with those for K. Progressive increases in K occurred and were consistent with an enriching effect. Levels of S and P increased during early analysis (40-60 sec live time) and decreased thereafter. The semi-conductive nature of biological samples, the loss of anions and gain of cations from the net negatively-charged electron interaction volume contributed to an electrochemical bias. These local modifications in fluid chemistry were reversible. Dehydration effects also occurred in stable, 'wet' samples. These differences indicated that EDS in ESEM may be limited to cations rather than anions, and that changes in fluid electrochemistry and dehydration may affect the level and distribution of elements.

  11. Restriction enzyme analysis of the human cytomegalovirus genome in specimens collected from immunodeficient patients in Belém, State of Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorotéa Lobato da Silva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human cytomegalovirus is an opportunistic betaherpesvirus that causes persistent and serious infections in immunodeficient patients. Recurrent infections occur due to the presence of the virus in a latent state in some cell types. It is possible to examine the virus using molecular methods to aid in the immunological diagnosis and to generate a molecular viral profile in immunodeficient patients. The objective of this study was to characterize cytomegalovirus genotypes and to generate the epidemiological and molecular viral profile in immunodeficient patients. METHODS: A total of 105 samples were collected from immunodeficient patients from the City of Belém, including newborns, hemodialysis patients, transplant recipients and HIV+ patients. An IgG and IgM antibody study was completed using ELISA, and enzymatic analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP was performed to characterize viral genotypes. RESULTS: It was observed that 100% of the patients had IgG antibodies, 87% of which were IgG+/IgM-, consistent with a prior infection profile, 13% were IgG+/IgM+, suggestive of recent infection. The newborn group had the highest frequency (27% of the IgG+/IgM+ profile. By RFLP analysis, only one genotype was observed, gB2, which corresponded to the standard AD169 strain. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of IgM antibodies in new borns indicates that HCMV continues to be an important cause of congenital infection. The low observed genotypic diversity could be attributed to the small sample size because newborns were excluded from the RFLP analysis. This study will be continued including samples from newborns to extend the knowledge of the general and molecular epidemiology of HCMV in immunodeficient patients.

  12. Emergency Whole Blood Use in the Field: A Simplified Protocol for Collection and Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    screened according to national safety standards for the detection of transfusion- transmittable diseases (TTDs), such as hepatitis B and C and HIV...Personnel ABO blood type must be analyzed by a cer- tified laboratory routinely performing these tests. As an in- herent part of the blood type, persons...antibodies. Determination of ABO titers is highly recommended for whole-blood transfusion programs that intend to use of type O to patients other than

  13. TEM Specimen Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: House Ear Institute ### Preparative Techniques for the TEM For routine transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it is generally accepted that specimens should be thin, dry and contain molecules which diffract electrons. Biological specimens, which are large and consist of large amounts of water, also do not defract electrons and are therefore difficult to see in the TEM. Preparing biological specimens for the TEM, whilst retaining the structural morphology of the material, is a...

  14. Laparoscopic specimen retrieval bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorgick, Noam

    2014-10-01

    Specimen retrieval bags have long been used in laparoscopic gynecologic surgery for contained removal of adnexal cysts and masses. More recently, the concerns regarding spread of malignant cells during mechanical morcellation of myoma have led to an additional use of specimen retrieval bags for contained "in-bag" morcellation. This review will discuss the indications for use retrieval bags in gynecologic endoscopy, and describe the different specimen bags available to date.

  15. Evaluation of a portable clinical analyzer for the determination of blood gas partial pressures, electrolyte concentrations, and hematocrit in venous blood samples collected from cattle, horses, and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, Juliana R; Borges, Alexandre S; Gonçalves, Roberto C; Mendes, Luiz Claudio N

    2010-05-01

    To compare results reported for blood gas partial pressures, electrolyte concentrations, and Hct in venous blood samples collected from cattle, horses, and sheep and analyzed by use of a portable clinical analyzer (PCA) and reference analyzer (RA). Clinically normal animals (24 cattle, 22 horses, and 22 sheep). pH; Pco(2); Po(2); total carbon dioxide concentration; oxygen saturation; base excess; concentrations of HCO(3)(-), Na(+), K(+), and ionized calcium; Hct; and hemoglobin concentration were determined with a PCA. Results were compared with those obtained for the same blood sample with an RA. Bias (mean difference) and variability (95% confidence interval) were determined for all data reported. Data were also subjected to analyses by Deming regression and Pearson correlation. Analysis of Bland-Altman plots revealed good agreement between results obtained with the PCA and those obtained with the RA for pH and total carbon dioxide concentration in cattle, K(+) concentration in horses and sheep, and base excess in horses. Except for Na(+) concentration and Hct in horses and sheep, correlation was good or excellent for most variables reported. Data from blood gas and electrolyte analyses obtained by use of the PCA can be used to evaluate the health status of cattle, horses, and sheep. Furthermore, the handheld PCA device may have a great advantage over the RA device as a result of the ability to analyze blood samples on farms that may be located far from urban centers.

  16. Anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I determination using blood collection on filter paper in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMIMORI-YAMASHITA Jane

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied 70 leprosy patients and 20 normal individuals, comparing the traditional sera collection method and the finger prick blood with the conservation on filter paper for specific antibodies against the native phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I from Mycobacterium leprae. The finger prick blood dried on filter paper was eluated in phosphate buffer saline (PBS containing 0.5% gelatin. The classical method for native PGL-I was performed for these eluates, and compared with the antibody determination for sera. It was observed that there is a straight correlation comparing these two methods; although the titles found for the eluates were lower than those obtained for serology. This blood collection method could be useful for investigation of new leprosy cases in field, specially in contacts individuals.

  17. Update 1996: Blood collection and handling procedures for assessment of plasminogen activators and inhibitors (Leiden Fibrinolysis Workshop)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluft, C.; Meijer, P.

    1996-01-01

    Procedures of blood collection and handling can be different for the various variables in fibrinolysis. Some of them may require adaptation to the progress in assay methodology and in biochemical and physiological knowledge. During the Leiden Fibrinolysis Workshop 6 in 1996, the procedures described

  18. PREDICTIVE VALUE OF CD34+ CELLS IN BLOOD OF PATIENT/DONOR BEFORE HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS COLLECTION BY LEUKAPHERESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoslav Domanovič

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the study we tried to define a predictive value of the circulating CD34+ cells in patients/ donors blood for estimation of the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC collection efficacy determine the optimal time to initiate the collection by leukapheresis procedure.Methods. We retrospectively analyzed 75 collections of HSC using the Amicus cell separator in 39 patients and 15 donors. Circulating CD34+cell counts in patients/donors were compared to the achieved CD34+ cell yields to determine its predictive value for the collection of a targeted yield of > 2 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight of patient.Results. The results of cell counts confirmed that mobilization regimens were successful and HSC collections efficient. High correlation coefficient (r = 0.82 between the number of circulating CD34+ cells before collection and CD34+ cell yield/kg of patient’s body weight was statistically significant (p < 0.05. With ROC analysis we determined the cut-off value 42 × 106/l CD34+ cell counts in the blood of patients/donors before collection that had a positive predictive value 87% and a negative predictive value 91.6%.Conclusions. Analysis showed that the number of circulating CD34+ cells before the procedure express a very high predictive value and can be used for determining the optimal time to initiate collection of HSC by leukapheresis.

  19. Capillary blood draws in the NICU: the use of the Innovac quick-draw whole blood collection system versus traditional capillary blood draws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Charles; Clifton-Koeppel, Robin; Sills, Jack; Lomax, Jacqueline M; Rapini, Molly; Huffman, Matt L; Modanlou, Houchang D

    2011-01-01

    (1) To determine the rate of damaged and discarded capillary blood draws in the NICU; (2) to compare the rate of damaged and discarded samples between traditional capillary blood draws and the Innovac Quick-Draw device; (3) to determine whether in-service training for nurses on capillary blood draws decreased the rate of damaged and discarded blood samples. During Phase I of the study, the rate of capillary blood draws by the traditional method was determined. At the completion of Phase I, the manufacturer provided in-service training to senior nurses in the NICU with the use of the Innovac Quick-Draw device. Additional in-service training was also provided for the traditional capillary blood draw technique. Within a month of in-service training, an openly randomized study (Phase II) was carried out comparing traditional versus Innovac device capillary blood draws. All infants admitted to the NICU between June 2008 and June 2009 were eligible to be in the study. There were no exclusion criteria based on weight, gestational age, or gender because the sampling method was the only variable being assessed. Phase I lasted two months, whereas Phase II lasted approximately four months. Occurrence of damaged capillary samples with the Innovac device versus the traditional method. In Phase I, the rate of damaged and discarded samples was 10 percent (28/278). In Phase II, the rate of damaged and discarded samples for traditional and Innovac device was 7.2 percent and 10 percent, respectively. Comparisons between traditional and Innovac for different type of samples were as follows: complete blood count, 11.0 percent (12/104) vs. 13.4 percent (14/104); serum electrolytes, 6.4 percent (6/94) vs. 9.5 percent (9/95); C-reactive protein, 5.7 percent (4/70) vs. 8.0 percent (5/62); and liver panel, 5.3 percent (7/131) vs. 8.3 percent (9/108). There were no statistically significant differences of damaged and discarded samples for the overall or individual sample type comparisons.

  20. Peripheral blood stem cells collection on spectra optia apheresis system using the continuous mononuclear cell collection protocol: A single center report of 39 procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, F; Poullin, P; Smith, R; Nicolino-Brunet, C; Philip, P; Chaib, A; Costello, R

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the performance of the new Continuous Mononuclear Cell Collection (CMNC) protocol on the Spectra Optia Apheresis System for collecting autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cells (PBSC) in adult patients with respect to collection variables, CD34+ cells harvest prediction and engraftment data. In this retrospective study, 39 CMNC procedures on 23 mobilized patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma were analyzed. CD34+ cells and blood cells yields, collection efficiencies (CE1 and CE2), cell losses were calculated. Engraftment data of 17 autologous transplantations were collected. Apheresis duration was 239 min for a product volume of 220 mL. Cell product haematocrit, MNC and platelets counts were acceptable (respectively 2.4%, 65%, 834 x 109/L). Median platelet loss was 27.3%. Median CD34+ CE1 and CE2 were 64.6% and 48.5% respectively. We harvested 2.92 × 10 6 CD34+ cells/kg, with a CD34 dose ≥ 2 × 10 6 /kg for 67% of the procedures. Linear correlation between preapheresis CD34 count and the CP CD34 dose/kg allowed a prediction model with a decrease trend for high WBC precount. Procedures were well tolerated. For 17 autologous transplantations, median time to neutrophils and platelets reconstitutions were 12 and 13 days respectively. Spectra Optia CMNC protocol successfully collected CD34+ cells with yields permitting the harvest of sufficient enriched grafts for autologous transplantation. The CD34+ cell yield prediction was excellent. PBSC collection with CMNC protocol had advantages of high processing rate, low product volume, and acceptable contamination by platelets. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:182-190, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Measurement of insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 after delayed separation of whole blood samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Hermien; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Wesseling, Jelle; van der Veer, Eveline; Boezen, H. Marike

    Objectives: Epidemiological studies benefit from unbiased blood specimens collected with minimal cost and effort of blood collection and storage. We evaluated the stability of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in whole blood samples stored at room temperature to justify delays in blood processing. Design and

  2. The impact of preapheresis white blood cell count on autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection efficiency and HSC infusion side effect rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Araci M; Kondo, Andrea T; Yokoyama, Ana Paula H; Lira, Sanny M C; Bub, Carolina B; Souza, Aline M; Cipolletta, Andrea N F; Alvarez, Kelen C; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Kutner, Jose M; Chiattone, Carlos S

    2018-01-19

    Autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSC) collection efficiency (CE) is reportedly affected by the patient's blood properties; however, studies to identify factors correlated with CE have shown inconsistent results. Additionally, variables such as stem cell graft granulocyte content and patient age, sex, and underlying disease, may be associated with hematopietic stem cell (HSC) infusion-related adverse reactions. In this study, we evaluated the correlation of preleukapheresis PB granulocyte count and PBSC harvest variables with CD34 + collection yield and efficiency, and thawed HSC infusion side effect occurrence. We evaluated data from 361 patients who had undergone autologous PBSC transplant. Large volume leukapheresis was the method for PBSC collection. Complete Blood Count and CD34 + cell enumeration were performed in the preapheresis PB and the apheresis product sample. The PBSC grafts were submitted to non-controlled rate freezing after addition of 5% DMSO plus 6% hidroxyethylstarch as a cryoprotectant solution. The cryopreserved graft was thawed in a 37°C water bath and then infused without further manipulation. The CD34 + yield was associated with preapheresis PB CD34 + count and immature granulocyte count. The PBSC CE was negatively correlated with preapheresis white blood cell (WBC), immature granulocyte and granulocyte count. The leukapheresis product total nucleated cell (TNC) and granulocyte content was correlated with the thawed graft infusion side effect occurrence. This study has shown that preapheresis PB WBC and granulocyte counts were associated with leukapheresis CE. Additionally, the leukapheresis product TNC and granulocyte content was correlated with thawed graft infusion side effect occurrence. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The type specimen of Anoura geoffroyi lasiopyga (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Gardner, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1868, Wilhelm Peters described Glossonycteris lasiopyga, based on a specimen provided by Henri de Saussure and collected in Mexico. The type specimen was presumed to be among those housed in the collections of the Zoologisches Museum of the Humboldt Universitat in Berlin, Germany. Our study of one of Saussure?s specimens from Mexico, discovered in the collections of the Museum d?Histoire Naturelle, Geneva, Switzerland, demonstrates that it and not one of the Berlin specimens is the holotype.

  4. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... production of red blood cells, including: Iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and ... inflammatory bowel disease are especially likely to have iron deficiency anemia. Anemia due to chronic disease. People with chronic ...

  5. Causes and impact of specimen rejection in a clinical chemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liyun; Chen, Meng; Phipps, Ron A; Del Guidice, Robert E; Handy, Beverly C; Wagar, Elizabeth A; Meng, Qing H

    2016-07-01

    Pre-analytical errors necessitate specimen rejection and negatively affect patient safety. Our purpose was to investigate the factors leading to specimen rejection and its impact. Specimen rejections in a clinical chemistry laboratory during a 1-year period were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for frequency, cause, circumstances, and impact. Of the 837,862 specimens received, 2178 (0.26%) were rejected. The most common reasons for specimen rejection were contamination (n=764, 35.1%), inappropriate collection container/tube (n=330, 15.2%), quantity not sufficient (QNS) (n=329, 15.1%), labeling errors (n=321, 14.7%), hemolyzed specimen (n=205, 9.4%), and clotted specimen (n=203, 9.3%). The analytes most often affected were glucose (n=192, 8.8%); calcium (n=152, 7.0%), magnesium (n=148, 6.8%), potassium (n=137, 6.3%), creatinine (n=100, 4.6%), and blood urea nitrogen (n=97, 4.4%). Outpatient service and blood draw by phlebotomists were associated with low rejection rates (536/493,501 or 0.11% and 368/586,503 or 0.06%, respectively). Recollection due to specimen rejection increased the turnaround time by an average of 108min. The total cost for the recollection was around $43,210 USD with an average cost around $21.9 USD. The factors associated with rejection are remediable by improved training and quality assurance measures. Policies and procedures specific to specimen collection, transportation, and preparation should be strictly followed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid assessment of sexual behavior, drug use, human immunodeficiency virus, and sexually transmitted diseases in northern thai youth using audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing and noninvasive specimen collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griensven, F; Supawitkul, S; Kilmarx, P H; Limpakarnjanarat, K; Young, N L; Manopaiboon, C; Mock, P A; Korattana, S; Mastro, T D

    2001-07-01

    Drug use, unwanted pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and sexually transmitted diseases are serious health problems among Thai youth. The gravity of these problems demands high-quality data to direct public health policy and prevention programs. Previous studies of stigmatized behaviors have been hampered by participation bias and underreporting. To evaluate sexual behavior, disease, and drug use, we used audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) and noninvasive specimen collection methods. We also evaluated effectiveness of these methods in minimizing participation bias and underreporting. In late 1999, students aged 15 to 21 years attending 3 vocational schools were invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey. Consenting students completed a classroom-based ACASI interview using a confidential code number system. Oral fluid specimens were tested for HIV antibodies, and urine was tested for chlamydial and gonococcal nucleic acids, methamphetamines, and opiates. Of 1736 invited students, 1725 (99%) agreed to participate. Of these, 48% of the male students and 43% of the female students reported ever having had sexual intercourse. Overall, the mean number of lifetime sexual partners was 4.6 among male participants (median: 2) and 2.8 among female participants (median: 1). Consistent use of condoms with steady partners was reported by 16% of male participants and 11% of female participants who had such partners. Of all male participants, 7% had ever paid for sex, 3% had ever sold sex, and 7% had ever been coerced to have sex. Of all female participants, 3% had ever sold sex and 21% had ever been coerced to have sex. Among women with a history of sexual intercourse, 27% reported at least 1 pregnancy. Of these pregnancies, 83% were terminated. Among those with sexual intercourse experience, the prevalence of HIV infection was 0.5%; of infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 0.4%; and of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, 5%. Twenty

  7. Blood donor show behavior after an invitation to donate: The influence of collection site factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, E.M.; Zijlstra, Bonne; De Kort, Wim L.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Show behaviour after invitation to donate varies considerably across donors. More insight into this variation is important for blood banks in achieving stable stocks. This study examined individual factors determining intended show behaviour. Most importantly, however, this

  8. A novel rapid genotyping technique for Collie eye anomaly: SYBR Green-based real-time polymerase chain reaction method applicable to blood and saliva specimens on Flinders Technology Associates filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hye-Sook; Mizukami, Keijiro; Yabuki, Akira; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Arai, Toshiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2010-09-01

    Collie eye anomaly (CEA) is a canine inherited ocular disease that shows a wide variety of manifestations and severity of clinical lesions. Recently, a CEA-associated mutation was reported, and a DNA test that uses conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has now become available. The objective of the current study was to develop a novel rapid genotyping technique by using SYBR Green-based real-time PCR for future large-scale surveys as a key part in the strategy to eradicate CEA by selective breeding. First, a SYBR Green-based real-time PCR assay for genotyping of CEA was developed and evaluated by using purified DNA samples from normal, carrier, and affected Border Collies in which genotypes had previously been determined by conventional PCR. This real-time PCR assay demonstrated appropriate amplifications in all genotypes, and the results were consistent with those of conventional PCR. Second, the availability of Flinders Technology Associates filter paper (FTA card) as DNA templates for the real-time PCR assay was evaluated by using blood and saliva specimens to determine suitability for CEA screening. DNA-containing solution prepared from a disc of blood- or saliva-spotted FTA cards was available directly as templates for the real-time PCR assay when the volume of solution was 2.5% of the PCR mixture. In conclusion, SYBR Green-based real-time PCR combined with FTA cards is a rapid genotyping technique for CEA that can markedly shorten the overall time required for genotyping as well as simplify the sample preparation. Therefore, this newly developed technique suits large-scale screening in breeding populations of Collie-related breeds.

  9. Dried Blood Spots, an Affordable Tool to Collect, Ship, and Sequence gDNA from Patients with an X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia Phenotype Residing in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesmar R. S. Segundo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNew sequencing techniques have revolutionized the identification of the molecular basis of primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID not only by establishing a gene-based diagnosis but also by facilitating defect-specific treatment strategies, improving quality of life and survival, and allowing factual genetic counseling. Because these techniques are generally not available for physicians and their patients residing in developing countries, collaboration with overseas laboratories has been explored as a possible, albeit cumbersome, strategy. To reduce the cost of time and temperature-sensitive shipping, we selected Guthrie cards, developed for newborn screening, to collect dried blood spots (DBS, as a source of DNA that can be shipped by regular mail at minimal cost.MethodBlood was collected and blotted onto the filter paper of Guthrie cards by completely filling three circles. We enrolled 20 male patients with presumptive X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA cared for at the Vietnam National Children’s Hospital, their mothers, and several sisters for carrier analysis. DBS were stored at room temperature until ready to be shipped together, using an appropriately sized envelope, to a CLIA-certified laboratory in the US for sequencing. The protocol for Sanger sequencing was modified to account for the reduced quantity of gDNA extracted from DBS.ResultHigh-quality gDNA could be extracted from every specimen. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK mutations were identified in 17 of 20 patients studied, confirming the diagnosis of XLA in 85% of the study cohort. Type and location of the mutations were similar to those reported in previous reviews. The mean age when XLA was suspected clinically was 4.6 years, similar to that reported by Western countries. Two of 15 mothers, each with an affected boy, had a normal BTK sequence, suggesting gonadal mosaicism.ConclusionDBS collected on Guthrie cards can be shipped inexpensively by airmail across continents

  10. Molecular DNA identification of blood sources fed on, for Culicine mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae collected in the Songkhla province, southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerakamol Pengsakul

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Culicine mosquitoes are medically important vectors. Therefore, mosquito control measures are a crucial strategy to interrupt disease transmission. Collection of data on mosquito feeding patterns is crucial for developing an effective vector control strategy. The objective of this study was to use molecular biology methods to identify the sources of DNA in mosquito blood meals. The DNA from blood meals in the mosquito stomachs was extracted and amplified with multiplex PCR, using specific primer sets based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, to identify the DNA sources among human, pig, goat, dog, cow, and chicken. Among the 297 mosquito samples collected in the Songkhla province of Thailand, in Aedes spp. mosquitoes the percentages positive for human, dog, pig, chicken, cow, a mixture of 2 vertebrate DNAs, or of 3, and negative (no identified DNA were 61.90, 2.38, 2.38, 0.60, 0.60, 4.18, 1.20 and 26.79% respectively. In Culex spp. blood meals the rank order was different: fractions positive for chicken, human, dog, cow, goat, pig, a mixture of 2 or 3 vertebrate DNAs, and negative were 40.83, 10.00, 5.00, 4.17, 1.67, 0.83, 8.32, 3.32 and 25.83% respectively. This study shows that feeding behaviors of the two species differ, with most Aedes spp. blood meals containing human blood, while Culex spp. had primarily consumed chicken blood. An improved understanding of the feeding behaviors of mosquitoes could contribute to new, more effective strategies for the control of mosquito populations.

  11. Specimen rejection in laboratory medicine: Necessary for patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Zeliha Gunnur; Pinar, Asli; Akbiyik, Filiz

    2015-01-01

    The emergency laboratory in Hacettepe University Hospitals receives specimens from emergency departments (EDs), inpatient services and intensive care units (ICUs). The samples are accepted according to the rejection criteria of the laboratory. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the sample rejection ratios according to the types of pre-preanalytical errors and collection areas. The samples sent to the emergency laboratory were recorded during 12 months between January to December, 2013 in which 453,171 samples were received and 27,067 specimens were rejected. Rejection ratios was 2.5% for biochemistry tests, 3.2% for complete blood count (CBC), 9.8% for blood gases, 9.2% for urine analysis, 13.3% for coagulation tests, 12.8% for therapeutic drug monitoring, 3.5% for cardiac markers and 12% for hormone tests. The most frequent rejection reasons were fibrin clots (28%) and inadequate volume (9%) for biochemical tests. Clotted samples (35%) and inadequate volume (13%) were the major causes for coagulation tests, blood gas analyses and CBC. The ratio of rejected specimens was higher in the EDs (40%) compared to ICUs (30%) and inpatient services (28%). The highest rejection ratio was observed in neurology ICU (14%) among the ICUs and internal medicine inpatient service (10%) within inpatient clinics. We detected an overall specimen rejection rate of 6% in emergency laboratory. By documentation of rejected samples and periodic training of healthcare personnel, we expect to decrease sample rejection ratios below 2%, improve total quality management of the emergency laboratory and promote patient safety.

  12. Computer Simulation Study of Collective Phenomena in Dense Suspensions of Red Blood Cells under Shear

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Timm

    2012-01-01

    The rheology of dense red blood cell suspensions is investigated via computer simulations based on the lattice Boltzmann, the immersed boundary, and the finite element methods. The red blood cells are treated as extended and deformable particles immersed in the ambient fluid. In the first part of the work, the numerical model and strategies for stress evaluation are discussed. In the second part, the behavior of the suspensions in simple shear flow is studied for different volume fractions, particle deformabilities, and shear rates. Shear thinning behavior is recovered. The existence of a shear-induced transition from a tumbling to a tank-treading motion is demonstrated. The transition can be parameterized by a single quantity, namely the effective capillary number. It is the ratio of the suspension stress and the characteristic particle membrane stress. At the transition point, a strong increase in the orientational order of the red blood cells and a significant decrease of the particle diffusivity are obser...

  13. Increased preoperative collection of autologous blood with recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in tertiary care hospitals of Jammu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To study whether the administration of recombinant human erythropoietin increases the amount of autologous blood that can be collected before orthopaedic surgery. Materials and Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of recombinant human erythropoietin in 68 adults scheduled for elective orthopedic procedures. The patients received either erythropoietin 600 units/kg of body weight or placebo intravenously every 5 th day prior to each phlebotomy for 21 days during which time up to 5 units of blood was collected. Patients were excluded from donation when their hematocrit values were less than 33%. All patients received iron sulphate 325mg orally 3 times daily. The mean number of units collected per patient was 4.33 ± 0.4 for erythropoietin group and 3.05± 0.71 for the placebo group. Results: The mean packed red cell volume donated by patients who received erythropoietin was 32% greater than that donated by patients who received placebo (196.3 vs. 169.4 ml, p<0.05. 68% in the placebo group and 9% of patients treated with erythropoietin were unable to donate ≥4 units. No adverse effects were attributed to erythropoietin. While participating in the study, complications developed in 2 patients one in each group necessitating their removal from the study. Conclusion: We conclude that recombinant human erythropoietin increases the ability of the patients about to undergo elective surgery to donate autologous blood units.

  14. 46 CFR 4.06-40 - Specimen handling and shipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... qualified to conduct tests on such specimens. A proper chain of custody must be maintained for each specimen... collection procedures of § 16.113 of this chapter and the chain of custody requirements of 49 CFR part 40...

  15. 77 FR 35408 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Opinions and Perspectives About the Current Blood Donation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... result, content pertaining to the sexual histories of survey respondents was expanded to inform the... the United Kingdom have reported what are likely the only population-based assessment of non-compliance with a similar restriction on blood donation for the MSM population as in the U.S.; this study was...

  16. 77 FR 10756 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Opinions and Perspectives About the Current Blood Donation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... likely the only population-based assessment of non-compliance with a similar restriction on blood.... The surveys will be conducted using an instrument that includes common content to maximize the comparability of the responses. Both surveys will be conducted using Internet-based techniques and currently...

  17. Blood donor show behaviour after an invitation to donate: The influence of collection site factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, E.-M.; Zijlstra, B. J. H.; de Kort, W. L. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and ObjectivesShow behaviour after invitation to donate varies considerably across donors. More insight into this variation is important for blood banks in achieving stable stocks. This study examined individual factors determining intended show behaviour. Most importantly, however, this

  18. Evaluation of methods for collecting blood-engorged mosquitoes from habitats within a wildlife refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortality of American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos Gmelin) chicks attributed to West Nile virus prompted field studies on the bionomics of mosquitoes on a wildlife refuge in northern Montana. One component of these studies was to identify blood meal sources for Culex tarsalis Coquillett...

  19. Quantitative assessment of postoperative blood collection in brain tumor surgery under valproate medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaras, T; Will, B E; Schoeber, W; Rona, S; Mittelbronn, M; Honegger, J B

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether valproate (VPA) increases the risk of bleeding complications in patients undergoing brain tumor surgery. A retrospective chart review of 85 patients operated on between January and December 2005 was performed. 19 patients received VPA, 22 patients were given other anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), 44 patients received no AEDs. Data analyzed included intraoperative blood loss, transfusion, important comorbidity factors and concomitant diseases. Preoperative and postoperative laboratory data included hemoglobin, hematocrit, fibrinogen, platelet count, INR, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time and RBC count. The tumor volume was evaluated by preoperative MRI and CT scans of the brain. All 85 patients underwent a native CT scan of the brain on the first day after the operation. The volume of the resection cavity and the volume of blood were documented. We could show that the volume of the tumor had a significant effect on the amount of blood in the tumor cavity, whereas VPA medication had no effect. In our dataset, we found that tumor size had a significant effect on postoperative blood volume. In contrast, no serious bleeding complications occurred in the patients receiving VPA. Therefore, the present study does not provide any evidence for the need to discontinue VPA medication prior to and during surgery.

  20. STEM tomography for thick biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Kazuhiro [FEI Company Japan Ltd., Application Laboratory, NSS-II Building, 2-13-34 Kohnan, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0075 (Japan)], E-mail: kazuhiro.aoyama@fei.com; Takagi, Tomoko [FEI Company Japan Ltd., Application Laboratory, NSS-II Building, 2-13-34 Kohnan, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0075 (Japan); Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, Japan Women' s University, 2-8-1 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan); Hirase, Ai; Miyazawa, Atsuo [Bio-multisome Research Team, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); CREST, JST (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography was applied to biological specimens such as yeast cells, HEK293 cells and primary culture neurons. These cells, which were embedded in a resin, were cut into 1-{mu}m-thick sections. STEM tomography offers several important advantages including: (1) it is effective even for thick specimens, (2) 'dynamic focusing', (3) ease of using an annular dark field (ADF) mode and (4) linear contrasts. It has become evident that STEM tomography offers significant advantages for the observation of thick specimens. By employing STEM tomography, even a 1-{mu}m-thick specimen (which is difficult to observe by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) was successfully analyzed in three dimensions. The specimen was tilted up to 73 deg. during data acquisition. At a large tilt angle, the specimen thicknesses increase dramatically. In order to observe such thick specimens, we introduced a special small condenser aperture that reduces the collection angle of the STEM probe. The specimen damage caused by the convergent electron beam was expected to be the most serious problem; however, the damage in STEM was actually smaller than that in TEM. In this study, the irradiation damage caused by TEM- and STEM-tomography in biological specimens was quantitatively compared.

  1. Cortisol and prolactin concentrations during repeated blood sample collection from freely moving, mouse-sized mammals (Phodopus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reburn, C J; Wynne-Edwards, K E

    2000-04-01

    Validation of a method for obtaining blood samples that does not change cortisol or prolactin concentrations yet allows serial blood samples to be collected from animals under anesthesia, without prior handling, from freely interacting social groups of small mammals. Results from five experiments are reported. Male dwarf hamsters (Phodopus spp.) were housed in modified home cages under continuous flow of compressed air that could be switched to isoflurane in O2 vehicle without approaching the cages. Dwarf hamsters respond to manual restraint with behavioral distress and increase in the concentration of the dominant glucocorticoid, cortisol, and decrease in prolactin concentration. Both effects are evident within one minute. In contrast, when this new method was used, neither cortisol nor prolactin changed in response to repeated sample collection (up to 8 successive samples at 2 hour intervals), prolonged isoflurane exposure, or substantial blood volume reduction (30%). Prolactin concentration was suppressed and cortisol concentration was increased in response to stimuli from other hamsters tested without anesthesia. Suppression of prolactin concentration was graded in response to the degree of stress and equaled the pharmacologic reduction caused by bromocryptine mesylate (50 microg of CB154 x 3 days). The technique is superior to alternatives for studies of behavioral endocrinology of freely interacting small mammals.

  2. Metagenomic profiling of the viromes of plasma collected from blood donors with elevated serum alanine aminotransferase levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Rika A; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Yasiui, Kazuta; Matsukura, Harumichi; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-08-01

    In Japanese Red Cross (JRC) blood centers, blood collected from donors with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels of more than 60 U/L are disqualified even if serologically negative for transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs). To assess potential risks of TTIs in plasma with elevated serum ALT levels in the current donor screening program of the JRC, we conducted a metagenomic analysis (MGA) of virome profiles in the plasma of blood donors with or without elevated serum ALT levels. Based on serum ALT levels, donors were classified into three groups: "high," more than 79 U/L; "middle," 61 to 79 U/L; and "low," less than 61 U/L. We individually analyzed 100 plasma samples from each group by MGA, employing shotgun sequencing. Viral sequences detected using MGA were partly confirmed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Donors with high and middle ALT levels were significantly younger than those with low ALT levels, and more than 90% were males. Herpesviridae, Anelloviridae, Picornaviridae, and Flaviviridae sequences were identified in plasma samples, and their distribution and frequency were not significantly different among the three groups. The serum ALT test may be unsuitable for monitoring for additional risks of TTIs in blood donors who were negative for typical TTIs using serologic and nucleic acid tests. Although MGA is less sensitive than PCR, it remains the best technology to detect known viruses in these donors. © 2015 AABB.

  3. The effect of blood collection procedure on plasma renin activity (PRA) and concentrations of direct renin (DRC) and aldosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinicki, Piotr; Jeske, Wojciech; Gietka-Czernel, Małgorzata; Bednarek-Papierska, Lucyna; Kruszyńska, Aleksandra; Słowińska-Srzednicka, Jadwiga; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-06-01

    Performing measurements of plasma renin activity (PRA) or direct renin concentration (DRC) and aldosterone concentration, we should be well informed about requirements concerning blood sample processing. Forty-seven patients had blood collected in the supine and upright positions. Blood was withdrawn into two EDTA2K tubes and one with clot activator. One EDTA2K tube was cooled at +4 °C and centrifuged at +4 °C whereas the other was prepared at room temperature. PRA and DRC were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and radioimmunometry (IRMA), respectively, in both cooled and not cooled plasma samples, and aldosterone was measured by RIA in not cooled plasma and in serum. In all the groups, with low, medium, and high values of PRA and direct renin, the temperature of sample processing within 30 minutes had no marked influence on the final result (correlation coefficient for renin was 0.9994, and for PRA, 0.8297). The measured concentrations of aldosterone also showed high correlation (r = 0.9790) but were markedly higher in plasma. The measurements of DRC, and to a lesser extent PRA, were similar regardless of temperature condition during the 20-30 minutes necessary for blood sample processing. Aldosterone concentrations in plasma vs serum samples appeared to be markedly higher. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Field evaluation of a broadly sensitive HIV-1 in-house genotyping assay for use with both plasma and dried blood spot specimens in a resource-limited country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzaule, Seth; Yang, Chunfu; Kasembeli, Alex; Nafisa, Lillian; Okonji, Jully; Oyaro, Boaz; Lando, Richard; Mills, Lisa A; Laserson, Kayla; Thomas, Timothy; Nkengasong, John; Zeh, Clement

    2013-02-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance (HIVDR) assays are important tools in clinical management of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and surveillance of drug-resistant variants at population levels. The high cost associated with commercial assays hinders their use in resource-limited settings. We adopted and validated a low-cost in-house assay using 68 matched plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) samples with a median viral load (VL) of 58,187 copies/ml, ranging from 253 to 3,264,850 against the commercial assay ViroSeq. Results indicated that the in-house assay not only had a higher plasma genotyping rate than did ViroSeq (94% versus 78%) but also was able to genotype 89.5% (51/57) of the matched DBS samples with VLs of ≥ 1,000 copies/ml. The sensitivity in detecting DR mutations by the in-house assay was 98.29% (95% confidence interval [CI], 97.86 to 98.72) on plasma and 96.54 (95% CI, 95.93 to 97.15) on DBS, and the specificity was 99.97% (95% CI, 99.91 to 100.00) for both sample types compared to ViroSeq. The minor DR mutation differences detected by the in-house assay against ViroSeq did not result in clinical significance. In addition, cost analysis showed that the in-house assay could reduce the genotyping cost by about 60% for both plasma and DBS compared to ViroSeq. This field condition evaluation highlights the potential utility of a cost-effective, subtype-independent, in-house genotyping assay using both plasma and DBS specimens for HIVDR clinical monitoring and population-based surveillance in resource-limited settings.

  5. Survey of Blood Collection Centers and Implementation of Guidance for Prevention of Transfusion-Transmitted Zika Virus Infection--Puerto Rico, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Amber M; Sapiano, Mathew R P; Basavaraju, Sridhar V; Kuehnert, Matthew J; Rivera-Garcia, Brenda

    2016-04-15

    Since November 2015, Puerto Rico has reported active mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus. Because of the potential for Zika virus to be transmitted through transfusion of blood components, and because a high percentage of persons infected with Zika virus are asymptomatic, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommended that blood collections cease in areas of the United States affected by active vector-borne transmission of Zika virus until laboratory screening of blood donations or pathogen reduction technology (PRT) for treatment of blood components can be implemented. To inform efforts to maintain the safety and availability of the blood supply in Puerto Rico, CDC, in collaboration with the Puerto Rico Department of Health, conducted a rapid assessment of blood collection and use on the island. A total of 139,369 allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) units, 45,243 platelet units, and 56,466 plasma units were collected in or imported to Puerto Rico during 2015, and 135,966 allogeneic RBC units, 13,526 therapeutic platelet units, and 25,775 plasma units were transfused. Because of the potential for local Zika virus transmission in areas with a competent mosquito vector, other areas of the United States should develop plans to ensure local blood safety and adequacy. Blood collection organizations and public health agencies should collaborate to maintain the safety and availability of local blood supplies in accordance with FDA guidance.

  6. Preserve specimens for reproducibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krell, F.-T.; Klimeš, Petr; Rocha, L. A.; Fikáček, M.; Miller, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 539, č. 7628 (2016), s. 168 ISSN 0028-0836 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : reproducibility * specimen * biodiversity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 40.137, year: 2016 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v539/n7628/full/539168b.html

  7. Effect of age and blood collection site on the metabolic profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different collection site did not affect the examined parameters, but some statistically significant differences were observed between the age groups. However, all the parameters agreed with the data reported in the literature and contribute to our knowledge of the metabolic profile of ostriches. South African Journal of Animal ...

  8. A Model-Based Product Evaluation Protocol for Comparison of Safety-Engineered Protection Mechanisms of Winged Blood Collection Needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, C; Spaeth, J; Ahne, T; Goebel, U; Steinmann, D

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate differences in product characteristics and user preferences of safety-engineered protection mechanisms of winged blood collection needles. Randomized model-based simulation study. University medical center. A total of 33 third-year medical students. Venipuncture was performed using winged blood collection needles with 4 different safety mechanisms: (a) Venofix Safety, (b) BD Vacutainer Push Button, (c) Safety-Multifly, and (d) Surshield Surflo. Each needle type was used in 3 consecutive tries: there was an uninstructed first handling, then instructions were given according to the operating manual; subsequently, a first trial and second trial were conducted. Study end points included successful activation, activation time, single-handed activation, correct activation, possible risk of needlestick injury, possibility of deactivation, and preferred safety mechanism. The overall successful activation rate during the second trial was equal for all 4 devices (94%-100%). Median activation time was (a) 7 s, (b) 2 s, (c) 9 s, and (d) 7 s. Single-handed activation during the second trial was (a) 18%, (b) 82%, (c) 15%, and (d) 45%. Correct activation during the second trial was (a) 3%, (b) 64%, (c) 15%, and (d) 39%. Possible risk of needlestick injury during the second trial was highest with (d). Possibility of deactivation was (a) 0%, (b) 12%, (c) 9%, and (d) 18%. Individual preferences for each system were (a) 11, (b) 17, (c) 5, and (d) 0. The main reason for preference was the comprehensive safety mechanism. Significant differences exist between safety mechanisms of winged blood collection needles.

  9. Specimen environments in thermal neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebula, D.J.

    1980-11-01

    This report is an attempt to collect into one place outline information concerning the techniques used and basic design of sample environment apparatus employed in neutron scattering experiments. Preliminary recommendations for the specimen environment programme of the SNS are presented. The general conclusion reached is that effort should be devoted towards improving reliability and efficiency of operation of specimen environment apparatus and developing systems which are robust and easy to use, rather than achieving performance at the limits of technology. (author)

  10. Blood meal analysis and virus detection in blood-fed mosquitoes collected during the 2006-2007 Rift Valley fever outbreak in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutomiah, Joel; Omondi, David; Masiga, Daniel; Mutai, Collins; Mireji, Paul O; Ongus, Juliette; Linthicum, Ken J; Sang, Rosemary

    2014-09-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonosis of domestic ruminants in Africa. Blood-fed mosquitoes collected during the 2006-2007 RVF outbreak in Kenya were analyzed to determine the virus infection status and animal source of the blood meals. Blood meals from individual mosquito abdomens were screened for viruses using Vero cells and RT-PCR. DNA was also extracted and the cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes amplified by PCR. Purified amplicons were sequenced and queried in GenBank and Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) to identify the putative blood meal sources. The predominant species in Garissa were Aedes ochraceus, (n=561, 76%) and Ae. mcintoshi, (n=176, 24%), and Mansonia uniformis, (n=24, 72.7%) in Baringo. Ae. ochraceus fed on goats (37.6%), cattle (16.4%), donkeys (10.7%), sheep (5.9%), and humans (5.3%). Ae. mcintoshi fed on the same animals in almost equal proportions. RVFV was isolated from Ae. ochraceus that had fed on sheep (4), goats (3), human (1), cattle (1), and unidentified host (1), with infection and dissemination rates of 1.8% (10/561) and 50% (5/10), respectively, and 0.56% (1/176) and 100% (1/1) in Ae. mcintoshi. In Baringo, Ma. uniformis fed on sheep (38%), frogs (13%), duikers (8%), cattle (4%), goats (4%), and unidentified hosts (29%), with infection and dissemination rates of 25% (6/24) and 83.3% (5/6), respectively. Ndumu virus (NDUV) was also isolated from Ae. ochraceus with infection and dissemination rates of 2.3% (13/561) and 76.9% (10/13), and Ae. mcintoshi, 2.8% (5/176) and 80% (4/5), respectively. Ten of the infected Ae. ochraceus had fed on goats, sheep (1), and unidentified hosts (2), and Ae. mcintoshi on goats (3), camel (1), and donkey (1). This study has demonstrated that RVFV and NDUV were concurrently circulating during the outbreak, and sheep and goats were the main amplifiers of these viruses respectively.

  11. Multidisciplinary team review of best practices for collection and handling of blood cultures to determine effective interventions for increasing the yield of true-positive bacteremias, reducing contamination, and eliminating false-positive central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Robert A; Spitzer, Eric D; Beaudry, Josephine; Beck, Cindy; Diblasi, Regina; Gilleeny-Blabac, Michelle; Haugaard, Carol; Heuschneider, Stacy; Kranz, Barbara P; McLean, Karen; Morales, Katherine L; Owens, Susan; Paciella, Mary E; Torregrosa, Edwin

    2015-11-01

    A literature search was conducted using keywords for articles published in English from January 1990 to March 2015. Using criteria related to blood culture collection and handling, the search yielded 101 articles. References used also included Microbiology Laboratory standards, guidelines, and textbook information. The literature identified diverse and complex issues surrounding blood culture practices, including the impact of false-positive results, laboratory definition of contamination, effect on central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) reporting, indications for collecting blood cultures, drawing from venipuncture sites versus intravascular catheters, selection of antiseptics, use of needleless connectors, inoculation of blood culture bottles, and optimizing program management in emergency departments, education, and implementation of bundled practice initiatives. Hospitals should optimize best practice in the collection, handling, and management of blood culture specimens, an often overlooked but essential component in providing optimal care of patients in all settings and populations, reducing financial burdens, and increasing the accuracy of reportable CLABSI. Although universal concepts exist in blood culture practices, some issues require further research to determine benefit. Institutions undertaking a review of their blood culture programs are encouraged to use a checklist that addresses elements that encompass the research contained in this review. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Peripheral blood stem cell collection for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Practical implications after 200 consequent transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren Sahin, Deniz; Arat, Mutlu

    2017-12-01

    Proper stem cell mobilization is one of the most important steps in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this paper is to share our 6 years' experience and provide practical clinical approaches particularly for stem cell mobilization and collection within the series of more than 200 successive allogeneic HSCT at our transplant center. Two hundred and seven consecutive patients who underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation were included in this study. Age, sex, weight, complete blood counts, CD34 + cell counts, total collected amount of CD34 + cells, CD34 + cells per 10l processed, mobilization failure and adverse events were reviewed. Median age was 40.2±12.9 (21-68) years and 46.4±13.4 (17-67) years for donors and patients, respectively. The number of donors who had undergone adequate CD34 + cell harvesting and completed the procedure on the fourth day was 67 (32.8% of all patients). Only 12 patients required cell apheresis both on day 5 and 6. Apheresis was completed on day 4 and/or day 5 in 94.2% of all our donors. There was no significant association between CD34 + stem cell volume and age, gender and weight values of donors. Mobilization failure was not seen in our series. G-CSF is highly effective in 1/3 of the donors on the 4th day in order to collect enough number of stem cells. We propose that peripheral stem cell collection might start on day 4th of G-CSF treatment for avoiding G-CSF related side effects and complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  14. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments

  15. The UK Biobank sample handling and storage protocol for the collection, processing and archiving of human blood and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Paul; Peakman, Tim C

    2008-04-01

    UK Biobank is a large prospective study in the UK to investigate the role of genetic factors, environmental exposures and lifestyle in the causes of major diseases of late and middle age. Extensive data and biological samples are being collected from 500,000 participants aged between 40 and 69 years. The biological samples that are collected and how they are processed and stored will have a major impact on the future scientific usefulness of the UK Biobank resource. The aim of the UK Biobank sample handling and storage protocol is to specify methods for the collection and storage of participant samples that give maximum scientific return within the available budget. Processing or storage methods that, as far as can be predicted, will preclude current or future assays have been avoided. The protocol was developed through a review of the literature on sample handling and processing, wide consultation within the academic community and peer review. Protocol development addressed which samples should be collected, how and when they should be processed and how the processed samples should be stored to ensure their long-term integrity. The recommended protocol was extensively tested in a series of validation studies. UK Biobank collects about 45 ml blood and 9 ml of urine with minimal local processing from each participant using the vacutainer system. A variety of preservatives, anti-coagulants and clot accelerators is used appropriate to the expected end use of the samples. Collection of other material (hair, nails, saliva and faeces) was also considered but rejected for the full cohort. Blood and urine samples from participants are transported overnight by commercial courier to a central laboratory where they are processed and aliquots of urine, plasma, serum, white cells and red cells stored in ultra-low temperature archives. Aliquots of whole blood are also stored for potential future production of immortalized cell lines. A standard panel of haematology assays is

  16. Comparative Study of Blood Collection Tubes and Thromboplastin Reagents for Correction of INR Discrepancies A Proposal for Maximum Allowable Magnesium Contamination in Sodium Citrate Anticoagulant Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Besselaar, Anton M. H. P.; van Zanten, Anton P.; Brantjes, Helen M.; Elisen, Marc G. L. M.; van der Meer, Felix J. M.; Poland, Dennis C. W.; Sturk, Augueste; Leyte, Anja; Castel, Ad

    2012-01-01

    International normalized ratio (INR) discrepancies were noted between clinical laboratories using various prothrombin time (PT) systems. We studied the influence of different commercial blood collection tubes and different PT systems on INR measurements. INRs of fresh patient samples were determined

  17. Hematopoietic Lineage Transcriptome Stability and Representation in PAXgeneTM Collected Peripheral Blood Utilising SPIA Single-Stranded cDNA Probes for Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Kennedy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood as a surrogate tissue for transcriptome profiling holds great promise for the discovery of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers, particularly when target tissues of disease are not readily available. To maximize the reliability of gene expression data generated from clinical blood samples, both the sample collection and the microarray probe generation methods should be optimized to provide stabilized, reproducible and representative gene expression profiles faithfully representing the transcriptional profiles of the constituent blood cell types present in the circulation. Given the increasing innovation in this field in recent years, we investigated a combination of methodological advances in both RNA stabilisation and microarray probe generation with the goal of achieving robust, reliable and representative transcriptional profiles from whole blood. To assess the whole blood profiles, the transcriptomes of purified blood cell types were measured and compared with the global transcriptomes measured in whole blood. The results demonstrate that a combination of PAXgeneTM RNA stabilising technology and single-stranded cDNA probe generation afforded by the NuGEN Ovation RNA amplification system V2TM enables an approach that yields faithful representation of specific hematopoietic cell lineage transcriptomes in whole blood without the necessity for prior sample fractionation, cell enrichment or globin reduction. Storage stability assessments of the PAXgeneTM blood samples also advocate a short, fixed room temperature storage time for all PAXgeneTM blood samples collected for the purposes of global transcriptional profiling in clinical studies.

  18. Hematopoietic Lineage Transcriptome Stability and Representation in PAXgene Collected Peripheral Blood Utilising SPIA Single-Stranded cDNA Probes for Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Laura; Vass, J Keith; Haggart, D Ross; Moore, Steve; Burczynski, Michael E; Crowther, Dan; Miele, Gino

    2008-08-25

    Peripheral blood as a surrogate tissue for transcriptome profiling holds great promise for the discovery of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers, particularly when target tissues of disease are not readily available. To maximize the reliability of gene expression data generated from clinical blood samples, both the sample collection and the microarray probe generation methods should be optimized to provide stabilized, reproducible and representative gene expression profiles faithfully representing the transcriptional profiles of the constituent blood cell types present in the circulation. Given the increasing innovation in this field in recent years, we investigated a combination of methodological advances in both RNA stabilisation and microarray probe generation with the goal of achieving robust, reliable and representative transcriptional profiles from whole blood. To assess the whole blood profiles, the transcriptomes of purified blood cell types were measured and compared with the global transcriptomes measured in whole blood. The results demonstrate that a combination of PAXgene() RNA stabilising technology and single-stranded cDNA probe generation afforded by the NuGEN Ovation RNA amplification system V2() enables an approach that yields faithful representation of specific hematopoietic cell lineage transcriptomes in whole blood without the necessity for prior sample fractionation, cell enrichment or globin reduction. Storage stability assessments of the PAXgene() blood samples also advocate a short, fixed room temperature storage time for all PAXgene() blood samples collected for the purposes of global transcriptional profiling in clinical studies.

  19. Hematopoietic Lineage Transcriptome Stability and Representation in PAXgene™ Collected Peripheral Blood Utilising SPIA Single-Stranded cDNA Probes for Microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Laura; Vass, J. Keith; Haggart, D. Ross; Moore, Steve; Burczynski, Michael E.; Crowther, Dan; Miele, Gino

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral blood as a surrogate tissue for transcriptome profiling holds great promise for the discovery of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers, particularly when target tissues of disease are not readily available. To maximize the reliability of gene expression data generated from clinical blood samples, both the sample collection and the microarray probe generation methods should be optimized to provide stabilized, reproducible and representative gene expression profiles faithfully representing the transcriptional profiles of the constituent blood cell types present in the circulation. Given the increasing innovation in this field in recent years, we investigated a combination of methodological advances in both RNA stabilisation and microarray probe generation with the goal of achieving robust, reliable and representative transcriptional profiles from whole blood. To assess the whole blood profiles, the transcriptomes of purified blood cell types were measured and compared with the global transcriptomes measured in whole blood. The results demonstrate that a combination of PAXgene™ RNA stabilising technology and single-stranded cDNA probe generation afforded by the NuGEN Ovation RNA amplification system V2™ enables an approach that yields faithful representation of specific hematopoietic cell lineage transcriptomes in whole blood without the necessity for prior sample fractionation, cell enrichment or globin reduction. Storage stability assessments of the PAXgene™ blood samples also advocate a short, fixed room temperature storage time for all PAXgene™ blood samples collected for the purposes of global transcriptional profiling in clinical studies. PMID:19578521

  20. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell harvest: Collection efficiency and factors affecting it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseem K Tiwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Harvest of hematopoietic progenitor cells via leukapheresis is being used increasingly for transplants in India. Adequate yield of cells per kilogram body weight of recipient is required for successful engraftment. Collection efficiency (CE is an objective quality parameter used to assess the quality of leukapheresis program. In this study, we calculated the CE of the ComTec cell separator (Fresenius Kabi, Germany using two different formulae (CE1 and CE2 and analyzed various patient and procedural factors, which may affect it. Materials and Methods: One hundred and one consecutive procedures in 77 autologous donors carried out over 3 years period were retrospectively reviewed. Various characteristics like gender, age, weight, disease status, hematocrit, preprocedure total leukocyte count, preprocedure CD34 positive (CD34+ cells count, preprocedure absolute CD34+ cell count and processed apheresis volume effect on CE were compared. CE for each procedure was calculated using two different formulae, and results were compared using statistical correlation and regression analysis. Results: The mean CE1 and CE2 was 41.2 and 49.1, respectively. CE2 appeared to be more accurate indicator of overall CE as it considered the impact of continued mobilization of stem cells during apheresis procedure, itself. Of all the factors affecting CE, preprocedure absolute CD34+ was the only independent factor affecting CE. Conclusion: The only factor affecting CE was preprocedure absolute CD34+ cells. Though the mean CE2 was higher than CE1, it was not statistically significant.

  1. Rotating specimen rack repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.E.; Rogers, P.J.; Nabor, W.G.; Bair, H.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980, an operator at the UCI TRIGA Reactor noticed difficulties with the rotation of the specimen rack. Investigations showed that the drive bearing in the rack had failed and allowed the bearings to enter the rack. After some time of operation in static mode it was decided that installation of a bearing substitute - a graphite sleeve - would be undertaken. Procedures were written and approved for removal of the rack, fabrication and installation of the sleeve, and re-installation of the rack. This paper describes these procedures in some detail. Detailed drawings of the necessary parts may be obtained from the authors

  2. Improving the Diet for the Rearing of Glossina brevipalpis Newstead and Glossina austeni Newstead: Blood Source and Collection – Processing – Feeding Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beer, Chantel J.; Venter, Gert J.; Vreysen, Marc J. B.

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges to maintain tsetse fly (Diptera: Glossinidae) colonies is the sustainable supply of high quality blood meals. The effect of using anticoagulants during collection of the blood, the addition of phagostimulants to the blood meals as well as using mixtures of bovine and porcine blood in different proportions for feeding on colony productivity was assessed. Defibrinated bovine blood was found to be suitable to maintain both the Glossina brevipalpis Newstead and Glossina austeni Newstead colonies. Blood collected with the anticoagulants sodium citrate, citric sodium combination, citrate phosphate dextrose adenine and citric acid did not affect colony performance of both species. Defibrinated bovine and porcine blood in a 1:1 ratio or the feeding of either bovine or porcine blood on alternating days improved pupae production of G. austeni and can be used to enhance colony growth. Bovine blood is appropriate to maintain G. brevipalpis colonies, however, feeding either bovine or porcine blood on alternating days did improve productivity. Adding the phagostimulants inosine tri-phosphate, cytosine mono-phosphate and guanosine mono-phosphate to the blood at a concentration of 10−4 M improved pupae production of the G. brevipalpis colony. The addition of adenosine tri-phosphate and inosine tri-phosphate improved the performance of the G. austeni colony. Decisions on the most suitable rearing diet and feeding protocols will not only depend on the biological requirements of the species but also on the continuous supply of a suitable blood source that can be collected and processed in a cost-effective way. PMID:28006007

  3. Isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells from blood samples collected from the jugular and cephalic veins of healthy adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Ashley N; Seeto, Wen J; Winter, Randolph L; Zhong, Qiao; Lipke, Elizabeth A; Wooldridge, Anne A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate optimal isolation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from peripheral blood of horses. SAMPLE Jugular and cephalic venous blood samples from 17 adult horses. PROCEDURES Each blood sample was divided; isolation was performed with whole blood adherence (WBA) and density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Isolated cells were characterized by uptake of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL), vascular tubule formation, and expression of endothelial (CD34, CD105, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, and von Willebrand factor) and hematopoietic (CD14) cell markers by use of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and flow cytometry. RESULTS Colonies with cobblestone morphology were isolated from 15 of 17 horses. Blood collected from the cephalic vein yielded colonies significantly more often (14/17 horses) than did blood collected from the jugular vein (8/17 horses). Of 14 cephalic blood samples with colonies, 13 were obtained with DGC and 8 with WBA. Of 8 jugular blood samples with colonies, 8 were obtained with DGC and 4 with WBA. Colony frequency (colonies per milliliter of blood) was significantly higher for cephalic blood samples and samples isolated with DGC. Cells formed vascular tubules, had uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, and expressed endothelial markers by use of IFA and flow cytometry, which confirmed their identity as ECFCs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maximum yield of ECFCs was obtained for blood samples collected from both the jugular and cephalic veins and use of DGC to isolate cells. Consistent yield of ECFCs from peripheral blood of horses will enable studies to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic uses.

  4. Detection of Ebola virus in oral fluid specimens during outbreaks of Ebola virus hemorrhagic fever in the Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenty, Pierre; Leroy, Eric Maurice; Epelboin, Alain; Libama, Francois; Lenzi, Marco; Sudeck, Hinrich; Yaba, Philippe; Allarangar, Yokouidé; Boumandouki, Paul; Nkounkou, Virginot Blad; Drosten, Christian; Grolla, Allen; Feldmann, Heinz; Roth, Cathy

    2006-06-01

    Patients who have refused to provide blood samples has meant that there have been significant delays in confirming outbreaks of Ebola virus hemorrhagic fever (EVHF). During the 2 EVHF outbreaks in the Republic of Congo in 2003, we assessed the use of oral fluid specimens versus serum samples for laboratory confirmation of cases of EVHF. Serum and oral fluid specimens were obtained from 24 patients with suspected Ebola and 10 healthy control subjects. Specimens were analyzed for immunoglobulin G antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and for Ebola virus by antigen detection ELISA and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Oral fluid specimens were collected with a commercially available collection device. We failed to detect antibodies against Ebola in the oral fluid specimens obtained from patients whose serum samples were seropositive. All patients with positive serum RT-PCR results also had positive results for their oral fluid specimens. This study demonstrates the usefulness of oral fluid samples for the investigation of Ebola outbreaks, but further development in antibodies and antigen detection in oral fluid specimens is needed before these samples are used for filovirus surveillance activities in Africa.

  5. Determination of reference intervals and comparison of venous blood gas parameters using a standard and nonstandard collection method in 51 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, K; Kutter, A; Jud Schefer, R S; Sigrist, N

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine reference intervals (RI) for venous blood parameters determined with the RAPIDPoint 500 (RP500) blood gas analyzer using blood gas syringes (BGS) and to determine whether immediate analysis of venous blood collected into lithium heparin (LH) tubes can replace anaerobic blood sampling into BGS. The null hypothesis was that canine venous blood samples collected in BGS and in LH tubes are comparable. Jugular blood was collected from 51 healthy dogs into a BGS and a LH tube. The BGS was immediately analyzed followed by the LH tube. The RI were calculated from BGS results. The BGS and LH tubes results were compared using paired t-test or Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test and Bland-Altman analysis. To assess clinical relevance, the bias between BGS and LH tubes was compared with the allowable total error (TEa). Values derived from LH tubes showed no significant difference for standard bicarbonate (HCO3std), whole blood base excess (BE B), Na, K, Cl, glucose and hemoglobin (tHb). The pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen, actual bicarbonate, extracellular base excess, ionized Ca, anion gap and lactate were significantly (p.

  6. Development of an animal-borne blood sample collection device and its deployment for the determination of cardiovascular and stress hormones in phocid seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Yoshio; Suzuki, Ippei; Wong, Marty K S; Milne, Ryan; Moss, Simon; Sato, Katsufumi; Hall, Ailsa

    2016-10-01

    An animal-borne blood sampler with data-logging functions was developed for phocid seals, which collected two blood samples for the comparison of endocrinological/biochemical parameters under two different conditions. The sampler can be triggered by preset hydrostatic pressure, acceleration (descending or ascending), temperature, and time, and also manually by light. The sampling was reliable with 39/50 (78%) successful attempts to collect blood samples. Contamination of fluids in the tubing to the next blood sample was seals ( Phoca vitulina ), the automated blood-sampling method was less stressful than direct blood withdrawal, as evidenced by lower levels of stress hormones ( P seal blood. Using the sampler, plasma levels of cardiovascular hormones, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), AVP, and ANG II were compared in grey seals ( Halichoerus grypus ), between samples collected when the animals were on land and in the water. HPLC analyses determined that [Met 12 ] ANP (1-28) and various forms of angiotensins (ANG II, III, and IV) were circulating in seal blood. Although water immersion profoundly changes the plasma levels of cardiovascular hormones in terrestrial mammals, there were only tendencies toward an increase in ANP ( P = 0.069) and a decrease in AVP ( P = 0.074) in the seals. These results suggest that cardiovascular regulation in phocid seals may have undergone adaptation during evolution of the carnivore to a semiaquatic lifestyle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Blood culture collection technique and pneumococcal surveillance in Malawi during the four year period 2003–2006: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijlstra Eduard E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood culture surveillance will be used for assessing the public health effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Africa. Between 2003 and 2006 we assessed blood culture outcome and performance in adult patients in the central public hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, before and after the introduction of a dedicated nurse led blood culture team. Methods A prospective observational study. Results Following the introduction of a specialised blood culture team in 2005, the proportion of contaminated cultures decreased (19.6% in 2003 to 5.0% in 2006, blood volume cultured increased and pneumococcal recovery increased significantly from 2.8% of all blood cultures to 6.1%. With each extra 1 ml of blood cultured the odds of recovering a pneumococcus increased by 18%. Conclusion Standardisation and assessment of blood culture performance (blood volume and contamination rate should be incorporated into pneumococcal disease surveillance activities where routine blood culture practice is constrained by limited resources.

  8. Determination of reference intervals and comparison of venous blood gas parameters using standard and non-standard collection methods in 24 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Karin; Kutter, Annette Pn; Schefer, Rahel Jud; Marly-Voquer, Charlotte; Sigrist, Nadja

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine in-house reference intervals (RIs) for venous blood analysis with the RAPIDPoint 500 blood gas analyser using blood gas syringes (BGSs) and to determine whether immediate analysis of venous blood collected into lithium heparin (LH) tubes can replace anaerobic blood sampling into BGSs. Methods Venous blood was collected from 24 healthy cats and directly transferred into a BGS and an LH tube. The BGS was immediately analysed on the RAPIDPoint 500 followed by the LH tube. The BGSs and LH tubes were compared using paired t-test or Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test, Bland-Altman and Passing-Bablok analysis. To assess clinical relevance, bias or percentage bias between BGSs and LH tubes was compared with the allowable total error (TEa) recommended for the respective parameter. Results Based on the values obtained from the BGSs, RIs were calculated for the evaluated parameters, including blood gases, electrolytes, glucose and lactate. Values derived from LH tubes showed no significant difference for standard bicarbonate, whole blood base excess, haematocrit, total haemoglobin, sodium, potassium, chloride, glucose and lactate, while pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen, actual bicarbonate, extracellular base excess, ionised calcium and anion gap were significantly different to the samples collected in BGSs ( P glucose and lactate can be made based on blood collected in LH tubes and analysed within 5 mins. For pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen, extracellular base excess, anion gap and ionised calcium the clinically relevant alterations have to be considered if analysed in LH tubes.

  9. The 3DBiopsy Prostate Biopsy System: Preclinical Investigation of a Needle, Actuator, and Specimen Collection Device Allowing Sampling of Individualized Prostate Lengths Between 20 and 60 mm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nelson N; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Schechter, David; Lucia, M Scott; Smith, Elizabeth E; Arangua, Paul; Hoenemeyer, John; Rosa, Jim; Bawa, Rajan; Crawford, E David

    2017-09-01

    To increase the likelihood of detecting anterior cancers within the prostate and provide a specimen that spans the length of the gland. Newly designed 17- and 15-gauge (G) biopsy needles, a variable actuator, and an integrated pathology system intended for the longer cores were developed and tested for this purpose. Testing was performed comparing 2 common cannula tip grinds, a Vet-point (sharp tip) and a Menghini-point (atraumatic tip), and were tested against 18-G Bard Monopty in porcine kidney. A variable actuator was developed to fire the needle 20-60 mm and tested in cadaver prostates. The aggregate firings for 3 different shot lengths comparing the Vet- with the Menghini-tip cannulas demonstrated 91% vs 85.2% fill (length of specimen/length of core bed, P = .007). A 15-G trocar needle with the Vet-tip cannula also had the best performance, with an aggregate standard deviation of 6.4% across 3 firing ranges and a minimum to maximum specimen length of 81%-105% of potential fill. Cadaver testing with the Vet-tip needles in the actuator for the transrectal (17-G) and transperineal (15-G) biopsies demonstrated mean fills of 93.3% and 76.5%, respectively. The new transrectal ultrasound needle obtained a 2-fold increase in specimen length over the standard Bard device (P planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 77 FR 42256 - Notice of Request for a Revision to and Extension of Approval of an Information Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... Delivery: Send your comment to Docket No. APHIS-2012-0054, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS... these programs. They are routinely used whenever specimens (such as blood, milk, tissue, or urine) from... to collect and submit specimens for laboratory analysis, and herd owners. Estimated annual number of...

  11. Blood sample tube transporting system versus point of care technology in an emergency department; effect on time from collection to reporting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Mogensen, Christian Backer

    2012-01-01

    Time is a crucial factor in an emergency department and the effectiveness of diagnosing depends on, among other things, the accessibility of rapid reported laboratory test results; i.e.: a short turnaround time (TAT). Former studies have shown a reduced time to action when point of care...... technologies (POCT) are used in emergency departments. This study assesses the hypothesis, that using Point of Care Technology in analysing blood samples versus tube transporting blood samples for laboratory analyses results in shorter time from the blood sample is collected to the result is reported...

  12. Rehydration of forensically important larval Diptera specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Michelle R; Pechal, Jennifer L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2011-01-01

    Established procedures for collecting and preserving evidence are essential for all forensic disciplines to be accepted in court and by the forensic community at large. Entomological evidence, such as Diptera larvae, are primarily preserved in ethanol, which can evaporate over time, resulting in the dehydration of specimens. In this study, methods used for rehydrating specimens were compared. The changes in larval specimens with respect to larval length and weight for three forensically important blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) species in North America were quantified. Phormia regina (Meigen), Cochliomyia macellaria (F.), and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) third-instar larvae were collected from various decomposing animals and preserved with three preservation methods (80% ethanol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, and hot-water kill then 80% ethanol). Preservative solutions were allowed to evaporate. Rehydration was attempted with either of the following: 80% ethanol, commercial trisodium phosphate substitute solution, or 0.5% trisodium phosphate solution. All three methods partially restored weight and length of specimens recorded before preservation. Analysis of variance results indicated that effects of preservation, rehydration treatment, and collection animal were different in each species. The interaction between preservative method and rehydration treatment had a significant effect on both P. regina and C. macellaria larval length and weight. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of collection animal on larval C. macellaria measurements. No significant effect was observed in C. rufifacies larval length or weight among the preservatives or treatments. These methods could be used to establish a standard operating procedure for dealing with dehydrated larval specimens in forensic investigations.

  13. Natural History Specimen Digitization: Challenges and Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Vollmar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A survey on the challenges and concerns invovled with digitizing natural history specimens was circulated to curators, collections managers, and administrators in the natural history community in the Spring of 2009, with over 200 responses received. The overwhelming barrier to digitizing collections was a lack of funding, based on a limited number of sources, leaving institutions mostly responsible for providing the necessary support. The uneven digitization landscape leads to a patchy accumulation of records at varying qualities, and based on different priorities, ulitimately influencing the data's fitness for use. The survey also found that although the kind of specimens found in collections and their storage can be quite varible, there are many similar challenges when digitizing including imaging, automated text scanning and parsing, geo-referencing, etc. Thus, better communication between domains could foster knowledge on digitization leading to efficiencies that could be disseminated through documentation of best practices and training.

  14. The Alaska Area Specimen Bank: a tribal–federal partnership to maintain and manage a resource for health research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Alan J.; Hennessy, Thomas; Bulkow, Lisa; Smith, H. Sally

    2013-01-01

    Banked biospecimens from a defined population are a valuable resource that can be used to assess early markers for illness or to determine the prevalence of a disease to aid the development of intervention strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Alaska Area Specimen Bank (AASB) currently contains 266,353 residual biologic specimens (serum, plasma, whole blood, tissue, bacterial cultures) from 83,841 persons who participated in research studies, public health investigations and clinical testing conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service and Alaska Native tribal health organisations dating back to 1961. The majority (95.7%) are serum specimens, 77% were collected between 1981 and 1994 and 85% were collected from Alaska Native people. Oversight of the specimen bank is provided by a working group with representation from tribal, state and federal health organisations, the Alaska Area IRB and a specimen bank committee which ensures the specimens are used in accordance with policies and procedures developed by the working group. PMID:23599909

  15. The Alaska Area Specimen Bank: a tribal-federal partnership to maintain and manage a resource for health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Alan J; Hennessy, Thomas; Bulkow, Lisa; Smith, H Sally

    2013-01-01

    Banked biospecimens from a defined population are a valuable resource that can be used to assess early markers for illness or to determine the prevalence of a disease to aid the development of intervention strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Alaska Area Specimen Bank (AASB) currently contains 266,353 residual biologic specimens (serum, plasma, whole blood, tissue, bacterial cultures) from 83,841 persons who participated in research studies, public health investigations and clinical testing conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service and Alaska Native tribal health organisations dating back to 1961. The majority (95.7%) are serum specimens, 77% were collected between 1981 and 1994 and 85% were collected from Alaska Native people. Oversight of the specimen bank is provided by a working group with representation from tribal, state and federal health organisations, the Alaska Area IRB and a specimen bank committee which ensures the specimens are used in accordance with policies and procedures developed by the working group.

  16. The Alaska Area Specimen Bank: a tribal–federal partnership to maintain and manage a resource for health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J. Parkinson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Banked biospecimens from a defined population are a valuable resource that can be used to assess early markers for illness or to determine the prevalence of a disease to aid the development of intervention strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Alaska Area Specimen Bank (AASB currently contains 266,353 residual biologic specimens (serum, plasma, whole blood, tissue, bacterial cultures from 83,841 persons who participated in research studies, public health investigations and clinical testing conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service and Alaska Native tribal health organisations dating back to 1961. The majority (95.7% are serum specimens, 77% were collected between 1981 and 1994 and 85% were collected from Alaska Native people. Oversight of the specimen bank is provided by a working group with representation from tribal, state and federal health organisations, the Alaska Area IRB and a specimen bank committee which ensures the specimens are used in accordance with policies and procedures developed by the working group.

  17. Impact of Angiotensin Type 1A Receptors in Principal Cells of the Collecting Duct on Blood Pressure and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daian; Stegbauer, Johannes; Sparks, Matthew A; Kohan, Donald; Griffiths, Robert; Herrera, Marcela; Gurley, Susan B; Coffman, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    The main actions of the renin-angiotensin system to control blood pressure (BP) are mediated by the angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1Rs). The major murine AT1R isoform, AT1AR, is expressed throughout the nephron, including the collecting duct in both principal and intercalated cells. Principal cells play the major role in sodium and water reabsorption. Although aldosterone is considered to be the dominant regulator of sodium reabsorption by principal cells, recent studies suggest a role for direct actions of AT1R. To specifically examine the contributions of AT1AR in principal cells to BP regulation and the development of hypertension in vivo, we generated inbred 129/SvEv mice with deletion of AT1AR from principal cells (PCKO). At baseline, we found that BPs measured by radiotelemetry were similar between PCKOs and controls. During 1-week of low-salt diet (hypertension, there was a modest but significant attenuation of hypertension in PCKOs (163±6 mm Hg) compared with controls (178±2 mm Hg; Phypertension and epithelial sodium channel activation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Fracture toughness of thin specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Kenji; Kikuchi, Masanori; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional elastic-plastic analyses were carried out on 1 and 2 mm-thick CCT specimens with or without side grooves. The valid effective thickness, 0.85 √(B o xB n ), was obtained from the 3-D analyses. The stretched-zone method is better than the R-curve method to determine the J in value of the thin specimen. However, a great many data should be gathered near the J in value. The J in value obtained using side-grooved specimens is always lower than that of non-side-grooved specimens. Considering the difficulty of machining the side groove, the side groove is not appropriate for the thin specimen. As the thickness decreases, the J in value decreases. However, it is possible to estimate the J ic value from the J in value obtained using thin CCT specimens. (author)

  19. Janka hardness using nonstandard specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Marshall Begel; William Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Janka hardness determined on 1.5- by 3.5-in. specimens (2×4s) was found to be equivalent to that determined using the 2- by 2-in. specimen specified in ASTM D 143. Data are presented on the relationship between Janka hardness and the strength of clear wood. Analysis of historical data determined using standard specimens indicated no difference between side hardness...

  20. Toward Standardization of BK Virus Monitoring: Evaluation of the BK Virus R-gene Kit for Quantification of BK Viral Load in Urine, Whole-Blood, and Plasma Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Sueur, Charlotte; Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Soulier, Eric; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Lepiller, Quentin; Freitag, Rachel; Bahram, Seiamak; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Fafi-Kremer, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Screening of BK virus (BKV) replication is recommended to identify patients at increased risk of BKV-associated diseases. However, the heterogeneity of molecular techniques hinders the establishment of universal guidelines for BKV monitoring. Here we aimed to compare the performance of the CE-marked BK virus R-gene kit (R-gene) to the performance of our in-house assay for quantification of BKV DNA loads (BKVL). A 12-specimen panel from the Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) orga...

  1. Application of Dried Blood Spots on Filter Paper for Detection of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover the present technique of collecting blood for diagnosis is associated with increased risk of infection, loss and contamination of specimen. This study aimed at evaluating the use of blood spot dried on filter paper (under different storage conditions) for detection of HIV antibodies in patient\\'s serum as an alternative ...

  2. A Survey On Ionic And Metabolite Factors Of Blood Serum In Kutum (Rutilus frisii kutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afkhami Majid

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ionic parameters and metabolite factors (cholesterol, total protein, and glucose of serum and their interrelationships were detected in 48 specimens of kutum (Rutilus frisii kutum captured during spawning migration. Blood sampling was conducted by cutting the caudal peduncle of each sample, and blood was collected into heparinized and sterile capillary glass tubes.

  3. Comparison of biochemical variables in plasma samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of standard and microsample blood collection tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Jacqueline C; Flatland, Bente

    2010-08-01

    To compare results of biochemical analyses performed on plasma samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of standard and microsample blood collection tubes. Evaluation study. 29 healthy client-owned animals (14 dogs and 15 cats). A blood sample (3 mL) was collected from each animal; 2.5 mL was transferred into a vacuum tube that contained lithium heparin, and 0.5 mL was transferred into a microsample tube that contained lithium heparin. Variables evaluated were albumin, bicarbonate, BUN, calcium, chloride, cholesterol, creatinine, glucose, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, total bilirubin, and total protein concentrations and alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase activities. Results for the 2 types of tubes in each species were compared by use of Pearson correlation coefficients, Passing-Bablok regression analysis, and Bland-Altman analysis. Data were normally distributed, except for creatine kinase activity of cats. The Pearson correlation coefficient was minimal for total bilirubin concentration in cats and moderate, high, or very high for all other variables. Constant bias for cholesterol and glucose concentration in dogs was identified during Bland-Altman analysis, although the mean difference between types of blood collection tubes was small. No constant or proportional bias for any other variable was revealed by regression analysis or Bland-Altman analysis. Samples obtained from healthy dogs and cats by use of microsample blood collection tubes that contained lithium heparin provided clinically equivalent biochemical results, compared with results for samples obtained by use of standard blood collection tubes, and minimized the total sample volume collected for diagnostic testing.

  4. Reduction of burden of hemolyzed specimens in a large urban emergency department: A real-world, five years’ experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Cervellin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In vitro hemolysis may jeopardize patient care because tests results generated using unsuitable specimens may lead to inappropriate patient management. The prevalence of hemolyzed specimens is high in the emergency department (ED. We previously showed that collecting blood by means of a closed system entailing manual aspiration of blood instead of using conventional evacuated systems was effective to cut-down by nearly half the rate of hemolysis. Aim of this real world study was to verify whether longterm replacement of standard evacuated blood collection systems may be really effective to reduce the burden of spurious hemolysis. Starting from May 2014 in the ED of our Hospital vacuum tubes were replaced with S-Monovette serum tubes. We compared data about hemolyzed specimens entered in the two years before the implementation of the new device (i.e., 2012 and 2013 and the two years after introducing SMonovette in manual aspiration mode (i.e. 2015 and 2016. The year 2014 was not considered due to mixed data. The rate of hemolyzed specimens decreased from 4.36% to 3.07% with the use of S-Monovette in manual aspiration mode (Chi squared, 183.8; P<0.001. The likelihood of obtaining hemolyzed specimens was hence reduced by approximately 30% (relative risk, 0.707, with an expected economic saving of approximately 510€/year. The results of this real-world study demonstrate that the use of an alternative closed device encompassing manual aspiration for drawing blood from intravenous catheters may reduce hemolyzed samples by approximately 30%, so representing a valuable perspective for safeguarding patient safety and improving ED efficiency.

  5. Positive Reinforcement Training for Blood Collection in Grizzly Bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) Results in Undetectable Elevations in Serum Cortisol Levels: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce-Zuniga, Nicole M; Newberry, Ruth C; Robbins, Charles T; Ware, Jasmine V; Jansen, Heiko T; Nelson, O Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Training nonhuman animals in captivity for participation in routine husbandry procedures is believed to produce a lower stress environment compared with undergoing a general anesthetic event for the same procedure. This hypothesis rests largely on anecdotal evidence that the captive subjects appear more relaxed with the trained event. Blood markers of physiological stress responses were evaluated in 4 captive grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) who were clicker-trained for blood collection versus 4 bears who were chemically immobilized for blood collection. Serum cortisol and immunoglobulin A (IgA) and plasma β-endorphin were measured as indicators of responses to stress. Plasma β-endorphin was not different between the groups. Serum IgA was undetectable in all bears. Serum cortisol was undetectable in all trained bears, whereas chemically immobilized bears had marked cortisol elevations (p bears with extensive recent immobilization experience. These findings support the use of positive reinforcement training for routine health procedures to minimize anxiety.

  6. Use of dried spots of whole blood, plasma, and mother's milk collected on filter paper for measurement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayele, Workenesh; Schuurman, Rob; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Dorigo-Zetsma, Wendelien; Mengistu, Yohannes; Goudsmit, Jaap; Paxton, William A.; de Baar, Michel P.; Pollakis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    We studied the use of dried spots of bodily fluids (plasma, whole blood, and mother's milk) on filter paper as a means of sample collection and storage for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral load testing under stringent field conditions. Plasma placed directly in lysis buffer, which

  7. Improving ED specimen TAT using Lean Six Sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Janet H; Karr, Tedd

    2015-01-01

    Lean and Six Sigma are continuous improvement methodologies that have garnered international fame for improving manufacturing and service processes. Increasingly these methodologies are demonstrating their power to also improve healthcare processes. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a case study for the application of Lean and Six Sigma tools in the reduction of turnaround time (TAT) for Emergency Department (ED) specimens. This application of the scientific methodologies uncovered opportunities to improve the entire ED to lab system for the specimens. This case study provides details on the completion of a Lean Six Sigma project in a 1,000 bed tertiary care teaching hospital. Six Sigma's Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control methodology is very similar to good medical practice: first, relevant information is obtained and assembled; second, a careful and thorough diagnosis is completed; third, a treatment is proposed and implemented; and fourth, checks are made to determine if the treatment was effective. Lean's primary goal is to do more with less work and waste. The Lean methodology was used to identify and eliminate waste through rapid implementation of change. The initial focus of this project was the reduction of turn-around-times for ED specimens. However, the results led to better processes for both the internal and external customers of this and other processes. The project results included: a 50 percent decrease in vials used for testing, a 50 percent decrease in unused or extra specimens, a 90 percent decrease in ED specimens without orders, a 30 percent decrease in complete blood count analysis (CBCA) Median TAT, a 50 percent decrease in CBCA TAT Variation, a 10 percent decrease in Troponin TAT Variation, a 18.2 percent decrease in URPN TAT Variation, and a 2-5 minute decrease in ED registered nurses rainbow draw time. This case study demonstrated how the quantitative power of Six Sigma and the speed of Lean worked in harmony to improve

  8. Relative quantification of PIK3CA gene expression level in fine-needle aspiration biopsy thyroid specimens collected from patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma and non-toxic goitre by real-time RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska-Durczyńska Katarzyna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway is important regulator of many cellular events, including apoptosis, proliferation and motility. PI3K pathway alterations (PIK3CA gene mutations and/or amplification have been observed in various human tumours. In the majority of diagnosed cases, mutations are localized in one of the three "hot spots" in the gene, responsible for coding catalytic subunit α of class I PI3K (PIK3CA. Mutations and amplification of PIK3CA gene are characteristic for thyroid cancer, as well. Methods The aim of our study was to examine a gene expression level of PIK3CA in fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB thyroid specimens in two types of thyroid lesions, papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC and non-toxic goitre (NTG. Following conventional cytological examination, 42 thyroid FNAB specimens, received from patients with PTC (n = 20 and NTG (n = 22, were quantitatively evaluated regarding PIK3CA expression level by real-time PCR in the ABI PRISM® 7500 Sequence Detection System. Results Significantly higher expression level (RQ of PIK3CA in PTC group has been noted in comparison with NTG group (p Conclusion These observations may suggest role of PIK3CA alterations in PTC carcinogenesis.

  9. specimens of patients with bloody diarrhoea in Mwanza, Tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and Butimba Health Centre. Bacteriological cultures were done at the National Institute for Medical Research laboratory. Atotal of 489 patients (median age= 20 years) participated in the study and were able to provide stool specimens. Shigella species were isolated from 14% (69/489) of the stool specimens collected.

  10. Measurement of thyroid hormones in donkey (Equus asinus) blood and milk: validation of ELISA kits and evaluation of sample collection, handling and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todini, Luca; Malfatti, Alessandro; Salimei, Elisabetta; Fantuz, Francesco

    2010-11-01

    Donkey's milk is well tolerated by human infants with cow's milk allergy and is useful in the treatment of human immune-related diseases and in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Thyroid hormones (TH) stimulate lactation and active triiodothyronine (T3) in colostrum and milk could take paracrine action supporting lactogenesis in the mother, and play physiological roles for the suckling offspring (systemic or within the gastrointestinal tract). The aims were to measure TH concentrations in donkey blood and milk, validate ELISA methods, evaluate the effects of sample collection and post-collection handling and the stability of TH in milk and blood serum and plasma samples. In milk and blood samples obtained from lactating jennies total concentrations of TH were assayed using competitive-type ELISA kits. Good validation results were obtained for both TH concentrations in blood serum and plasma and T3 in milk samples extracted with cold (-20°C) ethanol alkalinized (pH 9·0) with NH4OH. In most of the milk extract samples, thyroxine (T4) concentrations resulted below the sensitivity threshold. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variations of TH concentrations in different blood and milk samples were below 10%. Parallelism tests gave displacement lines parallel to those of the calibrators for both TH in blood serum and plasma and for T3 in milk extracts. Mean recovery rates were between 95% and 123%, but the concentration values approaching the highest calibrators were overestimated. Therefore, serum and plasma samples for T3 assay must be previously diluted with buffer. Both TH concentrations in blood serum and plasma and T3 in milk did not change during storage for up to 6 months at -20°C. In conclusion, the ELISA methods tested in the present study are suitable for determination of both TH concentrations in donkey blood samples, and for T3 measurement in milk, after extraction with cold alkaline ethanol.

  11. The working procedure of human autopsy specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rusong; Liu Guodong

    2000-01-01

    In order to perform the Coordinated Research Program for the Reference Asian Man (phase 2): Ingestion and body content of trace elements of importance in Radiation Protection, study on elemental content in organs of normal Chinese has been worked by China Institute for Radiation Protection and Institute of Radiation Medicine - CAMS in recent two years. Sampling and sample collection of human tissues and the procedures of sample preparation of human autopsy specimens are enlisted

  12. The Effect of Antibiotic Exposure and Specimen Volume on the Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Children With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Amanda J; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Howie, Stephen R C; Adrian, Peter V; Ahmed, Dilruba; DeLuca, Andrea N; Ebruke, Bernard E; Gitahi, Caroline; Higdon, Melissa M; Kaewpan, Anek; Karani, Angela; Karron, Ruth A; Mazumder, Razib; McLellan, Jessica; Moore, David P; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Rhodes, Julia; Saifullah, Md; Seidenberg, Phil; Sow, Samba O; Tamboura, Boubou; Zeger, Scott L; Murdoch, David R

    2017-06-15

    Antibiotic exposure and specimen volume are known to affect pathogen detection by culture. Here we assess their effects on bacterial pathogen detection by both culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in children. PERCH (Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health) is a case-control study of pneumonia in children aged 1-59 months investigating pathogens in blood, nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs, and induced sputum by culture and PCR. Antibiotic exposure was ascertained by serum bioassay, and for cases, by a record of antibiotic treatment prior to specimen collection. Inoculated blood culture bottles were weighed to estimate volume. Antibiotic exposure ranged by specimen type from 43.5% to 81.7% in 4223 cases and was detected in 2.3% of 4863 controls. Antibiotics were associated with a 45% reduction in blood culture yield and approximately 20% reduction in yield from induced sputum culture. Reduction in yield of Streptococcus pneumoniae from NP culture was approximately 30% in cases and approximately 32% in controls. Several bacteria had significant but marginal reductions (by 5%-7%) in detection by PCR in NP/OP swabs from both cases and controls, with the exception of S. pneumoniae in exposed controls, which was detected 25% less frequently compared to nonexposed controls. Bacterial detection in induced sputum by PCR decreased 7% for exposed compared to nonexposed cases. For every additional 1 mL of blood culture specimen collected, microbial yield increased 0.51% (95% confidence interval, 0.47%-0.54%), from 2% when volume was ≤1 mL to approximately 6% for ≥3 mL. Antibiotic exposure and blood culture volume affect detection of bacterial pathogens in children with pneumonia and should be accounted for in studies of etiology and in clinical management. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  13. RFID as a new ICT tool to monitor specimen life cycle and quality control in a biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Umberto; Spila, Antonella; Riondino, Silvia; Valente, Maria Giovanna; Somma, Paolo; Iacoboni, Mauro; Alessandroni, Jhessica; Papa, Veronica; Della-Morte, David; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Ferroni, Patrizia; Roselli, Mario; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2011-01-01

    Biospecimen quality is crucial for clinical and translational research and its loss is one of the main obstacles to experimental activities. Beside the quality of samples, preanalytical variations render the results derived from specimens of different biobanks or even within the same biobank incomparable. Specimens collected along the years should be managed with a heterogeneous life cycle. Hence, we propose to collect detailed data concerning the whole life cycle of stored samples employing radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology.? We describe the processing chain of blood biosamples that is operative at the biobank of IRCSS San Raffaele, Rome, Italy (BioBIM). We focus on the problem of tracing the stages following automated preanalytical processing: we collected the time stamps of all events that could affect the biological quality of the specimens by means of RFID tags and readers.? We developed a pilot study on a fragment of the life cycle, namely the storage between the end of the preanalytics and the beginning of the analytics, which is usually not traced by automated tools because it typically includes manual handling. By adopting RFID devices we identified the possible critical time delays. At 1, 3 and 6 months RFID-tagged specimens cryopreserved at -80°C were successfully read.? We were able to record detailed information about the storage phases and a fully documented specimen life cycle. This will allow us to promote and tune up the best practices in biobanking because i) it will be possible to classify sample features with a sharper resolution, which allows future utilization of stored material; ii) cost-effective policies can be adopted in processing, storing and selecting specimens; iii) after using each aliquot, we can study the life cycle of the specimen with a possible feedback on the procedures.

  14. Relationship between salt consumption measured by 24-h urine collection and blood pressure in the adult population of Vitória (Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S L; Souza Júnior, P R; Pimentel, E B; Baldo, M P; Malta, D C; Mill, J G; Szwarcwald, C L

    2015-08-01

    High salt intake is related to an increase in blood pressure and development of hypertension. However, currently, there are no national representative data in Brazil using the gold standard method of 24-h urine collection to measure sodium consumption. This study aimed to determine salt intake based on 24-h urine collection in a sample of 272 adults of both genders and to correlate it with blood pressure levels. We used a rigorous protocol to assure an empty bladder prior to initiating urine collection. We excluded subjects with a urine volume salt intake was 10.4±4.1 g/day (d), and 94% of the participants (98% of men and 90% of women) ingested more than the recommended level of 5 g/d. We found a positive association between salt and body mass index (BMI) categories, as well as with salt and blood pressure, independent of age and BMI. The difference in systolic blood pressure reached 13 mmHg between subjects consuming less than 6 g/d of salt and those ingesting more than 18 g/d. Subjects with hypertension had a higher estimated salt intake than normotensive subjects (11.4±5.0 vs 9.8±3.6 g/d, Psalt consumption in the general population.

  15. The post-occipital spinal venous sinus of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus: Its anatomy and use for blood sample collection and intravenous infusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan G. Myburgh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The post-occipital sinus of the spinal vein is often used for the collection of blood samples from crocodilians. Although this sampling method has been reported for several crocodilian species, the technique and associated anatomy has not been described in detail in any crocodilian, including the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus. The anatomy of the cranial neck region was investigated macroscopically, microscopically, radiographically and by means of computed tomography. Latex was injected into the spinal vein and spinal venous sinus of crocodiles to visualise the regional vasculature. The spinal vein ran within the vertebral canal, dorsal to and closely associated with the spinal cord and changed into a venous sinus cranially in the post-occipital region. For blood collection, the spinal venous sinus was accessed through the interarcuate space between the atlas and axis (C1 and C2 by inserting a needle angled just off the perpendicular in the midline through the craniodorsal cervical skin, just cranial to the cranial borders of the first cervical osteoderms. The most convenient method of blood collection was with a syringe and hypodermic needle. In addition, the suitability of the spinal venous sinus for intravenous injections and infusions in live crocodiles was evaluated. The internal diameter of the commercial human epidural catheters used during these investigations was relatively small, resulting in very slow infusion rates. Care should be taken not to puncture the spinal cord or to lacerate the blood vessel wall using this route for blood collection or intravenous infusions.

  16. [Absolute numbers of peripheral blood CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells prior to a leukapheresis procedure as a parameter predicting the efficiency of stem cell collection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtseva, I V; Davydova, Yu O; Gaponova, T V; Kapranov, N M; Kuzmina, L A; Troitskaya, V V; Gribanova, E O; Kravchenko, S K; Mangasarova, Ya K; Zvonkov, E E; Parovichnikova, E N; Mendeleeva, L P; Savchenko, V G

    To identify a parameter predicting a collection of at least 2·106 CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC)/kg body weight per leukapheresis (LA) procedure. The investigation included 189 patients with hematological malignancies and 3 HSC donors, who underwent mobilization of stem cells with their subsequent collection by LA. Absolute numbers of peripheral blood leukocytes and CD34+ cells before a LA procedure, as well as a number of CD34+ cells/kg body weight (BW) in the LA product stored on the same day were determined in each patient (donor). There was no correlation between the number of leukocytes and that of stored CD34+ cells/kg BW. There was a close correlation between the count of peripheral blood CD34+ cells prior to LA and that of collected CD34+ cells calculated with reference to kg BW. The optimal absolute blood CD34+ cell count was estimated to 20 per µl, at which a LA procedure makes it possible to collect 2·106 or more CD34+ cells/kg BW.

  17. Screen-film specimen radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, S.J.; Hogan, J.; Schreck, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the reproducibility and quality of biopsy specimen radiographs, a unique phototimed cabinet x-ray system is being developed. The system utilizes specially modified Kodal Min-R cassettes and will be compatible with current mammographic films. Tube voltages are in the 14-20-kVp range with 0.1-1.0-second exposure times. A top-hat type compression device is used (1) to compress the specimen to uniform thickness, (2) to measure the specimen thickness and determine optimum kVp, and (3) to superimpose a grid over the specimen for identification of objects of radiographic interest. The phototiming circuit developed specifically for this purpose will be described along with the modified Min-R cassette. Characteristics of the generator and cabinet will also be described. Tests will be performed on phantoms to evaluate the system limitations

  18. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  19. Screening for HIV, hepatitis B and syphilis on dried blood spots: A promising method to better reach hidden high-risk populations with self-collected sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge H M van Loo

    Full Text Available Many people at high risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs, e.g., men who have sex with men (MSM, are not optimally reached by current sexual health care systems with testing. To facilitate testing by home-based sampling or sampling in outreach setting we evaluated dried blood spots (DBS, a method for self-collected blood sampling for serological screening of HIV, hepatitis B (HBV and syphilis. The aims of this study were to assess the acceptability and feasibility of self-collected DBS and to compare the test results for screening of HIV, HBV and syphilis from DBS with blood drawn by venous puncture.DBS were collected from men who have sex with men (MSM, visiting the STI clinic of the public health service South Limburg (n = 183 and HIV positive and HBV positive patients (n = 34, visiting the outpatient clinics of the Maastricht University Medical Centre in the period January 2012-April 2015. The 93 first participating MSM visiting the STI clinic were asked to fill in a questionnaire about the feasibility and acceptability about self-collection of DBS in a setting without going to a health care facility and were asked to collect the DBS themselves. Serological screening tests for HIV (HIV combi PT, Roche, HBV (HBsAg, Roche and syphilis (Treponema pallidum Ig, Biokit 3.0 were performed on DBS and on blood drawn by venous puncture, which was routinely taken for screening.In total 217 participants were included in the study with a median age of 40 years (range between 17-80. Of MSM 84% agreed that it was clear and easy to do the finger-prick, while 53% agreed that it was clear and easy to apply the blood onto the DBS card. Also, 80% of MSM would use the bloodspot test again. In 91% (198 of DBS, sufficient material was collected to perform the three tests. No difference was observed in DBS quality between self-collected DBS and health care worker collected DBS. For HIV (n = 195 DBS-serum pairs sensitivity and specificity were 100%. For HBV

  20. 49 CFR 40.51 - What materials are used to send urine specimens to the laboratory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... container that adequately protects the specimen bottles from shipment damage in the transport of specimens from the collection site to the laboratory. (b) You are not required to use a shipping container if a...

  1. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... may be used to puncture the skin. The blood collects in a small glass tube called a ...

  2. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hematology 2017 A collection of articles from the 2017 ASH Annual Meeting Education Program Blood: How I Treat A ... Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ...

  3. Radiation-induced micronucleus frequencies in female peripheral blood lymphocytes collected during the first and second half of the menstrual cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krol, M.; Lankoff, A.; Buraczewska, I.; Derezinska, E.; Wojcik, A.

    2007-01-01

    Biological dosimetry relies on the assessment of dose in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of a victim. Variability in the individual radiosensitivity of PBL has an impact on the precision of dose estimate and radiation-induced micronuclei show a strong individual variability. A factor which can influence the radiosensitivity of PBL is the hormonal status of female donors, which shows a regular pattern during the menstrual cycle. The aim of the present investigation was to verify whether the position within the menstrual cycle has an impact on the level of micronuclei in PBL. Blood was collected from 19 donors during the first and second half of the menstrual cycle and exposed to 2 Gy. Although statistically significant differences between the MN frequencies in PBL collected during the different time points were observed in the case of some donors, no reproducible trend that could find application in biological dosimetry could be detected. (authors)

  4. Developmental stages of fish blood flukes, Cardicola forsteri and Cardicola opisthorchis (Trematoda: Aporocotylidae), in their polychaete intermediate hosts collected at Pacific bluefin tuna culture sites in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuo; Shirakashi, Sho; Tani, Kazuki; Shin, Sang Phil; Ishimaru, Katsuya; Honryo, Tomoki; Sugihara, Yukitaka; Uchida, Hiro'omi

    2017-02-01

    Farming of Pacific bluefin tuna (PBT), Thunnus orientalis, is a rapidly growing industry in Japan. Aporocotylid blood flukes of the genus Cardicola comprising C. orientalis, C. opisthorchis and C. forsteri are parasites of economic importance for PBT farming. Recently, terebellid polychaetes have been identified as the intermediate hosts for all these parasites. We collected infected polychaetes, Terebella sp., the intermediate host of C. opisthorchis, from ropes and floats attached to tuna cages in Tsushima, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Also, Neoamphitrite vigintipes (formerly as Amphitrite sp. sensu Shirakashi et al., 2016), the intermediate host of C. forsteri, were collected from culture cages in Kushimoto, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. The terebellid intermediate hosts harbored the sporocysts and cercariae in their body cavity. Developmental stages of these blood flukes were molecularly identified using species specific PCR primers. In this paper, we describe the cercaria and sporocyst stages of C. opisthorchis and C. forsteri and compare their morphological characteristics among three Cardicola blood flukes infecting PBT. We also discuss phylogenetic relations of the six genera of the terebellid intermediate hosts (Artacama, Lanassa, Longicarpus, Terebella, Nicolea and Neoamphitrite) of blood flukes infecting marine fishes, based on their morphological characters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acceptability of study procedures (self-collected introital swabs, blood draws and stool sample collection) by students 10-16 years for an HPV vaccine effectiveness study: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakalembe, Miriam; Mutyaba, Twaha; Mirembe, Florence

    2016-03-16

    A cohort study was planned to evaluate vaccine immunogenicity and effect of malaria and helminth co-infections on the bivalent Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. The study would involve self collected introital swabs, blood draws and stool sample collection. We therefore conducted a pilot study to assess the acceptability of these procedures among the students and their parents. A cross-sectional study among forty four students from two purposively selected primary schools of Western Uganda. Exit interviews and two focus group discussions (FGD) (for parents) were conducted. Acceptability was measured by willingness to undergo the procedures again, recommending the procedures to others as well as proportion of introital swabs positive for β globulin. FGD determined acceptability of the parents and explored opinions and perceptions that would influence their decisions. HPV-16/18 and β globulin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analysed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kit. All the students (100%) in the study were willing to provide a self- collected introital swab and a stool sample as well as recommending their friends while (86.3%) were willing for blood draws. There were 40/44 (90.1%) self collected introital swabs that had positive result for human β globulin though none of them was positive for HPV-16/18. In the FGD, it emerged that parents concerns were on the blood draws and introital swab collection which were addressed. The study procedures were highly acceptable among this study population of students and their parents. Follow-up to assess HPV vaccine effectiveness and factors that may influence the vaccine in this age group is feasible.

  6. Value of Routine Dengue Diagnostic Tests in Urine and Saliva Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andries, Anne-Claire; Duong, Veasna; Ly, Sowath; Cappelle, Julien; Kim, Kim Srorn; Lorn Try, Patrich; Ros, Sopheaktra; Ong, Sivuth; Huy, Rekol; Horwood, Paul; Flamand, Marie; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Tarantola, Arnaud; Buchy, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue laboratory diagnosis is essentially based on detection of the virus, its components or antibodies directed against the virus in blood samples. Blood, however, may be difficult to draw in some patients, especially in children, and sampling during outbreak investigations or epidemiological studies may face logistical challenges or limited compliance to invasive procedures from subjects. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of using saliva and urine samples instead of blood for dengue diagnosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Serial plasma, urine and saliva samples were collected at several time-points between the day of admission to hospital until three months after the onset of fever in children with confirmed dengue disease. Quantitative RT-PCR, NS1 antigen capture and ELISA serology for anti-DENV antibody (IgG, IgM and IgA) detection were performed in parallel on the three body fluids. RT-PCR and NS1 tests demonstrated an overall sensitivity of 85.4%/63.4%, 41.6%/14.5% and 39%/28.3%, in plasma, urine and saliva specimens, respectively. When urine and saliva samples were collected at the same time-points and tested concurrently, the diagnostic sensitivity of RNA and NS1 detection assays was 69.1% and 34.4%, respectively. IgG/IgA detection assays had an overall sensitivity of 54.4%/37.4%, 38.5%/26.8% and 52.9%/28.6% in plasma, urine and saliva specimens, respectively. IgM were detected in 38.1% and 36% of the plasma and saliva samples but never in urine. Conclusions Although the performances of the different diagnostic methods were not as good in saliva and urine as in plasma specimens, the results obtained by qRT-PCR and by anti-DENV antibody ELISA could well justify the use of these two body fluids to detect dengue infection in situations when the collection of blood specimens is not possible. PMID:26406240

  7. Collection and composition of autologous peripheral blood stem cells graft in patients with acute myeloid leukemia: influence on hematopoietic recovery and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raos, Mirela; Nemet, Damir; Bojanić, Ines; Sertić, Dubravka; Batinić, Drago; Dusak, Vesna; Dubravcić, Klara; Mazić, Sanja; Serventi-Seiwerth, Ranka; Mrsić, Mirando; Golubić-Cepulić, Branka; Labar, Boris

    2010-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a standard approach in the treatment of hematological malignant diseases. For the last 15 years the main source of cells for transplantation have been peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). With the availability of hematopoietic growth factors and understanding the advantages of treatment with PBSC, the application of bone marrow (BM) was supplanted. The aim of this survey was to explore the success of PBSC collection, the factors which influence the success of PBSC collection, the composition and the quality of graft and their influence on hematopoietic recovery and outcome after transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). PBSC were collected by the method of leukapheresis after applying a combination of chemotherapy and growth factors or only growth factors. The quality of graft was determined with the clonogenic progenitor cell assay and with the flow cytometry analysis. Of the total 134 patients with AML, who were submitted to HSC mobilization, the collection was successful in 78 (58.2%) patients. The collection was more successful after the first than after the second attempt of HSC mobilization (49% vs. 11%). The criteria for effective mobilization were the number of leukocytes > 3 x 10(9)/L and the concentration of CD34+ cells > 20 x 10(3)/mL in the peripheral blood on the first day of leukapheresis. The number of CD34+ cells infused had the strongest impact on hematopoietic recovery. We noted significantly faster hematological recovery of neutrophils and platelets, fewer number of transfused units of red blood cells and platelets, shorter duration of the tranfusion support, shorter treatment with intravenous antibiotic therapy and shorter hospitalization after PBSC compared to BM transplantation. These advantages could provide their standard application in the treatment of patients with AML.

  8. Detection of Theileria orientalis in mosquito blood meals in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de Marco, M; Brugman, V A; Hernández-Triana, L M; Thorne, L; Phipps, L P; Nikolova, N I; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2016-10-15

    Theileria spp. are tick-borne protozoan parasites that infect a wide range of wild and domestic animals. In this study, the utility of xenosurveillance of blood-fed specimens of Culiseta annulata for detecting the presence of piroplasms in livestock was investigated. Blood-fed mosquitoes were collected at Elmley National Nature Reserve, Kent, United Kingdom. All specimens were morphologically identified, and DNA barcoding was used to confirm the morphological identification. Both the vertebrate host species and Theileria genome was detected within the bloodmeal by real-time PCR. Sequencing was used to confirm the identity of all amplicons. In total, 105 blood-fed mosquitoes morphologically identified as Cs. annulata were collected. DNA barcoding revealed that 102 specimens were Cs. annulata (99%), while a single specimen was identified as Anopheles messeae. Two specimens could not be identified molecularly due to PCR amplification failure. Blood meal analysis revealed that Cs. annulata fed almost exclusively on cattle at the collection site (n=100). The application of a pan-piroplasm PCR detected 16 positive samples (15.2%) and sequence analysis of the amplicons demonstrated that the piroplasms present in the blood meal belonged to the Theileria orientalis group. This study demonstrates how xenosurveillance can be applied to detecting pathogens in livestock and confirms the presence of Theileria species in livestock from the United Kingdom. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Buffy coat specimens remain viable as a DNA source for highly multiplexed genome-wide genetic tests after long term storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowden Donald W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood specimen collection at an early study visit is often included in observational studies or clinical trials for analysis of secondary outcome biomarkers. A common protocol is to store buffy coat specimens for future DNA isolation and these may remain in frozen storage for many years. It is uncertain if the DNA remains suitable for modern genome wide association (GWA genotyping. Methods We isolated DNA from 120 Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD clinical trial buffy coats sampling a range of storage times up to 9 years and other factors that could influence DNA yield. We performed TaqMan SNP and GWA genotyping to test whether the DNA retained integrity for high quality genetic analysis. Results We tested two QIAGEN automated protocols for DNA isolation, preferring the Compromised Blood Protocol despite similar yields. We isolated DNA from all 120 specimens (yield range 1.1-312 ug per 8.5 ml ACD tube of whole blood with only 3/120 samples yielding Conclusions When collected as a long term clinical trial or biobank specimen for DNA, buffy coats can be stored for up to 9 years in a -80degC frozen state and still produce high yields of DNA suitable for GWA analysis and other genetic testing. Trial Registration The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00000620.

  10. Bleeding Time, Volume of Shed Blood Collected at the Bleeding Time Site, and the Peripheral Venous Hematocrit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-10

    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1991;98:327-328. 20. Bain B, Forster T. A sex difference in the bleeding time. 21. Smith PS, Baglini R, Meissner GF...Description of a method for determining the bleeding time and coagulation time and report of three cases of hemorrhagic disease relieved by...OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH CONTRACT N00014-88-C-0118 CONTRACT N00014-94-C-0149 TECHNICAL REPORT 95-01 BLEEDING TIME, VOLUME OF SHED BLOOD

  11. Sample handling of clinical specimens for ultratrace element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelis, R.

    1987-01-01

    Some simple logistics to an improved sample handling of clinical specimens are presented. This comprises clean room conditions, clean laboratory ware, ultra-pure reagents and good analytical practice. Sample handling procedures for blood, urine, soft tissues and pharmaceuticals are briefly discussed. (author) 26 refs

  12. Old Plants, New Tricks: Phenological Research Using Herbarium Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Charles G; Ellwood, Elizabeth R; Primack, Richard B; Davis, Charles C; Pearson, Katelin D; Gallinat, Amanda S; Yost, Jenn M; Nelson, Gil; Mazer, Susan J; Rossington, Natalie L; Sparks, Tim H; Soltis, Pamela S

    2017-07-01

    The timing of phenological events, such as leaf-out and flowering, strongly influence plant success and their study is vital to understanding how plants will respond to climate change. Phenological research, however, is often limited by the temporal, geographic, or phylogenetic scope of available data. Hundreds of millions of plant specimens in herbaria worldwide offer a potential solution to this problem, especially as digitization efforts drastically improve access to collections. Herbarium specimens represent snapshots of phenological events and have been reliably used to characterize phenological responses to climate. We review the current state of herbarium-based phenological research, identify potential biases and limitations in the collection, digitization, and interpretation of specimen data, and discuss future opportunities for phenological investigations using herbarium specimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dataset of herbarium specimens of threatened vascular plants in Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualart, Neus; Ibáñez, Neus; Luque, Pere; Pedrol, Joan; Vilar, Lluís; Guàrdia, Roser

    2017-01-01

    This data paper describes a specimens' dataset of the Catalonian threatened vascular plants conserved in five public Catalonian herbaria (BC, BCN, HGI, HBIL and MTTE). Catalonia is an administrative region of Spain that includes large autochthon plants diversity and 199 taxa with IUCN threatened categories (EX, EW, RE, CR, EN and VU). This dataset includes 1,618 records collected from 17 th century to nowadays. For each specimen, the species name, locality indication, collection date, collector, ecology and revision label are recorded. More than 94% of the taxa are represented in the herbaria, which evidence the paper of the botanical collections as an essential source of occurrence data.

  14. The potential of aqueous extracts of Bellucia dichotoma Cogn. (Melastomataceae) to inhibit the biological activities of Bothrops atrox venom: A comparison of specimens collected in the states of Pará and Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Valéria Mourão; de Souza, Luana Yamille Andrade; da Costa Guimarães, Noranathan; Dos Santos, Ilia Gilmara Carvalho; de Almeida, Patrícia Danielle Oliveira; de Oliveira, Ricardo Bezerra; Mourão, Rosa Helena Veras; Dos-Santos, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-20

    The effectiveness of aqueous extract of Bellucia dichotoma Cogn. (Melastomataceae) specimems collected in Santarém, PA, against some biological activities of Bothrops atrox venom (BaV) has been scientifically proven. Here, we analyzed the components and assessed the anti-snakebite potential of aqueous extracts of bark of B. dichotoma collected in Manaus, AM, (AEBd-MAO) and Santarém, PA, (AEBd-STM), both in Brazil. The phytochemical profiles of the aqueous extracts were identified using thin layer chromatography (TLC), and the concentrations of phenolics were determined by colorimetric assay. The inhibitory potential of the extracts was tested against the phospholipase A 2 , coagulant and gelatinolytic activities of BaV in vitro and its defibrinating and edema-inducing activities in vivo. Interaction between BaV and the extracts was investigated using SDS-Page electrophoresis and Western blotting. Extract cytotoxicity and antioxidant potential were assessed using the human fibroblast cell line MRC-5 and the DPPH assay in cell culture, respectively. While there was no difference between the phytochemical profiles of the extracts, AEBd-MAO had higher concentrations of total phenolics, total tannins and hydrolysable tannins. The extracts inhibited 100% of the phospholipase and coagulant activity of BaV when pre-incubated. Without pre-incubation, however, there was no reduction in phospholipase activity, although significant inhibition of coagulant activity was observed. In the doses used in folk medicine, without pre-incubation, both extracts inhibited 100% of the coagulant activity of BaV. In vivo, the extracts were unable to inhibit the defibrinating activity of the venom but were effective in inhibiting its edema-inducing activity. In the profiles of the extracts pre-incubated with BaV, not all the protein bands revealed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot were observed. Both extracts had a high antioxidant potential and neither had a cytotoxic effect. Although the

  15. Challenges for conducting blood collection and biochemical analysis in a large multicenter school-based study with adolescents: lessons from ERICA in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Vogt Cureau

    Full Text Available Abstract: The Study of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents (ERICA is a pioneering study that aimed to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, including metabolic syndrome components in Brazilian adolescents. This study aims to describe the methodological aspects related to blood collection as well as to report pertaining results of the preparation, transport, storage, and exams in ERICA. Exams in ERICA were performed in a single laboratory and blood samples were collected in schools in a standardized manner. Logistics involved air transportation of samples to the reference laboratory with controlled temperature since sample collection. The serum was stored in local biorepositories in four centers to be used in future analyses. During the study, 284,247 exams were performed and rate of participation in exams was 56.2%, thus involving 40,732 adolescents. From the total, 92.6% of the samples reached the reference laboratory maintaining the temperature between 0-10°C. No clinical significant changes in results due to temperature changes were identified. External quality control recorded satisfactory results in 98.7% of the evaluations. Four biorepositories with samples of 7,785 adolescents were created. Thus, we can consider that the logistics adopted in ERICA was fairly successful and description of this as well as the difficulties experienced in Brazil can inform and facilitate the planning of future studies, especially in developing countries.

  16. Digestive tube contents of blood cockle (Anadara granosa in a tropical mangrove estuary in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Yurimoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to clarify the feeding biology of the blood cockle (Anadara granosa. We collected blood cockles from 8 stations in the Matang mangrove estuary of Malaysia in July and August 2010. The digestive tube contents of the specimens were stained with Congo red and observed under a light microscope. The results showed blood cockles take in particles containing cellulose as well as phytoplankton such as diatoms. As blood cockles in estuaries are known to exhibit cellulolytic enzyme activity in their digestive gland, the present results indicate blood cockles in estuaries feed on litter supplied from mangrove forests and terrestrial plants.

  17. First detection and genotyping of Giardia intestinalis in stool samples collected from children in Ghazni Province, eastern Afghanistan and evaluation of the PCR assay in formalin-fixed specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Anna; Karanis, Panagiotis; Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    It is estimated that faecal-orally transmitted diseases are common in Afghanistan, as a consequence of poor hygienic standards of life and widespread contamination of water and food with both human and animal faeces. However, there is little information in the literature concerning infections caused by intestinal parasites in the Afghan population. In this study, we report the occurrence of Giardia intestinalis assemblages (A and B) in formalin-fixed stool samples collected from 245 Afghan schoolchildren living in Ghazni Province in eastern Afghanistan. Detection of the parasite's DNA and genotyping was performed using real-time PCR, specific to the β-giardin gene of G. intestinalis. Positive results were recorded in 52 (21.2%) samples. Genotyping was successful in 39 faecal samples and showed the predominance of assemblage B of G. intestinalis in this population (15 assemblage A and 24 assemblage B). Co-infection with both genotypes A and B was detected in four samples. Additionally, we evaluated the effect of 10% buffered formalin fixative on the detection of G. intestinalis DNA using real-time PCR and nested PCR characterised by different lengths of PCR products (74 and 479 bp, respectively). The human faeces containing the Giardia cysts were tested for 16 weeks. Amplification of G. intestinalis DNA with real-time PCR was possible up to 6 weeks of preservation of stool sample in formalin, compared to only 2 weeks with nested PCR. This suggests that real-time PCR is a more suitable tool in cases where stool samples have to be kept in formalin for longer periods of time.

  18. Establishment of a cervical cancer bio-bank for the Chinese population: from project-based sample collection to routine management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ru; Li, Xiong; Zhou, Hang; Jia, Yao; Zhou, Jin; Huang, Kecheng; Tang, Fangxu; Hu, Ting; Shen, Jian; Chen, Zhilan; Wang, Shaoshuai; Sun, Haiying; Guo, Lili; Wang, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ma, Ding; Li, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    There is an increasing need for the establishment of a cervical cancer bio-bank that will facilitate both clinical and basic research. The cervical cancer bio-bank was first established in January 1999 and included two stages. First, a GWAS-based sample collection was conducted with special emphasis on the diagnosis and the retrieval of the corresponding bio-specimens, especially blood samples. Second, clinical data and their corresponding bio-specimens were routinely collected and handled. Notably, these bio-specimens also included samples from Wufeng Tujia Autonomous County, which has the highest incidence of cervical cancer in China. The specimens were collected from patients with cervical cancer and those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, while the control samples were collected from normal individuals. With special emphasis on clinical data and blood samples for the GWAS analysis, the collection of other bio-specimens was slow, and the pairing of specimens and clinical data was poor during the first stage. However, in the second stage, the pairing of the clinical data and its corresponding bio-specimens improved. At present, the samples procured and preserved in the bio-bank cover most regions of China and different ethnic groups for both the normal controls and cervical cancer patients of different pathological categories. This bio-bank of cervical cancer specimens from the Chinese population will greatly promote the studies of cervical cancer in China.

  19. Training practices of hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis and -cord blood collection staff: analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonisation of Cellular Therapy Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celluzzi, Christina M; Keever-Taylor, Carolyn; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Alurf, Mahmoud; Koh, Mickey B C; Rabe, Fran; Rebulla, Paolo; Sacchi, Nicoletta; Sanders, Jean; McGrath, Eoin; Loper, Kathy

    2014-12-01

    As hematopoietic stem cell transplantation expands globally, identification of the key elements that make up high-quality training programs will become more important to optimizing collection practices and quality of the products collected. Multiple-choice and open questions to identify training practices of those collecting hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis [HPC(A)] and -cord blood [HPC(CB)] products were distributed via an electronic survey tool worldwide. Data were collected on facility demographics, job descriptions, and the content of training programs including general practices, staff assessment, retraining, and unique program features. Respondents from more than 50 countries predominantly associating with facilities in North America and Europe represented transplant centers or transfusion services also performing collections. For the majority of staff performing HPC(A) collections (50%), initial training required as many procedures as necessary be done until competency was achieved. Competency was evaluated by direct observation comparing performance to written procedures or protocol steps (47%), combination of written assessment and observation (45%), evaluation of product quality (40%), and written assessment alone (12%). Staff retraining was customized on a case-by-case basis (42%). Similar criteria were placed on HPC(CB) training, with an emphasis on product quality measured by sterility, CD34+ cell collection efficiency, hematocrit, volume, and mononuclear cell count. Observation, practice, evaluation, and retraining until competency is achieved marked the training programs. Success was based on the ability of staff to execute procedures ultimately measured in product quality. Identified features may assist facilities in further developing and strengthening their own training programs. © 2014 AABB.

  20. [Peripheral stem cell collection, search for predictive factors: a multicenter study. Working Group on Transfusion and Therapeutic Techniques of the French Blood Transfusion Society ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, A; Coffe, C; Adjizian, J C; Villard, F; Jolly, D; Desbois, I; Léon, A

    2000-10-01

    A multicentric study involving 12 centers was made to investigate the results of peripheral stem cell collection carried out between 1996 and 1997 from 655 patients with hemopathic syndromes or malignant tumors, The aim of this investigation was to determine the predictive factors for transplant quality, and to thereby optimize collection procedures. Information sheets were completed for 1,346 cytapheretic sessions, i.e., 655 grafts. The samples were taken after induction chemotherapy and exposure to hematopoeitic colony-stimulating growth factors (except the LMCs). Each graft was defined as being of good or bad quality depending on the number of CD34+ cells that it contained. Based on the data available in the literature, a workgroup consensus was reached that a level of CD34+ cells +/- 2.10(6)/kg recipient body weight constituted a good transplant criterion. The 2 subgroups (good graft versus lower quality graft) were compared by univariate analysis followed by discriminant multivariate analysis. It was established that a number of parameters were significantly linked to the criterion of collection quality; however, 3 predictive factors emerged from the multivariate analysis--the level of circulating CD34+ cells; the number of cytaphereses; the number of blood volumes treated. It was concluded that the level of circulating CD34+ cells seems to be an essential aspect in predicting the quality of the transplant and the number of cytaphereses required to obtain a sufficiently rich collection. Moreover, it also appears that at least 2 blood volumes should be treated to optimize the results.

  1. Susceptibility to antifungal agents of Candida spp. from blood and feces collected in Novi Sad in 3-year period (2008-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelesić Zora Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Candidemia is an important emerging nosocomial infection in patients with risk factors. Candida species from nonsterile sites can give insight into the characteristics of strains that may cause invasive disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate antifungal susceptibility of Candida blood and fecal isolates in Novi Sad, Vojvodina. During a 3-year period (2008 to 2010, 424 isolates of Candida spp. were collected, 30 bloodstream isolates and 394 strains from fecal samples. In vitro susceptibility of these isolates to five antifungal agents was established using commercial ATB FUNGUS 3 (Bio-Mérieux. Predominant species was Candida albicans (6 isolates from blood and 269 from feces. Resistance to one or more antifungal agents was less common in Candida albicans (3.63% than in other species (24.83%. Resistance to itraconazole was the most commonly found in both groups of isolates, 9.64% strains from feces and 20% from blood samples. Twelve isolates were multiply resistant, usually to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole. Resistance to amphotericine B was extremely rare. Although resistance to antimycotics of Candida spp. is rare at present, continued surveillance of antifungal susceptibility is necessary in order to monitor trends, and to choose the right empiric therapy.

  2. [Blood cultures in the paediatric emergency department. Guidelines and recommendations on their indications, collection, processing and interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Bou, S; Álvarez Álvarez, C; Campo Fernández, M N; García Herrero, M A; Gené Giralt, A; Giménez Pérez, M; Piñeiro Pérez, R; Gómez Cortés, B; Velasco, R; Menasalvas Ruiz, A I; García García, J J; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Liria, C

    2016-05-01

    Blood culture (BC) is the gold standard when a bacteraemia is suspected, and is one of the most requested microbiological tests in paediatrics. Some changes have occurred in recent years: the introduction of new vaccines, the increasing number of patients with central vascular catheters, as well as the introduction of continuous monitoring BC systems. These changes have led to the review and update of different factors related to this technique in order to optimise its use. A practice guideline is presented with recommendations on BC, established by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Emergency Care and the Spanish Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. After reviewing the available scientific evidence, several recommendations for each of the following aspects are presented: BC indications in the Emergency Department, how to obtain, transport and process cultures, special situations (indications and interpretation of results in immunosuppressed patients and/or central vascular catheter carriers, indications for anaerobic BC), differentiation between bacteraemia and contamination when a BC shows bacterial growth and actions to take with a positive BC in patients with fever of unknown origin. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors.

  4. Influence of centrifugation conditions on the results of 77 routine clinical chemistry analytes using standard vacuum blood collection tubes and the new BD-Barricor tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadamuro, Janne; Mrazek, Cornelia; Leichtle, Alexander B; Kipman, Ulrike; Felder, Thomas K; Wiedemann, Helmut; Oberkofler, Hannes; Fiedler, Georg M; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth

    2018-02-15

    Although centrifugation is performed in almost every blood sample, recommendations on duration and g-force are heterogeneous and mostly based on expert opinions. In order to unify this step in a fully automated laboratory, we aimed to evaluate different centrifugation settings and their influence on the results of routine clinical chemistry analytes. We collected blood from 41 healthy volunteers into BD Vacutainer PST II-heparin-gel- (LiHepGel), BD Vacutainer SST II-serum-, and BD Vacutainer Barricor heparin-tubes with a mechanical separator (LiHepBar). Tubes were centrifuged at 2000xg for 10 minutes and 3000xg for 7 and 5 minutes, respectively. Subsequently 60 and 21 clinical chemistry analytes were measured in plasma and serum samples, respectively, using a Roche COBAS instrument. High sensitive Troponin T, pregnancy-associated plasma protein A, ß human chorionic gonadotropin and rheumatoid factor had to be excluded from statistical evaluation as many of the respective results were below the measuring range. Except of free haemoglobin (fHb) measurements, no analyte result was altered by the use of shorter centrifugation times at higher g-forces. Comparing LiHepBar to LiHepGel tubes at different centrifugation setting, we found higher lactate-dehydrogenase (LD) (P = 0.003 to centrifuged at higher speed (3000xg) for a shorter amount of time (5 minutes) without alteration of the analytes tested in this study. When using LiHepBar tubes for blood collection, a separate LD reference value might be needed.

  5. Gradient field microscopy of unstained specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewoo; Sridharan, Shamira; Popescu, Gabriel

    2012-03-12

    We present a phase derivative microscopy technique referred to as gradient field microscopy (GFM), which provides the first-order derivatives of the phase associated with an optical field passing through a transparent specimen. GFM utilizes spatial light modulation at the Fourier plane of a bright field microscope to optically obtain the derivatives of the phase and increase the contrast of the final image. The controllable spatial modulation pattern allows us to obtain both one component of the field gradient (derivative along one direction) and the gradient intensity, which offers some advantages over the regular differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Most importantly, unlike DIC, GFM does not use polarizing optics and, thus, it is applicable to birefringent samples. We demonstrate these features of GFM with studies of static and dynamic biological cells (HeLa cells and red blood cells). We show that GFM is capable of qualitatively providing information about cell membrane fluctuations. Specifically, we captured the disappearance of the bending mode of fluctuations in osmotically swollen red blood cells.

  6. Occurrence of biflavones in leaves of Caesalpinia pyramidalis specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. Bahia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The chloroform partition of methanol extract of leaves of Caesalpinia pyramidalis was submitted to different chromatographic procedures which afforded besides agathisflavone and taxifolin, the minor biflavones loniflavone, amentoflavone, 5'- hydroxyamentoflavone and podocarpusflavone A. The structures of the compounds were established on the basis of NMR and MS data analysis. Besides, the content of biflavones of different specimens of C. pyramidalis, which are collected in different habitats of the Brazilian semi-arid region, was determinated by LC-APCI-MS analysis. These analysis demonstrated that only the specimens harvested in Bahia state showed collectively the presence of agathisflavone, amentoflavone, sequoiaflavone and podocarpusflavone A.

  7. 129 microbiological studies of blood specimen from presumptively ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is ogften fatal if allowed to progress for long, undetected and untreated. It has continued to pose serious epidemiological problems due to its high mortality and ..... Cross-reactivity between O-antigens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella spp. had also been observed (18). The isolation of organisms which are not ...

  8. 129 microbiological studies of blood specimen from presumptively ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patient' serum for salmonella antibodies is a rapid tool in the diagnosis of enteric fever, but can afford an indirect ... which various dilutions of patient's serum are mixed with drops of either O or H-antigen of Salm. Typhi .... biochemical characterization and sero-typing are essential for complete identification of salmonella.

  9. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and other fluorochemicals in fish blood collected near the outfall of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuemei; Yeung, Leo Wai Yin; Xu Muqi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Lam, Paul K.S.; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Dai Jiayin

    2008-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) were measured in zooplankton and five fish species collected from Gaobeidian Lake, which receives discharge from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing, China. The mean total PFCs in five fish were in the order: crucian carp > common carp > leather catfish > white semiknife carp > tilapia. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) occurred at the greatest concentrations, with mean concentrations ranging from 5.74 to 64.2 ng/ml serum. Perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) was the second dominant PFC in fish samples except for common carp in which perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) was dominant. A positive linear relationship (r 2 = 0.85, p 15 N) if tilapia was excluded. The risk assessment showed that PFOS might not pose an immediate risk to fish in Gaobeidian Lake. - Distribution of PFCs reveals varied composition profiles in zooplankton and fish from a recipient water affected by WWTPs in Beijing

  10. Alaska Phocid Table of Wild Captures and Specimens Collected

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Polar Ecosystems Program research projects focus primarily on abundance, trends, distribution, health and condition, and foraging behavior of phocids (harbor,...

  11. 49 CFR 219.205 - Specimen collection and handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... via air express, air freight or equivalent means. The railroad must maintain and document secure chain of custody of the kit from release by the medical facility to delivery for transportation, as...

  12. Instructions for the collection of specimens of Utricularia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, P.

    1956-01-01

    Utricularia is represented in Malaysia by two main kinds of plant, i.e., aquatic and terrestrial. The aquatic species can again be divided into two main groups, those which float freely in still water and those which are more or less anchored in and beneath shallow water. All of the aquatic species

  13. Swab and aspiration specimen collection methods and antibiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correspondence to: Dr. A S Adoga, Department of Surgery, Ear, Nose and Throat unit, Jos University Teaching. Hospital, Plateau State ... Six (4 males, 2 females) and 74 (26 males, 48 females) patients had bilateral and unilateral ear discharges, respectively. ..... El- Sayed Y. Bone conduction impairment in uncomplicated ...

  14. [Evaluation of blood agar medium for the growth of mycobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Ahmet Yılmaz; Akgüneş, Alper; Durupınar, Belma

    2011-10-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of blood agar for the growth of mycobacteria from clinical specimens sent to Mycobacteriology Laboratory of Samsun Chest Diseases Hospital. One hundred fifty six clinical specimens including 123 sputum, 28 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and 5 pleural fluid specimens were inoculated in Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ), BACTEC MGIT 960 system (Becton Dickinson, USA) and blood agar following decontamination process. The specimens were also simultaneously examined for the presence of acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Thirty five mycobacteria strains (33 Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 2 atypical mycobacteria) grew in blood agar, 38 (36 M.tuberculosis and 2 atypical mycobacteria) in LJ media and 46 (44 M.tuberculosis and 2 atypical mycobacteria) in BACTEC MGIT 960 system. Among 29 AFB negative specimens, 20 revealed growth in both blood agar and LJ medium and 27 in MGIT system. AFB positive 20 samples yielded growth in 15 samples in blood agar, 18 in LJ medium and 19 in MGIT system. Among the total of 156 samples, contamination was observed in 15 (9.6%) samples in blood agar, 16 (10.2%) in LJ medium and 18 (11.5%) in MGIT system. Growth time was 5-35 days (mean 18 ± 7.4), 11-35 days (mean 19 ± 5.9) and 5-15 days (mean 10 ± 2.4) for blood agar, LJ medium and BACTEC MGIT 960 system, respectively. The three samples which revealed contamination in BACTEC MGIT 960 system, grew successfully in both blood agar and LJ medium without contamination. In one sample, growth was observed only in LJ medium but neither in blood agar nor BACTEC MGIT 960 system. However, in another sample, growth was observed only in blood agar while no growth was detected in LJ or BACTEC MGIT 960 system. Six samples yielded mycobacteria only in BACTEC MGIT 960 system. These results indicated that simultaneous use of one liquid and one solid medium to grow mycobacteria from the clinical samples seemed to be complementary. Blood agar was a promising choice since it was found

  15. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and other fluorochemicals in fish blood collected near the outfall of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xuemei [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yeung, Leo Wai Yin [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (China); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Xu Muqi [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Taniyasu, Sachi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Lam, Paul K.S. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (China); Yamashita, Nobuyoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan)], E-mail: nob.yamashita@aist.go.jp; Dai Jiayin [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)], E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn

    2008-12-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) were measured in zooplankton and five fish species collected from Gaobeidian Lake, which receives discharge from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing, China. The mean total PFCs in five fish were in the order: crucian carp > common carp > leather catfish > white semiknife carp > tilapia. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) occurred at the greatest concentrations, with mean concentrations ranging from 5.74 to 64.2 ng/ml serum. Perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) was the second dominant PFC in fish samples except for common carp in which perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) was dominant. A positive linear relationship (r{sup 2} = 0.85, p < 0.05) was observed between ln PFOS concentrations (ln ng/ml) and trophic level (based on {delta}{sup 15}N) if tilapia was excluded. The risk assessment showed that PFOS might not pose an immediate risk to fish in Gaobeidian Lake. - Distribution of PFCs reveals varied composition profiles in zooplankton and fish from a recipient water affected by WWTPs in Beijing.

  16. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  17. A system for mapping radioactive specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britten, R.J.; Davidson, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A system for mapping radioactive specimens comprises an avalanche counter, an encoder, pre-amplifier circuits, sample and hold circuits and a programmed computer. The parallel plate counter utilizes avalanche event counting over a large area with the ability to locate radioactive sources in two dimensions. When a beta ray, for example, enters a chamber, an ionization event occurs and the avalanche effect multiplies the event and results in charge collection on the anode surface for a limited period of time before the charge leaks away. The encoder comprises a symmetrical array of planar conductive surfaces separated from the anode by a dielectric material. The encoder couples charge currents, the amlitudes of which define the relative position of the ionization event. The amplitude of coupled current, delivered to pre-amplifiers, defines the location of the event. (author) 12 figs

  18. An analysis of forensic entomological specimens by Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamsa, R A; Ahmad, F M S; Marwi, M A; Zuha, R M; Omar, B

    2010-09-01

    This study reviews forensic entomological specimens analysed by the Department of Parasitology & Medical Entomology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia for the year 2004. A total of 10 cases (6 males and 4 females) were observed for the entomological specimens. Various types of death scenes were obtained including indoor and outdoor area such as bushes field, rubbish dumping site, and aquatic areas. Identified fly species collected from the death sites were blow flies, Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya rufifacies and Lucilia cuprina and unknown sarcophagid larvae, with Ch. megacephala being the most common species found in the ecologically varied death scene habitats. The post-mortem interval (PMI) estimation ranged from one to five days, based on the entomological specimens collected.

  19. A 100-year-old anatomical specimen presenting with boomerang-like skeletal dysplasia: diagnostic strategies and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, R. J.; Dijkstra, P. F.; Baljet, B.; Verbeeten, B. W.; Hennekam, R. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Museum Vrolik collection of human anatomy comprises 360 recently redescribed specimens with congenital anomalies. The specimen described here dated from 1881 and presented with a general embryonic appearance, disproportionate short stature, brachycephaly, widened cranial sutures, hypertelorism,

  20. Establishment of human iPSC line NCCSi003-A from CD34+cells of peripheral blood collected during apheresis of healthy donor from Indian ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sophia; Tembe, Shruti; Shinde, Prajakta; Melinkeri, Sameer; Kale, Vaijayanti; Limaye, Lalita

    2018-03-01

    We present generation of iPSCs from CD34 + cells isolated from peripheral blood, collected during apheresis of a healthy female individual. We nucleofected the CD34 + cells by episomal vectors containing Oct4, Sox2, L-Myc, Lin28, Klf4 and p53DD (dominant negative mutation in p53). The resultant colonies showed cobble-stone appearance and stained positive for alkaline phosphatase. The colonies demonstrated presence of pluripotency markers by immunofluorescence, flow-cytometry and PCR. The plasmids were lost from cells subsequently during passages as assessed by PCR. Karyotype analysis demonstrated a stable genome. The cells had capability to differentiate to cells from all three-germ lineages in vitro. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Establishment of human iPSC line NCCSi003-A from CD34+cells of peripheral blood collected during apheresis of healthy donor from Indian ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Fernandes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present generation of iPSCs from CD34+ cells isolated from peripheral blood, collected during apheresis of a healthy female individual. We nucleofected the CD34+cells by episomal vectors containing Oct4, Sox2, L-Myc, Lin28, Klf4 and p53DD (dominant negative mutation in p53. The resultant colonies showed cobble-stone appearance and stained positive for alkaline phosphatase. The colonies demonstrated presence of pluripotency markers by immunofluorescence, flow-cytometry and PCR. The plasmids were lost from cells subsequently during passages as assessed by PCR. Karyotype analysis demonstrated a stable genome. The cells had capability to differentiate to cells from all three-germ lineages in vitro.

  2. Investigation on The Blood Cell Counts of Chalcides ocellatus (Sauria: Scincidae) Population in Anatolia

    OpenAIRE

    MERMER, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, the blood cell counts (erythrocyts and leucocyts) of 136 Chalcides ocellatus specimens (75 females + 61 males), collected from different locations in Anatolia have been investigated from the view point of the effects of geographical distance and altitude factors. The blood cell counts are found to be highest in the population from Gaziantep-Urfa and the cause of this difference is evaluated as due to geographic variation.

  3. Evaluation of the Xpert HCV Viral Load point-of-care assay from venepuncture-collected and finger-stick capillary whole-blood samples: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebely, Jason; Lamoury, Francois M J; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Mowat, Yasmin; Marshall, Alison D; Bajis, Sahar; Marks, Philippa; Amin, Janaki; Smith, Julie; Edwards, Michael; Gorton, Carla; Ezard, Nadine; Persing, David; Kleman, Marika; Cunningham, Philip; Catlett, Beth; Dore, Gregory J; Applegate, Tanya L

    2017-07-01

    Point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA testing offers an advantage over antibody testing (which only indicates previous exposure), enabling diagnosis of active infection in a single visit. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay with venepuncture and finger-stick capillary whole-blood samples. Plasma and finger-stick capillary whole-blood samples were collected from participants in an observational cohort enrolled at five sites in Australia (three drug and alcohol clinics, one homelessness service, and one needle and syringe programme). We compared the sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert HCV Viral Load test for HCV RNA detection by venepuncture and finger-stick collection with the Abbott RealTime HCV Viral Load assay (gold standard). Of 210 participants enrolled between Feb 8, 2016, and July 27, 2016, 150 participants had viral load testing results for the three assays tested. HCV RNA was detected in 45 (30% [95% CI 23-38]) of 150 participants based on Abbott RealTime. Sensitivity of the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay for HCV RNA detection in plasma collected by venepuncture was 100·0% (95% CI 92·0-100·0) and specificity was 99·1% (95% CI 94·9-100·0). Sensitivity of the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay for HCV RNA detection in samples collected by finger-stick was 95·5% (95% CI 84·5-99·4) and specificity was 98·1% (95% CI 93·4-99·8). No adverse events caused by the index test or the reference standard were observed. The Xpert HCV Viral Load test can detect active infection from a finger-stick sample, which represents an advance over antibody-based tests that only indicate past or previous exposure. National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia), Cepheid, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District (Australia), and Merck Sharp & Dohme (Australia). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative tear lysozyme assay: a new technique for transporting specimens.

    OpenAIRE

    Seal, D V; Mackie, I A; Coakes, R L; Farooqi, B

    1980-01-01

    We have developed a method for assaying the concentration of tear lysozyme using eluates of tear fluid collected on filter paper discs. Specimens can be stored and transported to remote laboratories for assay. We have shown that the 'indirect' or eluate method gives statistically comparable results to the 'direct' method using fresh, neat tear fluid.

  5. Quantitative tear lysozyme assay: a new technique for transporting specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, D V; Mackie, I A; Coakes, R L; Farooqi, B

    1980-09-01

    We have developed a method for assaying the concentration of tear lysozyme using eluates of tear fluid collected on filter paper discs. Specimens can be stored and transported to remote laboratories for assay. We have shown that the 'indirect' or eluate method gives statistically comparable results to the 'direct' method using fresh, neat tear fluid.

  6. Decreasing mislabeled laboratory specimens using barcode technology and bedside printers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judy E; Smith, Nancy; Sherfy, Beth R

    2011-01-01

    Mislabeling of laboratory samples has been found to be a high-risk issue in acute care hospitals. The goal of this study was to decrease mislabeled blood specimens. In the first year after the implementation of a positive patient identification system using barcoding and computer technology, the number of labeling errors decreased from 103 to 8 per year. The outcome was clinically and statistically significant (P < .001).

  7. Comparison of three different kits for extraction of high-quality RNA from frozen blood

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin-Hee; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, Jin-Ah; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Young Jun; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of high-quality RNA is a crucial step in gene expression profiling. To achieve optimal RNA extraction from frozen blood, the performance of three RNA extraction kits- TRI reagent, PAXgene blood RNA system (PAXgene) and NucleoSpin RNA blood kit (NucleoSpin)- was evaluated. Fifteen blood specimens collected in tubes containing potassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and stored at −80°C for approximately 5 years were randomly selected. The yield and purity of RNA, RIN (RNA in...

  8. Evaluation of specimen preservatives for DNA analyses of bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, M.; Droege, S.; Conrad, T.; Prager, S.; Richards, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale insect collecting efforts that are facilitated by the use of pan traps result in large numbers of specimens being collected. Storage of these specimens can be problematic if space and equipment are limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of various preservatives (alcohol solutions and DMSO) on the amount and quality of DNA extracted from bees (specifically Halictidae, Apidae, and Andrenidae). In addition, we examined the amount and quality of DNA obtained from bee specimens killed and stored at -80 degrees C and from specimens stored for up to 24 years in ethanol. DNA quality was measured in terms of how well it could be PCR-amplified using a set of mitochondrial primers that are commonly used in insect molecular systematics. Overall the best methods of preservation were ultra-cold freezing and dimethyl sulfoxide, but these are both expensive and in the case of ultra-cold freezing, somewhat impractical for field entomologists. Additionally, dimethyl sulfoxide was shown to have adverse effects on morphological characters that are typically used for identification to the level of species. We therefore recommend that the best alternative is 95% ethanol, as it preserves bee specimens well for both morphological and molecular studies.

  9. Development of Reconstitution Technology for Surveillance Specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasushi Atago; Shunichi Hatano; Eiichiro Otsuka

    2002-01-01

    The Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) has been carrying out the project titled 'Nuclear Power Plant Integrated Management Technology (PLIM)' consigned by Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) since 1996FY as a 10-years project. As one of the project themes, development of reconstitution technology for reactor pressure vessel (RPV/RV) surveillance specimens, which are installed in RPVs to monitor the neutron irradiation embrittlement on RPV/RV materials, is now on being carried out to deal with the long-term operation of nuclear power plants. The target of this theme is to establish the technical standard for applicability of reconstituted surveillance specimens including the reconstitution of the Charpy specimens and Compact Tension (CT) specimens. With the Charpy specimen reconstitution, application of 10 mm length inserts is used, which enables the conversion of tests from the LT-direction to the TL-direction. This paper presents the basic data from Charpy and CT specimens of RPV materials using the surveillance specimens obtained for un-irradiated materials including the following. 1) Reconstitution Technology of Charpy Specimens. a) The interaction between plastic zone and Heat Affected Zone (HAZ). b) The effects of the possible deviations from the standard specimens for the reconstituted specimens. 2) Reconstitution Technology of CT specimens. a) The correlation between fracture toughness and plastic zone width. Because the project is now in progress, this paper describes the outline of the results obtained as of the end of 2000 FY. (authors)

  10. Blood Collection Tubes and Storage Temperature Should Be Evaluated when Using the Siemens ADVIA Centaur XP for Measuring 25-Hydroxyvitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Songlin; Zhou, Weiyan; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Cheng, Qian; Han, Jianhua; Su, Wei; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    A significant bias was found when using the Siemens ADVIA Centaur XP system for measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) with VACUETTE® tubes with Serum Clot Activator and Gel. Here, we examined whether other commonly used tubes or temperatures affected 25OHD results obtained with the Siemens ADVIA Centaur XP system. Serum was collected into five types of vacuum blood collection tubes from three manufacturers, and 25OHD was analyzed using the Siemens ADVIA Centaur XP system and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) immediately or after storage at 4°C or -80°C for 48 h. Significantly higher 25OHD values were found when using the Siemens ADVIA Centaur XP system with VACUETTE® tubes with serum clot activator and gel and VACUETTE® tubes with clot activator but no gel compared with VACUETTE® tubes with no additives. The 25OHD values in all of these tubes were not significantly different from those obtained by LC-MS/MS. Moreover, after storage at -80°C for 48 h, the values obtained in IMPROVEVACUTER® tubes with serum clot activator and gel significantly increased, with a mean bias of 74.6% compared with the values before storage, on analysis with the Siemens ADVIA Centaur XP system. VACUETTE® tubes containing additives significantly affect the accuracy of 25OHD results obtained using the Siemens ADVIA Centaur XP system. Additionally, the composition of serum collected in IMPROVEVACUTER® tubes was affected by freezing, resulting in different measurements when using the Siemens 25OHD assay platform.

  11. Evaluation and investigation of regional cerebral blood flow by 1 point arterial blood collection method using 99mTc-ECD. Intravenous injection for 4 minutes with constant speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Takeo; Shibata, Kazuhiro; Sudoh, Hideaki; Tanaka, Masato; Itoh, Kenjiro; Ueno, Yasushi

    1998-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured using a 99m Tc-ECD through the 4-min constant intravenous infusion/one point arterial blood sampling method, proposed by Nakagawara et al. of Nakamura Memorial Hospital, and 133Xenon ( 133 Xe)-SPECT was performed on the same subjects to investigate the reproducibility of this method. We also determined whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) could be measured on the day of blood sampling through dilution of the obtained blood because it was difficult to measure the radioactivity in the blood on the day of blood sampling by this method. More, we investigated fixation of an octanol extraction rate and the substitution of venous blood for arterial blood in this method. The results revealed that CBF measured by this method with a 99m Tc-ECD were closely correlated to those measured by 133 Xe-SPECT, indicating the reliability as a method of measuring CBF. rCBF could be measured on the day of blood sampling through appropriate dilution of the obtained arterial blood. Octanol extraction rates were almost constant, indicating possible omission of cumbersome extraction procedure by fixation. However, the substitution of venous blood for arterial blood showed no correlation under the study system examined. (author)

  12. ARCTOS: a relational database relating specimens, specimen-based science, and archival documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Gordon H.; Ramotnik, Cindy A.; McDonald, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Data are preserved when they are perpetually discoverable, but even in the Information Age, discovery of legacy data appropriate to particular investigations is uncertain. Secure Internet storage is necessary but insufficient. Data can be discovered only when they are adequately described, and visibility increases markedly if the data are related to other data that are receiving usage. Such relationships can be built within (1) the framework of a relational database, or (1) they can be built among separate resources, within the framework of the Internet. Evolving primarily around biological collections, Arctos is a database that does both of these tasks. It includes data structures for a diversity of specimen attributes, essentially all collection-management tasks, plus literature citations, project descriptions, etc. As a centralized collaboration of several university museums, Arctos is an ideal environment for capitalizing on the many relationships that often exist between items in separate collections. Arctos is related to NIH’s DNA-sequence repository (GenBank) with record-to-record reciprocal linkages, and it serves data to several discipline-specific web portals, including the Global Biodiversity Information Network (GBIF). The University of Alaska Museum’s paleontological collection is Arctos’s recent extension beyond the constraints of neontology. With about 1.3 million cataloged items, additional collections are being added each year.

  13. Histopathologic analysis of appendectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shrestha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute appendicitis is one of the common conditions requiring emergency surgery. A retrospective study was performed to determine various histopathological diagnoses, their demographics and the rates of perforated appendicitis, negative appendectomy and incidental appendectomy. Materials and Methods: Histopathological records of resected appendices submitted to histopathology department Chitwan medical college teaching hospital over the period of 2 yrs from May, 2009 to April 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Out of 930 specimens of appendix, appendicitis accounted for 88.8% with peak age incidence in the age group of 11 to 30 yrs in both sexes. Histopathologic diagnoses included acute appendicitis (45.6%, acute suppurative (20.8%, gangrenous (16.3%, perforated (1.7%, resolving /recurrent/non specific chronic appendicitis (2.5%, acute eosinophilic appendicitis (1.2%, periappendicitis (0.2%, and carcinoid tumour (0.1%. Other important coexisting pathologies were parasitic infestation (0.2% and Meckel’s diverticulum (0.2%. Negative appendectomy rate was 10.8% and three times more common in females with peak occurrence in the age group of 21-30 yrs. There were 10 cases of acute appendicitis in incidental appendectomies (2.5%, 24 cases with 7 times more common in females of age group of 31- 60 yrs. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of appendicitis in adolescents and young adults in central south region of Nepal. Negative appendectomy is also very common in females. Incidental appendectomy in elderly females may have preventive value. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i3.6025 JPN 2012; 2(3: 215-219

  14. Ecological niches and blood sources of sand fly in an endemic focus of visceral leishmaniasis in Jiuzhaigou, Sichuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huiying; Li, Kaili; Shi, Hua; Zhang, Yong; Ha, Yu; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Jinjin; Wang, Yubin; Yang, Zhenzhou; Xu, Jiannong; Ma, Yajun

    2016-04-13

    Sand fly Phlebotomus chinensis is a principle vector for the visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in China with a wide geographic distribution. Jiuzhaigou, Sichuan is a mountain type endemic area of VL in China. Long term effective control efforts in the region have successfully reduced VL transmission. To assess the current status of the sand flies and their ecological aspects in the region, a survey was conducted in the summer of 2014 and 2015. Sand fly specimens were collected by light traps in a village and blood sources were identified by PCR and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. In a rock cave, 65.2 %-79.8 % of collected sand flies were male. On a rabbit farm, 92.9 %-98.8 % of specimens were female. In pig pens, 61.1 % of specimens were female. Some females had visible blood residues. The feeding rate was 49.4 % from the pig pens, 12.3 % from the cave, and only 1.7 % from the rabbit farm. Pig, rabbit, chicken, dog, and human blood were detected in the fed specimens. Swine blood, present in all tested samples, was a preferred blood source, while chicken and dog blood were present in a third of the samples. In Jiuzhaigou County, Sichuan Province of China, the considerable sandfly density and the peridomestic feeding behavior all increases the risk of VL transmission, and insecticide spraying in animal sheds could be exploited to reduce sand fly populations in human surroundings.

  15. AhR- and ER-mediated activities in human blood samples collected from PCB-contaminated and background region in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pliskova, M. [Veterinary Researcch Institute, Brno (Czech Republic); Canton, R.F.; Duursen, M.B.M. van [Utrecht Univ. (NL). Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    Endocrine disruption mediated through activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and estrogen receptor (ER) by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been studied extensively both in vivo and in vitro. Non-ortho- and mono-ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are potent AhR agonists therefore, increased dioxin-like activity of complex blood samples might reflect an increased exposure to PCBs. The induction of expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in different tissues, including lymphocytes, also depends on activation of AhR and it could be useful as a potential biomarker of exposure to dioxin-like compounds. Using various in vivo and in vitro models, the exposure to PCBs or hydroxy-PCBs has been reported to lead to either induction of ER-mediated activity or to an antiestrogenic effect associated with a suppression of estradiol-induced ER-dependent gene expression. Nevertheless, relative (anti)estrogenic potencies of a large set of prevalent environmental PCBs have not been yet compared in a single bioassay. A cross-talk between AhR and ER has been suggested to lead to a suppression of ER-mediated gene expression. Therefore, presence of dioxin-like compounds in blood could potentially suppress the ER-mediated activity. Additionally, AhR-dependent induction of CYP1A1 and especially CYP1B1, two enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism of estradiol and other estrogens, might enhance the metabolism of estradiol and it has been suggested to cause a potential depression of estrogen levels in the body. The aim of the present study was to determine dioxin-like, estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in human blood samples collected in two Eastern Slovakia regions differently polluted with PCBs using established in vitro bioassays. We also studied mRNA expression of CYP1A1 and 1B1 in lymphocytes and the genotypes of CYP1B1 as possible biomarkers of exposure for PCBs and related compounds. The biological data obtained

  16. Development of miniature bending fatigue specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.R.; Chin, B.A.; Rowcliffe, A.

    1991-01-01

    Two new miniaturized bending fatigue specimens have been designed and developed to aid in the scoping of materials for fusion first-wall and blanket structural applications. One of these is rectangular in shape with a gauge section 6.35 mm in length, while the other is cut from a 3 mm transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disk and has a gauge length of 1.5 mm. Test rules for unirradiated annealed type 316 stainless steel tested at room temperature, 550deg C and 650deg C are presented. A good correlation between miniature and standard subsize fatigue specimen results was obtained. The miniature specimen results show the same dependence of strain range on cycles to failure as the standard subsize specimens with the miniature-disk specimen results falling below all the other results. The results indicate that these specimens provide reliable data that can be used to scope fatigue properties for fusion applications. (orig.)

  17. SPME-GC analysis of THC in saliva samples collected with "EPITOPE" device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucci, N; De Giovanni, N; Chiarotti, M; Scarlata, S

    2001-07-15

    In this study we examined the presence of cannabinoids in saliva samples obtained from 24 drug-abusers. The saliva specimens were collected by "EPITOPE" system and the subsequent elution of samples was achieved by centrifugation. The resulting ultrafiltrates have been directly sampled with solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) and then analyzed by GC/MS. Saliva sampling is less invasive than collection of blood.

  18. Dataset of herbarium specimens of threatened vascular plants in Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Nualart

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This data paper describes a specimens’ dataset of the Catalonian threatened vascular plants conserved in five public Catalonian herbaria (BC, BCN, HGI, HBIL and MTTE. Catalonia is an administrative region of Spain that includes large autochthon plants diversity and 199 taxa with IUCN threatened categories (EX, EW, RE, CR, EN and VU. This dataset includes 1,618 records collected from 17th century to nowadays. For each specimen, the species name, locality indication, collection date, collector, ecology and revision label are recorded. More than 94% of the taxa are represented in the herbaria, which evidence the paper of the botanical collections as an essential source of occurrence data.

  19. Identification of host blood-meal sources and Borrelia in field-collected Ixodes ricinus ticks in north-western Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodecka, Beata; Skotarczak, Bogumila

    2016-01-01

    Forest animals play fundamental roles in the maintenance of Ixodes ricinus and Borrelia species in the forest biotope. To identify the forest vertebrate species that are host for I. ricinus and for the recognition of the reservoirs of Borrelia species, the blood-meal of 325 I. ricinus ticks collected at two forest sites in north-western Poland were analysed. Nested PCR was used to detect polymorphisms in a fragment of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene for the identification of the hosts species. The products were digested with the restriction enzymes, a combination that allows the identification of 60 vertebrate species, comprising 17 bird, 4 reptile and 39 mammalian species. Host DNA was detected in 244 (75%) I. ricinus individuals, with the species being detected and classified for 210 (86%) samples. The restriction patterns resulted in the identification of 14 vertebrate species, including 2 species of birds, lizard, badger, rabbit, deer; most of the samples contained DNA from wild boar (Sus scrofa), red fox (Vulpes vulpes), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). Identification of Borrelia species was based on the flaB gene using nested PCR coupled to RFLP. This method allows the identification of all Borrelia species transmitted by I. ricinus in Europe, including B. miyamotoi and 3 genetic variants of B. garinii. In the studied isolates, 2 species belonging to B. burgdorferi sensu lato were identified--B. garinii and B. afzelii, and B. miyamotoi, which are related to relapsing fever borreliae.

  20. New suoid specimens from Gebel Zelten, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickford, M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A restricted collection of suoids from Gebel Zelten was made in the 1990’s by the Spanish-Libyan Palaeontology Expedition. Dr Dolores Soria filmed the specimens with a video camera and took measurements of the teeth with vernier calipers. This paper uses the images from the video, which, even though somewhat limited in terms of picture quality, are of interest because they represent the first known snout of the gigantic suid Megalochoerus khinzikebirus. The images reveal that it is basically an enlarged version of Libycochoerus massai, but with relatively small premolars. The sanithere specimens from the site were photographed with an Olympus 1.4 megapixel digital camera, and the image quality is better than from the video camera. These specimens throw light on the degree of sexual dimorphism exhibited by sanitheres, a feature that was previously inferred from isolated teeth, but which can now be confirmed on the basis of the two mandible fragments from Gebel Zelten. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Dr Soria. This paper takes into account a few undescribed suid post-cranial bones from Gebel Zelten housed in the Natural History Museum, London, collected during the 1960’s by R. Savage.Una limitada colección de suoideos procedentes de Gebel Zelten fue hecha a finales de los años 1990 por una expedición paleontológica internacional, con participación española y libia. La Dra. Dolores Soria filmó los ejemplares con una cámara de vídeo y tomó las medidas de los dientes con calibre. En este trabajo se utilizan las imágenes filmadas, que, aunque algo limitadas en términos de calidad fotográfica, son interesantes porque representan las primeras conocidas del rostro del suido gigante Megalochoerus khinzikebirus. Las imágenes revelan que básicamente es una versión agrandada de Libycochoerus massai, pero con premolares relativamente más pequeños. Los ejemplares de saniterios fueron fotografiados con una cámara digital Olympus

  1. Alfredo Dugès' type specimens of amphibians and reptiles revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Villela, Oscar; Ríos-Muñoz, César A; Magaña-Cota, Gloria E; Quezadas-Tapia, Néstor L

    2016-03-14

    The type specimens of amphibians and reptiles of the Museo de Historia Natural Alfredo Dugès, at the University of Guanajuato (MADUG) were reviewed following Smith & Necker's (1943) summary. Owing to this collection's eventful history and its historical importance as the oldest herpetological collection in Mexico, a review of its conservation status was needed. After many years, the collection has received proper recognition at the University of Guanajuato with a portion of the herpetological types considered "Precious Assets" of the university. We found 34 type specimens pertaining to 18 taxa; six are additional specimens to those previously reported; six herpetological types are missing, including the body of the type of Adelophis copei. All specimens are in good to reasonable condition except for the type of Rhinocheilus antonii, which has dried out completely. All specimens are illustrated to show their condition.

  2. Study of Biological Pigments by Single Specimen Derivative Spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Jack M.

    1970-01-01

    The single specimen derivative (SSD) method provides an absolute absorption spectrum of a substance in the absence of a suitable reference. Both a reference and a measuring monochromatic beam pass through a single sample, and the specimen itself acts as its own reference. The two monochromatic beams maintain a fixed wavelength difference upon scanning, and the difference in absorbance of the two beams is determined. Thus, the resulting spectrum represents the first derivative of the conventional type absorption spectrum. Tissues and cell fractions have been examined at room and liquid N2 temperature and chromophoric molecules such as the mitochondrial cytochromes and blood pigments have been detectable in low concentrations. In the case of isolated cellular components, the observed effects of substrates and inhibitors confirm similar studies by conventional spectrophotometry. The extension of the SSD concept to the microscopic level has permitted the study of the tissue compartmentalization and function of cytochromes and other pigments within layered tissue. PMID:4392452

  3. Type specimens of Maastrichtian fossils in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leloux, J.

    2002-01-01

    The type specimens of Maastrichtian invertebrate fossils from Limburg, The Netherlands, present in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden, are listed. The Upper Cretaceous plant type specimens from Limburg of Miquel that were once part of the Staring collection present in the Palaeobotanical

  4. 7 CFR 97.8 - Specimen requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specimen requirements. 97.8 Section 97.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... required by the examiner to furnish representative specimens of the variety, or its flower, fruit, or seeds...

  5. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  6. Fatigue Specimens for Sheet and Plate Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijve, J.

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of simple sheet and plate specimens is discussed for various experimental research purposes. Specimens should be representative as much as possible for the conditions of fatigue problems in practice, which is more difficult to achieve for the fatigue crack initiation phase than for

  7. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dwight A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoegh, Kyle [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Khazanovich, Lev [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the field Hematology 2017 A collection of articles from the 2017 ASH Annual Meeting Education Program Blood: How I Treat A compendium of Blood articles updated to reflect the most recent scientific research ...

  9. Recent advances on Charpy specimen reconstitution techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Lobo, Raquel M.; Miranda, Carlos Alexandre J., E-mail: aandrade@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Charpy specimen reconstitution is widely used around the world as a tool to enhance or supplement surveillance programs of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The reconstitution technique consists in the incorporation of a small piece from a previously tested specimen into a compound specimen, allowing to increase the number of tests. This is especially important if the available materials is restricted and fracture mechanics parameter have to be determined. The reconstitution technique must fulfill some demands, among them tests results like the original standard specimens and the loaded material of the insert must not be influenced by the welding and machining procedure. It is known that reconstitution of Charpy specimens may affect the impact energy in a consequence of the constraint of plastic deformation by the hardened weldment and HAZ. This paper reviews some recent advances of the reconstitution technique and its applications. (author)

  10. Examination of Surgical Specimens of the Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Pablo A; Berho, Mariana

    2015-11-01

    Esophageal cancer continues to be one of the most lethal of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Its prognostic parameters are based on the gross and histopathologic examination of resected specimens by pathologists. To describe the implications of appropriate handling and examination of endomucosal resection and esophagectomy specimens from patients with esophageal carcinoma while considering the implications of the surgical techniques used to obtain such specimens. Parameters include histopathologic findings necessary for accurate staging, differences in the assessment of margins, residual malignancy, and criteria to evaluate for tumor regression after chemoradiation therapy as well as the role of immunohistochemistry and the judicious use of frozen sections. Sources were a review of the literature and the authors' experience handling these types of specimens. Examining surgical specimens of the esophagus is critical in the management of patients with esophageal carcinoma, and it requires careful consideration of the diagnostic pitfalls, staging-related parameters, and results of molecular tests.

  11. Recent advances on Charpy specimen reconstitution techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Arnaldo H.P.; Lobo, Raquel M.; Miranda, Carlos Alexandre J.

    2017-01-01

    Charpy specimen reconstitution is widely used around the world as a tool to enhance or supplement surveillance programs of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The reconstitution technique consists in the incorporation of a small piece from a previously tested specimen into a compound specimen, allowing to increase the number of tests. This is especially important if the available materials is restricted and fracture mechanics parameter have to be determined. The reconstitution technique must fulfill some demands, among them tests results like the original standard specimens and the loaded material of the insert must not be influenced by the welding and machining procedure. It is known that reconstitution of Charpy specimens may affect the impact energy in a consequence of the constraint of plastic deformation by the hardened weldment and HAZ. This paper reviews some recent advances of the reconstitution technique and its applications. (author)

  12. [A catalog of fish specimens preserved within Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li-Na; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2013-08-01

    As of 2013, some 178 fish type species and 2131 type specimens belonging to 4 orders and 11 families were currently being preserved at the Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology, located as art of the Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. These specimens were collected from across western China, includingYunnan, Sicuan, Guizhou, Guangxi, Hunan, Chongqi, Gansu and Xinjiang. In general, most species are Cyprinidae (71 species and 1103 specimens), followed by Nemacheilidae (52 species and 556 specimens). For the convenience of research and communication, the present paper presents a detailed list of fish type species preserved in the Kunming Natural History Museum of Zoology.

  13. Identification of host blood-meal sources and Borrelia in field-collected Ixodes ricinus ticks in north-western Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Wodecka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Forest animals play fundamental roles in the maintenance of [i]Ixodes ricinus[/i] and [i]Borrelia[/i] species in the forest biotope. To identify the forest vertebrate species that are host for I. ricinus and for the recognition of the reservoirs of [i]Borrelia[/i] species, the blood-meal of 325 [i]I. ricinus[/i] ticks collected at two forest sites in north-western Poland were analysed. Nested PCR was used to detect polymorphisms in a fragment of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene for the identification of the hosts species. The products were digested with the restriction enzymes, a combination that allows the identification of 60 vertebrate species, comprising 17 bird, 4 reptile and 39 mammalian species. Host DNA was detected in 244 (75%[i] I. ricinus[/i] individuals, with the species being detected and classified for 210 (86% samples. The restriction patterns resulted in the identification of 14 vertebrate species, including 2 species of birds, lizard, badger, rabbit, deer; most of the samples contained DNA from wild boar ([i]Sus scrofa[/i], red fox ([i]Vulpes vulpes[/i], red deer ([i]Cervus elaphus[/i] and roe deer ([i]Capreolus capreolus[/i]. Identification of Borrelia species was based on the flaB gene using nested PCR coupled to RFLP. This method allows the identification of all [i]Borrelia[/i] species transmitted by [i]I. ricinus [/i]in Europe, including [i]B. miyamotoi[/i] and 3 genetic variants of [i]B. garinii[/i]. In the studied isolates, 2 species belonging to [i]B. burgdorferi[/i] sensu lato were identified – B. [i]garinii [/i]and B. [i]afzelii[/i], and B. [i]miyamotoi,[/i] which are related to relapsing fever borreliae.

  14. Incident Infection and Resistance Mutation Analysis of Dried Blood Spots Collected in a Field Study of HIV Risk Groups, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xierong; Smith, Amanda J; Forrest, David W; Cardenas, Gabriel A; Beck, Dano W; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa R; Sionean, Catlainn; Owen, S Michele; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    To assess the utility of cost-effective dried blood spot (DBS) field sampling for incidence and drug resistance surveillance of persons at high risk for HIV infection. We evaluated DBS collected in 2007-2010 in non-clinical settings by finger-stick from HIV-positive heterosexuals at increased risk of HIV infection (n = 124), men who have sex with men (MSM, n = 110), and persons who inject drugs (PWID, n = 58). Relative proportions of recent-infection findings among risk groups were assessed at avidity index (AI) cutoffs of ≤25%, ≤30%, and ≤35%, corresponding to an infection mean duration of recency (MDR) of 220.6, 250.4, and 278.3 days, respectively. Drug resistance mutation prevalence was compared among the risk groups and avidity indices. HIV antibody avidity testing of all self-reported ARV-naïve persons (n = 186) resulted in 9.7%, 11.3% and 14.0% with findings within the 221, 250, and 278-day MDRs, respectively. The proportion of ARV-naïve MSM, heterosexuals, and PWID reporting only one risk category who had findings below the suggested 30% AI was 23.1%, 6.9% and 3.6% (pinfection results than did heterosexuals and PWID. The disproportionately higher recent-infection findings for MSM as compared to PWID and heterosexuals increased as the MDR window increased. Unreported ARV use might explain greater recent-infection findings and drug resistance in this MSM population. DBS demonstrated utility in expanded HIV testing; however, optimal field handling is key to accurate recent-infection estimates.

  15. 21 CFR 640.1 - Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole Blood. 640.1 Section 640.1 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Whole Blood § 640.1 Whole Blood. The proper name of this product shall be Whole Blood. Whole Blood is defined as blood collected from human donors for transfusion...

  16. Benzophenone-type UV filters in urine and blood from children, adults, and pregnant women in China: partitioning between blood and urine as well as maternal and fetal cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Sun, Hongwen; Qin, Xiaolei; Wu, Qian; Zhang, Yanfeng; Ma, Jing; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2013-09-01

    Limited information exists on the exposure of benzophenone (BP)-type UV filters (i.e., sunscreen compounds) in children, adults, and pregnant women in China. In this study, we determined the concentrations of five BP derivatives, BP-1, BP-2, BP-3, BP-8, and 4OH-BP in urine (n=101) as well as paired specimens of blood and urine (n=24 pairs) collected from adults; in matched maternal and fetal cord blood (n=20 pairs) collected from pregnant women; and in blood collected from children (n=10). 4OH-BP, BP-1, and BP-3 were found in 61%, 57%, and 25%, respectively, of the urine samples analyzed. 4OH-BP was found in all blood samples; BP-3 was found more frequently in the blood of adults (83%), followed, in decreasing order, by pregnant women (35%) and children (30%). Among all adults, urinary BP-3 concentrations were significantly (pblood and urine was 0.21 in adults, which was significantly lower than that for 4OH-BP (0.36). The concentration ratio of BPs between cord blood and maternal blood was higher for 4OH-BP (0.61) than that for BP-3 (0.48), which suggested greater trans-placental transfer potential of 4OH-BP. This is the first study to document the occurrence of BPs in paired urine and blood, and in matched maternal and fetal cord blood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Multivariate Evaluation of Factors Affecting the Quality of Freshly Frozen Tissue Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Chen, Chin-Chuan; Liang, Kung-Hao; Chen, Chi-Yuan; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Ueng, Shir-Hwa; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chen, Tse-Ching; Hsueh, Chuen

    2017-08-01

    Well-prepared and preserved freshly frozen specimens are indispensable materials for clinical studies. To manage specimen quality and to understand the factors potentially affecting specimen quality during preservation processes, we analyzed the quality of RNA and genomic DNA of various tissues collected between 2002 and 2011 in Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan. During this period, a total of 1059 freshly frozen specimens from eight major cancer categories were examined. It was found that preservation duration, organ origin, and tissue type could all influence the quality of RNA samples. The increased preservation period correlated with decreased RNA quality; the brain, breast, and stomach RNA specimens displayed faster degradation rates than those of other organs, and RNA specimens isolated from tumor tissues were apparently more stable than those of other tissues. These factors could all be used as quality predictors of RNA quality. In contrast, almost all analyses revealed that the genomic DNA samples had good quality, which was not influenced by the aforementioned factors. The results assisted us in determining preservation factors that affect specimen quality, which could provide evidence for improving processes of sample collection and preservation. Furthermore, the results are also useful for researchers to adopt as the evaluation criteria for choosing specimen collection and preservation strategies.

  18. Blood and urinary bisphenol A concentrations in children, adults, and pregnant women from china: partitioning between blood and urine and maternal and fetal cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Sun, Hongwen; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2013-05-07

    Limited information exists on exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) by children, adults, and pregnant women in China. In the present study, we determined BPA concentrations in whole blood collected from 10 children (1-5 years), 40 women (30 pregnant and 10 nonpregnant), and 30 fetuses (i.e., cord blood). Further, to evaluate the relationship between urinary and blood BPA concentrations, paired specimens of blood and urine (n = 50 pairs) were collected from an adult population. BPA was found in 46% of all blood samples analyzed, with a geometric mean (GM) concentration of 0.19 ng/mL. BPA was found in 84% of urine samples from adults, with a GM concentration of 1.01 ng/mL [0.48 μg/g creatinine (Cr)]. Gender and age were not good predictors of blood BPA concentrations. However, we did find that the creatinine-adjusted urinary BPA concentrations in females were significantly higher (p China were 0.041 (women who underwent intravenous drug administration immediately before delivery had significantly higher concentrations of BPA in their blood than did those who did not receive intravenous drug administration. This is the first study to document the occurrence of and human exposure to BPA by pregnant women and fetuses from China.

  19. Macroscopic techniques for ophthalmic tumor specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Fiona

    2016-05-01

    This article explores the range of tumor specimens that may be submitted to ophthalmic pathology. The handling of complex enucleation and exenteration is described along with smaller eyelid, conjunctival and corneal specimens. The importance of a good understanding of the unique anatomy of the ocular region and detailed clinical information is emphasized as this results in the taking of appropriate blocks for histology and consequently clinically helpful reports. Recommendations for handling specimens where further tissue is required for molecular studies is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of irradiated coating material specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Lee Moon [RCS Korea Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Evaluation result of irradiated coating material specimens - Coating material specimens radiated Gamma Energy(Co 60) in air condition. - Evaluation conditions was above 1 X 10{sup 4} Gy/hr, and radiated TID 2.0 X 10{sup 6} Gy. - The radiated coating material specimens, No Checking, Cracking, Flaking, Delamination, Peeling and Blistering. - Coating system at the Kori no. 1 and APR 1400 Nuclear power plant, evaluation of irradiated coating materials is in accordance with owner's requirement(2.0 X 10{sup 6} Gy)

  1. Magnetic resonance of hearts in a jar: breathing new life into old pathological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutras, Luc C

    2010-06-01

    Specimens of the normal and congenitally abnormal heart have been long preserved, collected, and studied. It is increasingly difficult to add to such pathological collections. These museum pieces are often inaccessible for teaching purposes. Magnetic resonance imaging of old pathological specimens could produce high-resolution unalterable datasets that could be processed to create three-dimensional reconstructions using inexpensive systems that could be used by untrained individuals. To our knowledge, the concept of "Virtual Autopsy" has not been applied to cardiac specimens of museum collections. To determine optimal sequences and assure specimen safety, five different pulse sequences designed to create three-dimensional datasets were tried on a uterus specimen suspended in a fluid-filled glass container, using a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an eight-channel phased-array coil. Having found the best sequences and established specimen integrity, we scanned six historical heart specimens in their original fluid-filled glass containers. The datasets were processed on a laptop with a DICOM viewer available as freeware. All specimens were successfully scanned. The best image quality was obtained by using a three-dimensional FSPGR and the BRAVO pulse sequences. High-resolution three-dimensional and multi-planar image processing was possible for all datasets. Detailed examination of the specimens could be easily performed. Pathological specimens can successfully be scanned in minutes resulting in unalterable and portable high-resolution three-dimensional datasets that can be processed by using inexpensive readily available software. The final cardiac reconstructions can be widely shared for educational and scientific purposes and ensure a lasting access to pathological specimens.

  2. Prevalence of antibody to the human immunodeficiency virus among clinical laboratory specimens: findings from a survey of primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, N H; Petersen, L R; Conway, G A; Critchley, S E

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection among patients of primary care physicians, we performed anonymous, unlinked HIV-1 antibody testing on leftover blood specimens submitted to 10 large commercial clinical laboratories for complete blood cell count or hematocrit determination, the most commonly ordered diagnostic tests. From January through August 1990, 55,613 specimens submitted by general internists, pediatricians, and family practitioners were sampled; 1,104 (2.0%) had HIV-1 antibody. Seroprevalence among the laboratories varied 50-fold, from 0.3 to 12.4%. The HIV-1 prevalence at each laboratory was not always consistent with the AIDS incidence in the area served by the laboratory. Overall the seroprevalence was almost eight times higher in men (3.9%) than in women (0.5%). Specimens from seropositive persons, especially from men, were unevenly distributed among the physician practices; only three practices submitted approximately 50% of all specimens from seropositive men. These data indicate that a few physicians treat the majority of HIV-1-infected primary care patients. The HIV-1 prevalence among specimens at a clinical laboratory is thus determined by whether few physicians submit specimens to that laboratory. These results could be of use, for instance, in analyzing proposals to mandate physician reporting of HIV-1 infection. The high HIV-1 prevalence among laboratory specimens underscores the potential for exposure to HIV-1-infected blood by clinical laboratory personnel and emphasizes the need for universal precautions for all blood specimens.

  3. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  4. CPS Trawl Life History Specimen Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Individual specimens measured (weight in grams and length in mm) and sexed from mainly targeted species caught during SWFSC-FRD fishery independent trawl surveys of...

  5. Comparison of Home-Based Oral Fluid Rapid HIV Self-Testing Versus Mail-in Blood Sample Collection or Medical/Community HIV Testing By Young Adult Black, Hispanic, and White MSM: Results from a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C; Clark, Melissa A; Liu, Tao; Romanoff, Justin; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Bauermeister, Jose; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to determine in a randomized trial if young adult black, Hispanic, and white men-who-have-sex-with-men (YMSM) are more likely to complete home-based oral fluid rapid HIV self-testing than either mail-in blood sample collection or medical facility/community organization-based HIV testing. Stratified by race/ethnicity, participants were randomly assigned to use a free oral fluid rapid HIV self-test (n = 142), a free mail-in blood sample collection HIV test (n = 142), or be tested at a medical facility/community organization of their choice (n = 141). Of the 425 participants, completion of assigned test (66% oral fluid vs. 40% mail-in blood sample vs. 56% medical facility/community), willingness to refer (36% oral fluid vs. 20% mail-in blood sample vs. 26% medical facility/community), and legitimate referrals (58% oral fluid vs. 43% mail-in blood sample vs. 43% medical facility/community) were greater in the oral fluid rapid HIV self-test than the mail-in blood sample collection HIV test arm, but not the medical facility/community testing arm. There were no differences in assigned test completion by race/ethnicity. Although free home-based oral fluid rapid HIV self-testing showed moderate promise in facilitating HIV testing among black, Hispanic, and white YMSM, it did not lead to greater testing than directing these YMSM to medical facility/community HIV testing venues. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02369627.

  6. Using the developed cross-flow filtration chip for collecting blood plasma under high flow rate condition and applying the immunoglobulin E detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hung, Chia-Wei; Wu, Chun-Han; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a cross-flow filtration chip for separating blood cells (white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets) and obtaining blood plasma from human blood. Our strategy is to flow the sample solution in parallel to the membrane, which can generate a parallel shear stress to remove the clogging microparticles on the membrane, so the pure sample solution is obtained in the reservoir. The cross-flow filtration chip includes a cross-flow layer, a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane, and a reservoir layer. The three layers are packaged in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) frame to create the cross-flow filtration chip. Various dilutions of the blood sample (original, 2 × , 3 × , 5 × , and 10×), pore sizes with different diameters (1 µm, 2 µm, 4 µm, 7 µm, and 10 µm), and different flow rates (1 mL/min, 3 mL/min, 5 mL/min, 7 mL/min, and 10 mL/min) are tested to determine their effects on filtration percentage. The best filtration percentage is 96.2% when the dilution of the blood sample is 10 × , the diameter of pore size of a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane is 2 µm, and the flow rate is 10 mL/min. Finally, for the clinical tests of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentration, the cross-flow filtration chip is used to filter the blood of the allergy patients to obtain the blood plasma. This filtered blood plasma is compared with that obtained using the conventional centrifugation based on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results reveal that these two blood separation methods have similar detection trends. The proposed filtration chip has the advantages of low cost, short filtration time, and easy operation and thus can be applied to the separation of microparticles, cells, bacteria, and blood.

  7. Using the developed cross-flow filtration chip for collecting blood plasma under high flow rate condition and applying the immunoglobulin E detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Hung, Chia-Wei; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Wu, Chun-Han

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a cross-flow filtration chip for separating blood cells (white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets) and obtaining blood plasma from human blood. Our strategy is to flow the sample solution in parallel to the membrane, which can generate a parallel shear stress to remove the clogging microparticles on the membrane, so the pure sample solution is obtained in the reservoir. The cross-flow filtration chip includes a cross-flow layer, a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane, and a reservoir layer. The three layers are packaged in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) frame to create the cross-flow filtration chip. Various dilutions of the blood sample (original, 2 × , 3 × , 5 × , and 10×), pore sizes with different diameters (1 µm, 2 µm, 4 µm, 7 µm, and 10 µm), and different flow rates (1 mL/min, 3 mL/min, 5 mL/min, 7 mL/min, and 10 mL/min) are tested to determine their effects on filtration percentage. The best filtration percentage is 96.2% when the dilution of the blood sample is 10 × , the diameter of pore size of a Ni-Pd alloy micro-porous membrane is 2 µm, and the flow rate is 10 mL/min. Finally, for the clinical tests of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) concentration, the cross-flow filtration chip is used to filter the blood of the allergy patients to obtain the blood plasma. This filtered blood plasma is compared with that obtained using the conventional centrifugation based on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results reveal that these two blood separation methods have similar detection trends. The proposed filtration chip has the advantages of low cost, short filtration time, and easy operation and thus can be applied to the separation of microparticles, cells, bacteria, and blood. (paper)

  8. Thermal property testing technique on micro specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Tetsuya; Kishimoto, Isao; Taketoshi, Naoyuki

    2000-01-01

    This study aims at establishment of further development on some testing techniques on the nuclear advanced basic research accumulated by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology for ten years. For this purpose, a technology to test heat diffusion ratio and specific heat capacity of less than 3 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness of micro specimen and technology to test heat diffusion ratio at micro area of less than 1 mm in area along cross section of less than 10 mm in diameter of column specimen were developed to contribute to common basic technology supporting the nuclear power field. As a result, as an element technology to test heat diffusion ratio and specific heat capacity of the micro specimen, a specimen holding technique stably to hold a micro specimen with 3 mm in diameter could be developed. And, for testing the specific heat capacity by using the laser flush differential calorimetry, a technique to hold two specimen of 5 mm in diameter at their proximities was also developed. In addition, by promoting development of thermal property data base capable of storing thermal property data obtained in this study and with excellent workability in this 1998 fiscal year a data in/out-put program with graphical user interface could be prepared. (G.K.)

  9. Comparative study on Charpy specimen reconstitution techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdiliau, B.; Decroix, G.-M.; Averty, X.; Wident, P.; Bienvenu, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Welding processes are used to reconstitute previously tested Charpy specimens. → Stud welding is preferred for a quick installation, almost immediately operational. → Friction welding produces better quality welds, but requires a development effort. - Abstract: Reconstitution techniques are often used to allow material from previously fractured Charpy-V specimens to be reused for additional experiments. This paper presents a comparative experimental study of various reconstitution techniques and evaluates the feasibility of these methods for future use in shielded cells. The following techniques were investigated: arc stud welding, 6.0 kW CO 2 continuous wave laser welding, 4.5 kW YAG continuous wave laser welding and friction welding. Subsize Charpy specimens were reconstituted using a 400 W YAG pulsed wave laser. The best result was obtained with arc stud welding; the resilience of the reconstituted specimens and the load-displacement curves agreed well with the reference specimens, and the temperature elevation caused by the welding process was limited to the vicinity of the weld. Good results were also obtained with friction welding; this process led to the best quality welds. Laser welding seems to have affected the central part of the specimens, thus leading to different resilience values and load-displacement curves.

  10. Banking Brain Tumor Specimens Using a University Core Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregy, Amade; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Faber, David A; Shah, Ashish H; Gomez, Carmen R; Komotar, Ricardo J; Egea, Sophie C

    2015-08-01

    Within the past three decades, the significance of banking human cancer tissue for the advancement of cancer research has grown exponentially. The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in collecting brain tumor specimens in collaboration with the University of Miami/Sylvester Tissue Bank Core Facility (UM-TBCF), to ensure the availability of high-quality samples of central nervous system tumor tissue for research. Successful tissue collection begins with obtaining informed consent from patients following institutional IRB and federal HIPAA guidelines, and it needs a well-trained professional staff and continued maintenance of high ethical standards and record keeping. Since starting in 2011, we have successfully banked 225 brain tumor specimens for research. Thus far, the most common tumor histology identified among those specimens has been glioblastoma (22.1%), followed by meningioma (18.1%). The majority of patients were White, non-Hispanics accounting for 45.1% of the patient population; Hispanic/Latinos accounted for 23%, and Black/African Americans accounted for 14%, which represent the particular population of the State of Florida according to the 2010 census data. The most common tumors found in each subgroup were as follows: Black/African American, glioblastoma and meningioma; Hispanic, metastasis and glioblastoma; White, glioblastoma and meningioma. The UM-TBCF is a valuable repository, offering high-quality tumor samples from a unique patient population.

  11. Computer vision applied to herbarium specimens of German trees: testing the future utility of the millions of herbarium specimen images for automated identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jakob; Merhof, Dorit; Renner, Susanne

    2016-11-16

    Global Plants, a collaborative between JSTOR and some 300 herbaria, now contains about 2.48 million high-resolution images of plant specimens, a number that continues to grow, and collections that are digitizing their specimens at high resolution are allocating considerable recourses to the maintenance of computer hardware (e.g., servers) and to acquiring digital storage space. We here apply machine learning, specifically the training of a Support-Vector-Machine, to classify specimen images into categories, ideally at the species level, using the 26 most common tree species in Germany as a test case. We designed an analysis pipeline and classification system consisting of segmentation, normalization, feature extraction, and classification steps and evaluated the system in two test sets, one with 26 species, the other with 17, in each case using 10 images per species of plants collected between 1820 and 1995, which simulates the empirical situation that most named species are represented in herbaria and databases, such as JSTOR, by few specimens. We achieved 73.21% accuracy of species assignments in the larger test set, and 84.88% in the smaller test set. The results of this first application of a computer vision algorithm trained on images of herbarium specimens shows that despite the problem of overlapping leaves, leaf-architectural features can be used to categorize specimens to species with good accuracy. Computer vision is poised to play a significant role in future rapid identification at least for frequently collected genera or species in the European flora.

  12. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drive Home Types of Blood Donations Blood Types Blood Types Not all blood is alike. There are eight ... African descent. Learn More About Blood and Diversity Blood Types and Transfusion There are very specific ways in ...

  13. Estimation of HIV-1 DNA Level Interfering with Reliability of HIV-1 RNA Quantification Performed on Dried Blood Spots Collected from Successfully Treated Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zida, Sylvie; Tuaillon, Edouard; Barro, Makoura; Kwimatouo Lekpa Franchard, Arnaud; Kagoné, Thérèse; Nacro, Boubacar; Ouedraogo, Abdoul Salam; Bolloré, Karine; Sanosyan, Armen; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Meda, Nicolas; Sangaré, Lassana; Rouzioux, Christine; Rouet, François; Kania, Dramane

    2016-01-01

    The impact of HIV-1 DNA coamplification during HIV-1 RNA quantification on dried blood spots (DBS) was explored. False-positive HIV RNA detection (22/62, 35%) was associated with high HIV-1 DNA levels. Specificity of HIV-1 RNA assays on DBS should be evaluated following manufacturer protocols on samples with HIV-1 DNA levels of ≥1,000 copies/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  14. Drugged Driving in Wisconsin: Oral Fluid Versus Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lorrine D; Smith, Katherine L; Savage, Theodore

    2017-07-01

    A pilot project was conducted in Dane County, Wisconsin, to evaluate the frequency of individuals driving under the influence of drugs (DUID). Evidentiary blood specimens, collected from subjects arrested for Operating While Intoxicated (OWI), were compared to oral fluid (OF) results obtained with the Alere DDS2®, a handheld screening device. The project objectives were to evaluate (i) the Alere DDS2® for use by police officers in the field, (ii) the frequency of individuals DUID and drugs combined with alcohol among OWI cases, (iii) the differences between detecting drugs in OF and in blood, and (iv) the effect of the laboratory drug testing cancellation policy (LCP) when the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) exceeds 0.100 g/100 mL. Following the arrest and collection of blood, subjects were asked to voluntarily participate in the project and provide an OF specimen. The OF was presumptively screened with the Alere DDS2® for six drug categories including (ng/mL) amphetamine (50), benzodiazepines (temazepam, 20), cocaine (benzoylecgonine, 30), methamphetamine (50), opioids (morphine, 40) and THC (delta-9-THC, 25). Results obtained with the OF screening instrument were not confirmed. A total of 104 subjects (22 female, 82 male), ages 18-72, were included in the project. Blood specimens were tested by gas chromatography-headspace (GCHS-FID) for volatiles, enzyme immunoassay (Siemens Viva-E Drug Testing System), and an alkaline basic drug screen with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) analysis. To compensate for differences between the EIA and the Alere DDS2® drug categories, results from the enzyme immunoassay and the alkaline basic drug screen were combined for purposes of comparing OF to blood. Seventy-six of 104 (73%) subjects arrested for OWI were driving under the influence of alcohol; 71 of the 76 had a BAC exceeding 0.10 g/100 mL. Subjects with a BAC exceeding the LCP, screened positive for drugs in both OF (n = 29) and blood (n = 28). Overall, one

  15. Quality standards for sample collection in coagulation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2012-09-01

    Preanalytical activities, especially those directly connected with blood sample collection and handling, are the most vulnerable steps throughout the testing process. The receipt of unsuitable samples is commonplace in laboratory practice and represents a serious problem, given the reliability of test results can be adversely compromised following analysis of these specimens. The basic criteria for an appropriate and safe venipuncture are nearly identical to those used for collecting blood for clinical chemistry and immunochemistry testing, and entail proper patient identification, use of the correct technique, as well as appropriate devices and needles. There are, however, some peculiar aspects, which are deemed to be particularly critical when collecting quality specimens for clot-based tests, and these require clearer recognition. These include prevention of prolonged venous stasis, collection of nonhemolyzed specimens, order of draw, and appropriate filling and mixing of the primary collection tubes. All of these important preanalytical issues are discussed in this article, and evidence-based suggestions as well as recommendations on how to obtain a high-quality sample for coagulation testing are also illustrated. We have also performed an investigation aimed to identify variation of test results due to underfilling of primary blood tubes, and have identified a clinically significant bias in test results when tubes are drawn at less than 89% of total fill for activated partial thromboplastin time, less than 78% for fibrinogen, and less than 67% for coagulation factor VIII, whereas prothrombin time and activated protein C resistance remain relatively reliable even in tubes drawn at 67% of the nominal volume. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Relationship of blood lead levels to obstetric outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angell, N.F.; Lavery, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Lead represents a significant environmental hazard to pregnant women and their offspring. Exposure to high environmental levels of lead has been associated with spontaneous abortion, premature rupture of fetal membranes (PROM), and preterm delivery. The relationship between lower exposures and obstetric complications is unknown. The concentration of lead in the blood was measured in 635 specimens of umbilical cord blood collected at delivery. No relationship was found between concentrations of lead in cord blood and the incidence of PROM, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, or meconium staining. Maternal and infant capillary blood was collected 24 hours post partum from 154 of these deliveries. The concentrations of lead in the blood did not vary significantly among cord, infant, and maternal samples, and the three measurements were highly correlated. Levels of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnP) were increased in cord blood as compared with mothers' blood, but no concentration-response relationships between the ratio of cord ZnP to maternal ZnP and lead were found.

  17. Design and Realization of Geographic Information System for Plant Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenran Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The thesis research work is based on adopting the combination of theory and technology research. For the unique characteristics of bambusoideae in yunnan province, analyses the characteristics, value and the present situation of resources of bambusoideae plant resources in yunnan province. According to the system requirements of the specimen of bambusoideae in Yunnan province, by Microsoft. Net framework platform, a collection of Web services and ASP.NET technology, based on the data of Microsoft SQL Server2008 and ADO.NET technology support, selecting desktop GIS Arc GIS platform (Arc GIS Desktop and server (Arc GIS Server as a system of GIS secondary development of GIS, and using developed tools of Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Visual, Finally, the information system of plant specimen which based on GIS integration development of bambusoideae is finished .

  18. Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

    2005-01-01

    Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2

  19. Retrospective analysis of heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island based on old and new herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Sofia M; Murray, David W; Whitfeld, Timothy J S

    2017-01-01

    Herbarium specimens may provide a record of past environmental conditions, including heavy metal pollution. To explore this potential, we compared concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc in historical and new collections from four sites in Rhode Island, USA. We compared historical specimens (1846 to 1916) to congener specimens collected in 2015 at three former industrial sites in Providence, Rhode Island, and one nonindustrial site on Block Island. Leaf material was prepared by UltraWAVE SRC Microwave Digestion, and heavy metal concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Heavy metal concentrations in the historical and new specimens were measurable for all elements tested, and levels of copper and zinc were comparable in the historical and 2015 collections. By contrast, the concentration of lead declined at all sites over time. Significant variability in heavy metal concentration was observed between taxa, reflecting their varied potential for elemental accumulation. It seems clear that herbarium specimens can be used to evaluate past levels of pollution and assess local environmental changes. With careful sampling effort, these specimens can be a valuable part of environmental science research. Broadening the possible applications for herbarium collections in this way increases their relevance in an era of reduced funding for collections-based research.

  20. Determine the prevalence of Brucella spp. and Leptospira spp. in blood samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction collected from cattle, sheep and goats in herds located in provinces of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faham Khamesipour

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis and brucellosis are common zoonosis that affect many species of mammals mostly causing economical losses. Further, very important fact is huge danger for human and animal health around the world. The purpose of the study is to determine the prevalence of Brucella spp. and Leptospira spp. using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR method, in blood samples collected from cattle, sheep and goats. In this study, a total number of 250 blood samples (5 cc of blood with ethilen diamin tetra asetic acid were collected randomly from 100 cattle, 80 sheep and 70 goats located on 6 herds in Chaharmahal Va Bakhtiari and Esfahan provinces, Iran. After DNA extraction and setting of mPCR for Brucella spp. and Leptospira spp. mPCR products were screened. The DNA of these microorganisms was detected by multiplex PCR from 31 and 21 out of 100 cattle, respectively. Four of 70 goat’s blood samples from goat breeding farms were positive for Leptospira spp. and 11 were positive for Brucella spp. Out of 80 sheep blood samples 23 were positive for Brucella spp. and 14 for Leptospira spp. The results of the present study show ruminant as an important reservoir for transmission of these zoonotic diseases to humans in Iran. mPCR has the ability to concurrently detect both Brucella and Leptospira species from blood samples of ruminants. The convenience and the possibility of detection of both bacteria at a time, strongly support the use of this mPCR for routine diagnostics.

  1. Sequencing historical specimens: successful preparation of small specimens with low amounts of degraded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproul, John S; Maddison, David R

    2017-11-01

    Despite advances that allow DNA sequencing of old museum specimens, sequencing small-bodied, historical specimens can be challenging and unreliable as many contain only small amounts of fragmented DNA. Dependable methods to sequence such specimens are especially critical if the specimens are unique. We attempt to sequence small-bodied (3-6 mm) historical specimens (including nomenclatural types) of beetles that have been housed, dried, in museums for 58-159 years, and for which few or no suitable replacement specimens exist. To better understand ideal approaches of sample preparation and produce preparation guidelines, we compared different library preparation protocols using low amounts of input DNA (1-10 ng). We also explored low-cost optimizations designed to improve library preparation efficiency and sequencing success of historical specimens with minimal DNA, such as enzymatic repair of DNA. We report successful sample preparation and sequencing for all historical specimens despite our low-input DNA approach. We provide a list of guidelines related to DNA repair, bead handling, reducing adapter dimers and library amplification. We present these guidelines to facilitate more economical use of valuable DNA and enable more consistent results in projects that aim to sequence challenging, irreplaceable historical specimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Illicit drugs in alternative biological specimens: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalho, Cláudia; Franco, João; Corte-Real, Francisco; Vieira, Duarte Nuno

    2011-04-01

    Postmortem tissues (e.g. liver, kidney) have been long used in forensic applications especially in those cases where blood is unavailable. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of the information provided to the forensic toxicologist at the time of carrying out the toxicological analysis, especially in cases where the samples commonly used in forensic toxicology are unavailable. This work describes the toxicological findings in a violent death resulting from a man who was hit by a train. Vitreous humor, liver and kidney were sent for toxicological analysis, once it was not possible to obtain blood and urine. The validated procedures used in the routine casework of Forensic Toxicology Laboratory of the Centre Branch of the National Institute of Legal Medicine, were applied in the analysis of liver, kidney and vitreous humor, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector for the analysis of drugs of abuse and ethanol, respectively. Morphine, codeine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester were found in the liver and in the kidney and no ethanol was found in the vitreous humor. The method validation included the study of specificity, selectivity, limits of detection, recovery and carryover. Although blood and urine are the most common and preferred matrices used for toxicological studies involving drugs of abuse, sometimes the choice of specimen is determined by the case under investigation. The forensic pathologist must be aware that relevant information must be provided so that the toxicological analysis can be conducted in accordance with case history, particularly when the only samples available for analysis are these "unconventional" specimens, since the interpretation of the obtained results is more difficult. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of Borrelia miyamotoi and other tick-borne pathogens in human clinical specimens and Ixodes scapularis ticks in New York State, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Danielle; Gebhardt, Linda; Prusinski, Melissa A; Meehan, Lisa J; Halse, Tanya A; Musser, Kimberlee A

    2017-03-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi (Bm) is a recently emerging bacterial agent transmitted by several species of ixodid ticks. Diagnosis of Bm infection can be challenging, as the organism is not easily cultivable. We have developed and validated a multiplex real-time PCR to simultaneously identify Bm infection and the agents causing human granulocytic anaplasmosis and human monocytic ehrlichiosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis, respectively. The assay is 100% specific; highly sensitive, detecting 11 gene copies of Bm DNA in both whole blood and cerebral spinal fluid; and provides rapid results in less than two hours. A retrospective study of 796 clinical specimens collected between the years 2012 and 2014 and a prospective study of 366 clinical specimens were performed utilizing this novel assay to evaluate the frequency of Bm infection in New York State (NYS). Eight clinical specimens (1%) were found to be positive for Bm, 216 were positive for A. phagocytophilum, and 10 were positive for E. chaffeensis. Additionally, we tested 411 I. scapularis ticks collected in NYS during 2013 and 2014 in a separate multiplex real-time PCR to determine the prevalence of Bm, A. phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., and Borrelia species. Our results indicated rates of 1.5%, 27%, 19.7%, and 8.8% respectively. The ability to monitor both the frequency and geographic distribution of Bm cases and the prevalence and geographic distribution of Bm in ticks will help create a better understanding of this emerging tick-borne pathogen. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. HRR Field in an Aluminum SEN Specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    edge notched, 2024-T3, 2024-0, and 5052 -H32 aluminum alloy specimens subjected to uniaxial and biaxial loadings [4,5,6]. One of the objectives of this...Contract N00014-89-J-1276 Technical Report No. UWA/DME/TR-89/63 00 HRR FIELD IN AN ALUMINUM SEN SPECIMENrkft Ln1 0 by M.S. Dadkhah and A.S. Kobayashi...Washington ~ dY~LI3OI k t*a U1PA09Q111 89 02Ieja II A I 6 I HRR FIELD IN AN ALUMINUM SEN SPECIMEN Mahyar Dadkhah ° and Albert S. Kobayashi** ABSTRACT Moire

  5. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lermen

    Full Text Available Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology. This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2 reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2 examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2 biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2 personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for

  6. Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood, as discussed in the following paragraphs. Red Blood Cells Red blood cells carry oxygen from ... leaks out, and its levels in your blood rise. For example, blood levels of troponin rise when ...

  7. Survivability of Existing Peripheral Intravenous Access Following Blood Sampling in a Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Sheree W; Friesen, Mary Ann; Stanger, Debra; Trickey, Amber Williams

    2018-03-07

    Although pediatric patients report venipuncture as their most feared experience during hospitalization, blood sampling from peripheral intravenous accesses (PIVs) is not standard of care. Blood sampling from PIVs has long been considered by healthcare personnel to harm the access. In an effort to minimize painful procedures, pediatric nursing staff conducted a prospective, observational study to determine if blood sampling using existing PIVs resulted in the loss of the access. The ability to obtain the sample from the PIV was measured along with patient and PIV characteristics. Specimen collection using 100 existing PIVs was attempted on pediatric inpatients. Each PIV was observed for functionality, infiltration, occlusion, and dislodgement following collection and again in 4h. Frequencies of PIV loss and successful blood sampling were calculated. Patient age, PIV gauge, access site, and PIV age were evaluated for associations with successful sampling using chi-square tests, Fisher's exact tests, and logistic regression. PIV survivability was reported at 99%. The ability to obtain a complete specimen was reported at 76% and found to be significantly related to PIV age and site. Size of PIV and patient's age were not significantly related to successful sampling. Encouraging rates of PIV survivability and collectability suggest blood sampling from PIVs to be a valuable technique to minimize painful and distressful procedures. Nursing practice was changed in this pediatric department. Patients and families are saved the pain and distress of venipuncture. Nurses reported saving time and personal distress by avoiding the venipuncture procedure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The production of calibration specimens for impact testing of subsize Charpy specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D. J.; Corwin, W. R.; Owings, T. D.

    Calibration specimens have been manufactured for checking the performance of a pendulum impact testing machine that has been configured for testing subsize specimens, both half-size (5.0 x 5.0 x 25.4 mm) and third-size (3.33 x 3.33 x 25.4 mm). Specimens were fabricated from quenched-and-tempered 4340 steel heat treated to produce different microstructures that would result in either high or low absorbed energy levels on testing. A large group of both half- and third-size specimens were tested at -40 C. The results of the tests were analyzed for average value and standard deviation, and these values were used to establish calibration limits for the Charpy impact machine when testing subsize specimens. These average values plus or minus two standard deviations were set as the acceptable limits for the average of five tests for calibration of the impact testing machine.

  9. Molecular detection of candida species from hospitalized patient’s specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Cardoso, José Luis; Martínez-Rivera, María Ángeles; Manzano-Gayosso, Patricia; Méndez-Tovar, Luis Javier; López-Martínez, Rubén; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca

    To identify the most frequent Candida species in specimens from patients hospitalized in different medical centers of Mexico City, with suspected fungal infection. Specimens were grown on Sabouraud dextrose agar at 28°C for 72 h. In addition, DNA was extracted. Isolates were grown on CHROMagar Candida™, at 37°C for 48 h. The molecular identification was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for four species. Eighty one specimens were processed and included: bronchial lavage, pleural, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, ascites and bile fluids; blood, sputum, bone marrow, oro-tracheal cannula and ganglion. By culture, 30 samples (37%) were positive, and by PCR, 41 (50.6%). By PCR, the frequency of species was: Candida albicans 82.9%, Candida tropicalis 31.7%, Candida glabrata 24.4%, and Candida parapsilosis 4.9%. In 34.1% of specimens a species mixture was detected suggesting a co-infection: Two species in five specimens (C. albicans-C tropicalis and C. albicans-C glabrata), and three species in three specimens (C. albicans-C. glabrata-C. tropicalis). The PCR is an useful tool for detection the most common Candida species causing infection in hospitalized patients, it avoids the requirement of culture weather we start from clinical specimen and it favors the early diagnosis of invasive candidiasis. Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud

  10. Virus isolation: Specimen type and probable transmission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Virus isolation: Specimen type and probable transmission. Over 500 CHIK virus isolations were made. 4 from male Ae. Aegypti (?TOT). 6 from CSF (neurological involvement). 1 from a 4-day old child (transplacental transmission.

  11. Some recent innovations in small specimen testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; He, M.; Gragg, D.; Klingensmith, D.; Lucas, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    New innovative small specimen test techniques are described. Finite element simulations show that combinations of cone indentation pile-up geometry and load-penetration depth relations can be used to determine both the yield stress and strain-hardening behavior of a material. Techniques for pre-cracking and testing sub-miniaturized fracture toughness bend bars, with dimensions of 1.65x1.65x9 mm 3 , or less, are described. The corresponding toughness-temperature curves have a very steep transition slope, primarily due to rapid loss of constraint, which has advantages in some experiments to characterize the effects of specified irradiation variables. As one example of using composite specimens, an approach to evaluating helium effects is proposed, involving diffusion bonding small wires of a 54 Fe-based ferritic-martensitic alloy to a surrounding fracture specimen composed of an elemental Fe-based alloy. Finally, we briefly outline some potential approaches to multipurpose specimens and test automation

  12. Best practice for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization and collection in adults and children: results of a Società Italiana Di Emaferesi e Manipolazione Cellulare (SIDEM) and Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO) consensus process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierelli, Luca; Perseghin, Paolo; Marchetti, Monia; Accorsi, Patrizia; Fanin, Renato; Messina, Chiara; Olivieri, Attilio; Risso, Marco; Salvaneschi, Laura; Bosi, Alberto

    2012-04-01

    A large heterogeneity in current mobilization and collection practices is perceived. Moreover, recent evidence introduced novel issues into some specific topics. Optimization of the clinical practice, through the adoption of clinical practice guidelines, previously proved to reduce health care resource use. Two Italian scientific societies, Società Italiana Di Emaferesi e Manipolazione Cellulare (SIDEM) and Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO), perceived the need of hematologists and transfusionists to share a common paradigm in the setting of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). The aim of the current position paper is to provide common definitions and criteria for mobilization and collection of peripheral blood stem cells both in autologous and in the allogeneic setting. Current international and national standards (i.e., International Society of Hematotherapy and Graft Engineering) and recommendations (i.e., European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation) were harmonized with the Panel recommendations. The Expert Panel consisted of nine members (five transfusionists and four hematologists with both clinical and scientific experience of SCT in both pediatric and adult setting) and one methodologist and first convened on April 19, 2010: they in turn agreed on the questions to be answered by the project. Available literature was reviewed by one expert and the methodologist and presented to the other members. Statements were then formulated. SIDEM and GITMO planned an informal meeting of the Panel every 2 years to discuss relevant updates and possible changes to the recommendations. The efforts of the expert panel members allowed to set up and share a common approach to the mobilization, enumeration, and collection issues in the field of both autologous and allogeneic peripheral blood SCT. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. Circumpolar dataset of sequenced specimens of Promachocrinus kerguelensis (Echinodermata, Crinoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemery, Lenaïg G; Améziane, Nadia; Eléaume, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This circumpolar dataset of the comatulid (Echinodermata: Crinoidea) Promachocrinus kerguelensis (Carpenter, 1888) from the Southern Ocean, documents biodiversity associated with the specimens sequenced in Hemery et al. (2012). The aim of Hemery et al. (2012) paper was to use phylogeographic and phylogenetic tools to assess the genetic diversity, demographic history and evolutionary relationships of this very common and abundant comatulid, in the context of the glacial history of the Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic shelves (Thatje et al. 2005, 2008). Over one thousand three hundred specimens (1307) used in this study were collected during seventeen cruises from 1996 to 2010, in eight regions of the Southern Ocean: Kerguelen Plateau, Davis Sea, Dumont d'Urville Sea, Ross Sea, Amundsen Sea, West Antarctic Peninsula, East Weddell Sea and Scotia Arc including the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and the Bransfield Strait. We give here the metadata of this dataset, which lists sampling sources (cruise ID, ship name, sampling date, sampling gear), sampling sites (station, geographic coordinates, depth) and genetic data (phylogroup, haplotype, sequence ID) for each of the 1307 specimens. The identification of the specimens was controlled by an expert taxonomist specialist of crinoids (Marc Eléaume, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris) and all the COI sequences were matched against those available on the Barcode of Life Data System (BOLD: http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/IDS_OpenIdEngine). This dataset can be used by studies dealing with, among other interests, Antarctic and/or crinoid diversity (species richness, distribution patterns), biogeography or habitat / ecological niche modeling. This dataset is accessible through the GBIF network at http://ipt.biodiversity.aq/resource.do?r=proke.

  14. The reptile type specimens preserved in the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC) of Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díez, Teresa; González-Fernández, José E

    2013-01-01

    A first complete list of the reptile type specimens preserved in the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (CSIC) of Madrid (updated until 15 July 2012) is provided. The collection houses a total of 319 type specimens representing 24 taxa belonging to 6 families and 12 genera. There are 22 taxa represented by primary types (19 holotypes, 2 neotypes and 1lectotype) and at least one paratype, and only two taxa are exclusively represented by one secondary type (paratype). The collection is specially rich in Spanish endemisms. Special attention is deserved by the type series of many subspecies of Podarcis lilfordi described by A. Salvador and V. Pdéez-Mellado. All type specimens are housed in the Herpetological collection except Blanus mariae and Psaimodroims occidentalis type series and Psammodroims hispanicus (neotype) which are preserved in the DNA/Tissues Collection.

  15. Specimen-based modeling, stopping rules, and the extinction of the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Chao, Anne; Colwell, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing species survival status is an essential component of conservation programs. We devised a new statistical method for estimating the probability of species persistence from the temporal sequence of collection dates of museum specimens. To complement this approach, we developed quantitative...... (Campephilus principalis), long assumed to have become extinct in the United States in the 1950s, but reportedly rediscovered in 2004. We analyzed the temporal pattern of the collection dates of 239 geo-referenced museum specimens collected throughout the southeastern United States from 1853 to 1932...

  16. Comparison of Vertebrate Cytochrome b and Prepronociceptin for Blood Meal Analyses in Culicoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj-Henni, Leila; De Meulemeester, Thibaut; Depaquit, Jérôme; Noël, Philippe; Germain, Adeline; Helder, Remi; Augot, Denis

    2015-01-01

    To date, studies on host preferences and blood meal identification have been conducted for Culicoides species using molecular-based methods such as PCR techniques to amplify only a fragment from universal vertebrate mitochondrial genes such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit I or cytochrome b (Cyt b). The vertebrate prepronociceptin gene (PNOC) was also tested in this field. However, the choice of molecular marker to identify blood meal is critical. The objective of our study is to compare the ability of Cyt b and PNOC as molecular markers for blood meal identification depending on the stage of blood meal digestion. In order to determine whether these Cyt b and PNOC could provide a positive result, 565 blood-fed females of Culicoides spp were collected and morphologically identified. The samples were collected between 2012 and 2014, in two localities in France. The collection localities were near either livestock or a forest. To catch the specimens, we used UV CDC miniature light traps. PNOC sequence of donkeys (Equus asinus) was sequenced and submitted because it was missing in GenBank. Our findings emphasize that the PNOC marker is not suitable to separate closely related Equid species such as horses and donkeys. The Cyt b marker was able to identify 204 more samples when compared to PNOC (99.55% of specimens). Cyt b appears to be better able to detect the origin of blood meals from females with digested blood in their abdomens. We conclude that Cyt b is a good marker as it increases the accuracy of blood meal identification of engorged females containing digested blood in their abdomens. The host opportunist behavior of Culicoides, especially that of C. obsoletus and C. scoticus, the main vectors of BTV in Europe was also highlighted.

  17. Comparison of vertebrate cytochrome b and prepronociceptin for blood meal analyses in Culicoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eHadj-henni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To date, studies on host preferences and blood meal identification have been conducted for Culicoides species using molecular-based methods such as PCR techniques to amplify only a fragment from universal vertebrate mitochondrial genes such as Cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI or Cytochrome b (Cyt b. The vertebrate prepronociceptin gene (PNOC was also tested in this field. However, the choice of molecular marker to identify blood meal is critical.The objective of our study is to compare the ability of Cyt b and PNOC as molecular markers for blood meal identification depending on the stage of blood meal digestion. In order to determine whether these Cyt b and PNOC could provide a positive result, 565 blood-fed females of Culicoides spp were collected and morphologically identified. The samples were collected between 2012 and 2014, in two localities in France. The collection localities were near either livestock or a forest. To catch the specimens, we used UV CDC miniature light traps. PNOC sequence of donkeys (Equus asinus was sequenced and submitted because it was missing in GenBank. Our findings emphasize that the PNOC marker is not suitable to separate closely related Equid species such as horses and donkeys. The Cyt b marker was able to identify 204 more samples when compared to PNOC (99.55% of specimens. Cyt b appears to be better able to detect the origin of blood meals from females with digested blood in their abdomens. We conclude that Cyt b is a good marker as it increases the accuracy of blood meal identification of engorged females containing digested blood in their abdomens. The host opportunist behavior of Culicoides, especially that of C. obsoletus and C. scoticus, the main vectors of BTV in Europe was also highlighted.

  18. Comparison of Vertebrate Cytochrome b and Prepronociceptin for Blood Meal Analyses in Culicoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj-Henni, Leila; De Meulemeester, Thibaut; Depaquit, Jérôme; Noël, Philippe; Germain, Adeline; Helder, Remi; Augot, Denis

    2015-01-01

    To date, studies on host preferences and blood meal identification have been conducted for Culicoides species using molecular-based methods such as PCR techniques to amplify only a fragment from universal vertebrate mitochondrial genes such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit I or cytochrome b (Cyt b). The vertebrate prepronociceptin gene (PNOC) was also tested in this field. However, the choice of molecular marker to identify blood meal is critical. The objective of our study is to compare the ability of Cyt b and PNOC as molecular markers for blood meal identification depending on the stage of blood meal digestion. In order to determine whether these Cyt b and PNOC could provide a positive result, 565 blood-fed females of Culicoides spp were collected and morphologically identified. The samples were collected between 2012 and 2014, in two localities in France. The collection localities were near either livestock or a forest. To catch the specimens, we used UV CDC miniature light traps. PNOC sequence of donkeys (Equus asinus) was sequenced and submitted because it was missing in GenBank. Our findings emphasize that the PNOC marker is not suitable to separate closely related Equid species such as horses and donkeys. The Cyt b marker was able to identify 204 more samples when compared to PNOC (99.55% of specimens). Cyt b appears to be better able to detect the origin of blood meals from females with digested blood in their abdomens. We conclude that Cyt b is a good marker as it increases the accuracy of blood meal identification of engorged females containing digested blood in their abdomens. The host opportunist behavior of Culicoides, especially that of C. obsoletus and C. scoticus, the main vectors of BTV in Europe was also highlighted. PMID:26664944

  19. An evaluation of the AVL 937C blood-gas and pH microanalyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutter, W P; Aitchison, T C; Thorburn, J; Sharp, F

    1976-12-01

    The AVL 937C blood-gas and pH microanalyser was evaluated with particular reference to its use in obsterics and in neonatal paediatrics in which its ability to analyse blood smaples as small as 40 micronlitre would be of particular value. Analysing samples of cord blood, maternal venous blood and foetal scalp blood, the reproducibility over the range of values measured was excellent with samples of 40-100 micronlitre. SD of the variation in values measured on samples collected in syringes were po2 0.11 kPa; Pco2 0.21 kPa; PH 0.005 unit. The same values for specimens collected in capillary tubes were: Po2 0.19 kPa;Pco 0.43 kPa; pH 0.013 unit. Analysis of tonometered blood samples showed a similar high standard of accuracy. The 91-98% confidence limits for the measurement of blood-gas values in samples collected in syringes were: Po2-0.22 to +0.49kPa; Pco2-0.53 to +0.42 kPa. The same values for samples collected in capillary tubes were: Po2 -0.38 to +0.70 kPa; Pco2 -0.97 to +0.86 kPa.

  20. From museum cases to the classroom: Emerging opportunities for specimen-based education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural history collections are one of the most powerful resources available for documenting the effects of changing environmental conditions on global biodiversity. Worldwide, more than 1.5 billion specimens are contained in natural history museums. These materials, collected over vast temporal and...

  1. Human Parechovirus in Respiratory Specimens from Children in Kansas City, Missouri

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Justin; Bell, Jeremiah; Harrison, Christopher J.; Nix, W. Allan; Oberste, M. Steven; Selvarangan, Rangaraj

    2012-01-01

    We detected a 3% prevalence rate for human parechovirus (HPeV) in 720 respiratory specimens collected from 637 children seen in our hospital in 2009. Fifteen of 20 were HPeV-3 and two were HPeV-1. Only nonspecific, modest respiratory symptoms were evident in patients with detectable HPeV in respiratory specimens. Seven patients had concurrent respiratory and central nervous system (CNS) HPeV-3 infection, suggesting a possible respiratory route of acquisition.

  2. Mongolian Rotifers on Micr oscope Slides: Instructions to Permanent Specimen Mounts from Expedition Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D. Jersabek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We here describe a method for permanently mounting specimens on microscope slides, as we applied it in the newly established rotifer collection in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. The liquid photopolymer NOA 61 was used as a primary sealant for pure glycerine mounts. We furthermore outline simple methods of rotifer narcotization and fi xation in the fi eld that yield, for the majority of species, adequately preserved specimen material for further preparation and identifi cation purposes.

  3. Increasing the efficiency of digitization workflows for herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulig, Melissa; Tarnowsky, Nicole; Bevans, Michael; Anthony Kirchgessner; Thiers, Barbara M

    2012-01-01

    The New York Botanical Garden Herbarium has been databasing and imaging its estimated 7.3 million plant specimens for the past 17 years. Due to the size of the collection, we have been selectively digitizing fundable subsets of specimens, making successive passes through the herbarium with each new grant. With this strategy, the average rate for databasing complete records has been 10 specimens per hour. With 1.3 million specimens databased, this effort has taken about 130,000 hours of staff time. At this rate, to complete the herbarium and digitize the remaining 6 million specimens, another 600,000 hours would be needed. Given the current biodiversity and economic crises, there is neither the time nor money to complete the collection at this rate.Through a combination of grants over the last few years, The New York Botanical Garden has been testing new protocols and tactics for increasing the rate of digitization through combinations of data collaboration, field book digitization, partial data entry and imaging, and optical character recognition (OCR) of specimen images. With the launch of the National Science Foundation's new Advancing Digitization of Biological Collections program, we hope to move forward with larger, more efficient digitization projects, capturing data from larger portions of the herbarium at a fraction of the cost and time.

  4. Effects of delayed microbial analysis of dental unit water line specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Charles John; Burgess, Kenneth H; Miller, Chris H

    2005-04-01

    Monitoring microbial concentrations in water emitted from dental unit water lines (DUWL) is an important safety procedure. Improper handling of test water specimens could give incorrect results. Thus, the objective of this study was to measure the effects delayed culturing might have on DUWL specimens. First, 100 mL water specimens were obtained from 10 different handpiece service lines within the School. All units had independent water systems, used DI (deionized water) water and were routinely cleaned using an alkaline peroxide based product. Two specimens of 10 mL were removed from the bottles and placed into individual sterile conical tubes. One set of tubes was processed immediately. 0.05 mL of sterile 1.0% (w/v) sodium thiosulfate solution was added to undiluted and diluted (1:10 and 1:100 with sterile DI water) specimens. After mixing, specimens were spiral plated onto duplicate R2A plates and incubated at 21degrees C for 7 days. Colonies were then counted and the cfu/mL of each original specimen determined. Another set of tubes was placed into a shipping envelope and mailed out to the School. Upon receipt, the tubes were processed as described above. The remaining 80 mL of water in the collection bottles were divided equally into new sterile tubes. One tube was left at 21 degrees C, while the other was placed into a 37 degrees C incubator. Aliquots were processed immediately and then after 1, 3 and 7 days. Next, 30 mL water specimens were obtained from 15 handpiece service lines in three outside clinics. All units had independent water systems, used DI water and were routinely cleaned with an alkaline peroxide-based product. Specimens were then divided equally into three sterile conical tubes. One of the tubes was transported (at 4 degrees C) to the laboratory and immediately processed as described. At the collection site, the second tube was placed into a padded envelope and mailed back to the School. The third tube was returned by overnight delivery using

  5. Standard guide for preparation of metallographic specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 The primary objective of metallographic examinations is to reveal the constituents and structure of metals and their alloys by means of a light optical or scanning electron microscope. In special cases, the objective of the examination may require the development of less detail than in other cases but, under nearly all conditions, the proper selection and preparation of the specimen is of major importance. Because of the diversity in available equipment and the wide variety of problems encountered, the following text presents for the guidance of the metallographer only those practices which experience has shown are generally satisfactory; it cannot and does not describe the variations in technique required to solve individual specimen preparation problems. Note 1—For a more extensive description of various metallographic techniques, refer to Samuels, L. E., Metallographic Polishing by Mechanical Methods, American Society for Metals (ASM) Metals Park, OH, 3rd Ed., 1982; Petzow, G., Metallographic Etchin...

  6. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Staats

    Full Text Available Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes, but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylogenetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more

  7. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Martijn; Erkens, Roy H J; van de Vossenberg, Bart; Wieringa, Jan J; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Stielow, Benjamin; Geml, József; Richardson, James E; Bakker, Freek T

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS) world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes), but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylo)genetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more horizontal

  8. Damage modeling in Small Punch Test specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Cuesta, I.I.; Peñuelas, I.

    2016-01-01

    Ductile damage modeling within the Small Punch Test (SPT) is extensively investigated. The capabilities ofthe SPT to reliably estimate fracture and damage properties are thoroughly discussed and emphasis isplaced on the use of notched specimens. First, different notch profiles are analyzed....... Furthermore,Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model predictions from a top-down approach are employed to gain insightinto the mechanisms governing crack initiation and subsequent propagation in small punch experiments.An accurate assessment of micromechanical toughness parameters from the SPT...

  9. Thermal endurance tests on silicone rubber specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warburton, C.

    1977-07-01

    Thermal endurance tests have been performed on a range of silicone rubber specimens at temperature above 300 0 C. It is suggested that the rubber mix A2426, the compound from which Wylfa sealing rings are manufactured, will fail at temperatures above 300 0 C within weeks. Hardness measurements show that this particular rubber performs in a similar manner to Walker's S.I.L./60. (author)

  10. Use of a dry-plasma collection device to overcome problems with storage and transportation of blood samples for epidemiology studies in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurgalieva, Z Z; Almuchambetova, R; Machmudova, A; Kapsultanova, D; Osato, M S; Peacock, J; Zoltek, R P; Marchildon, P A; Graham, D Y; Zhangabylov, A

    2000-11-01

    Studies are difficult in areas lacking modern facilities due to the inability to reliably collect, store, and ship samples. Thus, we sought to evaluate the use of a dry plasma collection device for seroepidemiology studies. Plasma was obtained by fingerstick using a commercial dry plasma collection device (Chemcard Plasma Collection Device) and serum (venipuncture) from individuals in Kazakhstan. Plasma samples were air dried for 15 min and then stored desiccated in foil zip-lock pouches at 4 to 6 degrees C and subsequently shipped to the United States by air at ambient temperature. Serum samples remained frozen at -20 degrees C until assayed. Helicobacter pylori status was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HM-CAP EIA) for the dry plasma and the serum samples. The results were concordant in 250 of the 289 cases (86.5%). In 25 cases (8.6%), the dry plasma samples gave indeterminate results and could not be retested because only one sample was collected. Five serum samples were positive, and the corresponding dry plasma samples were negative; one serum sample was negative, and the corresponding plasma sample was positive. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the Chemcard samples to serum were 97.6 and 97.9%, respectively, excluding those with indeterminate results. Repeated freeze-thawing had no adverse effect on the accuracy of the test. We found the dry plasma collection device to provide an accurate and practical alternative to serum when venipuncture may be difficult or inconvenient and sample storage and handling present difficulties, especially for seroepidemiologic studies in rural areas or developing countries and where freeze-thawing may be unavoidable.

  11. A Review of Sleeve Gastrectomy Specimen Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsinger, Luke A; Garber, James C; Whipple, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing popularity of sleeve gastrectomy, many stomach specimens are being evaluated. Understanding the significance and treatment for unexpected pathology is important. This study examines the incidence of relevant histopathology of sleeve gastrectomy specimens. It evaluates previous data for each histopathology and provides recommendations for treatment. In this study, a retrospective review was performed for 241 patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from 2009 to 2014 at a single institution. Of the specimens, 122 had no significant histopathology, 91 had gastritis, 13 had lymphoid aggregates, 5 had hyperplasia, 3 had intestinal metaplasia, 3 had gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and 3 had gastric polyps. Of the GISTs all had a low mitotic rate and the size of the tumor ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. The findings of metaplasia may be a marker for increased risk of malignancy and may require additional surveillance. The findings of GIST may warrant interval imaging to survey for recurrence, though the likelihood of recurrence for the tumors in this study is less than 2 per cent based on previous studies.

  12. Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Andreas Karl; Andresen, Nord

    2010-12-14

    The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

  13. Spalling Experiments on Large Hard Rock Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Lars; Appelquist, Karin; Lindkvist, Jan Erik

    2015-07-01

    Specimens of coarse-grained Äspö diorite were axially compressed to observe stress-induced spalling. The specimens had a novel design characterized by two manufactured large radius notches on opposite sides. The tangential stress occurring in the notches aimed to represent the tangential loading around a circular opening. Fracture stages were monitored by acoustic emission measurements. Rock chips were formed similar to those found in situ, which indicates a similar fracture process. Slabs were cut out from the specimens and impregnated using a fluorescent material to visualize the cracks. The cracks were subsequently examined by the naked eye and by means of microscopy images, from which fracture paths could be identified and related to different minerals and their crystallographic orientations. The microscopy analyses showed how the stress field and the microstructure interact. Parallel cracks were formed 2-4 mm below the surface, sub-parallel to the direction of the maximum principal stress. The crack initiation, the roles of minerals such as feldspar, biotite and quartz and their grain boundaries and crystallographic directions are thoroughly studied and discussed in this paper. Scale effects, which relate to the stress gradient and microstructure, are discussed.

  14. The Venice specimen of Ouranosaurus nigeriensis (Dinosauria, Ornithopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzo, Filippo; Dalla Vecchia, Fabio Marco; Fabbri, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Ouranosaurus nigeriensis is an iconic African dinosaur taxon that has been described on the basis of two nearly complete skeletons from the Lower Cretaceous Gadoufaoua locality of the Ténéré desert in Niger. The entire holotype and a few bones attributed to the paratype formed the basis of the original description by Taquet (1976). A mounted skeleton that appears to correspond to O. nigeriensis has been on public display since 1975, exhibited at the Natural History Museum of Venice. It was never explicitly reported whether the Venice specimen represents a paratype and therefore, the second nearly complete skeleton reported in literature or a third unreported skeleton. The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the complex history of the various skeletal remains that have been attributed to Ouranosaurus nigeriensis (aided by an unpublished field map of the paratype) and to describe in detail the osteology of the Venice skeleton. The latter includes the paratype material (found in 1970 and collected in 1972), with the exception of the left femur, the right coracoid and one manus ungual phalanx I, which were replaced with plaster copies, and (possibly) other manus phalanges. Some other elements (e.g., the first two chevrons, the right femur, the right tibia, two dorsal vertebrae and some pelvic bones) were likely added from other individual/s. The vertebral column of the paratype was articulated and provides a better reference for the vertebral count of this taxon than the holotype. Several anatomical differences are observed between the holotype and the Venice specimen. Most of them can be ascribed to intraspecific variability (individual or ontogenetic), but some are probably caused by mistakes in the preparation or assemblage of the skeletal elements in both specimens. The body length of the Venice skeleton is about 90% the linear size of the holotype. Osteohistological analysis (the first for this taxon) of some long bones, a rib and a dorsal neural spine

  15. The Venice specimen of Ouranosaurus nigeriensis (Dinosauria, Ornithopoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Bertozzo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ouranosaurus nigeriensis is an iconic African dinosaur taxon that has been described on the basis of two nearly complete skeletons from the Lower Cretaceous Gadoufaoua locality of the Ténéré desert in Niger. The entire holotype and a few bones attributed to the paratype formed the basis of the original description by Taquet (1976. A mounted skeleton that appears to correspond to O. nigeriensis has been on public display since 1975, exhibited at the Natural History Museum of Venice. It was never explicitly reported whether the Venice specimen represents a paratype and therefore, the second nearly complete skeleton reported in literature or a third unreported skeleton. The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the complex history of the various skeletal remains that have been attributed to Ouranosaurus nigeriensis (aided by an unpublished field map of the paratype and to describe in detail the osteology of the Venice skeleton. The latter includes the paratype material (found in 1970 and collected in 1972, with the exception of the left femur, the right coracoid and one manus ungual phalanx I, which were replaced with plaster copies, and (possibly other manus phalanges. Some other elements (e.g., the first two chevrons, the right femur, the right tibia, two dorsal vertebrae and some pelvic bones were likely added from other individual/s. The vertebral column of the paratype was articulated and provides a better reference for the vertebral count of this taxon than the holotype. Several anatomical differences are observed between the holotype and the Venice specimen. Most of them can be ascribed to intraspecific variability (individual or ontogenetic, but some are probably caused by mistakes in the preparation or assemblage of the skeletal elements in both specimens. The body length of the Venice skeleton is about 90% the linear size of the holotype. Osteohistological analysis (the first for this taxon of some long bones, a rib and a dorsal

  16. Human Saliva Collection Devices for Proteomics: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib Khurshid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a rapid growth in the interest and adaptation of saliva as a diagnostic specimen over the last decade, and in the last few years in particular, there have been major developments involving the application of saliva as a clinically relevant specimen. Saliva provides a “window” into the oral and systemic health of an individual, and like other bodily fluids, saliva can be analyzed and studied to diagnose diseases. With the advent of new, more sensitive technologies to detect smaller concentrations of analytes in saliva relative to blood levels, there have been a number of critical developments in the field that we will describe. In particular, recent advances in standardized saliva collection devices that were not available three to four years ago, have made it easy for safe, simple, and non-invasive collection of samples to be carried out from patients. With the availability of these new technologies, we believe that in the next decade salivary proteomics will make it possible to predict and diagnose oral as well as systemic diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases, among others. The aim of this article is to review recent developments and advances in the area of saliva specimen collection devices and applications that will advance the field of proteomics.

  17. Axial-Gap Induction Motor For Levitated Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Govind; Rhim, Won-Kyu; Barber, Dan; Chung, Sang

    1992-01-01

    Motor does not obscure view of specimen. Axial-gap induction motor applies torque to rotate electrostatically or electromagnetically levitated specimen of metal. Possible applications include turning specimens for uniform heating under focused laser beams and obtaining indirect measurements of resistivities or of surface tensions in molten specimens.

  18. Specimen loading list for the varying temperature experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qualls, A.L.; Sitterson, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    The varying temperature experiment HFIR-RB-13J has been assembled and inserted in the reactor. Approximately 5300 specimens were cleaned, inspected, matched, and loaded into four specimen holders. A listing of each specimen loaded into the steady temperature holder, its position in the capsule, and the identification of the corresponding specimen loaded into the varying temperature holder is presented in this report

  19. [Prospects in blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, P

    2003-04-01

    What will be the evolution of blood transfusion in the next 10 years? What are the scientific and medical arguments to help the decision makers to propose the developments? Many scientific and clinical studies show that blood substitutes are not ready for use in man. So, for a long time, blood collection in man will still be a necessity to prepare cell concentrates (red blood cells and platelets) and fresh frozen plasma. During this period, blood safety will be based on development of testing technics and preparation processes of blood products. Another major point will be a better clinical use of blood derivates. Cellular therapy will be probably only a way of diversification in blood transfusion centers in partnership with hospitals.

  20. Blood, sweat and plaster casts: Reviewing the history, composition, and scientific value of the Raymond A. Dart Collection of African Life and Death Masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, T M R; Billings, B K

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses the history, composition and scientific value of one of the most comprehensive facemask collections in Africa, the Raymond A. Dart Collection of African Life and Death Masks. Housed within the School of Anatomical Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa), it comprises 1110 masks (397 life, 487 death, 226 unknown). Life masks represent populations throughout Africa; death masks predominately southern Africa. Males preponderate by 75%. Recorded ages are error prone, but suggest most life masks are those of death masks of 36+ year-olds. A total of 241 masks have associated skeletons, 209 presenting a complete skull. Life masks date between 1927 and c.1980s, death masks 1933 and 1963. This historical collection presents uncanny associations with outmoded typological and evolutionary theories. Once perceived an essential scientific resource, performed craniofacial superimpositions identify the nose as the only stable feature maintained, with the remaining face best preserved in young individuals with minimal body fat. The facemask collection is most viable for teaching and research within the history of science, specifically physical anthropology, and presents some value to craniofacial identification. Future research will have to be conducted with appropriate ethical considerations to science and medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Blood Meal Analysis of and Virus Detection in Mosquitoes Collected during a Rift Valley fever Epizootic/Epidemic: Implications for epidemic disease transmission dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonosis of domestic ruminants in Africa. Bloodfed mosquitoes collected during the 2006-2007 RVF outbreak in Kenya were analyzed to determine the virus infection status and animal source of the bloodmeals. Bloodmeals from individual mosquito abdomens were screened for v...

  2. Effect of Blood Collection Tube Type and Time to Processing on the Enumeration and High-Content Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells Using the High-Definition Single-Cell Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lee, Mariam; Kolatkar, Anand; McCormick, Madelyn; Dago, Angel D; Kendall, Jude; Carlsson, Nils Anders; Bethel, Kelly; Greenspan, Emily J; Hwang, Shelley E; Waitman, Kathryn R; Nieva, Jorge J; Hicks, James; Kuhn, Peter

    2018-02-01

    - As circulating tumor cell (CTC) assays gain clinical relevance, it is essential to address preanalytic variability and to develop standard operating procedures for sample handling in order to successfully implement genomically informed, precision health care. - To evaluate the effects of blood collection tube (BCT) type and time-to-assay (TTA) on the enumeration and high-content characterization of CTCs by using the high-definition single-cell assay (HD-SCA). - Blood samples of patients with early- and advanced-stage breast cancer were collected into cell-free DNA (CfDNA), EDTA, acid-citrate-dextrose solution, and heparin BCTs. Time-to-assay was evaluated at 24 and 72 hours, representing the fastest possible and more routine domestic shipping intervals, respectively. - We detected the highest CTC levels and the lowest levels of negative events in CfDNA BCT at 24 hours. At 72 hours in this BCT, all CTC subpopulations were decreased with the larger effect observed in high-definition CTCs and cytokeratin-positive cells smaller than white blood cells. Overall cell retention was also optimal in CfDNA BCT at 24 hours. Whole-genome copy number variation profiles were generated from single cells isolated from all BCT types and TTAs. Cells from CfDNA BCT at 24-hour TTA exhibited the least noise. - Circulating tumor cells can be identified and characterized under a variety of collection, handling, and processing conditions, but the highest quality can be achieved with optimized conditions. We quantified performance differences of the HD-SCA for specific preanalytic variables that may be used as a guide to develop best practices for implementation into patient care and/or research biorepository processes.

  3. [Candida dubliniensis in clinical specimens and possibilities for identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahelová, M; Růžička, F

    2014-06-01

    The species Candida dubliniensis shares a wide range of phenotypic characteristics with Candida albicans, the most common yeast species isolated from clinical specimens. This is a considerable complication for the detection and identification of Candida dubliniensis from clinical specimens. The lack of data on the incidence of C. dubliniensis in the Czech Republic was the motivation behind the efforts to detect this pathogen in specimens analyzed at the Institute for Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine Masaryk University and St. Anne's Faculty Hospital in Brno. Another aim was to test the reliability of the culture methods used. Altogether 2260 yeast isolates initially identified as C. albicans were analysed. To differentiate C. dubliniensis from C. albicans, four phenotypic methods were used: colour-based differentiation on CHROMagar Candida medium, culture on medium with 6.5% of NaCl, growth at 42 °C, and colony characteristics on Staib agar. To verify the results, the Bichro-Dubli Fumouze latex agglutination test and species-specific polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were used. Using phenotypic methods, latex agglutination, and PCR, 50 (2.2%) strains from the study set were assigned to C. dubliniensis. Most (31) C. dubliniensis isolates were recovered from the respiratory tract and the remaining others were three urine isolates, four stool isolates, one central venous catheter isolate, and one blood isolate. With the exception of colour-based differentiation on CHROMagar Candida medium showing a specificity of 85.5%, all the culture methods used have a high sensitivity and a high specificity. Identification of C. dubliniensis as C. albicans was confirmed in various clinical specimens, most often from the upper respiratory tract. The colour-based differentiation of C. dubliniensis from C. albicans on chromogenic CHROMagar Candida medium can only be recommended as a screening test for the differentiation of C. dubliniensis from other species of the genus Candida

  4. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  5. Method for the Determination of Iodide in Dried Blood Spots from Newborns by High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un-Jung; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2018-03-06

    Dried blood spots (DBS), collected for newborn screening programs in the United States, have been used to screen for congenital metabolic diseases in newborns for over 50 years. DBS provide an easy and inexpensive way to collect and store peripheral blood specimens and present an excellent resource for studies on the assessment of chemical exposures in newborns. In this study, a selective and sensitive method was developed for the analysis of iodide in DBS by high performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Accuracy, inter- and intraday precision, matrix effects, and detection limits of the method were determined. Further validation of the method was accomplished by concurrent analysis of whole blood and fortified blood spotted on a Whatman 903 filter card. A significant positive correlation was found between measured concentrations of iodide in venous whole blood and the same blood spotted as DBS. The method limit of detection was 0.15 ng/mL iodide. The method was further validated by the analysis of a whole blood sample certified for iodide levels (proficiency testing sample) by spotting on a filter card. Twenty DBS samples collected from newborns in New York State were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the method. The measured concentrations of iodide in whole blood of newborns from New York State ranged between collected for epidemiological studies that investigate the importance of iodide on the health of newborns.

  6. Virtual blood bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kit Fai Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual blood bank is the computer-controlled, electronically linked information management system that allows online ordering and real-time, remote delivery of blood for transfusion. It connects the site of testing to the point of care at a remote site in a real-time fashion with networked computers thus maintaining the integrity of immunohematology test results. It has taken the advantages of information and communication technologies to ensure the accuracy of patient, specimen and blood component identification and to enhance personnel traceability and system security. The built-in logics and process constraints in the design of the virtual blood bank can guide the selection of appropriate blood and minimize transfusion risk. The quality of blood inventory is ascertained and monitored, and an audit trail for critical procedures in the transfusion process is provided by the paperless system. Thus, the virtual blood bank can help ensure that the right patient receives the right amount of the right blood component at the right time.

  7. Virtual blood bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kit Fai

    2011-01-01

    Virtual blood bank is the computer-controlled, electronically linked information management system that allows online ordering and real-time, remote delivery of blood for transfusion. It connects the site of testing to the point of care at a remote site in a real-time fashion with networked computers thus maintaining the integrity of immunohematology test results. It has taken the advantages of information and communication technologies to ensure the accuracy of patient, specimen and blood component identification and to enhance personnel traceability and system security. The built-in logics and process constraints in the design of the virtual blood bank can guide the selection of appropriate blood and minimize transfusion risk. The quality of blood inventory is ascertained and monitored, and an audit trail for critical procedures in the transfusion process is provided by the paperless system. Thus, the virtual blood bank can help ensure that the right patient receives the right amount of the right blood component at the right time. PMID:21383930

  8. 10 CFR 26.87 - Collection sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... solely to specimen collection, it must be secure at all times. Methods of assuring security may include... secured and, during the time period during which a specimen is being collected, a sign must be posted to... shower or sink) in the enclosure where urination occurs, or the source of water must be rendered unusable...

  9. CrowdCurio: an online crowdsourcing platform to facilitate climate change studies using herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Charles G; Law, Edith; Williams, Alex C; Franzone, Brian F; Bernardos, Rebecca; Bruno, Lian; Hopkins, Claire; Schorn, Christian; Weber, Ella; Park, Daniel S; Davis, Charles C

    2017-07-01

    Phenology is a key aspect of plant success. Recent research has demonstrated that herbarium specimens can provide important information on plant phenology. Massive digitization efforts have the potential to greatly expand herbarium-based phenological research, but also pose a serious challenge regarding efficient data collection. Here, we introduce CrowdCurio, a crowdsourcing tool for the collection of phenological data from herbarium specimens. We test its utility by having workers collect phenological data (number of flower buds, open flowers and fruits) from specimens of two common New England (USA) species: Chelidonium majus and Vaccinium angustifolium. We assess the reliability of using nonexpert workers (i.e. Amazon Mechanical Turk) against expert workers. We also use these data to estimate the phenological sensitivity to temperature for both species across multiple phenophases. We found no difference in the data quality of nonexperts and experts. Nonexperts, however, were a more efficient way of collecting more data at lower cost. We also found that phenological sensitivity varied across both species and phenophases. Our study demonstrates the utility of CrowdCurio as a crowdsourcing tool for the collection of phenological data from herbarium specimens. Furthermore, our results highlight the insight gained from collecting large amounts of phenological data to estimate multiple phenophases. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Improved sensitivity for molecular detection of bacterial and Candida infections in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacconi, Andrea; Richmond, Gregory S; Baroldi, Michelle A; Laffler, Thomas G; Blyn, Lawrence B; Carolan, Heather E; Frinder, Mark R; Toleno, Donna M; Metzgar, David; Gutierrez, Jose R; Massire, Christian; Rounds, Megan; Kennel, Natalie J; Rothman, Richard E; Peterson, Stephen; Carroll, Karen C; Wakefield, Teresa; Ecker, David J; Sampath, Rangarajan

    2014-09-01

    The rapid identification of bacteria and fungi directly from the blood of patients with suspected bloodstream infections aids in diagnosis and guides treatment decisions. The development of an automated, rapid, and sensitive molecular technology capable of detecting the diverse agents of such infections at low titers has been challenging, due in part to the high background of genomic DNA in blood. PCR followed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) allows for the rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms but with a sensitivity of about 50% compared to that of culture when using 1-ml whole-blood specimens. Here, we describe a new integrated specimen preparation technology that substantially improves the sensitivity of PCR/ESI-MS analysis. An efficient lysis method and automated DNA purification system were designed for processing 5 ml of whole blood. In addition, PCR amplification formulations were optimized to tolerate high levels of human DNA. An analysis of 331 specimens collected from patients with suspected bloodstream infections resulted in 35 PCR/ESI-MS-positive specimens (10.6%) compared to 18 positive by culture (5.4%). PCR/ESI-MS was 83% sensitive and 94% specific compared to culture. Replicate PCR/ESI-MS testing from a second aliquot of the PCR/ESI-MS-positive/culture-negative specimens corroborated the initial findings in most cases, resulting in increased sensitivity (91%) and specificity (99%) when confirmed detections were considered true positives. The integrated solution described here has the potential to provide rapid detection and identification of organisms responsible for bloodstream infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. SPIDIA-RNA: second external quality assessment for the pre-analytical phase of blood samples used for RNA based analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Malentacchi

    Full Text Available One purpose of the EC funded project, SPIDIA, is to develop evidence-based quality guidelines for the pre-analytical handling of blood samples for RNA molecular testing. To this end, two pan-European External Quality Assessments (EQAs were implemented. Here we report the results of the second SPIDIA-RNA EQA. This second study included modifications in the protocol related to the blood collection process, the shipping conditions and pre-analytical specimen handling for participants. Participating laboratories received two identical proficiency blood specimens collected in tubes with or without an RNA stabilizer. For pre-defined specimen storage times and temperatures, laboratories were asked to perform RNA extraction from whole blood according to their usual procedure and to return extracted RNA to the SPIDIA facility for further analysis. These RNA samples were evaluated for purity, yield, integrity, stability, presence of interfering substances, and gene expression levels for the validated markers of RNA stability: FOS, IL1B, IL8, GAPDH, FOSB and TNFRSF10c. Analysis of the gene expression results of FOS, IL8, FOSB, and TNFRSF10c, however, indicated that the levels of these transcripts were significantly affected by blood collection tube type and storage temperature. These results demonstrated that only blood collection tubes containing a cellular RNA stabilizer allowed reliable gene expression analysis within 48 h from blood collection for all the genes investigated. The results of these two EQAs have been proposed for use in the development of a Technical Specification by the European Committee for Standardization.

  12. DNA and RNA analysis of blood and muscle from bodies with variable postmortem intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob; Lesnikova, Iana; Funder, Anette Mariane Daa

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown of DNA and RNA in decomposing human tissue represents a major obstacle for postmortem forensic molecular analysis. This study investigated the feasibility of performing PCR-based molecular analysis of blood and muscle tissue from 45 autopsy cases with defined postmortem intervals...... ranging from one to more than 14 days. It was not possible to collect blood from 38 % of the autopsy cases due to severe coagulation and hemolysis, whereas muscle tissue was available for all cases. PCR-amplifiable DNA could be extracted from 96 % of the frozen muscle specimens and from 93...... % of the formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) muscle specimens. A quality assessment of muscle-derived DNA showed increased fragmentation with advancing body decomposition and generally more fragmentation in DNA from FFPE tissue than in DNA from frozen tissue. It was possible to amplify 1,000 basepair (bp...

  13. Histological evaluation of 400 cholecystectomy specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of gallbladder specimens show changes associated with chronic cholecystitis; however few harbour a highly lethal carcinoma. This study was conducted to review the significant histopathological findings encountered in gallbladder specimens received in our laboratory.Materials and Methods: Four hundred cholecystectomy specimens were studied over a period of five years (May, 2002 to April, 2007 received at department of pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, India. Results: Gallstones and associated diseases were more common in women in the 4th to 5th decade as compared to men with M: F ratio of 1:1.33. Maximum number of patients (28.25% being 41 to 50 years old. Histopathologically, the most common diagnosis was chronic cholecystitis (66.75%, followed by chronic active cholecystitis (20.25%, acute cholecystitis (6%, gangrenous cholecystitis (2.25%,xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (0.50%, empyema (1%, mucocele (0.25%, choledochal cyst (0.25%, adenocarcinoma gallbladder (1.25% and  normal  gallbladders (1%.Conclusion: All lesions were found more frequently in women except chronic active cholecystitis. Gallstones were present in (80.25% cases, and significantly associated with various lesions (P value 0.009. Pigment stones were most common, followed by cholesterol stones and mixed stones. Adequate  sectioning  is  mandatory  in  all  cases  to  assess  epithelial changes arising from cholelithiasis and chronic cholecystitis as it has been known to progress to malignancy in some cases.

  14. The Dugdale model for the compact specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Plastic zone size and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) equations were developed. Boundary collocation analyses were used to analyze the compact specimen subjected to various loading conditions (pin loads, concentrated forces, and uniform pressure acting on the crack surface). Stress intensity factor and crack surface displacement equations for some of these loadings were developed and used to obtain the Dugdale model. The results from the equations for plastic zone size and CTOD agreed well with numerical values calculated by Terada for crack length to width ratios greater than 0.4.

  15. The Dugdale model for compact specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Plastic zone size and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) equations were developed. Boundary collocation analyses were used to analyze the compact specimen subjected to various loading conditions (pin loads, concentrated forces, and uniform pressure acting on the crack surface). Stress intensity factor and crack surface displacement equations for some of these loadings were developed and used to obtain the Dugdale model. The results from the equations for plastic zone size and CTOD agreed well with numerical values calculated by Terada for crack length to width ratios greater than 0.4.

  16. The Alaska Area Specimen Bank: a tribal?federal partnership to maintain and manage a resource for health research

    OpenAIRE

    Parkinson, Alan J.; Hennessy, Thomas; Bulkow, Lisa; Smith, H. Sally

    2013-01-01

    Banked biospecimens from a defined population are a valuable resource that can be used to assess early markers for illness or to determine the prevalence of a disease to aid the development of intervention strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Alaska Area Specimen Bank (AASB) currently contains 266,353 residual biologic specimens (serum, plasma, whole blood, tissue, bacterial cultures) from 83,841 persons who participated in research studies, public health investigations and clini...

  17. Herbarium specimens show contrasting phenological responses to Himalayan climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robbie; Salick, Jan; Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Xu, Jianchu

    2014-07-22

    Responses by flowering plants to climate change are complex and only beginning to be understood. Through analyses of 10,295 herbarium specimens of Himalayan Rhododendron collected by plant hunters and botanists since 1884, we were able to separate these responses into significant components. We found a lack of directional change in mean flowering time over the past 45 y of rapid warming. However, over the full 125 y of collections, mean flowering time shows a significant response to year-to-year changes in temperature, and this response varies with season of warming. Mean flowering advances with annual warming (2.27 d earlier per 1 °C warming), and also is delayed with fall warming (2.54 d later per 1 °C warming). Annual warming may advance flowering through positive effects on overwintering bud formation, whereas fall warming may delay flowering through an impact on chilling requirements. The lack of a directional response suggests that contrasting phenological responses to temperature changes may obscure temperature sensitivity in plants. By drawing on large collections from multiple herbaria, made over more than a century, we show how these data may inform studies even of remote localities, and we highlight the increasing value of these and other natural history collections in understanding long-term change.

  18. [Real-time PCR detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in clinical specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacková, Z; Lžičařová, D; Stock, N K; Kozáková, J

    2015-10-01

    The study aim was to implement a molecular real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay recommended by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) for the detection of Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in clinical (culture negative) specimens from patients with suspected invasive bacterial disease. Clinical specimens are referred to the National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for Meningococcal Infections, Unit for Airborne Bacterial Infections, Centre for Epidemiology and Microbiology, National Institute of Public Health from various regions of the Czech Republic. Clinical specimens are, in particular, cerebrospinal fluid, anti-coagulated blood or serum and, exceptionally, post-mortem specimens. The NRL has implemented molecular diagnosis of these bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis and sepsis from clinical specimens since 1999. The first diagnostic method was semi-nested PCR followed by electrophoretic analysis. In 2014, a molecular qualitative real-time PCR assay was implemented.

  19. Detection of iso-α-acids to confirm beer consumption in postmortem specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Luke N; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Drummer, Olaf H

    2015-01-01

    Iso-α-acids (IAAs) can be used as markers for the consumption of beer. Postmortem specimens from a range of coronial cases were analyzed for IAAs in order to determine the prevalence of beer consumption and any correlation to blood alcohol concentrations (BAC). A total of 130 cases were included in this study including those where beer was mentioned in the case circumstances, cases where beer was not mentioned specifically but alcohol was detected, and cases where neither beer was mentioned nor a positive BAC was present. Available blood, serum, vitreous humour and urine specimens were analyzed. Of the 50 cases where beer was mentioned, 86% had one or more IAAs detected. In cases that only had a positive BAC (n = 60), 57% of these cases also showed the presence of these beer markers. IAAs were detected in specimens obtained from traumatized, burnt, and decomposed cases with a mention of beer consumption or where BAC was positive in blood. No IAAs were detected in cases where BAC was negative. There was little or no correlation between blood IAA concentrations and BAC. This study demonstrates the possible detection of IAAs as a marker for beer consumption. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Structural characterization of tick cement cones collected from in vivo and artificial membrane blood-fed Lone Star ticks (Amblyomma americanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Rebekah; Allen, Paige; Chao, Chien-Chung; Douglas, Jessica; Das, Pradipta; Morgan, Sarah E; Ching, Wei-Mei; Karim, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    The Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum, is endemic to the southeastern United States and capable of transmitting pathogenic diseases and causing non-pathogenic conditions. To remain firmly attached to the host, the tick secretes a proteinaceous matrix termed the cement cone which hardens around the tick's mouthparts to assist in the attachment of the tick as well as to protect the mouthparts from the host immune system. Cement cones collected from ticks on a host are commonly contaminated with host skin and hair making analysis of the cone difficult. To reduce the contamination found in the cement cone, we have adapted an artificial membrane feeding system used to feed long mouthpart ticks. Cones collected from in vivo and membrane fed ticks are analyzed to determine changes in the cone morphology. Comparisons of the cement cones using light microscopy shows similar structures and color however using scanning electron microscopy the cones have drastically different structures. The in vivo cones contain fibrils, sheets, and are heavily textured whereas cones from membrane fed ticks are remarkably smooth with no distinct structures. Analysis of the secondary protein structures using FTIR-ATR show both in vivo and membrane fed cement cones contain β sheets but only in vivo cement cones contain helical protein structures. Additionally, proteomic analysis using LC-MS/MS identifies many proteins including glycine rich proteins, metalloproteases, and protease inhibitors. Proteomic analysis of the cones identified both secreted and non-secreted tick proteins. Artificial membrane feeding is a suitable model for increased collection of cement cones for proteomic analysis however, structurally there are significant differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. On specimen killing in the era of conservation crisis - A quantitative case for modernizing taxonomy and biodiversity inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waeber, Patrick O; Gardner, Charlie J; Lourenço, Wilson R; Wilmé, Lucienne

    2017-01-01

    For centuries taxonomy has relied on dead animal specimens, a practice that persists today despite the emergence of innovative biodiversity assessment methods. Taxonomists and conservationists are engaged in vigorous discussions over the necessity of killing animals for specimen sampling, but quantitative data on taxonomic trends and specimen sampling over time, which could inform these debates, are lacking. We interrogated a long-term research database documenting 2,723 land vertebrate and 419 invertebrate taxa from Madagascar, and their associated specimens conserved in the major natural history museums. We further compared specimen collection and species description rates for the birds, mammals and scorpions over the last two centuries, to identify trends and links to taxon descriptions. We located 15,364 specimens documenting endemic mammals and 11,666 specimens documenting endemic birds collected between 1820 and 2010. Most specimens were collected at the time of the Mission Zoologique Franco-Anglo-Américaine (MZFAA) in the 1930s and during the last two decades, with major differences according to the groups considered. The small mammal and bat collections date primarily from recent years, and are paralleled by the description of new species. Lemur specimens were collected during the MZFAA but the descriptions of new taxa are recent, with the type series limited to non-killed specimens. Bird specimens, particularly of non-passerines, are mainly from the time of the MZFAA. The passerines have also been intensely collected during the last two decades; the new material has been used to solve the phylogeny of the groups and only two new endemic taxa of passerine birds have been described over the last two decades. Our data show that specimen collection has been critical for advancing our understanding of the taxonomy of Madagascar's biodiversity at the onset of zoological work in Madagascar, but less so in recent decades. It is crucial to look for alternatives to

  2. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... condition is known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening event that ... and travels to the blood vessels of the lungs. DVT and PE, collectively known as venous thromboembolism, ...

  3. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Assessment Program A comprehensive resource to help stay current with the latest advances in the field Hematology 2017 A collection of articles from the 2017 ASH Annual Meeting Education Program Blood: How I Treat A compendium of ...

  4. The effect of changing stool collection processes on compliance in nationwide organized screening using a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in Korea: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye Young; Suh, Mina; Baik, Hyung Won; Choi, Kui Son; Park, Boyoung; Jun, Jae Kwan; Lee, Chan Wha; Oh, Jae Hwan; Lee, You Kyoung; Han, Dong Soo; Lee, Do-Hoon

    2014-11-26

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by fecal occult blood test (FOBT) significantly reduces CRC mortality, and compliance rates directly influence the efficacy of this screening method. The aim of this study is to investigate whether stool collection strategies affect compliance with the FOBT. In total, 3,596 study participants aged between 50 and 74 years will be recruited. The study will be conducted using a randomized controlled trial, with a 2 × 2 factorial design resulting in four groups. The first factor is the method of stool-collection device distribution (mailing vs. visiting the clinic) and the second is the type of stool-collection device (sampling kit vs. conventional container). Participants will be randomly assigned to one of four groups: (1) sampling kit received by mail; (2) conventional container received by mail; (3) sampling kit received at the clinic; (4) conventional container received at the clinic (control group). The primary outcome will be the FOBT compliance rate; satisfaction and intention to be rescreened in the next screening round will also be evaluated. The rates of positive FOBT results and detection of advanced adenomas or cancers through colonoscopies will also be compared between the two collection containers. Identifying a method of FOBT that yields high compliance rates will be a key determinant of the success of CRC screening. The findings of this study will provide reliable information for health policy makers to develop evidence-based strategies for a high compliance rate. KCT0000803 Date of registration in primary registry: 9 January, 2013.

  5. First report of Anaplasma ovis in pupal and adult Melophagus ovinus (sheep ked) collected in South Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; He, Bo; Li, Kai-Rui; Li, Fei; Zhang, Lu-Yao; Li, Xian-Qiang; Liu, Yong-Hong

    2018-04-19

    Melophagus ovinus (sheep ked) is a blood-feeding ectoparasite that belongs to the family Hippoboscidae (Diptera: Hippoboscoidea) and mainly parasitizes sheep. The life-cycle of M. ovinus consists of three stages: larva, pupa and adult. It has a worldwide distribution and has been found in four provinces of China, especially South Xinjiang. In addition to causing direct damage to animal hosts, M. ovinus serves as a vector for disease transmission. In this study, our aim was to investigate the presence of Anaplasma spp. in pupal and adult M. ovinus. A total of 93 specimens (including eight pupal specimens) of M. ovinus collected in South Xinjiang were selected for isolation of genomic DNA, followed by PCR amplification and sequencing of the msp4 gene of Anaplasma spp. The sequences were analyzed in MEGA 7.0 software and via online BLAST. PCR and sequencing results showed that all the specimens collected in 2013 were free of Anaplasma spp., whereas three and 25 specimens (including five pupal specimens) collected in 2016 and 2017, respectively, tested positive for Anaplasma spp. The analysis of 24 msp4 gene sequences (from four pupal specimens) confirmed the presence of A. ovis in M. ovinus specimens collected in South Xinjiang, China. The detected A. ovis isolates belong to Genotypes II and III. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the detection of A. ovis DNA in pupal M. ovinus, confirming the vertical transmission of A. ovis in M. ovinus and the potential of M. ovinus to serve as a vector for A. ovis.

  6. Peripheral blood picture following mild head trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioglu, Bulent; Ozyurek, Emel; Avci, Zekai; Atalay, Basar; Caner, Hakan; Ozbek, Namik

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in peripheral white blood cell, and differential counts following mild head trauma in a pediatric population. Fifty-one patients (mean age, 79 +/- 62 months) with mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 15) who were admitted to the emergency department, were studied. Two blood specimens were collected from each patient, one on arrival and one after 24 h at the emergency department. Complete blood count was performed using a hemocytometer and the absolute cell counts for each sample were calculated after examination of peripheral smear. No patient developed any complication during the hospital stay or after discharge. Significant differences were found for white blood cell, neutrophil, and immature cell counts just after and 24 h after trauma (P = 0.047, 0.039 and 0.009, respectively). Mild head trauma may cause an increase in white blood cell, neutrophil and band counts in children just after trauma. In a child with a mild head trauma, who is asymptomatic, with GCS score of 15 and absence of risk factors, and without clinical deterioration, complete blood cell count may be omitted from laboratory workup. But a prospective randomized study comparing mild head trauma patients with good and bad clinical outcome is needed to draw a definite conclusion.

  7. First Record of Orobdella tsushimensis (Hirudinida: Arhynchobdellida: Gastrostomobdellidae from the Korean Peninsula and Molecular Phylogenetic Relationships of the Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakano, Takafumi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the genus Orobdella Oka, 1895 from Korea, including various locations in the Korean Peninsula, were identified as Orobdella tsushimensis Nakano, 2011. Phylogenetic analyses using mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI, ND1, $tRNA^{Cys}$ 수식 이미지, $tRNA^{Met}$ 수식 이미지, 12S rRNA, $tRNA^{val}$ 수식 이미지, and 16S rRNA markers show that the newly collected specimens form a monophyletic group with the known O. tsushimensis specimens. The genetic distance of COI of these specimens was in the range 0.4-6.6%. These results confirm that the newly collected specimens belong to O. tsushimensis. This is the first record of the genus Orobdella from the Korean Peninsula.

  8. Specimen size effect of explosive sensitivity under low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Danzhu; Chen, Pengwan; Dai, Kaida; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Low velocity impact may ignite the solid high explosives and cause undesired explosion incidents. The safety of high explosives under low velocity impact is one of the most important issues in handling, manufacture, storage, and transportation procedures. Various evaluation tests have been developed for low velocity impact scenarios, including, but not limited to the drop hammer test, the Susan test, the Spigot test, and the Steven test, with a charge mass varying from tens of milligrams to several kilograms. The effects of specimen size on explosive sensitivity were found in some impact tests such as drop hammer test and Steven tests, including the threshold velocity/height and reaction violence. To analyse the specimen size effects on explosive sensitivity under low velocity impacts, we collected the impact sensitivity data of several PBX explosives in the drop hammer test, the Steven test, the Susan test and the Spigot test. The effective volume of explosive charge and the critical specific mechanical energy were introduced to investigate the size-effect on the explosive reaction thresholds. The effective volumes of explosive charge in Steven test and Spigot test were obtained by numerical simulation, due to the deformation localization of the impact loading. The critical specific mechanical energy is closely related to the effective volume of explosive charge. The results show that, with the increase of effective volume, the critical mechanical energy needed for explosive ignition decreases and tends to reach a constant value. The mechanisms of size effects on explosive sensitivity are also discussed.

  9. Flexor tendon specimens in organ cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, F; Eiken, O; Bergenholtz, A; Lundborg, G; Erkel, L J

    1980-01-01

    The healing process of sectioned and subsequently sutured rabbit tendon segments was studied over a period of 3 weeks, using an organ culture technique. In one series, the tendon specimens were exposed to a chemically defined culture medium for nutrition. In two control series, the specimens were kept in the synovial cavity of the knee joint for varying periods of time, before being transferred to the culture medium. The tendons remained viable in the medium. The superficial tendon cells demonstrated the morphological characteristics of fibroblasts, but cellular fibroplasia could not be detected. The two control series subjected to synovia prior to transfer into the culture medium showed superficial repair similar to the findings in previous studies on healing capacity of tendon nourished by synovia. The investigation supports the hypothesis that superficial tendon cells are fibroblasts with a potential for repair and that synovia is an efficient nutrient medium. Thus, the beneficial effects on repair exercised by the tendon sheath function should be utilized in flexor tendon surgery.

  10. Creep test with use of miniaturized specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvostová, E.; Džugan, J.

    2017-02-01

    Application of the mini samples methods is very common especially for residual service life assessment of the components operating in the energy sector. Residual lifetime of operating device can be evaluated using standard tests, but these usually cannot be performed due to limited material amount that can be extracted from the components. It is possible to use in these cases a semi destructive sampling of materials and testing methods employing miniature specimens. This article deals with comparison of the creep results obtained with the use of on standard test bars and sub sized samples such as Small Punch Test and newly proposed miniature samples that are axially loaded. The experiment was performed on steam line steel CSN 15 128 after operation. Emphasis was put to practical use of the test results and therefore residual life was assessed with the use of standard and new mini specimens. The results obtained for standard and mini samples exhibit very good agreement without necessity of any correlation as in the case of SPT and thus much more straight forward approach can be applied even for “unknown materials”.

  11. Power morcellation in a specimen bag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholkeri-Singh, Aarathi; Miller, Charles E

    2015-02-01

    To show a technique of power morcellation within a rip-stop nylon specimen bag. Step-by-step explanation of the technique. The Food and Drug Administration recently warned against the use of electromechanical power morcellation for hysterectomy and myomectomy because of potential tissue dissemination within the abdomen and pelvis. If the tumor is malignant, this technique increases the staging of the patient and may further warrant re-operation and chemotherapy. If the tumor is benign, the patient is at risk for parasitic myomas that may lead to, but are not limited to, pain and/or bowel obstruction. To reduce the preceding risks, we reviewed the techniques of power morcellation within a specimen bag used by other surgeons across the United States. This technique was modified to incorporate a more durable bag made out of rip-stop nylon. Laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy during power morcellation was performed, along with an introduction to incorporating power morcellation of multiple myomas during a laparoscopic myomectomy. This technique of power morcellation within a rip-stop nylon bag minimizes the risk of inadvertent tissue spread. This allows the patient an opportunity to undergo minimally invasive surgery for hysterectomy and myomectomy. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Revised catalogue of the type specimens of Recent Amphibians and Reptiles in the “Zoölogisch Museum” University of Amsterdam the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Tuijl, van, L.

    1995-01-01

    This is a revision of the catalogue issued in 1966 (Daan & Hillenius) of type specimens of amphibians and reptiles in the collections of the ”Zoologisch Museum Amsterdam” (ZMA), also named: Institute for Systematics and Population Biology, of the University of Amsterdam.These include 51 holotypes, 1 neotype, 20 lectotypes, 84 syntypes, 63 paralectotypes, 187 paratypes; only the type specimens in ZMA collection are recorded. In many cases, type specimens have been sent to other museums: AMS, B...

  13. Does the preference of peripheral versus central venous access in peripheral blood stem cell collection/yield change stem cell kinetics in autologous stem cell transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogu, Mehmet Hilmi; Kaya, Ali Hakan; Berber, Ilhami; Sari, İsmail; Tekgündüz, Emre; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Iskender, Dicle; Kayıkçı, Ömur; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Keskin, Ali; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2016-02-01

    Central venous access is often used during apheresis procedure in stem cell collection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether central or peripheral venous access has an effect on stem cell yield and the kinetics of the procedure and the product in patients undergoing ASCT after high dose therapy. A total of 327 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The use of peripheral venous access for stem cell yield was significantly more frequent in males compared to females (p = 0.005). Total volume of the product was significantly lower in central venous access group (p = 0.046). As being a less invasive procedure, peripheral venous access can be used for stem cell yield in eligible selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identity and diversity of blood meal hosts of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae: Culicoides Latreille in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassen Sandra B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host preference studies in haematophagous insects e.g. Culicoides biting midges are pivotal to assess transmission routes of vector-borne diseases and critical for the development of veterinary contingency plans to identify which species should be included due to their risk potential. Species of Culicoides have been found in almost all parts of the world and known to live in a variety of habitats. Several parasites and viruses are transmitted by Culicoides biting midges including Bluetongue virus and Schmallenberg virus. The aim of the present study was to determine the identity and diversity of blood meals taken from vertebrate hosts in wild-caught Culicoides biting midges near livestock farms. Methods Biting midges were collected at weekly intervals for 20 weeks from May to October 2009 using light traps at four collection sites on the island Sealand, Denmark. Blood-fed female biting midges were sorted and head and wings were removed for morphological species identification. The thoraxes and abdomens including the blood meals of the individual females were subsequently subjected to DNA isolation. The molecular marker cytochrome oxidase I (COI barcode was applied to identify the species of the collected biting midges (GenBank accessions JQ683259-JQ683374. The blood meals were first screened with a species-specific cytochrome b primer pair for cow and if negative with a universal cytochrome b primer pair followed by sequencing to identify mammal or avian blood meal hosts. Results Twenty-four species of biting midges were identified from the four study sites. A total of 111,356 Culicoides biting midges were collected, of which 2,164 were blood-fed. Specimens of twenty species were identified with blood in their abdomens. Blood meal sources were successfully identified by DNA sequencing from 242 (76% out of 320 Culicoides specimens. Eight species of mammals and seven species of birds were identified as blood meal hosts. The

  15. Blood typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood typing is a method to tell what type of blood you have. Blood typing is done so you can safely donate your blood or receive a blood transfusion. It is also done to see if you have a substance called Rh factor on the surface of your red ...

  16. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth / For Teens / Blood Types What's in this article? Four Blood Groups... Plus Rh Factor... ...Make Eight Blood Types Why Blood Type Matters Print en español Tipos de sangre About 5 million Americans need blood transfusions every ...

  17. Coming home - Bally’s miniature phrenological specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Alice Cliff

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of William Bally’s set of miniature phrenological specimens in Manchester for the Wellcome Collection exhibition Brains: The Mind as Matter (26 July 2013 – 4 January 2014 was an ideal time to reassess the mysteries of its production – was it made in Manchester or Dublin? In what context was it produced? Phrenology – the study of the shape and contours of the skull to determine mental faculties – has received attention from historians. But the origin and context of this object, although long part of the canon of 19th-century phrenology, has never been fully explored. Close inspection of the object has enabled analysis of its place in the career of its maker, and its significance today as evidence of the role of material culture in the practice of 19th-century phrenology.

  18. Taxon and trait recognition from digitized herbarium specimens using deep convolutional neural networks

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Sohaib

    2018-03-13

    Herbaria worldwide are housing a treasure of hundreds of millions of herbarium specimens, which are increasingly being digitized and thereby more accessible to the scientific community. At the same time, deep-learning algorithms are rapidly improving pattern recognition from images and these techniques are more and more being applied to biological objects. In this study, we are using digital images of herbarium specimens in order to identify taxa and traits of these collection objects by applying convolutional neural networks (CNN). Images of the 1000 species most frequently documented by herbarium specimens on GBIF have been downloaded and combined with morphological trait data, preprocessed and divided into training and test datasets for species and trait recognition. Good performance in both domains suggests substantial potential of this approach for supporting taxonomy and natural history collection management. Trait recognition is also promising for applications in functional ecology.

  19. Analysis of blood spots for polyfluoroalkyl chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Kayoko; Wanigatunga, Amal A.; Needham, Larry L. [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Calafat, Antonia M., E-mail: acalafat@cdc.gov [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-12-10

    Polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs) have been detected in humans, in the environment, and in ecosystems around the world. The potential for developmental and reproductive toxicities of some PFCs is of concern especially to children's health. In the United States, a sample of a baby's blood, called a 'dried blood spot' (DBS), is obtained from a heel stick within 48 h of a child's birth. DBS could be useful for assessing prenatal exposure to PFCs. We developed a method based on online solid phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry for measuring four PFCs in DBS, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonate, perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and perfluorononanoate. The analytical limits of detection using one whole DBS ({approx}75 {mu}L of blood) were <0.5 ng mL{sup -1}. To validate the method, we analyzed 98 DBS collected in May 2007 in the United States. PFOS and PFOA were detected in all DBS at concentrations in the low ng mL{sup -1} range. These data suggest that DBS may be a suitable matrix for assessing perinatal exposure to PFCs, but additional information related to sampling and specimen storage is needed to demonstrate the utility of these measures for assessing exposure.

  20. Reheating of zinc-titanate sintered specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this work was observing dimensional and heat transfer changes in ZnTiO3 samples during heating in nitrogen and air atmosphere. Interactions of bulk specimens with gaseous surrounding induce microstructure changes during heating. Sintered ZnTiO3 nanopowder samples were submitted to subsequent heating. Dilatation curves and thermogravimetric with simultaneous differential thermal analysis TGA/DTA curves were recorded. Reheating was performed in air and nitrogen atmospheres. Reheated samples obtained at different characteristic temperatures in air were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. Microstructures obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM of reheated sintered samples are presented and compared. Reheating in a different atmosphere induced different microstructures. The goal was indicating possible causes leading to the microstructure changes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI172057 i br. III45014

  1. Current status of small specimen technology in Charpy impact testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, H.; Kayano, H.; Narui, M.; Yamazaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    The current status of small-scale specimen technology in Charpy impact testing for ferritic steels is presented, with emphasis on the effect of the notch dimensions (notch depth, notch root radius and notch angle) on the upper shelf energy (USE) and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The USE for miniaturized specimens, normalized by Bb 2 or (Bb) 3/2 (B is the specimen thickness, b the ligament size), is essentially independent of notch geometry and has a linear relationship with the USE of full size specimens, regardless of irradiation and alloy conditions. The DBTT of miniaturized specimens depends strongly on the notch dimensions; this dependence of the DBTT decreases as the DBTT of full size specimens increase due to neutron irradiation or thermal aging. These results may be useful in determining the USE and DBTT for full size specimens from those for miniaturized specimens. ((orig.))

  2. A new specimen management system using RFID technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hun; Uh, Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Yoon, Young Ro

    2011-12-01

    The specimen management system with barcode needs to be improved in order to solve inherent problems in work performance. This study describes the application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) which is the solution for the problems associated with specimen labeling and management. A new specimen management system and architecture with RFID technology for clinical laboratory was designed. The suggested system was tested in various conditions such as durability to temperature and aspect of effective utilization of new work flow under a virtual hospital clinical laboratory environment. This system demonstrates its potential application in clinical laboratories for improving work flow and specimen management. The suggested specimen management system with RFID technology has advantages in comparison to the traditional specimen management system with barcode in the aspect of mass specimen processing, robust durability of temperature, humidity changes, and effective specimen tracking.

  3. An Account of the Accessioned Specimens in the Jose Vera Santos Memorial Herbarium, University of the Philippines Diliman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L. Yap

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The University of the Philippines Herbarium was established in 1908 and originally located in Ermita, Manila. The majority of its pre-war collections were destroyed during World War II, and no formal records of its specimens were preserved. Since then, multiple efforts to restore and improve the Herbarium have been proposed and implemented, most notably its move to the UP Diliman campus. In 1999, the Herbarium was off icially renamed as the Jose Vera Santos Memorial Herbarium after the noted grass expert, who initiated rehabilitation work in the Herbarium after the war. The Herbarium is registered with the international code PUH in the Index Herbariorum, a global directory of public herbaria managed by the New York Botanical Garden. To assess the accessioned (uniquely numbered and recorded collection of the Herbarium, an electronic database of its accessions was created.The Herbarium currently contains 14,648 accessions, 12,681 (86.6% of which were collected in the Philippines. This is comprised of 309 families, 1903 genera, and 4485 distinct species. Thirty-nine type specimens form part of the collection, only one of which is a holotype. On the basis of major plant groups, angiosperms make up 71% of the collection. Unsurprisingly, Family Poaceae has the largest number of specimens at 2,759 accessions. The earliest dated Philippine specimen was collected by E.D. Merrill in 1902, and roughly half of the total accessioned specimens were collected in the 1950s and 1970s. The two most prolif ic collectors were Santos and Leonardo L. Co, with 2,320 and 2,147 specimens, respectively. Luzon is the most well-represented island group with 2,752 specimens collected in Metro Manila alone. At present, PUH Curator James V. LaFrankie is working on the expansion of the collection and upgrading of the herbarium to encourage future educational and research activities.

  4. 10 CFR 26.165 - Testing split specimens and retesting single specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (c), as applicable. If the specimen in Bottle A is free of any evidence of drugs or drug metabolites... suitable inquiry conducted under the provisions of § 26.63 or to any other inquiry or investigation... records must be provided to personnel conducting reviews, inquiries into allegations, or audits under the...

  5. A non-destructive DNA sampling technique for herbarium specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, Lara D.

    2017-01-01

    Herbarium specimens are an important source of DNA for plant research but current sampling methods require the removal of material for DNA extraction. This is undesirable for irreplaceable specimens such as rare species or type material. Here I present the first non-destructive sampling method for extracting DNA from herbarium specimens. DNA was successfully retrieved from robust leaves and/or stems of herbarium specimens up to 73 years old.

  6. A non-destructive DNA sampling technique for herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Lara D

    2017-01-01

    Herbarium specimens are an important source of DNA for plant research but current sampling methods require the removal of material for DNA extraction. This is undesirable for irreplaceable specimens such as rare species or type material. Here I present the first non-destructive sampling method for extracting DNA from herbarium specimens. DNA was successfully retrieved from robust leaves and/or stems of herbarium specimens up to 73 years old.

  7. Detection of alpha human papillomaviruses in archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Poljak, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens stored in pathology departments worldwide are an invaluable source for diagnostic purposes when fresh clinical material is unavailable as well as for retrospective molecular and epidemiological studies, especially when dealing with rare clinical conditions for which prospective collection is not feasible. Accurate detection of HPV infection in these specimens is particularly challenging because nucleic acids are often degraded and therefore, not suitable for amplification of larger fragments of the viral genome or viral gene transcripts. This review provides a brief summary of molecular methods for detecting alpha-HPV DNA/RNA in FFPE tissue specimens. We specifically address the key procedural and environmental factors that have the greatest impact on the quality of nucleic acids extracted from FFPE tissue specimens, and describe some solutions that can be used to increase their integrity and/or amplifiability. Moreover, commonly used methods for HPV DNA/RNA detection in FFPE tissue specimens are presented and discussed, focusing on studies using polymerase chain reaction as an HPV detection method and published after 1999. Finally, we briefly summarize our 22 years of experience with HPV detection in FFPE tissue specimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Herbarium specimens reveal a historical shift in phylogeographic structure of common ragweed during native range disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Michael David; Zimmer, Elizabeth A.; Olsen, Morten Tange

    2014-01-01

    populations of common ragweed across its native range as well as historical herbarium specimens collected up to 140 years ago. Bayesian clustering analyses of 453 modern and 473 historical samples genotyped at three chloroplast spacer regions and six nuclear microsatellite loci reveal that historical ragweed...

  9. Adaptation of Museum Specimens for Use in Anatomical Teaching Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Color transparencies are prepared of a re-colored anatomical specimen after placing labels temporarily in position to indicate specific structures. The specimen is also radiographed to show skeletal and soft tissue structures. Cross-reference among the specimen, photographs, and radiographs is supplemented by examination and self-assessment…

  10. 21 CFR 864.3250 - Specimen transport and storage container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Specimen transport and storage container. 864.3250 Section 864.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....3250 Specimen transport and storage container. (a) Identification. A specimen transport and storage...

  11. Retrospective analysis of heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island based on old and new herbarium specimens1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Sofia M.; Murray, David W.; Whitfeld, Timothy J. S.

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Herbarium specimens may provide a record of past environmental conditions, including heavy metal pollution. To explore this potential, we compared concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc in historical and new collections from four sites in Rhode Island, USA. Methods: We compared historical specimens (1846 to 1916) to congener specimens collected in 2015 at three former industrial sites in Providence, Rhode Island, and one nonindustrial site on Block Island. Leaf material was prepared by UltraWAVE SRC Microwave Digestion, and heavy metal concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy. Results: Heavy metal concentrations in the historical and new specimens were measurable for all elements tested, and levels of copper and zinc were comparable in the historical and 2015 collections. By contrast, the concentration of lead declined at all sites over time. Significant variability in heavy metal concentration was observed between taxa, reflecting their varied potential for elemental accumulation. Discussion: It seems clear that herbarium specimens can be used to evaluate past levels of pollution and assess local environmental changes. With careful sampling effort, these specimens can be a valuable part of environmental science research. Broadening the possible applications for herbarium collections in this way increases their relevance in an era of reduced funding for collections-based research. PMID:28090410

  12. Accelerating plant DNA barcode reference library construction using herbarium specimens: improved experimental techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Dong, Wenpan; Shi, Shuo; Cheng, Tao; Li, Changhao; Liu, Yanlei; Wu, Ping; Wu, Hongkun; Gao, Peng; Zhou, Shiliang

    2015-11-01

    A well-covered reference library is crucial for successful identification of species by DNA barcoding. The biggest difficulty in building such a reference library is the lack of materials of organisms. Herb