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Sample records for blood sedimentation

  1. Effects of Aggregation on Blood Sedimentation and Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhbanov, Alexander; Yang, Sung

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test has been used for over a century. The Westergren method is routinely used in a variety of clinics. However, the mechanism of erythrocyte sedimentation remains unclear, and the 60 min required for the test seems excessive. We investigated the effects of cell aggregation during blood sedimentation and electrical conductivity at different hematocrits. A sample of blood was drop cast into a small chamber with two planar electrodes placed on the bottom. The measured blood conductivity increased slightly during the first minute and decreased thereafter. We explored various methods of enhancing or retarding the erythrocyte aggregation. Using experimental measurements and theoretical calculations, we show that the initial increase in blood conductivity was indeed caused by aggregation, while the subsequent decrease in conductivity resulted from the deposition of erythrocytes. We present a method for calculating blood conductivity based on effective medium theory. Erythrocytes are modeled as conducting spheroids surrounded by a thin insulating membrane. A digital camera was used to investigate the erythrocyte sedimentation behavior and the distribution of the cell volume fraction in a capillary tube. Experimental observations and theoretical estimations of the settling velocity are provided. We experimentally demonstrate that the disaggregated cells settle much slower than the aggregated cells. We show that our method of measuring the electrical conductivity credibly reflected the ESR. The method was very sensitive to the initial stage of aggregation and sedimentation, while the sedimentation curve for the Westergren ESR test has a very mild slope in the initial time. We tested our method for rapid estimation of the Westergren ESR. We show a correlation between our method of measuring changes in blood conductivity and standard Westergren ESR method. In the future, our method could be examined as a potential means of accelerating

  2. Effect of geomagnetic storms upon blood sedimentation dynamics in ischemic heart disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurfinkel, Youri I.; Voeikov, Vladimir L.; Kondakov, Sergey E.; Demidion, P. Y.; Dmitriev, Andey Y.; Ozerskii, S. Y.

    2000-11-01

    The sedimentation properties of blood of 13 ischemic heart disease patients and 2 healthy volunteers have been analyzed using a special computerized optical device for high temporal resolution tracing of red blood/plasma boundary movement rate (ESR-graphy). The kinetic curves of red blood sedimentation are substantially nonmonotonic and exhibit multiple accelerations, decelerations and even backwards movement of the red blood/plasma boundary. The intensity of blood sedimentation rate oscillations is significantly higher in the blood of patients and voluteers on days of enhanced geomagnetic activity than on quiet days. In healthy donors, blood oscillations were also observed on active geomagnetic days, however, their intensity was lower, the sedimentation rate started to oscillate after a longer time upon pipette installation, and the oscillation frequency was lower than in the patients' blood. Thus, blood is highly responsive to changes in geomagnetic field activity. Possibly oscillatory behavior mechanism of blood sedimentation rate and the diagnostic and prognostic merits of the ESR graphs are discussed.

  3. Passive gravitational sedimentation of peripheral blood increases the sensitivity of microscopic detection of malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Davis; Trenden Flanigan; Eric Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine if passive gravitational sedimentation of blood samples, followed by buffy coat thin smear preparation could increase the sensitivity of malaria diagnosis when compared to conventional thin smear preparation without the additional cost of centrifuges or molecular diagnostics. Methods: Blood samples were collected from 205 patients. Each patient sample was analyzed using all three methods of sample preparation. Results: Buffy coat analysis of centrifuged blood samples greatly increased the sensitivity of malaria diagnosis when compared to standard thin smear techniques. Sensitivity between mechanically centrifuged samples and gravitationally sedimented samples showed equal improvement in sensitivity when compared to standard thin smear preparation. Conclusions: Passive gravitational sedimentation of red blood cells followed by buffy coat analysis dramatically improves the sensitivity of malaria diagnosis without the additional costs associated with centrifugation.

  4. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate of human blood exposed to low-level laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Musawi, Mustafa S; Jaafar, M S; Al-Gailani, B; Ahmed, Naser M; Suhaimi, Fatanah M; Bakhsh, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to investigate in vitro low-level laser (LLL) effects on rheological parameter, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), of human blood. The interaction mechanism between LLL radiation and blood is unclear. Therefore, research addresses the effects of LLL irradiation on human blood and this is essential to understanding how laser radiation interacts with biological cells and tissues. The blood samples were collected through venipuncture into EDTA-containing tubes as an anticoagulant. Each sample was divided into two equal aliquots to be used as a non-irradiated sample (control) and an irradiated sample. The aliquot was subjected to doses of 36, 54, 72 and 90 J/cm(2) with wavelengths of 405, 589 and 780 nm, with a radiation source at a fixed power density of 30 mW/cm(2). The ESR and red blood cell count and volume are measured after laser irradiation and compared with the non-irradiated samples. The maximum reduction in ESR is observed with radiation dose 72 J/cm(2) delivered with a 405-nm wavelength laser beam. Moreover, no hemolysis is observed under these irradiation conditions. In a separate protocol, ESR of separated RBCs re-suspended in irradiated plasma (7.6 ± 2.3 mm/h) is found to be significantly lower (by 51 %) than their counterpart re-suspended in non-irradiated plasma (15.0 ± 3.7 mm/h). These results indicate that ESR reduction is mainly due to the effects of LLL on the plasma composition that ultimately affect whole blood ESR. PMID:27250712

  5. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of contaminated estuarine sediments in fish peripheral blood: Laboratory versus in situ studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Pedro M., E-mail: pmcosta@fct.unl.pt [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Neuparth, Teresa S. [CIIMAR-Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Caeiro, Sandra [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Departamento de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Aberta, Rua da Escola Politecnica, 141, 1269-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lobo, Jorge [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos [IPIMAR-INRB, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biologicos, Avenida de Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal); Angel DelValls, T. [UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop Chair-Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Costa, Maria H. [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2011-01-15

    Juvenile Senegalese soles (Solea senegalensis) were exposed to estuarine sediments through 28-day laboratory and in situ (field) bioassays. The sediments, collected from three distinct sites (a reference plus two contaminated) of the Sado Estuary (W Portugal) were characterized for total organic matter, redox potential, fine fraction and for the levels of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorines, namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichloro diphenyl tricholoethane plus its main metabolites (DDTs). Genotoxicity was determined in whole peripheral blood by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or 'comet') assay and by scoring erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA). Analysis was complemented with the determination of lipid peroxidation in blood plasma by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) protocol and cell type sorting. The results showed that exposure to contaminated sediments induced DNA fragmentation and clastogenesis. Still, laboratory exposure to the most contaminated sediment revealed a possible antagonistic effect between metallic and organic contaminants that might have been enhanced by increased bioavailability. The laboratory assay caused a more pronounced increase in ENA whereas a very significant increase in DNA fragmentation was observed in field-tested fish exposed to the reference sediment, which is likely linked to increased lipid peroxidation that probably occurred due to impaired access to food. Influence of natural pathogens was ruled out by unaltered leukocyte counts. The statistical integration of data correlated lipid peroxidation with biological variables such as fish length and weight, whereas the genotoxicity biomarkers were more correlated to sediment contamination. It was demonstrated that laboratory and field bioassays for the risk assessment of sediment contamination may yield different genotoxicity profiles although both provided results that are in overall accordance with

  6. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of contaminated estuarine sediments in fish peripheral blood: Laboratory versus in situ studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvenile Senegalese soles (Solea senegalensis) were exposed to estuarine sediments through 28-day laboratory and in situ (field) bioassays. The sediments, collected from three distinct sites (a reference plus two contaminated) of the Sado Estuary (W Portugal) were characterized for total organic matter, redox potential, fine fraction and for the levels of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorines, namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichloro diphenyl tricholoethane plus its main metabolites (DDTs). Genotoxicity was determined in whole peripheral blood by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or 'comet') assay and by scoring erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA). Analysis was complemented with the determination of lipid peroxidation in blood plasma by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) protocol and cell type sorting. The results showed that exposure to contaminated sediments induced DNA fragmentation and clastogenesis. Still, laboratory exposure to the most contaminated sediment revealed a possible antagonistic effect between metallic and organic contaminants that might have been enhanced by increased bioavailability. The laboratory assay caused a more pronounced increase in ENA whereas a very significant increase in DNA fragmentation was observed in field-tested fish exposed to the reference sediment, which is likely linked to increased lipid peroxidation that probably occurred due to impaired access to food. Influence of natural pathogens was ruled out by unaltered leukocyte counts. The statistical integration of data correlated lipid peroxidation with biological variables such as fish length and weight, whereas the genotoxicity biomarkers were more correlated to sediment contamination. It was demonstrated that laboratory and field bioassays for the risk assessment of sediment contamination may yield different genotoxicity profiles although both provided results that are in overall accordance with sediment

  7. DEXTRAN SEDIMENTATION INDUCES A DIFFERENCE IN THE PERCENTAGE OF HYPODENSE EOSINOPHILS IN PERIPHERAL-BLOOD BETWEEN CHILDREN WITH ALLERGIC-ASTHMA AND HEALTHY CONTROLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEKSTRA, MO; DIJKHUIZEN, B; GERRITSEN, J; KAUFMAN, HF

    1994-01-01

    Considerable differences in the percentage of hypodense eosinophils in the peripheral blood of asthmatics have been reported by different investigators. In these previous studies dextran sedimentation was used for removal of erythrocytes prior to density centrifugation. We hypothesized that the sedi

  8. Effect of exposure to contaminated pond sediments on survival, development, and enzyme and blood biomarkers in veined treefrog (Trachycephalus typhonius) tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Paola M; Lajmanovich, Rafael C; Attademo, Andrés M; Junges, Celina M; Cabagna-Zenklusen, Mariana C; Repetti, María R; Sigrist, María E; Beldoménico, Horacio

    2013-12-01

    Sediments are important elements of aquatic ecosystems and in general sediments accumulate diverse toxic substances. Amphibians potentially have a greater risk of exposure to contaminants in sediments, and the test of sediments provides first lines of evidences. Sediment outdoor microcosm experiments were conducted to analyze biological endpoints (survival, development, growth, and morphological and organ malformation), enzyme activity (butyrylcholinesterase, BChE; glutathione-S-transferase, GST; and catalase, CAT) and blood biomarkers in veined treefrog Trachycephalus typhonius tadpoles, a widespread neotropical species. Hatching (stage 23) of T. thyphonius was exposed until they reached metamorphosis (stage 46). Sediment tests were performed and four different treatments were used: three ponds (LTPA, ISP, and SSP) influenced by industrial and agricultural activities and a reference treatment from a forest (RFS). Physical and chemical variables and concentration of nutrients, pesticide residues, and metals were determined. One treatment was metal-rich (LPTA) and two were nutrient-rich (ISP and SSP). Sediment treatments had no significant effect on survival; in contrast they had significant sublethal effects on T. typhonius larval development and growth rates, and affected overall size and shape at stage 38. Principally, in LPTA animals were significantly larger than in RFS, exhibiting swollen bodies, tail muscles and tail fin. In addition, metamorphs from LPTA, ISP, and SSP were smaller and showed signs of emaciation by the end of the experiment. Statistical comparisons showed that the proportions of each type of morphological abnormalities (swollen bodies and diamond shape, gut uncoiling, diverted gut, stiff tails, polydactyly, and visceral and hindlimb hemorrhaging) were significantly greater in metal- and nutrient-rich sediment treatments. Moreover, activities of BChE, GST and CAT, as well as and presence of micronuclei, immature, mitotic, anucleated

  9. Length of sedimentation reaction in blood: a comparison of the test 1 ESR system with the ICSH reference method and the sedisystem 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Adolfo; Muñoz, Manuel; Ramírez, Gemma

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the automatic TEST 1 ESR system, SIRE Analytical Systems (TEST 1), with that of the the Sedisystem 15, Becton Dickinson (SEDI), and the International Council for Standardization in Haematology reference method (Westergren) for measuring the length of sedimentation reaction in blood (LSRB). This reaction was measured in 418 paired blood samples drawn in K2-EDTA vacuum tubes and specific tubes from patients scheduled for routine LSRB measurement. The TEST 1 system uses micro-sedimentation and quantitative capillary photometry technology, whereas the SEDI uses a CCD camera. For Westergren, a 200 mm column with 3.0 mm internal diameter was used. Compared to Westergren, TEST 1 gives accurate values of LSRB in most of the samples (mean of differences: 0.99 +/- 10.4 mm; 95% CI, -0.807 to 2.78 mm; n =131). Similar results were obtained in the comparison with SEDI (mean of differences: -0.626 +/- 8 mm; 95% CI, -1.756 to 0.5 mm; n = 195). Compared to those of fresh blood samples, LSRB values were significantly lower in 24 h stored samples, either at 4 degrees C (21.5 +/- 2.3 vs. 19.4 +/- 2.2 mm; p (Spearman's coefficient of correlation): 0.981; n = 44) or at room temperature (19.1 +/- 2.5 vs. 16.2 +/- 2.1 mm; p: 0.903; n = 46). In conclusion, TEST 1 is a rapid, reliable system for automatic measurement of LSRB in standard K2-EDTA blood samples. It has a very low imprecision and maintains a good performance in 24 h stored samples. In addition, due to its operational characteristics (60 samples/20 min) it is a suitable tool for clinical laboratories with a high work load as well as for emergency laboratories. PMID:12667012

  10. Blood homocysteine and fasting insulin levels are reduced and erythrocyte sedimentation rates increased with a glycophospholipid-vitamin formulation: a retrospective study in older subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita R. Ellithorpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevations in Homocyteine (Hcys levels in the blood have been correlated with increased risk for coronary heart disease and stroke, loss of cognition and memory, and other chronic medical conditions. Objective: A retrospective study was initiated to determine if Hcys levels and other blood markers were altered in subjects taking an oral functional food supplement containing a mixture of phosphoglycolipids (NT Factor® and vitamins. Methods: Thirty-five patients (28 females, 7 males, Av. Age=60.7±9.6 years who had used the functional food Advanced Physician’s FormulaTM with NTFactor® in tablet form each day were enrolled in a retrospective study on blood chemistry. This retrospective study followed a prospective study on the use of the same supplement to reduce fatigue in patients with chronic fatigue. Participants were patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis or other fatiguing illnesses. Subjects had blood drawn over a 6-month period, and routine blood testing was performed. In this laboratory study the results were analyzed for differences, and statistical analyses were performed. Results: All participants responded in the study and showed an average reduction of 31.8% in Hcys levels (from 10.85±0.42 to 7.40±0.42 µmol/L; t-test, p<0.001; Wilcoxon, p<0.001. Women responded better than men: women (from 11.06±0.50 to 8.67±0.82 µmol/L, 34.4% reduction, t-test, p< 0.001; Wilcoxon, p<0.001 versus men (from 10.80±0.51 to 7.01±0.47 µmol/L, 21.6% reduction, t-test, p< 0.0862. Differences were also found in fasting insulin levels (from 12.80±3.11 to 5.30±1.77 µIU/mL, 58.6% reduction, t-test, p<0.005 and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. ESR increased from 10.5±2.21 to 20.19±3.20 mm/hr (92.2% increase, t-test, p<0.0314; Wilcoxon, p<0.0154. Other tests were not significantly different after 6 months of supplement, there were no side effects from the test supplement, and none of the participants had

  11. Comparative analysis on red blood cells through UF-100 urine sediment analyzer, urine dry chemistry analyze and urine sediment microscopy%尿沉渣分析仪、尿液干化学分析仪测定及尿沉渣镜检红细胞对比分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白士丽; 刘长青; 王晓丽; 郎国华

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To do the comparative analysis on red blood cells through UF-100 urine sediment analyzer, Urine Dry Chemistry Analyze and urine sediment microscopy for finding the most accurate judgment on red blood cells in the urine. Methods:Morning urine collected from 1200 cases of hospitalized patients with urine specimens, the UF-100 urine sediment analysis system, urine dry chemical analyzer and urine sediment microscopy detection to analyze it, detecting urine red blood cells. Results:UF-100 urine sediment analyzer detecting red blood cell positive rate was 18.8%, the urine dry chemical detecting red blood cell positive rate was 16.3%, microscopy positive rate was 13.2%. Conclusion:Urinary sediment analysis system, urine red blood cells in urine dry chemistry method and microscope test results vary, before two kinds of methods is influenced by certain factors can appear false positives and false negatives, so all can't replace the microscope examination in urine routine test, three methods should be combined together to provide accurate and reliable basis for clinical.%目的:对UF-100尿沉渣分析仪、尿液干化学分析仪检测尿液中红细胞与尿沉渣镜检法检测红细胞进行比较,以对尿液中红细胞进行最为准确的判断。方法:采集1200例住院患者的晨尿尿液标本,采用尿沉渣分析系统、尿液干化学分析仪与尿沉渣显微镜检测对其进行分析,检测尿液中的红细胞。结果:尿沉渣分析仪检测红细胞阳性率为18.8%,尿液干化学检测红细胞阳性率为16.3%,镜检阳性率为13.2%。结论:尿沉渣分析系统、尿液干化学法和显微镜检测尿液中红细胞结果存在差异,前两种方法受某些因素影响可出现假阳性及假阴性,因此尿液常规检测中均不能替代显微镜检查,应将3种检测方法相结合共同为临床提供准确可靠的红细胞检测依据。

  12. Detection of Red Blood Cells and White Blood Cells in Urine with the Combination of UF-500i Urinary Sediment Analyzer and AX-4030 Urinary Dry Chemistry Analyzer%UF-500i尿沉渣分析仪与AX-4030尿干化学分析仪联用对尿红细胞和白细胞的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雄; 李阑; 蒋博; 任佳; 李兵

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduced the process and results of detecting red blood cells (RBC) and white blood cells (WBC) in urine with the combination of UF-500i urinary sediment analyzer and AX-4030 urinary dry chemistry analyzer according to the manual microscopy results which were regarded as the gold standard. The detection results showed that the combination of the two machines can improve the detection accuracy of RBC and WBC.%本文阐述了以人工镜检结果为金标准,联用UF-500i尿沉渣分析仪与AX-4030尿干化学分析仪检测尿红细胞与白细胞的过程和结果,指出二者联用可提高检测准确性。

  13. Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  14. Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Index A-Z Blood Clots Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood that can be stationary (thrombosis) ... treated? What are blood clots? Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood. Normally, blood flows freely through ...

  15. Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2...

  16. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called homologous blood donation. Many communities have a blood bank at which any healthy person can donate blood. ... need to arrange with your hospital or local blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. ...

  17. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  18. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  19. Blood Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Group Links Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Basics Blood is a specialized body fluid. It ... about 9 pints. Jump To: The Components of Blood and Their Importance Many people have undergone blood ...

  20. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart contracts, which ... as it relaxes, which is called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure ...

  1. 四种全自动尿沉渣分析仪对尿液中红细胞和白细胞的检测性能研究%Performances of Four Automated Urine Sediment Analyzers in Detecting Urine Red Blood Cells and White Blood Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁骑; 李君安; 王东生; 万松; 费中海; 吴昊; 焦艳梅; 唐中

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价FUS-200、IQ-200、AVE-764B、UF-500i四种尿沉渣分析仪对尿液中红细胞(RBC)、白细胞(WBC)的检测性能.方法 对FUS-200、IQ-200、AVE-764B、UF-500i四种尿沉渣分析仪检测尿液中RBC、WBC的批内精密度、携带污染率、线性范围、干扰实验进行评价.选择100例阳性尿样本分别用以上四种尿沉渣分析仪检测RBC、WBC,并将检测结果与人工镜检的结果进行对比分析.结果 FUS-200、IQ-200、AVE-764B、UF-500i四种尿沉渣分析仪检测尿液中RBC的批内精密度分别为7.0%、5.8%、6.3%、3.2%,携带污染率分别为0、0.04%、0、0.09%;检测WBC的批内精密度分别为9.8%、8.2%、4.9%、5.9%,携带污染率分别为0、0.41%、0、0.12%.当RBC在0~15 000个/μl、WBC在0~10 000个/μl 范围内时,四种尿沉渣分析仪的测定值与理论值的线性相关系数R2均>0.99.UF-500i、FUS-200修饰后、IQ-200修饰后、AVE-764B修饰后的RBC及WBC检测结果与人工镜检的结果比较,差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05),真菌和结晶会干扰四种尿沉渣分析仪对RBC和WBC的检测结果.结论 FUS-200、IQ-200、AVE-764B、UF-500i四种尿沉渣分析仪检测尿液RBC和WBC的精密度高、线性好、携带污染率低,可用于临床样本的初筛,但不能完全取代人工镜检.%Objective To analyze the performances of four automated urine sediment analyzers ( FUS - 200, IQ -200, AVE -764B, and UF -500i ) in detecting urine red blood cells ( RBC ) and white blood cells ( WBC ). Methods The within - run precision, linearity, carryover rate, and anti - interference performance of four automated urine sediment analyzers ( FUS - 200, IQ - 200, AVE - 764B, and UF - 500i ) in detecting urine RBC and WBC were tested. WBC and RBC were detected using these four analyzers in 100 patients with positive urine samples, and the results were compared with those of manual microscopy. Results The within - run CVs for WBC counting and RBC counting

  2. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Types KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Types Print A A ... or straight hair instead of curly. ...Make Eight Blood Types The different markers that can be found in ...

  3. Immunoelectrophoresis - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    IEP - serum; Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - blood; Gamma globulin electrophoresis; Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis ... A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

  4. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  5. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osmotic fragility ) Deficiency of an enzyme called lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase Abnormalities of hemoglobin , the protein in ... sickle and Pappenheimer Red blood cells, target cells Formed elements of blood References Bain BJ. The peripheral ...

  6. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  7. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment...

  8. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  9. Electrodialytic remediation of sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland

    Sediments of harbors and freshwaters are regularly dredged for various reasons: maintenance of navigational depths, recovery of recreational locations, and even environmental recovery. In the past, sediments dredged from harbors have been dumped at sea, however, environmental regulations now, in ...

  10. Ocean Sediment Thickness Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean sediment thickness contours in 200 meter intervals for water depths ranging from 0 - 18,000 meters. These contours were derived from a global sediment...

  11. Blood: Tests Used to Assess the Physiological and Immunological Properties of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. G.; Tansey, E. A.; Johnson, C. D.; Roe, S. M.; Montgomery, L. E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of blood and the relative ease of access to which it can be retrieved make it an ideal source to gauge different aspects of homeostasis within an individual, form an accurate diagnosis, and formulate an appropriate treatment regime. Tests used to determine blood parameters such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hemoglobin…

  12. Blood / Money

    OpenAIRE

    Strong, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Marilyn Strathern has argued that "nature" in Euro-American culture has appeared as constraint; it has figured the givens of existence on which human artifice is seen to construct "society" or "culture."(5) Among those givens is the notion that human beings are naturally individuals. And blood, too, images individuality: "The very thought of blood, individual blood, touches the deepest feelings in man about life and death" ([RIchard Titmuss] 16.) Transfusion medicine, then, draws on a series ...

  13. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab and Imaging Tests Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts SHARE: Print Glossary Blood cell counts give ... your blood that's occupied by red cells. Normal Blood Counts Normal blood counts fall within a range ...

  14. Blood donation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A blood donation is organised by the Cantonal Hospital of Geneva On Thursday 19 March 2009 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT 2 Number of donations during the last blood donations :135 donors in July 2008 122 donors in November 2008 Let’s do better in 2009 !!! Give 30 minutes of your time to save lives...

  15. BLOOD DONATION

    CERN Document Server

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A blood donation, organized by EFS (Etablissement Français du Sang) of Annemasse will take place On Wednesday 12 November 2008, from 8:30 to 16:00, at CERN Restaurant 2 If possible, please, bring your blood group Card.

  16. Tainted blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Ida; Sheikh, Zainab Afshan; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    study of the historical rise and current workings of safety practices in the Danish blood system. Here, we identify a strong focus on contamination in order to avoid 'tainted blood', at the expense of working with risks that could be avoided through enhanced blood monitoring practices. Of further...... significance to this focus are the social dynamics found at the heart of safety practices aimed at avoiding contamination. We argue that such dynamics need more attention, in order to achieve good health outcomes in transfusion medicine. Thus, we conclude that, to ensure continuously safe blood systems, we...... need to move beyond the bifurcation of the social and medical aspects of blood supply as two separate issues and approach social dynamics as key medical safety questions....

  17. Moving blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelis, K

    1997-01-01

    Our internationally acclaimed journalist Sanguinia has returned safely from her historic assignment. Travelling from Homeric Greece to British Romanticism, she was witness to blood drinking, letting, bathing, and transfusion. In this report, she explores connections between the symbolic and the sadistic; the mythic and the medical--all in an effort to appreciate the layered meanings our culture has given to the movement of blood between our bodies. PMID:9407636

  18. Biology of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mail Facebook TwitterTitle Google+ LinkedIn Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Medical Dictionary Also ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  19. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of donor blood. Many communities have a blood bank where healthy people can donate blood. This blood ... need to arrange with your hospital or local blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. ...

  20. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ... Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood Clots ...

  1. Catecholamine blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norepinephrine -- blood; Epinephrine -- blood; Adrenalin -- blood; Dopamine -- blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... the test. This is especially true if both blood and urine catecholamines are to be measured. You ...

  2. Blood (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Print A A A ... about the mysterious, life-sustaining fluid called blood. Blood Basics Two types of blood vessels carry blood ...

  3. Blood Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Blood > Blood Facts and Statistics Printable Version Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts ... about American Red Cross Blood Services Facts about blood needs Every two seconds someone in the U.S. ...

  4. Managing your blood sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperglycemia - control; Hypoglycemia - control; Diabetes - blood sugar control; Blood glucose - managing ... Know how to: Recognize and treat low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Recognize and treat high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) ...

  5. Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to infections including those we develop from our vaccinations (such as poliovirus antibodies, which are made by ... the Transfusion Medicine Unit, Blood Bank, and Stem Cell Storage Facility University of Rochester Medical ... and health educators who are available by phone Monday through Friday, 9 am to 9 pm ( ...

  6. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... BMP) Blood Test: Complete Blood Count Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Getting a Blood Test (Video) Blood Test: ...

  7. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Patients Blood Disorders Blood Clots Blood Clotting & Pregnancy If you are pregnant, or you have just ... The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is increased by the following: Previous blood clots ...

  8. Blood Count Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your blood contains red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in your blood. This helps doctors check on your overall health. ...

  9. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  10. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Transfusions Print A ... United States get blood transfusions. A Bit About Blood As blood moves throughout the body, it carries ...

  11. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor prescribes it, medicine. What Is Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood flow inside ... Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you won't ...

  12. Blood Pressure Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  13. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right away. continue How Do Doctors Measure Blood Pressure? Blood pressure readings are fast and painless. Blood pressure ... same age, height, and gender have lower blood pressure. Blood pressure between 90% and 95% of the normal ...

  14. Sediment supply to beaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels

    2014-01-01

    Many beaches have been built by an onshore supply of sand from the shoreface, and future long-term coastal evolution critically depends on cross-shore sediment exchange between the upper and the lower shorefaces. Even so, cross-shore sediment supply remains poorly known in quantitative terms...... while the effect of orbital velocity skewness is more limited. A 1 year long simulation of sediment transfers between the lower and the upper shorefaces on a natural beach compares well with transport rates estimated from long-term bar migration patterns and aeolian accretion on the same beach....

  15. Dynamics of Cohesive Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Claus

    The present thesis considers the transport processes of cohesive sediments. The cohesive sediment used in the laboratory experiments was kaolinite, a clay mineral, in order to be able to reproduce the individual experiments. In the first part of the thesis, the theoretical considerations regarding...... to the erosion, deposition, settling velocity and consolidation of cohesive sediments. All experiments were evaluated considering the reproducibility of the individual experiments. The erosion and deposition experiments were conducted in a circular flume. The measurements of the settling velocity were carried...

  16. Offshore Surficial Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This data layer (PAC_EXT.txt and PAC_PRS.txt) represents two of five point coverages of known sediment samples, inspections, and probes from the usSEABED data...

  17. Risk management of sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment management nowadays is often concerned around sediments that have been polluted in former times, posing the following questions: what risks remain after time has passed concerning the persistence, ageing and bioavailability of the polluting substances; where does the risk apply regarding the transport of contaminated sediments and the management objectives in the different zones of a river basin; how can solutions be found; who is responsible for paying the management measures. This publication reflects on the discussions in the SedNet Working Group on risk management and communication claiming that sustainable sediment management needs to be risk based and oriented towards the river basin scale. Results of two case studies are recounted, which roughly followed the site prioritization approach that was suggested by the participants of the working group and gives an example on a decision making module that could help in communicating interests and the resulting priorities of measures, after areas of risks have been identified in a river basin

  18. Geochemistry of sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    have been discussed. Geochemical studies were also used in studying the volcanogenic sedimentation in the Indian Ocean region including the seismic and aseismic ridges, Kerguelen Plateau, Indonesian volcanic arc, and those from the intraplate volcanoes...

  19. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  20. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  1. Influenza-Sediment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusiak, A.; Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Alimova, A.; Galarza, J.; Wei, H.; Steiner, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A typical water fowl can secrete 1012 influenza virions per day. Therefore it is not unexpected that influenza virions interact with sediments in the water column. The influence of sediments on avian influenza virions is not known. With the threat of avian influenza emerging into the human population, it is crucial to understand virus survivability and residence time in a body of water. Influenza and clay sediments are colloidal particles and thus aggregate as explained by DLVO (Derjaguin & Landau, Verwey & Overbeek) theory. Of great importance is an understanding of the types of particulate or macromolecular components that bind the virus particles, and whether the virus remains biologically active. We present results of hetero-aggregation and transmission electron microscopy experiments performed with influenza A/PR8/38. Influenza particles are suspended with sediment and minimal nutrients for several days, after which the components are evaluated to determine influenza concentration and survivability. Transmission electron microscopy results are reported on the influenza-sediment aggregates to elucidate structure and morphology of the components.

  2. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 6, 2016, San Diego, CA Abstracts Registration Housing Travel Information Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood ... Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and Travel DVT Myths vs. Facts Blood Detectives Find a ...

  3. Where to Donate Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... zip code using the Blood Bank Locator below: Blood Bank Locator City: State/Province: ZIP Code: Country: Show ... safety and care. The Association sets standards for blood banks and transfusion services, and accredits member blood banks ...

  4. High blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you are at risk for: Bleeding from the aorta, the large blood vessel that supplies blood to ... tests Blood pressure check Blood pressure References American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes-2015 ...

  5. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... may be used to puncture the skin. The blood collects in a small glass tube called a ...

  6. Types of Blood Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Double Red Cell Plasma Platelets Red Cells What blood donation type is best for me? **If you do not ... blood type, a whole blood donation is recommended** Blood Donation Types: Volunteer Donations The standard or most common type ...

  7. Blood Type Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Blood Type Game Printable Version Blood Type Game This feature requires version 6 or later ... many points as possible by matching the appropriate blood type of a donor to the blood type of ...

  8. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or parts of blood ... liver failure or a severe infection. Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as ...

  9. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Transfusions Print A ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. ...

  10. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is the AHA recommendation for healthy blood pressure? This blood pressure chart reflects categories defined by the American ... unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare providers will want to get ...

  11. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Housing Travel Information Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances ... reflect the most recent scientific research View all publications For Patients Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding ...

  12. Transport Model of Underground Sediment in Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Jichao; Wang Guangqian

    2013-01-01

    Studies about sediment erosion were mainly concentrated on the river channel sediment, the terrestrial sediment, and the underground sediment. The transport process of underground sediment is studied in the paper. The concept of the flush potential sediment is founded. The transport equation with stable saturated seepage is set up, and the relations between the flush potential sediment and water sediment are discussed. Flushing of underground sediment begins with small particles, and large pa...

  13. Types of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » Blood Transfusion » Types of Blood Transfusions Explore Blood Transfusion What Is... ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Blood Transfusions Blood is transfused either as whole blood ( ...

  14. Cord blood testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to evaluate the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH levels) Blood sugar level Blood type and Rh Complete blood count ( ... means you have a blood infection (septicemia). High levels of blood sugar (glucose) in the cord blood may be found ...

  15. SEDIMENT CONTROL FOR IRRIGATION INTAKES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of the sediment problems in irrigation engineeringwas carried out, and the layout, the method as well as the effect of sediment control for irrigation intake structures in China were briefly introduced.

  16. Contaminated Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglal, Kendrick

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 relating to the assessment, evaluation and remediation of contaminated aquatic sediments is presented. The review is divided into the following main sections: policy and guidance, methodology, distribution, fate and transport, risk, toxicity and remediation. PMID:27620103

  17. Sediment Erosion in Hydro turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Neopane, Hari Prasad

    2010-01-01

    Sediment erosion is caused by the dynamic action of sediment flowing along with water impacting against a solid surface. Hydraulic turbine components operating in sediment-laden water are subject to abrasive and erosive wear. This wear not only reduces the efficiency and the life of the turbine but also causes problems in operation and maintenance, which ultimately leads to economic losses. This is a global operation and maintenance problem of hydropower plants. The high sediment concentratio...

  18. Autologous blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2004-01-01

    Although preoperative autologous blood donation is employed in elective surgery, this is declining because of the increasingly safe allogeneic blood supply. However, it continues to be used because of the public's perception of allogeneic blood risks and increasing blood shortages. Patients may donate a unit of blood (450 ± 45 ml) as often as twice weekly, up to 72 hours before surgery. Preoperative autologous blood is most beneficial in procedures that cause significant blood loss. It has be...

  19. Deep-water sediment bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Christopher J.; Jackson, Christopher A L; Hodgson, David M.; Hubbard, Stephen M.; Eggenhuisen, Joris T.

    2015-01-01

    Submarine gravity flows are a key process for transporting large volumes of sediment from the continents to the deep sea. The location, volume, and character of the sediment bypassed by these flows dictates the areal extent and thickness of the associated deposits. Despite its importance, sediment b

  20. A review of undulated sediment features on Mediterranean prodeltas: distinguishing sediment transport structures from sediment deformation

    OpenAIRE

    Urgeles, Roger; Cattaneo, Antonio; PUIG Pere; Liquete, Camino; Mol, Ben; Amblas, David; Sultan, Nabil; Trincardi, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Most Mediterranean prodeltas show undulated sediment features on the foresets of their Holocene wedges. These features have been described all along the Mediterranean for the last 30 years and interpreted as either soft sediment deformation and incipient landsliding, and more recently, as sediment transport structures. We perform a review and detailed analysis of these undulated sediment features using ultrahigh-resolution seismic and bathymetric data as well as geotechnical information and h...

  1. Sediment problems in reservoirs. Control of sediment deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Tom

    1997-12-31

    When a reservoir is formed on a river, sediment will deposit in the reservoir. Such processes are unfortunate, for instance, for the implementation of hydroelectric energy. This thesis studies the problem of reservoir sedimentation and discusses methods of removing the sediments. Various aspects of reservoir sedimentation are discussed. Anthropogenic impacts seem to greatly affect the erosion processes. Temporal distribution is uneven, mainly because of the very large flood events. A world map showing the Reservoir Capacity: Annual Sediment Inflow ratio for reservoirs with volume equal to 10% of annual inflow has been prepared. The map shows that sedimentation is severe in the western parts of North and South America, eastern, southern and northern Africa, parts of Australia and most of Asia. The development of medium-sized reservoirs is difficult, as they are too large for conventional flushing technique and too small to store the sediment that accumulates during their economic lifetime. A computer model, SSIIM, was used with good results in a case study of two flood drawdown trials in Lake Roxburg, New Zealand. Two techniques have been developed that permits controlled suction of sediment and water into a pipe: the Slotted Pipe Sediment Sluicer (SPSS) and the Saxophone Sediment Sluicer (SSS). The techniques exploit the inflow pattern in through a slot in a pipe. An equation describing this inflow pattern was derived and verified experimentally. The SPSS is fixed near the reservoir bed, and sediment that deposits on top of it is removed in the sluicing process. The SSS sluices sediment from the surface of the sediment deposits. Some technical and economic conditions affecting the economics of sediment removal from reservoirs have been identified and studied. 79 refs., 112 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. Medications and Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Medications and Blood Pressure Updated:Jul 6,2016 When your blood pressure ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  3. White blood cell scintigraphy for differentiation of infection and aseptic loosening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lene; Buhl, Anna; Oersnes, Thue;

    2007-01-01

    Diagnosis of an infected arthroplasty is often difficult. Fever, abnormal physical findings, radiographic changes, findings at bone scintigraphy, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP, and leucocytosis are not specific enough. We evaluated the diagnostic value of white blood cell scinti...

  4. Algal stabilisation of estuarine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of benthic microalgae can increase the stability of intertidal sediments and influence sediment fluxes within an estuarine environment. Therefore the relative importance of algal stabilisation needs to be understood to help predict the effects of a tidal barrage. The biogenic stabilisation of intertidal estuarine sediments by epipelic diatom films and the macrophyte Vaucheria was studied at three sites on the Severn Estuary. The cohesive strength meter (CSM) was developed to measure surface critical shear stress with varied algal density. A number of techniques have been used to determine the general in situ erodibility of cohesive estuarine sediments. The measurements of sediment shear strength and critical erosion velocity were investigated. Field experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of algae on binding sediments, and a predictive method for the assessment of sediment stabilisation by algal binding was developed. (author)

  5. Sediments of Ypacarai Lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottom and sestonic sediments of Ypacarai Lake were investigated with XRF and Moessbauer techniques. The 120 km2 lake, depth averages 1.8 m. In addition to the lakes use for recreation, its basin has economic significance. Sediments play an important role in the distribution of trace elements in the aquatic system and as a sink for metals. Bottom and seston samples were taken from 4 different sampling stations which were selected according the morphology and population sites on the shore. The concentration of toxic metals was found to be low and no adverse ecological impact should be expected. The main metallic ion component is iron (1.68%). Moessbauer studies showed this element appears as Fe3+. Iron2+ was not detected. We suggest that Fe3+ acts as the limiting element which controls the eutrophication process. (author) 13 refs.; 2 tabs

  6. Petrophysics of Palaeogene sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awadalkarim, Ahmed

    Changes of physical properties of sedimentary rocks with increasing burial depth have implications in hydrocarbon explorations. Physical properties of buried sediment are controlled by several factors such as mineralogical composition, depositional texture and burial depth. The main theme...... drilling operations and hydrocarbon production, or even during massive excavations for building tunnels. If the effective stress exceeds the strength of the rock, failure develops. Thus, estimating a more realistic effective stress allows determining the optimum drilling parameters to reduce problems......-sea sediments; to establish a relationship between static and dynamic modulus of shale which could be used to estimate geotechnical drained elastic modulus from bulk density and sonic velocity. The influence of burial depth on physical properties of Atlantic Palaeogene shale and Eocene chalk has been studied...

  7. Blood vessels, circulation and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series, describes the vessels of the body's blood and lymphatic circulatory systems. Blood pressure and its regulatory systems are examined. The causes and management of hypertension are also explored. It is important that nurses and other healthcare professionals understand the various mechanisms involved in the regulation of blood pressure to prevent high blood pressure or ameliorate its damaging consequences.

  8. SEDIMENTATION AND EROSION STUDIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted YANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ The river systems observed today is the cumulative result of surface, rill, and gully erosion, and sediment transport, scour, and deposition. The divisions of approach between these two related areas are man-made, and are not based on sound science. Most of the erosion studies are done by geologists and agricultural engineers who are concerned of the surface, rill, and gully erosion and the loss of agricultural land productivity. Hydraulic engineers are more interested in the study of sediment transport, scour, and deposition, and their impacts on river engineering and hydraulic structures in rivers and reservoirs. Erosion studies are often based on empirical relationships or field data to determinate the annual sediment yield from a watershed. On the other hand, hydraulic engineers focus their attention on solving equations based on assumed initial and boundary conditions with a time scale of days, hours, or seconds. Both approaches have their complementary strengths and weaknesses. It is important to provide a forum for specialists in both areas to communicate, exchange ideas, and learn from each other.

  9. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  10. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  11. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is increased by the following: Previous blood clots A genetic predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) Multiple ...

  12. CEA blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinoembryonic antigen blood test ... A blood sample is needed . ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. ...

  13. Ketones blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight ... there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  14. Magnesium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  15. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  16. Blood Type Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Presents a blood type puzzle that provides a visual, hands-on mechanism by which students can examine blood group reactions. Offers students an opportunity to construct their own knowledge about blood types. (JRH)

  17. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics . ...

  18. What Is Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Member Blood Centers Our Partners What is blood? PUBLICATIONS EDUCATION PRESS ROOM BLOG CAREERS CONTACT ABC ... for patients who need it. One unit of blood can be separated into the following components: Nearly ...

  19. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... facts about high blood pressure [PDF-255K] . High Blood Pressure in the United States About 70 million ...

  20. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... back to top How are Blood Clots in Pregnant Women Treated? Typically, blood clots are treated with ... you think you have one. If you are pregnant and have concerns about blood clots, talk with ...

  1. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms include the following: High blood glucose High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased ... you should check and what your blood glucose levels should be. Checking your blood and then treating ...

  2. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure and should be taken seriously. Over time, consistently high blood pressure weakens and damages ... of landmark NIH blood pressure study confirm that lower blood pressure target can reduce ...

  3. Money for Blood and Markets for Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derpmann, Simon; Quante, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Ontario's Bill 178 proposing a Voluntary Blood Donations Act declares the offer or acceptance of payment for the donation of blood a legal offence and makes it subject to penalty. The bill reinvigorates a fundamental debate about the ethical problems associated with the payment of money for blood. Scarcity of blood donors is a recurring problem in most health systems, and monetary remuneration of the willingness to donate blood is regularly discussed--and sometimes practiced--as a means to overcome scarcity in blood. However, making blood an object of economic exchange has long aroused ethical concerns that often refer to the specific meaning of blood. From the perspective of a modern understanding of money as a metric of economic value, the exchange of money for blood--shed or given--is seen as ethically troubling, because it appears to imply a commensurability of the value of human life and economic wealth. In this paper, we begin with a general taxonomy of the types of arguments that speak in favour or against compensating donors for giving blood. We then describe the context in which the discussion about payment for blood arises, and of the specific aims and concerns that are brought forward in this context. This is used to reconstruct the normative background that supports the rejection of payment for blood as it is envisaged in Bill 178 and the aims of the proposal. We then argue that while a payment indeed changes the nature of a blood donation in an ethically considerable way, we do not believe that decisive arguments against the monetary remuneration of blood donations can be substantiated, at least not independently of assuming specific societal circumstances. Thus it may be possible to establish a stable and safe blood supply through just gratification while at the same time taking strong provisions against social disconnection, injustice, exploitation or heteronomy.

  4. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  5. Phosphorus amendment reduces hematological effects of lead in mallards ingesting contaminated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Audet, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d?Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to sediments would reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of lead to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) as related to adverse hematological effects and altered plasma chemistries. Mallards received diets containing 12% clean sediment (controls) or 12% sediment from three different CDARB sites containing 4520, 5390, or 6990 :g/g lead (dw) with or without phosphoric acid amendment. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in all CDARB treatment groups and ranged from geometric mean values of 5.0 ug/g for the first two sites to 6.2 ug/g for the third site. With amendments, all blood lead concentrations became 41% to 64% lower. Red blood cell ALAD activity was depressed by 90% or more with lead-contaminated sediment from all sites and did not differ with amended diets. Free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP) concentrations were elevated by contaminated sediment from all sites. Amendment decreased the elevations in FEP by as much as 80%. Hematocrit values and hemoglobin concentrations were lower for all lead site sediments by as much as 30% for site 3. Plasma enzyme activities for ALT, CK, and LDH-L were elevated by as much as 2.2-fold, and plasma creatinine concentration was 1.7-fold higher for site 3 sediment. Amendments restored hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma enzyme activities so that they did not differ from controls. Although amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead and alleviated many of the adverse hematological effects, lead concentrations in the blood of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those believed to be harmful to waterfowl under the present conditions.

  6. Velocity and Sediment Concentration Profiles in Sediment-Laden Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-qing YANG (杨树清); Soon-Keat TAN; Siow-Yong LIM

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of velocity profiles in sediment-laden flows is presented by means of Prandtl-Kannan mixing length theorem. The study shows that the upward velocity of liquid-phase caused by settling sediment leads to the invalidity of the log-law and Rouse equation. The theoretical analysis takes into account the upward velocity and shows: 1) the mean velocity in sediment-laden flows follows the log-law, but the Karman constant reduces in the main flow region, 2)sediment concentration reduces the mixing length of fluid particles, 3) flow resistance reduces with the presence of sediment concentration, and 4) the sediment concentration profile deviates from the well know Rouse equation. The experimental data agree well with the equations derived on the basis of non-zero wall velocity. It is found that the wall-normal velocity should not be neglected for density gradient flows because it induces more than for pure water flows.

  7. Cyclic Sediment Trading Between Channel and River Bed Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadchi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the previous work on sediment tracing has focused on determining either the initial sources of the sediment (soils derive from a particular rock type) or the erosion processes generating the sediment. However, alluvial stores can be both a source and sink for sediment transported by streams. Here geochemical and fallout radionuclide tracing of river-bed and alluvial sediments are used to determine the role of secondary sources, sediment stores, as potential sources of sediment leaving Emu Creek catchment, southeastern Queensland, Australia. Activity concentrations of 137Cs on the river sediments are consistent with channel erosion being the dominant source at all sites sampled along the river. To characterise the deposition and remobilisation cycles in the catchment, a novel geochemical tracing approach was used. Successive pockets of alluvium were treated as discrete sink terms within geochemical mixing models and their source contributions compared with those of river bed sediments collected adjacent to each alluvial pocket. Three different size fractions were examined; silts and clays (soil/rock type sources to river bed and alluvial sediments at each sampling site was identical for all three different size fractions, but varied along the stream. Combining these findings it is concluded that proximal alluvial stores dominated the supply of sediment to the river at each location, with this being particularly evident at the catchment outlet. Identical contribution of rock type sources to both river bed and alluvial pockets together with the dominant erosion being from channel banks indicates a high degree of 'trading' between the fluvial space and the alluvial space. Hence, management works aimed at primarily reducing the supply of sediments to the outlet of Emu Creek should focus on rehabilitation of channel banks in the lower catchment.

  8. Sediment yields of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindall, S.M.; Flint, R.F.

    1970-01-01

    Sediment in Wisconsin streams causes economic and engineering problems in water management and reduces the value of water for nearly all uses. Sediment produces problems such as reduced reservoir capacity, navigation hazards, increased cost of water treatment, property damage, temporary loss of farmland, destruction of feeding and nesting grounds of fish, and destruction of wildlife habitat. Sediment in water also reduces the aesthetic value of surface waters and is detrimental to the State's tourist and recreation industry.

  9. Recent sediments of Midway Atoll

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Anne Brooks

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTAnne Brooks WarnerRECENT SEDIMENTS OF MIDWAY ATOLLMidway Atoll lies at the far northwestern end of the volcanic Hawaiian island chain and is one of few relatively pristine coral reef ecosystems remaining worldwide. Midway’s unusual morphology, high-latitude location (29°N), and history of anthropogenic changes make it a unique setting, which is likely recorded in sediment deposits. Surface sediment samples (N=356) were collected between July 2008 and September 2011 and analyzed for ...

  10. BUN - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood urea nitrogen ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health ... if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this ...

  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how often you should check and what your blood glucose levels should be. Checking your blood and then treating ... I Treat Hyperglycemia? You can often lower your blood glucose level by exercising. However, if your blood glucose is ...

  12. APPLICABILITY OF SEDIMENT TRANSPORT FORMULAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted YANG; Caian HUANG

    2001-01-01

    The paper provides a comprehensive testing of the applicability of 13 sediment transport formulas under different flow and sediment conditions. The dimensionless parameters used for testing the reliability and sensitivity of formulas are dimensionless particle diameter, relative depth, Froude number, relative shear velocity, dimensionless unit stream power, and sediment concentration. A total of 3,391 sets of laboratory and river data are used in the tests. Engineers may find the test results useful to their selection of formulas under different flow and sediment conditions.

  13. Modeling microalgal flocculation and sedimentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salim, S.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Rinzema, A.; Vermuë, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a combined flocculation and sedimentation model is developed. The model predicts the time needed to reach a desired concentration of microalgal suspension in a sedimentation tank. The concentration of the particles as function of the time and the position in the tank is described. The

  14. Intensive landfarming of contaminated sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieggers, H.J.J.; Bezemer, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and mineral oil was investigated in heavily and normally polluted sediments. The aims of the research were: to improve the knowledge of dewatering and ripening of sediments in an open land-farm, to quantify the biodegradation in two sedime

  15. Geochemistry of Sediments from the PLUTO Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical data for unconsolidated sediments (stream sediments, lake sediments, etc.) collected in the US and analyzed by the USGS. These data were originally...

  16. Study on the Reutilization of River Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Gui-yun; JIANG Pei-hua; XI Dan-li

    2002-01-01

    Main components and properties of river sediment are introduced. Secondary pollution of river sediments to the water quality of the river is clarified. The methods of the reutilization of river sediment are elucidated.

  17. FGMs by sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple sedimentation in organic solvents followed by hot-pressing is used to produce alumina-NiAl functionally graded materials (FGMs). Varying degrees of agglomeration influenced the phase arrangement in the mixed layer(s) producing microstructural variation. The authors discovered a pronounced structural dependence on NiAl stoichiometry. Slight variations in Al content are known to influence Tdb and these apparently lead to large increases in residual stress. Zirconia-NiAl FGMs were better able to accommodate these levels of residual stress possibly due to accommodation by enhanced tetragonal phase retention. However, these FGMs undergo transformation of the tetragonal phase to the monoclinic form, starting from the surface. Finally, variable microstructures result in detectable changes in the stress-strain behavior of alumina-NiAl FGMs. 47 refs., 11 figs

  18. Targeting sediment management strategies using sediment quantification and fingerprinting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2016-04-01

    Cost-effective sediment management is required to reduce excessive delivery of fine sediment due to intensive land uses such as agriculture, resulting in the degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Prioritising measures to mitigate dominant sediment sources is, however, challenging, as sediment loss risk is spatially and temporally variable between and within catchments. Fluctuations in sediment supply from potential sources result from variations in land uses resulting in increased erodibility where ground cover is low (e.g., cultivated, poached and compacted soils), and physical catchment characteristics controlling hydrological connectivity and transport pathways (surface and/or sub-surface). Sediment fingerprinting is an evidence-based management tool to identify sources of in-stream sediments at the catchment scale. Potential sediment sources are related to a river sediment sample, comprising a mixture of source sediments, using natural physico-chemical characteristics (or 'tracers'), and contributions are statistically un-mixed. Suspended sediment data were collected over two years at the outlet of three intensive agricultural catchments (approximately 10 km2) in Ireland. Dominant catchment characteristics were grassland on poorly-drained soils, arable on well-drained soils and arable on moderately-drained soils. High-resolution (10-min) calibrated turbidity-based suspended sediment and discharge data were combined to quantify yield. In-stream sediment samples (for fingerprinting analysis) were collected at six to twelve week intervals, using time-integrated sediment samplers. Potential sources, including stream channel banks, ditches, arable and grassland field topsoils, damaged road verges and tracks were sampled, oven-dried (stream banks, roads - road verges and tracks, fields - grassland and arable topsoils) were statistically un-mixed using FR2000, an uncertainty-inclusive algorithm, and combined with sediment yield data. Results showed sediment contributions

  19. Targeting sediment management strategies using sediment quantification and fingerprinting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2016-04-01

    Cost-effective sediment management is required to reduce excessive delivery of fine sediment due to intensive land uses such as agriculture, resulting in the degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Prioritising measures to mitigate dominant sediment sources is, however, challenging, as sediment loss risk is spatially and temporally variable between and within catchments. Fluctuations in sediment supply from potential sources result from variations in land uses resulting in increased erodibility where ground cover is low (e.g., cultivated, poached and compacted soils), and physical catchment characteristics controlling hydrological connectivity and transport pathways (surface and/or sub-surface). Sediment fingerprinting is an evidence-based management tool to identify sources of in-stream sediments at the catchment scale. Potential sediment sources are related to a river sediment sample, comprising a mixture of source sediments, using natural physico-chemical characteristics (or 'tracers'), and contributions are statistically un-mixed. Suspended sediment data were collected over two years at the outlet of three intensive agricultural catchments (approximately 10 km2) in Ireland. Dominant catchment characteristics were grassland on poorly-drained soils, arable on well-drained soils and arable on moderately-drained soils. High-resolution (10-min) calibrated turbidity-based suspended sediment and discharge data were combined to quantify yield. In-stream sediment samples (for fingerprinting analysis) were collected at six to twelve week intervals, using time-integrated sediment samplers. Potential sources, including stream channel banks, ditches, arable and grassland field topsoils, damaged road verges and tracks were sampled, oven-dried (roads - road verges and tracks, fields - grassland and arable topsoils) were statistically un-mixed using FR2000, an uncertainty-inclusive algorithm, and combined with sediment yield data. Results showed sediment contributions from channel

  20. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illus, E. [ed.

    1998-08-01

    The Second NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research)/EKO-1 Seminar was held at the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) on April 2-3, 1997. The work of the NKS is based on 4-year programmes; the current programme having been planned for the years 1994-1997. The programme comprises 3 major fields, one of them being environmental effects (EKO). Under this umbrella there are 4 main projects. The EKO-1 project deals with marine radioecology, in particular bottom sediments and sediment processes. The programme of the second seminar consisted of 8 invited lecturers and 6 other scientific presentations. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate are important in all types of sedimentological study and model calculations of fluxes of substances in the aquatic environment. In many cases these tasks have been closely related to radioecological studies undertaken in marine and fresh water environments, because they are often based on measured depth profiles of certain natural or artificial radionuclides present in the sediments. During recent decades Pb-210 has proved to be very useful in dating of sediments, but some other radionuclides have also been successfully used, e.g. Pu-239,240, Am-241 and Cs-137. The difficulties existing and problems involved in dating of sediments, as well as solutions for resolving these problems are discussed in the presentations

  1. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second NKS (Nordic Nuclear Safety Research)/EKO-1 Seminar was held at the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) on April 2-3, 1997. The work of the NKS is based on 4-year programmes; the current programme having been planned for the years 1994-1997. The programme comprises 3 major fields, one of them being environmental effects (EKO). Under this umbrella there are 4 main projects. The EKO-1 project deals with marine radioecology, in particular bottom sediments and sediment processes. The programme of the second seminar consisted of 8 invited lecturers and 6 other scientific presentations. Dating of sediments and determination of sedimentation rate are important in all types of sedimentological study and model calculations of fluxes of substances in the aquatic environment. In many cases these tasks have been closely related to radioecological studies undertaken in marine and fresh water environments, because they are often based on measured depth profiles of certain natural or artificial radionuclides present in the sediments. During recent decades Pb-210 has proved to be very useful in dating of sediments, but some other radionuclides have also been successfully used, e.g. Pu-239,240, Am-241 and Cs-137. The difficulties existing and problems involved in dating of sediments, as well as solutions for resolving these problems are discussed in the presentations

  2. Blood Sugar and Fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperglycemia) can be a sign of the disease diabetes mellitus. High blood sugar levels can eventually damage ... treated with the same medications used to treat diabetes. There is no simple blood test for insulin ...

  3. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  4. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  5. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) Multiple births Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood ...

  6. Ferritin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum ferritin level ... The amount of ferritin in the blood (serum ferritin level) is directly related to the amount of iron stored in your body. Iron is important for red blood cell production. Your doctor ...

  7. Blood Pressure Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, ... and kidney failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnancy: Be aware of risk factors. Know your family history. Make sure your doctor knows about any ... blood clots or blood clotting disorders in your family. Remain active, with your doctor's approval. Be aware ...

  9. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... San Diego, CA Abstracts Registration Housing Travel Information Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood Current Issue ... clot. Blood clots in pregnant women tend to form in the deep veins of the legs or ...

  10. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... harming your baby. Jump To: Am I at Risk? The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is ... prevent blood clots during pregnancy: Be aware of risk factors. Know your family history. Make sure your ...

  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To ... Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And ...

  12. Lyme disease blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . If the ELISA test is positive, it must be confirmed with another ... were seen in your blood sample. If the ELISA test is negative, usually no other testing is needed. ...

  13. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts About Type 2 Enroll ...

  14. Anthrax - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The best test for diagnosing anthrax is a culture of affected tissue or blood. Alternative Names Anthrax serology test; Antibody test for anthrax; Serologic test for B anthracis Images Blood test Bacillus anthracis References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. ...

  15. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood clots A genetic predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) ... Programs and Awards ASH Agenda for Hematology Research Education For Clinicians For Trainees For Educators For Patients ...

  16. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and eAG Hypoglycemia (Low blood glucose) Hyperglycemia (High blood glucose) Dawn Phenomenon Checking for Ketones Tight Diabetes Control donate en -- Diabetes Must Be Stopped - 2016-06-donation- ...

  17. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a unique focus on scholarly and educational ... Studies Published in Blood Search Blood , the official journal of ASH, for the results of the latest ...

  18. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the field Hematology 2015 A collection of articles from the 2015 ASH Annual Meeting Education Program Blood: How I Treat A compendium of Blood articles updated to reflect the most recent scientific research ...

  19. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a ... If you find that you are interested in learning more about blood diseases and disorders, here are ...

  20. Blood Culture Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficult to grow in culture, and additional blood cultures using special nutrient media may be done to try to grow and identify the pathogen . Viruses cannot be detected using blood culture bottles designed to grow bacteria. If the health ...

  1. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women ... Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A ...

  2. Genetics Blood Card Use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — SOP guiding collection of blood for genetics analysis. Provides stepwise instructions and guidance on how to collect DNA sample using a whole blood blot card

  3. Blood groups systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ranadhir Mitra; Nitasha Mishra; Girija Prasad Rath

    2014-01-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importa...

  4. Blood Donation Management System

    OpenAIRE

    K M Akkas Ali; Israt Jahan; Md. Ariful Islam; Md. Shafa-at Parvez

    2015-01-01

    This paper is focused on Blood Donation Management System which is a web application with supporting mobile application aimed to serve as a communication tool between patients (who need blood) and blood donor. To become members of the system, donors need to create their profiles by providing fundamental information like name, blood group, email address, password, and exact location from “Google Map”. In order to find out the exact location of a donor, Google Map is integrated with this app...

  5. Examining blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent specification relates to an invention concerned with improvements in or relating to the examination of blood vessels of interest. Particles of dimensions not greater than 8 microns capable of providing detectable signals, are introduced into the blood for examination of a blood vessel. The particles may be sources of radiation, e.g. Ga68. (author)

  6. Monitor blood glucose - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100220.htm Monitoring blood glucose - Series—Monitoring blood glucose: Using a self-test meter To use the ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Blood Sugar A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  7. Blood Test: Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Glucose Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de sangre: glucosa What It Is A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose (the main ...

  8. Right patient, Right blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selberg, Hanne; Madsen, Trine Stougaard

    2014-01-01

    Right patient, Right Blood Simulation based training in blood transfusion practice in nursing education Background: In spite of strict checking procedures to handling transfusion of blood severe adverse reactions are likely to happen and the major cause of morbidity occurs to be liable to human...

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: ... and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood Glucose A1C ...

  10. DESIGN OF SEDIMENT FLUSHING OUTLETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabhata K.SWAMEE

    2002-01-01

    Flushing pipe outlets are provided at the floor of sedimentation basins for flushing out of the deposited sediments. These outlets have to be positioned in such a way so as to remove the deposited sediments effectively. In the absence of rational method for the location, presently the outlets are located by judgment. A review of literature indicated that there is no judicious method available for obtaining the outlet diameter. Presented herein are the design equations for the flushing outlets. It is hoped that the equation will be useful to the design engineers.

  11. Elwha River Restoration: Sediment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrel, S.; Bountry, J.; Randle, T. J.; Ritchie, A.; Huginin, H.; Torrance, A.

    2013-12-01

    The removal of Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams on the Elwha River relies on controlled reservoir drawdown increments and natural river flows to erode and redistribute the reservoir sediment, estimated to be a total of 23 (× 3) million m3. To mitigate for the predicted sediment effects, facilities have been constructed for water quality and flood protection. A sediment monitoring program is being implemented by an interdisciplinary team from Reclamation and National Park Service to integrate real-time measurements with continually updated numerical model predictions. The most recent numerical reservoir modeling and monitoring results indicate about 20 to 25 percent of the reservoir sediment has been released since the start of dam removal. Monitoring results in 2012 and early 2013 confirmed that controlled reservoir drawdown increments have induced sufficient vertical and lateral erosion of delta surfaces behind both dams. Predam channel and floodplain surface has been exposed in numerous portions of Lake Aldwell, with the release of coarse and fine sediment in the first few pools below Elwha Dam. The material released from Lake Aldwell has included organic material. With the removal of about three quarters of Glines Canyon Dam and the disappearance of Lake Mills, coarse bedload sediment has been continually released into the downstream river since late fall 2012. Field measurements and numerical modeling are being used to track the progression of the sediment wave downstream to the Elwha River mouth. Initial findings are that the aggradation was greatest immediately downstream of Glines Canyon Dam, and filled pools and transformed river planform from step-pool to glide for most of the 7 mile reach between Lake Mills and Lake Aldwell. Although there has not been a major flood, winter flows and spring snowmelt have significantly reworked the released sediment and remnants of the pre-sediment release pools and rapids have re-emerged. Large wood and organics have also

  12. Sedimentation rate control on diagenesis, East China Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Zheng, Hongbo; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo

    2011-08-01

    Diagenesis of ferrimagnetic minerals can alter the magnetic properties, erasing partially or entirely the original paleomagnetic and paleoclimatic signals, especially on continental margins where sedimentation rates are usually high. Understanding the mechanisms by which magnetic particles are affected by diagenesis is therefore critical for retrieving paleomagnetic and paleoclimatic information from sediments. High-resolution magnetic analysis was carried out on rapidly deposited (0.4-20 mm/year) Holocene sediments from the East China Sea (ECS) inner continental shelf. The primary magnetic mineral assemblage in the sediment core contains ferrimagnetic minerals, such as magnetite, with minor contributions from hematite. The magnetic properties vary down-core in two steps, due to post-depositional reductive diagenesis. The first occurs at depths of 0.15-1.1 m and is characterized by reduction of both magnetite and hematite in suboxic sediments. The suboxic-sulfate boundary (SSB) is therefore located at 1.1 m. We demonstrate that the depth of the SSB has negative relation to the average sedimentation rate in Chinese marginal seas. The second step change in magnetic properties occurs at 3.2-5.8 m, and contains two intervals with extremely low magnetic mineral content, each corresponding to dissolution fronts associated with the former and present position of the sulfate-methanic transition (SMT). These two intervals correlate well with abrupt changes in sedimentation rate and separate the anoxic zone into two parts: the sulfidic zone and the methanic zone. Our study suggests that sedimentation rate provides a dominant control on magnetic mineral diagenesis, at least in the Chinese marginal seas, which controls not only the type of redox zonation, but also the thicknesses of diagenetic zones.

  13. [Autologous blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosencher, N; Conseiller, C

    2001-06-30

    Autologous blood transfusion techniques are the principal means of reducing allogeneic blood exposure. Those techniques were developed in order to prevent the risk of contamination by viruses, mainly HVB, HCV and HIV. However that risk has become so small that all studies show an exorbitant cost/efficiency ratio. Autologous blood transfusion would therefore be of no interest in terms of public health but a recent experimental study suggested a possible transmission of the BSE agent through blood. Until the matter is settled, the precaution principle means we should prefer alternative techniques to allogeneic blood whenever possible, hence a renewed interest in autologous transfusion. PMID:11503506

  14. BLOOD SERVICE IN FINLAND

    OpenAIRE

    TASHTEMIROV K.K.; LATVALA E.; IMANGAZINOV S.B.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the post is to summarize the experience of blood service in Finland by the result of the business move and examination of the service activities at the point.The research materials indicate that the blood service in Finland is a non-profit organization and is an independent part of the Finnish Red Cross (FRC). All expenses and development of Blood Service are covered by the sale of blood and blood products and expert services in the Finnish health care system. It is responsible fo...

  15. Blood Donation Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Akkas Ali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on Blood Donation Management System which is a web application with supporting mobile application aimed to serve as a communication tool between patients (who need blood and blood donor. To become members of the system, donors need to create their profiles by providing fundamental information like name, blood group, email address, password, and exact location from “Google Map”. In order to find out the exact location of a donor, Google Map is integrated with this application. The mobile application always updates the location of a donor. As a result, the system can automatically find a registered donor wherever he/she goes. Visitors can search blood donors from the home page by blood group and the place where blood is needed. The system will show the available donors along with their phone number, email address and mailing address through arranging them by nearest place and blood donation expire date. Visitors can send message to all donors through email but a member can send message using email and mobile phone. An appointment will be created only whenever a donor confirms that he/she will donate blood. Then the system will alert the donor before 12 hours of donation. Blood donors can also be searched from the mobile application, but this is only accessible for registered members. The goal of this paper is to reduce the complexity of the system to find blood donors in an emergency situation.

  16. Blood groups systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranadhir Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system.

  17. Blood groups systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-09-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  18. Haw River sediment quality assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents an evaluation of chemical contaminants in, and toxicity of, sediments collected from impoundments created by dams on the Haw River in Alamance...

  19. Seafloor Surficial Sediments (Deck 41)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) "Deck41" database contains surficial sediment descriptions for over 36,000 seafloor samples worldwide. The file was...

  20. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  1. SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT IN HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.G.RANGA RAJU; U.C.KOTHYARI

    2005-01-01

    Withdrawal of water from a river into a canal involves the construction of a barrage or a dam across the river depending on whether the river is perennial or not. The design of the reservoir upstream of the dam and of the canal requires consideration of the sediment load carried by the river in case the river is sediment-laden. The basic equations concerning morphological changes in such rivers are discussed with particular reference to computation of reservoir sedimentation. The hydraulics of lined canals carrying wash load is examined from the point of view of limiting transport capacity and changes in frictional resistance. Lastly,the methods of design of sediment extraction devices like settling basins and vortex chambers are presented.

  2. Monitoring Blood Sugar: The Importance of Checking Blood Sugar Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Monitoring Blood Sugar KidsHealth > For Parents > Monitoring Blood Sugar Print ... Other Tests Record Keeping The Importance of Checking Blood Sugar Levels Besides helping to keep blood sugar ...

  3. Mathematical theory of sedimentation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Hiroshi; Van Rysselberghe, P

    1962-01-01

    Mathematical Theory of Sedimentation Analysis presents the flow equations for the ultracentrifuge. This book is organized into two parts encompassing six chapters that evaluate the systems of reacting components, the differential equations for the ultracentrifuge, and the case of negligible diffusion. The first chapters consider the Archibald method for molecular weight determination; pressure-dependent sedimentation; expressions for the refractive index and its gradient; relation between refractive index and concentration; and the analysis of Gaussian distribution. Other chapters deal with th

  4. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  5. 7 CFR 58.134 - Sediment content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sediment content. 58.134 Section 58.134 Agriculture... Milk § 58.134 Sediment content. (a) Method of testing. Methods for determining the sediment content of... for the Examination of Dairy Products. Sediment content shall be based on comparison with...

  6. Use of blood and blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, E; Wood, B

    1999-11-01

    It is sometimes necessary for the practitioner to transfuse the ruminant with whole blood or plasma. These techniques are often difficult to perform in practice, are time-consuming, expensive, and stressful to the animal. Acute loss of 20% to 25% of the blood volume will result in marked clinical signs of anemia, including tachycardia and maniacal behavior. The PCV is only a useful tool with which to monitor acute blood loss after intravascular equilibration with other fluid compartments has occurred. An acutely developing PCV of 15% or less may require transfusion. Chronic anemia with PCV of 7% to 12% can be tolerated without transfusion if the animal is not stressed and no further decline in erythrocyte mass occurs. Seventy-five percent of transfused bovine erythrocytes are destroyed within 48 hours of transfusion. A transfusion rate of 10 to 20 mL/kg recipient weight is necessary to result in any appreciable increase in PCV. A nonpregnant donor can contribute 10 to 15 mL of blood/kg body weight at 2- to 4-week intervals. Sodium citrate is an effective anticoagulant, but acid citrate dextrose should be used if blood is to be stored for more than a few hours. Blood should not be stored more than 2 weeks prior to administration. Heparin is an unsuitable anticoagulant because the quantity of heparin required for clot-free blood collection will lead to coagulation defects in the recipient. Blood cross-matching is only rarely performed in the ruminant. In field situations, it is advisable to inject 200 mL of donor blood into the adult recipient and wait 10 minutes. If no reaction occurs, the rest of the blood can probably be safely administered as long as volume overload problems do not develop. Adverse reactions are most commonly seen in very young animals or pregnant cattle. Signs of blood or plasma transfusion reaction include hiccoughing, tachycardia, tachypnea, sweating, muscle tremors, pruritus, salivation, cough, dyspnea, fever, lacrimation, hematuria

  7. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whether imbalances in this system cause high blood pressure. Blood Vessel Structure and Function Changes in the structure ... can affect blood pressure. Genetic Causes of High Blood Pressure Much of the understanding of the body systems ...

  8. Controlling your high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that is healthy for you. Checking Your Blood Pressure Your blood pressure can be measured at many places, including: ... Alternative Names Controlling hypertension Images Taking your blood pressure at home Blood pressure check Low sodium diet References American Diabetes ...

  9. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also known as blood vessels and capillaries. The pressure --- blood pressure --- is the result of two forces. The ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  10. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much alcohol. Signs and Symptoms of High Blood Pressure High blood pressure usually has no warning signs or symptoms , ... they are at high risk for high blood pressure . Blood Pressure Levels Normal systolic: less than 120 mmHg ...

  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy ...

  12. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin ...

  13. Drying drops of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  14. Volume reduction in routine cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Roig, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an alternative source of hematopoietic progenitors for transplantation in the treatment of haematological malignancies, marrow failure, immunodeficiencies, hemoglobinopathies and inherited metabolic diseases. It has greatly contributed to increase the feasibility to transplantation for many patients in need. To date, more than 20,000 UCB transplants have been performed on children and adults, and more than 400,000 UCB units are available in more than 50 public CB banks. One of the most important objectives of banks is to cryopreserve and store high quality UCB units. Volume reduction is a usual process in cord blood banking that has some advantages as reducing the storage space and the DMSO quantity in final product. Volume reduction methodology must guarantee high cell recovery and red blood cell (RBC) depletion by reducing the UCB units to a standard volume. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) sedimentation was the first method developed for this purpose by the New York Cord Blood Bank and implemented in many banks worldwide. The semi-automated top and bottom system, usually used for blood fractionation was further developed to simplify and short the process. Later, automatic devices as SEPAX and AXP have been developed in last years specifically for UCB volume reduction purpose. This review critically analyses the advantages and disadvantages of the different procedures. All of them have been used in Valencia Cord Blood Bank along 10 years. In general, automatic devices are preferred because of compliance with cGTP, closed systems, higher reproducibility and less influence of technician. PMID:20528760

  15. River sediment supply, sedimentation and transport of the highly turbid sediment plume in Malindi Bay, Kenya

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JOHNSON U.Kitheka

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of a study on the sediment supply and movement of highly turbid sediment plume within Malindi Bay in the Northern region of the Kenya coast.The current velocities,tidal elevation,salinity and suspended sediment concentrations (TSSC)were measured in stations located within the bay using Aanderaa Recording Current Meter (RCM-9),Turbidity Sensor mounted on RCM-9,Divers Gauges and Aanderaa Temperature-Salinity Meter.The study established that Malindi Bay receives a high terrigenous sediment load amounting to 5.7 × 106 ton·yr-1.The river freshwater supply into the bay is highly variable ranging from 7 to 680 m3·s-1.The high flows that are > 150 m3·s-1 occurred in May during the South East Monsoon (SEM).Relatively low peak flows occurred in November during the North East Monsoon (NEM) but these were usually <70 m3·s-1.The discharge of highly turbidity river water into the bay in April and May occurs in a period of high intensity SEM winds that generate strong north flowing current that transports the river sediment plume northward.However,during the NEM,the river supply of turbid water is relatively low occurring in a period of relatively low intensity NEM winds that result in relatively weaker south flowing current that transports the sediment plume southward.The mechanism of advection of the sediment plume north or south of the estuary is mainly thought to be due to the Ekman transport generated by the onshore monsoon winds.Limited movement of the river sediment plume southward towards Ras Vasco Da Gama during NEM has ensured that the coral reef ecosystem in the northern parts of Malindi Marine National Park has not been completely destroyed by the influx of terrigenous sediments.However,to the north there is no coral reef ecosystem.The high sediment discharge into Malindi Bay can be attributed to land use change in the Athi-Sabaki River Basin in addition to rapid population increase which has led to clearance of forests to open land

  16. Developmental toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment in Canada geese (Branta canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David J.; Heinz, Gary H.; Sileo, Louis; Audet, Daniel J.; Campbell, Juile K.; Obrecht, Holly H.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has recently been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The effects of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho on posthatching development of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) were examined for 6 wk. Day-old goslings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (48%) supplemented control diet, or CDARB sediment (3449 mug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12%, 24%, or 48%. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 0.68 ppm (ww), with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over fourfold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 1.61 ppm with decreased hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma protein in addition to the effects just described. The 48% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.52 ppm with 22% mortality, decreased growth, and elevated plasma lactate dehydrogenase-L (LDH-L) activity. In this group the liver lead concentration was 6.57 ppm (ww), with twofold increases in hepatic lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, TBARS) and in reduced glutathione concentration; associated effects included elevated glutathione reductase activity but lower protein-bound thiols concentration and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) activity. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 14.93 ppm with subacute renal tubular nephrosis in one of the surviving goslings. Three other geese in this treatment group exhibited calcified areas of marrow, and one of these displayed severe chronic fibrosing pancreatitis. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated less readily in gosling blood and tissues than reported in ducklings but at given concentrations was generally more toxic to goslings. Many of these effects were similar to those reported in wild geese and mallards within the Coeur d'Alene River Basin.

  17. Contaminated sediment transport during floods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 48 years, operations and waste disposal activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have resulted in the contamination of parts of the White Oak Creek catchment. The contaminants presenting the highest risk to human health and the environment are particle reactive and are associated with the soils and sediments in the White Oak Creek drainage system. The erosion of these sediments during floods can result in the transport of contaminants both within the catchment and off-site into the Clinch River. A data collection program and a modeling investigation are being used to evaluate the probability of contaminated sediment transport during floods and to develop strategies for controlling off-site transport under present and future conditions

  18. Radionuclide interactions with marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical review of the literature on the subject of the interactions of radionuclides with marine sediments has been carried out. On the basis of the information available, an attempt has been made to give ranges and 'best estimates' for the distribution ratios between seawater and sediments. These estimates have been based on an understanding of the sediment seawater system and the porewater chemistry and mineralogy. Field measurements, laboratory measurements and estimates based on stable-element geochemical data are all taken into account. Laboratory measurements include distribution-ratio and diffusion-coefficient determinations. The elements reviewed are carbon, chlorine, calcium, nickel, selenium, strontium, zirconium, niobium, technetium, tin, iodine, caesium, lead, radium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium. (author)

  19. Modeling microalgal flocculation and sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, S; Gilissen, L; Rinzema, A; Vermuë, M H; Wijffels, R H

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a combined flocculation and sedimentation model is developed. The model predicts the time needed to reach a desired concentration of microalgal suspension in a sedimentation tank. The concentration of the particles as function of the time and the position in the tank is described. The model was validated with experimental data for Ettlia texensis. The concentration changes measured in time at different heights in the sedimentation vessel corresponded well with model predictions. The model predicts that it takes 25 h to reach a final concentration of 5.2 gDW L(-1), when the initial concentration is 0.26 gDW L(-1) and the tank height is 1m. This example illustrates the use of this model for the design of the settling tank needed for pre-concentration of microalgal biomass before further dewatering.

  20. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  1. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 13 November 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs will be held a blood donors campaign, organized by the Etablissement de Transfusion de Haute-Savoie If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  2. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Établissement de Transfusion de Rhône-Alpes will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2000 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  3. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Tuesday 19 March 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion sanguine of Geneva If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  4. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion d'Annemasse will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  5. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion Sanguine of Geneva will be held at CERN on Tuesday 13 March 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  6. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Publications Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a unique focus on scholarly and educational content The Hematologist Features Diffusion President's Column ASH Clinical News Society News Clinical News Features ASH Self- ...

  7. Virtual blood bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kit Fai Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual blood bank is the computer-controlled, electronically linked information management system that allows online ordering and real-time, remote delivery of blood for transfusion. It connects the site of testing to the point of care at a remote site in a real-time fashion with networked computers thus maintaining the integrity of immunohematology test results. It has taken the advantages of information and communication technologies to ensure the accuracy of patient, specimen and blood component identification and to enhance personnel traceability and system security. The built-in logics and process constraints in the design of the virtual blood bank can guide the selection of appropriate blood and minimize transfusion risk. The quality of blood inventory is ascertained and monitored, and an audit trail for critical procedures in the transfusion process is provided by the paperless system. Thus, the virtual blood bank can help ensure that the right patient receives the right amount of the right blood component at the right time.

  8. Give blood at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    ACCIDENTS and ILLNESSES don’t take a break! DO SOMETHING AMAZING - GIVE BLOOD! IT’S IN ALL OUR INTERESTS. 30 July 2008 from 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT NOVAE First floor - Salle des Pas Perdus After you have given blood, you are invited to partake of refreshments kindly offered by NOVAE.

  9. Beryllium-10 in continental sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.; Sacks, I.S.; Tera, F. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Terrestrial Magnetism); Klein, J.; Middleton, R. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1981-11-01

    The concentration of /sup 10/Be has been measured in 10 samples taken from a transect of surface sediments beginning in the Atchafalaya River and extending across the Bay 136 km into the Gulf of Mexico. If corrected for a lower retentivity of sand for Be, they have a concentration that is constant within 13%. This concentration is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of deep ocean sediments. For comparison, measurements of /sup 10/Be in rainwater, in a sample of soil and in a deep ocean core were made.

  10. ORANGE JUICE AND BLOOD PRESSURE

    OpenAIRE

    M. F. VALIM; Barros, S.

    2009-01-01

    Blood pressure is the force of blood against artery walls. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) and recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (as the heart contracts) over diastolic pressure (as the heart relaxes between beats). High blood pressure (hypertension) is defined as chronically elevated high blood pressure, with systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 140 mm Hg or greater, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of 90 mm Hg or greater. High blood pressure ...

  11. Sediment reworking rates in deep sediments of the Mediterranean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsanti, M., E-mail: mattia.barsanti@enea.it [ENEA, Marine Environment Research Centre, La Spezia (Italy); Delbono, I., E-mail: ivana.delbono@enea.it [ENEA, Marine Environment Research Centre, La Spezia (Italy); Schirone, A., E-mail: antonio.schirone@enea.it [ENEA, Marine Environment Research Centre, La Spezia (Italy); Langone, L., E-mail: leonardo.langone@bo.ismar.cnr.it [CNR, ISMAR Istituto di Scienze Marine, U.O.S. Bologna (Italy); Miserocchi, S., E-mail: stefano.miserocchi@bo.ismar.cnr.it [CNR, ISMAR Istituto di Scienze Marine, U.O.S. Bologna (Italy); Salvi, S., E-mail: stefano.salvi@enea.it [ENEA, Research Centre Brasimone, Camugnano (Italy); Delfanti, R., E-mail: roberta.delfanti@enea.it [ENEA, Marine Environment Research Centre, La Spezia (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Different pelagic areas of the Mediterranean Sea have been investigated in order to quantify physical and biological mixing processes in deep sea sediments. Herein, results of eleven sediment cores sampled at different deep areas (> 2000 m) of the Western and Eastern Mediterranean Sea are presented. {sup 210}Pb{sub xs} and {sup 137}Cs vertical profiles, together with {sup 14}C dating, are used to identify the main processes characterising the different areas and, finally, controlling mixing depths (SML) and bioturbation coefficients (D{sub b}). Radionuclide vertical profiles and inventories indicate that bioturbation processes are the dominant processes responsible for sediment reworking in deep sea environments. Results show significant differences in sediment mixing depths and bioturbation coefficients among areas of the Mediterranean Sea characterised by different trophic regimes. In particular, in the Oran Rise area, where the Almeria-Oran Front induces frequent phytoplankton blooms, we calculate the highest values of sediment mixing layers (13 cm) and bioturbation coefficients (0.187 cm{sup 2} yr{sup -1}), and the highest values of {sup 210}Pb{sub xs} and {sup 137}Cs inventories. Intermediate values of SML and D{sub b} ({approx} 6 cm and {approx} 0.040 cm{sup 2} yr{sup -1}, respectively) characterise the mesothrophic Algero-Balearic basin, while in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea mixing parameters (SML of 3 cm and D{sub b} of 0.011 cm{sup 2} yr{sup -1}) are similar to those calculated for the oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean (SML of 2 cm and D{sub b} of {approx} 0.005 cm{sup 2} yr{sup -1}). - Research highlights: {yields} Physical and biological mixing processes in the Mediterranean Sea are investigated. {yields} Results of 11 sediment cores in deep areas of the Mediterranean Sea are shown. {yields} {sup 210}Pb{sub xs} and {sup 137}Cs vertical profiles are analysed. {yields} New data on {sup 210}Pb and {sup 137}Cs inventories of Mediterranean deep sediments are

  12. STUDY ON TOTAL SEDIMENT TRANSPORT BY FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Total sediment transport under the action of flow includes generally three forms of sediment transport, suspended load, density current and bed load. How to realize simultaneously these three forms of sediment movement in an identical physical model was studied in this paper. For the suspended load, fall and pickup similarities were used to design sediment gradation, and similarities of sediment-carrying capacity and scouring and depositing time were be insured. For the density current its occurrence condition should be similar, and similarities of sediment concentration and depositing time were insured. For the bed load, sediment gradation was designed by the similarity of incipient motion, and similarities of sediment discharge and scouring and depositing time were satisfied. And a physical model test was conducted.

  13. Green PCB Remediation from Sediment Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPRSS technology is an in situ remediation technique for PCB-contaminated sediments. The technique provides an effective and safe method for sediment cleanup...

  14. Sediments of Buzzards Bay, MA (HOUGH40)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The modern sediments of Buzzards Bay are described principally by the use of quantitative data from mechanical analyses. The environment of the sediment and its...

  15. Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Biota-Sediment Accumulation Factor contains approximately 20,000 biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) from 20 locations (mostly Superfund sites) for...

  16. Home monitoring of blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    McGrath, Barry P

    2015-01-01

    Home blood pressure monitoring is the self-measurement of blood pressure by patients. In the diagnosis and management of high blood pressure it is complementary to 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and clinic blood pressure measurements. Home monitoring can also help to identify white-coat and masked hypertension.

  17. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate Updated:Aug 30,2016 Blood ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  18. Black carbon in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Van Breugel, P.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of black carbon were determined for a number of marine sediments. A comparison of black carbon based on thermal oxidation and hot concentrated nitric acid pretreatments revealed that the latter significantly overestimates combustion derived carbon phases. Black carbon accounts for abo

  19. Sediment transport under breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Mayer, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    generated at the surface where the wave breaks as well as the turbulence generated near the bed due to the wave-motion and the undertow. In general, the levels of turbulent kinetic energy are found to be higher than experiments show. This results in an over prediction of the sediment transport. Nevertheless...

  20. Radionuclide sorption by marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the solid/solution ratio on distribution ratios measured using a standard batch technique was investigated. Two different deep-sea sediments and the actinides americium, neptunium and plutonium were studied. It is shown that the apparent drop in distribution ratio with increasing sediment concentration can frequently be explained by the presence of a small amount of non-separable or 'low-Rsub(d)' species and that by measuring the Rsub(d) at different solid/solution ratios it is possible to estimate the proportion of low-Rsub(d) species present. These may be colloids or stable complexes. Plutonium exhibited anomalous behaviour with the high-carbonate sediment and the distribution ratio dropped from > 104 to 102 as the solid/soln ratio increased from 2g/l to 20g/l. At high sediment concentrations the plutonium in solution was mainly in the oxidised Pu(V + VI) form and it is postulated that Pu-VI carbonates were the main species present. (author)

  1. Flocculation Dynamics of cohesive sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Cohesive sediment suspended in natural waters is subject not only to transport and deposition processes but also to reactions of flocculation, \\textit{i.e.} aggregation of fine particles, and breakup of aggregates. Although aggregation and breakup occur at small and very small length scales compared

  2. SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND STREAM POWER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted YANG

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a step-by-step derivation of the sediment transport functions by Engelund and Hansen (1967) and by Ackers and White (1973). The theoretical derivations demonstrate that these two functions are closely related to Bagnold's (1966) stream power and efficiency concepts.

  3. Prediction of bedload sediment transport for heterogeneous sediments in shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durafour, Marine; Jarno, Armelle; Le Bot, Sophie; Lafite, Robert; Marin, François

    2015-04-01

    Key words: Particle shape, in-situ measurements, bedload transport, heterogeneous sediments Bedload sediment transport in the coastal area is a dynamic process mainly influenced by the type of hydrodynamic forcings involved (current and/or waves), the flow properties (velocity, viscosity, depth) and sediment heterogeneity (particle size, density, shape). Although particle shape is recognized to be a significant factor in the hydrodynamic behavior of grains, this parameter is not currently implemented in bedload transport formulations: firstly because the mechanisms of initiation of motion according to particle shape are still not fully understood, and secondly due to the difficulties in defining common shape parameters. In March 2011, a large panel of in-situ instruments was deployed on two sites in the Eastern English Channel, during the sea campaign MESFLUX11. Samples of the sediment cover available for transport are collected, during a slack period, per 2cm thick strata by divers and by using a Shipeck grab. Bedload discharges along a tidal cycle are also collected with a Delft Nile Sampler (DNS; Gaweesh and Van Rijn, 1992, 1994) on both sites. The first one is characterized by a sandy bed with a low size dispersion, while the other study area implies graded sediments from fine sands to granules. A detailed analysis of the data is performed to follow the evolution of in-situ bedload fluxes on the seabed for a single current. In-situ measurements are compared to existing formulations according to a single fraction approach, using the median diameter of the mixture, and a fractionwise approach, involving a discretization of the grading curve. Results emphasize the interest to oscillate between these two methods according to the dispersion in size of the site considered. The need to apply a hiding/exposure coefficient (Egiazaroff, 1965) and a hindrance factor (Kleinhans and Van Rijn, 2002) for size heterogeneous sediments is also clearly highlighted. A really good

  4. Sediment availability on burnt hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Petter; Sheridan, Gary; Moody, John; Smith, Hugh; Noske, Philip; Lane, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    In general, erosion has been modeled as being proportional to some form of energy or force (such as shear stress or stream power) with the proportionality constant being erodibility, which is a characterization of sediment availability. It is unclear if erodibility is constant with depth on recently burnt hillslopes. This study used both field- and laboratory based experiments to quantify sediment availability as a depth-dependent parameter on burnt hillslopes. An explicit representation of fire-effect on sediment availability was achieved by assuming that fire-effects produce a non-cohesive soil layer of variable depth. This depth is characterized as a probability density function with a single parameter that changed during recovery (0-3 years) as the available soil was depleted. Measurements in southeastern Australia found that initially after a wildfire the hillslope had a layer (0.75-0.91 cm in depth) of non-cohesive soil, which represented 97-117 t/ha of transport limited sediment. The thickness of this layer decreased exponentially with time since the wildfire. Additional results showed that fine roots (soils for depths soil depth and root density accounted for ~60 % of variation in the erodibility at soil depths soil properties (% silt and clay in particular) became more important as predictors of erodibility. The results are organized into a conceptual framework for modeling fire-effects on sediment availability for systems with low and high pre-fire erodibility. The fire-effect produces an equal depth of non-cohesive soil for both systems but this represents a greater perturbation for systems with low pre-fire erodibility than for those systems with a high pre-fire erodibility.

  5. Upstream sediment input effects on experimental dune trough scour in sediment mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding causes of dune irregularity, especially dune trough scour, is important for the modeling of vertical sorting of sediment mixtures in morphological models of rivers with sediment mixtures. Sediment in dunes is generally sorted in a fining-upward manner, which affects the sediment transp

  6. SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT IN FLOOD CONTROL DAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanapanchai, Maneechit; Shah, Farhed A.; Annandale, George

    2002-01-01

    Reservoir sedimentation reduces economic value and longevity of flood control dams. Periodic sediment removal allows extension of reservoir life. An optimal control model is developed to evaluate alternative sediment management strategies for flood control dams. An illustrative empirical analysis shows that sustainable management is economically desirable for a wide range of parameter values.

  7. White Blood Cell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... where they are needed, and then kill and digest the harmful organism or substance (see White blood ... Patel Hello Everyone! Hello to all of you readers! I know you will be seeing my biography, ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... educational meetings and webinars ASH Image Bank Educational Web-based library of hematologic imagery In This Section: ... Blood Publishing Office . Patient Groups A list of Web links to patient groups and other organizations that ...

  9. High Blood Pressure Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood to pass through more easily. Alpha-beta blockers not only reduce nerve impulses, but also make ... with less force. They combine the effects of beta blockers and alpha blockers. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (also ...

  10. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... genetic predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) Multiple births Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are ...

  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High ... the Guesswork out of Planning Meals! Find the healthy eating plan that works for you and your diabetes. ...

  12. Blood Test: Bilirubin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood. Babies with high levels may need phototherapy (treatment with a special light that makes bilirubin ... are afraid of needles. Explaining the test in terms your child can understand might help ease some ...

  13. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... If you find that you are interested in learning more about blood diseases and disorders, here are ... For Patients ASH Academy ASH On Demand ASH Image Bank Advocacy Action Alerts Policy News Advocacy Leadership ...

  14. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... avoid problems associated with hyperglycemia. How Do I Treat Hyperglycemia? You can often lower your blood glucose ... be a serious problem if you don't treat it, so it's important to treat as soon ...

  15. Vitamin A blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003570.htm Vitamin A blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The vitamin A test measures the level of vitamin A ...

  16. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral ... 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & ...

  17. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a unique focus ... ASH ASH Meeting on Hematologic Malignancies Consultative Hematology Course ASH Meeting on Lymphoma Biology ASH Workshop on ...

  18. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose ... Find Your Local Office Find your local diabetes education program Calendar of Events Wellness Lives Here Drive ...

  19. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term ... body can't use insulin properly. What Causes Hyperglycemia? A number of things can cause hyperglycemia: If ...

  20. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you avoid problems associated with hyperglycemia. How Do I Treat Hyperglycemia? You can often lower your blood ... record for use in an emergency. How Can I Prevent Hyperglycemia? Your best bet is to practice ...

  1. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flow and harming your baby. Jump To: Am I at Risk? The risk of developing a blood ... A Patient's Journey back to top Where Can I Find More Information? If you find that you ...

  2. Cord-Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cord blood mainly because of the promise that stem cell research holds for the future. Most of us would have little use for stem cells now, but research into using them to treat diseases is ongoing — ...

  3. Blood in the semen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by swelling or infection of the prostate or seminal vesicles. The problem may occur after a prostate biopsy . ... blood and if any clots formed in the seminal vesicles. Depending on the cause, other symptoms that may ...

  4. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Society News Clinical News Features ASH Self-Assessment Program A comprehensive resource to help stay current ... Blood The Hematologist ASH Clinical News ASH Self-Assessment Program Hematology , ASH Education Program About Awards Membership ...

  5. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Student Resources History of Diabetes Resources for School Projects How to Reference Our Site Diabetes Basics Myths ... blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is life-threatening and needs immediate treatment. Symptoms include: Shortness ...

  6. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Meeting Abstracts 2016 Call for Abstracts 2016 Abstract Review Categories Abstracts Archive View all Education ASH Academy ... Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a ...

  7. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst Part of managing your diabetes is checking your blood glucose often. ... Blog Online Community Site Menu Are You at Risk? Diagnosis Lower Your Risk Risk Test Alert Day ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood conditions. back to top Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: A Patient's Journey back to top Where Can I ... and help move hematology forward. Learn more Find a Hematologist Search a database of practicing hematologists in ...

  9. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical News Society News Clinical News Features ASH Self-Assessment Program A comprehensive resource to help stay ... Publications Blood The Hematologist ASH Clinical News ASH Self-Assessment Program Hematology , ASH Education Program About Awards ...

  10. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hispanic Heritage Month African American Programs Latino Programs Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders American Indian/ ... High blood glucose happens when the body has too little insulin or when the body can't ...

  12. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... techniques in the clinical application of genome editing technology MDS Summit Multiple dates and locations A complimentary ... of articles from the 2015 ASH Annual Meeting Education Program Blood: How I Treat A compendium of ...

  13. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High ... What Can I Drink? Fruit Dairy Food Tips Eating Out Quick Meal Ideas Snacks Nutrient Content Claims ...

  14. Sediment Characteristic Studies in the Surface Sediment from Kemaman Mangrove Forest, Terengganu, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. ONG

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 43 surface sediment samples from Kemaman mangrove forest, Terengganu were analyzed for sediment characteristic (mean, sorting and skewness off two seasons (dry season and wet season by using the Particle Size Analyzer (PSA after digest the sample with Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2 and Hydrochloric Acid (HCl. There is a significant (P<0.05 relationship between sediment characteristic with the seasonal changes with the increasing mean particle size occurring during the wet season. Finer sediments dominate the mangrove sediment during monsoon season while coarser sediments dominate during the dry season. Meanwhile, sediment mean size for each transect tends to be coarser towards the back mangrove.

  15. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... medicines you take. These include: Birth control pills Hormone therapy Testosterone DHEA (a supplement) If you are ...

  16. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... providers diagnose high blood pressure when blood pressure readings are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming ... minutes before the test. To track blood pressure readings over a period of time, the health care ...

  17. Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Heart Alternate Language URL Español Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them to Manage Your Diabetes Page Content Checking your blood sugar, also called blood glucose, is an important part ...

  18. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose high blood pressure when blood pressure ... painless and can be done in a health care provider’s office or clinic. To prepare for the ...

  19. Manage your blood sugar (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checking your blood sugar levels often and writing down the results will tell you how well you are managing your diabetes so you ... possible. The best times to check your blood sugar are before meals and at bedtime. Your blood ...

  20. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  1. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dangerous as elevations of both systolic and diastolic pressure. Blood pressure is elevated for two main reasons: too ... and Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), reduce blood pressure by relaxing blood vessels Beta blockers, which also cause the heart ...

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI ... providers diagnose high blood pressure when blood pressure readings are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood ...

  3. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI ... providers diagnose high blood pressure when blood pressure readings are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood ...

  4. Fully portable blood irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully portable blood irradiator was developed using the beta emitter thulium-170 as the radiation source and vitreous carbon as the body of the irradiator, matrix for isotope encapsulation, and blood interface material. These units were placed in exteriorized arteriovenous shunts in goats, sheep, and dogs and the effects on circulating lymphocytes and on skin allograft retention times measured. The present work extends these studies by establishing baseline data for skin graft rejection times in untreated animals

  5. Medium of Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Eddie Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Blood quantum, the measurement of American Indian ancestry possessed by members of America’s Indigenous nations, is most often considered a rubric utilized by the federal government in an oppressive form, or by tribal nations themselves as standards of tribal citizenship requirements. In this essay, the authors recontextualize blood as a medium of national identity within the context of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Such decentering, as presented here, illuminates Cherokee nationhood in wa...

  6. Medium of Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie Glenn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood quantum, the measurement of American Indian ancestry possessed by members of America’s Indigenous nations, is most often considered a rubric utilized by the federal government in an oppressive form, or by tribal nations themselves as standards of tribal citizenship requirements. In this essay, the authors recontextualize blood as a medium of national identity within the context of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Such decentering, as presented here, illuminates Cherokee nationhood in ways that have significant political import.

  7. Blood Screening for Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Hourfar, Michael Kai; Themann, Anna; Eickmann, Markus; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Laue, Thomas; Seifried, Erhard; Schmidt, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Influenza viruses, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1), could threaten blood safety. We analyzed 10,272 blood donor samples with a minipool nucleic acid amplication technique. Analytical sensitivity of the method was 804 geq/mL and 444 geq/mL for generic influenza primers and influenza (H5N1) subtype–specific primers. This study demonstrates that such screening for influenza viruses is feasible.

  8. Integrated Blood Barcode Chips

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Rong; Vermesh, Ophir; Srivastava, Alok; Yen, Brian K.H.; Qin, Lidong; Ahmad, Habib; Kwong, Gabriel A.; Liu, Chao-Chao; Gould, Juliane; Hood, Leroy; Heath, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Blood comprises the largest version of the human proteome1. Changes of plasma protein profiles can reflect physiological or pathological conditions associated with many human diseases, making blood the most important fluid for clinical diagnostics2-4. Nevertheless, only a handful of plasma proteins are utilized in routine clinical tests. This is due to a host of reasons, including the intrinsic complexity of the plasma proteome1, the heterogeneity of human diseases and the fast kinetics assoc...

  9. Questions and Answers about High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Page Content What is high blood pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood against the ... do I know if I have high blood pressure? High blood pressure is often called "the silent killer" because ...

  10. A Sediment Budget Case Study: Comparing Watershed Scale Erosion Estimates to Modeled and Empirical Sediment Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavitt, B.; O'Connor, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Pacific Lumber Company Habitat Conservation Plan requires watershed analyses to be conducted on their property. This paper summarizes a portion of that analysis focusing on erosion and sedimentation processes and rates coupled with downstream sediment routing in the Freshwater Creek watershed in northwest California. Watershed scale erosion sources from hillslopes, roads, and channel banks were quantified using field surveys, aerial photo interpretation, and empirical modeling approaches for different elements of the study. Sediment transport rates for bedload were modeled, and sediment transport rates for suspended sediment were estimated based on size distribution of sediment inputs in relation to sizes transported in suspension. Recent short-term, high-quality estimates of suspended sediment yield that a community watershed group collected with technical assistance from the US Forest Service were used to validate the resulting sediment budget. Bedload yield data from an adjacent watershed, Jacoby Creek, provided another check on the sediment budget. The sediment budget techniques and bedload routing models used for this study generated sediment yield estimates that are in good agreement with available data. These results suggest that sediment budget techniques that require moderate levels of fieldwork can be used to provide relatively accurate technical assessments. Ongoing monitoring of sediment sources coupled with sediment routing models and reach scale field data allows for predictions to be made regarding in-channel sediment storage.

  11. Modeling Transport of Flushed Reservoir Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinski, I. M.

    2014-12-01

    Drawdown flushing of a reservoir is often part of a reservoir sediment management program. Flushing can deliver higher than normal sediment loads to the river channel located downstream of a reservoir. The flushed sediment may contain a higher proportion of finer sediment than what was delivered to a channel prior to the presence of the reservoir. The extent of long-term impacts caused by the flushed sediment on the channel morphology and habitat will in part depend on the residence time of the sediment within the channel. In this study we used MIKE 21C to model the fate of flushed sediment through a river channel where the bed material consists of an armoring layer of gravels overlying finer sediment. MIKE 21C is a two-dimensional curvilinear morphological model for rivers developed by DHI. Curvilinear means that the model grid may curve to better follow the channel and flow direction, for example in a meandering channel. Multiple bed material layers are included in the model to represent the armoring and underlying layers existing in the bed separately from the overlying flushed sediment. These layers may also mix. The nature of the interactions between these two layers helps regulate transport and deposition of the flushed sediment, thus are critical to assessing the fate of the flushed sediment and associated potential impacts.

  12. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SEDIMENT RELEASE FROM RESERVOIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    For the computation of the sediment quantity released from reservoirs, a vertical two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is combined with a sediment transport model. The hydrodynamic model is based on the equations of mass and momentum conservation along with a k - ε model for closure of the Reynolds stresses. The sediment transport model is based on the convection-diffusion equation of sediment concentration and the sediment continuity equation. Both the hydrodynamic and sediment transport models are developed in a boundary-fitted curvilinear co-ordinate system. Comparison of the predicted mean velocity field with laboratory results indicates that the present model captures most experimental trends with reasonable accuracy. Also good agreement is found in comparison of the sediment transport results for the numerical model and the experimental model.

  13. Review of sediment stabilisation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The best sites for tidal power schemes are found in estuaries with high tidal ranges which have complex ecosystems and include a wide and diverse range of habitats. If the tidal power is to be developed, therefore, it is important to determine the likely effect on the environment and any ameliorative measures which may be necessary. One possible change is likely to be the erosion of material from the bed or shoreline of the estuary, and possibly the adjacent coast. This is of particular concern if intertidal sandflats, mudflats and saltmarsh are affected, as these are important wildlife habitats. Moreover, largescale movement of sediments would be undesirable. Results of a desk study of methods of preventing the erosion of sediment deposits in or near an estuary in the conditions that may occur following the construction of a tidal power barrage are presented. (author)

  14. Bottom sediments of Ypacarai Lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottom sediments of Ypacarai Lake was investigated with XRF and Mossbauer techniques. The lake of about 120 Km2, is a shallow one, medium deep of about 1.8m. In addition to its use for recreation, its basin has a wide area of influence and of economical significance. Bottom sediments play an important role in the overall distribution of trace elements in the aquatic system and act as a sink for metals. Bottom samples were taken from 5 different sampling stations, selected according to the morphology and population sites in the shore. The concentration of toxic metals was found to be low and no negative ecological impact should be expected. The main metallic ion component is iron (1.69%). Mossbauer studies showed this element appears as Fe+3 and no Fe+2 was detected. It is here suggested that Fe+3 acts as the limiting element which controls eutrophication process

  15. SEDIMENT TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTSIN UNSTEADY FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DE SUTTER R.; HUYGENS M.; VERHOEVEN R.

    2001-01-01

    By means of a test flume with semi-circular cross-section, bedload and suspended-sediment transport of non-cohesive material have been studied in transient flow. The experimental facility enables us to investigate the time evolution of friction and transport parameters. Preliminary measurements with a fixed bottom instead of a sediment bed yield a reliable assessment of flow and friction characteristics. Time sequence in unsteady flow of the relevant parameters is revealed. The influence of turbulence variation and shear stress variation on the transport is investigated. As existing transport equations are found to be in poor agreement with experimental data, a new "engineering" concept is constructed which relates friction velocity to transport.

  16. Vertical distribution of sediment concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sai-hua HUANG; Zhi-lin SUN; Dan XU; Shan-shan XIA

    2008-01-01

    A simple formula is proposed to predict the vertical distribution of a suspended load concentration in a 2D steady turbulent flow.The proposed formula significantly improves the well-known Rouse formula where sediment concentration has an infinitely large value at the channel bottom and a zero value at the water surface.Based on this formula and the logarithmic ve-locity profile,a theoretical elementary function for the transport rate of a suspended load is developed.This equation improves the Einstein equation in which the unit-width suspended sediment discharge must be solved by numerical integration and a contra-diction between the lower limit of the integral and that of velocity distribution exists.

  17. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods. Data on th

  18. Monitoring of pollution in sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee I. Abdallah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs were analyzed in surface sediments collected from Suez till Hurgharda coasts to establish baseline levels for various types of organic pollutants before the anticipated identification of anthropogenic activities, petrogenic and biogenic. AHs for all samples were dominated by unresolved complex mixture (UCM, and petrogenic mixed with biogenic sources. Results also revealed that sedimentary PAHs mainly originated from pyrolysis sources.

  19. MITIGATION OF SEDIMENTATION HAZARDS DOWNSTREAM FROM RESERVOIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ellen WOHL; Sara RATHBURN

    2003-01-01

    Many reservoirs currently in operation trap most or all of the sediment entering the reservoir,creating sediment-depleted conditions downstream. This may cause channel adjustment in the form of bank erosion, bed erosion, substrate coarsening, and channel planform change. Channel adjustment may also result from episodic sediment releases during reservoir operation, or from sediment evacuation following dam removal. Channel adjustment to increased sediment influx depends on the magnitude, frequency, duration and grain-size distribution of the sediment releases, and on the downstream channel characteristics. Channel adjustment may occur as a change in substrate sizedistribution, filling of pools, general bed aggradation, lateral instability, change in channel planform,and/or floodplain aggradation. The increased sediment availability may alter aquatic and riparian habitat, reduce water quality, distribute adsorbed contaminants along the river corridor, and provide germination sites for exotic vegetation. Mitigation of these sedimentation hazards requires: (1)mapping grain-size distribution within the reservoir and estimating the grain-size distributions of sediment that will be mobilized through time; (2) mapping shear stress and sediment transport capacity as a function of discharge on the basis of channel units for the length of the river likely to be affected; (3) mapping potential depositional zones, and aquatic habitat and "acceptable losses," along the downstream channel, and comparing these volumes to the total sediment volume stored in the reservoir as a means of estimating total transport capacity required to mobilize reservoir sediment delivered to the channel; (4) designing discharge and sediment release regime (magnitude, frequency,duration) to minimize adverse downstream impacts; and (5) developing plans to remove, treat, contain,or track contaminants, and to restrict establishment of exotic vegetation. The North Fork Poudre River in Colorado is used to

  20. Distribution of bacteria and yeasts within the 10-ml Isolator during the processing of seeded blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, J A; Levisky, J S

    1986-02-01

    Forty-five organisms consisting of stock cultures and clinical isolates of bacteria and yeast were separately inoculated into outdated blood bank blood to achieve a concentration of approximately 100 CFU/ml. Blood with each organism was introduced into groups of four Isolators (E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.), which were then processed according to the Isostat instructions of the manufacturer. The supernatant, sediment, and wash (material removed from the surface of the slanted stopper after sediment removal) were inoculated onto 5% sheep blood agar plates. Cultures were incubated aerobically (5 to 10% CO2) at 35 degrees C for 48 to 72 h. From the 180 Isolators, the mean recovery was 6% (range, 0 to 48%) for the supernatant, 87% (range, 47 to 98%) for the sediment, and 8% (range, 3 to 23%) for the wash. Neither variation among technologists nor intentional misalignment of additional Isolators in the centrifuge could explain all of the losses of microorganisms from the sediment. The manual nature of the Isolator procedure, which led to the loss of significant amounts of organisms from the sediment, may help to explain false-negative Isolator results obtained from blood of patients, particularly when small numbers of pathogens are present. PMID:3084546

  1. Oligocene tectonics and sedimentation, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the Oligocene epoch, California was marked by extensive nonmarine sedimentation, in contrast to its pre-Oligocene and post-Oligocene depositional history. The Oligocene continental deposits are especially widespread in southern California and fill a number of small and generally partly restricted basins. Fluvial facies in many basins prograded over previously deposited lower Tertiary turbidites. Volcanism, from widespread centers, was associated with the nonmarine sedimentation. However, some basins remained marine and a few contain Oligocene turbidites and pelagic sediments deposited at bathyal depths. The Oligocene redbeds of California do not form a post-orogenic molasse sequence comparable to the Old Red Sandstone or Alpine molasse. They are synorogenic and record local uplift of basins and surrounding source areas. Late Cretaceous to contemporary orogenesis in California has been generally characterized by the formation of small restricted basins of variable depth adjacent to small upland areas in response to strike-slip faulting. Deposition of Oligocene redbeds was associated with climatic change from warm and humid to cold and semiarid, and a global lowering of sea level. Oligocene tectonism occurred during the transition from subduction of the Farallon Plate to initiation of the modern San Andreas transform system. However, the major influence that caused uplift, formation of fault-bounded basins, and extensive redbed deposition, especially in southern California, was the approach of the Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge to the western margin of California. ?? 1984.

  2. Blood and war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2010-09-01

    In 1894 Ulsterman and pathologist Almroth Wright described the citation of blood. Twenty-one years later it was introduced into wartime and clinical practice. Harvard Medical School had a large part in providing Colonel Andrew Fullerton, later Professor of Surgery, Queen's Belfast, with the intellectual and practical help for the Allies to deploy blood on the post-Somme Western Front and in Salonika. The key investigators and clinicians were Americans and Canadians who with Fullerton and Wright instructed the Allies. The key enablers were two Harvard-trained surgeons surnamed Robertson-Oswald H. ("Robby") and L. Bruce (no relation). Physician Roger I. Lee of Harvard, surgeon George W Crile of Cleveland, Peyton Rous of the Rockefeller Institute and Richard Lewisohn of Mount Sinai Hospital, both located in the Upper East Side of New York City, played key roles.By Armistice in 1918, indirect citrated nutrient-enhanced blood transfusion was widely used by the Allies. Geoffrey Keynes was taught the techniques of blood transfusion by Dr. Benjamin Harrison Alton of Harvard at a Casualty Clearing Station near Albert at the time of the Battle of Passchendaele. Professor "Robby" Robertson, DSO, Sir Geoffrey Keynes and Sir Thomas Houston established blood banking.

  3. Rotary blood pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor); Kiris, Cetin (Inventor); Kwak, Dochan (Inventor); Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); DeBakey, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A blood pump that comprises a pump housing having a blood flow path therethrough, a blood inlet, and a blood outlet; a stator mounted to the pump housing, the stator having a stator field winding for producing a stator magnetic field; a flow straightener located within the pump housing, and comprising a flow straightener hub and at least one flow straightener blade attached to the flow straightener hub; a rotor mounted within the pump housing for rotation in response to the stator magnetic field, the rotor comprising an inducer and an impeller; the inducer being located downstream of the flow straightener, and comprising an inducer hub and at least one inducer blade attached to the inducer hub; the impeller being located downstream of the inducer, and comprising an impeller hub and at least one impeller blade attached to the impeller hub; and preferably also comprising a diffuser downstream of the impeller, the diffuser comprising a diffuser hub and at least one diffuser blade. Blood flow stagnation and clot formation within the pump are minimized by, among other things, providing the inducer hub with a diameter greater than the diameter of the flow straightener hub; by optimizing the axial spacing between the flow straightener hub and the inducer hub, and between the impeller hub and the diffuser hub; by optimizing the inlet angle of the diffuser blades; and by providing fillets or curved transitions between the upstream end of the inducer hub and the shaft mounted therein, and between the impeller hub and the shaft mounted therein.

  4. AUDIT OF BLOOD REQUISITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, P; Swarup, D; Singh, M M

    2001-01-01

    A total of 2793 requisition forms received by the blood banks of a Service zonal hospital, between June 1995 and December 1999, were analysed. 1697 (60.71%) forms were demand for single unit blood. Blood was collected against only 1099 forms (39.34%) out of which 713 (64.88%) were single unit issue. Urgency of requirement and blood group of patients was omitted in 56% cases. 104 forms were received without mention of the indications for transfusion. History of previous transfusion and pregnancy/HDN were omitted in 25.1% and 37.38% cases respectively. At an average 14.61% of the total collection was discarded. Of the 292 units discarded, 242 units were due to non utilisation. A transfusion committee should be established in all hospitals with a licensed blood bank. It should constitute definite objectives and conduct regular audits (prospective audit, concurrent review or retrospective review), in order to achieve utmost efficiency and numerous benefits, in terms of workload, cost, errors, risks of transfusion and ultimately increased customer satisfaction. It should strive to abolish single unit and inappropriate transfusion, and advocate autologous transfusion. PMID:27365575

  5. Infections Transmitted By the Transfusion of Blood and Blood Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekin A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Especially viral hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus(HIV which were transmitted by the transfusion of blood and blood products have been an important public health problem for a long time on the world. Transfusion of blood and blood products is an ideal and an easiest and a simplest route for transmission of infectious diseases. It is known that many infectious agents, either bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal agents may be transmitted by the transfusion of blood and blood products. In present study, we reviewed infection diseases that transmitted by the transfusion of blood and blood products.Additionally, we were aimed to emphasize a rare but a very important complication of transfusion of blood and blood products.

  6. Blood viscosity: influence of erythrocyte deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S; Usami, S; Dellenback, R J; Gregersen, M I

    1967-08-18

    Suspensions of canine and human erythocytes hardened with acetaldehyde differ from the suspensions of normal erythrocytes with respect to their rheological behavior. Normal erythrocytes can be packed by centrifugation so that the sediment volume is nearly 100 percent cells, but the hardened erythrocytes (RBC's) can be packed only to approximately 60 percent cells. At the same cell percentage the viscosity of the hardened RBC suspension is higher than that of the suspension of normal erythocytes. An increase in shear stress deforms the normal erythocytes and lowers the suspension viscosity, but has no influence on the viscosity of the hardened cell suspension. In blood with high cell percentages, the shear deformation of normal RBC's plays an important role in reducing viscosity and facilitating flow at high shear stresses. PMID:17842793

  7. Sufficient blood, safe blood: can we have both?

    OpenAIRE

    Bönig Halvard; Schmidt Michael; Hourfar Kai; Schüttrumpf Jörg; Seifried Erhard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The decision in September 2011 in the UK to accept blood donations from non-practicing men who have sex with men (MSM) has received significant public attention. Will this rule change substantially boost the number of blood donations or will it make our blood less safe? Clearly, most European countries have a blood procurement problem. Fewer young people are donating, while the population is aging and more invasive therapies are requiring more blood. Yet if that was the reason for al...

  8. Types of Blood Pressure Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Types of Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Aug 26,2016 Many medications known ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  9. High Blood Pressure and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More High Blood Pressure and Women Updated:Aug 13,2014 Many people ... was last reviewed on 08/04/14. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  10. Quantification of Gravel Rural Road Sediment Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, B. A.; Myers Toman, E.

    2014-12-01

    Unbound rural roads are thought to be one of the largest anthropogenic sources of sediment reaching stream channels in small watersheds. This sediment deposition can reduce water quality in the streams negatively impacting aquatic habitat as well as impacting municipal drinking water sources. These roads are thought to see an increase in construction and use in southeast Ohio due to the expansion of shale gas development in the region. This study set out to quantify the amount of sediment these rural roads are able to produce. A controlled rain event of 12.7 millimeters of rain over a half hour period was used to drive sediment production over a 0.03 kilometer section of gravel rural road. These 8 segments varied in many characteristics and produced from 2.0 to 8.4 kilograms of sediment per 0.03 kilometers of road with the average production over the 8 segments being 5.5 kilograms of sediment. Sediment production was not strongly correlated with road segment slope but traffic was found to increase sediment production from 1.1 to 3.9 times as much sediment after traffic use. These results will help inform watershed scale sediment budgeting, and inform best management practices for road maintenance and construction. This study also adds to the understanding of the impacts of rural road use and construction associated with the changing land use from agricultural to natural gas extraction.

  11. AN OVERVIEW ON BLOOD PURIFIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabia Chauhan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Blood is a connective tissue which protects us from different problems. Without blood body cannot functions at all and blood doesn’t purify itself. When blood does not purifies itself that times kidney, liver and lymphatic system work together that they help’s to purifiers the blood. Causes which are included in blood impurities are modern life style, junk food, alcohol etc. If the blood becomes impure it causes different problems e.g. acne, rashes, allergic etc. There is not any proper synthetic medication for blood impurities. Only herbal formulations are used for the blood purifier. In this review article we discussed about the market formulations and the different plants which are used in them with their different activities which are helpful in purifies the blood and also protects from other problems.

  12. Manual versus automated blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilmann, A C; Kalliokoski, Otto; Sørensen, Dorte B;

    2014-01-01

    corticosterone metabolites, and expressed more anxious behavior than did the mice of the other groups. Plasma corticosterone levels of mice subjected to tail blood sampling were also elevated, although less significantly. Mice subjected to automated blood sampling were less affected with regard to the parameters......Facial vein (cheek blood) and caudal vein (tail blood) phlebotomy are two commonly used techniques for obtaining blood samples from laboratory mice, while automated blood sampling through a permanent catheter is a relatively new technique in mice. The present study compared physiological parameters......, glucocorticoid dynamics as well as the behavior of mice sampled repeatedly for 24 h by cheek blood, tail blood or automated blood sampling from the carotid artery. Mice subjected to cheek blood sampling lost significantly more body weight, had elevated levels of plasma corticosterone, excreted more fecal...

  13. Sediment load reduction in Chinese rivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng LIU; Jueyi SUI; Zhao-Yin WANG

    2008-01-01

    In this Paper,the changes in the annual runoff and sediment transport have been assessed by using the long term observation data from 10 gauging stations on 10 large rivers across China from far north to far south.It is found that the annual sediment yield has generally had a decreasing trend in the past half century.According to the changes in annual runoff and the sediment yield per area.rivers in China can be classified into the following three groups:1)rivers with decreasing annual sediment transport and stable runoff:2)rivers with both decreasing annual sediment transport and runoff and 3)rivers with greatly reduced annual sediment transport and decreasing annual runoff.The results indicate that,in all southern rivers(to the south of the Huaihe River including the Huaihe River),there has been little change in average annual runoff but a dramatic decrease in annual sediment transport.In the northern rivers.however,both the annual sediment yield and the runoff show significant evidence of reduction.To further investigate the recent changes in annual runoff and sediment transport.the short-term observation data from these 10 gauging stations in the recent 10 years have been assessed.Results show that both the annual sediment transport and the runoff have decreased significantly in the northern rivers in the past 10 years.Using the Yellow River at the Lijin Station as an example,the average annual runoff for the last 10 years is only 1/3 of the long term average value and the average annual sediment yield of the last 10 years is only 1/4 of the long term average value.More unusually,in the Yongding River the annual sediment yield has approached zero and the runoff has decreased significantly.In addition,the impacts of human activities on the changes in both runoff and sediment transport have been discussed.

  14. Sediment supply versus local hydraulic controls on sediment transport and storage in a river with large sediment loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David; Topping, David; Schmidt, John C.; Griffiths, Ronald; Sabol, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Rio Grande in the Big Bend region of Texas, USA, and Chihuahua and Coahuila, Mexico, undergoes rapid geomorphic changes as a result of its large sediment supply and variable hydrology; thus, it is a useful natural laboratory to investigate the relative importance of flow strength and sediment supply in controlling alluvial channel change. We analyzed a suite of sediment transport and geomorphic data to determine the cumulative influence of different flood types on changing channel form. In this study, physically based analyses suggest that channel change in the Rio Grande is controlled by both changes in flow strength and sediment supply over different spatial and temporal scales. Channel narrowing is primarily caused by substantial deposition of sediment supplied to the Rio Grande during tributary-sourced flash floods. Tributary floods have large suspended-sediment concentrations, occur for short durations, and attenuate rapidly downstream in the Rio Grande, depositing much of their sediment in downstream reaches. Long-duration floods on the mainstem have the capacity to enlarge the Rio Grande, and these floods, released from upstream dams, can either erode or deposit sediment in the Rio Grande depending upon the antecedent in-channel sediment supply and the magnitude and duration of the flood. Geomorphic and sediment transport analyses show that the locations and rates of sand erosion and deposition during long-duration floods are most strongly controlled by spatial changes in flow strength, largely through changes in channel slope. However, spatial differences in the in-channel sediment supply regulate sediment evacuation or accumulation over time in long reaches (greater than a kilometer).

  15. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical ...

  16. Nanosized blood microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuana, Yuana

    2011-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) have important physiological and pathological roles in blood coagulation, inflammation and tumor progression. In recent years MPs also have been recognized to participate in important biological processes, such as in signaling and in the horizontal transfer of their specific pro

  17. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and-a1c-hyperglycemia,tips-and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood ... ensureArray(data.submitSurveyResponse.errors); $.each(surveyErrors, function () { if (this.errorField) { $('input[name="' + this.errorField + '"]').closest('.form-group') . ...

  18. Blood pressure and atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010319 Effects of combined application of Xuezhikang capsule with hypotensive drugs on arterial compliance and smoothness of the dynamic blood pressure. ZHU Zongtao(朱宗涛),et al. Dept Cardiol, Centr People’s Hosp, Tengzhou 277500.Chin J Integr Tradit & West Med 2010;30

  19. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term for ... diabetes. Learn More: Stories of Courage, Love and Resilience - 2016-08-blog.html Learn More Stories of ...

  20. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Submit to Blood View all Annual Meeting Abstracts 2016 Call for Abstracts 2016 Abstract Review Categories Abstracts Archive View all Education ... ASH Workshop on Genome Editing July 14-15, 2016 Learn new techniques in the clinical application of ...

  1. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your members of Congress to support continued medical research funding Take Action Meetings ASH Workshop on Genome Editing July 14- ... U.S. Surgeon General has issued a Call to Action on DVT and PE to raise public ... research on the causes, prevention, and treatment. Blood clots ...

  2. Chemistry of Blood Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, William F.

    2005-01-01

    The molecule of December 2005 comes from the paper by Rose, Palcic and Evans on structural factors determining the blood type. The structure was previously reported by Palcic and Evans and is presented without the water molecule that is determined in the crystal structure.

  3. CO2 blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  4. Blood transfusion and dermatology:

    OpenAIRE

    Al Aboud, Ahmad; Al Aboud, Khalid; Al Hawsawi, Khalid; Jain, Nipun; Ramesh, V.

    2006-01-01

    Blood transfusion is an accepted therapeutic procedure in all specialties of medicine. In dermatology, specialized techniques like plasmapheresis and extracorporeal photochemotherapy have provided a good treatment option in immune-mediated disorders like bullous dermatoses, collagen vascular diseases and cutaneous lymphomas. Other anecdotal and less substantiated reports point to its use in chronic disorders like atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Untowarddermatological manifestations include m...

  5. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one man for another, and the place…

  6. Impact of blood droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Laan

    2015-01-01

    Within Bloodstain Pattern Analysis, forensic experts commonly use the stringing method, based on a straight line approximation of the blood droplets trajectories to determine where the source of a bloodstain pattern was. However, by ignoring gravity, large errors may arise when inferring the 3D-loca

  7. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Edition Abstracts Collections Submit to Blood View all Annual Meeting Abstracts 2016 Call for Abstracts 2016 Abstract Review ... Abstracts Registration Housing Schedule and Program 58th ASH ® Annual Meeting & Exposition December 3-6, 2016, San Diego, CA ...

  8. Suspended sediment and sediment-associated contaminants in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, D.H.; Mumley, T.E.; Leatherbarrow, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Water-quality managers desire information on the temporal and spatial variability of contaminant concentrations and the magnitudes of watershed and bed-sediment loads in San Francisco Bay. To help provide this information, the Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP) takes advantage of the association of many contaminants with sediment particles by continuously measuring suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), which is an accurate, less costly, and more easily measured surrogate for several trace metals and organic contaminants. Continuous time series of SSC are collected at several sites in the Bay. Although semidiurnal and diurnal tidal fluctuations are present, most of the variability of SSC occurs at fortnightly, monthly, and semiannual tidal time scales. A seasonal cycle of sediment inflow, wind-wave resuspension, and winnowing of fine sediment also is observed. SSC and, thus, sediment-associated contaminants tend to be greater in shallower water, at the landward ends of the Bay, and in several localized estuarine turbidity maxima. Although understanding of sediment transport has improved in the first 10 years of the RMP, determining a simple mass budget of sediment or associated contaminants is confounded by uncertainties regarding sediment flux at boundaries, change in bed-sediment storage, and appropriate modeling techniques. Nevertheless, management of sediment-associated contaminants has improved greatly. Better understanding of sediment and sediment-associated contaminants in the Bay is of great interest to evaluate the value of control actions taken and the need for additional controls. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sedimentation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rixen, T.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Ittekkot, V.

    by a factor two in Arabian Sea. The organic carbon burial rates in Arabian Sea related to primary production and carbonate accumulation reveal an acceptable agreement on a global scale except at sea floor spreading zones and continental margins....

  10. Continental margin sedimentation: from sediment transport to sequence stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P.M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    This volume on continental margin sedimentation brings together an expert editorial and contributor team to create a state-of-the-art resource. Taking a global perspective, the book spans a range of timescales and content, ranging from how oceans transport particles, to how thick rock sequences are formed on continental margins. - Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes - Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other - Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy - Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which provide a quantitative basis for extrapolation in time and space of insights about continental-margin sedimentation - Provides a research resource for scientists studying modern and ancient margins, and an educational text for advanced students in sedimentology and stratigraphy

  11. DYNAMIC RESOURCES OF RIVER SEDIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George GERGOV; Tzviatka KARAGIOZOVA

    2005-01-01

    The currently enforced Bulgarian water legislation [the Water Act (1999),the Environmental Protection Act (2002),etc.] requires conducting special studies for accurate assessments of sand and gravel flux along the rivers,prior to the issue of the license for operation of the quarries,where they will be dredged. The activity of a quarry necessitates special investigations because of the large dimensions of the damages inflicted on the environment. Ours studies have shown that there are two types of river reaches,in which abstracion of sand and gravel is performed. The first one refers usually to the plain area river reaches. The other type is mountainous with high rate of sediment load,which consists of coarse solid matter. The "on-the-spot" study on the environmental impact of the sand and gravel dredging has revealed that in the area of the quarry the riverbed cuts into the alluvial sediments to about 6-7 m and this ditch has spread by attenuation at a distance of more than 25 km upstream. Downstream the pit the picture is replicated and at the 8th km a local scour on the riverbed,amounting to more than 1.80 - 2.00 m,has been measured near the foundation of a massive bridge in the centre of city of Plovdiv. Such assessments of dynamic resources of sand and gravel materials are expected to serve for the purposes of gradual limitation of this activity in river sections close to renewable resources. The amount of sediment load,which may be abstracted in the area of the Orizare quarry in Bulgaria on a yearly basis has been calculated as 6000 m3/a. It ensures that the resources will not be exhausted and irreversible distortion of the riverbed will be prevented. This is an environmentally safe limit.

  12. 21 CFR 640.1 - Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole Blood. 640.1 Section 640.1 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Whole Blood § 640.1 Whole Blood. The proper name of this product shall be Whole Blood. Whole Blood is defined as blood collected from human donors for...

  13. Crenarchaeota in Lake Michigan sediment.

    OpenAIRE

    MacGregor, B.J.; Moser, D. P.; Alm, E W; Nealson, K. H.; Stahl, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    RNA from Lake Michigan sediment was hybridized with a DNA probe for archaeal 16S rRNA. There was a peak of archaeal rRNA abundance in the oxic zone and another immediately below it. Six contributing species were identified by PCR amplification of extracted DNA with primers specific for archaeal rDNA: two related to Methanosarcina acetivorans and four related to marine crenarchaeotal sequences. rRNA quantification using a DNA probe specific for this crenarchaeotal assemblage showed it is most ...

  14. Long distance electron transmission in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    Geochemical observations in marine sediment have recently shown that electric currents may intimately couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes like oxygen reduction at the sediment surface and hydrogen sul-phide oxidation in anoxic layers centimeters below 1. Further experimental studies...... in the system. Long distance electron transmission may flourishes in marine sediments exposed to tran-sient oxygen depletion, leaving distinct signatures of such events in the geological record....

  15. Luminescence dating of storm-surge sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Geological evidence of storm surges has the potential to provide vital information on storm-surge risk. Sediment from the coastal dunes of the Netherlands contains evidence of extreme floods that occurred before reliable measurements of water level began. For these sediments to be useful in flood-risk analysis, they need to be reliably dated. This thesis investigates the use of Luminescence dating for storm-surge sediment. Luminescence dating is a radiometric dating method, which uses tiny li...

  16. Flux saturation length of sediment transport

    OpenAIRE

    Pähtz, T.; Kok, JF; Parteli, EJR; Herrmann, HJ

    2013-01-01

    Sediment transport along the surface drives geophysical phenomena as diverse as wind erosion and dune formation. The main length-scale controlling the dynamics of sediment erosion and deposition is the saturation length $L_\\mathrm{s}$, which characterizes the flux response to a change in transport conditions. Here we derive, for the first time, an expression predicting $L_\\mathrm{s}$ as a function of the average sediment velocity under different physical environments. Our expression accounts ...

  17. Biodegradation of petroleum in marine seep sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Sonakshi

    2016-01-01

    This study presented for the first time the use of intact sediment cores in a continuous sediment-oil-flow-through (SOFT) system for investigating the degradation of petroleum under a simulated petroleum seepage.The biogeochemical response of sediments from hydrocarbon adapted sites like the Caspian Sea, North Alex Mud Volcano in the Eastern Mediterranean, the Santa Barbara Channel and non-adapted site like the Eckernfoerde Bay in the Baltic Sea to petroleum seepage was investigated and compa...

  18. Sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Taylor, B. F.

    1978-01-01

    Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction were followed in laboratory incubations of sediments taken from tropical seagrass beds. Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction occurred simultaneously in sediments incubated under N2, thereby indicating that the two processes are not mutually exclusive. Sediments incubated under an atmosphere of H2 developed negative pressures due to the oxidation of H2 by sulfate-respiring bacteria. H2 also stimulated methanogenesis, but methanogenic bacteria could not compete for H2 with the sulfate-respiring bacteria.

  19. Leukocyte Count and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate as Diagnostic Factors in Febrile Convulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Rahbarimanesh; Peyman Salamati; Mohammadreza Ashrafi; Manelie Sadeghi; Javad Tavakoli

    2011-01-01

    "nFebrile convulsion (FC) is the most common seizure disorder in childhood. white blood cell (WBC) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are commonly measured in FC. Trauma, vomiting and bleeding can also lead to WBC and ESR so the blood tests must carefully be interpreted by the clinician. In this cross sectional study 410 children(163 with FC), aged 6 months to 5 years, admitted to Bahrami Children hospital in the first 48 hours of their febrile disease, either with or without seizu...

  20. Sediment reservoirs and sediment fluxes in high mountain environments: how does sediment move through the system at the decadal scale?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletti, Natan; Lambiel, Christophe; Lane, Stuart N.

    2016-04-01

    Faced with rapid climate warming over recent decades, high mountain systems are likely to respond dramatically because of: (1) the vulnerability of permafrost, glacial and nival processes to temperature and precipitation changes; (2) the ample availability of unconsolidated, potentially mobile sediments left after deglaciation; and (3) steep slopes, that potentially aid sediment mobilization. We no surprisingly know little about these processes over the decadal scale because the geomorphic response is often complex, spatially and temporally, and there is little history of decadal scale measurement of these systems. In this paper, we focus upon a number of basins in the Southern Swiss Alps, with a wide range of primary sediment transfer mechanisms and altitude ranges up to 1,800 to 3,600 m asl. We are able to combine a set of unique data on: (1) erosion/deposition processes (derived from combined geomorphological maps and photogrammetrically-derived Digital Elevation Models); (2) sediment flux based upon tracking sediment using image correlation; (3) sediment connection quantified using a new approach to handle DEM noise; (4) changing stream sediment transport capacity derived from hydrodynamic modeling applied to long time series of river flow; and (5) sediment export measured at intakes flushed periodically as part of hydropower management. Results suggest a distinct landscape response to climatic forcing. A progressive acceleration of surface displacements for different landforms is observed throughout the last five decades. We observed that, with the beginning of a warmer period in the 1980s, glacier retreat and enhanced snowmelt caused water yield to increase considerably for various watersheds. This translates into enhancement of sediment transport capacities, which in combination with the intensification of landscape dynamics (greater erosion rates) explains the increase flushing frequency and hence sediment export registered in the basins. However, whilst

  1. Incipient motion of surf zone sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Donya; Foster, Diane; Sou, In Mei; Calantoni, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Incipient motion experiments were conducted with natural gravel, acetate beads, and coarse-gravel-sized electronic grains called Smart Sediment Grains in a Small-Oscillatory Flow Tunnel. Measurements of fluid velocity were made using Particle Image Velocimetry. The strength of the fluid shear stresses and the pressure gradients were examined for a range of oscillatory flow conditions at the onset of motion of the sediment particles to determine which mechanism had induced particle motion. The three sediment types utilized in these experiments facilitated an assessment of the effects of sediment grain size diameter, shape, and density on incipient motion. Results suggested that the onset of sediment motion was dominated by the pressure gradients for flows with small orbital excursion amplitudes, by the shear stresses for flows with large orbital excursion amplitudes and by the combined effects for intermediate flows. The denser, angular gravel required greater free-stream accelerations to trigger sediment motion than the spherical, less dense acetate beads, and Smart Sediment Grains. A combined parameter for incipient motion that accounts for the simultaneous effects of both shear stresses and pressure gradients while depending on the static coefficient of friction and the packing concentration of the mobile bed layer was evaluated for accuracy using a range of sediment types. The results suggested that the combined parameter may be a better indicator of sediment mobilization under oscillatory flows than the typically assumed shear stress criterion.

  2. Release of metals from anoxic sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Mørk; Jacobsen, Gitte

    The Bornholm Deep is anoxic every summer, and samples were collected in the fall 2012 and stored dark and cold (4°C in climate room), degassing regularly with Ar(g) to keep the overlying water column anoxic. Nine sediments columns were selected and divided into three groups, (1) where the water w...... without crabs, but cloudy, indicating re-suspension in the group with crabs. The metal release from sediments will be discussed in the context of re-oxygenation of anoxic or low-oxic sediments and the effect of organism that digs into the sediment in recently re-oxidised bottom waters....

  3. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Remember Clinical Trials What is high blood pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against ... filtering units called nephrons. [ Top ] How does high blood pressure affect the kidneys? High blood pressure can damage ...

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead an active, normal life. What Is Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the force that blood puts on ... and medications. continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  5. Upstream sediment input effects on experimental dune trough scour in sediment mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinhans, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding causes of dune irregularity, especially dune trough scour, is important for the modeling of vertical sorting of sediment mixtures in morphological models of rivers with sediment mixtures. Sediment in dunes is generally sorted in a fining-upward manner, which affects the sediment transport composition depending on the scour depth distribution of the dunes. Why dunes become more irregular and develop deep scour holes in some conditions is only partially understood. Moreover, there...

  6. Development of a reference artificial sediment for chemical testing adapted to the MELA sediment contact assay

    OpenAIRE

    Le Bihanic, Florane; Perrichon, Prescilla; Landi, Laure; Clerandeau, Christelle; Le Menach, Karyn; Budzinski, Helene; Cousin, Xavier; Cachot, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Most persistent organic pollutants, due to their hydrophobic properties, accumulate in aquatic sediments and represent a high risk for sediment quality. To assess the toxicity of hydrophobic pollutants, a novel approach was recently proposed as an alternative to replace, refine and reduce animal experimentation: the medaka embryo–larval sediment contact assay (MELAc). This assay is performed with Japanese medaka embryos incubated on a natural sediment spiked with the compound being tested. Wi...

  7. Globalisation and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert

    2009-05-01

    Globalisation may be viewed as the growing interdependence of countries worldwide through the increasing volume and variety of cross-border transactions in goods and services, and also through the more rapid and widespread diffusion of technology. Globalisation is not just an economic phenomenon, although it is frequently described as such, but includes commerce, disease and travel, and immigration, and as such it affects blood safety and supply in various ways. The relatively short travel times offered by modern aviation can result in the rapid spread of blood-borne pathogens before measures to counteract transmission can be put in place; this would have happened with SARS if the basic life cycle of the SARS virus included an asymptomatic viraemia. This risk can be amplified by ecological factors which effect the spread of these pathogens once they are transferred to a naïve ecosystem, as happened with West Nile Virus (WNV) in North America. The rationalization and contraction of the plasma products industry may be viewed as one aspect of globalisation imposed by the remorseless inevitability of the market; the effect of this development on the safety and supply of products has yet to be seen, but the oversight and assurance of a shrinking number of players will present particular challenges. Similarly, the monopolization of technology, through patent enforcement which puts access beyond the reach of developing countries, can have an effect on blood safety. The challenges presented to blood safety by globalisation are heightening the tensions between the traditional focus on the product safety - zero risk paradigm and the need to view the delivery of safe blood as an integrated process. As an illustration of this tension, donor deferral measures imposed by globalisation-induced risks such as vCJD and WNV have resulted in the loss of the safest and most committed portion of the blood donor population in many Western countries, leading to an increased risk to

  8. Globalisation and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert

    2009-05-01

    Globalisation may be viewed as the growing interdependence of countries worldwide through the increasing volume and variety of cross-border transactions in goods and services, and also through the more rapid and widespread diffusion of technology. Globalisation is not just an economic phenomenon, although it is frequently described as such, but includes commerce, disease and travel, and immigration, and as such it affects blood safety and supply in various ways. The relatively short travel times offered by modern aviation can result in the rapid spread of blood-borne pathogens before measures to counteract transmission can be put in place; this would have happened with SARS if the basic life cycle of the SARS virus included an asymptomatic viraemia. This risk can be amplified by ecological factors which effect the spread of these pathogens once they are transferred to a naïve ecosystem, as happened with West Nile Virus (WNV) in North America. The rationalization and contraction of the plasma products industry may be viewed as one aspect of globalisation imposed by the remorseless inevitability of the market; the effect of this development on the safety and supply of products has yet to be seen, but the oversight and assurance of a shrinking number of players will present particular challenges. Similarly, the monopolization of technology, through patent enforcement which puts access beyond the reach of developing countries, can have an effect on blood safety. The challenges presented to blood safety by globalisation are heightening the tensions between the traditional focus on the product safety - zero risk paradigm and the need to view the delivery of safe blood as an integrated process. As an illustration of this tension, donor deferral measures imposed by globalisation-induced risks such as vCJD and WNV have resulted in the loss of the safest and most committed portion of the blood donor population in many Western countries, leading to an increased risk to

  9. The heritability of blood donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Birger; Axel, Skytthe; Rostgaard, Klaus;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voluntary blood donation is believed to be mostly motivated by altruism. Because studies have suggested that altruistic personality is determined by both genetic and environmental factors, we speculated that willingness to donate blood could also be governed by constitutional factors...... active Danish blood donors from 2002 to 2012, to establish blood donor status for Danish twins, who at age 17 years became eligible for donation in 2002 or later. Casewise concordance in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins were presented and heritability was estimated in Mx by variance component...... to donate blood, respectively. CONCLUSION: Becoming a volunteer blood donor is determined by both genetic and environmental factors shared within families....

  10. ESTUARINE AND COASTAL SEDIMENTATION PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leo C.VAN RIJN

    2005-01-01

    This keynote lecture addresses engineering sedimentation problems in estuarine and coastal environments and practical solutions of these problems based on the results of field measurements,laboratory scale models and numerical models. The three most basic design rules are: (1) try to understand the physical system based on available field data; perform new field measurements if the existing field data set is not sufficient (do not reduce on the budget for field measurements); (2) try to estimate the morphological effects of engineering works based on simple methods (rules of thumb,simplified models,analogy models,i.e. comparison with similar cases elsewhere); and (3) use detailed models for fine-tuning and determination of uncertainties (sensitivity study trying to find the most influencial parameters). Engineering works should be designed in such a way that side effects (sand trapping,sand starvation,downdrift erosion) are minimum. Furthermore,engineering works should be designed and constructed or built in harmony rather than in conflict with nature. This 'building with nature' approach requires a profound understanding of the sediment transport processes in morphological systems.

  11. Environmental records of lacustrine sediments in different time scales:Sediment grain size as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing'an; WAN Guojiang; David Dian Zhang; ZHANG Feng; HUANG Ronggui

    2004-01-01

    Sediment grain size is a conventional proxy of climatic changes. Larger sediment grain size is often interpreted to indicate dry climate during lower lake level while smaller sediment grain size implies wet climate during higher lake level. Through detailed study on sediment grain sizes in Lake Erhai and Lake Chenghai, this paper reveals the different indication significances of sediment grain sizes in different time scales, different resolution investigations. For long time-scale and low resolution (102a or 103a) studies, larger sediment grain size indicates lower lake level, smaller lake area and drier climate while smaller sediment grain size indicates higher lake level, larger lake area and wetter climate. For short time-scale and high resolution (a or 10a) studies, larger sediment grain size reflects more rainfall and wetter climate while smaller sediment grain size reflects less rainfall and drier climate. Environmental information revealed by lacustrine sediment records is often different in different time scales because of the variance of sedimentation resolution, sampling resolution and dating precision. Therefore, paleoclimate implications of environmental proxies in long time-scale and low resolution investigations could not be mechanically applied to short time-scale and high resolution studies. Only after synthetically analyzing the influence manner and extent of all factors on the sediment records in different time scales, can credible conclusions be obtained.

  12. Environmental records of lacustrine sediments in different time scales: Sediment grain size as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Jing'an; WAN; Guojiang; David; Dian; Zhang; ZHANG; F

    2004-01-01

    Sediment grain size is a conventional proxy of climatic changes. Larger sediment grain size is often interpreted to indicate dry climate during lower lake level while smaller sediment grain size implies wet climate during higher lake level. Through detailed study on sediment grain sizes in Lake Erhai and Lake Chenghai, this paper reveals the different indication significances of sediment grain sizes in different time scales, different resolution investigations. For long time-scale and low resolution (102a or 103a) studies, larger sediment grain size indicates lower lake level, smaller lake area and drier climate while smaller sediment grain size indicates higher lake level, larger lake area and wetter climate. For short time-scale and high resolution (a or 10a) studies, larger sediment grain size reflects more rainfall and wetter climate while smaller sediment grain size reflects less rainfall and drier climate. Environmental information revealed by lacustrine sediment records is often different in different time scales because of the variance of sedimentation resolution, sampling resolution and dating precision. Therefore, paleoclimate implications of environmental proxies in long time-scale and low resolution investigations could not be mechanically applied to short time-scale and high resolution studies. Only after synthetically analyzing the influence manner and extent of all factors on the sediment records in different time scales, can credible conclusions be obtained.

  13. Dating sediment in a fast sedimentation reservoir using 137Cs and 210Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 10,000 reservoirs have been constructed in agricultural watersheds in the United States since the 1940s to control floods and sediments. Reservoir sedimentation records provide a unique opportunity to retrospectively study the effects of land use changes and climate variations on sediment produ...

  14. Evaluating sediment storage dams: structural off-site sediment trapping measures in northwest Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekonnen, M.M.; Keesstra, S.D.; Baartman, J.E.M.; Ritsema, C.J.; Melesse, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Reservoir and lake sedimentation is a vital problem in Ethiopia. Constructing small and medium size dams at the outlets of sub-catchments within larger catchment helps to reduce the transport of sediment downstream to reservoirs or lakes. This study assessed the sediment trapping efficacy (STE) of s

  15. Cross-shore suspended sediment transport in the surf zone: A fieldbased parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Black, Kerry; Greenwood, Brian

    2002-01-01

    sediment transport, sediment concentrations, incident waves, undertow, morphodynamics, beach processes......sediment transport, sediment concentrations, incident waves, undertow, morphodynamics, beach processes...

  16. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  17. Blood rheology and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Başkurt, Oğuz K.; Simmonds, Michael J. ; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Journal of Geriatric Cardiology (2013) 10: 291301 ©2013 JGC All rights reserved; www.jgc301.com http://www.jgc301.com; | Journal of Geriatric Cardiology Review  Open Access  Blood rheology and aging Michael J. Simmonds1, Herbert J. Meiselman2, Oguz K. Baskurt3 1Heart Foundation Research Centre, Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Keck School of Medicine, University of S...

  18. Blood Flow Multiscale Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; Mijović, Budimir; Nikolić, Tatjana

    2007-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease is one of most frequent cause deaths in modern society. The objective of this work is analyse the effect of dynamic vascular geometry (curvature, torsion,bifurcation) and pulsatile blood nature on secondary flow, wall shear stress and platelet deposition. The problem was examined as multi-scale physical phenomena using perturbation analysis and numerical modelling. The secondary flow determined as influence pulsatile pressure, vascular tube time-dependen...

  19. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fuentes

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a blood pressure monitor which measures both the high blood pressure (systolic pressure,and the low blood pressure (diastolic pressure. It is a semiautomatic meter because the inflation of the occlusivecuff is carried out in a manual way. The transducer used is a piezoresistive silicon pressure sensor integrated onchip which provides a proportional voltage to the input pressure, with a measurement range from 0 to 50 kPa (0–7.3 PSI. The oscillometric method is employed, which consists on detecting the oscillometric signal on brachialartery, being processed at each pressure step, when the cuff is gradually deflated. Signal sampling is carried out ata rate determined by the heart rate.In order to program the digital electronics of the circuit we used Altera tools, with the compiler MAX-PLUS II, andthe device selected to implement the design was an EPM7128SLC84-15 CPLD (Complex Programmable LogicDevice

  20. Quantifying sediment connectivity in Wadi Al-Arab (NW Jordan) using a sediment budget approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, Sabine; Pöppl, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    Due to data scarcity, sediment connectivity most often only qualitatively describes the potential transfer of sediments through a landscape. However, quantitative information on sediment delivery is of special relevance for modelling approaches as well as for sustainable land and water management, especially in water scarce regions such as Jordan, where valuable water reservoirs suffer from sediment pollution. Measurements are needed to quantify sediment outputs of the different land units and to trace their pathways though the catchments. This study uses the outcomes of a multiple response sediment budget approach conducted in the Wadi al-Arab catchment in northwest Jordan (263.5 km²) to quantify sediment connectivity. The catchment shows a Mediterranean to semi arid climate and consists of carbonatic and marly geology of the Upper Cretaceous. The topography ranges from rolling hills in the East to steeper mountainous areas in the North and West were olive orchards are the main agricultural use. Soil erosion measurements in the main land use units and relevant sediment sources, such as olive orchards, agricultural fields, and natural vegetated slopes uncovered the potential ranges of soil erosion rates in these units. Furthermore, the annual sediment yield in the Wadi Al Arab water reservoir was calculated. With the extrapolation of the erosion rates of the main contributing land use units and the annual sediment amount that reaches the sink, a maximum value of lateral sediment connectivity could be quantified, reaching up to 18%. A multiple sediment fingerprint method was used to delineate the relative contribution of each measured source to the sink based on the lake sediment samples. Supported by additional 137Cs analysis of terrace samples and a survey of the Wadi bed a high longitudinal connectivity could be derived. The applied method mix allowed the quantification of lateral sediment connectivity on catchment scale and gave a comprehensive understanding of

  1. Accounting for Long Term Sediment Storage in a Watershed Scale Numerical Model for Suspended Sediment Routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, J. J.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Skalak, K.; Karwan, D. L.; Benthem, A.; Ackerman, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the delivery of suspended sediment from upland sources to downstream receiving waters is important for watershed management, but current routing models fail to accurately represent lag times in delivery resulting from sediment storage. In this study, we route suspended sediment tagged by a characteristic tracer using a 1-dimensional model that implicitly includes storage and remobilization processes and timescales. From an input location where tagged sediment is added, the model advects suspended sediment downstream at the velocity of the stream (adjusted for the intermittency of transport events). Deposition rates are specified by the fraction of the suspended load stored per kilometer of downstream transport (presumably available from a sediment budget). Tagged sediment leaving storage is evaluated from a convolution equation based on the probability distribution function (pdf) of sediment storage waiting times; this approach avoids the difficulty of accurately representing complex processes of sediment remobilization from floodplain and other deposits. To illustrate the role of storage on sediment delivery, we compare exponential and bounded power-law waiting time pdfs with identical means of 94 years. In both cases, the median travel time for sediment to reach the depocenter in fluvial systems less than 40km long is governed by in-channel transport and is unaffected by sediment storage. As the channel length increases, however, the median sediment travel time reflects storage rather than in-channel transport; travel times do not vary significantly between the two different waiting time functions. At distances of 50, 100, and 200 km, the median travel time for suspended sediment is 36, 136, and 325 years, orders of magnitude slower than travel times associated with in-channel transport. These computations demonstrate that storage can be neglected for short rivers, but for longer systems, storage controls the delivery of suspended sediment.

  2. High blood pressure and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007483.htm High blood pressure and diet To use the sharing features on ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ...

  3. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done ... provider’s office or clinic. To prepare for the test: Don’t drink coffee or smoke cigarettes for ...

  4. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... track blood pressure readings over a period of time, the health care provider may ask you to ... the office on different days and at different times to take your blood pressure. The health care ...

  5. Have You Given Blood Lately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testing: After donation, blood establishments are required to test each unit of donated blood for the following infectious disease agents: · Hepatitis B · Hepatitis C · Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) 1 and ...

  6. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters September 26, 2011 Genes that Influence Blood Pressure In one of the ... 16 previously unknown variations. Six were found in genes already suspected of regulating blood pressure. The remaining ...

  7. Low blood sugar symptoms (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nervousness and irritability are signs that a person's blood sugar is getting dangerously low. A person showing any of these symptoms should check their blood sugar. If the level is low (70 mg/dl), ...

  8. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2016:chap 73. Read More Acute kidney failure Acute pancreatitis Alanine transaminase (ALT) blood test ALP - blood test Burns Cardiac catheterization Enzyme Heart attack Hemolytic anemia Hepatic Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Liver disease Mononucleosis Muscular ...

  9. Flushable reagent stool blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stool occult blood test - flushable home test; Fecal occult blood test - flushable home test ... This test is performed at home with disposable pads. You can buy the pads at the drug store without ...

  10. Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your health care team. What are target blood sugar levels for people with diabetes? A target is something ... gly- see -mee-uh). It means that your blood sugar level is higher than your target level or over ...

  11. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  12. What Causes High Blood Cholesterol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes High Blood Cholesterol? Many factors can affect the cholesterol levels in your blood. You can control some ... but not others. Factors You Can Control Diet Cholesterol is found in foods that come from animal ...

  13. Denitrification in marine sediments: A model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Herman, P.M.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    1996-01-01

    The rate and factors controlling denitrification in marine sediments have been investigated using a prognostic diagenetic model. The model is forced with observed carbon fluxes, bioturbation and sedimentation rates, and bottom water conditions. It can reproduce rates of aerobic mineralization, denit

  14. Sediment retention in rangeland riparian buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Paul B

    2003-01-01

    Controlling nonpoint-source sediment pollution is a common goal of riparian management, but there is little quantitative information about factors affecting performance of rangeland riparian buffers. This study evaluated the influence of vegetation characteristics, buffer width, slope, and stubble height on sediment retention in a Montana foothills meadow. Three vegetation types (sedge wetland, rush transition, bunchgrass upland) were compared using twenty-six 6- x 2-m plots spanning 2 to 20% slopes. Plots were clipped moderately (10-15 cm stubble) or severely (2-5 cm stubble). Sediment (silt + fine sand) was added to simulated overland runoff 6, 2, or 1 m above the bottom of each plot. Runoff was sampled at 15-s to > 5-min intervals until sediment concentrations approached background levels. Sediment retention was affected strongly by buffer width and moderately by vegetation type and slope, but was not affected by stubble height. Mean sediment retention ranged from 63 to > 99% for different combinations of buffer width and vegetation type, with 94 to 99% retention in 6-m-wide buffers regardless of vegetation type or slope. Results suggest that rangeland riparian buffers should be at least 6 m wide, with dense vegetation, to be effective and reliable. Narrower widths, steep slopes, and sparse vegetation increase risk of sediment delivery to streams. Vegetation characteristics such as biomass, cover, or density are more appropriate than stubble height for judging capacity to remove sediment from overland runoff, though stubble height may indirectly indicate livestock impacts that can affect buffer performance. PMID:12809315

  15. Sediment transport capacity of hyperconcentrated flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As one of the most important components of river mechanics,sediment transport capacity of sediment-laden flows has attracted much attention from many researchers working on river mechanics and hydraulic engineering. Based on the time-averaged equation for a turbulent energy equilibrium in solid and liquid two-phase flow,an expression for the efficiency coefficient of suspended load movement was derived for the two-dimensional,steady,uniform,fully-developed turbulent flow. A new structural expression of sediment transport capacity was achieved. Using 115 runs of flume experimental data,which were obtained through two kinds of sediment transport experiments in the state of equilibrium,in combination with the basic rheological and sediment transporting characteristics of hyperconcentrated flow,the main parameters in the structural expression of sediment transport capacity were calibrated,and a new formula of sediment transport capacity for hyperconcentrated flow was developed. A large amount of field data from the Yellow River,Wuding River,and Yangtze River,etc. were adopted to verify the new formula and good agreement was obtained. These results above contribute to an improved theoretical system of river mechanics and a reliable tool for management of rivers carrying high concentration of sediments.

  16. Bioavailability of Metals in Contaminated Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paller M. H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Bioavailability controls the transfer of metals from sediments to ecological receptors and humans. It can rarely be predicted from total metal concentrations because it is affected by metal geochemistry in sediments as well as the biochemistry, physiology, and behavior of benthic organisms. There is no single approach for including bioavailability in risk assessments because of variability in site specific conditions and the difficulty of validating methods. Acid-volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted metals are useful in predicting bioavailability in anoxic sediments containing sulfides that react to form insoluble metal complexes. This method can be improved by adjusting for organic carbon and other ligands that also bind free metals. Site-specific desorption Kd values calculated by sequential extraction methods can be useful in predicting bioavailable metal fractions in oxic and anoxic sediments. A modified desorption distribution coefficient (Kdg can be calculated by extraction with the digestive gut fluids of sediment feeding organisms to account for the effects of ingestion on metal release from sediments. Recently developed in situ measurement technologies can accumulate dissolved metals in a controlled fashion that may correspond with bioavailable metal fractions in sediment. Successful evaluation of bioavailability requires the selection of methods suitable for the organisms and sediment environments under consideration. A weight-of-evidence approach that incorporates multiple lines of evidence can help address uncertainties and increase the likelihood of incorporating bioavailability into remedial decisions.

  17. On luminescence bleaching of tidal channel sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Pejrup, Morten; Murray, Andrew S.;

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the processes responsible for bleaching of the quartz OSL signal from tidal channel sediment. Tidal dynamics are expected to play an important role for complete bleaching of tidal sediments. However, no studies have examined the amount of reworking occurring in tidal channels and o...

  18. Accumulation and effects of sediment-associated silver nanoparticles to sediment-dwelling invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, Tina; Forbes, Valery E; Gilliland, Douglas;

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is increasingly recognized as the major sink for contaminants including nanoparticles (NPs). Thus, sediment-living organisms are especially susceptible to NP exposure. Studies of the fate and effects of NPs in the sediment matrix are still in their infancy, and data from such studies are...... in high demand. Here, we examine the effects of exposure to sediment mixed with either aqueous Ag (administered as AgNO3) or Ag NPs (13 nm, citrate-capped) at a nominal exposure concentration of 100 μg Ag/g dry weight sediment on four benthic invertebrates: two clones of the gastropod Potamopyrgus...

  19. Transfusions of blood and blood products and viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wróblewska

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfusions of blood and blood products are commonly used in medicine, but being biological materials they carry a risk of transmitting infections--viral, bacterial, parasitic, as well as prions. Laboratory tests used for screening of donated blood for viral infections at present cannot detect all infectious units. Criteria for selection of blood donors therefore must be very strict, while methods of inactivation of viruses and laboratory assays for detection of their presence must be improved. Indications for blood transfusion should be restricted.

  20. Sediment chemoautotrophy in the coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Cardenas, Diana; Meysman, Filip J. R.; van Breugel, Peter; Boschker, Henricus T. S.

    2016-04-01

    A key process in the biogeochemistry of coastal sediments is the reoxidation of reduced intermediates formed during anaerobic mineralization which in part is performed by chemoautotrophic micro-organisms. These microbes fix inorganic carbon using the energy derived from reoxidation reactions and in doing so can fix up to 32% of the CO2 released by mineralization. However the importance and distribution of chemoautotrophy has not been systematically investigated in these environments. To address these issues we surveyed nine coastal sediments by means of bacterial biomarker analysis (phospholipid derived fatty acids) combined with stable isotope probing (13C-bicarbonate) which resulted in an almost doubling of the number of observations on coastal sedimentary chemoautotrophy. Firstly, sediment chemoautotrophy rates from this study and rates compiled from literature (0.07 to 36 mmol C m‑2 d‑1) showed a power-law relation with benthic oxygen uptake (3.4 to 192 mmol O2 m‑2 d‑1). Benthic oxygen uptake was used as a proxy for carbon mineralization to calculate the ratio of the CO2 fixed by chemoautotrophy over the total CO2 released through mineralization. This CO2 efficiency was 3% in continental shelf, 9% in nearshore and 21% in salt marsh sediments. These results suggest that chemoautotrophy plays an important role in C-cycling in reactive intertidal sediments such as salt marshes rather than in the organic-poor, permeable continental shelf sediments. Globally in the coastal ocean our empirical results show that chemoautotrophy contributes ˜0.05 Pg C y‑1 which is four times less than previous estimates. Secondly, five coastal sediment regimes were linked to the depth-distribution of chemoautotrophy: 1) permeable sediments dominated by advective porewater transport, 2) bioturbated sediments, and cohesive sediments dominated by diffusive porewater transport characterized by either 3) canonical sulfur oxidation, 4) nitrate-storing Beggiatoa, or 5) electrogenic

  1. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose high blood pressure when blood pressure ... and painless and can be done in a health care provider’s office or clinic. To prepare for the ...

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure For most patients, health care providers diagnose high ... are consistently 140/90 mmHg or above. Confirming High Blood Pressure A blood pressure test is easy and painless ...

  3. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. Using the results of your blood pressure test, your health care provider will diagnose prehypertension or high blood pressure ... same age, gender, and height . Once your health care provider ... he or she can order additional tests to determine if your blood pressure is due ...

  4. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Stroke and High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 6,2015 Stroke is a leading ... heart disease and stroke. Start exploring today ! High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  5. Living with High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is to talk ... care provider and take steps to control your blood pressure by making healthy lifestyle changes and taking medications, ...

  6. Potassium and High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Potassium and High Blood Pressure Updated:Mar 1,2016 A diet that includes ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  7. Myths about High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Myths About High Blood Pressure Updated:Aug 12,2014 You CAN manage your ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  8. Incipient motion of sediment by waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the forces acting on sediment particles are analyzed in all the aspects. Considering the cohesive force between particles, the additional static water pressure induced by the solid-body characteristics of film water and the inertia force of waves, a unified formula of the incipient motion for both coarse and fine particles is defined. The formula can reflect the variation in the initial velocity of fine particles with the volume weight of sediment. The verification of the formula is carried out by use of both experimental data and field observation data accumulated by experts at home and abroad. The verification shows that the formula expresses the law governing the incipient motion of sediment of all particle sizes inclusive of natural sediment and light-weight materials, and thus a basic formula for the study and solution of sediment problems in estuarine and coastal regions is provided.

  9. Effects of oil sands sediments on fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrott, J.; Colavecchia, M.; Hewitt, L.; Sherry, J.; Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Turcotte, D.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a collaborative project organized by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Panel of Energy Research and Development (PERD) with researchers from Environment Canada and the University of Saskatchewan. The 4-year study was conducted to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments and river waters, and reclamation ponds and sediments on laboratory-raised fish. Three sediments from rivers were evaluated for their potential to cause adverse impacts on fathead minnow eggs and larvae for a period of 18 days. The study monitored hatching, larval survival, development, and growth. Naphthenic acids (NA), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals were measured in the sediments to determine if the compounds can be correlated with observed toxicity. The study will also assess walleye eggs exposed to sediments, and in situ fish exposures. Toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) studies will be conducted to isolate the fractions that may affect fish development and growth.

  10. Uncertainty in tsunami sediment transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Bruce E.; Goto, Kazuhisa; Sugawara, Daisuke; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; La Selle, SeanPaul M.

    2016-01-01

    Erosion and deposition from tsunamis record information about tsunami hydrodynamics and size that can be interpreted to improve tsunami hazard assessment. We explore sources and methods for quantifying uncertainty in tsunami sediment transport modeling. Uncertainty varies with tsunami, study site, available input data, sediment grain size, and model. Although uncertainty has the potential to be large, published case studies indicate that both forward and inverse tsunami sediment transport models perform well enough to be useful for deciphering tsunami characteristics, including size, from deposits. New techniques for quantifying uncertainty, such as Ensemble Kalman Filtering inversion, and more rigorous reporting of uncertainties will advance the science of tsunami sediment transport modeling. Uncertainty may be decreased with additional laboratory studies that increase our understanding of the semi-empirical parameters and physics of tsunami sediment transport, standardized benchmark tests to assess model performance, and development of hybrid modeling approaches to exploit the strengths of forward and inverse models.

  11. Particle reworking in Great Lakes sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollen grain distributions and radioactive fallout horizons observed in sediment cores collected over the past decade have served as tracers of sediment reworking and burial rates for both the marine and lacustrine environments. Errors associated with the analysis of these cores, attributable to biogenic sediment reworking and shipboard handling, have necessitated the development of more precise techniques to measure sediment transport rates. The authors utilize a rare earth element tracer technique, which takes advantage of the high neutron-capture cross-section of samarium oxide, and neutron activation analysis, to trace the burial and lateral transport rates of surficial sediments in the littoral (SCUBA diver depths) and profundal (manned submersible depths) of the Great Lakes

  12. Grain sedimentation inside giant planet embryos

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2010-01-01

    In the context of massive fragmenting protoplanetary discs, Boss (1998) suggested that grains can grow and sediment inside giant planet embryos formed at R ~ 5 AU away from the star. Several authors since then criticised the suggestion. Convection may prevent grain sedimentation, and the embryos cannot even form so close to the parent star as cooling is too inefficient at these distances. Here we reconsider the grain sedimentation process suggested by Boss (1998) but inside an embryo formed, as expected in the light of the cooling constraints, at R ~ 100 AU. Such embryos are much less dense and are also cooler. We make analytical estimates of the process and also perform simple spherically symmetric radiation hydrodynamics simulations to test these ideas. We find that convection in our models does not become important before a somewhat massive (~ an Earth mass, this is clarified in a followup paper) solid core is built. Turbulent mixing slows down dust sedimentation but is overwhelmed by grain sedimentation w...

  13. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF RESERVOIR SEDIMENTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jinchi

    2001-01-01

    Reliable quantitative estimation of bed aggradation or degradation is important for river-training and water management projects. With the development of water resources, sediment problems associated with a dam are becoming more severe. This paper describes some special problems in mathematical model for calculation of degradation and aggradation in a reservoir. The main efforts of this study are on the treatment of some physical processes of fine sediment transport (<0.05 mm). Problems in a reservoir are obviously different from a natural stream, such as the turbid current flow, orifice sediment flushing;and the initiation and consolidation of cohesive sediment deposition. The case of Liujiaxia Reservoir,which is located in the upper reaches of the Yellow River, is employed to verify the model. The results show that the model is applicable in the evaluation of an engineering planing with plenty of fine sediment movement.

  14. Sediment transport in rivers, estuaries and harbours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proper understanding of sediment transport phenomena both in terms of quality i.e. direction of sediment transport and quantity i.e. rate of sediment transport and deposition is necessary in : (1) development and maintenance of coastal harbours and appurtenance works such as approach channels, location of sand traps and selection of spoil dumping grounds, (2) deepening of harbours and dredging of channels in estuarine environment, (3) assessing life of a reservoir of a power/irrigation project and (4) silting study of irrigation system. Radioactive tracers have been mainly used in studying the movement of sediment in the coastal areas. Techniques are being developed for quantitative estimation of sediment transport. These techniques and their limitations are discussed. (M.G.B.)

  15. Effects of oil sands sediments on fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper described a collaborative project organized by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Panel of Energy Research and Development (PERD) with researchers from Environment Canada and the University of Saskatchewan. The 4-year study was conducted to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments and river waters, and reclamation ponds and sediments on laboratory-raised fish. Three sediments from rivers were evaluated for their potential to cause adverse impacts on fathead minnow eggs and larvae for a period of 18 days. The study monitored hatching, larval survival, development, and growth. Naphthenic acids (NA), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals were measured in the sediments to determine if the compounds can be correlated with observed toxicity. The study will also assess walleye eggs exposed to sediments, and in situ fish exposures. Toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) studies will be conducted to isolate the fractions that may affect fish development and growth.

  16. [Distributions of phosphorus fractions in suspended sediments and surface sediments of Tiaoxi mainstreams and cause analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Long; Yuan, Xu-Yin; Wang, Huan; Li, Zheng-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan

    2015-02-01

    Phosphorus is a primary nutrient showing the water quality status of river and inducing eutrophication, and a different phosphorus fraction can make diverse contributions to water quality. Four phosphorus forms of suspended sediments and surface sediments in Tiaoxi mainstreams were measured using a sequential extraction procedure, and the distributions of their forms were discussed. The results showed that the tropic status of Xitiaoxi River was inferior to that of Dongtiaoxi River as a whole, and the water quality in the middle reach of Dongtiaoxi River was better than that in the upper and lower reaches. The contents of nutrient elements in suspended sediments were significantly higher than those in surface sediment, which indicated an enrichment of nutrient in fine sediment. The percentages of the loosely absorbed phosphorus ( NH4Cl-P), the reductant phosphorus (BD-P) and the metal oxide bound phosphorus (NaOH-P) in the suspended sediment were higher than those in surface sediment, while the percentage of the calcium bound phosphorus (HCl-P) showed a reverse trend. Correlation analyses between phosphorus forms and chemical compositions of suspended sediments and surface sediments were performed. The results showed the phosphorus forms in suspended sediments and surface sediments of Xitiaoxi River had weak relationships with mineral components, while those in the Dongtiaoxi River had strong relationships with mineral, especially OM and clay mineral. The cause was associated with the geological setting and material sources in Tiaoxi watershed. PMID:26031071

  17. Evaluation of upland disposal of Oakland Harbor, California, sediment; Volume I: Turning basin sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Tatem, H.E.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.; Folsom, B.L.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes testing and evaluation performed by the Environmental Laboratory of the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station on sediment from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor, Oakland, CA. Test protocols from the Corps' Management Strategy for Disposal of Dredged Material were used in the present evaluation to determine the potential for migration of contaminants into effluent, surface runoff, leachates, plants, and animals at an upland disposal site. Two sediments from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor were tested: a composite sample of cores taken from the surface to 38-ft depth (upper sediment) and a composite sample of cores taken from 38- to 45-ft depth (lower sediment). In addition, two potential disposal site soils were tested: Twitchell Island and 7th Street disposal site. Sediment characterization indicated that the Oakland upper sediment contained higher concentrations of most contaminants than the lower sediment. Metal concentrations in the Oakland lower sediment were in the range of values found at the Twitchell Island disposal site. The Oakland upper sediment contained levels of cadmium and arsenic similar to those in Twitchell Island levee soils, but higher levels of zinc, nickel, lead, and copper.... Contaminant migration, Sediment testing, Contaminated sediments, Upland disposal, Dredged material.

  18. Membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator for point-of-care applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael; Gross, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Collman, Ronald G.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Often, high sensitivity, point of care, clinical tests, such as HIV viral load, require large volumes of plasma. Although centrifuges are ubiquitously used in clinical laboratories to separate plasma from whole blood, centrifugation is generally inappropriate for on-site testing. Suitable alternatives are not readily available to separate the relatively large volumes of plasma from milliliters of blood that may be needed to meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low abundance target molecules. We report on a simple to use, low-cost, pump-free, membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from undiluted whole blood within minutes. This plasma separator consists of an asymmetric, porous, polysulfone membrane housed in a disposable chamber. The separation process takes advantage of both gravitational sedimentation of blood cells and size exclusion-based filtration. The plasma separator demonstrated a “blood in-plasma out” capability, consistently extracting 275 ±33.5 μL of plasma from 1.8 mL of undiluted whole blood in less than 7 min. The device was used to separate plasma laden with HIV viruses from HIV virus-spiked whole blood with recovery efficiencies of 95.5% ± 3.5%, 88.0% ± 9.5%, and 81.5% ± 12.1% for viral loads of 35,000, 3,500 and 350 copies/mL, respectively. The separation process is self-terminating to prevent excessive hemolysis. The HIV-laden plasma was then injected into our custom-made microfluidic chip for nucleic acid Testing And Was Successfully Subjected To Reverse Transcriptase Loop mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), demonstrating that the plasma is sufficiently pure to support high efficiency nucleic acid amplification. PMID:24099566

  19. Settling velocities in batch sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sedimentation of mixtures containing one and two sizes of spherical particles (44 and 62 μm in diameter) was studied. Radioactive tracing with 57Co was used to measure the settling velocities. The ratio of the settling velocity U of uniformly sized particles to the velocity predicted to Stokes' law U0 was correlated to an expression of the form U/U0 = epsilon/sup α/, where epsilon is the liquid volume fraction and α is an empirical constant, determined experimentally to be 4.85. No effect of viscosity on the ratio U/U0 was observed as the viscosity of the liquid medium was varied from 1x10-3 to 5x10-3 Pa.s. The settling velocities of particles in a bimodal mixture were fit by the same correlation; the ratio U/U0 was independent of the concentrations of different-sized particles

  20. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  1. Interstitial brines in playa sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.F.; Van Denburgh, A.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Rettig, S.L.

    1969-01-01

    Study of several closed drainages in the Great Basin has shown that the interstitial solutions of shallow, fine-grained playa deposits store a large quantity of dissolved solids and are often more concentrated than associated lakes and ponds, except in peripheral zones of stream or ground-water inflow. These interstitial fluids, when compared with local runoff, impoundments, or spring waters, commonly have a distinctive ionic composition which sometimes cannot be explained by either simple mixing of surface and subsurface inflow or by evaporative concentration. At Abert Lake, Oregon, the interstitial solute concentrations increased with depth to values as much as five times greater than the lake, except where springs indicate significant ground-water input. Where Na+, Cl, and CO2 species constitute more than 90% of the solutes, Na+ Cl- ratios in the lake water are lower than in interstitial solutions of bottom cores and higher than in playa fluids. At the same time, Na+ K+ ratios are highest in the fluids of lake bottom muds and lowest in playa interstitials. In deeper playa profiles, interstitial Na+ Cl- tended to decrease with depth (5 ft. maximum). In the Abert Lake area, as in other parts of the western Great Basin, Na+ Cl- ratios are indicative of total CO2 in solution and the effects of organic decay in surficial sediments. These ratios, coupled with data on silica and bulk density, show that higher PCO2 accompanying decay promotes silicate dissolution and hydrogen ion exchange, stripping alkalis from sediment which had preferentially adsorbed K+ when entering the lake. On subsequent loss of pore fluid in the playa regime, silica initially released to solution in the lake environment is readsorbed on dissolution products. ?? 1969.

  2. Hanford contaminated sediment stabilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, L.E.; Key, K.T.; Higley, B.A.

    1977-03-01

    The major problems with radionuclide waste sites in the 200 Area plateau on the Hanford Reservation is the high degree of toxicity or Hazard Index (HI). Transport Factors (TF) are fortunately low but can increase with time and certainly with episodic events such as explosions or earthquakes. Two major tests involving surface affixation were sponsored by the Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company, one by Dowell using M-166 and the other by Battelle-Northwest comparing many different surface affixants. The latex emulsion, M-166, appeared to be well suited for the Hanford desert type area. Of the many surface affixants tested by Battelle-Northwest, Coherex and Aerospray appeared to be the best. As an emergency precaution, 200 barrels of M-166 were purchased for surface affixation in case of a range fire. The subsurface affixants laboratory and field tests include organic polymers, asphalt emulsions, concrete, AM-9, and sodium silicate-calcium chloride-foramide grouts. The applications were second containment (or leak prevention) of subsurface waste tanks and piping, grouting water wells to prevent contamination leaking to the water table, and encompassing cribs, trenches, burial grounds, and other subsurface sediment contaminations. Organic polymers added strength to the soil, but penetration of the viscous liquid was not as deep as desired; it may be good for situations requiring only a few inches penetration, such as well grouting. The asphalt emulsion looked promising as an easily injected well grouting material and it may also be good for encompassing subsurface contaminated sediment plumes. The sodium silicate-calcium chloride-foramide affixant appeared best for second containment of waste tanks but may require the help of asphalt emulsion to ensure good coverage.

  3. Biogenic silicate accumulation in sediments, Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; DAI Jicui; YUAN Huamao; LI Ning; LI Fengye; SUN Song

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that low silicate content in seawater is a major limiting factor to phytoplankton primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. However the reason of Si-limitation remains poorly understood. In the present study we measured the biogenic silicate content and discussed the accumulation of silicate in Jiaozhou Bay sediment. The results show that the biogenic silica content in the sediment of the Jiaozhou Bay is obviously much higher than those in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. The BSi:TN ratios and BSi:16P ratios in the sediment are > 1 and the OC:BSi ratio in sediment is lower than these of Redfield ratio (106:16), indicating that the decomposition rate of OC is much higher than that for BSi in similar conditions. Therefore, the majority of the biogenic silicate was buried and thus did not participate in silicate recycling. Silicate accumulation in sediment may explain why Si limits the phytoplankton growth in the Jiaozhou Bay. Comparing the flux of biogenic silicate from sediments with primary production rate, it can be concluded that only 15.5% of biogenic silicate is hydrolyzed during the journey from surface to bottom in seawater, thus approximate 84.5% of biogenic silicate could reach the bottom. The silicate releasing rate from the sediment to seawater is considerably lower than that of sedimentation of biogenic silicate, indicating silicate accumulation in sediment too. In a word, the silicate accumulation in sediment is the key reason of silicate limiting to phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay.

  4. Numerical modelling of mixed-sediment consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Florent; Le Hir, Pierre; Bassoullet, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Sediment transport modelling in estuarine environments, characterised by cohesive and non-cohesive sediment mixtures, has to consider a time variation of erodibility due to consolidation. Generally, validated by settling column experiments, mud consolidation is now fairly well simulated; however, numerical models still have difficulty to simulate accurately the sedimentation and consolidation of mixed sediments for a wide range of initial conditions. This is partly due to the difficulty to formulate the contribution of sand in the hindered settling regime when segregation does not clearly occur. Based on extensive settling experiments with mud-sand mixtures, the objective of this study was to improve the numerical modelling of mixed-sediment consolidation by focusing on segregation processes. We used constitutive relationships following the fractal theory associated with a new segregation formulation based on the relative mud concentration. Using specific sets of parameters calibrated for each test—with different initial sediment concentration and sand content—the model achieved excellent prediction skills for simulating sediment height evolutions and concentration vertical profiles. It highlighted the model capacity to simulate properly the segregation occurrence for mud-sand mixtures characterised by a wide range of initial conditions. Nevertheless, calibration parameters varied significantly, as the fractal number ranged from 2.64 to 2.77. This study investigated the relevance of using a common set of parameters, which is generally required for 3D sediment transport modelling. Simulations were less accurate but remained satisfactory in an operational approach. Finally, a specific formulation for natural estuarine environments was proposed, simulating correctly the sedimentation-consolidation processes of mud-sand mixtures through 3D sediment transport modelling.

  5. Blood Pump Bearing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  6. Controls on flood and sediment wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Maarten; Lane, Stuart N.; Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of flood wave propagation - celerity and transformation - through a fluvial system is of generic importance for flood forecasting/mitigation. In association with flood wave propagation, sediment wave propagation may induce local erosion and sedimentation, which will affect infrastructure and riparian natural habitats. Through analysing flood and sediment wave propagation, we gain insight in temporal changes in transport capacity (the flood wave) and sediment availability and transport (the sediment wave) along the river channel. Heidel (1956) was amongst the first to discuss the progressive lag of sediment concentration behind the corresponding flood wave based on field measurements. Since then this type of hysteresis has been characterized in a number of studies, but these were often based on limited amount of floods and measurement sites, giving insufficient insight into associated forcing mechanisms. Here, as part of a project concerned with the hydrological and geomorphic forcing of sediment transfer processes in alpine environments, we model the downstream propagation of short duration, high frequency releases of water and sediment (purges) from a flow intake in the Borgne d'Arolla River in south-west Switzerland. A total of >50 events were measured at 1 minute time intervals using pressure transducers and turbidity probes at a number of sites along the river. We show that flood and sediment wave propagation can be well represented through simple convection diffusion models. The models are calibrated/validated to describe the set of measured waves and used to explain the observed variation in wave celerity and diffusion. In addition we explore the effects of controlling factors including initial flow depth, flood height, flood duration, bed roughness, bed slope and initial sediment concentration, on the wave propagation processes. We show that the effects of forcing mechanisms on flood and sediment wave propagation will lead to different

  7. Managing Fine Sediment in Regulated Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    A paradigm useful in managing dams and diversions is that the combined effects of changing flow regime and sediment supply perturb regulated rivers into sediment deficit or sediment surplus. In the U.S. Southwest, large dams constructed on interregional rivers typically create sediment deficit segments >100 km long. Further downstream, sediment surplus may occur if desert tributaries deliver sufficient amounts of fine sediment, such as parts of the Rio Grande, lower Green River, and Colorado River delta. Sediment surplus also occurs on most smaller regional rivers. The protocols for managing rivers perturbed into sediment deficit have been refined for the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam but are nonetheless challenged by externally determined water-supply agreements that require annual water deliveries that sometimes occur when there has been little tributary resupply. Virtually all of the naturally supplied sand to the depleted, 100-km long Marble Canyon comes from the Paria River. The sand delivery rate since 2012 was sufficiently large to trigger short-duration controlled floods under the High Flow Experiment (HFE) Protocol. The sand mass balance of Marble Canyon since 2012 when the HFE Protocol was adopted was positive due to the combination of relatively large sand delivery from the Paria River and average total annual flows. Large total annual flows have the potential to export large amounts of sand and create a negative sand mass balance. Despite the challenge of managing a scarce and highly variable sand supply and occasional years of large reservoir releases, the long-term (2006-2015) sand mass balance for the upstream half of Marble Canyon is indeterminant and is positive for the downstream half of Marble Canyon. The apparent success of managing sand in Grand Canyon under deficit conditions suggests that fine sediment management protocols might be developed for other regulated rivers. Implementation would require establishment of networks of

  8. ORANGE JUICE AND BLOOD PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. VALIM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Blood pressure is the force of blood against artery walls. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg and recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (as the heart contracts over diastolic pressure (as the heart relaxes between beats. High blood pressure (hypertension is defined as chronically elevated high blood pressure, with systolic blood pressure (SBP of 140 mm Hg or greater, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP of 90 mm Hg or greater. High blood pressure (HBP, smoking, abnormal blood lipid levels, obesity and diabetes are risk factors for coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the US. Lifestyle modifications such as engaging in regular physical activity, quitting smoking and eating a healthy diet (limiting intake of saturated fat and sodium and increasing consumption of fiber, fruits and vegetables are advocated for the prevention, treatment, and control of HBP. As multiple factors influence blood pressure, the effects of each factor are typically modest, particularly in normotensive subjects, yet the combined effects can be substantial. Nutrition plays an important role in influencing blood pressure. Orange juice should be included as part of any low sodium diet and/or any blood pressure reducing eating plan, as it is sodium free, fat-free and can help meet recommended levels of potassium intake that may contribute to lower BP.

  9. Blood transfusion economics in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriopoulos, J E; Michail-Merianou, V; Gitona, M

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the organizational structure and the economic impact of blood donation and transfusion in Greece and discusses some alternative aspects of its financing and its costing policy. The cost of blood transfusion is rising in Greece and amounts to nearly 15 billion drachmas per year due to the constant increase in demand and consequently, the price of each unit of blood. The production and distribution of blood on national scale involves meeting the demand for 500.000 units. Blood is mostly given by the friends and relatives of patients (55%) and by voluntary blood donation (30%). Approximately 50% of the blood produced is used in surgery, 20% for cases of beta-thalassaemia, 10% for emergencies and 20% for internal medicine cases. The blood transfusion system is totally funded by the state budget and the value to users is free of charge. The way in which blood is collected and processed differs from one geographical area to another and the unit cost depends on the size of the department concerned, ranging from 60-150 $. The need to control costs and restrain expenditure, in conjunction with guarantees of sufficiency and quality, makes it essential that measures should be taken to introduce economies of scale and encourage competition among blood providers, for increased production, components preparation and rational usage of blood. The introduction of a costing policy becomes necessary in this effort to achieve cost-containment techniques. PMID:8581182

  10. Temporal variability of suspended sediment sources in an alpine catchment combining river/rainfall monitoring and sediment fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Navratil, O.; O. Evrard; Esteves, Michel; C. Legout; Ayrault, S.; Nemery, J.; Mate-Marin, A.; Ahmadi, M; Lefevre, I.; Poirel, A.; Bonte, P.

    2012-01-01

    Influence of the rainfall regime on erosion and transfer of suspended sediment in a 905-km(2) mountainous catchment of the southern French Alps was investigated by combining sediment monitoring, rainfall data, and sediment fingerprinting (based on geochemistry and radionuclide concentrations). Suspended sediment yields were monitored between October 2007 and December 2009 in four subcatchments (22-713km(2)). Automatic sediment sampling was triggered during floods to trace the sediment origin ...

  11. Prediction of sediment load by sediment rating curve and neural network (ANN) in El Kebir catchment, Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhrissa, Z A; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Tourki, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    The annual sediment load of a river is generally determined either from direct measurements of the sediment load throughout the year or from any of the many sediment transport equations that are available today. Due to lack of a long-term sediment concentration data, sediment rating curves and flux estimation are the most widely applied. This paper has investigated the abilities of statistical models to improve the accuracy of streamflow–suspended sediment relationships in daily and annual...

  12. Using sediment 'fingerprints' to assess sediment-budget errors, north Halawa Valley, Oahu, Hawaii, 1991-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, B.R.; DeCarlo, E.H.; Fuller, C.C.; Wong, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    Reliable estimates of sediment-budget errors are important for interpreting sediment-budget results. Sediment-budget errors are commonly considered equal to sediment-budget imbalances, which may underestimate actual sediment-budget errors if they include compensating positive and negative errors. We modified the sediment 'fingerprinting' approach to qualitatively evaluate compensating errors in an annual (1991) fine (<63 ??m) sediment budget for the North Halawa Valley, a mountainous, forested drainage basin on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, during construction of a major highway. We measured concentrations of aeolian quartz and 137Cs in sediment sources and fluvial sediments, and combined concentrations of these aerosols with the sediment budget to construct aerosol budgets. Aerosol concentrations were independent of the sediment budget, hence aerosol budgets were less likely than sediment budgets to include compensating errors. Differences between sediment-budget and aerosol-budget imbalances therefore provide a measure of compensating errors in the sediment budget. The sediment-budget imbalance equalled 25% of the fluvial fine-sediment load. Aerosol-budget imbalances were equal to 19% of the fluvial 137Cs load and 34% of the fluval quartz load. The reasonably close agreement between sediment- and aerosol-budget imbalances indicates that compensating errors in the sediment budget were not large and that the sediment-budget imbalance as a reliable measure of sediment-budget error. We attribute at least one-third of the 1991 fluvial fine-sediment load to highway construction. Continued monitoring indicated that highway construction produced 90% of the fluvial fine-sediment load during 1992. Erosion of channel margins and attrition of coarse particles provided most of the fine sediment produced by natural processes. Hillslope processes contributed relatively minor amounts of sediment.

  13. Modeling sediment deposition from marine outfall jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terfous, Abdelali; Chiban, Samia; Ghenaim, Abdellah

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional model to study the sediment deposition from marine outfall jets. The introduced unidirectional coupling (fluid-sediment) is an appropriate choice in the case of low-concentrated particle-laden jets such as municipal wastewater discharge, where the concentration of particles is small enough and does not affect the hydrodynamic development of the jet in the nearfield. The sedimentation model takes advantage of the preferential concentration phenomenon. The deposition criterion states that the deposition of sediments begins when the vertical component of the entrainment velocity becomes smaller than the settling velocity. Once the deposition process begins, it is controlled by the settling velocity, entrainment velocity, volume flux, and sediment concentration. The deposition along the jet trajectory is expressed by an ordinary differential equation coupled with the liquid phase equations. Experiments of Lane-Serff and Moran [Sedimentation from Buoyant jets. J Hyd Eng. 2005;131(3):166-174], Cuthbertson and Davies [Deposition from particle-laden, round, turbulent, horizontal, buoyant jets in stationary and coflowing receiving fluids. J Hydr Eng. 2008;134(4):390-402], and Lee [Mixing of horizontal sediment laden jets [dissertation]. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong; 2010], chosen from bibliography, are used to validate the model. These experiments cover the cases of horizontal and inclined buoyant jets in stationary ambient, horizontal buoyant jets in co-flow current and nonbuoyant horizontal jets in stationary ambient. Good agreement between the experiments and the obtained simulations is revealed. PMID:26732467

  14. Deposited sediment settlement and consolidation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai-jie Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study deposited sediment settlement and consolidation mechanisms, sediment settlement experiments were conducted using a settlement column. Based on the experimental results, sediment settlement stage definition, excessive pore pressure (EPP dissipation, and consolidation constitutive equations are discussed. Three stages, including the free settlement, hindered settlement, and self-weight consolidation settlement stages, are defined. The results of this study show that sediment settlement is mainly affected by the initial sediment concentration and initial settlement height, and the interface settlement rate is attenuated linearly with time on bilogarithmic scales during the hindered settlement and self-weight consolidation settlement stages. Moreover, the deposited sediment layer in the self-weight consolidation settlement stage experiences large strains, and the settlement amount in this stage is about 32% to 59% of the initial height of deposited sediment. EPP is nonlinearly distributed in the settlement direction, and consolidation settlement is faster than EPP dissipation in the self-weight consolidation settlement stage. Consolidation constitutive equations for the hydraulic conductivity and effective stress, applicable to large-strain consolidation calculation, were also determined and fitted in the power function form.

  15. Global sediment fluxes during the last millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naipal, Victoria; Reick, Christian; Van Oost, Kristof; Hoffmann, Thomas; Pongratz, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Soil redistribution plays an important role in the transport of carbon and nutrients between terrestrial ecosystems. However, quantification of soil redistribution and its effects on the global biogeochemical cycles is currently unknown. This study aims at developing new tools and methods to represent soil redistribution on a global scale, and contribute to the quantification of anthropogenic disturbances to the biogeochemical cycles. We present a new large-scale coarse resolution sediment budget model that can simulate spatial patterns and long-term trends in soil redistribution in floodplains and on hillslope, resulting from external forces such as climate and land use change. First, we validated the model for the Rhine catchment using observed Holocene sediment storage data and observed scaling behavior between sediment storage and catchment area. Then, we applied the model on 20 large river catchments globally, using climate and land cover data from the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) for the last millennium (850 - 2005AD). We show that the model can reproduce current observed sediment yields if uncertainty in the observations is taken into account. Furthermore, we find that the change in erosion rates during the last millennium resulted in a significant increase in sediment storage for different global catchments. We identify land use change as the main driver behind this change in sediment storage. Finally, catchments characteristics, such as area and slope, play an important role in buffering or amplifying the effect of land use and other external forces on the change in erosion and sediment storage.

  16. Erosion, sediment transportation and accumulation in rivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.I.ALEKSEEVSKIY; K.M.BERKOVICH; R.S.CHALOV

    2008-01-01

    The present paper analyses the interrelation between erosion,sediment transportation and accumulation proposed by N.I.Makkaveyev (1908-1983) and its further development in modem studies of river channel processes in Russia.Spatio-temporal linkages between erosion and accumulation are defined considering channel processes at different scales - river longitudinal profile,channel morphological patterns,alluvial bedforms (bars,dunes) and individual sediment particles.Relations between river geomorphic activity,flow transportation capacity and sediment budgets are established (sediment input and output;channel bed erosion and sediment entrainment into flow -termination of sediment transport and its deposition).Channel planforms,floodplain segments separated by the latter and alluvial channel bedforms are shown to be geomorphic expressions of sediment transport process at different spatial and temporal scales.This paper is dedicated to the 100th anniversary of N.I.Makkaveyev,Professor of the Moscow State University,author of the book "River channel and erosion in its basin" (1955).That book is regarded in Russia as the pioneering work which initiated the complex hydrological and geographical studies of channel processes and laid a basis for the theory of unified fluvial erosion-accumulation process.

  17. CATCHMENT-WIDE ANALYSIS OF THE SEDIMENT REGIME WITH RESPECT TO RESERVOIR SEDIMENTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helmut M. HABERSACK; Konrad BOGNER; Josef SCHNEIDER; Michael BRAUNER

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss a catchment-wide approach for analysing the sediment regime with respect to reservoir sedimentation, based on the Alpine Solk-basin in Austria. On a scaling perspective the boundary conditions and major processes of a catchment, like the geomorphological setting, are given by longterm developments. On the basis of field mapping these effects are discussed with respect to sediment availability, being affected e.g. by deep-seated gravitational slope deformations and slope creeping. Within these longterm processes, short-term unsteady sediment supply, erosion, transfer, deposition and remobilisation processes determine reservoir sedimentation and management. An intensive field monitoring program, including bedload and suspended sediment measurements, supplies data for the subsequent rainfall-runoff-erosion and sediment transport modeling (input, calibration and validation data). Instead of aiming to predict sediment transport processes in a purely deterministic manner the use of stochastic concepts allows to define locations in the catchment with a high probability for delivering significant amounts of sediments to the channels and finally the reservoir. Results show that landuse, channel regulation and avalanches are of great importance for sediment supply and that catchment management (beside managing the reservoir itself)has to address these.

  18. The suspended sediment transport equation and its near-bed sediment flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI RuiJie; LUO Feng; ZHU WenJin

    2009-01-01

    The suspended sediment transport equation and its near-bed sediment flux are one of the key prob-lems of sediment transport research under nonequilibrium condition. Based on the three-dimensional primitive suspended transport equation, the two-dimensional suspended sediment transport equation is deduced. The derived process indicates that the physical essence of the near-bed sediment flux is right the bottom boundary condition for the suspended sediment transport equation. This paper ana-lyzes the internal relations between the two methods of sediment carrying capacity and shear stress in common use, points out the consistency of these two methods in terms of form and physical meaning, and unifies these two methods theoretically. Furthermore, based on the analysis and comparison of the expressions of the near-bed sediment flux, this paper summarizes some problems to which attention should be paid, thus offering a novel approach to the study and the solution of the problems of sus-pended sediment transport and exchange flux of near-bed water sediment.

  19. The suspended sediment transport equation and its near-bed sediment flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The suspended sediment transport equation and its near-bed sediment flux are one of the key problems of sediment transport research under nonequilibrium condition. Based on the three-dimensional primitive suspended transport equation, the two-dimensional suspended sediment transport equation is deduced. The derived process indicates that the physical essence of the near-bed sediment flux is right the bottom boundary condition for the suspended sediment transport equation. This paper analyzes the internal relations between the two methods of sediment carrying capacity and shear stress in common use, points out the consistency of these two methods in terms of form and physical meaning, and unifies these two methods theoretically. Furthermore, based on the analysis and comparison of the expressions of the near-bed sediment flux, this paper summarizes some problems to which attention should be paid, thus offering a novel approach to the study and the solution of the problems of suspended sediment transport and exchange flux of near-bed water sediment.

  20. Evaluation of sediment transport in steep channels combining sediment impact sensors, tracer stones and TLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Gabriele; Schneider, Josef; Sass, Oliver; Stangl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Torrential floods combined with sediment transport presents major hazards to human life and infrastructure in alpine catchments. Despite the importance of sediment transport due to the large damage caused in case of flood events, we lack data on sediment movement and sediment transport rates in steep channels and torrents to improve the understanding of sediment transport processes in this areas. This paper presents an improved application of sediment impact sensors (SIS) integrated in a unique measurement system in an Alpine catchment in Austria consisting of meteorological stations, runoff gauges and tracer stones. In addition sediment availability, mobilization and accumulation have been mapped and quantified by means of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and structure from motion using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Additionally a numerical model was used to simulate the bed load transport rates in the torrent. This contribution focuses on field measurements of bed load transport rates in steep channels based on SIS data, tracer stone data, bed load measurements, precipitation and discharge data. The measurement data was compared to several sediment transport formulae for steep slopes and validated with the observed deposited amount of sediment in the sediment retention basin at the outlet of the catchment.

  1. A process-based model for aeolian sediment transport and spatiotemporal varying sediment availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonhout, Bas M.; Vries, Sierd de

    2016-08-01

    Aeolian sediment transport is influenced by a variety of bed surface properties, like moisture, shells, vegetation, and nonerodible elements. The bed surface properties influence aeolian sediment transport by changing the sediment transport capacity and/or the sediment availability. The effect of bed surface properties on the transport capacity and sediment availability is typically incorporated through the velocity threshold. This approach appears to be a critical limitation in existing aeolian sediment transport models for simulation of real-world cases with spatiotemporal variations in bed surface properties. This paper presents a new model approach for multifraction aeolian sediment transport in which sediment availability is simulated rather than parameterized through the velocity threshold. The model can cope with arbitrary spatiotemporal configurations of bed surface properties that either limit or enhance the sediment availability or sediment transport capacity. The performance of the model is illustrated using four prototype cases, the simulation of two wind tunnel experiments from literature and a sensitivity analysis of newly introduced parameters.

  2. Microbial interactions with naturally occurring hydrophobic sediments: Influence on sediment and associated contaminant mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droppo, I G; Krishnappan, B G; Lawrence, J R

    2016-04-01

    The erosion, transport and fate of sediments and associated contaminants are known to be influenced by both particle characteristics and the flow dynamics imparted onto the sediment. The influential role of bitumen containing hydrophobic sediments and the microbial community on sediment dynamics are however less understood. This study links an experimental evaluation of sediment erosion with measured sediment-associated contaminant concentrations and microbial community analysis to provide an estimate of the potential for sediment to control the erosion, transport and fate of contaminants. Specifically the paper addresses the unique behaviour of hydrophobic sediments and the role that the microbial community associated with hydrophobic sediment may play in the transport of contaminated sediment. Results demonstrate that the hydrophobic cohesive sediment demonstrates unique transport and particle characteristics (poor settling and small floc size). Biofilms were observed to increase with consolidation/biostabilization times and generated a unique microbial consortium relative to the eroded flocs. Natural oil associated with the flocs appeared to be preferentially associated with microbial derived extracellular polymeric substances. While PAHs and naphthenic acid increased with increasing shear (indicative of increasing loads), they tended to decrease with consolidation/biostabilization (CB) time at similar shears suggesting a chemical and/or biological degradation. PAH and napthenic acid degrading microbes decreased with time as well, which may suggest that there was a reduced pool of PAHs and naphthenic acids available resulting in their die off. This study emphasizes the importance that any management strategies and operational assessments for the protection of human and aquatic health incorporate the sediment (suspended and bed sediment) and biological (biofilm) compartments and the energy dynamics within the system in order to better predict contaminant

  3. Distribution of Cs-137 in lake sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study on Cs-137 from the Chernobyl accident was conducted in Lake Raaksjoen, an oligotrophic, mesohumic lake in central Sweden. The purpose was to determine the areal as well as the vertical distribution of Cs-137 in lake sediment and to see if the results could be explained by parameters such as morphometry of the lake, wind exposure, currents, wave action etc. Sediments cores were taken on 19 sites in March 1992 when the lake still was ice covered and these sampling-sites were spread all over the lake. The sediment cores were taken to the laboratory and sliced into 0.5-1 cm increments down to a sediment depth of 10 cm. The sediment increments were analysed on physical parameters such as density and water content and chemical parameters like C, N, Fe, Mn and Ca together with a measure of Cs-137 concentrations using a sodium iodine detector. The average concentration of cesium-137 in the sediment in Lake Raaksjoen was 30-35 kBq/m2, which coincide with the amount deposited on the lake (30-40 kBq/m2). There was a clear tendency for the concentration to increase with water depth, as a result of sediment focusing. The vertical distribution of Cs-137 was quite uniform for all sampling-sites with a peak about a centimeter down in the sediment and then decreasing concentrations downwards to a negligible value not affected by the Chernobyl accident at a sediment depth of 10 cm. There were no connections found between cesium content and other substances analysed

  4. Improving Fishpond Sediment by Aquatic Vegetable Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Tao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuously intensive fish farming results in pond degradation that needs to be improved. Therefore, the experiment rotating intensive fish culture with two aquatic vegetables lotus (Nelumbo nucifera and water chestnuts (Eleocharis dulcis cultivation is conducted aiming at determining the effect of rotation as a sediment management technique on improving the pond sediment and assessing the food safety risk of the vegetables cultivated in the pond sediment from the aspects of heavy metal. The results showed that after rotation, the content of Total Nitrogen (TN and Organic Matter (OM in the upper 10 cm sediment decreased significantly (p<0.05, with TN content reduced 1.05 and 0.74 g/kg; OM content reduced 0.59 and 0.37%, respectively. The contents of Organic-Phosphorus (OP and Fe/Al-bound Phosphorus (Fe/Al-P in the sediment decreased significantly (p<0.05, with OP reduced 0.05 and 0.04 g/kg, Fe/Al-P reduced 0.19 and 0.15 g/kg, respectively. The heavy metal contents of As, Pb, Cd, Hg, Cr and Zn except Cu in the pond sediment were under Chinese National II Soil Criterion and the contents of As, Pb, Cd, Hg, Cr, Cu and Zn in edible vegetable rhizomes satisfied Safety Requirements for Non-environmental Pollution Vegetable. Rotation of fish culture with aquatic vegetables cultivation effectively mitigated excessive nutrient load in the sediment while recycled the nutrient in the sediment to produce safe vegetables. It could be considered as a viable sediment quality improving technique.

  5. Sedimentation in mountain streams: A review of methods of measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Lara B.; Anderson, James T.; Welsh, Stuart; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this review paper is to provide a list of methods and devices used to measure sediment accumulation in wadeable streams dominated by cobble and gravel substrate. Quantitative measures of stream sedimentation are useful to monitor and study anthropogenic impacts on stream biota, and stream sedimentation is measurable with multiple sampling methods. Evaluation of sedimentation can be made by measuring the concentration of suspended sediment, or turbidity, and by determining the amount of deposited sediment, or sedimentation on the streambed. Measurements of deposited sediments are more time consuming and labor intensive than measurements of suspended sediments. Traditional techniques for characterizing sediment composition in streams include core sampling, the shovel method, visual estimation along transects, and sediment traps. This paper provides a comprehensive review of methodology, devices that can be used, and techniques for processing and analyzing samples collected to aid researchers in choosing study design and equipment.

  6. Assessing ecorelevance of emerging chemicals in sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forbes, Valery E.; Selck, Henriette; Salvito, D.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of the Great Lakes and elsewhere has detected the presence of a wide variety of chemicals which has raised concern that these chemicals pose risks to resident species. Sediments are of particular interest due to their tendency to accumulate hydrophobic and persistent...... chemicals and because less is known about toxic effects of chemicals to sediment-feeding organisms than to pelagic species. Data collected on the polycyclic musks provides available evidence relevant to assessing exposure and effects in Great Lakes' sediments. Studies at Roskilde University demonstrate how...

  7. Amyloplast Sedimentation Kinetics in Corn Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, A. C.; Sack, F.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the parameters of amyloplast sedimentation is crucial for an evaluation of proposed mechanisms of root graviperception. Early estimates of the rate of root amyloplast sedimentation were as low as 1.2 micron/min which may be too slow for many amyloplasts to reach the vicinity of the new lower wall within the presentation time. On this basis, Haberlandt's classical statolith hypothesis involving amyloplast stimulation of a sensitive surface near the new lower wall was questioned. The aim was to determine the kinetics of amyloplast sedimentation with reference to the presentation time in living and fixed corn rootcap cells as compared with coleoptiles of the same variety.

  8. Remediation technologies for oil-contaminated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-30

    Oil-contaminated sediments pose serious environmental hazards for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Innovative and environmentally compatible technologies are urgently required to remove oil-contaminated sediments. In this paper, various physical, chemical and biological technologies are investigated for the remediation of oil-contaminated sediments such as flotation and washing, coal agglomeration, thermal desorption, ultrasonic desorption, bioremediation, chemical oxidation and extraction using ionic liquids. The basic principles of these technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages for practical application have been discussed. A combination of two or more technologies is expected to provide an innovative solution that is economical, eco-friendly and adaptable.

  9. [Blood donation in urban areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, F

    2013-05-01

    Medical and technical developments increase the difficulty to provide sufficient safe blood for all patients in developed countries and their sociodemographic and societal changes. Sufficient national blood supply remains a reached, however still actual, challenge. Tomorrow is prepared today: the management of blood donation programs both in line with these developments and with social marketing strategies is one of the keys to success. If the main components of this organization are well known (mobile blood drives in various appropriate environments, and permanent blood donation centers) their proportions in the whole process must evolve and their contents require adaptations, especially for whole blood donation in urban areas. We have to focus on the people's way of life changes related to increasing urbanization of the society and prominent position taken by very large cities. This requires targeting several goals: to draw the attention of the potential blood-giving candidate, to get into position to collect him when he will decide it, to give meaning and recognition to his "sacrifice" (give time rather than donate blood) and to give him desire and opportunity to come back and donate one more time. In this strategy, permanent blood centers in urban areas have significant potential for whole blood collection, highlighted by the decrease of apheresis technology requirements. This potential requires profound changes in their location, conception and organization. The concept of Maison Du Don (MDD) reflects these changes. PMID:23597586

  10. [Blood donation in urban areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, F

    2013-05-01

    Medical and technical developments increase the difficulty to provide sufficient safe blood for all patients in developed countries and their sociodemographic and societal changes. Sufficient national blood supply remains a reached, however still actual, challenge. Tomorrow is prepared today: the management of blood donation programs both in line with these developments and with social marketing strategies is one of the keys to success. If the main components of this organization are well known (mobile blood drives in various appropriate environments, and permanent blood donation centers) their proportions in the whole process must evolve and their contents require adaptations, especially for whole blood donation in urban areas. We have to focus on the people's way of life changes related to increasing urbanization of the society and prominent position taken by very large cities. This requires targeting several goals: to draw the attention of the potential blood-giving candidate, to get into position to collect him when he will decide it, to give meaning and recognition to his "sacrifice" (give time rather than donate blood) and to give him desire and opportunity to come back and donate one more time. In this strategy, permanent blood centers in urban areas have significant potential for whole blood collection, highlighted by the decrease of apheresis technology requirements. This potential requires profound changes in their location, conception and organization. The concept of Maison Du Don (MDD) reflects these changes.

  11. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. PMID:26778104

  12. Cadmium in blood and hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Ki-Do; Lee, Mi-Sun [Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Domyung [Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: paekdm@snu.ac.kr

    2008-12-15

    Objectives:: This study is to examine the effect of cadmium exposure on blood pressure in Korean general population. Methods:: The study population consisted of 958 men and 944 women who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), in which blood pressure and blood cadmium were measured from each participant. Results:: The mean blood cadmium level was 1.67 {mu}g/L (median level 1.55). The prevalence of hypertension was 26.2%. The blood cadmium level was significantly higher among those subjects with hypertension than those without (mean level 1.77 versus 1.64 {mu}g/dL). After adjusting for covariates, the odds ratio of hypertension comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of cadmium in blood was 1.51 (95% confidence interval 1.13 to 2.05), and a dose-response relationship was observed. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure were all positively associated with blood cadmium level, and this effect of cadmium on blood pressure was markedly stronger when the kidney function was reduced. Conclusions:: Cadmium exposures at the current level may have increased the blood pressure of Korean general population.

  13. How much blood is needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifried, E; Klueter, H; Weidmann, C; Staudenmaier, T; Schrezenmeier, H; Henschler, R; Greinacher, A; Mueller, M M

    2011-01-01

    Demographic changes in developed countries as their populations age lead to a steady increase in the consumption of standard blood components. Complex therapeutic procedures like haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cardiovascular surgery and solid organ transplantation are options for an increasing proportion of older patients nowadays. This trend is likely to continue in coming years. On the other hand, novel aspects in transplant regimens, therapies for malignant diseases, surgical procedures and perioperative patient management have led to a moderate decrease in blood product consumption per individual procedure. The ageing of populations in developed countries, intra-society changes in the attitude towards blood donation as an important altruistic behaviour and the overall alterations in our societies will lead to a decline in regular blood donations over the next decades in many developed countries. Artificial blood substitutes or in vitro stem cell-derived blood components might also become alternatives in the future. However, such substitutes are still in early stages of development and will therefore probably not alleviate this problem within the next few years. Taken together, a declining donation rate and an increase in the consumption of blood components require novel approaches on both sides of the blood supply chain. Different blood donor groups require specific approaches and, for example, inactive or deferred donors must be re-activated. Optimal use of blood components requires even more attention. PMID:21175652

  14. When Blood Sugar Is Too High

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? When Blood Sugar Is Too High KidsHealth > For Teens > When Blood ... it often can be unhealthy. What Is High Blood Sugar? The blood glucose level is the amount of ...

  15. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during rowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels Henry; Pott, F; Knudsen, L.;

    1997-01-01

    original,arterial blood pressure,central venous pressure,cerebral blood flow, exercise, transcranial Doppler......original,arterial blood pressure,central venous pressure,cerebral blood flow, exercise, transcranial Doppler...

  16. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, age, ... can increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure tends to rise with age. About 65 ...

  17. Blood Pressure Matters: Keep Hypertension in Check

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuff, or an automatic device may measure the pressure. Blood pressure is given as 2 numbers. The first ... described above. High Blood Pressure NIHSeniorHealth: High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease Heart and Vascular Diseases ...

  18. Healthy Blood Pressure: "It's Worth the Effort!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Healthy Blood Pressure: "It's worth the effort!" Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... Numbers: What They Mean / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Healthy Blood Pressure: "It's worth the effort!" / Keep the Beat ...

  19. High blood pressure and eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features ... are sent to the brain. Causes High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina. The higher the blood ...

  20. Whole blood viscosity assessment issues IV: Prevalence in acute phase inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperviscosity syndrome has been suggested as not simply an acute reaction. Yet, erythrocyte sedimentation rate is associated with whole blood viscosity and it is an indirect acute phase inflammation marker. Aims: This work investigates the prevalence of hyperviscosity in acute phase inflammation. Materials and Methods: Archived clinical pathology data for the period of 1999 to 2008 were utilized. 40,632-cases tested for C-reactive protein and/or erythrocyte sedimentation rate from five alternate years, which were concomitantly tested for haematocrit and total proteins, were extracted. The prevalence of abnormal viscosity associated with positive results of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were evaluated. Results: Hyperviscosity is infrequently associated with positive C-reactive protein (2.9% and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (2.7% sub-populations, and are not statistically different from their respective negative sub-populations. Normoviscosity is significantly more prevalent in the positive sub-populations (p < 0.01. Further analyses indicate that prevalence of acute phase inflammation is statistically significantly less in hyperviscosity compared to normoviscosity sub-population (p < 0.00001. Actual blood viscosity level increases with level of inflammation though. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that although blood viscosity level may increase with inflammation, hyperviscosity is not frequent in, or sensitive to acute phase inflammation. It portends that whole blood viscosity is not unspecific as acute phase inflammation markers. It calls for clinicians to consider utilizing whole blood viscosity in disease conditions where stasis is implicated, in which it is specific and valuable. It would also benefit to establish whether hyperviscosity is a chronic phase inflammation marker.

  1. Sufficient blood, safe blood: can we have both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bönig Halvard

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The decision in September 2011 in the UK to accept blood donations from non-practicing men who have sex with men (MSM has received significant public attention. Will this rule change substantially boost the number of blood donations or will it make our blood less safe? Clearly, most European countries have a blood procurement problem. Fewer young people are donating, while the population is aging and more invasive therapies are requiring more blood. Yet if that was the reason for allowing non-practicing MSM to donate, clearly re-admission of some other, much larger populations that are currently deferred from donation should likewise be considered. As far as risks for blood safety are concerned, evidence has been provided that the current quality of infectious disease marker testing significantly mitigates against, although does not completely eradicate, risks associated with admission of donors with a high risk of carrying certain blood-transmissible agents. However, it could be argued that more effective recruitment of the non-donor pool, which is substantially larger than the group of currently ineligible donors, would be a better strategy. Recruitment of this group will benefit the availability of blood without jeopardizing the current excellent safety profile of blood.

  2. Sediment pollution and dynamic in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (southern Italy): insights from bottom sediment traps and surficial sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Luca Giorgio; Cassin, Daniele; Giuliani, Silvia; Botter, Margherita; Zonta, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Major and trace element, PAH, and PCB concentrations were measured in surface sediments and particles from sediment traps collected in the First and Second Basin of the Mar Piccolo (Gulf of Taranto) in two periods (June-July and August-September, 2013). The aim of the study was to evaluate pollution degree, sediment transport and particle redistribution dynamic within the area. Results confirm the higher contamination of sediments from the First Basin observed by previous researches, particularly for Cu, Hg, Pb, total PAHs, and total PCBs. Advective transport from the First to the Second Basin appears to be the leading transfer mechanism of particles and adsorbed contaminants, as evidenced by measured fluxes and statistical analyses of contaminant concentrations in surficial sediments and particles from sediment traps. Long-range selective transports of PAHs and microbial anaerobic degradation processes for PCBs have been also observed. These results are limited to a restricted time window but are consistent with the presence of transport fluxes at the bottom of the water column. This mechanism deserves further investigation and monitoring activities, potentially being the main responsible of pollutant delivering to the less contaminated sectors of the Mar Piccolo. PMID:27117149

  3. Blood pressure and atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930082 Clinical administration of atrial natri-uretic factor in reno-vascular hypertension.ZHANG Weiguo(张卫国),et al.Cardiovasc In-stit & Fuwai Hosp,CAMS,Beijing.Chin Cir J1992;7(5):450-452.In order to evaluate the effects of atrial natri-uretic factor(ANF)on patients with reno-vas-cular hypertension,α-hANF(0.025μg/kg/min×60min)was administered to 7 patients byi.v.drip..The renin-angiotensin-aldosteronesystem,plasma catecholamine and arginine va-sopressin were suppressed with diuresis and na-triuresis and lowering of blood pressure.The

  4. Order of blood draw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornes, Michael; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée; Grankvist, Kjell;

    2016-01-01

    been a number of studies recently looking at whether order of draw remains a problem with modern phlebotomy techniques and materials, or it is an outdated practice followed simply because of historical reasons. In the following article, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory......It has been well reported over recent years that most errors within the total testing process occur in the pre-analytical phase (46%-68.2%), an area that is usually outside of the direct control of the laboratory and which includes sample collection (phlebotomy). National and international (WHO...... Medicine Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) provides an overview and summary of the literature with regards to order of draw in venous blood collection. Given the evidence presented in this article, the EFLM WG-PRE herein concludes that a significant frequency of sample contamination...

  5. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term survival of transfusion recipients has rarely been studied. This study examines short- and long-term mortality among transfusion recipients and reports these as absolute rates and rates relative to the general population. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Population-based cohort study...... of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... registered transfusion. Three months after the first transfusion, 84.3 percent of recipients were alive. One-, 5-, and 20-year posttransfusion survival was 73.7, 53.4, and 27.0 percent, respectively. Survival was slightly poorer in men than in women, decreased with increasing age, and was worst...

  6. Sediment availability on burned hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Petter; Sheridan, Gary J.; Moody, John A.; Smith, Hugh G.; Noske, Philip J.; Lane, Patrick N. J.

    2013-12-01

    describes the inherent resistance of soil to erosion. Hillslope erosion models typically consider erodibility to be constant with depth. This may not be the case after wildfire because erodibility is partly determined by the availability of noncohesive soil and ash at the surface. This study quantifies erodibility of burned soils using methods that explicitly capture variations in soil properties with depth. Flume experiments on intact cores from three sites in western United States showed that erodibility of fire-affected soil was highest at the soil surface and declined exponentially within the top 20 mm of the soil profile, with root density and soil depth accounting for 62% of the variation. Variation in erodibility with depth resulted in transient sediment flux during erosion experiments on bounded field plots. Material that contributed to transient flux was conceptualized as a layer of noncohesive material of variable depth (dnc). This depth was related to shear strength measurements and sampled spatially to obtain the probability distribution of noncohesive material as a function of depth below the surface. After wildfire in southeast Australia, the initial dnc ranged from 7.5 to 9.1 mm, which equated to 97-117 Mg ha-1 of noncohesive material. The depth decreased exponentially with time since wildfire to 0.4 mm (or < 5 Mg ha-1) after 3 years of recovery. The results are organized into a framework for modeling fire effects on erodibility as a function of the production and depletion of the noncohesive layer overlying a cohesive layer.

  7. A Hydrograph-Based Sediment Availability Assessment: Implications for Mississippi River Sediment Diversion

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy Rosen; Y. Jun Xu

    2014-01-01

    The Mississippi River Delta Plain has undergone substantial land loss caused by subsidence, relative sea-level rise, and loss of connectivity to the Mississippi River. Many restoration projects rely on diversions from the Mississippi River, but uncertainty exists about the timing and the amount of actually available sediment. This study examined long-term (1980–2010) suspended sediment yield as affected by different hydrologic regimes to determine actual suspended sediment availability and h...

  8. Fingerprinting upland sediment sources : particle size-specific magnetic linkages between soils, lake and suspended sediments.

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Hatfield; Maher, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated erosion of fine-grained sediment is an environmental problem of international dimensions. Erosion control strategies and targeting of mitigation measures require robust and quantitative identification of sediment sources. Here, we use magnetic ‘fingerprinting’ to characterize soils, and examine their affinity with and contribution to suspended sediments transported within two subcatchments feeding Bassenthwaite Lake, northwest England. A high-resolution soil magnetic susceptibilit...

  9. Sediment Composition of periplatform sediments and calciturbidites around Pedro Bank, Southwestern Caribbean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Andresen, Nils

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the carbonate production and sediment export of the Pedro Bank carbonate platform were studied in response to the late Quaternary sea level fluctuations. A set of nine sediment cores were obtained from up- and downcurrent position to Pedro Bank to form a downcurrent offbank transect that covers the proximal toe-of-slope to a distal basinal setting. The sediments studied were deposited between 650 to 2520 meter below recent sea level, and reach back until oxy...

  10. Mercury in dated Greenland marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmund, G.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty marine sediment cores from Greenland were analysed for mercury, and dated by the lead-210 method. In general the cores exhibit a mercury profile with higher mercury concentrations in the upper centimetres of the core. The cores were studied by linear regression of In Hg vs, age...... of the sediment for the youngest 100 years. As a rule the mercury decreased with depth in the sediment with various degrees of significance. The increase of the mercury flux during the last 100 years is roughly a doubling. The increase may be of anthropogenic origin as it is restricted to the last 100 years....... In four cores the concentration of manganese was found also to increase in the top layers indicating diagenesis. In the other cases the higher concentrations were not accompanied by higher manganese concentrations. The mercury flux to the sediment surface was generally proportional to the Pb-210 flux...

  11. Delaware River and Upper Bay Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The area of coverage consists of 192 square miles of benthic habitat mapped from 2005 to 2007 in the Delaware River and Upper Delaware Bay. The bottom sediment map...

  12. Scripps Sediment Description File- OCSEAP Portion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Scripps Institution of Oceanography compiled descriptions of sediment samples in the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf area, funded through the NOAA Outer...

  13. Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. M.; Keiser, K.; Graves, S. J.; Conover, H.; Ebersole, S.

    2009-12-01

    Since the year 2000, Eastern Louisiana, coastal Mississippi, Alabama, and the western Florida panhandle have been affected by 28 tropical storms, seven of which were hurricanes. These tropical cyclones have significantly altered normal coastal processes and characteristics in the Gulf region through sediment disturbance. Although tides, seasonality, and agricultural development influence suspended sediment and sediment deposition over periods of time, tropical storm activity has the capability of moving the largest sediment loads in the shortest periods of time for coastal areas. The importance of sediments upon water quality, coastal erosion, habitats and nutrients has made their study and monitoring vital to decision makers in the region. Currently agencies such as United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), NASA, and Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) are employing a variety of in-situ and airborne based measurements to assess and monitor sediment loading and deposition. These methods provide highly accurate information but are limited in geographic range, are not continuous over a region and, in the case of airborne LIDAR are expensive and do not recur on a regular basis. Multi-temporal and multi-spectral satellite imagery that shows tropical-storm-induced suspended sediment and storm-surge sediment deposits can provide decision makers with immediate and long-term information about the impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes. It can also be valuable for those conducting research and for projects related to coastal issues such as recovery, planning, management, and mitigation. The recently awarded Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support will generate decision support products using NASA satellite observations from MODIS, Landsat and SeaWiFS instruments to support resource management, planning, and decision making activities in the Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, SANDS will generate decision support products that address the impacts of tropical storms

  14. THE SEDIMENTATION AND DREDGING OF GUANTING RESERVOIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing YANG; Shanzheng LI; Shiqi ZHANG

    2003-01-01

    The main tasks of the Guanting Reservoir on the Yongding River were flood control and water supply to Beijing. However, it is not able to supply water due to the serious sedimentation and water pollution in recent years. Of the total original reservoir storage capacity of 2.27×109 m3 (after rebuilt), 0.651×109 m3 in the Yongding Zone is lost due to sedimentation and 0.252×109 m3 in the Guishui Zone cannot be used due to the sand bar at the mouth of the Guishui River. Dredging is performed to deal with the sedimentation of Guanting Reservoir. A dredged channel on the mouth bar between the two parts of the reservoir, i.e. Yongding Zone and Guishui Zone, to resume their connection and a dike to guide most sediment from upstream of the Yongding River to the Guishui Zone are suggested.

  15. Effects of intensive mariculture on sediment biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pusceddu, Antonio; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Mirto, Simone;

    2007-01-01

    The exponential growth of off-shore mariculture that has occurred worldwide over the last 10 years has raised concern about the impact of the waste produced by this industry on the ecological integrity of the sea bottom. Investigations into this potential source of impact on the biochemistry...... of the sea floor have provided contrasting results, and no compelling explanations for these discrepancies have been provided to date. To quantify the impact of fish-farm activities on the biochemistry of sediments, we have investigated the quantity and biochemical composition of sediment organic matter...... regions, with the exception of seagrass sediments in Spain, the biochemistry of the sediments showed significant differences between the control and fish-farm locations. However, the variables explaining the differences observed varied among the regions and between habitats, suggesting idiosyncratic...

  16. Sediment generation and provenance: processes and pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, L.; Garzanti, E.; von Eynatten, H.; Weltje, G. J.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to trace sediments from their sources to sedimentary basins is a prerequisite for quantitative analysis of Earth-surface dynamics. The comparatively recent revival of sedimentary provenance analysis goes hand-in-hand with the ever expanding range of analytical tools available for quantifying sediment properties (isotopic, mineral, chemical, and petrographic composition, grain-size and shape distributions, age spectra, etc.), and for interpreting such data in paleo-geographic, -tectonic and -climatic terms. The breakdown of sediment budgets into source-specific contributions - one of the most important tasks of provenance analysis - permits quantification of rates of surface processes in the geological past ("deep time"), even in cases where the source areas themselves have been destroyed by global tectonics. Quantitative sedimentary provenance analysis is therefore crucial to the reconstruction of ancient sediment-routing systems, the fundamental units of mass transfer at the Earth's surface.

  17. Stabilization of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koś Karolina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of stabilization of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir. Based on the geotechnical characteristics of the tested sediments it was stated they do not fulfill all the criteria set for soils in earth embankments. Therefore, an attempt to improve their parameters was made by using two additives – cement and lime. An unconfined compressive strength, shear strength, bearing ratio and pH reaction were determined on samples after different time of curing. Based on the carried out tests it was stated that the obtained values of unconfined compressive strength of sediments stabilized with cement were relatively low and they did not fulfill the requirements set by the Polish standard, which concerns materials in road engineering. In case of lime stabilization it was stated that the tested sediments with 6% addition of the additive can be used for the bottom layers of the improved road base.

  18. Geophysical Processes - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  19. Sediment transport in ice-covered channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian KNACK; Hung-tao SHEN

    2015-01-01

    The existence of ice cover has important effects on sediment transport and channel morphology for rivers in areas with an annual occurrence of an ice season. The interaction of sediment transport and surface ice is poorly understood. In this paper, data from existing flume experiments, each with a limited range of flow and sediment transport conditions, are analyzed. The analysis showed that the bed load transport in ice-covered channels can be described by conventional relationships for the equivalent free-surface flow if the flow strength is expressed in terms of the bed shear stress. A modified Rouse formulation considering the effect of the ice cover on velocity and turbulent diffusion is shown to be applicable for calculating the suspended sediment transport discharge.

  20. Methods in mooring deep sea sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Fernando, V.; Rajaraman, V.S.; Janakiraman, G.

    The experience gained during the process of deployment and retrieval of nearly 39 sets of deep sea sediment trap moorings on various ships like FS Sonne, ORV Sagarkanya and DSV Nand Rachit are outlined. The various problems encountered...

  1. The NGDC Seafloor Sediment Geotechnical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGDC Seafloor Sediment Geotechnical Properties Database contains test engineering properties data coded by students at NGDC from primarily U.S. Naval...

  2. Deck41 Surficial Seafloor Sediment Description Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deck41 is a digital summary of surficial sediment composition for 36,401 seafloor samples worldwide. Data include collecting source, ship, cruise, sample id,...

  3. Landfill liners from dam reservoir sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koś Karolina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Landfill liners from dam reservoir sediments. Every municipal solid waste landfill has to be properly secured to protect the natural environment from possible leachate. Most often an artificial sealing is used, which is based on a soil liner from cohesive soils (clays, silts. Usability evaluation of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir for building these liners was presented in the paper. Sediments from dam reservoirs, gathered as a result of the siltation process, can be a valuable material for earthworks purposes. Determination of their possible ways of usage is important, especially before the planned dredging, because thanks to that this material will not be put on a heap. Based on the analysis of the geotechnical parameters of these sediments it was stated that this material can be preliminary allowed for using in liners.

  4. Quantitative paleoparasitology applied to archaeological sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín H Fugassa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Three techniques to extract parasite remains from archaeological sediments were tested. The aim was to improve the sensibility of recommended paleoparasitological techniques applied in archaeological remains. Sediment collected from the pelvic girdle of a human body found in Cabo Vírgenes, Santa Cruz, Argentina, associated to a Spanish settlement founded in 1584 known as Nombre de Jesús, was used to search for parasites. Sediment close to the skull was used as control. The techniques recommended by Jones, Reinhard, and Dittmar and Teejen were used and compared with the modified technique presented here, developed to improve the sensibility to detect parasite remains. Positive results were obtained only with the modified technique, resulting in the finding of Trichuris trichiura eggs in the sediment.

  5. Seafloor and sediment characteristics in INDEX AREA

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.; Valsangkar, A.B.; Khadge, N.H.; Gupta, S.M.; Parthiban, G.

    Seafloor surveys and sediment sampling during the INDEX (Indian Deep-Sea Environmental Experiment) studies in the Central Indian Basin, resulted in identification of Test and Reference Areas, as well of establishment of baseline conditions...

  6. The NGDC Seafloor Sediment Grain Size Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGDC (now NCEI) Seafloor Sediment Grain Size Database contains particle size data for over 17,000 seafloor samples worldwide. The file was begun by NGDC in 1976...

  7. Fisheries Sediment Data (WIGLEY65 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a part of the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) Seafloor Surficial Sediment (Deck 41) Data File. Deck 41 is an original data file created by the...

  8. Magnesium Isotopic Composition of Subducting Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y.; Teng, F. Z.; Plank, T. A.; Huang, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Subducted marine sediments have recently been called upon to explain the heterogeneous Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg, ‰) found in mantle wehrlites (-0.39 to +0.09 [1]) in the context of a homogeneous mantle (-0.25 ± 0.07 [2]). However, no systematic measurements of δ26Mg on marine sediments are currently available to provide direct support to this model. To characterize the Mg inputs to global subduction zones, we measured δ26Mg data for a total of 90 marine sediments collected from 12 drill sites outboard of the world's major subduction zones. These sediments span a 1.73‰ range in δ26Mg. The detritus-dominated sediments have δ26Mg (-0.59 to +0.53) comparable to those of weathered materials on continents (e.g. -0.52 to +0.92 [3]), while the calcareous oozes yield δ26Mg (as light as -1.20) more similar to the seawater value (-0.83 [4]). The negative correlation between δ26Mg and CaO/Al2O3 in these sediments indicates the primary control of mineralogy over the Mg isotopic distribution among different sediment types, as carbonates are enriched in light Mg isotopes (-5.10 to -0.40 [5]) whereas clay-rich weathering residues generally have heavier δ26Mg (e.g. up to +0.65 in saprolite [6]). In addition, chemical weathering and grain-size sorting drive sediments to a heavier δ26Mg, as indicated by the broad positive trends between δ26Mg with CIA (Chemical Index of Alteration [7]) and Al2O3/SiO2, respectively. Collectively, the arc systems sampled in this study represent ~30% of global arc length and the extrapolated global Mg flux of subducting marine sediments accounts for ~9% of the yearly Mg riverine input with a flux-weighted average δ26Mg at -0.26. Subduction of these heterogeneous sediments may not cause significant mantle heterogeneity on a global scale, but the highly variable Mg fluxes and δ26Mg of sediments delivered to different trenches are capable of producing local mantle variations. Volcanic rocks sourced from these mantle domains are thus

  9. Blood mixtures: impact of puncture site on blood parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, X; El Hassani, M S; Lecq, S; Michel, C L; El Mouden, E H; Michaud, B; Slimani, T

    2016-08-01

    Various puncture routes, veins, arteries, heart, are used to take blood in animals. For anatomical reasons, differences in blood composition are expected among puncture sites. However, this issue has been rarely assessed and contrasted results have been reported: strong effects of puncture site versus a lack of effect. We captured free-ranging freshwater turtles from different locations to compare the mean concentrations of 12 blood parameters (metabolites, hormone, ions, and enzyme) among three puncture sites: (1) a lateral branch of the jugular vein, (2) a dorsal subcarapacial cervical plexus (sometimes incorrectly referred as the 'cervical sinus' in the literature), and (3) a caudal plexus site (sometimes incorrectly referred as the 'caudal sinus'). Because we used very small syringes (27-30G), we were able to separate lymph, blood, or blood-lymph mixtures. Our results show very strong effects of puncture site and of mixture level (mean maximal difference between sites was 250 %). We also found strong sex and geographical effects. Typically, there were differences in concentrations of blood solutes sampled from the lateral jugular vein and subcarapacial plexus, mainly due to sampling a mixture of blood and lymph from the 'blood' at the subcarapacial site and pure blood from the lateral jugular site, and likewise, samples from the caudal site were highly variable due to often sampling a mixture of blood and lymph. These results have technical and fundamental implications, especially when performing comparative analyses. Further, by selecting precise puncture sites, physiological differences between lymph and blood compartments could be investigated. PMID:27146147

  10. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  11. Sediment transport in two mediterranean regulated rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobera, G; Batalla, R J; Vericat, D; López-Tarazón, J A; Tena, A

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean climate is characterized by highly irregular rainfall patterns with marked differences between wet and dry seasons which lead to highly variable hydrological fluvial regimes. As a result, and in order to ensure water availability and reduce its temporal variability, a high number of large dams were built during the 20th century (more than 3500 located in Mediterranean rivers). Dams modify the flow regime but also interrupt the continuity of sediment transfer along the river network, thereby changing its functioning as an ecosystem. Within this context, the present paper aims to assess the suspended sediment loads and dynamics of two climatically contrasting Mediterranean regulated rivers (i.e. the Ésera and Siurana) during a 2-yr period. Key findings indicate that floods were responsible for 92% of the total suspended sediment load in the River Siurana, while this percentage falls to 70% for the Ésera, indicating the importance of baseflows on sediment transport in this river. This fact is related to the high sediment availability, with the Ésera acting as a non-supply-limited catchment due to the high productivity of the sources (i.e. badlands). In contrast, the Siurana can be considered a supply-limited system due to its low geomorphic activity and reduced sediment availability, with suspended sediment concentration remaining low even for high magnitude flood events. Reservoirs in both rivers reduce sediment load up to 90%, although total runoff is only reduced in the case of the River Ésera. A remarkable fact is the change of the hydrological character of the River Ésera downstream for the dam, shifting from a humid mountainous river regime to a quasi-invariable pattern, whereas the Siurana experiences the opposite effect, changing from a flashy Mediterranean river to a more constant flow regime below the dam.

  12. The kinetics of denitrification in permeable sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Victor; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2013-04-01

    Permeable sediments comprise the majority of shelf sediments, yet the rates of denitrification remain highly uncertain in these environments. Computational models are increasingly being used to understand the dynamics of denitrification in permeable sediments, which are complex environments to study experimentally. The realistic implementation of such models requires reliable experimentally derived data on the kinetics of denitrification. Here we undertook measurements of denitrification kinetics as a function of nitrate concentration and in the presence and absence of oxygen, in carefully controlled flow through reactor experiments on sediments taken from six shallow coastal sites in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia. The results showed that denitrification commenced rapidly (within 30 min) after the onset of anoxia and the kinetics could be well described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with half saturation constants (apparent Km) ranging between 1.5 and 19.8 μM, and maximum denitrification rate (Vmax) were in the range of 0.9-7.5 nmol mL-1 h-1. The production of N2 through anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) was generally found to be less than 10% that of denitrification. Vmax were in the same range as previously reported in cohesive sediments despite organic carbon contents one order of magnitude lower for the sediments studied here. The ratio of sediment O2 consumption to Vmax was in the range of 0.02-0.09, and was on average much lower than the theoretical ratio of 0.8. The most likely explanation for this is that the microbial community is not able to instantaneously shift or optimally use a particular electron acceptor in the highly dynamic redox environment experienced in permeable sediments. Consistent with this explanation, subsequent longer-term experiments over 5 days showed that denitrification rates increased by a factor of 10 within 3 days of the permanent onset of anoxia. In contrast to previous studies, we did not observe any significant

  13. Soil conservation through sediment trapping: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Mulatie; Keesstra, Saskia; Baartman, Jantiene; Maroulis, Jerry; Stroosnijder, Leo

    2014-05-01

    Preventing the off-site effects of soil erosion is an essential part of good catchment management. Most efforts are in the form of on-site soil and water conservation measures. However, sediment trapping (ST) can be an alternative (or additional) measure to prevent the negative off-site effects of soil erosion. Therefore, not all efforts should focus solely on on-site soil conservation, but also on the safe routing of sediment-laden flows and on creating sites and conditions where sediment can be trapped, preferably in a cost effective or even profitable way. ST can be applied on-site (in-field) and off-site and involves both vegetative and structural measures. The main vegetative measures include grass strips, tree or bush buffers, grassed waterways and restoration of the waterways and their riparian zone; while structural measures include terraces, ponds and check dams. This paper provides a review of studies that have assessed the sediment trapping efficacy (STE) of such vegetative and structural measures. Vegetation type and integration of two or more measures (vegetative as well as structural) are important factors influencing STE. In this review, the STE of most measures was evaluated either individually or in such combinations. In real landscape situations, it is not only important to select the most efficient erosion control measures, but also to determine their optimum location in the catchment. Hence, there is a need for research that shows a more integrated determination of STE at the catchment scale. If integrated measures are implemented at the most appropriate spatial locations within a catchment where they can disconnect landscape units from each other, they will decrease runoff velocity and sediment transport and, subsequently, reduce downstream flooding and sedimentation problems. KEY WORDS: Integrated sediment trapping, sediment trapping efficacy, vegetative, structural, on-site and off-site measures.

  14. Nonlinear acoustical properties of suspended sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Kozhevnikova, I.; BjØrnØ, L.

    1994-01-01

    Maritime advances during recent years have shown the importance of and the need for development of ultrasonic methods for the investigation of the transport of suspended marine sediments in rivers and in coastal regions. Two main acoustical procedures have been developed and used for the investigations of suspended sediment qualities during the laboratory studies, (1) high frequency resonance backscattering and (2) attenuation acoustic spectroscopy. Both approaches are based on the same funda...

  15. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  16. Age Dating Fluvial Sediment Storage Reservoirs to Construct Sediment Waiting Time Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalak, K.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Benthem, A.; Karwan, D. L.; Mahan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Suspended sediment transport is an important geomorphic process that can often control the transport of nutrients and contaminants. The time a particle spends in storage remains a critical knowledge gap in understanding particle trajectories through landscapes. We dated floodplain deposits in South River, VA, using fallout radionuclides (Pb-210, Cs-137), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and radiocarbon dating to determine sediment ages and construct sediment waiting time distributions. We have a total of 14 age dates in two eroding banks. We combine these age dates with a well-constrained history of mercury concentrations on suspended sediment in the river from an industrial release. Ages from fallout radionuclides document sedimentation from the early 1900s to the present, and agree with the history of mercury contamination. OSL dates span approximately 200 to 17,000 years old. We performed a standard Weibull analysis of nonexceedance to construct a waiting time distribution of floodplain sediment for the South River. The mean waiting time for floodplain sediment is 2930 years, while the median is approximately 710 years. When the floodplain waiting time distribution is combined with the waiting time distribution for in-channel sediment storage (available from previous studies), the mean waiting time shifts to approximately 680 years, suggesting that quantifying sediment waiting times for both channel and floodplain storage is critical in advancing knowledge of particle trajectories through watersheds.

  17. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite derived suspended sediment concentrations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ratheesh Ramakrishnan; A S Rajawat

    2012-10-01

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are realized with respect to the sediment size distribution and the bottom bed materials observed in the Gulf. Simulated SSCs are compared with alternate OCM derived SSC. The results are observed to be impetus where the model is able to generate the spatial dynamics of the sediment concentrations. Sediment dynamics like deposition, erosion and dispersion are explained with the simulated tidal currents and OCM derived sediment concentrations. Tidal range is observed as the important physical factor controlling the deposition and resuspension of sediments within the Gulf. From the simulation studies; maximum residual current velocities, tidal fronts and high turbulent zones are found to characterise the islands and shoals within the Gulf, which results in high sediment concentrations in those regions. Remarkable variability in the bathymetry of the Gulf, different bed materials and varying tidal conditions induces several circulation patterns and turbulence creating the unique suspended sediment concentration pattern in the Gulf.

  18. 30 CFR 816.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment... available to: (1) Prevent, to the extent possible, additional contributions of sediment to streamflow or...

  19. 30 CFR 817.45 - Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.45 Hydrologic balance: Sediment control measures. (a) Appropriate sediment... available to: (1) Prevent, to the extent possible, additional contributions of sediment to stream flow or...

  20. Biogeochemistry of pyrite and iron sulfide oxidation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schippers, A.; Jørgensen, BB

    2002-01-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) and iron monosulfide (FeS) play a central role in the sulfur and iron cycles of marine sediments, They may be buried in the sediment or oxidized by O-2 after transport by bioturbation to the sediment surface. FeS2 and FeS may also be oxidized within the anoxic sediment in which NO3-...

  1. A SEDIMENT TOXICITY METHOD USING LEMNA MINOR, DUCKWEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed a Lemna minor sediment toxicity test method to assess sediment contaminants which may affect plants. This 96-hour test used 15 ml of sediment and 2 ml of overlying water which was renewed after 48 hours. Sand was used as the control sediment and also to dilute test ...

  2. SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN YALU RIVER ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian-hua; GAO Shu; CHENG Yan; DONG Li-xian; ZHANG Jing

    2003-01-01

    Tidal cycle measurements of tidal currents, salinity and water temperature, and suspended sediment conc entra-tions were measured at four stations, together with surveys along two profiles short core collection within the Yalu River estuary.Grain size analysis of the three core sediment showed that: 1) the sediment from B1 to B3 became finer, worse sorting andpositively skewed; 2) the diversification of matter origin became more and more evident from east to west; 3) the sediments overthe region were of the same origin, as indicated by their similar colors and grain sizes. The data indicated that stratiticationoccurred in the flood season, from upstream to downstream, and a salt wedge was formed. The water column was well mixed, butthe longitudinal gradient of the salinity was larger on spring tide. The results also showed that the dominating mechanisnt ofsuspended sediment transport in the Yalu River estuary was T1, T2, T3 and T5. The non-tidal steady advection transport wasrestricted by the net transport of suspended sediment induced by mass Stoked drift directed to landwards, then the net sedimenttransport rate were decreased and the turbidity maxima was also favored to forming and extending.

  3. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  4. Interaction between water, sediments and radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model-based measurements program was carried out to evaluate the primary mechanisms controlling transport of uranium 238 and thorium 232 decay chain radionuclides in Quirke Lake, a water body draining much of the uranium mining and milling district near Elliot Lake, Ontario. This program included studies of radionuclide accumulation in sediments, particle settling and lake mass-balance studies. Also, sediment studies were undertaken to evaluate chemical fractionation, mineralogical associations, and sediment-water adsorption and release. A limnocorral experiment was conducted in an isolated portion of a lake to measure radium 226 removal from the water column and diffusion from the sediments back to the water. Modelling studies were made to assess the data. Substantial agreement was obtained using the model originally developed for the AECB between model predictions and observations for Quirke Lake and for the limnocorrals. Further work is required to complete the studies undertaken in this project to assess the significance of the efflux of radionuclides from the sediments. These studies include a laboratory program to measure kinetics of adsorption, sediment-water modelling studies of the results and a field measurement program to develop a mass-balance analysis for thorium. (numerous refs)

  5. Purpose and Criteria for Blood Smear Scan, Blood Smear Examination, and Blood Smear Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gulati, Gene; Song, Jinming; Florea, Alina Dulau; Gong, Jerald

    2012-01-01

    A microscopic examination of an appropriately prepared and well-stained blood smear by a knowledgeable laboratory professional is necessary and clinically useful in a number of circumstances and for a variety of reasons. In this article, an attempt is made to delineate the purpose and criteria for blood smear examination in a variety of circumstances that are encountered in everyday laboratory hematology practice. A blood smear scan serves to at least (a) verify the flagged automated hematolo...

  6. Mechanisms of damage to corals exposed to sedimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Miriam; Beer, Dirk de; Lott, Christian; Polerecky, Lubos; Kohls, Katharina; Abed, Raeid M. M.; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Fabricius, Katharina E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms leading to rapid death of corals when exposed to runoff and resuspended sediments, postulating that the killing was microbially mediated. Microsensor measurements were conducted in mesocosm experiments and in naturally accumulated sediment on corals. In organic-rich, but not in organic-poor sediment, pH and oxygen started to decrease as soon as the sediment accumulated on the coral. Organic-rich sediments caused tissue degradation within 1 d, whereas organic-poo...

  7. Contaminant variability in a sedimentation area of the river Rhine.

    OpenAIRE

    Winkels, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Aquatic sediments in sedimentation zones of major rivers are in general sinks for pollutants. The sedimentation zone Ketelmeer/IJsselmeer is an important sink for contaminants of the river Rhine (i.e. river IJssel). Recent and historical pollution interact here. Redistribution of suspended solids and erosion of deposited sediment in the shallow Dutch lakes (due to wave action) are likely to change contamination levels of sediments in these lakes, which is the subject of this thesis. The aim o...

  8. Study on utilizing ultrasonic for measurement of sediment concentration distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiaChunjuan; TangMaoguan

    1998-01-01

    In the course of sedimentation research, the measurement of sediment concentration and its distribution is very important. At present, most traditional methods are arduous and cannot measure the sediment timely and successively. In order to seek the new measurement method,the paper reports utilizing ultrasonic measurement. When ultrasonic wave spreads along the depth in aqueous suspensions, the scatter intensity of sediment particles changes the depth and sediment concentration. Based on this principle,

  9. SEDIMENT DEPOSITION IN A SOUTH SULAWESI SEAGRASS BED

    OpenAIRE

    Lanuru, Mahatma

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of suspended sediment was measured with sediment traps in shallow coastal water colonized by Thallasia dominated seagrass in Pannikiang Island, South Sulawesi (Indonesia). The primary objective of this study was to compare the amounts of sediment deposition inside seagrass beds and in adjacent unvegetated area. The traps were placed in a seagrass bed (station I, II, and III) and in an adjacent unvegetated area (Station IV) measuring the sediment flux on the seabed. The sediment f...

  10. Large-scale suspended sediment transport and sediment deposition in the Mekong Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manh, N. V.; Dung, N. V.; Hung, N. N.; Merz, B.; Apel, H.

    2014-08-01

    Sediment dynamics play a major role in the agricultural and fishery productivity of the Mekong Delta. However, the understanding of sediment dynamics in the delta, one of the most complex river deltas in the world, is very limited. This is a consequence of its large extent, the intricate system of rivers, channels and floodplains, and the scarcity of observations. This study quantifies, for the first time, the suspended sediment transport and sediment deposition in the whole Mekong Delta. To this end, a quasi-2D hydrodynamic model is combined with a cohesive sediment transport model. The combined model is calibrated using six objective functions to represent the different aspects of the hydraulic and sediment transport components. The model is calibrated for the extreme flood season in 2011 and shows good performance for 2 validation years with very different flood characteristics. It is shown how sediment transport and sediment deposition is differentiated from Kratie at the entrance of the delta on its way to the coast. The main factors influencing the spatial sediment dynamics are the river and channel system, dike rings, sluice gate operations, the magnitude of the floods, and tidal influences. The superposition of these factors leads to high spatial variability of sediment transport, in particular in the Vietnamese floodplains. Depending on the flood magnitude, annual sediment loads reaching the coast vary from 48 to 60% of the sediment load at Kratie. Deposited sediment varies from 19 to 23% of the annual load at Kratie in Cambodian floodplains, and from 1 to 6% in the compartmented and diked floodplains in Vietnam. Annual deposited nutrients (N, P, K), which are associated with the sediment deposition, provide on average more than 50% of mineral fertilizers typically applied for rice crops in non-flooded ring dike floodplains in Vietnam. Through the quantification of sediment and related nutrient input, the presented study provides a quantitative basis for

  11. Earthflow sediment production and Holocene sediment record in a large Apennine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Alessandro; Ponza, Alessio; Picotti, Vincenzo; Berti, Matteo; Dinelli, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    Landscape evolution in active mountain chains can be dominated by gravitational slope movements. This is observed in a large portion of the Reno river catchment, Apennines, Italy, where weak rocks, such as clayshales, are subject to earthflows that control hillslope morphology and supply sediments to the channel network. In this paper, we evaluate the sediment flux generated by earthflows and compare it with Holocene-averaged deposition rates to assess the contribution of mass movements to landscape evolution. Present-day hillslope sediment flux is estimated by combining measured displacement rates (72 inclinometers) and spatial attributes of earthflows and historical frequency of reactivations. Averaged sediment yield (~ 1.6 x 103 t/km2/yr) compares well with similar studies on earthflow-dominated landscapes, despite notable differences in methodology. In the study area, the connectivity between hillslopes and the stream network is well developed and no significant sediment sinks influence the sediment transport processes. We document best estimates of regional sediment fluxes and related uncertainties, based on available data. Coarse limestone fragments, present in the clayshales, are used as a natural sediment tracer to allow a comparison with sedimentation rates taking place at the mouth of the intramontane catchment. Here, available borehole logs, 14C datings and stratigraphic correlations of the alluvial fan are used to obtain an estimate of the deposition that took place during Holocene times. Taking also into account the role of solute transport, sedimentation rates are compared to earthflow sediment production rates. Results show a good agreement and demonstrate that earthflows are the primary mass wasting process in these weak rock lithologies. We document best estimates of regional sediment fluxes and related uncertainties. Present earthflow sediment production outpaces Holocene-averaged sedimentation rates by a factor of two. The gap between sediment

  12. Dynamic sediment trapping and episodic sediment accretion in fluviodeltaic environments: Implications for coastal restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z.; Tornqvist, T. E.; Chamberlain, E. L.; Esposito, C. R.; Marshak, J.; Nijhuis, A.; Sandoval, L.; Mauz, B.

    2013-12-01

    Many large river deltas are experiencing severe land loss because of various natural and anthropogenic causes. This is truly the case for the Mississippi Delta where ~40 km2/yr land loess have been documented for the last 25 years. A solid understanding about fluviodeltaic sediment dispersion and accretion is essential to improve management of fluviodeltaic landscapes. Here we present field data collected from the Bayou Lafourche subdelta in the Mississippi Delta to investigate the sedimentary and chronologic development of the Bayou Lafourche floodplain. The textural composition of the floodplain deposits shows dramatic changes along Bayou Lafourche. In the upstream portion where Bayou Lafourche cut through swamp environments, the floodplain deposits are dominantly mud, similar in composition to sediment load of the Lower Mississippi River. This suggests that the floodplain in this reach has a relatively high sediment trapping efficiency, which is confirmed by a >50% sediment trapping efficiency estimated for a crevasse splay there. In contrast, Bayou Lafourche floodplain deposits are sand dominant in the downstream portion where the subdelta extended into an open water environment, which suggests a relatively low sediment trapping efficiency in open water environments, similar to the Wax Lake Delta in the Mississippi Delta. Optical chronology for the Bayou Lafourche floodplain deposits demonstrates that fluviodeltaic sedimentation is episodic at a centennial time scale. As a consequence of relatively high sediment trapping efficiency and the episodic pattern of fluviodeltaic deposition, sediment accretion rates on the upstream portion of Bayou Lafourche are on the order of cm/yr at a centennial time scale. Our data suggest that mud, which constitutes ~80% of the Lower Mississippi River sediment load, can be used efficiently for wetland creation if being diverted to locations favor a high trapping efficiency, such as inland vegetated swamps. The sediment accretion

  13. Remediation of sediments contaminated by oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent environmental legislation and increased awareness of the environmental pollution by oil spills have stimulated a demand for invention, development and implementation of effective remediation technologies. There are positive achievements in cleaning up of terrestrial ecosystems but remediation of aquatic ecosystems is still acute problem. Oil contaminated bottom sediments are the chronic contamination source for the aquatic ecosystems. General practice of most oil companies in Russia for treatment of oil spills in rivers and lakes is limited to harvesting of floating oil and treatment of spoiled shore. The pilot project on remediation of Shuchye Lake (Usinsk District, Komi Republic, Arctic European part of Russia) supported by oil production company Lukoil-Comi Ltd. is carried out by NTT Priborservice Ltd. NTT Priborservice Ltd. is R and D enterprise specialized in the contaminated soils, sediments and water remediation, and production of equipments (devices) for this. The project aimed to develop and implement cost-effective technology for cleaning up sediments contaminated by oil hydrocarbons. The technology is based on combination of physico-mechanical and biological approaches. Treatment of bottoms sediments was carried out with usage of the original devices for flotation ('Flotator') and aeration. Usage of 'Flotator' allows to extract petroleum hydrocarbons from sediments excepting mineral particles. Treatment of bottom sediments is combined with aeration of deep layers of water and supplying fertilizers to stimulate microflora, zooplankton and phytoplankton. The project consists of several steps. Survey carried out before the first step of project indicated the average depth of water was ∼4 m (max 7 m), the initial concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons in bottom sediments was ∼55 g/kg dw (max 125 g/kg dw). Total amount of bottom surface treated during the first step of the project (July-August 2004) was 4 ha. Monitoring allows to assess the

  14. [Toxicologic blood emergency screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sabine; Manat, Aurélie; Dumont, Benoit; Bévalot, Fabien; Manchon, Monique; Berny, Claudette

    2010-01-01

    In order to overcome the stop marketing by Biorad company of automated high performance liquid chromatograph with UV detection (Remedi), we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and to give an approximation of the overdose of molecules frequently encountered in drug intoxications. Therefore two hundred eighty seventeen blood samples were collected over a period of one year and allowed us to evaluate and compare the performance of these two techniques. As identification, GC-MS does not identify all molecules detected by Remedi in 24.2% of cases; there is a lack of sensitivity for opiates and the systematic absence of certain molecules such as betablockers. However, in 75.8% of cases the GC-MS detects all molecules found by Remedi and other molecules such as meprobamate, paracetamol, benzodiazepines and phenobarbital. The concentrations obtained are interpreted in terms of overdose showed 15.7% of discrepancy and 84.3% of concordance between the two techniques. The GC-MS technique described here is robust, fast and relatively simple to implement; the identification is facilitated by macro commands and the semi quantification remains manual. Despite a sequence of cleaning the column after each sample, carryover of a sample to the next remains possible. This technique can be used for toxicologic screening in acute intoxications. Nevertheless it must be supplemented by a HPLC with UV detection if molecules such as betablockers are suspected. PMID:20348049

  15. Blood Vessels in Allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahimi, P; Liu, R; Pober, J S

    2015-07-01

    Human vascularized allografts are perfused through blood vessels composed of cells (endothelium, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells) that remain largely of graft origin and are thus subject to host alloimmune responses. Graft vessels must be healthy to maintain homeostatic functions including control of perfusion, maintenance of permselectivity, prevention of thrombosis, and participation in immune surveillance. Vascular cell injury can cause dysfunction that interferes with these processes. Graft vascular cells can be activated by mediators of innate and adaptive immunity to participate in graft inflammation contributing to both ischemia/reperfusion injury and allograft rejection. Different forms of rejection may affect graft vessels in different ways, ranging from thrombosis and neutrophilic inflammation in hyperacute rejection, to endothelialitis/intimal arteritis and fibrinoid necrosis in acute cell-mediated or antibody-mediated rejection, respectively, and to diffuse luminal stenosis in chronic rejection. While some current therapies targeting the host immune system do affect graft vascular cells, direct targeting of the graft vasculature may create new opportunities for preventing allograft injury and loss. PMID:25807965

  16. BIOMATERIALS FOR ROTARY BLOOD PUMPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANOEVEREN, W

    1995-01-01

    Rotary blood pumps are used for cardiac assist and cardiopulmonary support since mechanical blood damage is less than with conventional roller pumps. The high shear rate in the rotary pump and the reduced anticoagulation of the patient during prolonged pumping enforces high demands on the biocompati

  17. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not, you should ask for your readings. Blood Pressure Severity and Type Your health care provider usually takes 2–3 ... any other location. Health care providers diagnose this type of high blood pressure by reviewing readings in the office and ...

  18. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  19. Local Control of Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Organ blood flow is determined by perfusion pressure and vasomotor tone in the resistance vessels of the organ. Local factors that regulate vasomotor tone include myogenic and metabolic autoregulation, flow-mediated and conducted responses, and vasoactive substances released from red blood cells. The relative importance of each of these factors…

  20. Blood Test: Lead (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Test: Lead KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Lead Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Análisis de sangre: plomo What It Is A lead test is used to determine the amount of ...

  1. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Public Health Topics Education & Awareness Resources Contact The Health Information ... Contact Us FAQs Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » High Blood Pressure » Diagnosis of High Blood ...

  2. Two small lymphocyte subpopulations in human peripheral blood. I. Purification and surface marker profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Hokland, P; Heron, I

    1978-01-01

    By means of simple rosette sedimentation methods two subsets from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been isolated: (1) (E, Fc)- and (2) (E, Ig)-. The first subset was obtained by centrifuging suspensions of macrophage-depleted PBL in which E and EA rosettes had been allowed to form simultan......By means of simple rosette sedimentation methods two subsets from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been isolated: (1) (E, Fc)- and (2) (E, Ig)-. The first subset was obtained by centrifuging suspensions of macrophage-depleted PBL in which E and EA rosettes had been allowed to form...... simultaneously. The dominant marker of these E- Fc- cells was surface Ig, and during 4 days of culture this population did not alter its surface markers. Subset 2 was obtained in two ways following rosette centrifugation with AET-treated SRBC and rabbit anti-human Ig-coated autologous RBC. This 'Null cell...

  3. Shifting Sediment Sources in the Quaternary Nile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Jamie; Macklin, Mark; Fielding, Laura; Millar, Ian; Williams, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Invited Paper The Nile basin contains the longest river channel system in the world and drains about one tenth of the African continent. A dominant characteristic of the modern Nile is the marked spatial and temporal variability in the flux of water and sediment. Because the major headwater basins of the Nile are linked to key elements of the global climate system, the sedimentary records in the basin have attracted good deal of attention from the Quaternary palaeoclimate and palaeohydrology communities. Various approaches (from heavy minerals to strontium isotopes) have been employed to examine present and past patterns of sediment yield in the basin. A good deal of work has been carried out on the long sediment records in the delta and offshore which provide high resolution archives of hydrological changes in the upstream basin as well fluctuations in the input of dust from the desert. The sediment load of the modern desert Nile (downstream of Khartoum) is dominated by sediment inputs from the Blue Nile (61 +/- 5%) and Atbara (35 +/- 4%), whilst the White Nile contribution is meagre (3 +/- 2%) (Padoan et al. 2011). Recent work has shown that these values were very different during humid phases of the Quaternary when stronger Northern Hemisphere summer insolation produced wetter conditions across North Africa. In the early Holocene, for example, the Nile floodplain in Northern Sudan shows a tributary wadi input of 40-50%. This paper will review three decades of work on the sediment delivery dynamics of the Quaternary Nile and explore their palaeoclimatic implications. Padoan, M., Garzanti, E., Harlavan, Y., Villa, I.M. (2011) Tracing Nile sediment sources by Sr and Nd isotope signatures (Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75 (12), 3627-3644.

  4. Autologous blood storage in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, W N; Owen, H G; Collins, M L

    1988-08-01

    Autologous transfusion, storage of one's own blood for subsequent infusion if needed, is safe and effective in a variety of scheduled operative procedures. Obstetric involvement in such programs is very limited, however. Thirty pregnant women with placenta previa or other potential complications underwent 55 phlebotomies in an autologous transfusion program. Phlebotomies were performed at an average gestational age of 32.4 weeks (range 13-40). Changes in mean diastolic blood pressure and pulse were minimal. Electronic fetal monitoring tracings were normal during the 34 procedures in which it was used. The frequency of mild donor reactions (4%) was consistent with that in nonpregnant donors. After entry into this program, 15 patients received a total of 29 U of packed red blood cells (23 autologous; six homologous). Homologous transfusion was avoided in 86.7% of patients receiving blood. Selected pregnant women can participate safely in autologous blood collection programs, minimizing the need, and therefore the risks, of homologous transfusion. PMID:3292974

  5. Peripheral blood count in preoperative radiotherapy (with radiomodificators) of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indices of peripheral blood in 215 patients with lung cancer during preoperative radiation using hyperglycemia or metronidazole are studied. It is shown that after preoperative radiotherapy, when radiomodifying effects are not used, the content of erythrocytes, thrombocytes, leukocytes, the concentration of hemoglobin in peripheral blood, as well as erythrocyte sedimentation rare didn't change. Functional disorders of the leukopoietic function and the thrombopoietic function of bone marrow when using metronidazole are registered when applying various types of preoperative radiotherapy. Lymphopenia is established when using various types of radiotherapy with radiomodificators

  6. Sediment Types - SEDIMENT_INVENTORY_EPA_IN: National Sediment Inventory (NSI) and Data Summaries in Indiana, Derived from EPA BASINS 3 (United States Environmental Protection Agency, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — SEDIMENT_INVENTORY_EPA_IN is a point shapefile from the National Sediment Inventory developed by the USEPA BASINS 3.0 program and edited by Bernardin, Lochmueller...

  7. Sediment connectivity: A framework for understanding sediment transfer at multiple scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracken, Louise J.; Turnbull, Laura; Wainwright, John; Bogaart, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for geomorphologists is to scale up small-magnitude processes to produce landscape form, yet existing approaches have been found to be severely limited. New ways to scale erosion and transfer of sediment are thus needed. This paper evaluates the concept of sediment connectivity as

  8. Sedimentation rates and age modeling of Late Quaternary marine sediments with unsupported 230Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    230Th is a radionuclide of the 238U decay series, characterized by natural abundance in sediments and a half-life of 75,380 years, suitable for direct evaluation of sedimentation rates and sediment ages in a time scale of 700,000 years before the present. 230Th cycle creates a contrast between supported and unsupported 230Th in the sedimentary matrix due to the different geochemical behaviors of 230Th and its parent, 234U. This study aimed at establishing and validating a mathematical model that evaluates sedimentation rates and age modeling based on 230Th data retrieved from a sediment core sampled in the southeastern Brazilian continental margin. The validation of the age modeling of this method was made through a statistical comparison between its results and those of benthic foraminifera δ 18O record technique, widely used for sediment dating and determination of sedimentation rates. It was observed that the model of unsupported 230Th was successful in determining Late Quaternary sedimentation rates and ages in a confidence level of 95 %. It was possible to determine several breaking points in unsupported 230Th vertical profile, and it was shown that those divides correspond to some major intervals between glacial and interglacial periods when compared with the benthic foraminifera record. (author)

  9. Reservoir Sedimentation and Upstream Sediment Sources: Perspectives and Future Research Needs on Streambank and Gully Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, G. A.; Sheshukov, A.; Cruse, R.; Kolar, R. L.; Guertault, L.; Gesch, K. R.; Dutnell, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    The future reliance on water supply and flood control reservoirs across the globe will continue to expand, especially under a variable climate. As the inventory of new potential dam sites is shrinking, construction of additional reservoirs is less likely compared to simultaneous flow and sediment management in existing reservoirs. One aspect of this sediment management is related to the control of upstream sediment sources. However, key research questions remain regarding upstream sediment loading rates. Highlighted in this article are research needs relative to measuring and predicting sediment transport rates and loading due to streambank and gully erosion within a watershed. For example, additional instream sediment transport and reservoir sedimentation rate measurements are needed across a range of watershed conditions, reservoir sizes, and geographical locations. More research is needed to understand the intricate linkage between upland practices and instream response. A need still exists to clarify the benefit of restoration or stabilization of a small reach within a channel system or maturing gully on total watershed sediment load. We need to better understand the intricate interactions between hydrological and erosion processes to improve prediction, location, and timing of streambank erosion and failure and gully formation. Also, improved process-based measurement and prediction techniques are needed that balance data requirements regarding cohesive soil erodibility and stability as compared to simpler topographic indices for gullies or stream classification systems. Such techniques will allow the research community to address the benefit of various conservation and/or stabilization practices at targeted locations within watersheds.

  10. Reference material for radionuclides in sediment IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povinec, P.P.; Pham, M.K.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.;

    2007-01-01

    A reference material designed for the determination of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in sediment, IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment), is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 8 radionuclides (K-40, Co-60, Eu-155, Th-230, U-238, ...

  11. Identifying cause in sediment assessments : bioavailability and the sediment quality triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgmann, U.; Norwood, W.P.; Reynoldson, T.B.; Rosa, F. [Environment Canada, Burlington, ON (Canada). National Water Research Inst.

    2001-05-01

    A study was conducted to examine the biological impacts of metals in sediments found in the Sudbury area lakes. This study included the analysis of the standard Sediment Quality Triad components from a 1996 study. Metal bioavailability or bioaccumulation in Hyalella azteca was also measured under laboratory conditions with fresh sediments collected in 1998 to determine the adequacy of the Sediment Quality Triad. The objective of the study was to determine first of all if contaminants are getting into the system, and if so, whether they are bioavailable. The second objective was to see if there is a measurable response and to determine what is causing the response. The application of the Sediment Quality Triad approach to non-pH-stressed area lakes showed increased levels of cadmium, cobalt, copper and nickel, with decreased amounts of benthic invertebrates and significant sediment toxicity to amphipods and mayflies. The cause of sediment toxicity was determined by comparing metal bioaccumulation with critical body concentrations previously shown to cause toxicity. Nickel was the only metal that was clearly identified as contributing to toxicity in chronic tests with Hyalella exposed to Sudbury area sediments. 31 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  12. Effect of suspended sediment grain size on channel sedimentation in the lower Yellow River and some implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU JiongXin; HU ChunHong; CHEN JianGuo

    2009-01-01

    Based on the data of suspended sediment transport and channel sedimentation in various grain size fractions in the period of 1962-1985,the relationship between channel sedimentation in the lower Yellow River and sediment input has been plotted with respect to each grain size fraction.Several fill-scour thresholds in sediment input have been identified from these graphs.It was found that the fill-scour threshold in sediment input decreases with the increase in fraction grain size.The correlation coefficient between channel sedimentation and sediment input becomes larger with the increasing fraction grain size,indicating that channel sedimentation depends more on coarser grain size fractions than on smaller ones.The fraction channel sedimentation induced by unit change of fraction sediment input increases with grain size.Of the input of sediment larger than 0.025 mm,43.73% was deposited on the channel,and for inputs of sediments larger than 0.05 mm and larger than 0.10 mm,76.61% and 97.68% were deposited on the channel,respectively.Thus,for reduction of each ton of sediment larger than 0.10 mm from the drainage basin,the resultant reduction in channel sedimentation in the lower Yellow River would be 1.275 times that for the sediment larger than 0.10 mm,and 2.234 times that for the sediment larger than 0.025 mm.Therefore,if the erosion and sediment control measures are enforced in the areas where >0.05 or >0.10 mm sediment is produced,then the best beneficial will be achieved in reducing sedimentation in the lower Yellow River.

  13. Effect of suspended sediment grain size on channel sedimentation in the lower Yellow River and some implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the data of suspended sediment transport and channel sedimentation in various grain size fractions in the period of 1962―1985, the relationship between channel sedimentation in the lower Yellow River and sediment input has been plotted with respect to each grain size fraction. Several fill-scour thresholds in sediment input have been identified from these graphs. It was found that the fill-scour threshold in sediment input decreases with the increase in fraction grain size. The correlation coefficient between channel sedimentation and sediment input becomes larger with the increasing fraction grain size, indicating that channel sedimentation depends more on coarser grain size fractions than on smaller ones. The fraction channel sedimentation induced by unit change of fraction sediment input increases with grain size. Of the input of sediment larger than 0.025 mm, 43.73% was deposited on the channel, and for inputs of sediments larger than 0.05 mm and larger than 0.10 mm, 76.61% and 97.68% were deposited on the channel, respectively. Thus, for reduction of each ton of sediment larger than 0.10 mm from the drainage basin, the resultant reduction in channel sedimentation in the lower Yellow River would be 1.275 times that for the sediment larger than 0.10 mm, and 2.234 times that for the sediment larger than 0.025 mm. Therefore, if the erosion and sediment control measures are enforced in the areas where >0.05 or >0.10 mm sediment is produced, then the best beneficial will be achieved in reducing sedimentation in the lower Yellow River.

  14. Bioleaching of heavy metal polluted sediment: influence of sediment properties. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeser, C. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Lebensmittel- und Bioverfahrenstechnik, Bergstrasse 120, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Zehnsdorf, A. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Umwelt- und Biotechnologisches Zentrum, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hoffmann, P.; Seidel, H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    A remediation process for heavy metal polluted sediment has previously been developed, in which the heavy metals are removed from the sediment by solid-bed bioleaching using sulfuric acid as a leaching agent arising from added elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}). This process has been engineered with Weisse Elster River sediment (dredged near Leipzig, Germany), as an example. Here, six heavy metal polluted sediments originating from various bodies of water in Germany were subjected to bioleaching to evaluate the applicability of the developed process on sediment of different nature: each sediment was mixed with 2 % S{sup 0}, suspended in water and then leached under identical conditions. The buffer characteristics of each sediment were mainly governed by its carbonate and Ca content, i.e., by its geological background, the redox potential and oxidation state depended on its pre-treatment (e.g., on land disposal), while the pH value was influenced by both. The added S{sup 0} was quickly oxidized by the indigenous microbes even in slightly alkaline sediment. The microbially generated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} accumulated in the aqueous phase and was in part precipitated as gypsum. Significant acidification and heavy metal solubilization only occurred with sediment poor in buffer substances. With the exception of one sediment, the behavior in bioleaching correlated well with the behavior in titration with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Since the content in carbonate seemed to be the most important factor deciding on the leachability of a sediment, oxic Weisse Elster River sediment was mixed with 2 % S{sup 0} and 0 to 100 g/kg of ground limestone to simulate various buffer capacities, suspended in water and then leached. The lime did not inhibit microbial S{sup 0} oxidation but generated a delay in acidification due to neutralization of formed H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, where the pH only started to decrease when the lime was completely consumed. The more lime the sediment contained, the longer this lag

  15. Sediment contributions from floodplains and legacy sediments to Piedmont streams of Baltimore County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Mitchell; Miller, Andrew; Baker, Matthew; Gellis, Allen

    2015-04-01

    Disparity between watershed erosion rates and downstream sediment delivery has remained an important theme in geomorphology for many decades, with the role of floodplains in sediment storage as a common focus. In the Piedmont Province of the eastern USA, upland deforestation and agricultural land use following European settlement led to accumulation of thick packages of overbank sediment in valley bottoms, commonly referred to as legacy deposits. Previous authors have argued that legacy deposits represent a potentially important source of modern sediment loads following remobilization by lateral migration and progressive channel widening. This paper seeks to quantify (1) rates of sediment remobilization from Baltimore County floodplains by channel migration and bank erosion, (2) proportions of streambank sediment derived from legacy deposits, and (3) potential contribution of net streambank erosion and legacy sediments to downstream sediment yield within the Mid-Atlantic Piedmont. We calculated measurable gross erosion and deposition rates within the fluvial corridor along 40 valley segments from 18 watersheds with drainage areas between 0.18 and 155 km2 in Baltimore County, Maryland. We compared stream channel and floodplain morphology from lidar-based digital elevation data collected in 2005 with channel positions recorded on 1:2400 scale topographic maps from 1959-1961 in order to quantify 44-46 years of channel change. Sediment bulk density and particle size distributions were characterized from streambank and channel deposit samples and used for volume to mass conversions and for comparison with other sediment sources. Average annual lateral migration rates ranged from 0.04 to 0.19 m/y, which represented an annual migration of 2.5% (0.9-4.4%) channel width across all study segments, suggesting that channel dimensions may be used as reasonable predictors of bank erosion rates. Gross bank erosion rates varied from 43 to 310 Mg/km/y (median = 114) and were

  16. On extracting sediment transport information from measurements of luminescence in river sediment

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Harrison J; Mahan, Shannon A; McGuire, Chris; Rhodes, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Accurately quantifying sediment transport rates in rivers remains an important goal for geomorphologists, hydraulic engineers, and environmental scientists. However, current techniques for measuring transport rates are laborious, and formulae to predict transport are notoriously inaccurate. Here, we attempt to estimate sediment transport rates using luminescence, a property of common sedimentary minerals that is used by the geoscience community for geochronology. This method is advantageous because of the ease of measurement on ubiquitous quartz and feldspar sand. We develop a model based on conservation of energy and sediment mass to explain the patterns of luminescence in river channel sediment from a first-principles perspective. We show that the model can accurately reproduce the luminescence observed in previously published field measurements from two rivers with very different sediment transport styles. The parameters from the model can then be used to estimate the time-averaged virtual velocity, charac...

  17. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki J Hendrick

    Full Text Available The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura, the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus, showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa. With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally

  18. Sedimentation rate and {sup 210}Pb sediment dating at Apipucos reservoir, Recife, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Marcela D.C. de; Silva, Danubia B. da; Cunha, Manuela S. da; Rodrigues, Kelia R.G.; Pedroza, Eryka H.; Melo, Roberto T. de; Oliveira, Aristides; Hazin, Clovis A.; Souza, Vivianne L.B. de, E-mail: rtmelo@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: vlsouza@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Apipucos Reservoir is located in Recife, State of Pernambuco, and, several districts of the metropolitan area use this reservoir to dispose waste and sewage. Dating sediments uses {sup 210}Pb from the atmosphere which is formed as a result of {sup 222}Rn emanation from the soil. Atmospheric lead, carried by rain, is called non-supported {sup 21}'0Pb, to differentiate it from the one contained in the sediment, in balance with the {sup 226}Ra. The model chosen for dating sediments depends on certain conditions: in an environment where the amount of sediment influx can vary, the constant rate of supply model is adopted. On the other hand, in environments where the sedimentation rate is constant and the sediment can be considered to have a constant initial concentration of unsupported {sup 210}Pb and the (CIC) model is applied. A 70-cm long, 5-cm internal-diameter wide core was collected for sediment dating. Each core was sliced, into 5 or 10 cm intervals. Samples were dried at 105 deg C, and about 5 g dry material from each sample was dissolved with acids. The {sup 210}Pb and {sup 226}Ra contents were separated and determined by beta and alpha counting by using a gas-flow proportional counter. Sediment ages were calculated by the two models, and for the second and fourth sampling points, both models could be used. The results showed an increase in sedimentation rate over the last 50 - 60 years. We can conclude that the top sediment layer is dated from 30 years ago. We can also conclude that the CRS is the best applicable model to use in this area. (author)

  19. Resuspension of sediment, a new approach for remediation of contaminated sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourabadehei, Mehdi; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2016-06-01

    Natural events and anthropogenic activities are the reasons of undesirable resuspension of contaminated sediments in aquatic environment. Uncontrolled resuspension could remobilize weakly bound heavy metals into overlying water and pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystem. Shallow harbours, with contaminated sediments are subjected to the risk of uncontrolled resuspension. Remediation of sediments in these areas cannot be performed by conventional in situ methods (e.g. capping with or without reactive amendment). Ex situ remediation also requires dredging of sediment, which could increase the risk of spreading contaminants. Alternatively, the resuspension technique was introduced to address these issues. The concept of the resuspension method is that finer sediments have a greater tendency to adsorb the contamination. Therefore, finer sediments, believed carry more concentration of contaminants, were targeted for removal from aquatic environment by a suspension mechanism in a confined water column. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the resuspension technique as a new approach for remediation of contaminated sediment and a viable option to reduce the risk of remobilization of contaminants in harbours due to an undesirable resuspension event. Unlike the common in situ techniques, the resuspension method could successfully reduce the total concentration of contaminants in almost all samples below the probable effect level (PEL) with no significant change in the quality of overlying water. The results indicated that removal efficiency could be drastically enhanced for metals in sediment with a higher enrichment factor. Moreover, availability of metals (e.g. Cd and Pb) with a high concentration in labile fractions was higher in finer sediments with a high enrichment factor. Consequently, removal of contaminants from sediment through the resuspension method could reduce the risk of mobility and availability of metals under changing

  20. Resuspension of sediment, a new approach for remediation of contaminated sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourabadehei, Mehdi; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2016-06-01

    Natural events and anthropogenic activities are the reasons of undesirable resuspension of contaminated sediments in aquatic environment. Uncontrolled resuspension could remobilize weakly bound heavy metals into overlying water and pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystem. Shallow harbours, with contaminated sediments are subjected to the risk of uncontrolled resuspension. Remediation of sediments in these areas cannot be performed by conventional in situ methods (e.g. capping with or without reactive amendment). Ex situ remediation also requires dredging of sediment, which could increase the risk of spreading contaminants. Alternatively, the resuspension technique was introduced to address these issues. The concept of the resuspension method is that finer sediments have a greater tendency to adsorb the contamination. Therefore, finer sediments, believed carry more concentration of contaminants, were targeted for removal from aquatic environment by a suspension mechanism in a confined water column. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the resuspension technique as a new approach for remediation of contaminated sediment and a viable option to reduce the risk of remobilization of contaminants in harbours due to an undesirable resuspension event. Unlike the common in situ techniques, the resuspension method could successfully reduce the total concentration of contaminants in almost all samples below the probable effect level (PEL) with no significant change in the quality of overlying water. The results indicated that removal efficiency could be drastically enhanced for metals in sediment with a higher enrichment factor. Moreover, availability of metals (e.g. Cd and Pb) with a high concentration in labile fractions was higher in finer sediments with a high enrichment factor. Consequently, removal of contaminants from sediment through the resuspension method could reduce the risk of mobility and availability of metals under changing

  1. Bioavailability of lead in North Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, M.; Kröncke, I.

    1991-12-01

    As part of an interdisciplinary research programme, lead contents were measured in the polychaete Nephtys spp. and in the sea-urchin Echinocardium cordatum as well as in the respective sediment fractions <20 μm taken from the Dogger Bank proper and the eastern coastal North Sea. A lower lead content was generally observed in the organisms taken from the German Bight than in those from the Dogger Bank, especially from its northeastern part. It is possible to divide both areas according to the slope found in the linear regression of lead versus total organic carbon contents in sediments, which is twice as steep for the Dogger Bank as for the eastern North Sea. This criterium points to a difference in sediment quality with regard to toxic metal contamination. The sediment quality of the Dogger Bank seems to be twice as bad compared with that of the eastern North Sea. This is in good agreement with the differences found in lead contamination of the sediment-dwelling polychaetes from both areas. The results indicate that lead is primarily accumulated by food ingestion.

  2. Mathematical simulation of sediment and radionuclide transport in estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

    1982-11-01

    The finite element model LFESCOT (Flow, Energy, Salinity, Sediment and Contaminant Transport Model) was synthesized under this study to simulate radionuclide transport in estuaries to obtain accurate radionuclide distributions which are affected by these factors: time variance, three-dimensional flow, temperature, salinity, and sediments. Because sediment transport and radionuclide adsorption/desorption depend strongly on sizes or types of sediments, FLESCOT simulates sediment and a sediment-sorbed radionuclide for the total of three sediment-size fractions (or sediment types) of both cohesive and noncohesive sediments. It also calculates changes of estuarine bed conditions, including bed elevation changes due to sediment erosion/deposition, and three-dimensional distributions of three bed sediment sizes and sediment-sorbed radionuclides within the bed. Although the model was synthesized for radionuclide transport, it is general enough to also handle other contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides, or toxic chemicals. The model was checked for its capability for flow, water surface elevation change, salinity, sediment and radionuclide transport under various simple conditions first, confirming the general validity of the model's computational schemes. These tests also revealed that FLESCOT can use large aspect ratios of computational cells, which are necessary in handling long estuarine study areas. After these simple tests, FLESCOT was applied to the Hudson River estuary between Chelsea and the mouth of the river to examine how well the model can predict radionuclide transport through simulating tidally influenced three-dimensional flow, salinity, sediment and radionuclide movements with their interactions.

  3. Mathematical simulation of sediment and radionuclide transport in estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The finite element model LFESCOT (Flow, Energy, Salinity, Sediment and Contaminant Transport Model) was synthesized under this study to simulate radionuclide transport in estuaries to obtain accurate radionuclide distributions which are affected by these factors: time variance, three-dimensional flow, temperature, salinity, and sediments. Because sediment transport and radionuclide adsorption/desorption depend strongly on sizes or types of sediments, FLESCOT simulates sediment and a sediment-sorbed radionuclide for the total of three sediment-size fractions (or sediment types) of both cohesive and noncohesive sediments. It also calculates changes of estuarine bed conditions, including bed elevation changes due to sediment erosion/deposition, and three-dimensional distributions of three bed sediment sizes and sediment-sorbed radionuclides within the bed. Although the model was synthesized for radionuclide transport, it is general enough to also handle other contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides, or toxic chemicals. The model was checked for its capability for flow, water surface elevation change, salinity, sediment and radionuclide transport under various simple conditions first, confirming the general validity of the model's computational schemes. These tests also revealed that FLESCOT can use large aspect ratios of computational cells, which are necessary in handling long estuarine study areas. After these simple tests, FLESCOT was applied to the Hudson River estuary between Chelsea and the mouth of the river to examine how well the model can predict radionuclide transport through simulating tidally influenced three-dimensional flow, salinity, sediment and radionuclide movements with their interactions

  4. Experimental investigation of the effect of sediment transport patterns on the adsorption of cadmium ions onto sediment particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Sui-liang; NG Chiu-on; GUO Qi-zhong

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of flow turbulence, sediment supply conditions, and sediment transport patterns that affect the adsorption of cadmium ions onto sediment particles in natural waters are experimentally simulated and studied in this study both in batch reactors and in a turbulence simulation tank. By changing the agitation conditions, the sediment transport in batch reactors can be categorized into bottom sediment-dominated sediment and suspended sediment-dominated sediment. It is found that the adsorption rate of bottom sediment is much less than that of suspended sediment, but the sediment transport pattern does not affect the final (equilibrium) concentration of dissolved cadmium. This result indicates that the parameters of an adsorption isotherm are the same regardless of the sediment transport pattern. In the turbulence simulation tank, the turbulence is generated by harmonic grid-stirred motions, and the turbulence intensity is quantified in terms of eddy diffusivity, which is equal to 9.84F(F is the harmonic vibration frequency) and is comparable to natural surface water conditions.When the turbulence intensity of flow is low and sediment particles stay as bottom sediment, the adsorption rate is significantly low, and the adsorption quantity compared with that of suspended sediment is negligible in the 6 h duration of the experiment. This result greatly favors the simplification of the numerical modeling of heavy metal pollutant transformation in natural rivers. When the turbulence intensity is high but bottom sediment persists, the rate and extent of descent of the dissolved cadmium concentration in the tank noticeably increase, and the time that is required to reach adsorption equilibrium also increases considerably due to the continuous exchange that occurs between the suspended sediment and the bottom sediment.A comparison of the results of the experiments in the batch reactor and those in the turbulence simulation tank reveals that the adsorption ability of

  5. Diet, blood pressure, and multicollinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D; McGee, D; Yano, K; Hankin, J

    1985-01-01

    Recent reports of an inverse association between dietary calcium intake and hypertension stimulated this analysis of the relationship of blood pressure to more than 20 dietary factors among a group of 8000 Japanese men in Hawaii. Reported intakes of potassium, calcium, protein, and milk were all inversely associated with blood pressure levels when examined one at a time while controlling for other risk factors. Alcohol intake was directly associated with blood pressure, and was treated as a confounding variable in the analysis. The association of potassium intake with blood pressure was relatively stronger than the associations for other nutrients, but the intake of potassium was so highly correlated with intakes of calcium, milk, and protein that it was not statistically possible to identify the independent association of potassium and blood pressure. Calcium intake was strongly correlated with milk and potassium intakes, and only calcium from dairy sources was associated with blood pressure. These data thus indicate that several dietary factors are inversely related to blood pressure levels independently of other risk factors such as age, body mass, and alcohol intake. The high degree of intercorrelation (multicollinearity) among these dietary factors, however, indicates that the independent role of any specific nutrient cannot be conclusively separated from the possible effects of other nutrients in this type of study.

  6. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwee Teck Lim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. Microfluidics is an attractive solution for this application leveraging its numerous advantages to process clinical blood samples. This paper reviews the various microfluidic approaches realized to successfully fractionate one or more blood components. Techniques to separate plasma from hematologic cellular components as well as isolating blood cells of interest including certain rare cells are discussed. Comparisons based on common separation metrics including efficiency (sensitivity, purity (selectivity, and throughput will be presented. Finally, we will provide insights into the challenges associated with blood-based separation systems towards realizing true point-of-care (POC devices and provide future perspectives.

  7. Transfusion of blood and blood products: indications and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Sharma, Poonam; Tyler, Lisa N

    2011-03-15

    Red blood cell transfusions are used to treat hemorrhage and to improve oxygen delivery to tissues. Transfusion of red blood cells should be based on the patient's clinical condition. Indications for transfusion include symptomatic anemia (causing shortness of breath, dizziness, congestive heart failure, and decreased exercise tolerance), acute sickle cell crisis, and acute blood loss of more than 30 percent of blood volume. Fresh frozen plasma infusion can be used for reversal of anticoagulant effects. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent hemorrhage in patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet function defects. Cryoprecipitate is used in cases of hypofibrinogenemia, which most often occurs in the setting of massive hemorrhage or consumptive coagulopathy. Transfusion-related infections are less common than noninfectious complications. All noninfectious complications of transfusion are classified as noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion. Acute complications occur within minutes to 24 hours of the transfusion, whereas delayed complications may develop days, months, or even years later.

  8. 42 CFR 409.87 - Blood deductible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., from an individual or a blood bank, a replacement offer that meets the criteria specified in paragraph... replacement of blood. A blood replacement offer made by a beneficiary, or an individual or a blood bank on... Administration regulations under 21 CFR part 640, i.e.— (1) The replacement blood would not endanger the...

  9. The absorbed dose to blood from blood-borne activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänscheid, H.; Fernández, M.; Lassmann, M.

    2015-01-01

    The radiation absorbed dose to blood and organs from activity in the blood is relevant for nuclear medicine dosimetry and for research in biodosimetry. The present study provides coefficients for the average absorbed dose rates to the blood from blood-borne activity for radionuclides frequently used in targeted radiotherapy and in PET diagnostics. The results were deduced from published data for vessel radius-dependent dose rate coefficients and reasonable assumptions on the blood-volume distribution as a function of the vessel radius. Different parts of the circulatory system were analyzed separately. Vessel size information for heart chambers, aorta, vena cava, pulmonary artery, and capillaries was taken from published results of morphometric measurements. The remaining blood not contained in the mentioned vessels was assumed to reside in fractal-like vascular trees, the smallest branches of which are the arterioles or venules. The applied vessel size distribution is consistent with recommendations of the ICRP on the blood-volume distribution in the human. The resulting average absorbed dose rates to the blood per nuclear disintegration per milliliter (ml) of blood are (in 10-11 Gy·s-1·Bq-1·ml) Y-90: 5.58, I-131: 2.49, Lu-177: 1.72, Sm-153: 2.97, Tc-99m: 0.366, C-11: 4.56, F-18: 3.61, Ga-68: 5.94, I-124: 2.55. Photon radiation contributes 1.1-1.2·10-11 Gy·s-1·Bq-1·ml to the total dose rate for positron emitters but significantly less for the other nuclides. Blood self-absorption of the energy emitted by ß-particles in the whole blood ranges from 37% for Y-90 to 80% for Tc-99m. The correspondent values in vascular trees, which are important for the absorbed dose to organs, range from 30% for Y-90 to 82% for Tc-99m.

  10. Cholangiocytes and blood supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugenio Gaudio; Antonio Franchitto; Luigi Pannarale; Guido Carpino; Gianfranco Alpini; Heather Francis; Shannon Glaser; Domenico Alvaro; Paolo Onori

    2006-01-01

    The microvascular supply of the biliary tree, the peribiliary plexus (PBP), stems from the hepatic artery branches and flows into the hepatic sinusoids. A detailed three-dimensional study of the PBP has been performed by using the Scanning Electron Microscopy vascular corrosion casts (SEMvcc) technique. Considering that the PBP plays a fundamental role in supporting the secretory and absorptive functions of the biliary epithelium, their organization in either normalcy and pathology is explored. The normal liver shows the PBP arranged around extra- and intrahepatic biliary tree.In the small portal tract PBP was characterized by a single layer of capillaries which progressively continued with the extrahepatic PBP where it showed a more complex vascular network. After common duct ligation (BDL), progressive modifications of bile duct and PBP proliferation are observed. The PBP presents a threedimensional network arranged around many bile ducts and appears as bundles of vessels, composed by capillaries of homogeneous diameter with a typical round mesh structure. The PBP network is easily distinguishable from the sinusoidal network which appears normal. Considering the enormous extension of the PBP during BDL, the possible role played by the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is evaluated. VEGF-A,VEGF-C and their related receptors appeared highly immunopositive in proliferating cholangiocytes of BDL rats. The administration of anti-VEGF-A or anti-VEGF-C antibodies to BDL rats as well as hepatic artery ligation induced a reduced bile duct mass. The administration of rVEGF-A to BDL hepatic artery ligated rats prevented the decrease of cholangiocyte proliferation and VEGF-A expression as compared to BDL control rats. These data suggest the role of arterial blood supply of the biliary tree in conditions of cholangiocyte proliferation, such as it occurs during chronic cholestasis. On the other hand,the role played by VEGF as a tool of cross-talk between cholangiocytes

  11. Significance of irradiation of blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many reports of fatal GVHD occurring in non-immunocompromised patients after blood transfusion have been published in Japan. One explantation is that transfused lymphocytes were simulated and attack the recipient organs recognized as HLA incompatible. That is so called 'one-way matching'. To reduce the risk of post-transfusion GVHD, one of the most convenient methods is to irradiate the donated blood at an appropriate dose for inactivation of lymphocytes. Because no one knows about the late effect of irradiated blood, it is necessary to make the prospective safety control. (author)

  12. RATIONAL BASIS FOR SUSPENDED SEDIMENT MODELING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun ZHOU; Binliang LIN; Bingnan LIN

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a rational basis to model the transport of suspended sediment. The looseboundary condition for 3D models and the adjustment coefficients for both the depth-integrated 2D and laterally integrated 1D models are treated comprehensively. A combination of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions is proposed as the loose-boundary condition. The adjustment coefficient for 2D models is obtained on the basis of the proposed boundary condition and analytical solutions developed for some simple cases of non-equilibrium transport of sediment in uniform flows. The adjustment coefficient for 1D models for natural rivers is further obtained from lateral integration. Comparisons with analytical solutions and a considerable amount of laboratory and prototype data show that mathematical models developed along the proposed line of attack would well simulate the transport of suspended sediment in practical problems.

  13. Equilibrium bed-concentration of nonuniform sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the equilibrium bed-concentration is vital to mathematical modeling of the river-bed deformation associated with suspended load but previous investigations only dealt with the reference concentration of uniform sediment because of difficulties in observation of the bed-concentration. This work is a first attempt to develop a theoretical formula for the equilibrium bed-concentration of any fraction of nonuniform sediment defined at the bed-surface. The formula is based on a stochastic-mechanistic model for the exchange of nonuniform sediment near the bed, and described as a function of incipient motion probability, non-ceasing probability, pick-up probability, and the ratio of the average single-step continuous motion time to static time. Comparison of bed-concentration calculated from the proposed formula with the measured data showed satisfactory agreement, indicating the present formula can be used for solving the differential equation governing the motion of suspended load.

  14. Sediment resuspension in the Lake Taihu, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to examine the intensity of surficial sediment resuspension in Lake Taihu, a large shallow lake in eastern China, suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) were measured on the basis of analysis of water samples collected using an innovative multi-level water sampler. The results show that under calm weather conditions, the SSC is relatively homogenous through the entire water column. However, when strong winds occur, the SSC in the bottom layer is 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in the surface layer; thus, in this case, the amount of total suspended matter in the water column cannot be estimated using the SSC values of the surface layer alone. Furthermore, the depth of disturbance, or the thickness of the sediment layer that is set in motion by wind-wave induced currents, is of the order of 100 mm.

  15. Degradation of methyl bromide in anaerobic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Strohmaler, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) was anaerobically degraded in saltmarsh sediments after reaction with sulfide. The product of this nucleophilic substitution reaction was methanethiol, which underwent further chemical and bacterial reactions to form dimethyl sulfide. These two gases appeared transiently during sediment incubations because they were metabolized by methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A second, less significant reaction of MeBr was the exchange with chloride, forming methyl chloride, which was also susceptible to attack by sulfide. Incubation of 14C-labeled methyl iodide as an analogue of MeBr resulted in the formation of 14CH4 and 14CO2 and also indicated that sulfate-reducing bacteria as well as methanogens metabolized the methylated sulfur intermediates. These results suggest that exposed sediments with abundant free sulfide, such as coastal salt-marshes, may constitute a sink for atmospheric MeBr.

  16. Determination of sediment provenance by unmixing the mineralogy of source-area sediments: The "SedUnMix" program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, John T.; Eberl, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Along the margins of areas such as Greenland and Baffin Bay, sediment composition reflects a complex mixture of sources associated with the transport of sediment in sea ice, icebergs, melt-water and turbidite plumes. Similar situations arise in many contexts associated with sediment transport and with the mixing of sediments from different source areas. The question is: can contributions from discrete sediment (bedrock) sources be distinguished in a mixed sediment by using mineralogy, and, if so, how accurately? To solve this problem, four end-member source sediments were mixed in various proportions to form eleven artificial mixtures. Two of the end-member sediments are felsic, and the other two have more mafic compositions. End member and mixed sediment mineralogies were measured for the Elsevier B.V..

  17. Lutocline Mixing and sediment wave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, P.; Gonzalez/Nieto, P. L.

    2010-05-01

    Coastal mixing induced by waves is modeled experimentally by means of an oscillating grid, [1,2]when the boundary layer is turbulent as when waves generated by a storm break and spill, or when wind interacts with wave stirring, then a strong turbulence lifts off bottom sediments and these often form a distinct sediment laden region capped by a sharp density interface called in this case a Lutocline. These particle layer may be transported to deeper regions by compensation or gravity currents[3,4]. Point velocity distributions created by wind, waves and sloping currents are dominated by breaker areas which act as strong attractors for the sediments in suspension, because at the same time there is a higher mean water level near the coast due to wave radiation[5]. The combination of offshore and onshore together with the longshore and crosshore strong currents due to wave radiation imbalance produce the strongest local shear induced morphological sediment transport. The use of a circular Couette flow to hold sediments in suspension using a vortex generator (producing shear) or an oscilating grid is used to investigate the parameter range of sediment lift off. [1] Crespo A. and Redondo J.M.(1989) A simple experiment on the interaction between gravity currents and sediment transport, Rev. de Geofisica 45, 203-210. [2] Redondo J.M. and Cantalapiedra I.R. (1993) Mixing in horizontally heterogeneous flows", Applied Scientific Research, 51, 217-222 [3] J.E. Simpson (1997) Gravity Currents: In the Environment and the Laboratory, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England. [4] R.S.J. Sparks, R.T. Bonnecaze, H.E. Huppert, J.R. Lister, M.A. Hallworth, H. Mader, J. Phillips (1993) Sediment-laden gravity currents with reversing buoyancy, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 114. 243-257. [5] Bezerra M.O., Diez M., Medeiros C. Rodriguez A., Bahia E., Sanchez Arcilla A and Redondo J.M. (1998) Study on the influence of waves on coastal diffusion using image analysis. Applied

  18. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of young sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    of OSL dating, outlines the problems specific to the dating of young material, and then uses recent applications to young sediments to illustrate the greatly increased scope and potential of the method in geomorphology and the geology of recent deposits. The overall reliability of this new generation...... for determining the time of deposition of water-lain sediments from the coastal zone, and aeolian deposits from both coastal and inland environments. Our conclusion is supported by the growing popularity of OSL dating in geomorphology and geology...

  19. Anthropopression markers in lake bottom sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolna, Anna; Nowicka, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Lakes are vulnerable to various types of anthropogenic disturbances. Responses of lake ecosystems to environmental stressors are varied and depend not only on the type of a factor but also on the lake natural resistance to degradation. Within the EULAKES project an evaluation of anthropogenic stress extent in a flow-through, postglacial, ribbon lake (Lake Charzykowskie) was carried out. It was assumed, that this impact manifests unevenly, depending on a type and degree of the pressure on the shore zones, water quality of tributaries, lake basin shape and dynamics of a water movement. It was stated, that anthropogenic markers are substances accumulated in bottom sediments as a result of allochthonous substances inflow from the catchment and atmosphere. Along the selected transects 105 samples from the top layer of sediments (about 20 cm) was collected representing the contemporary accumulation (about 15 years). The content of selected chemical elements and compounds was examined, including nutrients (TN and TP), heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, mercury, iron, and manganese) and pesticides (DDT, DDD, DDE, DMDT , γ-HCH). The research was conducted in the deepest points of each lake basin and along the research transects - while choosing the spots, the increased intensity of anthropogenic impact (ports, roads with heavy traffic, wastewater discharge zones, built-up areas) was taken into consideration. The river outlets to the lake, where there are ecotonal zones between limnic and fluvial environment, were also taken into account. Analysis of the markers distribution was carried out against the diversity of chemical characteristics of limnic sediments. Ribbon shape of the lake basin and the dominant wind direction provide an opportunity of easy water mixing to a considerable depth. Intensive waving processes cause removal of the matter from the littoral zone towards lake hollows (separated by the underwater tresholds), where the

  20. CRITICAL UNIT STREAM POWER FOR SEDIMENT TRANSPORT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Yang's (1996) sediment transport theory based on unit stream power is one of the most accurate theories, but in his equations the use of product of slope and critical velocity instead for critical unit stream power is not suitable. Dimensionless critical unit stream power required at incipient motion can be derived from the principle of conservation of power as a function of dimensionless particle diameter and relative roughness. Based on a lot of data sets, this new criterion was developed. By use of this new criteria, Yang's (1973) sand transport formula and his 1984 gravel transport formula could be improved when sediment concentration is less than about 100 ppm by weight.