WorldWideScience

Sample records for blood safety risk

  1. Safety and radiation risks in the labelling of blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk in the management of radioactive material and biological exposition to infectious agents. Protocols and normative to observe GOOD RADIOPHARMACY Practices. Main infectious agents that may be transmitted during preparation of a blood cell radiopharmaceutical. Problems of contamination

  2. Pathogen Inactivation Technologies: The Advent of Pathogen-Reduced Blood Components to Reduce Blood Safety Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Dana V; Schubert, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Pathogen inactivation technologies represent a shift in blood safety from a reactive approach to a proactive protective strategy. Commercially available technologies demonstrate effective killing of most viruses, bacteria, and parasites and are capable of inactivating passenger leukocytes in blood products. The use of pathogen inactivation causes a decrease in the parameters of products that can be readily measured in laboratory assays but that do not seem to cause any alteration in hemostatic effect of plasma or platelet transfusions. Effort needs to be made to further develop these technologies so that the negative quality impact is ameliorated without reducing the pathogen inactivation effectiveness. PMID:27112999

  3. Does a perception of increased blood safety mean increased blood transfusion? An assessment of the risk compensation theory in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Kumanan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk compensation theory is a widely used concept in transport economics to analyze driver risk behaviour. This article explores the feasibility of applying the theory in blood transfusion to raise important questions regarding the increased blood safety measures and their possible effects on blood usage (e.g., the appropriateness in transfusion. Further, it presents the findings of a pilot survey of physicians in Canada. Discussion While studies have attempted to define transfusion appropriateness, this article argues that if the risk compensation theory holds true for transfusion practice, physicians may actually be transfusing more. This may increase the possibility of contracting other unknown risks, such as the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD, as well as increasing the risk of non-infectious transfusion risks, such as transfusion reactions. Summary A much larger study involving psychosocial assessment of physician decision making process to fully assess physician behaviour within the context of risk compensation theory and transfusion practice in Canada is needed to further explore this area.

  4. Health economics and outcomes methods in risk-based decision-making for blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Brian; Janssen, Mart P

    2015-08-01

    Analytical methods appropriate for health economic assessments of transfusion safety interventions have not previously been described in ways that facilitate their use. Within the context of risk-based decision-making (RBDM), health economics can be important for optimizing decisions among competing interventions. The objective of this review is to address key considerations and limitations of current methods as they apply to blood safety. Because a voluntary blood supply is an example of a public good, analyses should be conducted from the societal perspective when possible. Two primary study designs are recommended for most blood safety intervention assessments: budget impact analysis (BIA), which measures the cost to implement an intervention both to the blood operator but also in a broader context, and cost-utility analysis (CUA), which measures the ratio between costs and health gain achieved, in terms of reduced morbidity and mortality, by use of an intervention. These analyses often have important limitations because data that reflect specific aspects, for example, blood recipient population characteristics or complication rates, are not available. Sensitivity analyses play an important role. The impact of various uncertain factors can be studied conjointly in probabilistic sensitivity analyses. The use of BIA and CUA together provides a comprehensive assessment of the costs and benefits from implementing (or not) specific interventions. RBDM is multifaceted and impacts a broad spectrum of stakeholders. Gathering and analyzing health economic evidence as part of the RBDM process enhances the quality, completeness, and transparency of decision-making. PMID:25855475

  5. Globalisation and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert

    2009-05-01

    Globalisation may be viewed as the growing interdependence of countries worldwide through the increasing volume and variety of cross-border transactions in goods and services, and also through the more rapid and widespread diffusion of technology. Globalisation is not just an economic phenomenon, although it is frequently described as such, but includes commerce, disease and travel, and immigration, and as such it affects blood safety and supply in various ways. The relatively short travel times offered by modern aviation can result in the rapid spread of blood-borne pathogens before measures to counteract transmission can be put in place; this would have happened with SARS if the basic life cycle of the SARS virus included an asymptomatic viraemia. This risk can be amplified by ecological factors which effect the spread of these pathogens once they are transferred to a naïve ecosystem, as happened with West Nile Virus (WNV) in North America. The rationalization and contraction of the plasma products industry may be viewed as one aspect of globalisation imposed by the remorseless inevitability of the market; the effect of this development on the safety and supply of products has yet to be seen, but the oversight and assurance of a shrinking number of players will present particular challenges. Similarly, the monopolization of technology, through patent enforcement which puts access beyond the reach of developing countries, can have an effect on blood safety. The challenges presented to blood safety by globalisation are heightening the tensions between the traditional focus on the product safety - zero risk paradigm and the need to view the delivery of safe blood as an integrated process. As an illustration of this tension, donor deferral measures imposed by globalisation-induced risks such as vCJD and WNV have resulted in the loss of the safest and most committed portion of the blood donor population in many Western countries, leading to an increased risk to

  6. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. PMID:26778104

  7. Malaria and blood transfusion: major issues of blood safety in malaria-endemic countries and strategies for mitigating the risk of Plasmodium parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Saleh; Karunamoorthi, Kaliyaperumal

    2016-01-01

    Malaria inflicts humankind over centuries, and it remains as a major threat to both clinical medicine and public health worldwide. Though hemotherapy is a life-sustaining modality, it continues to be a possible source of disease transmission. Hence, hemovigilance is a matter of grave concern in the malaria-prone third-world countries. In order to pursue an effective research on hemovigilance, a comprehensive search has been conducted by using the premier academic-scientific databases, WHO documents, and English-language search engines. One hundred two appropriate articles were chosen for data extraction, with a particular reference to emerging pathogens transmitted through blood transfusion, specifically malaria. Blood donation screening is done through microscopic examination and immunological assays to improve the safety of blood products by detection major blood-borne pathogens, viz., HIV, HBV, HCV, syphilis, and malarial parasites. Transfusion therapy significantly dwindles the preventable morbidity and mortality attributed to various illnesses and diseases, particularly AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. Examination of thick and thin blood smears are performed to detect positivity and to identify the Plasmodium species, respectively. However, all of these existing diagnostic tools have their own limitations in terms of sensitivity, specificity, cost-effectiveness, and lack of resources and skilled personnel. Globally, despite the mandate need of screening blood and its components according to the blood-establishment protocols, it is seldom practiced in the low-income/poverty-stricken settings. In addition, each and every single phase of transfusion chain carries sizable inherent risks from donors to recipients. Interestingly, opportunities also lie ahead to enhance the safety of blood-supply chain and patients. It can be achieved through sustainable blood-management strategies like (1) appropriate usage of precise diagnostic tools/techniques, (2) promoting

  8. The variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Risk, uncertainty or safety in the use of blood and blood derivatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liras, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    It has been long since French physician Jean-Baptiste Denys carried out the first successful blood transfusion to a human being. Using bird feathers as canules, sheep blood was transfused to a young man. The patient died soon after Denys' treatment and Denys was accused of murder. In the XXI century, known as the biotechnology century, we face new challenges in Medicine. New emerging and reemerging diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) or "mad cow disease" and its human variant (vCJD), challenge the biosafety aspects of a widely extended and extremely useful technique, that is, the perfusion of blood, of its derived components and of other pharmacological products obtained from plasma. To face these new challenges we need innovative prevention strategies. PMID:18573217

  9. The variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Risk, uncertainty or safety in the use of blood and blood derivatives?

    OpenAIRE

    Liras, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    It has been long since French physician Jean-Baptiste Denys carried out the first successful blood transfusion to a human being. Using bird feathers as canules, sheep blood was transfused to a young man. The patient died soon after Denys' treatment and Denys was accused of murder. In the XXI century, known as the biotechnology century, we face new challenges in Medicine. New emerging and reemerging diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) or "mad cow disease" and its human variant (v...

  10. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes. PMID:23171300

  11. Blood gas and patient safety: considerations based on experience developed in accordance with the Risk Management perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaldi, Marco; Baranzoni, Mariateresa; Coppolecchia, Pasquale; Moschello, Jennifer N; Novaco, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    It is the responsibility of health organizations to guarantee a high level of healthcare by using adequate methodologies and instruments, creating secure conditions for treatment, and preventing adverse events due to human or system errors. It is necessary to introduce Risk Management programs, and in particular to promote Clinical Risk Management, one of the constituent elements of Clinical Governance, to assure the delivery of high-quality performance and services. In the point-of-care testing (POCT) context, using an analysis of our experiences, we discuss the entire analytical process, including acquisition and usage, while focusing on blood gas analyzers. Our experience confirms that within a Clinical Governance framework, it is necessary to apply, even when choosing instruments, a systematic vision that is not limited to analytical validation, but also includes an in-depth analysis of the impact in a specific context. Assessment of the correlated risks, independent of the analytical methodology used, is indispensable in a clinical environment to identify the most suitable approach for such risks. A study of the latent factors can be proactively performed to identify (and stimulate) what the pre-organizational environment (producer companies) can offer in terms of product orientation to effectively reduce correlated risk during use. Among the different options for possible treatment of risk, one involves the transfer of the assumption of risk to third parties (e.g., maintenance and quality controls). Transferring the responsibility for control operations to the operator of the instrument, which follows the quality controls with total autonomy, is equivalent to transferring the correlated risk for the clinician (in the POCT case) to the producer, who becomes the guarantor. In practice this is equivalent to a specific assurance stipulation with zero cost. PMID:17579531

  12. Possible Risks of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  13. Production, safety, exchange, and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hausken, Kjell

    2011-01-01

    Two agents convert resources into safety investment and production while exchanging goods voluntarily. Safety investment ensures reduction of costly risk. High unit cost of safety effort reduces both productive effort and safety effort, which reduces income.

  14. Risk management and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper informs on the efforts to elaborate a feedback system for risk comprehensive evaluation and a system to improve structure safety foreseeing the possibility to control the latent risk, ensuring the qualitative evaluation of the safety level and improvement of safety culture in various branches of industry, first and foremost, in the electricity producing sector including the nuclear power industry

  15. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, age, ... can increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure tends to rise with age. About 65 ...

  16. Blood safety and availability: continuing challenges in China's blood banking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ling; Wang, Jing-Xing; Stevens, Lori; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2014-02-01

    Social and economic development, along with increased health care coverage, has caused a sharp increase in the clinical demand for blood in China. Whole blood collection has increased rapidly in the past decade but has failed to keep pace with the ever-increasing demand. Overall, the country's blood safety has been improved with 99% of whole blood donations collected from voluntary unpaid donors. However, the unmet clinical demand for blood and the increasing incidence of human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis in the general population pose new challenges to China's blood banking system. To ensure a safe and adequate blood supply, continued efforts are required to recruit and retain a sufficient number of low-risk voluntary blood donors, improve donor prescreening and blood testing process, ease donor restrictions, and strengthen patient blood management. PMID:23710600

  17. Safety, risk and Harrisburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses public attitudes to safety, industrial accidents and reactor accidents, in particular the accident at Three-Mile Island. Arguments in favour of nuclear power, including its relative safety, are presented

  18. Risk-based safety indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is structured as follows: 1. Risk-based safety indicators: Typology of risk-based indicators (RBIs); Tools for defining RBIs; Requirements for the PSA model; Data sources for RBIs; Types of risks monitored; RBIs and operational safety indicators; Feedback from operating experience; PSO model modification for RBIs; RBI categorization; RBI assessment; RBI applications; Suitable RBI applications. 2. Proposal for risk-based indicators: Acquiring information from operational experience; Method of acquiring safety relevance coefficients for the systems from a PSA model; Indicator definitions; On-line indicators. 3. Annex: Application of RBIs worldwide. (P.A.)

  19. Blood safety in the world updated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvano Wandel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Blood safety is of paramount importance in any medical context, given that it represents one of the most impor-tant supportive procedures in medicine. Nearly all medical fields that lead with very critical patients will depend on blood products as part of supporting medical strategies (both clinical and surgical). Thus, it is im-portant that every country in the world relies on a well established national blood program.

  20. Risk analysis and safety rationale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decision making with respect to safety is becoming more and more complex. The risk involved must be taken into account together with numerous other factors such as the benefits, the uncertainties and the public perception. Can the decision maker be aided by some kind of system, general rules of thumb, or broader perspective on similar decisions? This question has been addressed in a joint Nordic project relating to nuclear power. Modern techniques for risk assessment and management have been studied, and parallels drawn to such areas as offshore safety and management of toxic chemicals in the environment. The report summarises the finding of 5 major technical reports which have been published in the NORD-series. The topics includes developments, uncertainties and limitations in probabilistic safety assessments, negligible risks, risk-cost trade-offs, optimisation of nuclear safety and radiation protection, and the role of risks in the decision making process. (author) 84 refs

  1. [Haemovigilance and blood safety in overseas military].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailliol, A; Plang, S; Martinaud, C; Pouget, T; Vedy, S; Clavier, B; Cellarier, V; Roche, C; Civadier, C; Ausset, S

    2014-11-01

    The French military blood institute (FMBI) is the only military blood supplier in France. FMBI operates independently and autonomously under the Ministry of Defense's supervision, and accordingly, to the French, European and NATO technical and safety guidelines. FMBI is in charge of the collection, preparation and distribution of blood products to supply transfusion support to armed forces, especially during overseas operations. In overseas military, a primary physician is responsible for haemovigilance in permanent relation with an expert in the FMBI to manage any adverse reaction. Additionally, traceability of delivered or collected blood products during overseas operation represents a priority, allowing an appropriate management of transfusion inquiries and assessment of practices aiming to improve and update procedures and training. Transfusion safety in overseas operation is based on regular and specific training of people concerned by blood supply chain in exceptional situation. PMID:25284434

  2. Reliability, safety and risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book has been designed to support students and practitioners in their understanding and practice of safety and reliability. It not only discusses issues relating to plant and technology but also acknowledges the importance of human factors in the design, implementation and management of related safe systems. The adoption of this broad view of safety and reliability is a reflection of an almost universal movement towards a human factors orientation in this area. This stems not only from what has been learnt from the practice of health and safety management and risk assessment and from fundamental research but also from the lessons drawn from recent investigations of major accidents and disasters. The authors thus advocate an integrated approach to safety, reliability and risk management. This involves bringing together efficient engineering systems and controls of plant and equipment (hardware) with efficient management systems and procedures (software) and a practical understanding of people (liveware) and a general knowledge of other human factor considerations. (author)

  3. Risk and Safety of Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Doron, Shira; Snydman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have been used safely for years. Safety outcomes are inconsistently reported in published clinical trials. In 2011, a report released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality concluded that, although the existing probiotic clinical trials reveal no evidence of increased risk, “the current literature is not well equipped to answer questions on the safety of probiotics in intervention studies with confidence.” Critics point out that the preponderance of evidence, including t...

  4. Safety control and risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceptable probability of major accidents in nuclear power is very small, and can not be determined from direct empirical evidence. Therefore, control of the level of safety is a complex problem. The difficulty is related to the fact that a variable, 'safety', which is not accessible to direct measurement, is to be tightly controlled. Control, therefore, depends on a systematic, analytical prediction of the target state, i.e., the level of safety, from indirect evidence. From a control theoretic point of view this means that safety is controlled by a system which includes openloop as well as closed loop control paths. The aim of the paper is to take a general systems view on the complex mechanisms involved in the control of safety of industrial installations like nuclear power. From this, the role of probabilistic risk analysis is evaluated and needs for further development discussed. (author)

  5. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. PMID:25578550

  6. Risk control and food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 11th International Symposium on Toxic Microorganisms of the Joint Panel on Toxic Microorganisms, US-Japan Cooperative Program on Development and Utilization of Natural Resources (UJNR), was held March 4-9, 2012 in Tokyo, Japan. Having the theme "Risk Control and Food Safety," it was the most re...

  7. Risk, fear and public safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part 1 of the paper advocates a rational approach to public safety based on unbiassed quantitative assessment of overall risks and benefits of any technological activity. It shows that improved safety should be attainable at less cost than is the case at present. Part 2 offers an explanation of why so little has been achieved in this direction and outlines the major errors in present practices. Part 3 suggests what might realistically be done towards the achievement of some of the possible benefits. Factors which are important in the study of safety and evidence supporting the arguments are discussed in six appendices. It is urged that the scientific and technological community should improve its understanding of safety as a specialization and should endeavour to lead rather than follow in our present political system

  8. Reducing the risk, managing safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Fire safety in healthcare premises has always been a challenge to those that discharge this duty. Statutory compliance should be a matter of course, but in an ever increasingly challenged NHS, even this is not a given. While the NHS is driven by managing very complex risk to deliver cutting edge healthcare, providers cannot be risk averse. Which risk, however, takes priority? Here Peter Aldridge, fire and corporate services manager at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, and Secretary to the National Association of Healthcare Fire Officers (NAHFO)--which will this month and next jointly stage fire safety seminars with IHEEM; see page 8--considers the key issues, with input from a fire officer at a leading mental health and community Trust. PMID:27017658

  9. Automated nucleic acid amplification testing in blood banks: An additional layer of blood safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Chigurupati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A total of 30 million blood components are transfused each year in India. Blood safety thus becomes a top priority, especially with a population of around 1.23 billion and a high prevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV in general population. Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT in blood donor screening has been implemented in many developed countries to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted viral infections (TTIs. NAT takes care of the dynamics of window period of viruses and offers the safest blood pack for donation. Aims: The aim of this study is to show the value of NAT in blood screening. Settings and Design: Dhanavantari Blood Bank, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India. Subjects and Methods: Over a period of 1 year from January 2012 to December 2012, a total number of 15,000 blood donor samples were subjected to tests for HIV, HBV, and HCV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method and 8000 ELISA nonreactive samples were subjected for NAT using multiplex polymerase chain reaction technology. Results: Of the 15,000 donors tested, 525 were seroreactive. In 8000 ELISA negative blood samples subjected to NAT, 4 donor samples were reactive for HBV. The NAT yield was 1 in 2000. Conclusions: NAT could detect HIV, HBV, and HCV cases in blood donor samples those were undetected by serological tests. NAT could interdict 2500 infectious donations among our approximate 5 million annual blood donations.

  10. Safety methodology and risk targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In assessing the potential safety concerns of fusion, the experience from other energy sources lead to a variety of safety assessment approaches. The available approaches are: (1) The maximum possible accident approach; (2) The maximum credible accident approach; (3) The probabilistic total risk assessment. In the first approach, the mechanistic development of the events leading to the safety concern is ignored. Instead, the total radioactivity of the plant is assumed accessible to the public. Such an approach is obviously conservative and unrealistic. In the second approach a selection is made among the most severe of the possible accidents, and the progression of the accident is modeled as mechanistically as possible. In this case, the passive and active accident mitigation capabilities of the plant are taken into consideration. The result is expected to be that none or only a fraction of the total radioactivity can be released to the public. The adverse effect of this approach is to concentrate attention on a particular accident class, and perhaps not allow for other classes, a judgement that may later become undesirable. The probabilistic risk assessment requires the safety analysts to consider all classes of accidents and estimate both the probabilities of their occurrences and their consequences. Thus, the plant design in fact is subjected to a thorough investigation and the impact of alterations in design can be reflected in the total risk estimate. The disadvantage of this approach lies in the absence of well defined acceptable risk criteria as well as the large effect of public perception factors on the accepted risk. This paper will review the impact of application of these approaches in determination of the level of protection needed against activation product release to the atmosphere. (author)

  11. Processing and storage of blood components: strategies to improve patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietersz RNI

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruby NI Pietersz, Pieter F van der Meer Department of Product and Process Development, Sanquin Blood Bank, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: This review focuses on safety improvements of blood processing of various blood components and their respective storage. A solid quality system to ensure safe and effective blood components that are traceable from a donor to the patient is the foundation of a safe blood supply. To stimulate and guide this process, National Health Authorities should develop guidelines for blood transfusion, including establishment of a quality system. Blood component therapy enabled treatment of patients with blood constituents that were missing, only thus preventing reactions to unnecessarily transfused elements. Leukoreduction prevents many adverse reactions and also improves the quality of the blood components during storage. The safety of red cells and platelets is improved by replacement of plasma with preservative solutions, which results in the reduction of isoantibodies and plasma proteins. Automation of blood collection, separation of whole blood into components, and consecutive processing steps, such as preparation of platelet concentrate from multiple donations, improves the consistent composition of blood components. Physicians can better prescribe the number of transfusions and therewith reduce donor exposure and/or the risk of pathogen transmission. Pathogen reduction in cellular blood components is the latest development in improving the safety of blood transfusions for patients. Keywords: blood components, red cell concentrates, platelet concentrates, plasma, transfusion, safety 

  12. Risk Factors and Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Dutch Blood Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Slot, Ed; Hogema, Boris M; Molier, Michel; BART, Aldert; Hans L Zaaijer

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood donors unaware of Trypanosoma cruzi infection may donate infectious blood. Risk factors and the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in at-risk Dutch blood donors were studied to assess whether specific blood safety measures are warranted in the Netherlands. Methodology Birth in a country endemic for Chagas disease (CEC), having a mother born in a CEC, or having resided for at least six continuous months in a CEC were considered risk factors for T. cruzi infection. From March thro...

  13. ABO blood group and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasan, Senthil K; Hwang, Jinseub; Rostgaard, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The associations between ABO blood group and cancer risk have been studied repeatedly, but results have been variable. Consistent associations have only been reported for pancreatic and gastric cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We estimated associations between different ABO blood...... groups and site-specific cancer risk in a large cohort of healthy blood donors from Sweden and Denmark. RESULTS: A total of 1.6 million donors were followed over 27 million person-years (20 million in Sweden and 7 million in Denmark). We observed 119,584 cancer cases. Blood groups A, AB and B were...... associated either with increased or decreased risk of cancer at 13 anatomical sites (p≤0.05), compared to blood group O. Consistent with assessment using a false discovery rate approach, significant associations with ABO blood group were observed for cancer of the pancreas, breast, and upper gastrointestinal...

  14. Blood donation and risk of polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Nyrén, Olof; Hultcrantz, Malin; Nielsen, Kaspar Rene; Pedersen, Ole B V; Björkholm, Magnus; Rostgaard, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that blood donors could have an increased risk of polycythemia vera (PV). However, no study has assessed whether frequent donors have a higher PV risk than less frequent donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: From the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT2......) database, we established a cohort of blood donors who had donated whole blood at least once between 1980 and 2012. Within this cohort we first assessed the risk of PV, comparing the donors to the general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs......). To assess the association between frequency of blood donation and risk of PV we then conducted a case-control study nested within the cohort, where we compared prior donation activity among donors who were diagnosed with PV and matched controls. Here odds ratios (ORs) were used as measures of...

  15. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  16. Improving health profile of blood donors as a consequence of transfusion safety efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Tran, Trung Nam; Hjalgrim, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    ,110,329 blood donors were followed for up to 35 years from first computer-registered blood donation to death, emigration, or December 31, 2002. Standardized mortality and incidence ratios expressed relative risk of death and cancer comparing blood donors to the general population. RESULTS: Blood donors had an...... selection criteria for blood donation. Blood donors recruited in more recent years exhibited a lower relative mortality than those who started earlier. CONCLUSION: Blood donors enjoy better than average health. Explicit and informal requirements for blood donation in Scandinavia, although mostly of a simple......BACKGROUND: Transfusion safety rests heavily on the health of blood donors. Although they are perceived as being healthier than average, little is known about their long-term disease patterns and to which extent the blood banks' continuous efforts to optimize donor selection has resulted in...

  17. Seismic safety design and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adequacy and sufficiency of NPP seismic safety design are confirmed by the defense-in-depth safety performance and the risk profile. Seismic safety design and risk assessment are now inseparable for safety assurance of nuclear facilities. Applying the defense-in-depth principle to NPP seismic safety is a difficult issue with respect to the current seismic design philosophy in Japan. The defense-in-depth seismic safety of NPP requires not only resisting seismic events but also assuring safety when safety measures do not function as designed in the seismic events. The current deterministic design practice is not appropriate for the defense-in-depth principle when earthquake shaking demand increases because of new knowledge. Probabilistic risk assessment allows application of the defense-in-depth principle to NPP seismic safety design in these cases. The probability of failure, the maximum conditional probability of failure and the ground motion at the condition derived with the relationship between the realistic seismic load and seismic capacity are the three important indexes for safety design. Performing the safety performance analyses considering maximum conditional probability of failure and the risk assessment complying the probability of failure is essential to satisfy the necessary and sufficiently conditions for the defense-in-depth safety requirements of NPPs. (author)

  18. Economic analysis of safety risks in construction

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Bourbon; Fernando Santos; Alfredo Soeiro

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study revolves around the analysis of the safety risks involved with one construction project, and the respective economic effects of risk prevention and safety management. As a result of the co-ordination of systems, and harmonising of work between the Project Leader, Safety Co-ordinator and Contractor, an adequate strategy was developed for the safety of the project Escola de Ciências da Saúde da Universidade do Minho. The risk evaluation is carried out in simulated fo...

  19. Radiological safety and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief radiological safety and risk assessment of a nuclear power generation center with an adjacent on-site waste disposal facility at a specific site in the State of Utah is presented. The assessment was conducted to assist in determining the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) in Utah consisting of nine 1250 MWe nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) electrical generating units arranged in 3 clusters of 3 units each known as triads. The site selected for this conceptual study is in the Horse Bench area about 15 miles directly south of the town of Green River, Utah. The radiological issues included direct radiation exposures to on-site workers and the off-site population, release of radioactive material, and effects of these releases for both normal operations and accidental occurrences. The basic finding of this study is that the concept of an NEC in the Green River area, specifically at the Horse Bench site, is radiologically feasible

  20. Production, safety, fighting, and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hausken, Kjell

    2011-01-01

    Two agents make a trade off between production and safety investment, fighting for joint production. Ceteris paribus, if agent 1 has a higher unit cost of production, lower emphasis on safety causes more fighting and higher utility for agent 1, and less production and safety effort by agent 1.

  1. Developing risk-based food safety management

    OpenAIRE

    Tuomisto, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    The drive for risk-based food safety management, systems and control has spread world-wide in recent decades. Since the term is still internationally undefined, its use and implementation vary, producing different realizations. In this Ph.D. thesis, microbiological risk assessment (MRA) was investigated as a basis for risk-based food safety management, which was defined as ‘food safety management based on risk assessment in order to achieve an appropriate level of protection (ALOP)’. Gove...

  2. Do expert assessments converge? An exploratory case study of evaluating and managing a blood supply risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Examining professional assessments of a blood product recall/withdrawal and its implications for risk and public health, the paper introduces ideas about perceptions of minimal risk and its management. It also describes the context of publicly funded blood transfusion in Canada and the withdrawal event that is the basis of this study. Methods Interviews with 45 experts from administration, medicine, blood supply, laboratory services and risk assessment took place using a multi-level sampling framework in the aftermath of the recall. These experts either directly dealt with the withdrawal or were involved in the management of the blood supply at the national level. Data from these interviews were coded in NVivo for analysis and interpretation. Analytically, data were interpreted to derive typifications to relate interview responses to risk management heuristics. Results While all those interviewed agreed on the importance of patient safety, differences in the ways in which the risk was contextualized and explicated were discerned. Risk was seen in terms of patient safety, liability or precaution. These different risk logics are illustrated by selected quotations. Conclusions Expert assessments did not fully converge and it is possible that these different risk logics and discourses may affect the risk management process more generally, although not necessarily in a negative way. Patient safety is not to be compromised but management of blood risk in publicly funded systems may vary. We suggest ways of managing blood risk using formal and safety case approaches. PMID:21864330

  3. Do expert assessments converge? An exploratory case study of evaluating and managing a blood supply risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Emmy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Examining professional assessments of a blood product recall/withdrawal and its implications for risk and public health, the paper introduces ideas about perceptions of minimal risk and its management. It also describes the context of publicly funded blood transfusion in Canada and the withdrawal event that is the basis of this study. Methods Interviews with 45 experts from administration, medicine, blood supply, laboratory services and risk assessment took place using a multi-level sampling framework in the aftermath of the recall. These experts either directly dealt with the withdrawal or were involved in the management of the blood supply at the national level. Data from these interviews were coded in NVivo for analysis and interpretation. Analytically, data were interpreted to derive typifications to relate interview responses to risk management heuristics. Results While all those interviewed agreed on the importance of patient safety, differences in the ways in which the risk was contextualized and explicated were discerned. Risk was seen in terms of patient safety, liability or precaution. These different risk logics are illustrated by selected quotations. Conclusions Expert assessments did not fully converge and it is possible that these different risk logics and discourses may affect the risk management process more generally, although not necessarily in a negative way. Patient safety is not to be compromised but management of blood risk in publicly funded systems may vary. We suggest ways of managing blood risk using formal and safety case approaches.

  4. An Autopsy Checklist: A Monitor of Safety and Risk Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrum, Michael James; Kent, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    Any autopsy has safety and risk management issues, which can arise in the preautopsy, autopsy, and postautopsy phases. The London Health Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Autopsy Checklist was developed to address these issues. The current study assessed 1 measure of autopsy safety: the effectiveness of the checklist in documenting pathologists' communication of the actual or potential risk of blood-borne infections to support staff. Autopsy checklists for cases done in 2012 and 2013 were reviewed. The frequency of communication, as recorded in checklists, by pathologists to staff of previously diagnosed blood-borne infections (hepatitis B/C and human immunodeficiency virus) or the risk of infection based on lifestyle (eg, intravenous drug abuse) was tabulated. These data were compared with medical histories of the deceased and circumstances of their deaths described in the final autopsy reports. Information about blood-borne infections was recorded less frequently in the checklists compared with the final reports. Of 4 known human immunodeficiency virus cases, there was no checklist documentation in 3. All 11 hand injuries were documented. None of these cases had known infectious risks. The Autopsy Checklist is a standardized means of documenting safety and risk issues arising during the autopsy process, but its effectiveness relies on accurate completion. PMID:27356015

  5. Blood pressure and control of cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A Whitworth

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Judith A WhitworthJohn Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Two key early 20th century notions, the first the primacy of diastolic pressure in determining risk, and the second that hypertension is a discrete disorder, have proved to be incorrect. We now recognize the primacy of systolic pressure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that hypertension is an arbitrary definition. In the early 21st century, we are moving away from a dichotomous approach to risk classification, and away from notions of hypertension and normotension towards an appreciation that blood pressure-related risk is continuous. In parallel, there has been a paradigm shift from a single risk factor approach to comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk prevention. Accordingly, prevention of cardiovascular disease requires a focus on lowering of blood pressure and modification of associated risk factors rather than simply treatment of hypertension. This emphasis is reflected in the World Health Organization (WHO – International Society of Hypertension (ISH 2003 statement on management of hypertension.Keywords: blood pressure, hypertension, cardiovascular risk, treatment

  6. Risk culture: an outgrowth of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper builds on the principal themes addressed in previous Accident Prevention Group (APG) papers on the subject of Nuclear Safety Culture: Nuclear Safety Imperatives including the Human Dimension, IAEA Safety Culture Initiatives, a U.S. Utility Safety Culture and Integrated Risk Management. It recognizes that the safety culture in the U.S. nuclear utility settings has been achieved in many instances with costly solutions. The U.S. National Energy Act, signed into law by President Bush, began deregulation of the electric utility industry creating a competitive climate heretofore never known and in particular affecting those utilities with large imbedded costs from nuclear generation units. The authors perceive that there are three major ingredients or a tripod for a survival strategy for the nuclear power plant option in the U.S. as a part of larger energy security strategy: (1) Integrated rather than fragmented Risk Management by nuclear utilities; (2) Risk Based Regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to free up resources for more productive uses in nuclear safety regulation, and (3) Due emphasis to be placed in Operational Risk Management on controlling swings in the Core Damage Frequency with time by virtue of building an effective operational risk model. The paper makes an attempt to raise awareness regarding the human dimension component in the operational risk model. It concludes that the proposed tripod is achievable only if accompanied by a swift shift to a risk culture which is introduced in a conceptual form. (author)

  7. Risk measures in living probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of the study are: to define risk measures and suggested uses of them in various living PSA applications for the operational safety management and to describe specific model features required for living PSA applications. The report is based on three case studies performed within the Nordic research project Safety Evaluation by Use of Living PSA and Safety Indicators. (48 refs., 11 figs., 17 tabs.)

  8. On health safety standards and risks comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Special index is desirable for the establishment of universal safety standards of population and personnel, and other levels of decision-making on protective steps as well as for the comparison of different risk sources. It is defined as effective damage per year - dissipated years of the healthy life as a result of risk source effect during the present year. Universal safety norms in the terms of this value are suggested. Derived safety norms for the ionizing radiation and some other concrete risk sources involving chemical pollutants of the environment were obtained on their basis. The recommendations on the methods and indexes of different risk sources comparison are given. Examples for the comparison of different kinds of risks are presented

  9. Expensive blood safety initiatives may offer less benefit than we think

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf; Titlestad, Kjell; Ullum, Henrik; Shanwell, Agneta; Reilly, Marie; Melbye, Mads; Nyrén, Olof; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Various blood safety initiatives have ensured a historically low risk of infection transmission through blood transfusion. Although further prevention of infection transmission is possible through, for example, nucleic acid testing and future introduction of pathogen inactivation, such initiative...... are very costly in relation to the benefit they offer. Although estimation of the cost-effectiveness requires detailed information about the survival of transfusion recipients, previous cost-effectiveness analyses have relied on incorrect survival assumptions....

  10. Risk assessment and improving nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper activities of the Relko, Ltd. are described. The Relko team is an distinguished group of engineers, applied scientists and management consultants who are widely recognised for their problem solving capabilities in the field of safety of nuclear power plants equipped with WWER type reactors. Relko Ltd. was founded in February 1993. The company performs safety analyses and evaluation of operational experience as well as consulting on matters of plant safety. Relko Ltd. provides for nuclear power plants the following services: Preparing of level 1 and level 2 full power and shutdown PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) studies; Support decision making in plant safety upgrading using PSA; Support plant operation based on PSA applications: - risk monitoring by EOOS Risk Monitor (Equipment Out Of Service), - optimization of technical specifications (allowed outage times and test intervals of safety systems), - optimization of maintenance activities based on the RCM (Reliability Centered Maintenance) approach; Reliability analyses for computerized reactor protection systems, control and instrumentation systems (software and hardware); Deterministic fire risk analyses; Deterministic flood risk analysis; High energy piping break analysis; Further development of accident management measures, drafting of safety requirements, emergency operating procedures and guides

  11. Concept of risk: risk assessment and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissertation is a critical examination of risk assessment and its role in public policy. Nuclear power safety safety issues are selected as the primary source of illustrations and examples. The dissertation examines how risk assessment studies develop a concept of risk which becomes decisive for policy choices. Risk-assessment techniques are interpreted as instruments which secure an evaluation of risk which, in turn, figures prominently in technical reports on nuclear power. The philosophical critique is mounted on two levels. First, an epistemological critique surveys distinctions between the technical concept of risk and more familiar senses of risk. The critique shows that utilization of risk assessment re-structures the concept of risk. The technical concept is contrasted to the function of risk within a decision-maker's conceptual agenda and hierarchy of values. Second, an ethical critique exposes the value commitments of risk assessment recommendations. Although some of these values might be defended for policy decisions, the technical character of risk assessment obfuscates normative issues. Risk assessment is shown to be a form of factual enquiry which, nonetheless, represents a commitment to a specific selection of ethical and social values. Risk assessment should not be interpreted as a primary guide to decision unless the specific values incorporated into its concept of risk are stated explicitly and justified philosophically. Such a statement would allow value questions which have been sublimated by the factual tone of the analytic techniques to be debated on clear, social and ethical grounds

  12. [New viral risks in blood transfusion by 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzetto, B; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    Viral safety remains a major concern in transfusion of blood products. Over years, the control measures applied to blood products were made more and more sophisticated; however, the number of infectious agents, and notably of viruses, that can be transmitted by transfusion is increasing continuously. The aim of this review paper is to actualize that published in the same journal by the same authors in 2011 with more details on some of actual vs virtual viral threats that were identified recently in the field of blood transfusion. The main subjects that are covered successively concern the transmission via transfusion of hepatitis E virus, the frequency of transfusion transmitted arboviruses, transfusion at the time of the Ebola epidemics in West Africa, the debated role of Marseillevirus (giant viruses infecting amoebae and suspected to infect human blood latently), and, finally, the recent report of the identification in blood donors of a new member of the Flaviviridae family. The addition of these new viral risks to those already identified-partially controlled or not-pleads for the urgent need to move forward to considering inactivation of infectious agents in blood products. PMID:26781857

  13. Thermonuclear generation program: risks and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the fundamental concepts of risk and safety related to nuclear power generation. In the first chapter, a general evaluation of the various systems for energy generation and their environmental impacts is made. Some definitions for safety and risk are suggested, based on the already existing regulatory processes and also on the current tendencies of risk management. Aspects regarding the safety culture are commented. The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES), a coherent and clear mechanism of communication between nuclear specialists and the general public, is analyzed. The second chapter examines the thermonuclear generation program in Brazil and the role of the National Nuclear Energy Commission. The third chapter presents national and international scenarios in terms of safety and risks, available policies and the main obstacles for future development of nuclear energy and nuclear engineering, and strategies are proposed. In the last chapter, comments about possible trends and recommendations related to practical risk management procedures, taking into account rational criteria for resources distribution and risk reduction are made, envisaging a closer integration between nuclear specialists and the society as a whole, thus decreasing the conflicts in a democratic decision-making process

  14. Nuclear safety culture and integrated risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary focus of nuclear safety is the prevention of large releases of radioactivity in the case of low-probability severe accidents. An analysis of the anatomy of nuclear (Chernobyl, Three Mile Island Unit 2) and nonnuclear (Challenger, Bhopal, Piper Alpha, etc.) severe accidents yields four broad categories of root causes: human (operating crew response), machine (design with its basic flaws), media (natural phenomena, operational considerations, political environment, commercial pressures, etc.)-providing triggering events, and management (basic organizational safety culture flaws). A strong management can minimize the contributions of humans, machines, and media to the risk arising from the operation of hazardous facilities. One way that management can have a powerful positive influence is through the establishment of a proper safety culture. The term safety culture is used as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Safety Advisory Group

  15. Safety Factors in Pesticide Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, N.; Jagers op Akkerhuis, G. A. J. M.

    to secure that the methodology is adequate. As new knowledge surfaces the risk assessment procedures develops. The present report is a contribution to the development of safety factors used to account for the uncertainty when · extrapolating from the results of test with a single species in the......Foreword It has become common practice to protect the environment from hazardous chemicals by use of risk assessment to establish environmental concentration at which only limited damage to the ecosystem can be expected. The methods and tools applied in the risk assessment need constant evaluation...... safety factors used in pesticide risk assessment: the variability in species sensitivities, and the relationship between acute LC50's and chronic NOEC's....

  16. On the Regulation of Life Safety Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Michael Havbro; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper takes up the issue of appropriate choice of metric for life safety and health related risks in a regulatory context addressing effects of temporal and spatial scales for their consistent quantification and comparison across societal sectors, industries and application areas......; in some cases take the perspective of individuals and in other cases address the performance of applied technologies. It is furthermore shown that the typically applied averaging of individual risks over time and space may result in unintentional masking of poorly performing activities and applied....... Starting point is taken in a short outline of what is considered to comprise the present best practice rationale for life safety and health risk regulation. Thereafter, based on selected principal examples from different application areas, inconsistencies in present best practice risk quantification...

  17. HANFORD SAFETY ANALYSIS & RISK ASSESSMENT HANDBOOK (SARAH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EVANS, C B

    2004-12-21

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 2 and 3 (HC-2 and 3) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management''. Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' Consistent with DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 2, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'' (STD-3009), and DOE-STD-3011-2002, ''Guidance for Preparation of Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) Documents'' (STD-3011), the Hanford SARAH describes methodology for performing a safety analysis leading to development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), and provides the information necessary to ensure a consistently rigorous approach that meets DOE expectations. The DSA and TSR documents, together with the DOE-issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER), are the basic components of facility safety basis documentation. For HC-2 or 3 nuclear facilities in long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M), for decommissioning activities, where source term has been eliminated to the point that only low-level, residual fixed contamination is present, or for environmental remediation activities outside of a facility structure, DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities'' (STD-1120), may serve as the basis for the DSA. HC-2 and 3 environmental remediation sites also are subject to the hazard analysis methodologies of this standard.

  18. Blood safety in the United States: Current status and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Y. Dodd

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction Since the emergence of AIDS/HIV in the 1980s,blood safety has been considered to be a priority in the Unit-ed States (US). Not only is a great deal of attention paid to the major transfusion transmissible infections,but there is also concern about emerging infections.Although blood is collected by a range of independent organizations in the US, it is highly regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration and most blood collec-tion agencies are also subject to voluntary accreditation through professional organizations such as AABB.

  19. Assessing the Residual Risk for Transfusion-Transmitted Infections in the Philippine Blood Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Hilton Y.; Vicente Y Belizario; Juban, Noel R; Alejandria, Marissa M; Castillo-Carandang, Nina; Arcellana-Nuqui, Elizabeth; Mirasol, Ma. Angelina; Cordero, Cynthia P.; Olivia T Sison; Rivera, Adovich S.

    2014-01-01

    Due to a USAID-funded study on blood banks, a national policy was instituted in 1994 that set standards for Philippine blood services, promoted voluntary donation, and led to a ban on commercial blood banks. In this follow-up study, we assess the safety of the supply by determining the residual risk for transfusion-transmitted infections (syphilis, hepatitis B and C, HIV). We also identified unsafe facility practices and generated policy recommendations. A 1992 study found that transfusion-re...

  20. Dengue viremia in blood donors in Northern India: Challenges of emerging dengue outbreaks to blood transfusion safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana Mangwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backdround: Emerging infectious diseases pose threats to the general human population; including recipients of blood transfusions. Dengue is spreading rapidly to new areas and with increasing frequency of major outbreaks. Screening blood for dengue antigens in dengue-endemic countries would be costly and should, therefore, be recommended only after careful assessment of risk for infection and cost. Aim: A prospective study was conducted to establish the magnitude of the threat that dengue poses to blood safety where it is sporadic with seasonal variations, to quantify risk and to assess that whether screening is feasible and cost-effective. Materials and Methods: Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 antigen test was done on 1709 donations during dengue outbreak in the months August to November 2013 as an additional test using Bio-Rad Platelia Dengue NS1AG test kit which is one step sandwich format microplate enzyme immunoassay using murine monoclonal antibodies for capture and revelation. Chi-square test was used to find statistical significance. Results and Conclusions: Majority cases were whole blood, replacement, male donors with 76.10% donors in <35 years age group. About 17.85% were single donor platelet donations. NS1 antigen in all donors was negative. In the past, dengue affected mainly children who do not donate blood. With the changing trend, mean age of infection increased affecting the population that does donate blood, further reducing blood donation pool. Further studies need to be done in different geographic regions of the country during dengue transmission season to establish maximum incidence of viremic donations, rates of transfusion transmission and clinical consequences in recipients. If risk is found to be substantial, decision will be taken by the policymakers at what threshold screening should be instituted to ensure safe blood transfusion.

  1. Risk based management of safety systems' availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of Task 14 of the OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) Principal Working Group 5. Following completion of work on 'PSA Application to Technical Specifications', Task 14 was initiated at the Autumn 1992 meeting of the Principal Working Group, and was completed at the end of 1994. The agreed objective of the task was to review the possibilities for using probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) based insights in the real time management of safety system reliability. The practicality of on-line risk based monitoring of safety systems' availability status has been demonstrated by seven years of experience at each of four nuclear power reactors in the United Kingdom. Within this experience many thousands of status changes have been monitored and evaluated. 4 refs, 3 figs

  2. Perception of risk from automobile safety defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovic, P; MacGregor, D; Kraus, N N

    1987-10-01

    Descriptions of safety engineering defects of the kind that compel automobile manufacturers to initiate a recall campaign were evaluated by individuals on a set of risk characteristic scales that included overall vehicle riskiness, manufacturer's ability to anticipate the defect, importance for vehicle operation, severity of consequences and likelihood of compliance with a recall notice. A factor analysis of the risk characteristics indicated that judgments could be summarized in terms of two composite scales, one representing the uncontrollability of the damage the safety defect might cause and the other representing the foreseeability of the defect by the manufacturer. Motor vehicle defects were found to be highly diverse in terms of the perceived qualities of their risks. Location of individual defects within the factor space was closely associated with perceived riskiness, perceived likelihood of purchasing another car from the same manufacturer, perceived likelihood of compliance with a recall notice, and actual compliance rates. PMID:3675807

  3. Mastery of risks and operating safety, risks and efficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proper management of ones risks consists in acting to exert prevention and protection capacities against the negative consequences of an event, but also by committing oneself into an offensive approach allowing to improve efficiency, quality and availability. Safety and efficiencies are mutual reinforcing goals aiming at ensuring the perenniality of industries and services. The implementation of a risk management approach in an industrial environment allows to reach a better reactiveness and to increase the efficiency of a system by the mastery of organization and processes. The activities in concern are those of industries and services: transports, energy and environment, automotive industry, petrochemistry, chemistry, food, space, health, defense industries, telecommunication, mining industry, information systems, textile industry, finances.. The topics approached during this meeting treat of: the relevance of risk-abatement resources with respect to risks criticality; the consistent management of uncertainties with respect to stakes; the mastery of components aging and the expression of aging-dependent availability, maintenance and safety policies; the expression of obsolescence-related renewing policies; the operating safety tools and methods applied to complex and computerized-controlled systems; the integration of social, organizational and human factors in technical decisions and companies management; transverse and global risk analysis and decision-aid approaches; the vigilance culture; crisis anticipation and management; the experience feedback on technical and organisational aspects; efficiency and risk mastery indicators; cost/benefit approach in risk management, and economic intelligence approaches. Nineteen presentations have been selected which deal with the mastery of risks and the operating safety at nuclear facilities. (J.S.)

  4. Food safety risks and consumer health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassy, Bruce M

    2010-11-30

    The major food safety risks are not eating a healthy diet, and failure to avoid foodborne illness. Over one billion people in the world suffer from food insecurity and malnutrition. Nutritionally enhanced transgenic crops such as Golden Rice are one potential strategy for reducing malnutrition in the world. Transgenic crops are subjected to a rigorous pre-market safety assessment. The safety of novel proteins and other products is established, and through compositional analysis and animal studies, the safety of any observed changes is evaluated. These studies provide evidence that the new product is as safe as, or safer than, comparable varieties. It must be asked, however, if this rigorous analysis is necessary, because unregulated crops produced by other breeding methods also undergo genetic changes and contain unintended effects. Golden Rice poses infinitesimally small, if any, risk to consumers whilst it has the potential to spare millions of lives each year. However, because it is a transgenic crop, it cannot be deployed without years of expensive pre-market safety review. Paradoxically, if Golden Rice had been produced by less precise conventional methods of breeding, it would already be in the hands of poor farmers. It is concluded that the hyper-precautionary regulatory process applied to transgenic crops works to the extreme disadvantage of the hungry and the poor. PMID:20621653

  5. Safety analysis and risk assessment handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) provides guidance to the safety analyst at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in the preparation of safety analyses and risk assessments. Although the older guidance (the Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide) continues to be used for updating the Final Safety Analysis Reports developed in the mid-1980s, this new guidance is used with all new authorization basis documents. With the mission change at RFETS came the need to establish new authorization basis documents for its facilities, whose functions had changed. The methodology and databases for performing the evaluations that support the new authorization basis documents had to be standardized, to avoid the use of different approaches and/or databases for similar accidents in different facilities. This handbook presents this new standardized approach. The handbook begins with a discussion of the requirements of the different types of authorization basis documents and how to choose the one appropriate for the facility to be evaluated. It then walks the analyst through the process of identifying all the potential hazards in the facility, classifying them, and choosing the ones that need to be analyzed further. It then discusses the methods for evaluating accident initiation and progression and covers the basic steps in a safety analysis, including consequence and frequency binning and risk ranking. The handbook lays out standardized approaches for determining the source terms of the various accidents (including airborne release fractions, leakpath factors, etc.), the atmospheric dispersion factors appropriate for Rocky Flats, and the methods for radiological and chemical consequence assessments. The radiological assessments use a radiological open-quotes templateclose quotes, a spreadsheet that incorporates the standard values of parameters, whereas the chemical assessments use the standard codes ARCHIE and ALOHA

  6. Safety analysis, risk assessment, and risk acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a number of topics that relate safety analysis as documented in the Department of Energy (DOE) safety analysis reports (SARs), probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) as characterized primarily in the context of the techniques that have assumed some level of formality in commercial nuclear power plant applications, and risk acceptance criteria as an outgrowth of PRA applications. DOE SARs of interest are those that are prepared for DOE facilities under DOE Order 5480.23 and the implementing guidance in DOE STD-3009-94. It must be noted that the primary area of application for DOE STD-3009 is existing DOE facilities and that certain modifications of the STD-3009 approach are necessary in SARs for new facilities. Moreover, it is the hazard analysis (HA) and accident analysis (AA) portions of these SARs that are relevant to the present discussions. Although PRAs can be qualitative in nature, PRA as used in this paper refers more generally to all quantitative risk assessments and their underlying methods. HA as used in this paper refers more generally to all qualitative risk assessments and their underlying methods that have been in use in hazardous facilities other than nuclear power plants. This discussion includes both quantitative and qualitative risk assessment methods. PRA has been used, improved, developed, and refined since the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) was published in 1975 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Much debate has ensued since WASH-1400 on exactly what the role of PRA should be in plant design, reactor licensing, 'ensuring' plant and process safety, and a large number of other decisions that must be made for potentially hazardous activities. Of particular interest in this area is whether the risks quantified using PRA should be compared with numerical risk acceptance criteria (RACs) to determine whether a facility is 'safe.' Use of RACs requires quantitative estimates of consequence frequency and magnitude

  7. Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Virus Infection among Blood Donors in Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Growing awareness about the importance of blood safety for controlling the transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has helped to decrease the spread of this virus in many settings. This study was conducted in order to evaluate potential risk factors for HCV infection among blood donors in Georgia. Methods: The study population consisted of 553 blood donors in three major Georgian cities; Tbilisi, the capital city and Batumi and Poti, naval port cities. Risk factors were examined using a behavior questionnaire. All blood samples were initially tested using 3rd generation anti-HCV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and confirmed using recombinant immunoblot assays and nucleic acid testing. Results: Forty-three blood donors, 7.8%, were confirmed HCV positive. Significant risk factors included: drug injection ever (OR: 42; 95% CI: 3.2-550.7); history of hepatitis (OR: 25.9; 95% CI: 4.6-145.5); history of a previous surgical procedure (OR: 148.4; 95% CI: 26.9-817.4); blood transfusion (OR: 25.9; 95% CI: 3.2-210.9). Conclusions: This study found a very high prevalence of HCV among blood donors in Georgia. The main risk factor for HCV infection in this population of blood donors was previous contact with contaminated blood or blood products. Reliable screening of donors and their blood is critical for controlling the further spread of HCV in Georgia

  8. Risk Factors and Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Dutch Blood Donors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Slot

    Full Text Available Blood donors unaware of Trypanosoma cruzi infection may donate infectious blood. Risk factors and the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in at-risk Dutch blood donors were studied to assess whether specific blood safety measures are warranted in the Netherlands.Birth in a country endemic for Chagas disease (CEC, having a mother born in a CEC, or having resided for at least six continuous months in a CEC were considered risk factors for T. cruzi infection. From March through September 2013, risk factor questions were asked to all donors who volunteered to donate blood or blood components. Serum samples were collected from donors reporting one or more risk factors, and screened for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi by EIA.Risk factors for T. cruzi infection were reported by 1,426 of 227,278 donors (0.6%. Testing 1,333 at-risk donors, none (0.0%; 95%, CI 0.0-0.4% was seroreactive for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi. A total of 472 donors were born in a CEC; 553 donors reported their mother being born in a CEC; and 1,121 donors reported a long-term stay in a CEC. The vast majority of reported risk factors were related to Suriname and Brazil. Overall, the participants resided for 7,694 years in CECs, which equals 2.8 million overnight stays. Of those, 1.9 million nights were spent in Suriname.Asymptomatic T. cruzi infection appears to be extremely rare among Dutch blood donors. Blood safety interventions to mitigate the risk of T. cruzi transmission by transfusion would be highly cost-ineffective in the Netherlands, and are thus not required.

  9. Product Engineering Class in the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy for Building Safety-Critical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Janice; Victor, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    When software safety requirements are imposed on legacy safety-critical systems, retrospective safety cases need to be formulated as part of recertifying the systems for further use and risks must be documented and managed to give confidence for reusing the systems. The SEJ Software Development Risk Taxonomy [4] focuses on general software development issues. It does not, however, cover all the safety risks. The Software Safety Risk Taxonomy [8] was developed which provides a construct for eliciting and categorizing software safety risks in a straightforward manner. In this paper, we present extended work on the taxonomy for safety that incorporates the additional issues inherent in the development and maintenance of safety-critical systems with software. An instrument called a Software Safety Risk Taxonomy Based Questionnaire (TBQ) is generated containing questions addressing each safety attribute in the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy. Software safety risks are surfaced using the new TBQ and then analyzed. In this paper we give the definitions for the specialized Product Engineering Class within the Software Safety Risk Taxonomy. At the end of the paper, we present the tool known as the 'Legacy Systems Risk Database Tool' that is used to collect and analyze the data required to show traceability to a particular safety standard

  10. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums

  11. Safety and risk considerations for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment is made of the risk to human health implied in the utilization of fusion reactors as a source of electricity. Three conceptual designs for TOKAMAK fusion reactors are used in the assessment. It was assumed in this analysis that a fusion plant will release 10 Ci/day to the atmosphere. The consequences of this release are the major source of the public health effect. The radioactive wastes of fusion are found to be potentially less hazardous than those of fission reactors. In assessing the potential safety concerns due to accidental releases of radioactivity from a fusion plant, the experience from other energy sources leads to three approaches: 1) the maximum possible accident approach, 2) the maximum credible accident approach, 3) the probabilistic risk assessment approach. A brief review of the premise and shortcomings of each approach is presented. Applying models for structural oxidation and lithium fires, the fraction of the reactor first wall that may be released under realistic conditions was found small compared to tolerable limits based on the WASH-1400 results for LWR risk. Comparison of the fusion occupational and public risk with coal, LWR, solar thermal and solar-photovoltaic plants has been undertaken. It is concluded that, compared to other fuel cycles, fusion can potentially have a favourable position with respect to risk

  12. Acceptable risk in reactor safety studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acceptable risk is defined in terms of its five basic parameters: the hazard or problem; the probability of occurrence; the consequence; the possible alternative actions; and the value system of the community or the society. The problem of consistency in design at a site and between differing sites is discussed and solutions are suggested. Techniques for consistent deterministic and probabilistic setting limits and design standards are illustrated using data from AEC Reactor Safety Study, WASH-1400. The influence of level of consequence is discussed and a general methodology for decision analysis in resource allocation problem is briefly introduced and illustrated. The concept of acceptable risk is put in a quantitative format that can be used by engineers and planners. Bayesian statistical methods are introduced to develop the methodologies

  13. Blood Pressure Patterns May Predict Stroke Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure reading) of more than 6,700 Dutch adults. Participants were ages 55 to 106 and ... stroke or death from other blood pressure-related diseases up to age 80, the study found. Moderately ...

  14. Blood Pressure Patterns May Predict Stroke Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure from normal systolic blood pressure (120 mm Hg) in middle age to high (160 mm Hg). Normal blood pressure in middle age but a steep rise to very high (200 mm Hg). Moderately high blood pressure (140 mm Hg) in ...

  15. Software Safety Risk in Legacy Safety-Critical Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Janice L.; Baggs, Rhoda

    2007-01-01

    Safety Standards contain technical and process-oriented safety requirements. Technical requirements are those such as "must work" and "must not work" functions in the system. Process-Oriented requirements are software engineering and safety management process requirements. Address the system perspective and some cover just software in the system > NASA-STD-8719.13B Software Safety Standard is the current standard of interest. NASA programs/projects will have their own set of safety requirements derived from the standard. Safety Cases: a) Documented demonstration that a system complies with the specified safety requirements. b) Evidence is gathered on the integrity of the system and put forward as an argued case. [Gardener (ed.)] c) Problems occur when trying to meet safety standards, and thus make retrospective safety cases, in legacy safety-critical computer systems.

  16. Hanford safety analysis and risk assessment handbook (SARAH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 1,2, and 3 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. SARAH describes currently acceptable methodology for development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of technical safety requirements (TSR) based on 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management,'' Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' and provides data to ensure consistency in approach

  17. [Occupational risks among public safety and security forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candura, S M; Verni, P; Minelli, C M; Rosso, G L; Cappelli, M I; Strambi, S; Martellosio, V

    2006-01-01

    The present paper tries to identify the occupational risk factors (physical, chemical, biological, psychological), variable depending on jobs and tasks, to which the heterogeneous public safety/security workers are exposed. The fight against criminality and public order maintenance imply (sometimes fatal) traumatic risks, and expose to psychophysical and sensorial tiring, unfavourable macro- and microclimatic conditions, the risk of baropathy (air navigation, underwater activities), noise (generated by firearms and several other sources), vibrations and shakings (automatic weapons, transport vehicles), the risk of electric injury, ionizing (X and gamma rays) and non-inonizing (ultraviolet rays, microwaves and radiofrequencies, electromagnetic fields) radiations. Chemical hazards include carbon monoxide and other combustion products (fires, urban traffic), substances released in chemical accidents, tear gases, lead (firing grounds, metal works, environmental pollution), solvents, lubrificants and cutting oils (mechanic repair and maintenance), laboratory materials and reagents, irritant and/or sensitizing agents contained in gloves. The main biological risks are tetanus, blood-borne diseases (viral hepatitis, AIDS), aerogenous diseases (e.g., tuberculosis, Legionnaire's disease, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis), dog- or horse-transmitted zoonosis. Finally, emotional, psychosomatic and behavioural stress-related disorders (e.g., burn-out syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder) are typically frequent. The presence of numerous and diversified hazards among public safety/security forces imposes the adoption of occupational medicine measures, including risk assessment, health education, technical and environmental prevention, personal protective devices, sanitary surveillance and biological monitoring, clinical interventions (diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation of occupational accidents and illnesses), prompt medico-legal evaluation of occupational

  18. [ABO BLOOD GROUPS AS RISK FACTOR IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzáles Flores, Pedro Alejandro; Díaz Ferrer, Javier Omar; Monge Salgado, Eduardo; Watanabe Varas T, Teresa

    2000-01-01

    TITLE: ABO blood groups as risk factor in Helicobacter pylori infection.OBJECTIVE: To asses the relation between ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection. METHODS: The present is a case and control study. A study population of dyspeptic patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was selected. Four biopsies were taken from the antrum and the body of the stomach and blood group was typified. Patients with gastrectomy, gastric cancer, treated for Hp infection in the previous six months or without blood group typification were excluded. The population sample was found using EPIINFO 5.1 program. We called case to every patient with Hp (+) biopsy and control all with Hp (-) biopsy. The risk of the infection was calculated with the OR (Odds ratio) and the study sample was compared with the blood bank control group using the Chi-square test (pblood groups between the study population and the blood bank control. When we compared the ABO blood distribution between patients Hp (+) and Hp (-) we found significant differences for blood group O (p=0.004) and blood group A (p=0.03). Statistical analysis revealed an OR=2,22 for the blood group O and OR=0,5 for the blood group A.CONCLUSIONS: 1) The ABO blood group distribution is different in patients with Hp infection compared with those without Hp infection. 2) Blood group O would be a moderate risk factor for infection by Helicobacter pylori. PMID:12140571

  19. Risk Classification and Risk-based Safety and Mission Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Jesse A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent activities to revamp and emphasize the need to streamline processes and activities for Class D missions across the agency have led to various interpretations of Class D, including the lumping of a variety of low-cost projects into Class D. Sometimes terms such as Class D minus are used. In this presentation, mission risk classifications will be traced to official requirements and definitions as a measure to ensure that projects and programs align with the guidance and requirements that are commensurate for their defined risk posture. As part of this, the full suite of risk classifications, formal and informal will be defined, followed by an introduction to the new GPR 8705.4 that is currently under review.GPR 8705.4 lays out guidance for the mission success activities performed at the Classes A-D for NPR 7120.5 projects as well as for projects not under NPR 7120.5. Furthermore, the trends in stepping from Class A into higher risk posture classifications will be discussed. The talk will conclude with a discussion about risk-based safety and mission assuranceat GSFC.

  20. Risk Factors of Viral Hepatitis B among Egyptian Blood Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Awadalla, HI; Ragab, MH; Osman, MA; Nassar, NA; Cairo, Egypt.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Surveillance of infectious disease markers in the blood donor population is important in recognizing trends in prevalence and incidence of transfusion related infections in asymptomatic volunteer blood donors. Subjects & Methods: It is a community base cross sectional study. Subjects of study are volunteers to donate blood. Samples were collected from blood donors and questionnaire was designed to collect the risk factors data. The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HB...

  1. Benchmarking Global Food Safety Performances: The Era of Risk Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valleé, Jean-Charles Le; Charlebois, Sylvain

    2015-10-01

    Food safety data segmentation and limitations hamper the world's ability to select, build up, monitor, and evaluate food safety performance. Currently, there is no metric that captures the entire food safety system, and performance data are not collected strategically on a global scale. Therefore, food safety benchmarking is essential not only to help monitor ongoing performance but also to inform continued food safety system design, adoption, and implementation toward more efficient and effective food safety preparedness, responsiveness, and accountability. This comparative study identifies and evaluates common elements among global food safety systems. It provides an overall world ranking of food safety performance for 17 Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries, illustrated by 10 indicators organized across three food safety risk governance domains: risk assessment (chemical risks, microbial risks, and national reporting on food consumption), risk management (national food safety capacities, food recalls, food traceability, and radionuclides standards), and risk communication (allergenic risks, labeling, and public trust). Results show all countries have very high food safety standards, but Canada and Ireland, followed by France, earned excellent grades relative to their peers. However, any subsequent global ranking study should consider the development of survey instruments to gather adequate and comparable national evidence on food safety. PMID:26408141

  2. Fuzzy Risk Graph Model for Determining Safety Integrity Level

    OpenAIRE

    Ouzraoui, N.; R. Nait-Said; Zidani, F.

    2008-01-01

    The risk graph is one of the most popular methods used to determine the safety integrity level for safety instrumented functions. However, conventional risk graph as described in the IEC 61508 standard is subjective and suffers from an interpretation problem of risk parameters. Thus, it can lead to inconsistent outcomes that may result in conservative SIL's. To overcome this difficulty, a modified risk graph using fuzzy rule-based system is proposed. This novel version of risk graph uses fuzz...

  3. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    OpenAIRE

    St. Pierre, M

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flo...

  4. Risk communication activities toward nuclear safety in Tokai: your safety is our safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As several decades have passed since the construction of nuclear power plants began, residents have become gradually less interested in nuclear safety. The Tokai criticality accident in 1909, however, had roused residents in Tokai-Mura to realize that they live with nuclear technology risks. To prepare a field of risk communication, the Tokai-Mura C3 project began as a pilot research project supported by NISA. Alter the project ended, we are continuing risk. communication activities as a non-profit organisation. The most important activity of C3 project is the citizen's inspection programme for nuclear related facilities. This programme was decided by participants who voluntarily applied to the project. The concept of the citizen's inspection programme is 'not the usual facility tours'. Participants are involved from the planning stage and continue to communicate with workers of the inspected nuclear facility. Since 2003, we have conducted six programmes for five nuclear related organisations. Participants evaluated that radiation protection measures were near good but there were some problems concerning the worker's safety and safety culture, and proposed a mixture of advice based on personal experience. Some advice was accepted and it did improve the facility's safety measures. Other suggestions were not agreed upon by nuclear organisations. The reason lies in the difference of concept between the nuclear expert's 'safety' and the citizen's 'safety'. Residents do not worry about radiation only, but also about the facility's safety as a whole including the worker's safety. They say, 'If the workers are not safe, you also are unable to protect us'. Although the disagreement remained, the participants and the nuclear industry learned much about each other. Participating citizens received a substantial amount of knowledge about the nuclear industry and its safety measures, and feel the credibility and openness of the nuclear industry. On the other hand, the nuclear

  5. Whole blood pathogen reduction technology and blood safety in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review with regional discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa'ah Nkohkwo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite vast improvements in transfusion services in sub-Saharan Africa over the last decade, there remain serious concerns on the safety and adequacy of the blood supply across the region.Objective: This review paper ascertains the role of pathogen reduction technology (PRT in improving blood safety and supply adequacy in the region.Method: The state of blood safety in sub-Saharan Africa was reviewed. Meetings, seminars and correspondence were undertaken with key clinicians, scientists and professional bodies in the region, including the World Health Organization’s Regional Office for Africa, to examine the suitability of PRT for improving the safety of whole blood transfusion, a prevalent transfusion format in the region.Results: Existing literature suggests that combining PRT with current blood safety measures (such as serology would improve the safety and adequacy of the blood supply for transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa. This was echoed by the findings of the stakeholder meetings.Conclusion: Following a detailed appraisal of two leading PRT systems, the Mirasol® PRT System and the Cerus S-303 System, we suggest that companies conduct comprehensive toxicological evaluation of the agents used for PRT and publish this in the scientific literature. We also recommend that the safety and efficacy of these technologies should be established in a randomised clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa.Keywords: Pathogen Reduction/ Inactivation, Transfusion-Transmitted Infections, Blood Safety, Sub-Saharan Africa

  6. Safety measure S 05 'Sump clogging risk'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper dealt with the safety measure S 05 'Sump clogging risk'. Problem specification contains: (1) to determine the effective strainer surface needed to be available in order to assure sufficient coolant volumes for a reliable operation of emergency systems; (2) to determine quantity and structure of insulation material which can be dislodged and can induce strained clogging; (3) to verify properties of insulation material with regard to its thermal degradation as a result of a long-term reactor unit operation; (4) to design and erect strainers so to assure sufficient congestion of emergency pump intake lines in post-accident regimes; (5) to design seismically resistant strainers with a capability to resist dynamic impacts from adjacent piping; (6) to assure monitoring of the strainer condition in real time with signals sent to the main control room

  7. Incidence and risk factors of occupational blood exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelsing, S; Nielsen, T L; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik;

    1997-01-01

    Occupational blood exposures involves a risk of transmission of serious infections. We performed a nation-wide survey, to describe the incidence and risk factors of percutaneous (PCE) and mucocutaneous (MCE) blood exposures among hospital employed doctors in Denmark. Of 9,374 questionnaires, 6......). Only 35% adhered to the basic principles of universal precautions (UP) and non-compliance was associated with a considerably increased risk of both MCE and PCE, especially in non-surgical specialties. In conclusion, we found an unacceptably high incidence of occupational blood exposures among Danish...

  8. Safety culture' is integrating 'human' into risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significance of Fukushima nuclear power accident requested reconsideration of safety standards, of which we had usually no doubt. Risk assessment standard (JIS B 9702), Which was used for repetition of database preparation and cumulative assessment, defined allowable risk and residual risk. However, work site and immediate assessment was indispensable beside such assessment so as to ensure safety. Risk of casualties was absolutely not acceptable in principle and judgments to approve allowable risk needed accountability, which was reminded by safety culture proposed by IAEA and also identified by investigation of organizational cause of Columbia accident. Actor of safety culture would be organization and individual, and mainly individual. Realization of safety culture was conducted by personnel having moral consciousness and firm sense of mission in the course of jobs and working daily with sweat pouring. Safety engineering/technology should have framework integrating human as such totality. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Contribution of the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS) to research on blood transfusion safety in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Paula; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Proietti, Anna Bárbara Carneiro; Capuani, Ligia; Gonçalez, Thelma Terezinha; de Oliveira, Claudia Di Lorenzo; Leão, Silvana Carneiro; Lopes, Maria Inês; Sampaio, Divaldo; Patavino, Giuseppina Maria; Ferreira, João Eduardo; Blatyta, Paula Fraiman; Lopes, Maria Esther Duarte; Mendrone-Junior, Alfredo; Salles, Nanci Alves; King, Melissa; Murphy, Edward; Busch, Michael; Custer, Brian; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira

    2014-03-01

    The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS) program was established in the United States in 1989 with the purpose of increasing blood transfusion safety in the context of the HIV/AIDS and human T-lymphotropic virus epidemics. REDS and its successor, REDS-II were at first conducted in the US, then expanded in 2006 to include international partnerships with Brazil and China. In 2011, a third wave of REDS renamed the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III) was launched. This seven-year research program focuses on both blood banking and transfusion medicine research in the United States of America, Brazil, China, and South Africa. The main goal of the international programs is to reduce and prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other known and emerging infectious agents through transfusion, and to address research questions aimed at understanding global issues related to the availability of safe blood. This article describes the contribution of REDS-II to transfusion safety in Brazil. Articles published from 2010 to 2013 are summarized, including database analyses to characterize blood donors, deferral rates, and prevalence, incidence and residual risk of the main blood-borne infections. Specific studies were developed to understand donor motivation, the impact of the deferral questions, risk factors and molecular surveillance among HIV-positive donors, and the natural history of Chagas disease. The purpose of this review is to disseminate the acquired knowledge and briefly summarize the findings of the REDS-II studies conducted in Brazil as well as to introduce the scope of the REDS-III program that is now in progress and will continue through 2018. PMID:24790542

  10. Contribution of the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS to research on blood transfusion safety in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Loureiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS program was established in the United States in 1989 with the purpose of increasing blood transfusion safety in the context of the HIV/AIDS and human T-lymphotropic virus epidemics. REDS and its successor, REDS-II were at first conducted in the US, then expanded in 2006 to include international partnerships with Brazil and China. In 2011, a third wave of REDS renamed the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III was launched. This seven-year research program focuses on both blood banking and transfusion medicine research in the United States of America, Brazil, China, and South Africa. The main goal of the international programs is to reduce and prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other known and emerging infectious agents through transfusion, and to address research questions aimed at understanding global issues related to the availability of safe blood. This article describes the contribution of REDS-II to transfusion safety in Brazil. Articles published from 2010 to 2013 are summarized, including database analyses to characterize blood donors, deferral rates, and prevalence, incidence and residual risk of the main blood-borne infections. Specific studies were developed to understand donor motivation, the impact of the deferral questions, risk factors and molecular surveillance among HIV-positive donors, and the natural history of Chagas disease. The purpose of this review is to disseminate the acquired knowledge and briefly summarize the findings of the REDS-II studies conducted in Brazil as well as to introduce the scope of the REDS-III program that is now in progress and will continue through 2018.

  11. Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Metabolic Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) • Consumer ...

  12. A risk informed safety classification for a Nordic NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaenkaelae, K. [Fortum Nuclear Services Ltd. (Finland)

    2002-01-01

    The report describes a study to develop a safety classification proposal or classi- fication recommendations based on risks for selected equipment of a nuclear power plant. The application plant in this work is Loviisa NPP unit 1. The safety classification proposals are to be considered as an exercise in this pilot study and do not necessarily represent final proposals in a real situation. Comparisons to original safety classifications and technical specifications were made. The study concludes that it is possible to change safety classes or safety signifi- cances as considered in technical specifications and in in-service-inspections into both directions without endangering the safety or even by improving the safety. (au)

  13. A risk informed safety classification for a Nordic NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes a study to develop a safety classification proposal or classi- fication recommendations based on risks for selected equipment of a nuclear power plant. The application plant in this work is Loviisa NPP unit 1. The safety classification proposals are to be considered as an exercise in this pilot study and do not necessarily represent final proposals in a real situation. Comparisons to original safety classifications and technical specifications were made. The study concludes that it is possible to change safety classes or safety signifi- cances as considered in technical specifications and in in-service-inspections into both directions without endangering the safety or even by improving the safety. (au)

  14. Risk Analysis of Safety-Critical Control Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Karol Rastocny

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with problems associated with risks analysis of a safety-critical control system. In the paper there are introduced recommendations enabling practical enforceability of risk analysis by the assurance of sufficient objectivity level. In the initial phases of the system lifecycle risk analysis serves for a tolerable hazard rate definition for individual safety relevant functions. In the end of the control system development process the risk analysis (an analysis of failures con...

  15. Application of risk assessment to nuclear merchant ship safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the risk assessment technique which is a part of the system safety approach. It examines studies performed in both the land based reactor safety field and the marine safety field and determines, in a general sense, how the techniques can be applied to nuclear propelled merchant ships. Several examples are given which illustrate the facilitation of the approach

  16. Failure rate data for fusion safety and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fusion Safety Program (FSP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducts safety research in materials, chemical reactions, safety analysis, risk assessment, and in component research and development to support existing magnetic fusion experiments and also to promote safety in the design of future experiments. One of the areas of safety research is applying probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods to fusion experiments. To apply PRA, we need a fusion-relevant radiological dose code and a component failure rate data base. This paper describes the FSP effort to develop a failure rate data base for fusion-specific components

  17. Behavior-Based Safety and Occupational Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, E. Scott

    2005-01-01

    The behavior-based approach to managing occupational risk and preventing workplace injuries is reviewed. Unlike the typical top-down control approach to industrial safety, behavior-based safety (BBS) provides tools and procedures workers can use to take personal control of occupational risks. Strategies the author and his colleagues have been…

  18. Nuclear energy-hazards, safety strategies, risk proportions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear risk analysis is the most advanced field of safety science but a number of unclear definitions, e.g. very small probability of accidents or very great consequences of damage, remain to be settled. The risks of nuclear energy are evaluated on the basis of comparisons, and points of main effort of recent safety research are discussed with emphasis on health hazards. (DG)

  19. Safety and risk in road traffic: selected problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew ŁUKASIK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of road safety, the concept of "risk" is used to define a measurable level of road safety dependent on numerical accident exposure value. This is an approach different (even contradictory to calculate the level of security, measured by the number of accidents or injuries. So, whether otherwise - risk assessment is needed to improve the safety of road transport and define priorities in the field of public health. The article presents the concept of risk and selected problems of risk analysis in road traffic.

  20. Categorization of reactor safety issues from a risk perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an effort to identify and rank reactor safety and risk issues identified from past Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) and other safety analyses. Because of the varied scope of these analyses, the list of issues may be incomplete. Nevertheless, those studies comprised ordered analyses to whatever their respective depths; hence, they warranted scrutiny for whatever insights they could reveal with respect to issue importance. The top-ranked issues in terms of their contribution to the uncertainty in risk are described in some detail. All of these risk issues are compared to the generic safety issues for completeness and omissions

  1. Blood pressure management in cardiovascular risk stratification : procedure, progression, process

    OpenAIRE

    Adiyaman, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we have explored different aspects of blood pressure measurement and related it to the risk of cardiovascular disease. In the first part we showed that when the arm is positioned under heart level, for example when the arm is placed on a desk or a chair support, the blood pressure and the cardiovascular risk is overstimated. We demonstrated that crossing the legs at the level of the knee, but not at the level of the ankle, causes a rise of blood pressure. We proved that the phy...

  2. Risk perception and its role in attitudes toward blood transfusion: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ly Thi; Bruhn, Roberta; Custer, Brian

    2013-04-01

    Despite improvements in blood safety making transfusion a much safer clinical procedure, the general public still perceives it as risky. We systematically reviewed available literature to examine evidence regarding the reasons and causes behind this perception. Electronic databases including PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE for literature dating back to the 1980s were searched. Eligible studies collected information on blood recipients' demographics, measures of risk domains (sets of values that risks encompass), and general knowledge of blood transfusion in terms of risks and benefits. Each study was assessed for quality of data, research method, and relevant findings. A scoring system was used to subjectively rate the overall quality of each study. Each study was reviewed for its method of data collection and information abstracted on hazards and conceptual dimensions used to measure risk. Risk perception between blood transfusion and other hazards including alternatives to transfusion were compared. Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria, all of which were conducted outside the United States, with most of the studies published more than 10 years ago and conducted by only 3 research groups. Five studies were rated as being very good, four good, five fair, and one of poor quality. The finding of the studies consistently show that objective or raw knowledge is not correlated with risk perception, but subjective or calibrated knowledge is. Thus, it is what people think they know rather than what they actually do know that influences risk perception of transfusion. Of the 3 common conceptual domains-dread, unknown risk, and benefits-blood transfusion was found to be of intermediate dread, intermediate unknown risk, and most beneficial compared with other hazards. Donated blood was found to have lower perceived risk than all other alternatives to transfusion, except for use of autologous blood. There is a lack of recent studies on allogeneic transfusion

  3. Travel Safety: A Social Media Enabled Mobile Travel Risk Application

    OpenAIRE

    Noyen, Kay; Wortmann, Felix

    2014-01-01

    We present the design artifact Travel Safety, a mobile travel risk information system (IS). Besides offering general travel risk information, the iPhone application leverages social media, in particular Twitter, to source travel risk information from multiple foreign offices. This provides a comprehensive real-time information base for the application and enables dispatch of automatic travel warnings. On the basis of Travel Safety we want to explore if content from social media can be leverag...

  4. Modeling of Safety Functions in Quantitative Risk Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thien Duy

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative risk analysis in the offshore industry is mandated by the Norwegian legislation. A literature survey is carried out, related to the current legislation from the Norwegian Petroleum Safety Authority (PSA) and supporting NORSOK standards. Process accidents on offshore installations, operating on the Norwegian continental shelf are emphasized. A risk picture is the synthesis of a risk assessment, describing the risk level. Requirements to the risk picture are discussed, and associat...

  5. Occupational safety and health management and risk governance

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkman, A; Terwoert, J.

    2014-01-01

    The advancement in new technologies, substances and new ways of working make it necessary to look beyond traditional methods of risk management. General drivers to emerging occupational safety and health (OSH) risks are: globalisation; demographic changes; technical innovations; changes in risk perception; and an increase in natural hazards. OSH issues affected by these rapid developments are, for example: physical risks associated with inactivity; psychosocial risks; work intensification and...

  6. Individual donor-nucleic acid testing for human immunodeficiency virus-1, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus and its role in blood safety

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Kumar; Sonia Gupta; Amarjit Kaur; Manvi Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) are one of the biggest threats to blood transfusion safety. Nucleic acid testing (NAT) in blood donor screening has been implemented in many countries to reduce the risk of TTIs. NAT shortens this window period, thereby offering blood centers a much higher sensitivity for detecting viral infections. Aims: The objective was to assess the role of individual donor-NAT (ID-NAT) for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV...

  7. Critical factors and paths influencing construction workers' safety risk tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayuan; Zou, Patrick X W; Li, Penny P

    2016-08-01

    While workers' safety risk tolerances have been regarded as a main reason for their unsafe behaviors, little is known about why different people have different risk tolerances even when confronting the same situation. The aim of this research is to identify the critical factors and paths that influence workers' safety risk tolerance and to explore how they contribute to accident causal model from a system thinking perceptive. A number of methods were carried out to analyze the data collected through interviews and questionnaire surveys. In the first and second steps of the research, factor identification, factor ranking and factor analysis were carried out, and the results show that workers' safety risk tolerance can be influenced by four groups of factors, namely: (1) personal subjective perception; (2) work knowledge and experiences; (3) work characteristics; and (4) safety management. In the third step of the research, hypothetical influencing path model was developed and tested by using structural equation modeling (SEM). It is found that the effects of external factors (safety management and work characteristics) on risk tolerance are larger than that of internal factors (personal subjective perception and work knowledge & experiences). Specifically, safety management contributes the most to workers' safety risk tolerance through its direct effect and indirect effect; while personal subjective perception comes the second and can act as an intermedia for work characteristics. This research provides an in-depth insight of workers' unsafe behaviors by depicting the contributing factors as shown in the accident causal model developed in this research. PMID:26775077

  8. Blood Type Influences Pancreatic Cancer Risk | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variation in the gene that determines ABO blood type influences the risk of pancreatic cancer, according to the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) for this highly lethal disease. The genetic variation, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), was discovered in a region of chromosome 9 that harbors the gene that determines blood type, the researchers reported August 2 online in Nature Genetics. |

  9. Income risk, coping strategies and safety nets

    OpenAIRE

    Dercon, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    Rural and urban households in developing countries face substantial idiosyncratic and common risk, resulting in high income variability. Households in risky environments have developed sophisticated (ex-ante) risk-management and (ex-post) risk-coping strategies, including self-insurance via savings and informal insurance mechanisms to do so while formal credit and insurance markets appear to contribute only little to reducing income risk and its consequences. Informal credit and insurance, ho...

  10. Proactive Management of Aviation System Safety Risk

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aviation safety systems have undergone dramatic changes over the past fifty years. If you take a look at the early technology in this area, you'll see that there...

  11. TWRS safety and technical integration risk management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety and Technical Integration (STI) programmatic risk management program are to assess, analyze, and handle risks associated with TWRS STI responsibilities and to communicate information about the actions being taken and the results to enable decision making. The objective of this TWRS STI Risk Management Plan is to communicate a consistent approach to risk management that will be used by the organization

  12. OCCUPATIONAL RISKS IN HEALTH CARE WORKERS AND EMPLOYEE SAFETY CONCEPT

    OpenAIRE

    SOMUNOĞLU İKİNCİ, Sinem

    2015-01-01

     From the perspective of health sector, occupational risks encountered by employees and employee safety concepts are considered to be highly topical matters. This is mainly because health sector involves greater risks compared to many other sectors. Major occupational risk factors are classified as biological, physical, chemical, ergonomic and psycho-social. These risk factors recently have led to an increase in occupational diseases, work accidents, and health problems. As its direct consequ...

  13. A study of the noncompliance of blood banks on safety and quality parameters in blood donation camps in Bengaluru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Kumar Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The compliance of safety and quality parameters laid out by national and international guidelines in outdoor blood donation camps has not been studied in India. Our study aimed at identifying, monitoring, analyzing, and developing preventive strategies for several key parameters associated with the quality and safety of outdoor voluntary blood donation camps (VBDC. Settings: The study covered a total of 424 VBDCs at various locations in Bengaluru, Karnataka (South India from 2009 to 2013. Seven government hospitals based blood banks, three private hospitals based blood banks and two voluntary standalone blood banks participated in the VBDCs included in the study. Materials and Methods: At the onset, the quality and safety standards to be followed were discussed and agreed upon. During the study, noncompliance (NC to the agreed upon standards were recorded and shared. Periodic trainings were also organized to help minimize NC. Results: One or more instances of NC in 73% of the VBDCs. Highest NC were observed associated with punctuality (34%, wearing gloves (16%, hemoglobin (Hb estimation (11% and donor screening and selection other than Hb check (8-9%. Conclusion: For all 16 parameters under study, significant NC was observed. As a whole private hospital based blood banks were more noncompliant. The high degree of NC to matters relating to quality and safety in VBDCs is high and warrants for urgent attention and further study. Our study also shows that regular monitoring and systematic and strategic intervention can decrease the rate of NC.

  14. Risk Stratification by Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Across JNC Classes of Conventional Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines propose classification of conventional blood pressure (CBP) into normotension (<120/<80 mm Hg), prehypertension (120-139/80-89 mm Hg), and hypertension (≥140/≥90 mm Hg). METHODS: To assess the potential differential contribution of ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in predict......BACKGROUND: Guidelines propose classification of conventional blood pressure (CBP) into normotension (...) in predicting risk across CBP strata, we analyzed outcomes in 7,826 untreated people recruited from 11 populations. RESULTS: During an 11.3-year period, 809 participants died (276 cardiovascular deaths) and 639, 383, and 225 experienced a cardiovascular, cardiac, or cerebrovascular event. Compared...... with normotension (n = 2,639), prehypertension (n = 3,076) carried higher risk (P ≤ 0.015) of cardiovascular (+41%) and cerebrovascular (+92%) endpoints; compared with hypertension (n = 2,111) prehypertension entailed lower risk (P ≤ 0.005) of total mortality (-14%) and cardiovascular mortality (-29...

  15. Health and safety risks in nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Fountouki A.; Theofanidis D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: professional hazards create insecurity and frustration to nurses during their clinical work. Aim of this review is to present and analyze daily risks and aggravating factors during the clinical work of nurses. Method: a systematic evaluation of the International and Greek literature findings was undertaken, according to Rogers’ model of analysis. Results: the frame of analysis showed five categories of risks which include: Biological/contagious risks, Chemical factors, Environme...

  16. Safety goals in 'risk-informed, performance-based' regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent overall improvement in key operational safety indices in the United States, combined with 'risk-informed, performance-based' regulation by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), has indicated that 'safety goals' are indispensable; thereby both licensee and regulator can share common objectives and common indicators of safety performance. Recognizing these, the author proposes a new concept of safety goals to facilitate engineering application, while removing some of the uncertainties often encountered in implementing the safety goals, by extending a framework of the International Nuclear Event Scales (INES) being widely used in the world. In this article, safety goals are characterized from a point of view of nuclear regulation by oversight, as established by the US NRC. This is a new tendency of nuclear regulation to motivate initiatives of licensees to improve safety and operational performance and to minimize potential nuclear risks, without the regulatory side specifying how the specific safety requirements should be met. Whereas in the 'compliance-based regulation,' which is a more widely used approach of nuclear regulation in many countries, detailed prescriptive safety requirements are specified to enforce the licensees to strictly follow them. The author observes, through the past experience of the US NRC, the latter approach has a basic limitation in improving total safety of nuclear facilities, and supports the new direction to be taken more widely in the nuclear community

  17. Selection of tolerable risk criteria for dam safety decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk assessment has received increasing attention in recent years as a means of aiding decision making on dams by providing systematic and rational methods for dealing with risk and uncertainty. Risk assessment is controversial and decisions affecting risk to life are the most controversial. Tolerable criteria, based on the risks that society is prepared to accept in order to avoid excessive costs, set bounds within which risk-based decisions may be made. The components of risk associated with dam safety are addressed on an individual basis and criteria established for each component, thereby permitting flexibility in the balance between component risk and avoiding the problems of placing a monetary value on life. The guiding principle of individual risk is that dams do not impose intolerable risks on any individual. A risk to life of 1 in 104 per annum is generally considered the maximum tolerable risk. When considering societal risk, the safety of a dam should be proportional to the consequences of its failure. Risks of financial losses beyond the corporation's ability to finance should be so low as to be considered negligible. 17 refs., 3 figs

  18. There is more to risk and safety planning than dramatic risks: Mental health nurses' risk assessment and safety-management practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Agnes; Doyle, Louise; Downes, Carmel; Morrissey, Jean; Costello, Paul; Brennan, Michael; Nash, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Risk assessment and safety planning are considered a cornerstone of mental health practice, yet limited research exists into how mental health nurses conceptualize 'risk' and how they engage with risk assessment and safety planning. The aim of the present study was to explore mental health nurses' practices and confidence in risk assessment and safety planning. A self-completed survey was administered to 381 mental health nurses in Ireland. The findings indicate that nurses focus on risk to self and risk to others, with the risk of suicide, self-harm, substance abuse, and violence being most frequently assessed. Risk from others and 'iatrogenic' risk were less frequently considered. Overall, there was limited evidence of recovery-oriented practice in relation to risk. The results demonstrate a lack of meaningful engagement with respect to collaborative safety planning, the identification and inclusion of protective factors, and the inclusion of positive risk-taking opportunities. In addition, respondents report a lack of confidence working with positive risk taking and involving family/carers in the risk-assessment and safety-planning process. Gaps in knowledge about risk-assessment and safety-planning practice, which could be addressed through education, are identified, as are the implications of the findings for practice and research. PMID:26632975

  19. Blood lipid levels and prostate cancer risk; a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Roermund, van J.G.H.; Aben, K.K.H.; Heijer, den M.; Swinkels, D.W.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that blood lipid levels might be associated with prostate cancer risk. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and prost

  20. Risk management modeling and its application in maritime safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ting-Rong; Chen, Wei-Jiong; Zeng, Xiang-Kun

    2008-12-01

    Quantified risk assessment (QRA) needs mathematicization of risk theory. However, attention has been paid almost exclusively to applications of assessment methods, which has led to neglect of research into fundamental theories, such as the relationships among risk, safety, danger, and so on. In order to solve this problem, as a first step, fundamental theoretical relationships about risk and risk management were analyzed for this paper in the light of mathematics, and then illustrated with some charts. Second, man-machine-environment-management (MMEM) theory was introduced into risk theory to analyze some properties of risk. On the basis of this, a three-dimensional model of risk management was established that includes: a goal dimension; a management dimension; an operation dimension. This goal management operation (GMO) model was explained and then emphasis was laid on the discussion of the risk flowchart (operation dimension), which lays the groundwork for further study of risk management and qualitative and quantitative assessment. Next, the relationship between Formal Safety Assessment (FSA) and Risk Management was researched. This revealed that the FSA method, which the international maritime organization (IMO) is actively spreading, comes from Risk Management theory. Finally, conclusion were made about how to apply this risk management method to concrete fields efficiently and conveniently, as well as areas where further research is required.

  1. Risk management modeling and its application in maritime safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Ting-rong; CHEN Wei-jiong; ZENG Xiang-kun

    2008-01-01

    Quantified risk assessment (QRA) needs mathematicization of risk theory. However,attention has been paid almost exclusively to applications of assessment methods,which has led to neglect of research into fundamental theories,such as the relationships among risk,safety,danger,and so on. In order to solve this problem,as a first step,fundamental theoretical relationships about risk and risk management were analyzed for this paper in the light of mathematics,and then illustrated with some charts. Second,man-machine-environment-management (MMEM) theory was introduced into risk theory to analyze some properties of risk. On the basis of this,a three-dimensional model of risk management was established that includes: a goal dimension;a management dimension;an operation dimension. This goal management operation (GMO) model was explained and then emphasis was laid on the discussion of the risk flowchart (operation dimension),which lays the groundwork for further study of risk management and qualitative and quantitative assessment. Next,the relationship between Formal Safety Assessment (FSA) and Risk Management was researched. This revealed that the FSA method,which the international maritime organization (IMO) is actively spreading,comes from Risk Management theory. Finally,conclusion were made about how to apply this risk management method to concrete fields efficiently and conveniently,as well as areas where further research is required.

  2. Occupational health and safety: Designing and building with MACBETH a value risk-matrix for evaluating health and safety risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, D. F.; Oliveira, M. D.; Costa, C. A. Bana e.

    2015-05-01

    Risk matrices (RMs) are commonly used to evaluate health and safety risks. Nonetheless, they violate some theoretical principles that compromise their feasibility and use. This study describes how multiple criteria decision analysis methods have been used to improve the design and the deployment of RMs to evaluate health and safety risks at the Occupational Health and Safety Unit (OHSU) of the Regional Health Administration of Lisbon and Tagus Valley. ‘Value risk-matrices’ (VRMs) are built with the MACBETH approach in four modelling steps: a) structuring risk impacts, involving the construction of descriptors of impact that link risk events with health impacts and are informed by scientific evidence; b) generating a value measurement scale of risk impacts, by applying the MACBETH-Choquet procedure; c) building a system for eliciting subjective probabilities that makes use of a numerical probability scale that was constructed with MACBETH qualitative judgments on likelihood; d) and defining a classification colouring scheme for the VRM. A VRM built with OHSU members was implemented in a decision support system which will be used by OHSU members to evaluate health and safety risks and to identify risk mitigation actions.

  3. Risk-based rules for crane safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has recommended a method called formal safety assessment (FSA) for future development of rules and regulations. The FSA method has been applied in a pilot research project for development of risk-based rules and functional requirements for systems and components for offshore crane systems. This paper reports some developments in the project. A method for estimating target reliability for the risk-control options (safety functions) by means of the cost/benefit decision criterion has been developed in the project and is presented in this paper. Finally, a structure for risk-based rules is proposed and presented

  4. Prevalence of p24 antigen among a cohort of HIV antibody negative blood donors in Sokoto, North Western Nigeria - the question of safety of blood transfusion in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaro, Erhabor; Mohammed, Ndakotsu; Zama, Isaac; Yakubu, Abdulrahaman; Dorcas, Ikhuenbor; Festus, Aghedo; Kwaifa, Ibrahim; Sani, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Blood transfusions remain a substantial source of HIV in SSA particularly among children and pregnant women. Aims and objectives: This aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the prevalence of p24 antigen among HIV antibody seronegative blood donors in Sokoto, North West Nigeria. Methods A total of 15,061 HIV antibody negative blood donors with mean age and age range (29.2 ± 8.18 and 18-50 years) were screened for p24 antigen between January 2010 to July 2013 using the Diapro Diagnostic immunoassay kit for P24 antigen (King Hawk Pharmaceuticals Beijing China). Results The overall prevalence of p24 antigen among the HIV antibody negative donors sample was 5.84%. The yearly prevalence was 9.79, 8.12, 2.7 and 2.84% respectively in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Of the total number of blood donor tested, 14,968 (99.38%) were males while 93 (0.62%) were females. The prevalence of P24 antigen was significantly higher among male blood donors 873 (5.8%) compared to females 7(0.05%), (p= 0.001). P24 positivity was significantly higher among blood group O blood donors compared to A, B and AB donors (494 (3.29%) compared to 184 (1.89%), 196 (1.30%) and 6 (0.04%)) respectively, p = 0.001). The prevalence of P24 antigen was significantly higher among Rhesus positive blood donors compared to Rhesus negative (807 (5.36%) versus 73 (0.48%), p =0.001). Conclusion Blood transfusion in Nigeria is associated with increased risk of HIV transmission. There is the urgent need to optimize the screening of blood donors in Nigeria by the inclusion of p24 antigen testing into the blood donor screening menu. The Nigerian government urgently need to adopt the WHO blood safety strategies to reduce the risk of transmission of HIV through blood transfusion. PMID:25419301

  5. Hydrogen economy infrastructure - safety and risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The scarcity of fossil fuels and the resulting increase of prices have put alternative energies on the agenda. Hydrogen may play an important role in the energy production in the future. Large-scale introduction of hydrogen into economy implies risks associated with it to be at least not larger than those of existing technologies. The paper presents a procedure for risk analysis for the hydrogen economy infrastructure. (authors)

  6. Perceived safety and teen risk taking in online chat sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Cheryl; Prawitz, Aimee D; Derscheid, Linda E; Montgomery, Bette

    2011-03-01

    Framed by theories of adolescent development, this study explored relationships among adolescents' perceptions of chat-site safety, time spent chatting, and risky online behaviors. Tenth graders (N = 139) in rural Midwestern U.S. schools completed surveys. Factor analysis produced three factors each for perception of safety and risk-taking behaviors. Regression analyses revealed that perception of safety factors were useful in predicting online risk-taking behaviors. Teens with more social discomfort and those who thought it was safe to reveal personal information and trust chat-site "friends" were more likely to take risks. As time spent in chat sites increased, so did risk-taking behaviors. Implications for educators and parents are discussed, such as initiation of conversations about safe Internet use, parental participation in chat sites as teens' invited "friends," and school programs to teach safe online practices. PMID:20677982

  7. Health and safety risks in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fountouki A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: professional hazards create insecurity and frustration to nurses during their clinical work. Aim of this review is to present and analyze daily risks and aggravating factors during the clinical work of nurses. Method: a systematic evaluation of the International and Greek literature findings was undertaken, according to Rogers’ model of analysis. Results: the frame of analysis showed five categories of risks which include: Biological/contagious risks, Chemical factors, Environmental/mechanical risks, Physical dangers, Psychosocial risks. Discussion: biological dangers can be dealt with by using suitable equipment for trauma avoidance and careful execution of nursing tasks. Chemical risks, including exposure to chemotherapeutic medicines, can be prevented by using protective measures such as gloves, masks, goggles and special appliances for preparing medication. The mechanical strain of the musculaskeletical system should be limited by ergonomic equipment and education, while the physical factors such as noise requires depends also on the personal sensitivity of workers. Conclusions: many preventative measures are based simply on the modification and adoption of a new behaviour and do not demand financial resources or special equipment. The strong-will for protecting the health status of nursing staff and promoting the profession are the two main drives in improving nursing working like conditions and the administration of safe care.

  8. Risk based maintenance to increase safety and decrease costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk-Based techniques have been developed for commercial nuclear power plants for the last eight years by a team working through the ASME Center for Research and Technology Development (CRTD). System boundaries and success criteria is defined using the Probabilistic Risk Analysis or Probabilistic Safety Analysis developed to meet the Individual Plant Evaluation. Final ranking of components is by a plant expert panel similar to the one developed for the Maintenance Rule. Components are identified as being high risk-significant or low risk-significant. Maintenance and resources are focused on those components that have the highest risk-significance. The techniques have been developed and applied at a number of plants. Results from the first risk-based inspection pilot plant indicates safety due to pipe failure can be doubled while the inspection reduced to about 80% when compared with current inspection programs. Pilot studies on risk-based testing indicate that about 60% of pumps and 25 to 30% of valves in plants are high safety-significant The reduction in inspection and testing reduces the person-rem exposure and resulting in further increases in safety. These techniques have been documented in publications by the ASME CRTD which are referenced. (author)

  9. From the safety culture to the culture of risk, people. A key to safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several issues are summarized resulting from reviews carried out in 1994 by the Nuclear Plant Operations Corporate Resources of Electricite de France, in view of expanding the notions behind the INSAG 4 report and identifying potential levers within the company for developing the safety culture. Introducing the notion of risk and fostering discussion of risks among operators will contribute to further safety progress. This also provides a perception of safety which could become a shared goal for all actors and thus contribute to social cohesion. (author)

  10. Tolerability of risk, safety assessment principles and their implications for probabilistic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a regulatory view of probabilistic safety assessment as seen by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) and in the light of the general regulatory risk aims set out in the Health and Safety Executive's (HSE) The tolerability of risk from nuclear power stations (TOR) and in Safety assessment principles for nuclear plants (SAPs), prepared by NII on behalf of the HSE. Both of these publications were revised and republished in 1992. This paper describes the SAPs, together with the historical background, the motivation for review, the effects of the Sizewell and Hinkley Point C public inquiries, changes since the original versions, comparison with international standards and use in assessment. For new plant, probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) is seen as an essential tool in balancing the safety of the design and in demonstrating compliance with TOR and the SAPs. (Author)

  11. Risk and safety analysis of nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, John C

    2011-01-01

    The book has been developed in conjunction with NERS 462, a course offered every year to seniors and graduate students in the University of Michigan NERS program. The first half of the book covers the principles of risk analysis, the techniques used to develop and update a reliability data base, the reliability of multi-component systems, Markov methods used to analyze the unavailability of systems with repairs, fault trees and event trees used in probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), and failure modes of systems. All of this material is general enough that it could be used in non-nuclear a

  12. Risk Perception, Communication and Food Safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frewer, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    Developing an effective communication strategy about different food hazards depends not only on technical risk assessments (for example related to health or the environment) but must also take into account consumer perceptions and preferences. In addition, consumers make decisions about food choices

  13. Safety criteria: Intercomparison and aggregation of risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of the assumptions underlying the use of limit lines in nuclear regulation and risk comparisons led to an alternative approach, where frequency-consequence curves are divided into two components: number of accidents during a specified time period and consequences conditional upon the occurrence of an unwanted event. This approach leads to a neat separation between natural and technological disasters. To compare probability distributions when stochastic dominance principles are not applicable, risk indices based on a linearized moments model (LMM) were established. The LMM permits explicit introduction of individual, societal or group opinions, thus incorporating the various perceptions of risks by society directly into the evaluation process. A questionnaire was applied to elicit empirical data which were then compared with the predictions of the linearized moments model. Furthermore the LMM also allows the comparison of events in those cases where the cumulative probability distributions cross each other. For the evaluation of a probability distribution that crosses the limit line, the risk index of the limit line (calculated by using the LMM) should be compared to the index of the accident under consideration

  14. Psychological aspects of food safety risk perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim

    would make avoidance behaviour socially inappropriate. The four conditions are illustrated with examples from past and ongoing research. Since many of the involved mechanisms operate almost automatically, interventions that are based on occasional risk communication alone are unlikely to have lasting...

  15. Investments in blood safety improve the availability of blood to underserved areas in a sub-saharan african country

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, J.P.; Wilkinson, R.L.; Basavaraju, S.V.; Von Finckenstein, B.G.; Sibinga, C.T.H.; Marfin, A.; Postma, M.J.; Mataranyika, M.N.; Tobias, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since 2004, several African countries, including Namibia, have received assistance from the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Aims: Gains have been documented in the safety and number of collected units in these countries, but the distribution of blood has not bee

  16. Current issues and perspectives in food safety and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrand, G

    2015-12-01

    In this review, current issues and opportunities in food safety assessment are discussed. Food safety is considered an essential element inherent in global food security. Hazard characterization is pivotal within the continuum of risk assessment, but it may be conceived only within a very limited frame as a true alternative to risk assessment. Elucidation of the mode of action underlying a given hazard is vital to create a plausible basis for human toxicology evaluation. Risk assessment, to convey meaningful risk communication, must be based on appropriate and reliable consideration of both exposure and mode of action. New perspectives, provided by monitoring human exogenous and endogenous exposure biomarkers, are considered of great promise to support classical risk extrapolation from animal toxicology. PMID:26614817

  17. Risk concepts in UK nuclear safety decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the concept of risk as understood in the UK, with particular reference to the use of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) in nuclear safety decision making. The way 'risk' appears in UK fundamental legislation means that the concept cannot be limited to evaluation of numerical probabilities of physical harm. Rather the focus is on doing all that is reasonably practicable to reduce risks: this entails applying relevant good practice and then seeking further safety measures until the money, time and trouble required are grossly disproportionate to the residual risk. PSA is used to inform rather than dictate such decisions. This approach is reinforced by considering how far any practical PSA can be said to measure risk. The behaviour of complex socio-technical systems such as nuclear power stations does not meet the conditions under which probability theory can be applied in an absolutely objective statistical sense. Risk is not an intrinsic real property of such systems. Rather PSA is a synthesis of data and subjective expert judgements, dependent on the extent of detailed knowledge of the plant. There are many other aspects of engineering judgement involved in safety decisions which cannot be so captured. (author)

  18. Bayesian-network-based safety risk analysis in construction projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a systemic decision support approach for safety risk analysis under uncertainty in tunnel construction. Fuzzy Bayesian Networks (FBN) is used to investigate causal relationships between tunnel-induced damage and its influential variables based upon the risk/hazard mechanism analysis. Aiming to overcome limitations on the current probability estimation, an expert confidence indicator is proposed to ensure the reliability of the surveyed data for fuzzy probability assessment of basic risk factors. A detailed fuzzy-based inference procedure is developed, which has a capacity of implementing deductive reasoning, sensitivity analysis and abductive reasoning. The “3σ criterion” is adopted to calculate the characteristic values of a triangular fuzzy number in the probability fuzzification process, and the α-weighted valuation method is adopted for defuzzification. The construction safety analysis progress is extended to the entire life cycle of risk-prone events, including the pre-accident, during-construction continuous and post-accident control. A typical hazard concerning the tunnel leakage in the construction of Wuhan Yangtze Metro Tunnel in China is presented as a case study, in order to verify the applicability of the proposed approach. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach and its application potential. A comparison of advantages and disadvantages between FBN and fuzzy fault tree analysis (FFTA) as risk analysis tools is also conducted. The proposed approach can be used to provide guidelines for safety analysis and management in construction projects, and thus increase the likelihood of a successful project in a complex environment. - Highlights: • A systemic Bayesian network based approach for safety risk analysis is developed. • An expert confidence indicator for probability fuzzification is proposed. • Safety risk analysis progress is extended to entire life cycle of risk-prone events. • A typical

  19. 76 FR 76732 - Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ..., transfusion organ and tissue transplantation, bioethics, and/or related disciplines. Nominations should be... health, ethical, and legal issues related to transfusion and transplantation safety, and (3) the... Public Health Advisor for Blood, Organ and Tissue Safety Policy, Department of Health and Human...

  20. Blood safety measures and the role of central blood institute in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenji Tadokoro

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Japanese Blood Programme Japanese Red Cross Blood Service is the sole conductor of blood service in Japan. It collects 5.3 million volun-tary non-remunerated donations from 127 million popu-lations and distributes 18 million units ( one unit = 200 ml,2 million Liter) blood matching the medical needs.A part of plasma is supplied to the JRCBS fractionation center and other 3 commercial manufacturers for pro-duction of plasma derivatives.

  1. Introduction to Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization and Blood Safety in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Abolghasemi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nCurrently, in Iran blood transfusion is an integral part of the national health system and blood donation is voluntary and non­remu­nerated and blood and its components may not be a source of profit. In 1974 and following establishment of Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization (IBTO all blood transfusion activities from donor recruitment to production of blood com­po­nents and delivery of blood and blood products were centralized. The activities of IBTO are followed the laws and regu­la­tions of Ministry of Health and criteria of Iran National Regulatory Authority. In order to meet the country's demand in 2007 IBTO collected about 1.7 millions units of blood from the population of 70 millions. In 1979 coincided with the Is­lamic revolution the number of  blood units collected throughout the country were 124,000 units or 3.4 unit per 1000 popu­la­tion whereas after about 30 years this increased to about 25 unit per 1000 population. With improving the pool of vol­un­tary donors, IBTO has been successful in excluding "family replacement" donation since 2007 and reached to 100% volun­tary and nonremunerated blood donation. Currently more than 92% of blood donors in Iran are male and contribution of fe­male in blood donation is less than 8%. Although all donated blood in Iran screened for HBsAg since 1974, screening of blood units for HIV and HCV started since 1989 and 1996, respectively. The frequency of HBV infection in blood do­nors showed a significant decline from 1.79% in 1998 to 0.4% in 2007. The overall frequency of HCV and HIV infection are 0.13% and 0.004% respectively.

  2. Integrating risk management and safety culture in a framework for risk informed decision making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R. [Det Norske Veritas (U.S.A.), Inc., Katy, Texas (United States)], E-mail: Bill.Nelson@dnv.com

    2009-07-01

    Operators and regulators of nuclear power plants agree on the importance of maintaining safety and controlling accident risks. Effective safety and risk management requires treatment of both technical and organizational components. Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) provides tools for technical risk management. However, organizational factors are not treated in PRA, but are addressed using different approaches. To bring both components together, a framework of Risk Informed Decision Making (RIDM) is needed. The objective tree structure of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is a promising approach to combine both elements. Effective collaboration involving regulatory and industry groups is needed to accomplish the integration. (author)

  3. Mycotoxin food safety risk in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat Ramesh V.; Vasanthi, Siruguri

    2003-01-01

    "Mycotoxins are produced by fungi, commonly known as mold. These toxins can develop during production, harvesting, or storage of grains, nuts, and other crops. Mycotoxins are among the most potent mutagenic and carcinogenic substances known. They pose chronic health risks: prolonged exposure through diet has been linked to cancer and kidney, liver, and immune-system disease. Because mycotoxins occur more frequently under tropical conditions and diets in many developing countries are more heav...

  4. Risk and Safety Working Group: perspectives,accomplishments and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generation IV Technology Road-map identifies 3 specific safety goals: 1) Generation IV nuclear energy systems will excel in safety and reliability; 2) Generation IV nuclear energy systems will have a very low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage; and 3) Generation IV nuclear energy systems will eliminate the need for offsite emergency response. This paper describes an integrated safety philosophy for Generation IV nuclear systems. The following postulates should underlie such a safety philosophy: -) Opportunities exist to further improve on nuclear power's already excellent safety record in most countries; -) Safety improvements should simultaneously be based on several elements which will require specific research efforts; -) The principle of 'defense in depth' has served the nuclear power industry well, and must be preserved in the design of Generation IV systems; -) The Generation IV design process should be driven by a 'risk-informed' approach. The methodology is tentatively called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM). Although the ISAM is essentially a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) based methodology for Generation IV systems, the strength of the ISAM is that it offers tools that are tailored to answering specific types of questions at various stages of design development, and that the elements of the methodology complement and support one another in a way that contributes to a much more complete understanding of the range of safety issues. (A.C.)

  5. Safety of light water reactors. Risks of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on the safety of light-water reactors includes the following chapters: Part I: Physical and technical safety concept of actual German and future European light-water reactors: (1) Worldwide operated nuclear power plants in 2011, (2) Some reactor physical fundamentals. (3) Nuclear power plants in Germany. (4) Radioactive exposure due to nuclear power plants. (5) Safety concept of light-water reactors. (6) Probabilistic analyses and risk studies. (7) Design of light-water reactors against external incidents. (8) Risk comparison of nuclear power plants and other energy systems. (9) Evaluation of risk studies using the improved (new) safety concept for LWR. (19) The severe reactor accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. Part II: Safety of German LWR in case of a postulated aircraft impact. (11) Literature. (12) Review of requirements and actual design. (13) Incident scenarios. (14) Load approach for aircraft impact. (15) Demonstration of the structural behavior in case of aircraft impact. (16) Special considerations. (17) Evaluation of the safety state of German and foreign nuclear power plants. Part III: ROSOS as example for a computer-based decision making support system for the severe accident management. (19) Literature. (20) Radiological fundamentals, accident management, modeling of the radiological situation. (21) The decision making support system RODOS. (22) RODOS and the Fukushima accident. (23) Recent developments in the radiological emergency management in the European frame.

  6. Risk perception and safety targets for major accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety and Reliability Directorate of the U.K. Atomic Energy Authority is currently (1987) conducting a re-examination of the risk to society arising from major accidents, and in particular major accidents that could potentially originate from the nuclear power industry. As part of this work, the criteria of safety have been reviewed and the definition of safety goals and safety targets to be met in different circumstances have been examined. Safety goals and targets must be clear to the design and operating side of the industry and to the regulatory authorities; however, they must also be understood by and broadly acceptable to decision makers and to the concerned public. The S.R.D. therefore invited the Environmental Risk Assessment Unit in the University of East Anglia to organise this Seminnar, to include a number of people in academic life who have studied different aspects of the perception of risks and of the factors that seem to argue for or against the acceptability of risks. The papers submitted to the Seminar by six invited speakers are printed in full; they have been slightly amended by the authors in the light of the discussion. A short account of the main points that emerged during the discussions is included at the end of the Report. (author)

  7. Risk informed resource allocation policy: safety can save costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasman, H J

    2000-01-01

    During economic doldrums, decision making on investments for safety is even more difficult than it already is when funds are abundant. This paper attempts to offer some guidance. After stating the present challenge to prevention of losses in the process industries, the systematic approach of quantified risk assessment is briefly reviewed and improvements in the methodology are mentioned. In addition, attention is given to the use of a risk matrix to survey a plant and to derive a plan of action. Subsequently, the reduction of risk is reviewed. Measures for prevention, protection, and mitigation are discussed. The organization of safety has become at least as important as technical safety of equipment and standards. It is reflected in the introduction of a safety management system. Furthermore, the design process in a pro-active approach is described and the concept of inherent safety is briefly addressed. The concept of Layer of Protection Analysis is explained and also the reason why it is relevant to provide a cost-benefit analysis. Finally, after comments regarding the cost of accidents, the basics of costing and profitability are summarized and a way is suggested to apply this approach to risk-reducing measures. An example is provided on how a selection can be made from a number of alternatives. PMID:10677670

  8. Evaluation of life safety risks related to severe flooding

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan, Saqib

    2009-01-01

    The flooding risk has always been considered to be very important for the risk safety management of dams. The extreme flooding downstream of a dam could be either due to dam failure or sometimes it can occur without failure. In both cases, it poses serious risks to people and property downstream of the dam. In this study, the risk assessment for the Jhelum river valley downstream of Mangla dam has been carried out. Mangla dam is one of the large earth and rock-fill dams in the world. The hei...

  9. Use of risk information to safety regulation. Fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure of ISA (Integrated Safety Analysis) for uranium fuel fabrication/enrichment facilities has been under the development aiming to utilize risk information for safety regulations in this project. Activities in the fiscal year 2012 are summarized in the paper. There are two major activities in the year. First one is a study on ISA procedure for external events such as earthquakes. Second one is that for chemical consequences such as UF6 and HF. Other than the activities a fundamental study on a policy of utilizing risk information was conducted. The outline and results are provided in the chapter 1 and 2 respectively. (author)

  10. TOXOPLASMOSIS: FOOD SAFETY AND RISK COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Celano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis, parasitic pathology supported by Toxoplasma gondii, is a typical example of multi-issue and inter-disciplinary on which, with equal intensity, converge the interests of various branches of human and veterinary medicine. The aim of research was the assessment of risk communication to pregnant women by doctors gynecologists involved in ASL’s territorial about toxoplasmosis, which can have serious effects on pregnancy and the unborn child. The results acquired during the investigation showed the need to develop and implement appropriate information campaigns and proper nutrition education.

  11. Health and safety risks in production agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Essen, S G; McCurdy, S A

    1998-01-01

    Production agriculture is associated with a variety of occupational illnesses and injuries. Agricultural workers are at higher risk of death or disabling injury than most other workers. Traumatic injury commonly occurs from working with machinery or animals. Respiratory illness and health problems from exposures to farm chemicals are major concerns, and dermatoses, hearing loss, certain cancers, and zoonotic infections are important problems. Innovative means of encouraging safe work practices are being developed. Efforts are being made to reach all groups of farmworkers, including migrant and seasonal workers, farm youth, and older farmers. PMID:9795581

  12. N reactor individual risk comparison to quantitative nuclear safety goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A full-scope level III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been completed for N reactor, a US Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided the technical leadership for this work, using the state-of-the-art NUREG-1150 methodology developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The main objectives of this effort were to assess the risks to the public and to the on-site workers posed by the operation of N reactor, to identify changes to the plant that could reduce the overall risk, and to compare those risks to the proposed NRC and DOE quantitative safety goals. This paper presents the methodology adopted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and SNL for individual health risk evaluation, its results, and a comparison to the NRC safety objectives and the DOE nuclear safety guidelines. The N reactor results, are also compared with the five NUREG-1150 nuclear plants. Only internal events are compared here because external events are not yet reported in the current draft NUREG-1150. This is the first full-scope level III PRA study with a detailed quantitative safety goal comparison performed for DOE production reactors

  13. Leisure-Time Exercise Could Lower Your Risk of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time exercise could lower your risk of high blood pressure American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report September ... American Heart Association Download (1.4 MB) High Blood Pressure A high blood pressure reading. copyright American Heart ...

  14. Microwave milk pasteurization without food safety risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Géczi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 96 Normal 0 false false false CS JA X-NONE According to nutrition science, milk and milk products are essential food for humans. The primary processing of milk includes its storage, separation, homogenization and the pasteurization process as well. The latter is a kind of heat treatment, which has been used to extend the storage life of food since the late 18th century. Although heat treatment of milk can be achieved through the use of microwave technology, the inhomogeneity of electromagnetic fields leads to an uneven distribution of temperature in the food products, therefore precluding their use in industry. The pasteurization operation is very often Critical Controll Point (CCP according of food safety systems. In recent years our research team has developed continuously operating heat treatment pilot-plant equipment, capable of measuring and contrasting the effects of different heat treatment methods, such as thermostat-controlled water baths and microwave energy, on liquid food products. We examined and compared protein, fat and bacterial content in samples of fresh cow milk with heat-treated cow milk samples. In addition, storage experiments were carried out under a microscope and recordings made of fat globules. Our results so far show that the microwave heat treatment is equivalent to the convection manner pasteurization technology, as we found no difference between the heat-treated products.doi:10.5219/260

  15. Dengue viremia in blood donors in Northern India: Challenges of emerging dengue outbreaks to blood transfusion safety

    OpenAIRE

    Sadhana Mangwana

    2015-01-01

    Backdround: Emerging infectious diseases pose threats to the general human population; including recipients of blood transfusions. Dengue is spreading rapidly to new areas and with increasing frequency of major outbreaks. Screening blood for dengue antigens in dengue-endemic countries would be costly and should, therefore, be recommended only after careful assessment of risk for infection and cost. Aim: A prospective study was conducted to establish the magnitude of the threat that dengue pos...

  16. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND RISK ASSESSMENT IN THE MINING INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Slobodan Radosavljević

    2008-01-01

    Global dynamics of the technological changes creates a need for modern approaches while evaluating and analysing the risk in the mining industry. Analysing and managing technical systems in the mining industry is a key factor concerning the quality of their functioning. Dependability, safety, and maintenance management based on the risk analysis can contribute substantially to the overall effectiveness and efficiency of the mining technological systems. Besides applying adequate technology, o...

  17. Risk based safety management to enhance technical safety and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk management is an activity which integrates recognition of risk, risk assessment and develops strategies to manage it. Objective of risk management is to reduce different risks related to a pre-selected domain to an acceptable level. It may refer to numerous types of threats caused by environment, technology, humans, organizations and politics. The paper describes the different steps and methods in the risk management process. (authors)

  18. Safety- and Risk Analysis Activities in Chemical Industry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current paper gives an overview of the legislation and the methods used in safety and risk management in the chemical industry within Europe and in particular within the European Union. The paper is based on a report that has been written for the SOS-1 project under the Nordic nuclear safety research (NKS). Safety- and risk-related matters in the process industry, in particular, in chemical, within the EU are subject to consideration at three levels: (1) EU legislation, (2) European/intemational standardisation, and (3) socio-economic analysis. EC Directives define the 'essential requirements', e.g., protection of health and safety, that must be fulfilled when goods are placed on the market or some industry is put into operation. The European standards bodies (CEN, CENELEC and ETSI) have the task of establishing the corresponding technical specifications, meeting the essential requirements of the Directives, compliance with which will provide a presumption of conformity with the essential requirements. Such specifications are referred to as 'harmonised standards'. Compliance with harmonised standards remains voluntary, and manufacturers are free to choose any other technical solution that provides compliance with the essential requirements. This view is stated in the 'New Approach' to technical harmonisation and standardisation (details can be found on the web page: http://europe.eu.int/comm/enterprise/newapproach/standardization/index .html). Standardisation as well as the regulation of technical risks is increasingly being undertaken at European or international level. The European legislator limits its role to the affirmation of overall objectives, and leaves it to the economic players to draw up the technical procedures and standards to specify in detail the ways and means of attaining them. Many countries have introduced requirements that new legislation and/or administrative regulations be subject to socio-economic analysis. In this respect there is a

  19. Downsizing, reengineering and patient safety: numbers, newness and resultant risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, G E; Kelley, M; Hodgson, S; Simpson, K R; Carrier, L; Berry, D

    1999-01-01

    Downsizing and reengineering are facts of life in contemporary healthcare organizations. In most instances, these organizational changes are undertaken in an attempt to increase productivity or cut operational costs with results measured in these terms. Less often considered are potential detrimental effects on patient safety or strategies, which might be used to minimize these risks. PMID:10620901

  20. Gun Safety Management with Patients at Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Robert I.

    2007-01-01

    Guns in the home are associated with a five-fold increase in suicide. All patients at risk for suicide must be asked if guns are available at home or easily accessible elsewhere, or if they have intent to buy or purchase a gun. Gun safety management requires a collaborative team approach including the clinician, patient, and designated person…

  1. Risk Management: Earning Recognition with an Automated Safety Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberry, Linden; Strasburger, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Risk management is a huge task that requires diligent oversight to avoid penalties, fines, or lawsuits. Add in the burden of limited resources that schools face today, and the challenge of meeting the required training, reporting, compliance, and other administrative issues associated with a safety program is almost insurmountable. Despite an…

  2. Protection of environment, health and safety using risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Section 304 of the 1990 clean air amendments (CAAA) directed the US occupational safety and health administration (OSFA) to develop a chemical process safety standard to protect workers on-site from accidents involving hazardous substances. OSHA issued 29 CFR 1910.119, process safety management of Highly hazardous chemicals (PSM) in 1992. Section 112 r of the CAAA further mandated that a standard be developed to protect the environment from accidental releases of hazardous substances. The US environmental protection agency (EPA) proposed such a standard in 1993 (58 Fr 54190) and revised their proposal in 1995). The final rule for risk management and accidental release prevention is more comprehensive and extensive than OSHA's PSM standard. In this paper we will discuss the concepts of both programs, the classes of substances that would trigger a facility's need for compliance and review the regulations for risk management

  3. A comparison of integrated safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission conducted a comparison of two standard tools for risk informing the regulatory process, namely, the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and the Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA). PRA is a calculation of risk metrics, such as Large Early Release Frequency (LERF), and has been used to assess the safety of all commercial power reactors. ISA is an analysis required for fuel cycle facilities (FCFs) licensed to possess potentially critical quantities of special nuclear material. A PRA is usually more detailed and uses more refined models and data than an ISA, in order to obtain reasonable quantitative estimates of risk. PRA is considered fully quantitative, while most ISAs are typically only partially quantitative. The extension of PRA methodology to augment or supplant ISAs in FCFs has long been considered. However, fuel cycle facilities have a wide variety of possible accident consequences, rather than a few surrogates like LERF or core damage as used for reactors. It has been noted that a fuel cycle PRA could be used to better focus attention on the most risk-significant structures, systems, components, and operator actions. ISA and PRA both identify accident sequences; however, their treatment is quite different. ISA's identify accidents that lead to high or intermediate consequences, as defined in 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 70, and develop a set of Items Relied on For Safety (IROFS) to assure adherence to performance criteria. PRAs identify potential accident scenarios and estimate their frequency and consequences to obtain risk metrics. It is acceptable for ISAs to provide bounding evaluations of accident consequences and likelihoods in order to establish acceptable safety; but PRA applications usually require a reasonable quantitative estimate, and often obtain metrics of uncertainty. This paper provides the background, features, and methodology associated with the PRA and ISA. The differences between the

  4. Risks and safety perception. IPSN barometer october 1999. Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An opinion investigation was realized in october 1999 by the IPSN to know the public opinion concerning the risks and safety perception. Five subjects were treated: the public care subjects (social and environment); the science and scientists image; the food risks; the opinion on the nuclear activities (interveners ability and credibility, nuclear controversy, radioactive wastes and nuclear accidents); the french people cares about the risks. The methodology and the analysis of the poll results are detailed. Tables of data investigation are also included. (A.L.B.)

  5. Use of risk information to safety regulation. Reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for a reprocessing facility has been under the development aiming to utilize risk information for safety regulations in this project. Activities in the fiscal year 2012 are summarized in the paper. A major activity is a fundamental study on a concept of serious accidents, requirements of serious accident management, and a policy of utilizing risk information for fabrication and reprocessing facilities. Other than the activity a study on release and transport of aerial radioactive materials at a serious accident in a reprocessing facility has been conducted. The outline and results are provided in the chapter 1 and 2 respectively. (author)

  6. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part II: safety concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with the blood coagulation system can be beneficial or adverse depending on the intended use of a nanomaterial. Nanoparticles can be engineered to be procoagulant or to carry coagulation-initiating factors to treat certain disorders. Likewise, they can be designed to be anticoagulant or to carry anticoagulant drugs to intervene in other pathological conditions in which coagulation is a concern. An overview of the coagulation system was given and a discussion of a des...

  7. Issues regarding Risk Effect Analysis of Digitalized Safety Systems and Main Risk Contributors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk factors of safety-critical digital systems affect overall plant risk. In order to assess this risk effect, a risk model of a digitalized safety system is required. This article aims to provide an overview of the issues when developing a risk model and demonstrate their effect on plant risk quantitatively. Research activities in Korea for addressing these various issues, such as the software failure probability and the fault coverage of self monitoring mechanism are also described. The main risk contributors related to the digitalized safety system were determined in a quantitative manner. Reactor protection system and engineered safety feature component control system designed as part of the Korean Nuclear I and C System project are used as example systems. Fault-tree models were developed to assess the failure probability of a system function which is designed to generate an automated signal for actuating both of the reactor trip and the complicated accident-mitigation actions. The developed fault trees were combined with a plant risk model to evaluate the effect of a digitalized system's failure on the plant risk. (authors)

  8. Surface Mine System Simulation and Safety Risk Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui-xin; YU Dong-fang; LI Xin-wang; YAO Xin-gang; LIU Yu

    2006-01-01

    Modern surface mines, either mono-system or multi-systems, need a large fleet of equipment consisting of excavators, loaders, haulers and auxiliary machines. Presently, the complexity of the system, the interference between sub-systems and the lag in management skills has been a bottle neck for improving productivity of the system. Based on the fact that the traditional tools for safety analysis have been insufficient to evaluate systematically and dynamically the safety risks, this paper tries to create a virtual reality tool consisting of human, machine and mines, using Pro/E and the 3D MAX software in order to evaluate visually the operations of typical mining equipment, such as the bucket wheel excavator (BWE), the shovel, the truck and the dragline. Within this virtual world, the behavior of the system, such as interaction, interference and potential risk can be replayed and reviewed visually. The objective of the study is to identify the critical safety issues of the system and to provide a convenient and powerful tool for safety training and safety management.

  9. Stakeholder risk attitudes in safety risk management : exploring the relationship between risk attitude and safety risk management performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Shichao; 马世超

    2015-01-01

    A construction project requires a multitude of people with different skills and interests and the coordination of a wide range of disparate, yet interrelated, activities. Such complexity is further compounded by the unique characteristics of a project and many other external uncertainties. As a result, construction is subject to more risk than other business activities. In a risky situation, individuals or organizations perceive the situation in their own ways and behave differently to meet t...

  10. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute retrovirus epidemiology donor studies (Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study and Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II): twenty years of research to advance blood product safety and availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Steven; King, Melissa R; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L; Glynn, Simone A

    2012-10-01

    The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS), conducted from 1989 to 2001, and the REDS-II, conducted from 2004 to 2012, were National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded, multicenter programs focused on improving blood safety and availability in the United States. The REDS-II also included international study sites in Brazil and China. The 3 major research domains of REDS/REDS-II have been infectious disease risk evaluation, blood donation availability, and blood donor characterization. Both programs have made significant contributions to transfusion medicine research methodology by the use of mathematical modeling, large-scale donor surveys, innovative methods of repository sample storage, and establishing an infrastructure that responded to potential emerging blood safety threats such as xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus. Blood safety studies have included protocols evaluating epidemiologic and/or laboratory aspects of human immunodeficiency virus, human T-lymphotropic virus 1/2, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, West Nile virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 8, parvovirus B19, malaria, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, influenza, and Trypanosoma cruzi infections. Other analyses have characterized blood donor demographics, motivations to donate, factors influencing donor return, behavioral risk factors, donors' perception of the blood donation screening process, and aspects of donor deferral. In REDS-II, 2 large-scale blood donor protocols examined iron deficiency in donors and the prevalence of leukocyte antibodies. This review describes the major study results from over 150 peer-reviewed articles published by these 2 REDS programs. In 2011, a new 7-year program, the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III, was launched. The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III expands beyond donor-based research to include studies of blood transfusion recipients in the hospital setting and adds a third country, South Africa

  11. Risk Informed Margins Management as part of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith

    2014-06-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

  12. Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook, new guidance to the safety analyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New guidance to the safety analyst has been developed at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in the form of the new Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH). Although the older guidance (the Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide) continues to be used for updating the Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs) developed in the mid-1980s, this new guidance is used with all new authorization basis documents. With the RFETS mission change in the early 1990s came the need to establish new authorization basis documents for its facilities, whose missions had changed. The methodology and databases for performing the evaluations that support the new authorization basis documents needed to be standardized, to avoid the use of different approaches and/or databases for similar accidents in different facilities. This paper presents this new standardized approach, the SARAH

  13. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  14. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  15. Space Reactor Launch Safety--An Acceptably Low Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from previous space reactor and radioisotope power source risk assessments were combined to provide a scoping assessment of the possible risks from the launch of a reactor power system for use on the surface of the moon or Mars. It is assumed that future reactor power system launches would be subject to the same rigorous safety analysis and launch approval process as past nuclear payload launches. Using the same methodology that has gained approval of past launches, it was determined that the mission risk would be 0.029 person-rem worldwide which translates to 1.5*10-5 latent health effects. It is seen that the only significant sources of radiological risks from a non-operating reactor are possible inadvertent criticality accidents and the consequences of such events have been shown to be extremely low. Passive means such as spectral shift poisons or high reactor core length/diameter ratios have been shown to be able to reduce or eliminate the possibility of the more credible criticality accidents, such as flooding or sand burial. This paper advances the premise that, for design purposes, future space reactor surface-power designs should primarily address the credible accidents and not the hypothetical accidents. For launch accidents and other safety assessments, a probabilistic risk assessment approach will have to be used to assess the safety impact of all types of accidents, including the hypothetical accidents. With this approach, the design of the system will not be burdened with design features that are based on hypothetical criticality accidents having negligible risk. Moreover, there is little chance of convincingly demonstrating that these design features can substantially reduce or eliminated the risk associated with hypothetical criticality accidents

  16. Observing the Safety Precautions Against Blood-Borne Infections by Delivery Agents in Therapeutic and Training Hospitals of Tabriz in 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Bani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Blood transferred disease is one of the great difficulties for human and it is counted as one of the serious problems of public health. Although health care is valuable, it has some risks such as contacting with various pathogens, especially blood transferred pathogens, so the aim of this study is to observe the safety precautions against blood-borne infections by delivery agents in therapeutic and training hospitals of Tabriz in 2012. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive research and all of the participants were the childbirth agents in 3 hospital of Tabriz (Alzahra , Taleghani , 29 Bahman. All of sample size was 100 persons. After obtaining informed consent, the questionnaires which contain demographic information and 24 statements that they were related to observance of safety points against blood transferred infections in childbirth rooms were given to participants to complete. The data were analyzed with SPSS software (Ver. 13. Results: Results showed that the rate of total observance of safety precautions against blood transmitted diseases was good in 54% of delivery agents and in 46% of them was average. Conclusion: Observing safety precautions against blood transmitted diseases needs motivation, effective education and necessary, that all of them should be in priority of health care planning by relevant authorities to reduce contaminated individuals and the costs of their treatment.

  17. Optoelectronic blood oximetry as a tool of health safety monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysewska-Sobusiak, Anna

    2001-08-01

    A metrological approach of some selected problems connected with the significant field of biomedical optics i.e., monitoring of arterial blood oxygenation by use of the tissues as optical media exposed to the controlled light action, has been presented. The subject of the measurements based on utilization of the selection absorption properties of blood is the hemoglobin oxygen saturation. Using optoelectronic sensing allows to convert sophisticated effects of noninvasive light-living tissue interaction to electrical signals which may be convenient to measure. Pulse oximetry which is based upon such a way of sensing and processing, is the recent advance in noninvasive oximetry. The unique advantages of that marvelous diagnostic technique have caused to recommend pulse oximeters as standard equipment in intensive care and other critical situations impending hypoxemia appearance. However, end-users of the pulse oximeters not always are aware of that these devices fall under specific limitations, of both physiological and technical nature. The author of this paper is a metrologist and deals mainly with various interdisciplinary problems of a measurement reliability including the aspects such as uncertainty of an outcome accessible to the user, causes affecting sensitivity, resolution and repeatability of processing function, and response time and stability of results. Referring to the subject discussed herein, and taking into account some open questions, the author's contribution is her own experience in modeling as well as in in vivo measuring of transilluminated living objects. A proposed novel use of the known pulse oximetry concept may be considered as complementary results against a general review background of the achievements obtained in oximetry as the state-of-the-art, and furthermore, the developing studies which are still in progress.

  18. Cyber Security Risk Assessment for the KNICS Safety Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Korea Nuclear I and C Systems Development (KNICS) project the platforms for plant protection systems are developed, which function as a reactor shutdown, actuation of engineered safety features and a control of the related equipment. Those are fully digitalized through the use of safety-grade programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and communication networks. In 2006 the Regulatory Guide 1.152 (Rev. 02) was published by the U.S. NRC and it describes the application of a cyber security to the safety systems in the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Therefore it is required that the new requirements are incorporated into the developed platforms to apply to NPP, and a cyber security risk assessment is performed. The results of the assessment were input for establishing the cyber security policies and planning the work breakdown to incorporate them

  19. Myelodysplastic syndrome. A blood disease of high risk to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is reviewed on its classification, diagnosis, therapy, prognosis, patho-physiology, causes and relation to radiation, mainly from radiation biology aspect. MDL is a cryptogenic, progressive and refractory blood disease with abnormal morphology and dysfunction of cells of bone marrow and peripheral blood and often results in leukemia. Epidemiology shows that radiation is a potent cause of MDL as well as chemotherapy to malignant diseases and that in Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, leukemia risk is linearly correlated with their exposed dose. In Hiroshima survivors, the excessive relative risk of MDL per Sv (ERR1Sv) is preliminarily reported to be as high as 13 and MDL patients is reportedly increasing in Chernobyl. T-lymphocytes from MDL patients are found more sensitive to X-ray in the micronucleus assay. However, direct causal gene(s) are obscure now. Cause and pathology of MDL are expected solved by future elucidation of gene expression concerned with radiation response and DNA repair, and of subsequent change of functional protein products. (K.H.)

  20. Risk factors for fishermen's health and safety in Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frantzeskou, Elpida; Kastania, Anastasia N; Riza, Elena;

    2012-01-01

    Background: This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first occupational health study in Greek fishing. Aim: The aim of the study is to determine the risks for health and safety in Greek fisheries workers by exploring their health status and the health risk factors present in their occupational...... factors include alcohol, fatty food consumption, smoking, and lack of physical exercise. Conclusions: The health effects observed are causally related to diet, smoking, and exercise, which in turn relate to the specific working conditions and culture in small-scale fishing that need to be taken into...

  1. An approach for risk informed safety culture assessment for Canadian nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important components of effective safety and risk management for nuclear power stations is a healthy safety culture. DNV has developed an approach for risk informed safety culture assessment that combines two complementary paradigms for safety and risk management: loss prevention - for preventing and intervening in accidents; and critical function management - for achieving safety and performance goals. Combining these two paradigms makes it possible to provide more robust systems for safety management and to support a healthy safety culture. This approach is being applied to safety culture assessment in partnership with a Canadian nuclear utility. (author)

  2. An approach for risk informed safety culture assessment for Canadian nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R. [Det Norske Veritas (U.S.A.), Inc., Katy, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    One of the most important components of effective safety and risk management for nuclear power stations is a healthy safety culture. DNV has developed an approach for risk informed safety culture assessment that combines two complementary paradigms for safety and risk management: loss prevention - for preventing and intervening in accidents; and critical function management - for achieving safety and performance goals. Combining these two paradigms makes it possible to provide more robust systems for safety management and to support a healthy safety culture. This approach is being applied to safety culture assessment in partnership with a Canadian nuclear utility. (author)

  3. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND RISK ASSESSMENT IN THE MINING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Radosavljević

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Global dynamics of the technological changes creates a need for modern approaches while evaluating and analysing the risk in the mining industry. Analysing and managing technical systems in the mining industry is a key factor concerning the quality of their functioning. Dependability, safety, and maintenance management based on the risk analysis can contribute substantially to the overall effectiveness and efficiency of the mining technological systems. Besides applying adequate technology, organizing and harmonizing the system links among various structures and standardization is of the great importance in achieving business goals. The choice and use of the optimal solutions in the analysis ought to recognize, anticipate, forestall, reduce, and minimize the risk and possible destructive applications. The mining industry production practice recognizes the need for the strategy of organizational and process redesigning as well as raising this issue to the level of the other managing functions of the company. A realistic view of the present state in the risk analysis shows the need for the rapid transformation in the mining industry. The study puts forward a proposal for the possible approaches and improvement relating to the following and implementing modern, standardized world trends, (models and methods concerning the analysis of the technical and occupational safety risk in some of the basic processes in the mining industry.

  4. Nuclear risk and communication: the essential role of safety authorities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautin, N. [Ecole National Superieure de Cachan, 94 (France)]|[Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: whether concerning mad cow disease, asbestos, nuclear, OGM or now, dioxin in French meat, public health risks have been making the headlines of newspapers for a while. And, firms whose activity is associated with these risks are in effect in the defendants box. Therefore, communicating becomes difficult: their word is suspect and, debates quite rapidly exceed the firm competencies to become a socio-cultural conflict. This paper explores in nuclear fields the essential role of safety authorities in such communication cases. Our surveys and the comparative case study between the pipe at La Hague and 'contaminated' nuclear transports in France are eloquent: the messages of nuclear firms is perceived through their image of a State within the State built from the past and reinforced by the negative prism of the news. Regular and technical arguments (the respect of norms) entertain the debate rather than hush it. That is why we could infer an objective, and independent opinion is required, one different from the firm, the public and ministries: its role of referee could allow a constructive dialog between the public and the firm. Risk communication nature and efficiency depend on that (cf. the diagram). As a solution, we think about a legitimate authority organization identified by the public first, but by other actors as well. From the public point of view, if we see the place of pressure groups (e.g. Greenpeace) in the debate as a measure of the lack of trust in the independence of safety authorities, we can infer that it is a reaffirmation of democracy which is demanded by the French public, which could be satisfied with powerful safety authorities. That is why safety authorities have an essential role to play, beyond this of control, in nuclear risk communication towards the public. Diagram: communication path between a nuclear firm and the public during conflict. (author)

  5. Nuclear risk and communication: the essential role of safety authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: whether concerning mad cow disease, asbestos, nuclear, OGM or now, dioxin in French meat, public health risks have been making the headlines of newspapers for a while. And, firms whose activity is associated with these risks are in effect in the defendants box. Therefore, communicating becomes difficult: their word is suspect and, debates quite rapidly exceed the firm competencies to become a socio-cultural conflict. This paper explores in nuclear fields the essential role of safety authorities in such communication cases. Our surveys and the comparative case study between the pipe at La Hague and 'contaminated' nuclear transports in France are eloquent: the messages of nuclear firms is perceived through their image of a State within the State built from the past and reinforced by the negative prism of the news. Regular and technical arguments (the respect of norms) entertain the debate rather than hush it. That is why we could infer an objective, and independent opinion is required, one different from the firm, the public and ministries: its role of referee could allow a constructive dialog between the public and the firm. Risk communication nature and efficiency depend on that (cf. the diagram). As a solution, we think about a legitimate authority organization identified by the public first, but by other actors as well. From the public point of view, if we see the place of pressure groups (e.g. Greenpeace) in the debate as a measure of the lack of trust in the independence of safety authorities, we can infer that it is a reaffirmation of democracy which is demanded by the French public, which could be satisfied with powerful safety authorities. That is why safety authorities have an essential role to play, beyond this of control, in nuclear risk communication towards the public. Diagram: communication path between a nuclear firm and the public during conflict. (author)

  6. Development of risk-informed regulatory positions on CANDU safety issues, part I: Methodology development for risk estimation and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk informed decision making is used by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission as a management tool to support decisions related to licensing, compliance and planning/resource allocation. The decision-making process provides information on the risks related to a certain decision, produces recommendations for controlling the risk, and provides for implementation of the risk-control measures and for monitoring the impact on risk following a decision. This paper describes the methodology developed for the estimation and evaluation of the risks used as an input into the risk-informed decision making process. The methodology allows for consideration of all risks in a consistent manner; it recognizes the differences between the risks in the absence of the safety issue and the risks when the safety issue is present. The methodology refers to safety related risks, although similar considerations can be made for other types of risks. (author)

  7. Process management - critical safety issues with focus on risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizational changes focused on process orientation are taking place among Swedish nuclear power plants, aiming at improving the operation. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate has identified a need for increased knowledge within the area for its regulatory activities. In order to analyze what process orientation imply for nuclear power plant safety a number of questions must be asked: 1. How is safety in nuclear power production created currently? What significance does the functional organization play? 2. How can organizational forms be analysed? What consequences does quality management have for work and for the enterprise? 3. Why should nuclear power plants be process oriented? Who are the customers and what are their customer values? Which customers are expected to contribute from process orientation? 4. What can one learn from process orientation in other safety critical systems? What is the effect on those features that currently create safety? 5. Could customer values increase for one customer without decreasing for other customers? What is the relationship between economic and safety interests from an increased process orientation? The deregulation of the electricity market have caused an interest in increased economic efficiency, which is the motivation for the interest in process orientation. among other means. It is the nuclear power plants' owners and the distributors (often the same corporations) that have the strongest interest in process orientation. If the functional organization and associated practices are decomposed, the prerequisites of the risk management regime changes, perhaps deteriorating its functionality. When nuclear power operators consider the introduction of process orientation, the Nuclear Power Inspectorate should require that 1. The operators perform a risk analysis beforehand concerning the potential consequences that process orientation might convey: the analysis should contain a model specifying how safety is currently

  8. Risk factors for hepatitis B carrier status among blood donors of the National Blood Center, Thai Red Cross Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuchprayoon, T; Chumnijarakij, T

    1992-06-01

    A study of risk factors for hepatitis B carriers among voluntary blood donors of the National Blood Center, Thai Red Cross Society was carried out in a case-control study design during January 1989 to June 1990. Cases were 876 blood donors whose blood identified HBsAg at time of recruitment and continued positive for more than 6 months. Controls were 1,750 blood donors whose blood was free from HBsAg who came for blood donation at the same period as the cases. The ratio of cases:controls = 1:2. Self-administered questionnaires were constructed and pretested before using both cases and controls. The study revealed that the risk factors for hepatitis B among voluntary blood donors were age of less than 30 years old; low socioeconomic status (family income of less than 8,000 Baht/month); single status, especially males; male occupations of students, monks, nongovernment workers compared with government officials; female occupations of laborers, students, nongovernment workers and government officials compared with housewives. Sharing of nail clippers, used blades and tooth brushes among family members are proved to be risk factors, especially among males. In addition, sharing of used blades in barber shops proved to be a risk among males while sharing of nail clippers in beauty salons, history of ear-piercing at department stores or history of caesarean section among females could not be shown to be risk factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1439976

  9. Risk-based safety performance indicators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a Concerted Action (CA), sponsored by the European Commission within its 5th Framework Program, a consortium of eleven partners from eight countries has reviewed and evaluated the application of Safety Performance Indicators (SPIs), which - in combination with other tools - can be used to monitor and improve the safety of nuclear power plants. The project was aimed at identification of methods that can be used in a risk-informed regulatory system and environment, and to exploit PSA techniques for the development and use of meaningful additional/alternative SPIs. The CA included the review of existing indicator systems, and the collection of information on the experience from indicator systems by means of a specific questionnaire. One of the most important and challenging issues for nuclear plant owners and/or regulators is to recognize early signs of deterioration in safety performance, caused by influences from management, organization and safety culture (MOSC), before actual events and/or mishaps take place. Most of the existing SPIs as proposed by various organizations are considered as 'lagging' indicators, that is, they are expected to show an impact only when a downward trend has already started. Furthermore, most of the available indicators are at a relatively high level, such that they will not provide useful information on fundamental weaknesses causing the problem in the first place. Regulators' and utilities' views on the use of a Safety Performance Indicator System have also been a part of the development of the CA. (author)

  10. Risk informed safety and regulatory decision making: An NRC perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To accomplish its mission in the coming years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established a set of four strategic objectives or performance measures by which it can plan, budget, perform and manage its activities: to maintain safety, to increase regulatory effectiveness and efficiency, to reduce unnecessary regulatory burden, and to increase public confidence. Measures are now being developed to assess the NRC's performance in these areas to communicate with stakeholders and demonstrate accountability for its resources. One of the key strategies for accomplishing the NRC's goals is to risk inform its regulations through the use of probabilistic risk analyses, or PRAs. In making risk informed decisions on changing its regulatory framework, the NRC relies on five key principles, as discussed in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.174: (1) does the change continue to meet current regulations? (2) has defence in depth been appropriately considered? (3) is a sufficient safety margin maintained? (4) are the changes in core damage frequency and large early release frequency small? and (5) how are the impacts of the changes monitored? The NRC has undertaken a number of risk informed initiatives based on the general guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.174. The NRC has risk informed initiatives in technical specifications, inservice inspection and testing, the reactor oversight process, relaxation of special treatment requirements, and revisions to technical requirements. As the NRC moves forward with increased use of risk informed techniques, it must also undertake the effort to communicate with stakeholders to receive input and explain its activities. That is why the NRC is conducting mandatory PRA training for staff, holding workshops with industry and the public, and generally reaching out to ensure that its efforts in this area are both visible and understandable. The vision for the final product of this complex process is a regulatory structure or

  11. Application of risk-based methodologies to prioritize safety resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) started a program entitled risk-based prioritization in 1992. The purpose of this program is to provide generic technical support to the nuclear power industry relative to its recent initiatives in the area of operations and maintenance (O ampersand M) cost control using state-of-the-art risk methods. The approach uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), or similar techniques, to allocate resources commensurate with the risk posed by nuclear plant operations. Specifically, those items or events that have high risk significance would receive the most attention, while those with little risk content would command fewer resources. As quantified in a companion paper,close-quote the potential O ampersand M cost reduction inherent in this approach is very large. Furthermore, risk-based methods should also lead to safety improvements. This paper outlines the way that the EPRI technical work complements the technical, policy, and regulatory initiatives taken by others in the industry and provides an example of the approach as used to prioritize motor-operated valve (MOV) testing in response to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Letter 89-10

  12. 76 FR 15982 - Nominations to the Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... incurred to attend meetings and conduct committee-related business, in accordance with Standard Government..., or socioeconomic status. The Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch are.... James J. Berger, Associate Public Health Advisor for Blood, Organ and Tissue Safety. BILLING CODE...

  13. Safety- and Risk Analysis Activities in Chemical Industry in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozine, Igor; Duijm, Nijs Jan; Lauridsen Kurt [Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark). Systems Analysis Department

    2001-07-01

    The current paper gives an overview of the legislation and the methods used in safety and risk management in the chemical industry within Europe and in particular within the European Union. The paper is based on a report that has been written for the SOS-1 project under the Nordic nuclear safety research (NKS). Safety- and risk-related matters in the process industry, in particular, in chemical, within the EU are subject to consideration at three levels: (1) EU legislation, (2) European/intemational standardisation, and (3) socio-economic analysis. EC Directives define the 'essential requirements', e.g., protection of health and safety, that must be fulfilled when goods are placed on the market or some industry is put into operation. The European standards bodies (CEN, CENELEC and ETSI) have the task of establishing the corresponding technical specifications, meeting the essential requirements of the Directives, compliance with which will provide a presumption of conformity with the essential requirements. Such specifications are referred to as 'harmonised standards'. Compliance with harmonised standards remains voluntary, and manufacturers are free to choose any other technical solution that provides compliance with the essential requirements. This view is stated in the 'New Approach' to technical harmonisation and standardisation (details can be found on the web page: http://europe.eu.int/comm/enterprise/newapproach/standardization/index .html). Standardisation as well as the regulation of technical risks is increasingly being undertaken at European or international level. The European legislator limits its role to the affirmation of overall objectives, and leaves it to the economic players to draw up the technical procedures and standards to specify in detail the ways and means of attaining them. Many countries have introduced requirements that new legislation and/or administrative regulations be subject to socio-economic analysis

  14. 77 FR 75176 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice..., 2012, Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee meeting due to unanticipated weather conditions caused by Hurricane Sandy. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory...

  15. Risk monitor - a tool for operational safety assessment risk monitor - user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment has become a key tool as on today to identify and understand Nuclear Power Plant vulnerabilities. As a result of the availability of these PSA studies, there is a desire to use them to enhance plant safety and to operate the nuclear stations in the most efficient manner. Risk Monitor is a PC based tool, which computes the real time safety level and assists plant personnel to manage day-to-day activities. Risk Monitor is a PC based user friendly software tool used for modification and re-analysis of a nuclear Power plant. Operation of Risk Monitor is based on PSA methods for assisting in day to day applications. Risk Monitoring programs can assess the risk profile and are used to optimize the operation of Nuclear Power Plants with respect to a minimum risk level over the operating time. This report presents the background activities of Risk Monitor, its application areas and the step by step procedure for the user.to interact with the software. This software can be used with the PSA model of any Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  16. Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) is a generic risk assessment approach applied by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leuschner, R. G. K.; Robinson, T. P.; Hugas, M.; Cocconcelli, P. S.; Richard-Forget, F.; Klein, G.; Licht, Tine Rask; Nguyen-The, C.; Querol, A.; Richardson, M.; Suarez, J.E.; Thrane, Ulf; Vlak, J. M.; von Wright, A.

    2010-01-01

    Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) is a generic risk assessment approach applied by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to notified biological agents aiming at simplifying risk assessments across different scientific Panels and Units. The aim of this review is to outline the implementation...

  17. ABO blood type is associated with endometrial cancer risk in Chinese women

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Wang-hong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2011-01-01

    ABO blood type has been associated with risk of several malignancies. However, results are not consistent. In this population-based case-control study including 1204 incident endometrial cancer cases and 1212 population controls, we examined the association of self-reported Serologic blood type with endometrial cancer risk using a logistic regression model. Women with endometrial cancer were more likely to have blood type A. Compared to women with blood type O, the adjusted odds ratios for en...

  18. Influence of nutrient intake on blood lead levels of young children at risk for lead poisoning.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Scherer, Roberta W.; Sexton, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Although removal of lead paint hazards from at-risk houses remains the primary means of preventing elevated blood lead among young children, reduction of risk through nutritional factors has also been of interest. In this study we evaluated the effect of nutrient intake on blood lead levels by analyzing whether the intakes of certain dietary components a) were associated with blood lead levels independent of lead exposure or b) modified the effect of lead exposure on blood lead. Subjects were...

  19. 75 FR 10490 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Arthritis Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee....

  20. Tainted blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Ida; Sheikh, Zainab Afshan; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    study of the historical rise and current workings of safety practices in the Danish blood system. Here, we identify a strong focus on contamination in order to avoid 'tainted blood', at the expense of working with risks that could be avoided through enhanced blood monitoring practices. Of further...... significance to this focus are the social dynamics found at the heart of safety practices aimed at avoiding contamination. We argue that such dynamics need more attention, in order to achieve good health outcomes in transfusion medicine. Thus, we conclude that, to ensure continuously safe blood systems, we...... need to move beyond the bifurcation of the social and medical aspects of blood supply as two separate issues and approach social dynamics as key medical safety questions....

  1. Do expert assessments converge? An exploratory case study of evaluating and managing a blood supply risk

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold Emmy; Webert Kathryn; Heddle Nancy; Eyles John; McCurdy Bronwen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Examining professional assessments of a blood product recall/withdrawal and its implications for risk and public health, the paper introduces ideas about perceptions of minimal risk and its management. It also describes the context of publicly funded blood transfusion in Canada and the withdrawal event that is the basis of this study. Methods Interviews with 45 experts from administration, medicine, blood supply, laboratory services and risk assessment took place using a m...

  2. Guidance Document for Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM) - (GDI): EC JRC report prepared for GIF Risk and Safety Working Group

    OpenAIRE

    Ammirabile, Luca

    2014-01-01

    A key objective of the Generation IV (Gen IV) International Forum’s Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) is the development and the qualification of an integrated methodology that can be used to evaluate and document the safety of Gen IV nuclear systems. The presentation of the GIF’s Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM) to different stakeholders, nuclear safety experts and the individual Gen IV System Steering Committees has produced a series of comments and suggestions expressing ...

  3. Integrated risk management of safety and development on transportation corridors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prioritization of investments to protect safety and performance of multi-regional transportation networks from adjacent land development is a key concern for infrastructure agencies, land developers, and other stakeholders. Despite ample literature describing relationships between transportation and land use, no evidence-based methods exist for monitoring corridor needs on a large scale. Risk analysis is essential to the preservation of system safety and capacity, including avoidance of costly retrofits, regret, and belated action. This paper introduces the Corridor Trace Analysis (CTA) for prioritizing corridor segments that are vulnerable to adjacent land development. The method integrates several components: (i) estimation of likelihood of adjacent land development, using influence diagram and rule-based modeling, (ii) characterization of access point density using geospatial methods, and (iii) plural-model evaluation of corridors, monitoring indices of land development likelihood, access point densities, and traffic volumes. The results inform deployment of options that include closing access points, restricting development, and negotiation of agencies and developers. The CTA method is demonstrated on a region encompassing 6000 centerline miles (about 10,000 km) of transportation corridors. The method will be of interest to managers investing in safety and performance of infrastructure systems, balancing safety, financial, and other criteria of concern for diverse stakeholders. - Highlights: • The Corridor Trace Analysis (CTA) method for prioritizing transportation corridors. • The CTA method studies corridors vulnerable to adjacent land development. • The CTA method quantifies the influence of risk scenarios on agency priorities. • The CTA method is demonstrated on 6000 miles of critical transportation corridor

  4. Possibility of enhanced risk of retinal neovascularization in repeated blood donors: blood donation and retinal alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastmanesh R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reza RastmaneshDepartment of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Tehran, IranAbstract: Repeated blood donors manifest clinical, subclinical, and biochemical signs of iron deficiency anemia, have significantly higher erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF concentrations, and decreased tissue oxygen saturation, oxygenated tissue hemoglobin, and regional cerebral oxygen saturation. Erythropoietin and VEGF are potent retinal angiogenic factors which may initiate and promote the retinal angiogenesis process independently or simultaneously. Increases in circulating levels of erythropoietin and VEGF are proportionate to the levels of hematocrit, hypoxemia, and tissue hypoxia. It is suggested that higher erythropoietin production following iron deficiency anemia-induced chronic hypoxemia/hypoxia may, hypothetically, enhance the risk of retinal angiogenesis and/or neovascularization, possibly by inducing hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, which consequently upregulates genes stimulating angiogenesis, resulting in formation of a new vasculature, possibly by modulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in the retina. Implications of this hypothesis cover erythropoietin doping, chronic hypoxia, and hypoxemic situations, such as angiogenesis-related cardiac and pulmonary diseases.Keywords: repeated blood donation, erythropoietin, retinal neovascularization, vascular endothelial growth factor, hypoxia

  5. Endothelial function, blood pressure control, and risk modification: impact of irbesartan alone or in combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Derosa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Derosa, Sibilla AT SalvadeoDepartment of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pavia, Pavia, ItalyAbstract: Irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, is approved as monotherapy, or in combination with other drugs, for the treatment of hypertension in many countries worldwide. Data in the literature suggest that irbesartan is effective for reducing blood pressure over a 24-hour period with once-daily administration, and slows the progression of renal disease in patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, irbesartan shows a good safety and tolerability profile, compared with angiotensin II inhibitors and other angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists. Thus, irbesartan appears to be a useful treatment option for patients with hypertension, including those with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy. Irbesartan has an inhibitory effect on the pressor response to angiotensin II and improves arterial stiffness, vascular endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation in hypertensive patients. There has been considerable interest recently in the renoprotective effect of irbesartan, which appears to be independent of reductions in blood pressure. In particular, mounting data suggests that irbesartan improves endothelial function, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the kidneys. Recent studies have highlighted a possible role for irbesartan in improving coronary artery inflammation and vascular dysfunction. In this review we summarize and comment on the most important data available with regard to antihypertensive effect, endothelial function improvement, and cardiovascular risk reduction with irbesartan.Keywords: blood pressure, hypertension, endothelial function, irbesartan, antihypertensive drugs, combination therapy

  6. Using the Job Demands-Resources model to investigate risk perception, safety climate and job satisfaction in safety critical organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Birkeland; Mearns, Kathryn; Matthiesen, Stig Berge; Eid, Jarle

    2011-10-01

    Using the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R) as a theoretical framework, this study investigated the relationship between risk perception as a job demand and psychological safety climate as a job resource with regard to job satisfaction in safety critical organizations. In line with the JD-R model, it was hypothesized that high levels of risk perception is related to low job satisfaction and that a positive perception of safety climate is related to high job satisfaction. In addition, it was hypothesized that safety climate moderates the relationship between risk perception and job satisfaction. Using a sample of Norwegian offshore workers (N = 986), all three hypotheses were supported. In summary, workers who perceived high levels of risk reported lower levels of job satisfaction, whereas this effect diminished when workers perceived their safety climate as positive. Follow-up analyses revealed that this interaction was dependent on the type of risks in question. The results of this study supports the JD-R model, and provides further evidence for relationships between safety-related concepts and work-related outcomes indicating that organizations should not only develop and implement sound safety procedures to reduce the effects of risks and hazards on workers, but can also enhance other areas of organizational life through a focus on safety. PMID:21534979

  7. Continuous Postoperative Pericardial Flushing: A Pilot Study on Safety, Feasibility, and Effect on Blood Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshanden, Johan S.J.; Gielen, Chantal L.I.; de Borgie, Corianne A.J.M.; Klautz, Robert J.M.; de Mol, Bas A.J.M.; Koolbergen, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged or excessive blood loss is a common complication after cardiac surgery. Blood remnants and clots, remaining in the pericardial space in spite of chest tube drainage, induce high fibrinolytic activity that may contribute to bleeding complications. Continuous postoperative pericardial flushing (CPPF) with an irrigation solution may reduce blood loss by preventing the accumulation of clots. In this pilot study, the safety and feasibility of CPPF were evaluated and the effect on blood loss and other related complications was investigated. Methods Between November 2011 and April 2012 twenty-one adult patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) received CPPF from sternal closure up to 12 h postoperative. With an inflow Redivac drain that was inserted through one of the chest tube incision holes, an irrigation solution (NaCl 0.9% at 38 °C) was delivered to the pericardial cavity using a volume controlled flushing system. Safety aspects, feasibility issues and complications were registered. The mean actual blood loss in the CPPF group was compared to the mean of a retrospective group (n = 126). Results CPPF was successfully completed in 20 (95.2%) patients, and no method related complications were observed. Feasibility was good in this experimental setting. Patients receiving CPPF showed a 30% (P = 0.038) decrease in mean actual blood loss 12 h postoperatively. Conclusions CPPF after cardiac surgery was found to be safe and feasible in this experimental setting. The clinically relevant effect on blood loss needs to be confirmed in a randomized clinical trial. PMID:26501121

  8. Occupational Health and Safety: reflection on potential risks and the safety handling of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Frederico Bernardo Lenz e Silva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Every day the nanotechnology, that refers to a field whose theme is the control of matter on an atomic and molecular scale working with nanometric structures (<100 nm, is more present in the development of products and industrial processes. The particle manipulation of nanometric structures has created opportunities in the development of new products and materials. However, synthesis, handling, storage, stabilization and the incorporation of these materials, with nanometric dimensions, demand a new perspective of analysis and evaluation of old manufacturing processes, procedures and industrial devices, in order to guarantee collective and individual protection to workers and society. With the increasing of scale and production of nanoestrutuctured materials, a big part of labour community starts to be in contact with different nanomaterials (forms and ways. In this work the main aspects and involved risks of manufacture, storage, synthesis, stabilization and incorporation of nanomaterials on new products are evaluated in order to reduce, decrease and eliminate chemical, physical and biological risks for the employees. A bibliographic review was conducted about risk, safety and nanotechnology based on available English literature focusing safety and environmental agencies from different countries such as USA, Canada, EU (France, UK, Germany, Den-mark, Australia and Japan.

  9. Risk-informed decision making during Bohunice NPP safety upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes some facts of risk-informed regulation developments within UJD regulatory environment. Based on national as well as international operating experience and indications resulted from PSA, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) since its constituting in 1993 has devoted an effort to use PSA technology to support the regulatory policy in Slovakia. The PSA is considered a complement, not a substitute, to the deterministic approach. Suchlike integrated approach is used in decision making processes and the final decision on scope and priorities is based on it. The paper outlines risk insights used in the decision making process concerning Bohunice NPP safety upgrading and focuses on the role of PSA results in Gradual Reconstruction of Bohunice VI NPP. Besides, two other examples of the PSA results application to the decision making process are provided: the assessment of proposal of modifications to the main power supply diagram (incorporation of generator switches) and the assessment of licensee request for motor generator AOT (Allowable Outage Time) extension. As an example of improving support of Bohunice V-2 risk-informed operations, concept of AOT calculations and Bohunice V-2 Risk Monitor Project are briefly described. (author)

  10. Early signals for emerging food safety risks: From past cases to future identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brug, F,J, van de; Luijckx, N.B.L.; Cnossen, H.J.; Houben, G.F.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades multiple unexpected and wide spread food safety incidents have occurred. The aim of this study is to learn from the past by studying the early emergence of historic food safety risks and apply these lessons for future early identification of emerging food safety risks. Inform

  11. Guidance Note on Health Care Worker Safety from HIV and Other Blood Borne Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, Julian; Tomkins, Maggy; Melling, Phillip; Bates, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    The safety of heath care workers (HCWs) who take care of people with HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases is of paramount importance. Occupational transmission of blood borne infections is not regarded as a common problem in developed country settings, but this is not the case in resource poor countries where the incidence and impact of such exposures is under-reported and is now becomin...

  12. Risk-informed approaches to assess ecological safety of facilities with radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingenious risk-informed methods to assess ecological safety of facilities with radioactive waste are proposed in the paper. Probabilistic norms on lethal outcomes and reliability of safety barriers are used as safety criteria. Based on the probability measures, it is established that ecological safety conditions are met for the standard criterion of lethal outcomes

  13. Risk Compensation in Children: Why Do Children Show It in Reaction to Wearing Safety Gear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, Barbara A.; Lasenby, Jennifer; Walpole, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    School-age children's self-reported risk compensation (greater risk-taking when wearing safety gear compared to when not doing so) was investigated using 6 common play situations. Children responded to hypothetical scenarios by rating intended risk-taking when wearing safety gear and not doing so, and by providing explanations for their behavior.…

  14. 77 FR 65000 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General... Committee (DSaRM). The Agency plans to present information on the risk management of teratogens, some...

  15. 77 FR 34051 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General... 29 and 30, 2012, the committee will discuss the public health benefits and risks, including...

  16. 78 FR 30929 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General... and Risk Management Advisory Committee (DSaRM). On July 10, 2013, the Agency plans to discuss the...

  17. Patient safety in midwifery care for low-risk women: instrument development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martijn, L.M.; Jacobs, A.; Harmsen, M.; Maassen, I.T.H.M.; Wensing, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Few studies have examined the safety of midwife-led care for low-risk childbearing women. While most women have a low-risk profile at the start of pregnancy, validated measures to detect patient safety risks for this population are needed. The increased interest of midwife-led care for

  18. Childhood Blood Pressure Trends and Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure: The NHANES experience 1988–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Rosner, Bernard; Cook, Nancy R.; Daniels, Stephen; Falkner, Bonita

    2013-01-01

    The obesity epidemic in children makes it plausible that prevalence rates of elevated blood pressure are increasing over time. Yet, previous literature is inconsistent due to small sample sizes. Also, it is unclear whether adjusting for risk factors can explain longitudinal trends in prevalence of elevated blood pressure. Thus, we analyzed a population-based sample of 3,248 children in National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III (1988–1994) and 8,388 children in continuous N...

  19. Organizational choices and occupational health and safety risks prevention. An interpretation of Italian regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Marchiori, Michela; Albano, Valentina; Barbini, Francesco Maria

    2012-01-01

    The social and economic costs of risks produced by organizations are becoming more and more evident and relevant. Enterprises are expected (and, sometimes, obliged) to become able to efficiently manage the risks they induce: industrial hazards, financial uncertainty, environmental risks, risk to safety and health in the workplace, etc. By adopting an organizational perspective, this contribution investigates the approaches to Occupational Health and Safety risks prevention that are promoted b...

  20. Management of High Blood Pressure in Those without Overt Cardiovascular Disease Utilising Absolute Risk Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing blood pressure has a continuum of adverse risk for cardiovascular events. Traditionally this single measure was used to determine who to treat and how vigorously. However, estimating absolute risk rather than measurement of a single risk factor such as blood pressure is a superior method to identify who is most at risk of having an adverse cardiovascular event such as stroke or myocardial infarction, and therefore who would most likely benefit from therapeutic intervention. Cardiovascular disease (CVD risk calculators must be used to estimate absolute risk in those without overt CVD as physician estimation is unreliable. Incorporation into usual practice and limitations of the strategy are discussed.

  1. Safe patient care – safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    OpenAIRE

    St. Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    [english] Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization’s vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture (“top-down process”). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization’s maturity in respect to safety is infor...

  2. A model for managing cold-related health and safety risks at workplaces

    OpenAIRE

    Risikko, Tanja; Mäkinen, Tiina M.; Påsche, Arvid; Toivonen, Liisa; Hassi, Juhani

    2003-01-01

    Cold conditions increase health and safety risks at work in several ways. The effects of cold have not been sufficiently taken into consideration in occupational safety and health practices. A systematic model and methods were developed for managing cold-related health and safety risks at workplaces. The development work was performed, in a context-bound manner, in pilot industries and workplaces. The model can be integrated into the company's occupational health and safety management system,...

  3. ABO Genotype, ‘Blood-Type’ Diet and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Jingzhou Wang; Bibiana García-Bailo; Nielsen, Daiva E.; Ahmed El-Sohemy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 'Blood-Type' diet advises individuals to eat according to their ABO blood group to improve their health and decrease risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease. However, the association between blood type-based dietary patterns and health outcomes has not been examined. The objective of this study was to determine the association between 'blood-type' diets and biomarkers of cardiometabolic health and whether an individual's ABO genotype modifies any associations. ...

  4. Natural Disasters and Safety Risks at Nuclear Power Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutnova, T.

    2012-04-01

    In the aftermath of Fukushima natural-technological disaster the global opinion on nuclear energy divided even deeper. While Germany, Italy and the USA are currently reevaluating their previous plans on nuclear growth, many states are committed to expand nuclear energy output. In China and France, where the industry is widely supported by policymakers, there is little talk about abandoning further development of nuclear energy. Moreover, China displays the most remarkable pace of nuclear development in the world: it is responsible for 40% of worldwide reactors under construction, and aims at least to quadruple its nuclear capacity by 2020. In these states the consequences of Fukushima natural-technological accident will probably result in safety checks and advancement of new reactor technologies. Thus, China is buying newer reactor design from the USA which relies on "passive safety systems". It means that emergency power generators, crucial for reactor cooling in case of an accident, won't depend on electricity, so that tsunami won't disable them like it happened in the case of Fukushima. Nuclear energy managed to draw lessons from previous nuclear accidents where technological and human factors played crucial role. But the Fukushima lesson shows that the natural hazards, nevertheless, were undervalued. Though the ongoing technological advancements make it possible to increase the safety of nuclear power plants with consideration of natural risks, it is not just a question of technology improvement. A necessary action that must be taken is the reevaluation of the character and sources of the potential hazards which natural disasters can bring to nuclear industry. One of the examples is a devastating impact of more than one natural disaster happening at the same time. This subject, in fact, was not taken into account before, while it must be a significant point in planning sites for new nuclear power plants. Another important lesson unveiled is that world nuclear

  5. LWR risk management by safety R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a methodology which has been developed for selecting LWR safety RandD projects. The methodology provides ranking of the RandD projects and the RandD budget allocation which minimizes public risk. The methodology contains procedures to identify institutional, organizational, legal, and contractual factors which affect the probabilities of success and use of RandD projects so that these factors can be evaluated and possibly managed.The methodology also contains a nonlinear optimization code to provide the optimum selection of RandD projects and evaluate the sensitivity of this selection to uncertainity in the input data. Application of the methodology to a test case has shown that: 1) commonly used schemes for ranking RandD projects do not necessarily lead to the optimum selection, and 2) the optimum selection is not necessarily strongly sensitive to uncertainty in the input data

  6. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Tom Riley; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

  7. Blood coagulation and the risk of atherothrombosis: a complex relationship

    OpenAIRE

    van der Voort Danielle; Spronk Henri MH; ten Cate Hugo

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The principles of Virchov's triad appear to be operational in atherothrombosis or arterial thrombosis: local flow changes and particularly vacular wall damage are the main pathophysiological elements. Furthermore, alterations in arterial blood composition are also involved although the specific role and importance of blood coagulation is an ongoing matter of debate. In this review we provide support for the hypothesis that activated blood coagulation is an essential determinant of th...

  8. Quantitative safety goals through more adequate risk management and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper offers an over view of the current regulatory background within the United States, emphasising nuclear regulation, related to the establishment of quantitative safety goals as a way to respond to the key issue of 'How safe is safe enough'. The approach described in the paper based on use of probabilistic risk assessments techniques is centred around definition of quantitative safety regions. Regions are termed: design basis, safety margin, the design capability, and safety research. The design basis region is bounded by the frequency of 10-4 per reactor year and consequences of no identifiable public injury. The frequency of 10-4 per reactor year, is associated with the total projected lifetime of a commercial US nuclear power programme. Events which have a 50% chance of happening are included in the design basis region. In the safety margin region, which extends below the design basis region, protection is provided against events whose probability of not happening during the expected course of the US nuclear power programme is within the region of 50 to 90%. Setting the lower mean frequency to this region of 10-5 per reactor year is equivalent to offering 90% assurance that an accident of given severity will not happen. (author)

  9. Safety from physical viewpoint: ''two-risk model in multiple risk problem''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: the problem of safety provision for people and environment within the framework of a certain socio-economic system (SES) as a problem of managing a great number of interacting risks characterizing numerous hazards (natural, manmade, social, economic once, etc.) inherent in the certain SES has been discussed. From the physical point of view, it can be considered a problem of interaction of many bodies which has no accurate mathematical solution even if the laws of interaction of this bodies are known. In physics, to solve this problem, an approach based on the reduction of the above-mentioned problem of the problem of two-body interaction which can be solved accurately in mathematics has been used. The report presents a similar approach to the problem of risk management in the SES. This approach includes the subdivision of numerous hazards inherent within the framework of the SES into two classes of hazards, so that each of the classes could be considered an integrated whole one, each of them being characterized by the appropriate risk. Consequently, problem of 'multiple-risk' management (i.e. the problem of many bodies, as represented in physics) can be reduced to the 'two-risk' management problem (that is, to the problem two-bodies). Within the framework of the two-risk model the optimization of costs to reduce the two kinds of risk, that is, the risk inherent in the SES as a whole, as well as the risk potentially provoked by lots of activities to be introduced in the SES economy has been described. The model has made it possible to formulate and prove the theorem of equilibrium in risk management. Using the theorem, a relatively simple and practically applicable procedure of optimizing the threshold costs to reduce diverse kinds of risk has been elaborated. The procedure provides to assess the minimum value of the cost that can be achieved regarding the socio-economic factors typical of the SES under discussion. The aimed

  10. Occupational Health, Safety and Risk Analysis in Large Scale Industry of Lahore

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Qasim; Aroj Bashir; Malik Muhammad Anees; Muhammad Usman Ghani; Moeen Khalid; Faisal Hanan; Jahanzaib Malik

    2014-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) it is concerned with guarding the safety, health and welfare of people who are engaged in work or employment. The aim of paper is discussed Occupational Health, Safety and Risk Analysis In large scale industry of Lahore. The paper has completed after study various articles and research paper related to Occupational safety and health so it concluded that Promotion of Health is an important part of occupational health professionals. Health educators, safety ...

  11. A systems approach to risk management through leading safety indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of leading indicators for safety is to identify the potential for an accident before it occurs. Past efforts have focused on identifying general leading indicators, such as maintenance backlog, that apply widely in an industry or even across industries. Other recommendations produce more system-specific leading indicators, but start from system hazard analysis and thus are limited by the causes considered by the traditional hazard analysis techniques. Most rely on quantitative metrics, often based on probabilistic risk assessments. This paper describes a new and different approach to identifying system-specific leading indicators and provides guidance in designing a risk management structure to generate, monitor and use the results. The approach is based on the STAMP (System-Theoretic Accident Model and Processes) model of accident causation and tools that have been designed to build on that model. STAMP extends current accident causality to include more complex causes than simply component failures and chains of failure events or deviations from operational expectations. It incorporates basic principles of systems thinking and is based on systems theory rather than traditional reliability theory. - Highlights: • Much effort has gone into developing leading indicators with only limited success. • A systems-theoretic, assumption-based approach may be more successful. • Leading indicators are warning signals of an assumption’s changing vulnerability. • Heuristic biases can be controlled by using plausibility rather than likelihood

  12. Evaluation model for safety capacity of chemical industrial park based on acceptable regional risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guohua Chen; Shukun Wang; Xiaoqun Tan

    2015-01-01

    The paper defines the Safety Capacity of Chemical Industrial Park (SCCIP) from the perspective of acceptable regional risk. For the purpose of exploring the evaluation model for the SCCIP, a method based on quantitative risk assessment was adopted for evaluating transport risk and to confirm reasonable safety transport capacity of chemical industrial park, and then by combining with the safety storage capacity, a SCCIP evaluation model was put forward. The SCCIP was decided by the smaller one between the largest safety storage capacity and the maximum safety transport capacity, or else, the regional risk of the park will exceed the acceptable level. The developed method was applied to a chemical industrial park in Guangdong province to obtain the maximum safety transport capacity and the SCCIP. The results can be realized in the regional risk control of the park effectively.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  15. Development of risk-informed regulatory positions on CANDU safety issues, Part II: Application of risk-informed decision making for categorization of safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the approach taken by staff of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission to identify the list of outstanding safety issues for Canadian CANDU reactors, and the application of the Risk-Informed Decision Making for developing risk-informed regulatory positions, including the path forward for resolution of each safety issue in view of currently operating reactors, life extension of existing reactors and new reactors. A general categorization of the issues is outlined here, and two specific examples presented for the risk identification, estimation, and evaluation with the use of the methodology described in Part I of this paper. Measures to control the risk are also recommended. It has to be realized that the issues identified in this paper, and associated risks, should not be viewed as questioning the safety of operating reactors, which have attained a very high operational-safety record, but rather as areas where uncertainty in knowledge exists, where the safety assessment has been based on conservative assumptions, and where regulatory decisions are needed, or will need to be confirmed. It is also important to note that some of the safety issues identified here are common to other reactor types as well. (author)

  16. Track 6: safety and risk management. Plant operational risk management. Plant Configuration Risk Assessment Methodology Development for Periodic Maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the operation experiences of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Korea accumulate and NPP safety functions become enhanced, the role of stable and optimal NPP operation within acceptable safety criteria becomes important at present. To accomplish the goal of safe and optimal operation, maintenance and its related activities should be regarded as the issues of most concern. Studies of methodologies for maintenance improvement and optimization have focused on system performance rather than on the hardware itself. From this point of view, the probabilistic methods are most useful. In terms of risk including core damage frequency and unavailability, the cause that might impact plant safety during normal maintenance activities can be identified and evaluated effectively. The results from these probabilistic analyses can provide insightful information for the reallocation of risk-contributing maintenance activity. This information can be utilized in a way that separates the significant risk-contributing maintenance activities from each other unless they are timely related. In Korea, the risk-monitoring program for operating NPPs is under development and will be implemented in 2003. To accomplish the risk-monitoring program objectives, suitable risk evaluation methods should be developed before the implementation of the risk-monitoring program. The plant configuration assessment methodology was developed for these reasons, and this method is to incorporate the field experiences into the risk calculation exactly within the limit of probabilistic methods. During normal plant operation, the plant operational risk changes frequently depending on the status of the plant system and the arrangement of the components. Specific plant systems or components are typically removed from service because of random equipment failure, planned preventive/predictive maintenance, corrective maintenance, surveillance testing, and operational bypass activities, and such events usually impact the

  17. Measures to decrease the risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome transmission by blood transfusion. Evidence of volunteer blood donor cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindyck, J; Waldman, A; Zang, E; Oleszko, W; Lowy, M; Bianco, C

    1985-01-01

    We studied whether volunteers giving blood to the Greater New York Blood Program (GNYBP) cooperated with procedures implementing public health recommendations intended to decrease the risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) transmission by blood transfusion. Predonation medical screening was expanded to exclude donors who might be ill with AIDS. To exclude possible asymptomatic carriers of the disease, members of groups at increased risk of AIDS were asked either not to give blood or to give it for laboratory studies. A confidential questionnaire, administered to all donors after medical screening, provided the vehicle for donors to advise the GNYBP whether their donation was for laboratory studies or for patient transfusion. We found that the number of male donors decreased; AIDS-related questions in medical history led to a 2 percent increase in donor rejections; 97 percent of donors said their blood could be used for transfusions; 1.4 percent said their blood could be used for laboratory studies only; and 1.6 percent did not respond. Only units designated for transfusion were released to hospitals. People who indicated that their donation was for laboratory studies had a higher prevalence of markers for hepatitis B virus and of antibodies to cytomegalovirus. White cell counts and helper/suppressor T lymphocyte ratios were not significantly different in the two groups. We conclude that volunteer donors have cooperated with the established procedures. None of the laboratory assays identified blood units donated by individuals who, based on information about AIDS high-risk groups, designated their donation for laboratory studies. PMID:3969698

  18. Incidence and risk factors of occupational blood exposure: a nation-wide survey among Danish doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelsing, S; Nielsen, T L; Brønnum-Hansen, H;

    1997-01-01

    Occupational blood exposures involves a risk of transmission of serious infections. We performed a nation-wide survey, to describe the incidence and risk factors of percutaneous (PCE) and mucocutaneous (MCE) blood exposures among hospital employed doctors in Denmark. Of 9,374 questionnaires, 6......). Only 35% adhered to the basic principles of universal precautions (UP) and non-compliance was associated with a considerably increased risk of both MCE and PCE, especially in non-surgical specialties. In conclusion, we found an unacceptably high incidence of occupational blood exposures among Danish...

  19. Safety of predeposit autologous blood donation in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, C R; Schwartz, I R; Chhibber, G; Teplick, F B; Cohen, A W

    1990-05-01

    The option of predeposit autologous blood donation (PABD) before elective surgery has been gaining popularity as a means of eliminating the transmission of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome and hepatitis. It also prevents potential antigen sensitization and transfusion reactions. The use of PABD in pregnant women has been described, but its safety for both mother and fetus, especially in the first and third trimester, has not been established. After studying 16 third-trimester pregnant women with antenatal surveillance techniques and continuous fetal monitoring, we concluded that PABD is a safe procedure for both mother and fetus. PMID:2352248

  20. Acute effects of electromagnetic stimulation of the brain on cortical activity, cortical blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate in the cat: an evaluation of safety.

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, J A; Flecknell, P. A.; Kenyon, B R; Koh, T H; Miller, S.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of repeated high intensity electromagnetic stimulation of the brain on cortical activity, cortical blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate has been investigated in the cat, to evaluate the safety of the method. The observations have been made in preparations under propofol anaesthesia before, during and after periods of anoxia. Electromagnetic stimulation of the brain evoked activity in descending motor pathways and was recorded by activity in the median nerve and by muscle tw...

  1. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prescribed if you have high blood pressure or atrial fibrillation . Stroke prevention is often the focus of doctor-patient conversations in atrial fibrillation, Dr. Sacco said. But for people with high ...

  2. Bayesian-network-based safety risk assessment for steel construction projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Sou-Sen; Chang, Ching-Miao

    2013-05-01

    There are four primary accident types at steel building construction (SC) projects: falls (tumbles), object falls, object collapse, and electrocution. Several systematic safety risk assessment approaches, such as fault tree analysis (FTA) and failure mode and effect criticality analysis (FMECA), have been used to evaluate safety risks at SC projects. However, these traditional methods ineffectively address dependencies among safety factors at various levels that fail to provide early warnings to prevent occupational accidents. To overcome the limitations of traditional approaches, this study addresses the development of a safety risk-assessment model for SC projects by establishing the Bayesian networks (BN) based on fault tree (FT) transformation. The BN-based safety risk-assessment model was validated against the safety inspection records of six SC building projects and nine projects in which site accidents occurred. The ranks of posterior probabilities from the BN model were highly consistent with the accidents that occurred at each project site. The model accurately provides site safety-management abilities by calculating the probabilities of safety risks and further analyzing the causes of accidents based on their relationships in BNs. In practice, based on the analysis of accident risks and significant safety factors, proper preventive safety management strategies can be established to reduce the occurrence of accidents on SC sites. PMID:23499984

  3. Proposal for risk-informed safety management in Japanese nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a risk-informed safety management concept for Japanese nuclear power plants. The proposed concept is to incorporate probabilistic approach combined with current deterministic approach based on defense-in-depth philosophy. Seven safety principle and safety management criteria have been discussed. (author)

  4. The role of engineering judgement, safety culture, and organizational factors in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the role of engineering judgement, safety culture, and organizational factors in risk assessment by examining the reasons for human-based error. The need for more emphasis on producing engineers with good engineering judgement is described. The progress in quantifying the role of safety culture and organizational factors in risk assessment studies is summarized

  5. 75 FR 23782 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee....

  6. Risk and safety in the nuclear industry and conventional norms of society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study the societal acceptance of various risks is analyzed and rules of risk acceptance as a function of different parameters are spelled out. The monetary value of a human life is estimated, based on investments in safety of different human activities. The acceptable risks and safety investments in different human activities are then compared with risks and safety investments of the nuclear industry. Safety investments required to reduce the radioactivity releases and risks from nuclear power stations to ALAP levels are taken as a study case. It is found that risks in the nuclear industry are several orders of magnitude lower and safety investments per human life saved are several orders of magnitude higher, as compared with risks and safety investments in other human activities. It is also shown that the incremental safety investments needed to further reduce the radiation doses in the environment during normal and continuous operation of nuclear plants are extravagantly high as compared to safety investments in other human activities and in other facets of human life. Considering that there is a limit to the economic means available, societal expenditures for reducing risks should by spread, as much as possible, over all human activities to get the maximum return from investments. (B.G.)

  7. Overview of Risk Mitigation for Safety-Critical Computer-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a high-level overview of a general strategy to mitigate the risks from threats to safety-critical computer-based systems. In this context, a safety threat is a process or phenomenon that can cause operational safety hazards in the form of computational system failures. This report is intended to provide insight into the safety-risk mitigation problem and the characteristics of potential solutions. The limitations of the general risk mitigation strategy are discussed and some options to overcome these limitations are provided. This work is part of an ongoing effort to enable well-founded assurance of safety-related properties of complex safety-critical computer-based aircraft systems by developing an effective capability to model and reason about the safety implications of system requirements and design.

  8. Consumer Food Safety Risk Attitudes and Perceptions Over Time: The Case of BSE Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Kalogeras, N.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Ittersum, van, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has shown that by decoupling the risk response behaviour of consumers into the separate components of risk perception and risk attitude, a more robust conceptualization and prediction of consumers’ reactions to food safety issues is possible. Furthermore, it has been argued that the influence of risk attitudes and risk perceptions on consumer risk behaviour for contaminated food products can be used to formulate effective agricultural policies and strategies in case of a food ...

  9. Food Safety for Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants People at Risk of Foodborne Illness To Your Health! Food Safety for Seniors Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ...

  10. Safety risk management of underground engineering in China: Progress, challenges and strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Qihu Qian; Peng Lin

    2016-01-01

    Underground construction in China is featured by large scale, high speed, long construction period, complex operation and frustrating situations regarding project safety. Various accidents have been reported from time to time, resulting in serious social impact and huge economic loss. This paper presents the main progress in the safety risk management of underground engineering in China over the last decade, i.e. (1) establishment of laws and regulations for safety risk management of undergro...

  11. Blood transfusion after total shoulder arthroplasty: Which patients are at high risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Kandil, Abdurrahman; Griffin, Justin W.; Novicoff, Wendy M.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple reported risk factors and a wide range of reported blood transfusion rates for total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). There are no evidence-based guidelines for blood transfusions in TSA patients. Materials and Methods: We utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to analyze 51,191 patients undergoing TSA between 1998 and 2011. The purpose was to describe the incidence and identify the preoperative factors that are independently associated with blood transfusion after T...

  12. Blood transfusion after total shoulder arthroplasty: Which patients are at high risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurrahman Kandil; Griffin, Justin W.; Novicoff, Wendy M.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple reported risk factors and a wide range of reported blood transfusion rates for total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). There are no evidence-based guidelines for blood transfusions in TSA patients. Materials and Methods: We utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to analyze 51,191 patients undergoing TSA between 1998 and 2011. The purpose was to describe the incidence and identify the preoperative factors that are independently associated with blood transfusion aft...

  13. Ibuprofen versus steroids: risk and benefit, efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Giovannini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years we have observed an upward trend in the employment of ibuprofen as anti-inflammatory and antipyretic therapy. Therefore the pediatrician has often a precious option in the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic treatment in children instead of using steroids and paracetamol. In clinical practice ibuprofen can be used in the treatment of headache, toothache, otalgy, dysmenorrhea, neuralgia, arthralgia, myalgia, abdominal pain and fever: it is the first choice for these common diseases. However, the use of steroids is a routine, even if non-corticosteroid anti-inflammatory molecules could be useful. Certainly steroids are powerful anti-inflammatory, indicated for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders and in acute respiratory and allergic diseases. Beside, thanks to their chemical and pharmacological profile, they also provide patients with an antipyretic effect. However, the use of steroids must be reserved to cases in which other classical antipyretics such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not effective. The possible side effects and risks associated with stepping down steroids must be considered. Although “steroids-phobia” should be discouraged, steroids are to be reserved only as the first indication. In all other cases the pediatrician can use ibuprofen, whose efficacy and safety are widely demonstrated by now.

  14. Innovative modeling approaches for risk assessment in food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food safety involves preventing foodborne illness by describing ways to properly handle, prepare and store food. Regulation of food safety is applied to companies that produce food. Thus, the goal of food safety regulation is to reduce human pathogens to acceptable levels at the processing plant t...

  15. The Studies to Eliminate the Risk of Occupational Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Němec, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Bachelor's thesis is focused on the issue of occupational safety and health protection in the area of biogas plant owned by selected business entity. The work provides a theoretical basis for the issue, analyzes the level of occupational safety and compliance with legal requirements at the company and the workplace. Closing with recommendations for improving safety and health.

  16. An application of probabilistic risk analysis in nuclear criticality safety design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current criticality safety practice requires a system design to meet the double contingency criteria. Since the probability of occurrence and the increments of the keff value resulting from the failure of each of the safety barriers are system dependent, a basis is needed to quantify the risk of the mitigative measures of a system design that follows the double contingency principle. This paper proposes a criticality risk assessment methodology which applies the probabilistic risk assessment to supplement the nuclear criticality assessment to provide a quantitative basis for the assessment of system risk and the criticality safety margin to achieve a safe design

  17. A risk-informed perspective on deterministic safety analysis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the deterministic safety analysis (DSA) approach to nuclear safety is examined from a risk-informed perspective. One objective of safety analysis of a nuclear power plant is to demonstrate via analysis that the risks to the public from events or accidents that are within the design basis of the power plant are within acceptable levels with a high degree of assurance. This nuclear safety analysis objective can be translated into two requirements on the risk estimates of design basis events or accidents: the nominal risk estimate to the public must be shown to be within acceptable levels, and the uncertainty in the risk estimates must be shown to be small on an absolute or relative basis. The DSA approach combined with the defense-in-depth (DID) principle is a simplified safety analysis approach that attempts to achieve the above safety analysis objective in the face of potentially large uncertainties in the risk estimates of a nuclear power plant by treating the various uncertainty contributors using a stylized conservative binary (yes-no) approach, and applying multiple overlapping physical barriers and defense levels to protect against the release of radioactivity from the reactor. It is shown that by focusing on the consequence aspect of risk, the previous two nuclear safety analysis requirements on risk can be satisfied with the DSA-DID approach to nuclear safety. It is also shown the use of multiple overlapping physical barriers and defense levels in the traditional DSA-DID approach to nuclear safety is risk-informed in the sense that it provides a consistently high level of confidence in the validity of the safety analysis results for various design basis events or accidents with a wide range of frequency of occurrence. It is hoped that by providing a linkage between the consequence analysis approach in DSA with a risk-informed perspective, greater understanding of the limitation and capability of the DSA approach is obtained. (author)

  18. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Damalas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food and drinking water. Occupational exposure to pesticides often occurs in the case of agricultural workers in open fields and greenhouses, workers in the pesticide industry, and exterminators of house pests. Exposure of the general population to pesticides occurs primarily through eating food and drinking water contaminated with pesticide residues, whereas substantial exposure can also occur in or around the home. Regarding the adverse effects on the environment (water, soil and air contamination from leaching, runoff, and spray drift, as well as the detrimental effects on wildlife, fish, plants, and other non-target organisms, many of these effects depend on the toxicity of the pesticide, the measures taken during its application, the dosage applied, the adsorption on soil colloids, the weather conditions prevailing after application, and how long the pesticide persists in the environment. Therefore, the risk assessment of the impact of pesticides either on human health or on the environment is not an easy and particularly accurate process because of differences in the periods and levels of exposure, the types of pesticides used (regarding toxicity and persistence, and the environmental characteristics of the areas where pesticides are usually applied. Also, the number of the criteria used and the method of their implementation to assess the adverse effects of pesticides on human health could affect risk assessment and would possibly affect the characterization

  19. RFID in the blood supply chain--increasing productivity, quality and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Lynne; Davis, Rodeina; Gutierrez, Alfonso; Kopetsky, Matthew; Young, Kassandra; Veeramani, Raj

    2009-01-01

    As part of an overall design of a new, standardized RFID-enabled blood transfusion medicine supply chain, an assessment was conducted for two hospitals: the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics (UIHC) and Mississippi Baptist Health System (MBHS). The main objectives of the study were to assess RFID technological and economic feasibility, along with possible impacts to productivity, quality and patient safety. A step-by-step process analysis focused on the factors contributing to process "pain points" (errors, inefficiency, product losses). A process re-engineering exercise produced blueprints of RFID-enabled processes to alleviate or eliminate those pain-points. In addition, an innovative model quantifying the potential reduction in adverse patient effects as a result of RFID implementation was created, allowing improvement initiatives to focus on process areas with the greatest potential impact to patient safety. The study concluded that it is feasible to implement RFID-enabled processes, with tangible improvements to productivity and safety expected. Based on a comprehensive cost/benefit model, it is estimated for a large hospital (UIHC) to recover investment from implementation within two to three years, while smaller hospitals may need longer to realize ROI. More importantly, the study estimated that RFID technology could reduce morbidity and mortality effects substantially among patients receiving transfusions. PMID:19894488

  20. Addressing safety liabilities of TfR bispecific antibodies that cross the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Jessica A; Yu, Y Joy; Zhang, Yin; Tarrant, Jacqueline M; Fuji, Reina N; Meilandt, William J; Solanoy, Hilda; Tong, Raymond K; Hoyte, Kwame; Luk, Wilman; Lu, Yanmei; Gadkar, Kapil; Prabhu, Saileta; Ordonia, Benjamin A; Nguyen, Quyen; Lin, Yuwen; Lin, Zhonghua; Balazs, Mercedesz; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Ernst, James A; Dennis, Mark S; Watts, Ryan J

    2013-05-01

    Bispecific antibodies using the transferrin receptor (TfR) have shown promise for boosting antibody uptake in brain. Nevertheless, there are limited data on the therapeutic properties including safety liabilities that will enable successful development of TfR-based therapeutics. We evaluate TfR/BACE1 bispecific antibody variants in mouse and show that reducing TfR binding affinity improves not only brain uptake but also peripheral exposure and the safety profile of these antibodies. We identify and seek to address liabilities of targeting TfR with antibodies, namely, acute clinical signs and decreased circulating reticulocytes observed after dosing. By eliminating Fc effector function, we ameliorated the acute clinical signs and partially rescued a reduction in reticulocytes. Furthermore, we show that complement mediates a residual decrease in reticulocytes observed after Fc effector function is eliminated. These data raise important safety concerns and potential mitigation strategies for the development of TfR-based therapies that are designed to cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:23636093

  1. Individual donor-nucleic acid testing for human immunodeficiency virus-1, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus and its role in blood safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs are one of the biggest threats to blood transfusion safety. Nucleic acid testing (NAT in blood donor screening has been implemented in many countries to reduce the risk of TTIs. NAT shortens this window period, thereby offering blood centers a much higher sensitivity for detecting viral infections. Aims: The objective was to assess the role of individual donor-NAT (ID-NAT for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV and its role in blood safety. Materials and Methods: A total of 32978 donations were tested for all three viruses using enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (Vironostika ® HIV Ag-Ab, Hepanostika ® HCV ultra and hepatitis B surface antigen ultra by Biomerieux and ID-NAT using Procleix Ultrio plus ® Assay (Novartis Diagnostic, USA. All initial NAT reactive samples and serology nonreactive were retested in triplicate and NAT discriminatory assay for HIV-1, HCV and HBV were performed. Results: Of the 32978 samples, 43 (0.13% were found to be ID-NAT reactive but seronegative. Out of 43, one for HIV-1, 13 for HCV and 27 for HBV were reactive by discriminatory assays. There were two samples that were reactive for both HCV-HBV and counted as HCV-HBV co-infection NAT yield. The prevalence of these viruses in our sample, tested by ID-NAT is 0.06%, 0.71%, and 0.63% for HIV-1, HCV and HBV respectively. The combined NAT yield among blood donors was 1 in 753. Conclusion: ID-NAT testing for HIV-1, HCV and HBV can tremendously improve the efficacy of screening for protecting blood recipient from TTIs. It enables detection of these viruses that were undetected by serological test and thus helped in providing safe blood to the patients.

  2. Blood transfusion after total shoulder arthroplasty: Which patients are at high risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Kandil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There are multiple reported risk factors and a wide range of reported blood transfusion rates for total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA. There are no evidence-based guidelines for blood transfusions in TSA patients. Materials and Methods: We utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to analyze 51,191 patients undergoing TSA between 1998 and 2011. The purpose was to describe the incidence and identify the preoperative factors that are independently associated with blood transfusion after TSA. In addition, we studied the association of blood transfusions with certain variables such as length of stay (LOS, total charges, and payer status. Results: The blood transfusion rate in our study was 6.1%. There was no difference in the rate of blood transfusions over the study period (P < 0.001. In our logistic regression model, significant associations were found with increased age (odds ratio [OR] =1.03, white race (OR = 1.05, higher Charlson-Deyo score (OR = 1.12, presence of ischemic heart disease (OR = 1.24, blood loss anemia (OR = 1.65, female gender (OR = 1.94, presence of coagulation disorders (OR = 2.25, and presence of deficiency anemia (OR = 3.5. Patients receiving a blood transfusion had higher total charges, a longer hospital LOS, and were more likely to be Medicare payers (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Our study found five clinically significant risk factors for blood transfusions for TSA: female gender, ischemic heart disease, deficiency anemia, coagulation disorder, and blood loss anemia. Patients with these risk factors should be considered higher risk for requiring a blood transfusion after TSA and counseled appropriately. Level of Evidence: Level II, retrospective cohort study, prognostic study.

  3. Risk and management of blood-borne infections in health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, E M; Williams, I T; Shapiro, C N; Chamberland, M E

    2000-07-01

    Exposure to blood-borne pathogens poses a serious risk to health care workers (HCWs). We review the risk and management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in HCWs and also discuss current methods for preventing exposures and recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis. In the health care setting, blood-borne pathogen transmission occurs predominantly by percutaneous or mucosal exposure of workers to the blood or body fluids of infected patients. Prospective studies of HCWs have estimated that the average risk for HIV transmission after a percutaneous exposure is approximately 0.3%, the risk of HBV transmission is 6 to 30%, and the risk of HCV transmission is approximately 1.8%. To minimize the risk of blood-borne pathogen transmission from HCWs to patients, all HCWs should adhere to standard precautions, including the appropriate use of hand washing, protective barriers, and care in the use and disposal of needles and other sharp instruments. Employers should have in place a system that includes written protocols for prompt reporting, evaluation, counseling, treatment, and follow-up of occupational exposures that may place a worker at risk of blood-borne pathogen infection. A sustained commitment to the occupational health of all HCWs will ensure maximum protection for HCWs and patients and the availability of optimal medical care for all who need it. PMID:10885983

  4. Evaluation of safety assessment methodologies in Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide (1985) and Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report (1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FSARs. Rockwell International, as operating contractor at the Rocky Flats plant, conducted a safety analysis program during the 1980s. That effort resulted in Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs) for several buildings, one of them being the Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report, June 87 (707FSAR) and a Plant Safety Analysis Report. Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide, March 1985 (RFRAG85) documents the methodologies that were used for those FSARs. Resources available for preparation of those Rocky Flats FSARs were very limited. After addressing the more pressing safety issues, some of which are described below, the present contractor (EG ampersand G) intends to conduct a program of upgrading the FSARs. This report presents the results of a review of the methodologies described in RFRAG85 and 707FSAR and contains suggestions that might be incorporated into the methodology for the FSAR upgrade effort

  5. Analysis and insights from a dynamical model of nuclear plant safety risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we expand upon previously reported results of a dynamical systems model for the impact of plant processes and programmatic performance on nuclear plant safety risk. We utilize both analytical techniques and numerical simulations typical of the analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems to obtain insights important for effective risk management. This includes use of bifurcation diagrams to show that period doubling bifurcations and regions of chaotic dynamics can occur. We also investigate the impact of risk mitigating functions (equipment reliability and loss prevention) on plant safety risk and demonstrate that these functions are capable of improving risk to levels that are better than those that are represented in a traditional risk assessment. Next, we analyze the system response to the presence of external noise and obtain some conclusions with respect to the allocation of resources to ensure that safety is maintained at optimal levels. In particular, we demonstrate that the model supports the importance of management and regulator attention to plants that have demonstrated poor performance by providing an external stimulus to obtain desired improvements. Equally important, the model suggests that excessive intervention, by either plant management or regulatory authorities, can have a deleterious impact on safety for plants that are operating with very effective programs and processes. Finally, we propose a modification to the model that accounts for the impact of plant risk culture on process performance and plant safety risk. We then use numerical simulations to demonstrate the important safety benefits of a strong risk culture

  6. Aggressive blood pressure reduction in patients at high vascular risk: is it dangerous?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Angeli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this review was to summarize the current state of evidence regarding the optimal blood pressure goals in patients with high vascular risk. In particular, this review critically addresses the issue of the “J-curve” paradox – a hypothesis indicating that low treatment-induced blood pressure values are characterized by an increase, rather than a decrease, in the incidence of cardiovascular events. Materials and methods We reviewed evidence from studies published in peer-reviewed journals indexed in Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL that compared different BP goals. Results Post-hoc analyses of randomized trials specifically conducted to test the hypothesis of the “J-shaped curve” yielded conflicting results. However, trials directly comparing different blood pressure goals and meta-analyses showed that in-treatment blood pressure values below the usual goal of less than 140/90 mmHg improve outcomes in patients at increased vascular risk. Discussion The fear that an excessive reduction in blood pressure may be dangerous is inconsistent with the available data and probably conditioned by the adverse impact of other risk factors that may be more frequent in patients with low values of achieved blood pressure. The association between blood pressure reduction and cardiovascular risk seems to be linear and not J-shaped.

  7. Colonising Safety: creating risk through the enforcement of biomedical constructions of safety.

    OpenAIRE

    Kadetz, P.

    2013-01-01

    In the normative health care discourse, safety is represented as a concept that is at once universal, irrefutable, and inherently beneficent. Yet, research at local levels in the Philippines challenges these assumptions embedded in the biomedical construction of safety. This article examines how the imposition of a biomedical construction of safety onto a given local group, which does not share this construction of safety, can affect the local group. Specifically, this article examines the ap...

  8. Health and Safety Risks in Britain's Workplaces: Where are They and Who Controls Them?

    OpenAIRE

    Bryson, Alex

    2016-01-01

    This is the first paper to identify the correlates of workplace managers' perceptions of the health and safety risks faced by workers and the degree to which workers have control over those risks. The risks workers face and the control they have over those risks are weakly negatively correlated. Managerial risk ratings are positively associated with both injury and illness rates, but not with absence rates. The control rating is also positively associated with injury and illness rates, but it...

  9. Real-Time Safety Risk Assessment Based on a Real-Time Location System for Hydropower Construction Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hanchen; Lin, Peng; Fan, Qixiang; Qiang, Maoshan

    2014-01-01

    The concern for workers' safety in construction industry is reflected in many studies focusing on static safety risk identification and assessment. However, studies on real-time safety risk assessment aimed at reducing uncertainty and supporting quick response are rare. A method for real-time safety risk assessment (RTSRA) to implement a dynamic evaluation of worker safety states on construction site has been proposed in this paper. The method provides construction managers who are in charge ...

  10. Real-Time Safety Risk Assessment Based on a Real-Time Location System for Hydropower Construction Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Hanchen Jiang; Peng Lin; Qixiang Fan; Maoshan Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The concern for workers’ safety in construction industry is reflected in many studies focusing on static safety risk identification and assessment. However, studies on real-time safety risk assessment aimed at reducing uncertainty and supporting quick response are rare. A method for real-time safety risk assessment (RTSRA) to implement a dynamic evaluation of worker safety states on construction site has been proposed in this paper. The method provides construction managers who are in charge ...

  11. Blood Lipids and other Related Risk Factors of stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu YAND; Hiu Lu

    2000-01-01

    Abstract To assess the ralationship between incidence of stroke and blood lipids, apolipoprolcin (apo) , 219 patients with stroke(cerebral hemorrhage 87, cerebral infarction 132) , diagnosed with the aid of CT, were examined. The levels of serum total cholesterol, triglycerioes, apo-A, apo-B were calculatea. 160 cases with no disorder in metabolism of blood lipids or other disease of meurologic system were taken as centrol group. The results zhowed that the ratio of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low clensity lipoprotein cholesterol was iower than.that of control group(p<0. 05) . In the patients group, cases with diabetes, hypentension coronary heart disease or onesity, the levels of blood liprds. triglyceride and cholesterol were higher than those vithout above mentioned disease The condusion is, that there is certain reletionship between the contents of bliid lipids. lipoprotein and it sulqraction HDL2, HDL3 and cerebrovasculor cisease. The radis of high density lipoprotein and low density lipoprolein is the important factor in predicting of stroke

  12. Invasively Measured Aortic Systolic Blood Pressure and Office Systolic Blood Pressure in Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Esben; Knudsen, Søren T; Hansen, Klavs W;

    2016-01-01

    Aortic systolic blood pressure (BP) represents the hemodynamic cardiac and cerebral burden more directly than office systolic BP. Whether invasively measured aortic systolic BP confers additional prognostic value beyond office BP remains debated. In this study, office systolic BP and invasively...

  13. Blood pressure load does not add to ambulatory blood pressure level for cardiovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yan; Thijs, Lutgarde; Boggia, José;

    2014-01-01

    Experts proposed blood pressure (BP) load derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings as a more accurate predictor of outcome than level, in particular in normotensive people. We analyzed 8711 subjects (mean age, 54.8 years; 47.0% women) randomly recruited from 10 populations. We expressed BP...

  14. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Georg B; Munroe, Patricia B; Rice, Kenneth M; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D; Chasman, Daniel I; Smith, Albert V; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A; Jackson, Anne U; Peden, John F; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C; Fox, Ervin R; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D G; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Steinle, Nanette I; Grobbee, Diederick E; Arking, Dan E; Kardia, Sharon L; Morrison, Alanna C; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Beilby, John P; Lawrence, Robert W; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J Hunter; Bis, Joshua C; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette R; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R; Bornstein, Stefan R; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B; Hunt, Steven C; Sun, Yan V; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Thomas J; Burton, Paul R; Soler Artigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K; Rudock, Megan E; Heckbert, Susan R; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R G; Wain, Louise V; Morken, Mario A; Swift, Amy J; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J L; van Gilst, Wiek H; Janipalli, Charles S; Mani, K Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Oostra, Ben A; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M V Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Casas, Juan P; Mohlke, Karen L; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Cooper, Richard S; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C; Harris, Tamara B; Morris, Richard W; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J; Johnson, Toby

    2011-10-01

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or  ≥90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  15. Implementation of technology for reliability, safety and risk monitoring on BN-600 power unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For assessment of current safety level of Beloyarsk-3 reactor by probabilistic methods and for risk-informed decision supports during operation the reliability, safety and risk monitoring system of nuclear unit is developed and is putting into practice. The base of this system is the risk monitoring system RIM, which uses logico-probabilistic models of nuclear unit improved for risk monitoring aids. Risk monitoring system RIM is interconnected with maintenance and repair planning system of Beloyarsk-3 reactor and analytical monitoring system of reliability and safety. The analytical monitoring system of reliability and safety of BN-600 reactor is developed and adopted on the base of data retrieval system Istochnik-BN which provides structured storage of information, data systematization and processing, it has extensive data retrieval and exchange system

  16. Formal safety assessment based on relative risks model in ship navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formal safety assessment (FSA) is a structured and systematic methodology aiming at enhancing maritime safety. It has been gradually and broadly used in the shipping industry nowadays around the world. On the basis of analysis and conclusion of FSA approach, this paper discusses quantitative risk assessment and generic risk model in FSA, especially frequency and severity criteria in ship navigation. Then it puts forward a new model based on relative risk assessment (MRRA). The model presents a risk-assessment approach based on fuzzy functions and takes five factors into account, including detailed information about accident characteristics. It has already been used for the assessment of pilotage safety in Shanghai harbor, China. Consequently, it can be proved that MRRA is a useful method to solve the problems in the risk assessment of ship navigation safety in practice

  17. The blood pressure-lowering effect and safety of chlorogenic acid from green coffee bean extract in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takuya; Arai, Yoichi; Mitsui, Yuki; Kusaura, Tatsuya; Okawa, Wataru; Kajihara, Yasushi; Saito, Ikuo

    2006-07-01

    Chlorogenic acids (CGA) in green coffee bean extract (GCE) reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats and humans. The authors examined the blood pressure-lowering effect and safety of CGA in patients with mild hypertension through a placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Subjects (n = 28) were randomized to receive treatment with CGA (140 mg/day) from GCE or placebo. Blood pressure, pulse rate, body mass index, routine blood test, hematochemistry, urinalysis, and subjective symptoms were recorded throughout the study. In the CGA group, but not the placebo group, blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) decreased significantly during the ingestion period. There was no difference in body mass index and pulse rate between groups, nor were there any apparent side effects. Thus, CGA from GCE is effective in decreasing blood pressure and safe for patients with mild hypertension. PMID:16820341

  18. Why consumers behave as they do with respect to food safety and risk information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Wim; Frewer, Lynn J.; Scholderer, Joachim;

    2007-01-01

    risk information and provides explanations for these behaviours based on the nature of the risk and individual psychological processes. Potential solutions for rebuilding consumer confidence in food safety and bridging between lay and expert opinions towards food risks are reviewed. These include...

  19. Identification and evaluation of priorities in the business process of a risk or safety organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agencies are increasingly following principles and guidelines for the coordination of risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication in large-scale programs. In particular, there is a challenge to comply with the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) memorandum “Updated Principles for Risk Analysis” among other guidelines. This paper demonstrates a systemic approach to achieve compliance of a risk program with administrative and organizational principles and guidelines for risk analysis. The paper suggests three canonical questions as the mission of such a program: (i) what sources of risks are to be managed by the program, (ii) how should multiple risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication activities be administered and coordinated, and what should be the basis for resource allocation to these activities, and (iii) how will the performance of the program be monitored and evaluated. The paper demonstrates a re-prioritization of policy initiatives of the program based on emergent and future conditions. The approach is useful to agencies implementing risk or safety organizational guidelines such as those of the OMB, the US Government Accountability Office, the US Department of Homeland Security, the US Department of Defense, and others. This paper will be of interest to risk managers; agencies; and risk and safety analysts engaged in the conception, implementation, and evaluation of risk or safety programs. - Highlights: ► We develop a systemic approach for management of a risk or safety program. ► The approach includes business process models and policy prioritization. ► The results support organizations to implement risk and safety programs.

  20. Study and Application of Safety Risk Evaluation Model for CO2 Geological Storage Based on Uncertainty Measure Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hujun He; Yaning Zhao; Xingke Yang; Yaning Gao; Xu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing showed that the safety risk evaluation for CO2 geological storage had important significance. Aimed at the characteristics of CO2 geological storage safety risk evaluation, drawing on previous research results, rank and order models for safety risk evaluation of CO2 geological storage were put forward based on information entropy and uncertainty measure theory. In this model, the uncertainty problems in safety risk evaluation of CO2 geological storage were solved by qualitative anal...

  1. Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Reilly, Marie; Hjalgrim, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term deleterious effects of repeated blood donations may be masked by the donors' healthy lifestyle. To investigate possible effects of blood donation and iron loss through blood donation on cancer incidence while minimizing "healthy donor effects," we made dose......-response comparisons within a cohort of Swedish and Danish blood donors. METHODS: We used a nested case-control study design, in which case patients were defined as all donors who were diagnosed with a malignancy between their first recorded blood donation and study termination (n = 10866). Control subjects (n...... = 107140) were individually matched on sex, age, and county of residence. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated relative risks of cancer according to number of blood donations made or estimated iron loss 3-12 years before a case patient was diagnosed with cancer. All statistical tests were...

  2. ABO blood type is associated with endometrial cancer risk in Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-Hong Xu; Wei Zheng; Yong-Bing Xiang; Xiao-Ou Shu

    2011-01-01

    ABO blood type has been associated with risk of several malignancies.However,results are not consistent.In this population-based case-control study including 1204 incident endometrial cancer cases and 1212 population controls,we examined the association of self-reported serologic blood type with endometrial cancer risk using a logistic regression model.Women with endometrial cancer were more likely to have blood type A.Compared to women with blood type O,the adjusted odds ratios for endometrial cancer were 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI),0.79-1.28] for type B,1.24 (95% CI,0.90-1.69) for type AB,and 1.50 (95% CI,1.19-1.90) for type A.A significant dose-response relationship was observed for cancer risk and level of antigen A (P for trend =0.0003).The positive association of blood type A with cancer risk was observed regardless of menopausal status,body mass index,oral contraceptive use,or family cancer history.Our results suggest that ABO blood type may be involved in the development of endometrial cancer.

  3. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  4. Proof of concept in cardiovascular risk: the paradoxical findings in blood pressure and lipid abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Flavio Danni; Fuchs, Sandra Costa; Moreira, Leila Beltrami; Gus, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    High blood pressure and lipoprotein abnormalities were identified by many cohort studies as the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Laboratory experiments apparently confirmed their role in the causation of atherosclerosis, but a proof of concept requires the corroboration by clinical trials in human beings. The size of benefit in clinical trials regarding the control of high blood pressure was within the estimations of risk provided by cohort studies. For a reduction of 10 mmHg in systolic blood pressure or 5 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure, the relative risk reduction of coronary heart disease was 22% (95% confidence interval 27%-17%) in a meta-analysis of clinical trials, close to the estimation of reduction of 25% (95% confidence interval 23%-27%) provided by a meta-analysis of cohort studies. The corresponding values for stroke were 41% (95% confidence interval 33%-48%) in clinical trials compared to a cohort risk prediction of 36% (95% confidence interval 34%-38%). This efficacy was shared by all blood pressure-lowering drugs. The same figure has not paradoxically happened with drugs that act over abnormalities of cholesterol and lipoproteins. Only statins, which have other beneficial actions as well, have consistently lowered the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, an efficacy that was not reproduced by older and newer quite potent lipid drugs. The adverse effects of these drugs may nullify their beneficial effects over lipoproteins and abnormalities of lipoproteins may only be surrogate markers of the underlying real risks. PMID:22870036

  5. Risk of malaria transmission through blood transfusion and its detection by serological method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the risk of transmission of malaria through blood transfusion, and compare efficacy of testing by immuno chromatographic (ICT) devices vis a vis peripheral blood film (PBF). Results: Amongst healthy blood donors we did not find even a single case of malaria and there was no report of persistent post transfusion pyrexia. We are unable to comment on species frequency in blood donors. However, amongst known patients of malaria we found a higher frequency of Plasmodium viax(P.v) as compared to Plasmodium falciparum(P.f). Testing by serological method, helped us to diagnose 5% of our patients who were missed by peripheral blood films. Conclusion: Between properly selected voluntary non-remunerated blood donors the incidence of malaria transmission is zero and the blood is safe for transfusion. Serological testing shows good correlation with peripheral blood film detection. In fact, it can detect the disease even when film detection has been unsuccessful. If proper donor selection criteria are observed there is little risk of transmitting malaria through transfusion. However, as the donor pool in the Service is not necessarily totally the of voluntary non-remunerated donors and substantive numbers of replacement/first time, occasionally uneducated/unaware donors, are being bled, screening for malaria will not be totally unrewarding. (author)

  6. Workers’ Risk Underestimation and Occupational Health and Safety Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Drakopoulos, Stavros A.; Theodossiou, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    The standard treatment of occupational risk in the labour market is conducted in terms of the theory of compensating wage differentials, the basic characteristic of which is that workers can fully estimate actual occupational risks. However, research in cognitive psychology, and recent advances in economic psychology, suggest that individuals consistently underestimate risks associated with accidents. In this paper, we discuss the case when the workers systematically underestimate job risks...

  7. Common basis of establishing safety standards and other safety decision-making levels for different sources of health risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current approaches in establishing safety standards and other decision-making levels for different sources of health risk are critically analysed. To have a common basis for this decision-making a specific risk index R is recommended. In the common sense R is quantitatively defined as LLE caused by the annual exposure to the risk source considered: R = annual exposure, damage (LLE) from the exposure unit. This common definition is also rewritten in specific forms for a set of different risk sources (ionising radiation, chemical pollutants, etc): for different risk sources the exposure can be measured with different quantities (the probability of death, the exposure dose, etc.). R is relative LLE: LLE in years referred to 1 year under the risk. The dimension of this value is [year/year]. In the statistical sense R is conditionally the share of the year, which is lost due to exposure to a risk source during this year. In this sense R can be called as the relative damage. Really lifetime years are lost after the exposure. R can be in some conditional sense considered as a dimensionless quantity. General safety standards Rn for the public and occupational workers have been suggested in terms of this index: Rn = 0.0007 and 0.01 accordingly. Secondary safety standards are derived for a number of risk sources (ionising radiation, environmental chemical pollutants, etc). Values of Rn are chosen in such a way that to have the secondary radiation BSS being equivalent to the current one's. Other general and derived levels for safety decision-making are also proposed including the de-minimus levels. Their possible dependence on the national or regional health-demographic data (HDD) is considered. Such issues as the ways of the integration and averaging of risk indices considered through the national or regional HDD for different risk sources and the use of non-threshold linear exposure - response relationships for ionising radiation and chemical pollutants are analysed

  8. Mitigating construction safety risks using prevention through design

    OpenAIRE

    Gangolells Solanellas, Marta; Casals Casanova, Miquel; Forcada Matheu, Núria; Roca Ramon, Xavier; Fuertes Casals, Alba

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Research and practice have demonstrated that decisions made prior to work at construction sites can influence construction worker safety. However, it has also been argued that most architects and design engineers possess neither the knowledge of construction safety nor the knowledge of construction processes necessary to effectively perform Construction Hazards Prevention through Design (CHPtD). Method: This paper introduces a quantitative methodology that supports d...

  9. Expert forecast on emerging biological risks related to occupational safety and health

    OpenAIRE

    Brun, Emmanuelle

    2007-01-01

    This report contains a forecast of emerging biological risks related to occupational safety and health (OSH) based on an expert survey and a literature review. The Agency also worked on forecasts and literature reviews on physical, chemical, and psychosocial risks in order to paint as full a picture as possible of the potential emerging risks in the world of work. These results are linked to other Risk Observatory work and aims to examine OSH trends in Europe and to anticipa...

  10. Identifying potential health and safety risks at the pre-construction stage

    OpenAIRE

    Gangolells Solanellas, Marta; Casals Casanova, Miquel; Forcada Matheu, Núria; Roca Ramon, Xavier; Fuertes Casals, Alba; Macarulla Martí, Marcel; Vilella, Quirze

    2010-01-01

    Previous researches have demonstrated that decisions made during the pre-construction stage have a big influence on the construction worker safety. This paper introduces a systematic approach for dealing with health and safety risks during the pre-construction stage. The developed methodology helps designers to calculate the safety-related performance of their residential construction designs, providing a consistent basis for comparisons between them. In order to avoid a typical shortcomin...

  11. Reducing risks and increasing safety in everyday life: the role of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: in social science risk research more attention has been paid to examining how people in general perceive risks than to how they perceive possible measures to reduce risks and to increase their own safety. The latter area is, however, becoming increasingly important to understand, particularly in the light of current emphasis on individual responsibility in risk prevention and emergency preparedness. For example, in Sweden a major effort to increase safety awareness among the general public and to increase knowledge and skills in a number of safety-related areas is at present being planned. This effort is being undertaken as a cooperative effort between different authorities and institutions and is coordinated by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency. The intentions behind this and similar programmes raise a number of questions concerning how people view risks and safety measures in their own immediate environment. Knowledge of the factors affecting willingness to take precautions is important in the design of communication and information. The factors which are of significance may be risk-related and concern perceptions of personal risk, but may also be related to attitudes an beliefs concerning different precautionary measures, to perception of social norms and conventions as well as to personal experiences and values. This paper presents some data concerning views and actions among lay groups in relation to reducing risks and increasing safety. Factors affecting these views are discussed in the light of previous research and of empirical data from some recent studies. (author)

  12. A framework of risk-informed seismic safety evaluation of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A framework of risk-informed seismic design and safety evaluation of nuclear power plants is under consideration in Japan so as to utilize the progress in the seismic probabilistic safety assessment methodology. Issues resolved to introduce this framework are discussed after the concept, evaluation process and characteristics of the framework are described. (author)

  13. Understanding the Health and Safety Risks for British Columbia’s Outbound Medical Tourists

    OpenAIRE

    Crooks, Valorie; Bristeir, J.; Turner, J; Snyder, J.; Casey, V.; Johnston, R.

    2011-01-01

    When patients choose to go abroad to privately purchase medical care they are engaging in ‘medical tourism’, which isthe most commonly used name for this practice. Several studies and reports suggest that there are a number of healthand safety risks to patients who choose to purchase private medical care abroad. Much of our existing knowledgeabout the health and safety risks of medical tourism for patients is, however, limited due to a lack of comprehensiveresearch and reporting. Acknowledgin...

  14. Colonising Safety : creating risk through the enforcement of biomedical constructions of safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadetz, P.

    2013-01-01

    In the normative health care discourse, safety is represented as a concept that is at once universal, irrefutable, and inherently beneficent. Yet, research at local levels in the Philippines challenges these assumptions embedded in the biomedical construction of safety. This article examines how the

  15. Health risk from radioactive and chemical environmental contamination: common basis for assessment and safety decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the growing practical need in risk analysis in Russia health risk assessment tools and regulations have been developed in the frame of few federal research programs. RRC Kurchatov Institute is involved in R and D on risk analysis activity in these programs. One of the objectives of this development is to produce a common, unified basis of health risk analysis for different sources of risk. Current specific and different approaches in risk assessment and establishing safety standards developed for chemicals and ionising radiation are analysed. Some recommendations are given to produce the common approach. A specific risk index R has been proposed for safety decision-making (establishing safety standards and other levels of protective actions, comparison of various sources of risk, etc.). The index R is defined as the partial mathematical expectation of lost years of healthy life (LLE) due to exposure during a year to a risk source considered. The more concrete determinations of this index for different risk sources derived from the common definition of R are given. Generic safety standards (GSS) for the public and occupational workers have been suggested in terms of this index. Secondary specific safety standards have been derived from GSS for ionizing radiation and a number of other risk sources including environmental chemical pollutants. Other general and derived levels for decision-making have also been proposed including the e-minimum level. Their possible dependence on the national or regional health-demographic data is shortly considered. Recommendations are given on methods and criteria for comparison of various sources of risk. Some examples of risk comparison are demonstrated in the frame of different comparison tasks. The paper has been prepared on the basis of the research work supported by International Science and Technology Centre, Moscow (project no. 2558). (author)

  16. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil K Vasan

    Full Text Available Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail.We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models.Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3,615 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 1,842 cases of vascular dementia, and 9,091 cases of unspecified dementia. Overall, our study showed no association between ABO blood group and risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia or unspecified dementia. This was also true when analyses were restricted to donors aged 70 years or older except for a slight, but significantly decreased risk of all dementia combined in subjects with blood group A (IRR, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.98, compared to those with blood group O.Our results provide no evidence that ABO blood group influences the risk of dementia.

  17. Blood Viscosity and Hematocrit as Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Tamariz, Leonardo J; Young, J. Hunter; Pankow, James S; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Astor, Brad; Frederick L. Brancati

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support the notion that elevated blood viscosity may predispose to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus by limiting delivery of glucose, insulin, and oxygen to metabolically active tissues. To test this hypothesis, the authors analyzed longitudinal data on 12,881 initially nondiabetic adults, aged 45–64 years, who were participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1987–1998). Whole blood viscosity was estimated by using a validated ...

  18. Impacts of soil and water pollution on food safety and health risks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonglong; Song, Shuai; Wang, Ruoshi; Liu, Zhaoyang; Meng, Jing; Sweetman, Andrew J; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C; Li, Hong; Luo, Wei; Wang, Tieyu

    2015-04-01

    Environmental pollution and food safety are two of the most important issues of our time. Soil and water pollution, in particular, have historically impacted on food safety which represents an important threat to human health. Nowhere has that situation been more complex and challenging than in China, where a combination of pollution and an increasing food safety risk have affected a large part of the population. Water scarcity, pesticide over-application, and chemical pollutants are considered to be the most important factors impacting on food safety in China. Inadequate quantity and quality of surface water resources in China have led to the long-term use of waste-water irrigation to fulfill the water requirements for agricultural production. In some regions this has caused serious agricultural land and food pollution, especially for heavy metals. It is important, therefore, that issues threatening food safety such as combined pesticide residues and heavy metal pollution are addressed to reduce risks to human health. The increasing negative effects on food safety from water and soil pollution have put more people at risk of carcinogenic diseases, potentially contributing to 'cancer villages' which appear to correlate strongly with the main food producing areas. Currently in China, food safety policies are not integrated with soil and water pollution management policies. Here, a comprehensive map of both soil and water pollution threats to food safety in China is presented and integrated policies addressing soil and water pollution for achieving food safety are suggested to provide a holistic approach. PMID:25603422

  19. Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, and risk of vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, N; Gao, P; Seshasai, S R Kondapally;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainties persist about the magnitude of associations of diabetes mellitus and fasting glucose concentration with risk of coronary heart disease and major stroke subtypes. We aimed to quantify these associations for a wide range of circumstances. METHODS: We undertook a meta...... markers. HRs for coronary heart disease were higher in women than in men, at 40-59 years than at 70 years and older, and with fatal than with non-fatal disease. At an adult population-wide prevalence of 10%, diabetes was estimated to account for 11% (10-12%) of vascular deaths. Fasting blood glucose......-analysis of individual records of diabetes, fasting blood glucose concentration, and other risk factors in people without initial vascular disease from studies in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration. We combined within-study regressions that were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure...

  20. Incidence and risk factors of occupational blood exposure: A nation-wide survey among Danish doctors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational blood exposures involves a risk of transmission of serious infections. We performed a nation-wide survey, to describe the incidence and risk factors of percutaneous (PCE) and mucocutaneous (MCE) blood exposures among hospital employed doctors in Denmark. Of 9,374 questionnaires, 6,256 (67%) were returned and 6,005 were eligible for analysis. The highest risk per person-risk-year (pry) was found in General surgery, Neurosurgery, Obstetrics-Gynaecology and Orthopaedic surgery (6.2--8.5 PCE/pry and 7.3--8.8 MCE/pry). The second risk group was Anaesthesiology and Oto-rhino-laryngology (2.6--3.1 PCE/pry and 6.0--6.9 MCE/pry). Finally Pathology, Internal medicine, Radiology and Paediatrics had a considerable risk (0.8--1.3 PCE/pry and 1.3--2.9 MCE/pry). Potential risk factors were examined by Poisson regression. Employment as senior as compared to junior doctor was associated with a higher risk of PCE (RR 2.2) and MCE (RR up to 2.7 depending on experience) among surgeons and an increased risk of PCE in anaesthetists (RR 1.7). In contrast, senior physicians in Internal medicine, Radiology and Paediatrics had a several fold lower risk of PCE (RR 0.6) and MCE (RR 0.6 in males, 0.3 in females). Only 35% adhered to the basic principles of universal precautions (UP) and non-compliance was associated with a considerably increased risk of both MCE and PCE, especially in non-surgical specialties. In conclusion, we found an unacceptably high incidence of occupational blood exposures among Danish doctors. Non-compliance with UP was associated with an increased risk of exposure and efforts to improve compliance with UP as well as implementation and evaluation of other preventive measures are needed

  1. Risk quantification in deterministic procedures: outage key safety functions evaluation using probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2007 a collaboration agreement between the Nuclear Industry and the Nuclear Engineering Research Group of the Technical University of Catalonia (NERG-UPC) began on the Risk-Informed Operation Decision Management field. A Manual has been created; it provides a guidance of the systematic of using Probabilistic Risk Assessment for the evaluation of guides or procedures which ensure the compliment of Outage Key Safety Functions (OKSF) in nuclear power plants. The evaluation base is probabilistic; the core damage frequencies (CDF) values determine the acceptance of the analyzed guides and encourage suggestions for improvements in the contained procedures. Acceptance criteria from Plants Supervision System are used throw out quantifications. The developed methodology pretends to evaluate the risk associated to the availability system configurations during the outage. The documents used in the development have been: PRA, OKSF procedure and Performance Technical Specifications (PTS) from a 3 loops Westinghouse PWR. As a pilot experience, the methodology has been applied to the 3. and 13. Operational Plant State (OPS), always within the operational mode 4. Some conclusions of the analysis: The analyzed procedure requires the operability of just one charge pump as boric acid supply source. PRA gives a CDF increase (ΔCDF) of 1,19.10-6 year-1 for the pump in standby, consequently, an exposure time T= 53,6 hours. Given an average time for the OPS of 40 hours, it is concluded the correct treatment of the procedure. However, it could be improved with the inclusion of an additional inventory replacement function. This would limit the charge pump unavailability. On the other hand, the availability of the external electrical sources is ratified. The procedure requires the operability of both supplies during the OPS. The unavailability of one of them (transformer fail) involves a ΔCDF equal to 1,64.10-5 year-1 and a T= 3,89 hours. Then, it is considered appropriate the treatment

  2. Blood pressure and 10-year mortality risk in the Milan Geriatrics 75+ Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogliari, Giulia; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Muller, Majon;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: optimal blood pressure targets in older adults are controversial. OBJECTIVE: to investigate whether the relation of blood pressure with mortality in older adults varies by age, functional and cognitive status. DESIGN: longitudinal geriatric outpatient cohort. SETTING: Milan Geriatrics...... 75+ Cohort Study. SUBJECTS: one thousand five hundred and eighty-seven outpatients aged 75 years and over. METHODS: the relations of systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with mortality risk were analysed using Cox proportional hazards models. Blood pressure, Mini-Mental State Examination...... correlations of SBP and DBP with mortality were U-shaped. Higher SBP is related to lower mortality in subjects with impaired ADL and MMSE. ADL and MMSE may identify older subjects who benefit from higher blood pressure....

  3. Risk of cancer after blood transfusion from donors with subclinical cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Reilly, Marie;

    2007-01-01

    transmission from blood donors to recipients through blood transfusion. METHODS: We did a register-based retrospective cohort study of cancer incidence among patients who received blood from donors deemed to have a subclinical cancer at the time of donation. These precancerous donors were diagnosed with a...... cancer within 5 years of the donation. Data from all computerised blood bank registers in Sweden and Denmark gathered between 1968 and 2002 were merged into a common database. Demographic and medical data, including mortality and cancer incidence, were ascertained through linkages with nationwide, and......BACKGROUND: Although mechanisms for detection of short-term complications after blood transfusions are well developed, complications with delayed onset, notably transmission of chronic diseases such as cancer, have been difficult to assess. Our aim was to investigate the possible risk of cancer...

  4. A Case Study of Measuring Process Risk for Early Insights into Software Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Lucas; Basili, Victor; Zelkowitz, Marvin V.; Fisher, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, we examine software safety risk in three flight hardware systems in NASA's Constellation spaceflight program. We applied our Technical and Process Risk Measurement (TPRM) methodology to the Constellation hazard analysis process to quantify the technical and process risks involving software safety in the early design phase of these projects. We analyzed 154 hazard reports and collected metrics to measure the prevalence of software in hazards and the specificity of descriptions of software causes of hazardous conditions. We found that 49-70% of 154 hazardous conditions could be caused by software or software was involved in the prevention of the hazardous condition. We also found that 12-17% of the 2013 hazard causes involved software, and that 23-29% of all causes had a software control. The application of the TPRM methodology identified process risks in the application of the hazard analysis process itself that may lead to software safety risk.

  5. Archer Fire and Safety - reducing risk in the offshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, K.

    2000-06-01

    Protecting the lives and safety of offshore oil and gas workers is the business of Newfoundland-based Archer Fire and Safety. Originally established as a supplier of industrial materials focusing on the oil and gas industry, the company narrowed its focus in 1996 to fire and safety protection, introduced more specialized fire and safety equipment, and began to explore service opportunities to the industry in addition to the usual consumables. After some anxious few years, the company now operates two SCBA service centres in Newfoundland, in addition to sales and servicing a wide range of fire and safety equipment such as gas, flame and heat detection.The company is constantly on the lookout for new opportunities and has developed a computer-based pricing system which enables them to provide quick response to pricing inquiries, a big advantage in an industry with relatively unsophisticated business practices. The company's emphasis on research and quick response capability enabled the company to anticipate future requirements and to land major contracts first at Bull Arm, and later on the Terra Nova Project. Its reputation for best-in-class products, high quality service and a business-like approach helped to attract other clients such as Terra Nova Alliance, Canship and Schlumberger, and offshore drilling companies like Glomar International and TransOcean Sedco-Forex, with further opportunities in the offing with upcoming projects such as the White Rose and Hebron.Today about 60 per cent of the business is offshore related.

  6. The Concepts of Risk, Safety, and Security: Applications in Everyday Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boholm, Max; Möller, Niklas; Hansson, Sven Ove

    2016-02-01

    The concepts of risk, safety, and security have received substantial academic interest. Several assumptions exist about their nature and relation. Besides academic use, the words risk, safety, and security are frequent in ordinary language, for example, in media reporting. In this article, we analyze the concepts of risk, safety, and security, and their relation, based on empirical observation of their actual everyday use. The "behavioral profiles" of the nouns risk, safety, and security and the adjectives risky, safe, and secure are coded and compared regarding lexical and grammatical contexts. The main findings are: (1) the three nouns risk, safety, and security, and the two adjectives safe and secure, have widespread use in different senses, which will make any attempt to define them in a single unified manner extremely difficult; (2) the relationship between the central risk terms is complex and only partially confirms the distinctions commonly made between the terms in specialized terminology; (3) whereas most attempts to define risk in specialized terminology have taken the term to have a quantitative meaning, nonquantitative meanings dominate in everyday language, and numerical meanings are rare; and (4) the three adjectives safe, secure, and risky are frequently used in comparative form. This speaks against interpretations that would take them as absolute, all-or-nothing concepts. PMID:26283018

  7. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  8. The Application of Big data Mining in Risk Warning for Food Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yajie; WANG; Bing; YANG; Yan; LUO; Jinlin; HE; Hong; TAN

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive evaluation and warning is very important and difficult in food safety. This paper mainly focuses on introducing the application of using big data mining in food safety warning field. At first,we introduce the concept of big data miming and three big data methods. At the same time,we discuss the application of the three big data miming methods in food safety areas. Then we compare these big data miming methods,and propose how to apply Back Propagation Neural Network in food safety risk warning.

  9. Economic aspects of the NPP safety. Risk insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach to evaluation of technical-economical indices of the AS and TES competing projects, accounting for expenditures on the electrical energy and heat production (insurance fees) and damages liquidation from possible accidents, the scale whereof depends on the induces of the AS and TES safety, is proposed

  10. Risk Management: the Economics and Mor ality of Safety Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John

    The introduction to the proceedings of the Royal Academy of Engineering 2006 seminar on The Economics and Morality of Safety (RAEng 2006) concluded with a list of issues that were ‘worthy of further exploration’. I have reduced them to the following questions: Why do moral arguments about ‘rights’ persist unresolved?

  11. Food safety risks and consumers' demand for credence characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Latvala, Terhi

    2007-01-01

    59 % of consumers are willing to pay more to get information about safety and quality of beef products. Within this group the mean WTP was 2,20 €. Consumers need for additional information: 1. The control of food of animal origin. 2. GMO in animals. 3. Country of origin. 4. Use of hormones.

  12. Strengthening of the Blood Safety System in the National Blood Transfusion Service - Implementation of the European Union IPA Project - at the Institute for Transfusion Medicine of the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada M. Grubovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Safety of the Blood Supply in any country is of utmost importance to safeguard patients from serious adverse events of blood transfusion. Implementation of a Quality System in the Blood Transfusion Service, with support of Government and Ministry of Health is a key element to guarantee safe blood. The IPA TAIB 2009 project - Strengthening of the Blood Safety System executed in 2013/14 provided the means to start implementing a Quality System in the Institute for Transfusion Medicine of the Republic of Macedonia. This project aimed to ultimately bring the Blood Transfusion Service to European Union standards, allowing the exchange of blood components and all other types of collaboration with other European Union countries in future. The project put the basis for unification of blood transfusion standards and operating procedures in the whole country as well as set up essential education of blood transfusion personnel.

  13. L-Band Digital Aeronautical Communications System Engineering - Initial Safety and Security Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed L-band (960 to 1164 MHz) terrestrial en route communications system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents a preliminary safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the L-band communication system after the technology is chosen and system rollout timing is determined. The security risk analysis resulted in identifying main security threats to the proposed system as well as noting additional threats recommended for a future security analysis conducted at a later stage in the system development process. The document discusses various security controls, including those suggested in the COCR Version 2.0.

  14. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  15. Listening to Excluded Young People's Experiences of e-Safety and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on excluded young people's experiences with and management of e-safety and risk. It has importance in exploring these concerns given that excluded young people's voices are very often absent in education and technology research and yet they are potentially more at risk when using Information and Communication…

  16. Blood glucose may be an alternative to cholesterol in CVD risk prediction charts

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Julia; Bopp, Matthias; Faeh, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Established risk models for the prediction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) include blood pressure, smoking and cholesterol parameters. The use of total cholesterol for CVD risk prediction has been questioned, particularly for primary prevention. We evaluated whether glucose could be used instead of total cholesterol for prediction of fatal CVD using data with long follow-up. Methods We followed-up 6,095 men and women aged ≥16 years who participated 1977-79 in a community based heal...

  17. Demonstration of Risk Profiling for promoting safety in SME´s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kirsten; Duijm, Nijs Jan; Troen, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the risks and potential risks that may lead to accidents. It aims to look at how to improve risk assessment within SMEs for the benefit of all staff. Design/methodology/approach – The research included results from a Dutch project which...... identifies accident risks and safety barriers that are presented in a huge database and risk calculator. The method was first to develop a simple way of accessing this enormous amount of data, second, to develop a tool to observe risks and safety barriers in SMEs and to investigate the usefulness of the...... developed tools in real life, third, to collect data on risks and safety barriers in SMEs for two occupations by following 20 people for three days each and to create a risk profile for each occupations. Findings – The result is a simple way to go through all types of risks for accidents – a tool for risk...

  18. Risk and safety evaluation in radioactive waste transport in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti there were performed qualification tests for packages designed for transport and storage of low activity radwaste. Risk assessment activities aiming the evaluation of risk categories that may arise either during accident free transport or during accident conditions of waste transportation to the disposal center, in Romania, have been approached. The accident rates calculation, the distribution within accident scenarios and overall effective collective dose (man. Sv/year), for routine road transportation and the accidental Risk (ma.Sv/Year) were determined. (author)

  19. Development of reliability and probabilistic safety assessment program RiskA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • There are four parts in the structure of RiskA. User input part lets users input the PSA model and some necessary data by GUI or model transformation tool. In calculation engine part, fault tree analysis, event tree analysis, uncertainty analysis, sensitivity analysis, importance analysis and failure mode and effects analysis are supplied. User output part outputs the analysis results, user customized reports and some other data. The last part includes reliability database, some other common tools and help documents. • RiskA has several advanced features. Extensible framework makes it easy to add any new functions, making RiskA to be a large platform of reliability and probabilistic safety assessment. It is very fast to analysis fault tree in RiskA because many advanced algorithm improvement were made. Many model formats can be imported and exported, which made the PSA model in the commercial software can be easily transformed to adapt RiskA platform. Web-based co-modeling let several users in different places work together whenever they are online. • The comparison between RiskA and other mature PSA codes (e.g. CAFTA, RiskSpectrum, XFTA) has demonstrated that the calculation and analysis of RiskA is correct and efficient. Based on the development of this code package, many applications of safety and reliability analysis of some research reactors and nuclear power plants were performed. The development of RiskA appears to be of realistic and potential value for academic research and practical operation safety management of nuclear power plants in China and abroad. - Abstract: PSA (probabilistic safety assessment) software, the indispensable tool in nuclear safety assessment, has been widely used. An integrated reliability and PSA program named RiskA has been developed by FDS Team. RiskA supplies several standard PSA modules including fault tree analysis, event tree analysis, uncertainty analysis, failure mode and effect analysis and reliability

  20. Safety impact--the risk/benefits of functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Gérard

    2009-12-01

    It is amazing to see how much the approach of the food risk analysis evolved in the recent years. For half a century and the birth of the risk assessment methodology in the food domain, only no appreciable health risk was considered acceptable by the manager. This is the vocabulary used in the case of a voluntary, deliberated human action, as the use of food additives (definition of ADI). In the case of risks not resulting from such an action, as that of the presence of contaminants, the risk assessor allocates provisional tolerable daily, weekly or monthly intake that are the basis for regulation. This vocabulary is in agreement with the objective which consists in approaching closer possible of the zero risk which is the wish of a majority of the consumers. Some years ago, the risk managers insisted to obtain from the assessors as often as possible a quantitative risk evaluation. More recently even, the managers would like to decide on the basis of a balance of risk and benefit acceptable for management purposes. Finally, they hope that general principles and tools will be available for conducting a quantitative risk-benefit analysis for foods and food ingredients. What is possible in the case of functional foods (FF)? Based on the definition of FF proposed in the programme FUFOSE, one has to distinguish between different situations in order to assess the risk: that of a micro-, that of a macro-component or that of a whole food. These situations have been clearly described in the document resulting from FOSIE. The standardized methodology relevant to assess micro-components is not well adapted to the assessment of whole food. Concepts of substantial equivalence and of history of safe use could be useful tools in this case. However, quantitative risk assessment remains a very difficult exercise. If a process for the assessment of health benefit of FF has been proposed as an outcome of the PASSCLAIM action, the quantification of this benefit needs adequate tools

  1. Changes in risk factors of HBsAg positive blood donors in Zahedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Alavi-Naini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis B viral infection is a great global problem. According to high prevalence of infection in some parts of Iran, identifying etiologies and risk factors of the disease is an important issue in controlling infection in the community. The objective of this study is to compare the risk factors of HBsAg positive blood donors during a 10 year-period time-course.Materials and Method: We conducted a retrospective study in 1200 HBsAg positive blood donors referring to blood bank center in Zahedan during the years 1378, 1383 and 1387. Demographic variables and several risk factors were evaluated and compared during those years.Results: Our findings revealed significant statistical changes in age and education. Age was decreased and the disease was increased in illiterate cases during the study years. Risk factors that showed significant increasing changes during that time-period were history of dental procedures, surgery, hospitalization, endoscopy, positive family history for HBsAg, addiction to non-injectable drugs, living with positive HBsAg partners and intra-venous drug users. Conclusion: Decreasing the mean age of the patients during those years reflects increasing high risk behaviors among young people. Neonatal and family vaccination and screening family members, especially mothers could prevent this devastating disease. Following hygienic rules in the hospital is another important preventive measure. Premarital screening especially in high risk individuals is an effective preventive way to decrease the disease in the society.

  2. An Online Risk Monitor System (ORMS) to Increase Safety and Security Levels in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main idea of this research is to develop an Online Risk Monitor System (ORMS) based on Living Probabilistic Safety Assessment (LPSA). The article highlights the essential features and functions of ORMS. The basic models and modules such as, Reliability Data Update Model (RDUM), running time update, redundant system unavailability update, Engineered Safety Features (ESF) unavailability update and general system update have been described in this study. ORMS not only provides quantitative analysis but also highlights qualitative aspects of risk measures. ORMS is capable of automatically updating the online risk models and reliability parameters of equipment. ORMS can support in the decision making process of operators and managers in Nuclear Power Plants

  3. Food Safety Management in a Global Environment: The Role of Risk Assessment Models

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes-Pila, Joaquin; Jimeno, Vicente; Manzano, Amparo; Rodriguez Monroy, Carlos; Mar Fernandez, Maria Del

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative risk assessment models are playing a minor role in the development of the new EU legal framework for food safety. There is a tendency of the EU institutions to apply the precautionary principle versus the predisposition of the USA institutions to rely on risk analysis. This paper provides a comparison of the role played by quantitative risk assessment models in the development of new policies on food safety in the EU and in the USA, focusing on a study case: the supply chain of s...

  4. Questionnaire-Related Deferrals in Regular Blood Donors in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Håkon Reikvam; Kjersti Svendheim; Anne S. Røsvik; Tor Hervig

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary donation is a key issue in transfusion medicine. To ensure the safety of blood transfusions, careful donor selection is important. Although new approaches to blood safety have dramatically reduced the risks for infectious contamination of blood components, the quality and the availability of blood components depend on the willingness to donate and the reliability of the information given by the donors about their own health, including risk behavior. As donors who are deferred by the...

  5. Risks worth Taking: Safety Agreements among Discordant Gay Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Beougher, Sean C.; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Garcia, Carla C.; Darbes, Lynae A.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Hoff, Colleen C.

    2012-01-01

    As HIV research and prevention efforts increasingly target gay men in relationships, situational factors such as couple serostatus and agreements about sex become central to examinations of risk. Discordant gay couples are of particular interest because the risk of HIV infection is seemingly near-at-hand. Yet little is known about their sexual behaviors, agreements about sex, and safer sex efforts. The present study utilized longitudinal semi-structured, qualitative interviews to explore thes...

  6. Analysis of Transmission Model of Consumers’ Risk Perception of Food Safety based on Case Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ma

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, food safety incidents frequently occurred in China, the people paid more and more attention on the importance of food safety and brought out higher and higher demands on the quality of food. Especially, after the incidents came to light, consumers became be increasingly wary of the market, the government increasingly lacked credibility in the minds of consumers. The consumers’ perceived risks continue to pass down which slowly expands the perceived risks groups. The study proposes the transmission path of risks perception and taking “Sanlu milk powder”, “Nongfushangquan” and “Jinhao tea” for examples, analyzes the tripartite behaviors of the corporate, the government and the consumer in the three events and sums up the transmission path of consumers’ risk perception of food safety incident.

  7. Incorporation of formal safety assessment and Bayesian network in navigational risk estimation of the Yangtze River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formal safety assessment (FSA), as a structured and systematic risk evaluation methodology, has been increasingly and broadly used in the shipping industry around the world. Concerns have been raised as to navigational safety of the Yangtze River, China's largest and the world's busiest inland waterway. Over the last few decades, the throughput of ships in the Yangtze River has increased rapidly due to the national development of the Middle and Western parts of China. Accidents such as collisions, groundings, contacts, oil-spills and fires occur repeatedly, often causing serious consequences. In order to improve the navigational safety in the Yangtze River, this paper estimates the navigational risk of the Yangtze River using the FSA concept and a Bayesian network (BN) technique. The navigational risk model is established by considering both probability and consequences of accidents with respect to a risk matrix method, followed by a scenario analysis to demonstrate the application of the proposed model

  8. Global DNA hypomethylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a biomarker of cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global DNA hypomethylation is an early molecular event in carcinogenesis. Whether methylation measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) DNA is a clinically reliable biomarker for early detection or cancer risk assessment is to be established. From an original sample-set of 753 male and...

  9. Risk factors for the presence of non-rhesus D red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Koelewijn; T.G.M. Vrijkotte; M. de Haas; C.E. van der Schoot; G.J. Bonsel

    2009-01-01

    To identify risk factors for the presence of non-rhesus D (RhD) red blood cell (RBC) antibodies in pregnancy. To generate evidence for subgroup RBC antibody screening and for primary prevention by extended matching of transfusions in women < 45 years. Case-control study. Nationwide evaluation of scr

  10. Awareness and Knowledge of Cardiovascular Risk through Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Testing in College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, J. A.; Panza, G.; Zaleski, A.; Taylor, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, yet knowledge of CVD risk factors is surprisingly low in college students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an individualized blood pressure, cholesterol, and CVD education intervention on college freshmen. Methods:…

  11. Integrated Safety Mechanisms Based on Security Risks Minimization for the Distributed Computer Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vadym Mukhin; Artem Volokyta

    2013-01-01

    Today, there are known the basic principles of decision-making on the safety control of distributed computer systems in the face of uncertainty and risk. However, in this area there are no practical methods for the quantitative risk analysis and assessment, taking into account the dynamic changes of security threats, which is typical for distributed computer systems.In this paper is suggested an approach to assesment and minimization of the security risks, which allows to reduce the potentia...

  12. Expert forecast on emerging psychosocial risks related to occupational safety and health

    OpenAIRE

    Milczarek, M.; Brun, E; Houtman, I.; Goudswaard, A.; Evers, M.; Bovenkamp, M. van de; Roskams, N.; Op de Beeck, R.; Pahkin, K.; Berthet, M.; Morvan, E.; Kuhn, K.; Kaluza, K; Hupke, M.; Hauke, A.

    2007-01-01

    This report is in cooperation with TNO Work and Employment and the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work. The expert forecast on emerging psychosocial risks was carried out by means of the Delphi method. The main emerging psychosocial risks revealed were related to new forms of employment contracts and job insecurity, the OSH risks for the ageing workforce, work intensification - high workload and work pressure, high emotional demands at work - including violence and bullying, and poo...

  13. Safety at the Margins: A Rhetorical Analysis of Occupational Risk Communication in Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Patriarca, Ashley S

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on occupational risk communication created by grantees of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration\\'s Susan Harwood Training Grant (SHTG) Program. Although the SHTG program is aimed at workers in most high-hazard industries, I focus on occupational risk communication developed for residential construction workers, who remain the most at-risk for on-the-job injuries and fatalities. In 2011 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), 721 constru...

  14. Safety of Lithium Ion Batteries: Can there Be Zero Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Fontecave, Marc; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical storage of energy is one of the great challenges of the twenty-first century, both for the exploitation of renewable energies and for the development of electric vehicles. While batteries, especially ones based on lithium (Li) ions, are highly sought after for applications requiring large quantities of energy, their cost still needs to be reduced and their user-safety improved. The Electrochemical Energy Storage Network (RS2E) organized a day of debates on these themes, en...

  15. Safety role of inservice inspection for LMFBR's: a risk perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of safety-related inservice inspection (ISI) at nuclear power plants is first reviewed and several key trade-offs involved with selecting an optimum ISI program are identified. A specialized reliability model developed to assist in making these trade-offs is presented, and the effectiveness of one type of ISI (namely, periodic inspection of passive mechanical components in large LMFBR's) is discussed in terms of this model. 5 refs

  16. Risk Factors for Bartonella species Infection in Blood Donors from Southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Pedro Paulo Vissotto de Paiva; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Barjas-Castro, Maria Lourdes; Sowy, Stanley; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria from the genus Bartonella are emerging blood-borne bacteria, capable of causing long-lasting infection in marine and terrestrial mammals, including humans. Bartonella are generally well adapted to their main host, causing persistent infection without clinical manifestation. However, these organisms may cause severe disease in natural or accidental hosts. In humans, Bartonella species have been detected from sick patients presented with diverse disease manifestations, including cat scratch disease, trench fever, bacillary angiomatosis, endocarditis, polyarthritis, or granulomatous inflammatory disease. However, with the advances in diagnostic methods, subclinical bloodstream infection in humans has been reported, with the potential for transmission through blood transfusion been recently investigated by our group. The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with Bartonella species infection in asymptomatic blood donors presented at a major blood bank in Southeastern Brazil. Five hundred blood donors were randomly enrolled and tested for Bartonella species infection by specialized blood cultured coupled with high-sensitive PCR assays. Epidemiological questionnaires were designed to cover major potential risk factors, such as age, gender, ethnicity, contact with companion animals, livestock, or wild animals, bites from insects or animal, economical status, among other factors. Based on multivariate logistic regression, bloodstream infection with B. henselae or B. clarridgeiae was associated with cat contact (adjusted OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.1-9.6) or history of tick bite (adjusted OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.3-13.4). These risk factors should be considered during donor screening, as bacteremia by these Bartonella species may not be detected by traditional laboratory screening methods, and it may be transmitted by blood transfusion. PMID:26999057

  17. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasan, Senthil K; Rostgaard, Klaus; Ullum, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined...... the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail. METHODS: We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient...... and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3...

  18. Patient safety in the operating room: an intervention study on latent risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Beuzekom Martie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is one of the greatest challenges in healthcare. In the operating room errors are frequent and often consequential. This article describes an approach to a successful implementation of a patient safety program in the operating room, focussing on latent risk factors that influence patient safety. We performed an intervention to improve these latent risk factors (LRFs and increase awareness of patient safety issues amongst OR staff. Methods Latent risk factors were studied using a validated questionnaire applied to the OR staff before and after an intervention. A pre-test/post-test control group design with repeated measures was used to evaluate the effects of the interventions. The staff from one operating room of an university hospital acted as the intervention group. Controls consisted of the staff of the operating room in another university hospital. The outcomes were the changes in LRF scores, perceived incident rate, and changes in incident reports between pre- and post-intervention. Results Based on pre-test scores and participants’ key concerns about organizational factors affecting patient safety in their department the intervention focused on the following LRFs: Material Resources, Training and Staffing Recourses. After the intervention, the intervention operating room - compared to the control operating room - reported significantly fewer problems on Material Resources and Staffing Resources and a significantly lower score on perceived incident rate. The contribution of technical factors to incident causation decreased significantly in the intervention group after the intervention. Conclusion The change of state of latent risk factors can be measured using a patient safety questionnaire aimed at these factors. The change of the relevant risk factors (Material and Staffing resources concurred with a decrease in perceived and reported incident rates in the relevant categories. We conclude that

  19. Risk informed safety margins characterization via failure domain quantification. Loss of main feed water example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In theory regulatory bodies of almost all countries leave a possibility for risk informed safety justification. By risk informed safety analysis we assume a combination of probabilistic (e.g. Best estimate plus uncertainties) and deterministic (thermo-hydraulic, mechanical, neutronic or multiphysics) analysis. In practice risk informed approaches may be difficult to defend: it is difficult to justify the robustness of the results with respect to probabilistic assumptions and it is difficult to justify and visualize available margins. Natural solution to this two problems would be an intensive parametric deterministic study, which does not depend on the probabilistic assumptions (e.g. choice of distributions for particular parameters). Unfortunately this approach involves prohibitively expensive calculations. In this paper we present a safety margins framework based on failure domain quantification for operator actions (to avoid probabilistic modeling of operator actions) for the loss of main feed and auxiliary feed water event for a PWR plant. We compare performance of different sampling strategies (Parametric Study, One dimensional Efficient Global Optimization, Inverted Kriging - a stepwise uncertainty reduction method). This failure domain will be used in Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization: combination of PRA model (probability values for discreet system configuration, Monte-Carlo sampling for parameters those distribution can be estimated from operating feedback (thus can be considered as well known) and parametric damage domain study for operator actions (to avoid probabilistic modeling of operator actions). Our approach can help to visualized safety margins, it also provides balanced information for risk informed decision making. (author)

  20. Safety Planning Intervention: A Brief Intervention to Mitigate Suicide Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    The usual care for suicidal patients who are seen in the emergency department (ED) and other emergency settings is to assess level of risk and refer to the appropriate level of care. Brief psychosocial interventions such as those administered to promote lower alcohol intake or to reduce domestic violence in the ED are not typically employed for…

  1. Use of sanitizing products: safety practices and risk situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Aurélia Rocha da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the handling and risk factors for poisoning and/or digestive tract injuries associated with the use of sanitizing products at home. METHODS: interviews were conducted in 419 households from different regions, collecting epidemiological data from residents and risk habits related to the use and storage of cleaning products. RESULTS: sanitizing products considered to be a health risk were found in 98% of the households where the research was conducted, and in 54% of cases, they were stored in places easily accessible to children. Lye was found in 19%, followed by illicit products in 39% of homes. In 13% of households, people produced soap, and in 12% they stored products in non-original containers. The use of illicit products and the manufacture of handmade soap were associated with lower educational level of the household owners and with the regions and socioeconomic classes with lower purchasing power. CONCLUSIONS: risk practices such as inadequate storage, manufacturing, and use of sanitizing products by the population evidence the need for public health policies, including educational measures, as a means of preventing accidents.

  2. Use of quantitative risk and probabilistic safety criteria in the conceptual design of a large pool-type LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes how quantitative risk and probabilistic safety criteria have been used to supplement licensing regulations to guide the safety-related design of a large (1000 MWe) pool-type LMFBR

  3. Operation safety risk analysis method of hydropower project considering time-dependent effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Sherong; Yan Lei

    2012-01-01

    In order to consider the time-dependent characteristic of risk factors of hydropower project, the method of stochastic process simulating structure resistance and load effect is adopted. On the basis of analyzing the structure characteristics and mode of operation, the operation safety risk rate assessment model of hydropower project is established on the comprehensive application of the improved analytic hierarchy process, the time-dependent reliability theory and the risk rate threshold. A scheme to demonstrate the time-dependent risk rate assessment method for an example of the earth-rock dam is particularly implemented by the proposed approach. The example shows that operation safety risk rate is closely related to both the service period and design standard ; considering the effect of time-dependent, the risk rate increases with time and the intersection of them reflects the technical service life of structures. It could provide scientific basis for the operation safety and risk decision of the hydropower project by predicting the trend of risk rate via this model.

  4. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  5. Thermonuclear generation program: risks and safety; Programa de geracao termonuclear: seus riscos e segurancas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goes, Alexandre Gromann de Araujo

    1999-07-01

    This work deals with the fundamental concepts of risk and safety related to nuclear power generation. In the first chapter, a general evaluation of the various systems for energy generation and their environmental impacts is made. Some definitions for safety and risk are suggested, based on the already existing regulatory processes and also on the current tendencies of risk management. Aspects regarding the safety culture are commented. The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES), a coherent and clear mechanism of communication between nuclear specialists and the general public, is analyzed. The second chapter examines the thermonuclear generation program in Brazil and the role of the National Nuclear Energy Commission. The third chapter presents national and international scenarios in terms of safety and risks, available policies and the main obstacles for future development of nuclear energy and nuclear engineering, and strategies are proposed. In the last chapter, comments about possible trends and recommendations related to practical risk management procedures, taking into account rational criteria for resources distribution and risk reduction are made, envisaging a closer integration between nuclear specialists and the society as a whole, thus decreasing the conflicts in a democratic decision-making process.

  6. Use of quantitative safety goals and probabilistic risk assessment in regulatory decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The establishment of quantitative safety goals as an expression of acceptable risk level and the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) as a means of estimating level of risk are gaining increased acceptance as a means of rationally improving the regulatory decision-making process. In the USA, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the nuclear industry have made significant advances in attempting to apply these tools in practice. This paper presents a review of US nuclear industry proposals for the establishment and use of quantitative safety goals and PRA. The structure and rationale for a set of quantitative safety goals which address (1) individual risk, (2) population risk, (3) cost/benefit criteria for risk reduction, and (4) core melt frequency are presented. In concert with this, a process is described for applying these quantitative safety goals and utilizing PRA studies in determining whether existing regulations and plant designs are adequate for controlling the introduction of new requirements into the regulations for plant-specific backfitting. Suggestions are provided regarding the use of these techniques by developing countries in establishing their regulatory policies and requirements. (author)

  7. The use of a basic safety investment model in a practical risk management context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aven, Terje, E-mail: terje.aven@uis.no [University of Stavanger (Norway); Hiriart, Yolande [University of Franche-Comte, Besancon (France)

    2011-11-15

    We consider a basic model in economic safety analysis: a firm is willing to invest an amount x in safety measures to avoid an accident A, which in the case of occurrence, leads to a loss of size L. The probability of an accident is a function of x. The optimal value of x is determined by minimizing the expected costs. In the paper, we re-examine this model by adopting a practical risk/safety management perspective. We question how this model can be used for guiding the firm and regulators in determining the proper level of investment in safety. Attention is given to issues like how to determine the probability of an accident and how to take into account uncertainties that extend beyond the expected value. It is concluded that the model, with suitable extensions and if properly implemented, provides a valuable decision support tool. By focusing on investment levels and stimulating thereby the generation of alternative risk-reducing measures, the model is considered particularly useful in risk reduction (ALARP) processes. - Highlights: > It is shown how to use a basic investment model in a practical risk management setting. > The model may be a valuable decision support tool if properly implemented. > It guides decision makers on risk reduction and how to determine what is ALARP. > The model stimulates the generation of alternative risk-reducing measures.

  8. Increase plant safety and reduce cost by implementing risk-informed in-service inspection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea behind the program is that it is possible to 'inspect less, but inspect better'. In other words, the risk-informed In-Service Inspection (ISI) process is used to improve the effectiveness of examination of piping components, i.e. concentrate inspection resources and enhance inspection strategies on high safety significant locations, and reduce inspection requirements on others. The Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) risk-informed ISI process has already been applied for full scope (Millstone 3, Surry 1) and limited scope (Beznau, Ringhals 4, Asco, Turkey Point 3). By examining the high safety significant piping segments for the different fluid piping systems, the total piping core damage frequency is reduced. In addition, more than 80% of the risk associated with potential pressure boundary failures is addressed with the WOG risk-informed ISI process, while typically less that 50% of this same risk is addressed by the current inspection programs. The risk-informed ISI processes are used to improve the effectiveness of inspecting safety-significant piping components, to reduce inspection requirements on other piping components, to evaluate improvements to plant availability and enhanced safety measures, including reduction of personnel radiation exposure, and to reduce overall Operation and Maintenance (O and M) costs while maintaining regulatory compliance. A description of the process as well as benefits from past projects is presented, since the methodology is applicable for WWER plant design. (author)

  9. Increase plant safety and reduce cost by implementing risk-informed In-Service Inspection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea behind the program is that it is possible to 'inspect less, but inspect better'. In other words, the risk-informed In-Service Inspection (ISI) process is used to improve the effectiveness of examination of piping components, i.e. concentrate inspection resources and enhance inspection strategies on high safety significant locations, and reduce inspection requirements on others. The Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) risk-informed ISI process has already been applied for full scope (Millstone 3, Surry 1) and limited scope (Beznau, Ringhals 4, Asco, Turkey Point 3). By examining the high safety significant piping segments for the different fluid piping systems, the total piping core damage frequency is reduced. In addition, more than 80% of the risk associated with potential pressure boundary failures is addressed with the WOG risk-informed ISI process, while typically less than 50% of this same risk is addressed by the current inspection programs. The risk-informed ISI processes are used: to improve the effectiveness of inspecting safety-significant piping components; to reduce inspection requirements on other piping components; to evaluate improvements to plant availability and enhanced safety measures, including reduction of personnel radiation exposure; and to reduce overall Operation and Maintenance (O and M) costs while maintaining regulatory compliance. A description of the process as well as benefits of past projects is presented, since the methodology is applicable for VVER plant design. (author)

  10. The use of a basic safety investment model in a practical risk management context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a basic model in economic safety analysis: a firm is willing to invest an amount x in safety measures to avoid an accident A, which in the case of occurrence, leads to a loss of size L. The probability of an accident is a function of x. The optimal value of x is determined by minimizing the expected costs. In the paper, we re-examine this model by adopting a practical risk/safety management perspective. We question how this model can be used for guiding the firm and regulators in determining the proper level of investment in safety. Attention is given to issues like how to determine the probability of an accident and how to take into account uncertainties that extend beyond the expected value. It is concluded that the model, with suitable extensions and if properly implemented, provides a valuable decision support tool. By focusing on investment levels and stimulating thereby the generation of alternative risk-reducing measures, the model is considered particularly useful in risk reduction (ALARP) processes. - Highlights: → It is shown how to use a basic investment model in a practical risk management setting. → The model may be a valuable decision support tool if properly implemented. → It guides decision makers on risk reduction and how to determine what is ALARP. → The model stimulates the generation of alternative risk-reducing measures.

  11. Safety Margins for Systematic Biometric and Financial Risk in a Semi-Markov Life Insurance Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Niemeyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Insurance companies use conservative first order valuation bases to calculate insurance premiums and reserves. These valuation bases have a significant impact on the insurer’s solvency and on the premiums of the insurance products. Safety margins for systematic biometric and financial risk are in practice typically chosen as time-constant percentages on top of the best estimate transition intensities. We develop a risk-oriented method for the allocation of a total safety margin to the single safety margins at each point in time and each state. In a case study, we demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method in different frameworks. The results show that the traditional method yields an unwanted variability of the safety level with respect to time, whereas the variability can be significantly reduced by the new method. Furthermore, the case study supports the German 60 percent rule for the technical interest rate.

  12. Blood plasma fractionaing and the safety against viruses; Kessho bunkaku to uirusu anzensei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomono, T.

    1997-05-05

    This paper describes the outline of a typical method of fractionating blood plasma for blood plasma fractional products, and introduces various kinds of operation contributing to the study of measures against viruses. The main fractional products include human blood serum albumin (Alb), human immunoglobulin (IgG) and a blood coagulation factor products. Although blood plasma can be used for the first two product, fresh freezed blood plasma is needed for the coagulation factor products. The blood plasma fractionating methods include methods utilizing the solubility difference of protein, methods, such as chromatography in which the interaction between blood plasma and protein is utilized, and methods utilizing a physical field. The virus inactivation methods include heat treatment methods, treatment methods using an organic solvent and a surfactant, and photochemical inactivation methods, by ultraviolet ray irradiation. The virus removing methods include the Cone fractionating method, methods of removing viruses by chromatography, and membrane filtration removing methods. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. A prospective analysis of blood donation history and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazusa; Birmann, Brenda M; Zhang, Xuehong; Giovannucci, Edward; Bertrand, Kimberly A

    2016-06-01

    Blood donation may influence subsequent NHL development via temporary immune system alterations. To test the hypothesis that frequent blood donation is associated with an increased risk of NHL and its most common histologic subtypes, this study followed 36 576 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), who provided information on frequency of blood donation in the past 30 years in 1992. This study confirmed 544 incident cases of NHL through 2010. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazards ratios (HR) and 95% CI for the risk of all NHL and major NHL histologic subtypes associated with number of blood donations. In this prospective study, there was no significant evidence of an association between blood donation frequency and incidence of NHL (age-adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.94-1.68, comparing > 20 donations vs 0 donations over 30 years, p for trend = 0.18) or of any major NHL subtypes. PMID:26373836

  14. Long telomeres in blood leukocytes are associated with a high risk of ascending aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija J Huusko

    Full Text Available Ascending aortic aneurysm is a connective tissue disorder. Even though multiple novel gene mutations have been identified, risk profiling and diagnosis before rupture still represent a challenge. There are studies demonstrating shorter telomere lengths in the blood leukocytes of abdominal aortic aneurysm patients. The aim of this study was to measure whether relative telomere lengths are changed in the blood leukocytes of ascending aortic aneurysm patients. We also studied the expression of telomerase in aortic tissue samples of ascending aortic aneurysms. Relative lengths of leukocyte telomeres were determined from blood samples of patients with ascending aortic aneurysms and compared with healthy controls. Telomerase expression, both at the level of mRNA and protein, was quantified from the aortic tissue samples. Mean relative telomere length was significantly longer in ascending aortic aneurysm blood samples compared with controls (T/S ratio 0.87 vs. 0.61, p<0.001. Expressions of telomerase mRNA and protein were elevated in the aortic aneurysm samples (p<0.05 and p<0.01. Our study reveals a significant difference in the mean length of blood leukocyte telomeres in ascending aortic aneurysm and controls. Furthermore, expression of telomerase, the main compensating factor for telomere loss, is elevated at both the mRNA and protein level in the samples of aneurysmal aorta. Further studies will be needed to confirm if this change in telomere length can serve as a tool for assessing the risk of ascending aortic aneurysm.

  15. Delay in blood sampling for routine newborn screening is associated with increased risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Tidselbak Larsen, Janne; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker;

    2015-01-01

    ' country of origin, child admission, and parental education and income, the estimates were slightly different. Thus, blood collection at 0-4days was associated with an IRR of 1.27 (95% CI 0.94-1.71), 6-9days 1.31 (95% CI 0.94-1.84) and 10+days 3.52 (95% CI 1.50 to 8.24). DISCUSSION: After adjusting risk......BACKGROUND: The Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank, containing dried blood spot samples from all newborn in Denmark, is a unique source of data that can be utilized for analyses of genetic and environmental exposures related to schizophrenia and other mental disorders. In previous analyses, we have...... found that early and late blood sampling, compared to sampling at day 5, was associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. As delay in sampling of blood for neonatal screening cannot in itself influence the risk of schizophrenia, it must be seen as a proxy for unknown underlying causes responsible...

  16. Radiation safety assessment of cobalt 60 external beam radiotherapy using the risk-matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy is the only practice in which humans are placed directly in a radiation beam with the intention to deliver a very high dose. This is why safety in radiotherapy is very critical, and is a matter of interest to both radiotherapy departments and regulatory bodies. Accidental exposures have occurred throughout the world, thus showing the need for systematic safety assessments, capable to identify preventive measures and to minimize consequences of accidental exposure. Risk-matrix is a systematic approach which combines the relevant event features to assess the overall risk of each particular event. Once an event sequence is identified, questions such as how frequent the event, how severe the potential consequences and how reliable the existing safety measures are answered in a risk-matrix table. The ultimate goal is to achieve that the overall risk for events with severe consequences should always be low o very low. In the present study, the risk-matrix method has been applied to an hypothetical radiotherapy department, which could be equivalent to an upper level hospital of the Ibero American region, in terms of safety checks and preventive measures. The application of the method has identified 76 event sequences and revealed that the hypothetical radiotherapy department is sufficiently protected (low risk) against them, including 23 event sequences with severe consequences. The method has revealed that the risk of these sequences could grow to high level if certain specific preventive measures were degraded with time. This study has identified these preventive measures, thus facilitating a rational allocation of resources in regular controls to detect any loss of reliability. The method has proven to have an important practical value and is affordable at hospital level. The elaborated risk-matrix can be easily adapted to local circumstances, in terms of existing controls and safety measures. This approach can help hospitals to identify

  17. Human health and safety risks management in underground coal mines using fuzzy TOPSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scrutiny of health and safety of personnel working in underground coal mines is heightened because of fatalities and disasters that occur every year worldwide. A methodology based on fuzzy TOPSIS was proposed to assess the risks associated with human health in order to manage control measures and support decision-making, which could provide the right balance between different concerns, such as safety and costs. For this purpose, information collected from three hazardous coal mines namely Hashouni, Hojedk and Babnizu located at the Kerman coal deposit, Iran, were used to manage the risks affecting the health and safety of their miners. Altogether 86 hazards were identified and classified under eight categories: geomechanical, geochemical, electrical, mechanical, chemical, environmental, personal, and social, cultural and managerial risks. Overcoming the uncertainty of qualitative data, the ranking process is accomplished by fuzzy TOPSIS. After running the model, twelve groups with different risks were obtained. Located in the first group, the most important risks with the highest negative effects are: materials falling, catastrophic failure, instability of coalface and immediate roof, firedamp explosion, gas emission, misfire, stopping of ventilation system, wagon separation at inclines, asphyxiation, inadequate training and poor site management system. According to the results, the proposed methodology can be a reliable technique for management of the minatory hazards and coping with uncertainties affecting the health and safety of miners when performance ratings are imprecise. The proposed model can be primarily designed to identify potential hazards and help in taking appropriate measures to minimize or remove the risks before accidents can occur. - Highlights: • Risks associated with health and safety of coal miners were investigated. • A reliable methodology based on Fuzzy TOPSIS was developed to manage the risks. • Three underground mines in Kerman

  18. Patient Safety with Blood Products Administration Using Wireless and Bar-Code Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Porcella, Aleta; Walker, Kristy

    2005-01-01

    Supported by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, a University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics interdisciplinary research team created an online data-capture-response tool utilizing wireless mobile devices and bar code technology to track and improve blood products administration process. The tool captures 1) sample collection, 2) sample arrival in the blood bank, 3) blood product dispense from blood bank, and 4) administration. At each step, the scanne...

  19. Mobile phone radiation health risk controversy: the reliability and sufficiency of science behind the safety standards

    OpenAIRE

    Leszczynski Dariusz; Xu Zhengping

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There is ongoing discussion whether the mobile phone radiation causes any health effects. The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety and the World Health Organization are assuring that there is no proven health risk and that the present safety limits protect all mobile phone users. However, based on the available scientific evidence, the situation is not as clear. The majority of the evidence comes from in ...

  20. ESTIMATION OF PROCESSES REALIZATION RISK AS A MANNER OF SAFETY MANAGEMENT IN THE INTEGRATED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Karkoszka

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Realization of quality, environmental and occupational health and safety policy using the proposed model of processes' integrated risk estimation leads to the improvement of the analyzed productive processes by the preventive and corrective actions, and in consequence - to their optimization from the point of view of products' quality and in the aspect of quality of environmental influence and occupational health and safety.

  1. A CONCEPTUAL DISASTER RISK REDUCTION FRAMEWORK FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY HAZARDS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Amir S. GOHARDANI; Folke BJÖRK

    2013-01-01

    The health and safety hazard status of construction workers is constantly challenged by the projects in the built environment. In this article, various aspects of health and safety hazards for construction workers have been reviewed and investigated through a disaster risk reduction prism. This approach has further led to the perception of glancing at the construction sector as an ongoing disaster zone and equally provides a new management perspective. From this perspective, the occurrence of...

  2. Banking Risks around the World : The Implicit Safety Net Subsidy Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Laeven, Luc

    2000-01-01

    The author calculates gross safety net subsidies for a large sample of banks in 12 countries, to assess the relationship between the risk-taking behavior of banks, and certain ban characteristics. He finds that gross safety net subsidies are higher for banks that have concentrated ownership, that are affiliated with a business group, that are small, or that have high credit growth, and for...

  3. The uses and benefits of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has proven to be an important tool in the safety assessment of nuclear reactors throughout the world. Decision making with regard to many safety issues has been facilitated by both general insights from and direct application of this technology. Key uses of PRA are discussed and some examples of successful applications are cited. The benefits and limitations of PRA are also discussed as well as the broader outlook for applications of PRA. 9 refs

  4. Development of a risk-informed safety management system at the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komljenovic, D.; Hotte, G.; Beaudet, M. [Hydro-Quebec, Nuclear Generating Station Gentilly-2, Gentilly, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: komljenovic.dragan@hydro.qc.ca

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents an overview regarding current and future activities related to the management of safety and regulatory framework at the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station. The paper discusses alignment of these activities with the best Canadian and international practices. It also proposes manners to develop a consistent risk-informed safety management system. The paper takes particularly into consideration the impact of this new framework on the refurbishment project, and the operations after the refurbishment of the station. (author)

  5. SPATIAL ANALYSIS BASED HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LINEAR CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    H. Atay; G. Toz

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an on-going study that aims to develop a web-based spatial decision support system model for proactive health and safety management in linear construction projects. Currently, health and safety management is usually performed reactively instead of proactive management since hazard identification and risk assessment is mostly performed on paper based documents that are not effectively used at site. This leads to accidents and fatalities at construction sites. The proposed ...

  6. From aviation to medicine: applying concepts of aviation safety to risk management in ambulatory care

    OpenAIRE

    Wilf-Miron, R; Lewenhoff, I; Benyamini, Z; Aviram, A

    2003-01-01

    

 The development of a medical risk management programme based on the aviation safety approach and its implementation in a large ambulatory healthcare organisation is described. The following key safety principles were applied: (1) errors inevitably occur and usually derive from faulty system design, not from negligence; (2) accident prevention should be an ongoing process based on open and full reporting; (3) major accidents are only the "tip of the iceberg" of processes that indicate possi...

  7. A risk characterization of safety research areas for Integral Fast Reactor program planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper characterizes the areas of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure of critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR Safety and related Base Technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorites

  8. Application of risk assessment in upgrading safety and quality of radiochemical operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Comprehensive Safety Assessment and Upgrade Program (CSAUP) was commenced by the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve excellence in the safety and quality of its operations and condition of its facilities. In the course of conducting CSAUP, a number of issues of concern were identified. The safety risk of these issues has been assessed, and planned actions were prepared for those issues that require corrective actions or improvement/upgrading. The planned actions were evaluated on consideration for the uniqueness of Chem Tech facilities and operations to determine the risks (high, moderate or low) involved by failure to implement the actions. The risk was defined in terms of the frequency and severity of impact. Priority of categorized actions was based on the urgency of the actions. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  9. The cardiac safety of aripiprazole treatment in patients at high risk for torsade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polcwiartek, Christoffer; Sneider, Benjamin; Graff, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    reviewed and cardiac safety data were extracted. Continuous and dichotomous QTc data were used in the meta-analysis. RESULTS: Preclinical studies suggested that aripiprazole has limited affinity for the delayed rectifier potassium current. TdP was reported in two case reports and SCD was reported in one...... case report and one case series. No clinical studies assessing aripiprazole's cardiac safety in patients at high risk for torsade were found. No thorough QT (TQT) study with aripiprazole was found. The meta-analysis revealed that the mean ΔQTc interval was decreased with aripiprazole and QTc...... factors. OBJECTIVES: Aripiprazole's cardiac safety has not been assessed in patients at high risk for torsade, where QTc prolongation risk is highly increased. METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were searched for preclinical, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Eligible studies were...

  10. Risk Analysis an Approach for Safety-related Projects at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Balda, F

    2001-01-01

    In recent years Risk Analysis has become increasingly important for any kind of project for both personnel and equipment safety assessments. Many divisional projects must respect the rules imposed by the French regulatory authority (INB) and the requirements of applicable international standards. This document proposes a systematic approach for the setting up of a complete Risk Analysis, and it defines coherent steps to be undertaken in order to check the achievement of the project safety goals. Several techniques are discussed, and some ST projects to which they have been applied or are going to be applied are presented. The proposed Risk Analysis structure should be associated and adapted to the different stages of the design and allows the definition of safety requirements; it furthermore traces the guidelines for qualitative and quantitative assessments.

  11. Acceptable risk as the criteria for NPP efficiency and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four types of criteria of effective and safe operation of NPP power units are studied and formulated. Criterion types are formulated in risk terms of failure to comply problems, losses of capital outlays and territory (ecological risk), NPP personnel and population health damage. The structure of losses and profiles under conditions of the modern economic system is considered for the given types of criteria. The mathematical cost-profit model of a stochastic processes of power unit utilization is developed. The explicit functional form of the positive effect on the process trajectories for each of criterion types is constructed. The functional construction is based on the representation of a power unit as a generator of random events leading to power unit failure its damage or loss of territory, correspondingly

  12. Pesticide Exposure, Safety Issues, and Risk Assessment Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Damalas, Christos A.; Ilias G. Eleftherohorinos

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used in agricultural production to prevent or control pests, diseases, weeds, and other plant pathogens in an effort to reduce or eliminate yield losses and maintain high product quality. Although pesticides are developed through very strict regulation processes to function with reasonable certainty and minimal impact on human health and the environment, serious concerns have been raised about health risks resulting from occupational exposure and from residues in food an...

  13. Safety and feasibility of countering neurological impairment by intravenous administration of autologous cord blood in cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Young-Ho; Choi Kyung; Moon Jin; Jun Hyun-Joo; Kang Hye-Ryeong; Oh Se-In; Kim Hyung; Um Jang; Kim Mi; Choi Yun; Lee Young-Jun; Kim Hee-Jin; Lee Jong-Hwa; Son Su; Choi Soo-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Backgrounds We conducted a pilot study of the infusion of intravenous autologous cord blood (CB) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) to assess the safety and feasibility of the procedure as well as its potential efficacy in countering neurological impairment. Methods Patients diagnosed with CP were enrolled in this study if their parents had elected to bank their CB at birth. Cryopreserved CB units were thawed and infused intravenously over 10~20 minutes. We assessed potential effic...

  14. Safety, reliability, risk management and human factors: an integrated engineering approach applied to nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has an important engineering legacy to share with the conventional industry. Much of the development of the tools related to safety, reliability, risk management, and human factors are associated with nuclear plant processes, mainly because the public concern about nuclear power generation. Despite the close association between these subjects, there are some important different approaches. The reliability engineering approach uses several techniques to minimize the component failures that cause the failure of the complex systems. These techniques include, for instance, redundancy, diversity, standby sparing, safety factors, and reliability centered maintenance. On the other hand system safety is primarily concerned with hazard management, that is, the identification, evaluation and control of hazards. Rather than just look at failure rates or engineering strengths, system safety would examine the interactions among system components. The events that cause accidents may be complex combinations of component failures, faulty maintenance, design errors, human actions, or actuation of instrumentation and control. Then, system safety deals with a broader spectrum of risk management, including: ergonomics, legal requirements, quality control, public acceptance, political considerations, and many other non-technical influences. Taking care of these subjects individually can compromise the completeness of the analysis and the measures associated with both risk reduction, and safety and reliability increasing. Analyzing together the engineering systems and controls of a nuclear facility, their management systems and operational procedures, and the human factors engineering, many benefits can be realized. This paper proposes an integration of these issues based on the application of systems theory. (author)

  15. Safety, reliability, risk management and human factors: an integrated engineering approach applied to nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Silva, Eliane Magalhaes Pereira da; Costa, Antonio Carlos Lopes da; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, e-mail: silvaem@cdtn.br, e-mail: aclc@cdtn.br, e-mail: reissc@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear energy has an important engineering legacy to share with the conventional industry. Much of the development of the tools related to safety, reliability, risk management, and human factors are associated with nuclear plant processes, mainly because the public concern about nuclear power generation. Despite the close association between these subjects, there are some important different approaches. The reliability engineering approach uses several techniques to minimize the component failures that cause the failure of the complex systems. These techniques include, for instance, redundancy, diversity, standby sparing, safety factors, and reliability centered maintenance. On the other hand system safety is primarily concerned with hazard management, that is, the identification, evaluation and control of hazards. Rather than just look at failure rates or engineering strengths, system safety would examine the interactions among system components. The events that cause accidents may be complex combinations of component failures, faulty maintenance, design errors, human actions, or actuation of instrumentation and control. Then, system safety deals with a broader spectrum of risk management, including: ergonomics, legal requirements, quality control, public acceptance, political considerations, and many other non-technical influences. Taking care of these subjects individually can compromise the completeness of the analysis and the measures associated with both risk reduction, and safety and reliability increasing. Analyzing together the engineering systems and controls of a nuclear facility, their management systems and operational procedures, and the human factors engineering, many benefits can be realized. This paper proposes an integration of these issues based on the application of systems theory. (author)

  16. Risk analysis of Safety Service Patrol (SSP) systems in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Brett D; Santos, Joost R

    2011-12-01

    The transportation infrastructure is a vital backbone of any regional economy as it supports workforce mobility, tourism, and a host of socioeconomic activities. In this article, we specifically examine the incident management function of the transportation infrastructure. In many metropolitan regions, incident management is handled primarily by safety service patrols (SSPs), which monitor and resolve roadway incidents. In Virginia, SSP allocation across highway networks is based typically on average vehicle speeds and incident volumes. This article implements a probabilistic network model that partitions "business as usual" traffic flow with extreme-event scenarios. Results of simulated network scenarios reveal that flexible SSP configurations can improve incident resolution times relative to predetermined SSP assignments. PMID:21605149

  17. Driving behaviours, traffic risk and road safety: comparative study between Malaysia and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saif ur Rehman; Khalifah, Zainab Binti; Munir, Yasin; Islam, Talat; Nazir, Tahira; Khan, Hashim

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate differences in road safety attitude, driver behaviour and traffic risk perception between Malaysia and Singapore. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted among a sample of Singaporean (n = 187) and Malaysian (n = 313) road users. The data was analysed using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling applied to measure comparative fit indices of Malaysian and Singaporean respondents. The results show that the perceived traffic risk of Malaysian respondents is higher than Singaporean counterparts. Moreover, the structural equation modelling has confirmed perceived traffic risk performing the role of full mediation between perceived driving skills and perceived road safety for both the countries, while perceived traffic skills was found to perform the role of partial mediation between aggression and anxiety, on one hand, and road safety, on the other hand, in Malaysia and Singapore. In addition, in both countries, a weak correlation between perceived driving skills, aggression and anxiety with perceived road safety was found, while a strong correlation exists with traffic risk perception. The findings of this study have been discussed in terms of theoretical, practical and conceptual implications for both scholars and policy-makers to better understand the young drivers' attitude and behaviour relationship towards road safety measures with a view to future research. PMID:24974915

  18. Perception of risks and safety. Results of the November 2001 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the themes present in the survey on the perception of risks and safety as far as nuclear energy is concerned, this report proposes an analysis of the obtained results. It discusses the current general concerns, the perception of risks (confidence, truth), the perception of technological and natural risks for the environment (hazardous installations, demand for environmental acceptability of installations, disasters), the opinions on nuclear activities (image, actors, control of these activities, possibility of a nuclear accident), and finally the risks associated with radon

  19. Perception of risks and safety. Results of the October 1999 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the themes present in the survey on the perception of risks and safety as far as nuclear energy is concerned, this report proposes an analysis of the obtained results. It discusses the current general concerns, the perception of risks (demand, confidence, truth), the opinions on scientific expertise, the opinions on nuclear activities (image, actors, information, control of these activities), the issue of radioactive wastes and mining residues (perceived risk depending on the site vicinity, time scale, site management), the possibility of a nuclear accident and the implemented countermeasures, and finally the risks concerning food

  20. Safety optimization in waste management based on risk analysis using fuzzy-logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk analysis is the basis for site selection of repositories for low and medium radioactive waste and for optimization of a selected waste disposal system from a safety point of view. It comprises the processing of subjective expert judgment data and the identification of events which are major risk contributors according to the authors. The method of risk analysis is based on probability theory and elements of fuzzy set theory and involves uncertainty analysis and the structured use of expert judgment data. The risk analysis methodology and its application to waste management systems are explained in detail

  1. Perception of risks and safety. Results of the November 2002 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the themes present in the survey on the perception of risks and safety as far as nuclear energy is concerned, this report proposes an analysis of the obtained results. It discusses the current general concerns, the perception of risks (risks for the society, confidence in authorities, spoken truth), the opinions on the scientific expertise (role, opinion, confidence), the perception of technological and natural risks for the environment (hazardous installations, demand for environmental acceptability of installations, participation to information session, industrial and natural disasters), the opinions on nuclear activities (image, actors, information, control of these activities), and finally the possibility of a nuclear accident and the implemented countermeasures

  2. Longitudinal Patterns of Change in Systolic Blood Pressure and Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruski-Ivleva, Natalia; Viera, Anthony J; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul; Avery, Christy L; Schneider, Andrea L C; Couper, David; Kucharska-Newton, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Elevated blood pressure in midlife contributes significantly to the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, patterns of blood pressure increase may differ among individuals and may result in differential risk. Our goal was to examine the contribution of longitudinal patterns of blood pressure change to incidence of heart failure, coronary heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular disease mortality. Latent class growth models were used to identify patterns of change in blood pressure across 4 clinical examinations (1987-1998) among 9845 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort participants (mean age, 53.7 [SD 5.7] years). Patterns of change in systolic blood pressure included slowly and steeply increasing, a decreasing and a sustained elevated blood pressure. Changes in diastolic and mid-blood pressure (½ systolic+½ diastolic) were less pronounced. The association of blood pressure pattern group membership with incidence of clinical outcomes was examined in follow-up from the fourth clinical examination (1996-1998) to December 31, 2011, using Poisson regression models adjusted for demographic and metabolic characteristics, and hypertension medication use. A gradient of rates of all events was observed across the identified patterns. Associations were attenuated after adjustment for covariates. Cumulative systolic blood pressure load, rather than the temporal pattern of change in systolic blood pressure itself, plays a role in determining the risk of cardiovascular disease, in particular, of heart failure and cardiovascular disease mortality, independent of blood pressure level measured at one point in time. PMID:27045024

  3. [New international initiatives to create systems of effective risk prediction and food safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimochkinal, N R; Bagryantseva, E C; Dupouy, E C; Khotimchenko, S A; Permyakov, E V; Sheveleva, S A; Arnautov, O V

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring food safety is one of the most important problems that is directly related to health protection of the population. The problem is particularly relevant on aglobalscale because ofincreasingnumberoffood-borne diseases andimportance of the health consequence early detection. In accordance with the position of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, food safety concept also includes quality. In this case, creation of the national, supranational and international early warning systems related to the food safety, designed with the purpose to prevent or minimize risks on different stages of the food value chain in various countries, regions and climate zones specific to national nutrition and lifestyle in different groups of population, gains particular importance. The article describes the principles and working examples of international, supranational and national food safety early warning systems. Great importance is given to the hazards of microbial origin - emergent pathogens. Example of the rapid reaction to the appearance of cases, related to the melanin presence in infant formula, are presented. Analysis of the current food safety and quality control system in Russian Federation shows that main improvements are mostly related to the development of the efficient monitoring, diagnostics and rapid alert procedures forfood safety on interregional and international levels that will allow to estimate real contamination of food with the most dangerous pathogens, chemical and biological contaminants, and the development of the electronic database and scientifically proved algorithms for food safety and quality management for targeted prevention activities against existing and emerging microbiological and other etiology risks, and public health protection. PMID:27455605

  4. Systematic approach for determining optimal risks for seismic safety and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach for the systematic determination of the optimal target reliabilities (or acceptable risks) for the earthquake-resistant design of structures is proposed. Optimal acceptable risks for damage control and life safety are determined through minimization of the respective lice-cycle costs. The process requires the proper integration of seismic hazard analysis, structural damage and reliability assessments, and life-cycle cost formulations. The resulting target reliabilities can be translated into conventional criteria (e.g. in terms of required base coefficients) to insure damage control and life safety in design. (author). 15 refs., 7 figs

  5. Safety and security in transportation of radioactive material- the perception of risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the event of September 11, 2001, the way most people look at transportation risk has changed. There is now a lot more focusing on the security concerns related to the transportation of radioactive material. Most people are now more concerned about the risk of terrorist actions or sabotage than of accidents. This is probably due to the fact that the safety record for transportation of radioactive material has so far been very good and that most people experience terrorism and sabotage more scaring and less controllable than general accidents. This paper will compare the safety and the security regulations and discuss synergies and contradictions between the sets of regulations

  6. Women's perceptions of safety and risk following police intervention for intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Melissa E; Gelles, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Police intervention is a primary response to intimate partner violence (IPV) but does not guarantee a victim's future safety. This study sought to identify factors associated with IPV survivors' perceptions of safety and risk of revictimization following police intervention. One hundred sixty-four women completed a questionnaire, and 11 of those women also took part in qualitative interviews. The findings revealed that feeling unsafe and perceiving oneself to be at risk of future violence is associated with experiencing particular forms of IPV, including battering, lethality threats, and sexual violence. Having support from others and distance from the partner helps women feel safe. PMID:22411298

  7. Moderating effect of perceived risk on the relationship between product safety and intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarina Ismail

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Herbal Products industry has experienced significant growth in product demand. Therefore, this study aims to identify the factors effecting the actual buying of Herbal Product. This study also examines the moderation effect of perceived risk on the relationship between product safety and intention. Mall intercept survey was used to collect data from six various states in Malaysia. The data is analyzed using Partial Least Squares (PLS path modeling. The path coefficient results supported the direct influence of intention on actual buying. Similarly, the findings reveal that perceived risk moderate the relationship between product safety and buying intention.

  8. A Study on the Estimation Method of Risk Based Area for Jetty Safety Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong-Wook Nam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the importance of safety-monitoring systems was highlighted by the unprecedented collision between a ship and a jetty in Yeosu. Accordingly, in this study, we introduce the concept of risk based area and develop a methodology for a jetty safety-monitoring system. By calculating the risk based areas for a ship and a jetty, the risk of collision was evaluated. To calculate the risk based areas, we employed an automatic identification system for the ship, stopping-distance equations, and the regulation velocity near the jetty. In this paper, we suggest a risk calculation method for jetty safety monitoring that can determine the collision probability in real time and predict collisions using the amount of overlap between the two calculated risk based areas. A test was conducted at a jetty control center at GS Caltex, and the effectiveness of the proposed risk calculation method was verified. The method is currently applied to the jetty-monitoring system at GS Caltex in Yeosu for the prevention of collisions.

  9. BARC-risk monitor- a tool for operational safety assessment in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment has become a key tool as on today to identify and understand nuclear power plant vulnerabilities. As a result of the availability of these PSA studies, there is a desire to use them to enhance plant safety and to operate the nuclear stations in the most efficient manner. Risk monitor is a PC based tool, which computes the real time safety level and assists plant personnel to manage day-to-day activities. Risk monitor is a PC based user friendly software tool used for modification and re-analysis of a nuclear power plant. Operation of risk monitor is based on PSA methods for assisting in day to day applications. Risk monitoring programs can assess the risk profile and are used to optimise the operation of nuclear power plants with respect to a minimum risk level over the operating time. This report presents the background activities of risk monitor, its application areas and also gives the status of such tools in international scenarios. The software is based on the PSA model of Kaiga generating station and would be applicable to similar design configuration. (author)

  10. Effect of antecedent hypertension and follow-up blood pressure on outcomes after high-risk myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thune, J.J.; Signorovitch, J.; Velazquez, E.J.;

    2007-01-01

    The influence of blood pressure on outcomes after high-risk myocardial infarction is not well characterized. We studied the relationship between blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular events in 14 703 patients with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, or both after acute...... higher risk of stroke (adjusted HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.17 to 2.29) and combined cardiovascular events (adjusted HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.31). Six months after a high-risk myocardial infarction, elevated systolic blood pressure, a potentially modifiable risk factor, is associated with an increased risk of...... myocardial infarction in the Valsartan in Myocardial Infarction Trial. We assessed the relationship between antecedent hypertension and outcomes and the association between elevated (systolic: >140 mm Hg) or low blood pressure (systolic: <100 mm Hg) in 2 of 3 follow-up visits during the first 6 months and...

  11. Integrated risk reduction framework to improve railway hazardous materials transportation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An integrated framework is developed to optimize risk reduction. • A negative binomial regression model is developed to analyze accident-cause-specific railcar derailment probability. • A Pareto-optimality technique is applied to determine the lowest risk given any level of resource. • A multi-attribute decision model is developed to determine the optimal amount of investment for risk reduction. • The models could aid the government and rail industry in developing cost-efficient risk reduction policy and practice. -- Abstract: Rail transportation plays a critical role to safely and efficiently transport hazardous materials. A number of strategies have been implemented or are being developed to reduce the risk of hazardous materials release from train accidents. Each of these risk reduction strategies has its safety benefit and corresponding implementation cost. However, the cost effectiveness of the integration of different risk reduction strategies is not well understood. Meanwhile, there has been growing interest in the U.S. rail industry and government to best allocate resources for improving hazardous materials transportation safety. This paper presents an optimization model that considers the combination of two types of risk reduction strategies, broken rail prevention and tank car safety design enhancement. A Pareto-optimality technique is used to maximize risk reduction at a given level of investment. The framework presented in this paper can be adapted to address a broader set of risk reduction strategies and is intended to assist decision makers for local, regional and system-wide risk management of rail hazardous materials transportation

  12. Warning: safety risk with some Apple AC Wall Plug Adapters

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN IT department

    2016-01-01

    Dear Mac and iOS Users, Apple has determined that some of its two prong Apple AC wall plug adapters may break and create a risk of electrical shock.   CERN users can now exchange their affected Apple wall plug adapters at the Service Desk. To find out if your adapter is affected and for any further information concerning the procedure to follow to exchange it, please check the following URL: https://cern.service-now.com/service-portal/view-outage.do?n=OTG0028639.

  13. Uncertainties leading to the use of fuzzy risk analysis of hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important issue involved with the expanded use of hydrogen as a fuel concerns the related safety risks that would be incurred by society. Hydrogen is generally considered a high risk or relatively dangerous fuel. However, assigning this designation is subjective and arguments can be leveled both for and against this position. These arguments stem from uncertainties in the meaning of words used to describe both the sources and levels of risk. Even more rudimentary is the definition of the concept of risk. Other sources of uncertainty in a safety analysis is found to be derived from choosing relevant fuel characteristics pertaining to safety, as well as from the measurement methods, accuracy and relative importance of these characteristics. A review of the sources of these uncertainties leads to the proposal that an analysis based on fuzzy logic would be appropriate. Fuzzy analysis is a relatively new area of study with Zadeh's 1965 seminal paper regarded as the establishment of this field. Since that time a proliferation of studies has been conducted in a wide field of applications. A variety of methods of fuzzy risk analysis have been applied to areas ranging from economic and investment choices to project analysis and safety, each method attempting to take advantage of the uncertainty and imprecision in the analysis. (author)

  14. Governance implications of nanomaterials companies' inconsistent risk perceptions and safety practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engeman, Cassandra D. [University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Sociology (United States); Baumgartner, Lynn; Carr, Benjamin M.; Fish, Allison M.; Meyerhofer, John D. [UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Satterfield, Terre A. [University of California, Santa Barbara, NSF Center for Nanotechnology and Society (United States); Holden, Patricia A. [UC Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), University of California, Santa Barbara (United States); Harthorn, Barbara Herr, E-mail: harthorn@cns.ucsb.edu [University of California, Santa Barbara, NSF Center for Nanotechnology and Society (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Current research on the nanotechnology industry indicates its downstream expansion at a rapid pace, while toxicological research and best practices for environmental health and safety are still being developed. Companies that use and/or produce engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have enormous potential to influence safe-handling practices for ENMs across the product life cycle. Knowledge of both industry practices and leaders' perceptions of risk is vital for understanding how companies will act to control potential environmental and health risks. This article reports results from a new international survey of nanomaterials companies in 14 countries. In this survey, company participants reported relatively high levels of uncertainty and/or perceived risk with regard to ENMs. However, these perspectives were not accompanied by expected risk-avoidant practices or preferences for regulatory oversight. A majority of companies indicated 'lack of information' as a significant impediment to implementing nano-specific safety practices, but they also reported practices that were inconsistent with widely available guidance. Additionally, in the absence of safe-handling regulations, companies reported nano-specific health and safety programs that were narrow in scope. Taken together, these findings indicate that health and safety guidance is not reaching industry. While industry leaders' reluctance toward regulation might be expected, their own reported unsafe practices and recognition of possible risks suggest a more top-down approach from regulators is needed to protect workers and the environment.

  15. Risk and Work Configuration Management as a Function of Integrated Safety Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), has established a work management program and corresponding electronic Facilities and Operations Management Information System (e-FOM) to implement Integrated Safety Management (ISM). The management of work scopes, the identification of hazards, and the establishment of implementing controls are reviewed and approved through electronic signatures. Through the execution of the program and the implementation of the electronic system, NSTec staff work within controls and utilize feedback and improvement process. The Integrated Work Control Manual further implements the five functions of ISM at the Activity level. By adding the Risk and Work Configuration Management program, NSTec establishes risk acceptance (business and physical) for liabilities within the performance direction and work management processes. Requirements, roles, and responsibilities are specifically identified in the program while e-FOM provides the interface and establishes the flowdown from the Safety Chain to work and facilities management processes to company work-related directives, and finally to Subject Matter Expert concurrence. The Program establishes, within the defined management structure, management levels for risk identification, risk mitigation (controls), and risk acceptance (business and physical) within the Safety Chain of Responsibility. The Program also implements Integrated Safeguards and Security Management within the NSTec Safety Chain of Responsibility. Once all information has been entered into e-FOM, approved, and captured as data, the information becomes searchable and sortable by hazard, location, organization, mitigating controls, etc

  16. Governance implications of nanomaterials companies’ inconsistent risk perceptions and safety practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current research on the nanotechnology industry indicates its downstream expansion at a rapid pace, while toxicological research and best practices for environmental health and safety are still being developed. Companies that use and/or produce engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have enormous potential to influence safe-handling practices for ENMs across the product life cycle. Knowledge of both industry practices and leaders’ perceptions of risk is vital for understanding how companies will act to control potential environmental and health risks. This article reports results from a new international survey of nanomaterials companies in 14 countries. In this survey, company participants reported relatively high levels of uncertainty and/or perceived risk with regard to ENMs. However, these perspectives were not accompanied by expected risk-avoidant practices or preferences for regulatory oversight. A majority of companies indicated “lack of information” as a significant impediment to implementing nano-specific safety practices, but they also reported practices that were inconsistent with widely available guidance. Additionally, in the absence of safe-handling regulations, companies reported nano-specific health and safety programs that were narrow in scope. Taken together, these findings indicate that health and safety guidance is not reaching industry. While industry leaders’ reluctance toward regulation might be expected, their own reported unsafe practices and recognition of possible risks suggest a more top-down approach from regulators is needed to protect workers and the environment.

  17. Screening for transfusion transmissible infections using rapid diagnostic tests in Africa: a potential hazard to blood safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugger, C; Laperche, S; Murphy, E L; Bloch, E M; Kaidarova, Z; Tafflet, M; Lefrère, J-J; Jouven, X

    2016-02-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are routinely used in African blood centres. We analysed data from two cross-sectional studies representing 95 blood centres in 29 African countries. Standardized panels of sera containing varying concentrations of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies (Ab), hepatitis B virus antigen (HBsAg) and antihepatitis C virus (HCV) Ab were screened using routine operational testing procedures at the centres. Sensitivity of detection using RDTs was high for HIV Ab-positive samples, but low for intermediately HBsAg (51·5%) and HCV Ab (40·6%)-positive samples. These findings suggest that current RDT use in Africa could pose a hazard to blood safety. PMID:26646317

  18. Transfusion requirements in septic shock (TRISS) trial - comparing the effects and safety of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion in septic shock patients in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) is recommended in septic shock and the majority of these patients receive RBC transfusion in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, benefit and harm of RBCs have not been established in this group of high-risk patients. METHODS: The Transfusion Re...... after 500 patients, and the Data Monitoring and Safety Committee will recommend the trial be stopped if a group difference in 90-day mortality with P......BACKGROUND: Transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) is recommended in septic shock and the majority of these patients receive RBC transfusion in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, benefit and harm of RBCs have not been established in this group of high-risk patients. METHODS: The Transfusion...... Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial is a multicenter trial with assessor-blinded outcome assessment, randomising 1,000 patients with septic shock in 30 Scandinavian ICUs to receive transfusion with pre-storage leuko-depleted RBC suspended in saline-adenine-glucose and mannitol (SAGM) at haemoglobin...

  19. Ethical and legal implications of the risks of medical tourism for patients: a qualitative study of Canadian health and safety representatives’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Turner, Leigh; Cohen, I Glenn; Bristeir, Janet; Snyder, Jeremy; Casey, Victoria; Whitmore, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Medical tourism involves patients’ intentional travel to privately obtain medical care in another country. Empirical evidence regarding health and safety risks facing medical tourists is limited. Consideration of this issue is dominated by speculation and lacks meaningful input from people with specific expertise in patient health and safety. We consulted with patient health and safety experts in the Canadian province of British Columbia to explore their views concerning risks that medical tourists may be exposed to. Herein, we report on the findings, linking them to existing ethical and legal issues associated with medical tourism. Design We held a focus group in September 2011 in Vancouver, British Columbia with professionals representing different domains of patient health and safety expertise. The focus group was transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Participants Seven professionals representing the domains of tissue banking, blood safety, health records, organ transplantation, dental care, clinical ethics and infection control participated. Results Five dominant health and safety risks for outbound medical tourists were identified by participants: (1) complications; (2) specific concerns regarding organ transplantation; (3) transmission of antibiotic-resistant organisms; (4) (dis)continuity of medical documentation and (5) (un)informed decision-making. Conclusions Concern was expressed that medical tourism might have unintended and undesired effects upon patients’ home healthcare systems. The individual choices of medical tourists could have significant public consequences if healthcare facilities in their home countries must expend resources treating postoperative complications. Participants also expressed concern that medical tourists returning home with infections, particularly antibiotic-resistant infections, could place others at risk of exposure to infections that are refractory to standard treatment regimens and thereby pose

  20. Interactive effects of vascular risk burden and advanced age on cerebral blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eBangen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascular risk factors and cerebral blood flow (CBF reduction have been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD; however the possible moderating effects of age and vascular risk burden on CBF in late life remain understudied. We examined the relationships among elevated vascular risk burden, age, CBF, and cognition. Seventy-one non-demented older adults completed an arterial spin labeling MR scan, neuropsychological assessment, and medical history interview. Relationships among vascular risk burden, age, and CBF were examined in a priori regions of interest (ROIs previously implicated in aging and AD. Interaction effects indicated that, among older adults with elevated vascular risk burden (i.e., multiple vascular risk factors, advancing age was significantly associated with reduced cortical CBF whereas there was no such relationship for those with low vascular risk burden (i.e., no or one vascular risk factor. This pattern was observed in cortical ROIs including medial temporal (hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncus, inferior parietal (supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus, and frontal (anterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus cortices. Furthermore, among those with elevated vascular risk, reduced CBF was associated with poorer cognitive performance. Such findings suggest that older adults with elevated vascular risk burden may be particularly vulnerable to cognitive change as a function of CBF reductions. Findings support the use of CBF as a potential biomarker in preclinical AD and suggest that vascular risk burden and regionally-specific CBF changes may contribute to differential age-related cognitive declines.

  1. Elevated Blood Lead Levels Are Associated with Reduced Risk of Malaria in Beninese Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Moya-Alvarez

    Full Text Available Elevated blood lead levels (BLL and malaria carry an important burden of disease in West Africa. Both diseases might cause anemia and they might entail long-term consequences for the development and the health status of the child. Albeit the significant impact of malaria on lead levels described in Nigeria, no evaluation of the effect of elevated BLL on malaria risk has been investigated so far.Between 2010 and 2012, blood lead levels of 203 Beninese infants from Allada, a semi-rural area 50km North from Cotonou, were assessed at 12 months of age. To assess lead levels, blood samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In parallel, clinical, microbiological and hematological data were collected. More precisely, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, CRP, vitamin B12, folate levels, and Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia were assessed and stool samples were also analyzed.At 12 months, the mean BLL of infants was 7.41 μg/dL (CI: 65.2; 83, and 128 infants (63% had elevated blood lead levels, defined by the CDC as BLL>5 μg/dL. Lead poisoning, defined as BLL>10 μg/dL, was found in 39 infants (19%. Twenty-five infants (12.5% had a positive blood smear at 12 months and 144 infants were anemic (71%, hemoglobin<110 g/L. Elevated blood lead levels were significantly associated with reduced risk of a positive blood smear (AOR = 0.38, P-value = 0.048 and P. falciparum parasite density (beta-estimate = -1.42, P-value = 0.03 in logistic and negative binomial regression multivariate models, respectively, adjusted on clinical and environmental indicators.Our study shows for the first time that BLL are negatively associated with malarial risk considering other risk factors. Malaria is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in infants under 5 years worldwide, and lead poisoning is the 6th most important contributor to the global burden of diseases measured in disability adjusted life years (DALYs according to the Institute of Health Metrics. In conclusion, due

  2. Securing executive buy-in for preventative risk management - lessons from water safety plans

    OpenAIRE

    Summerill, Corinna; Pollard, Simon J. T.; Smith, J A; Breach, B.; Williams, T

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate implementation of water safety plans (WSPs) offers an important opportunity to engage in and promote preventative risk management within water utilities. To ensure success, the whole organization, especially executive management, need to be advocates. Illustrated by four case studies, we discuss the influence of organisational culture on buy-in and commitment to WSPs. Despite an internal desire to undertake risk management, aspects of organisational culture prevented these from re...

  3. Estimating the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in blood donors and pregnant women in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    難波江, 功二

    2014-01-01

    主査: 西脇祐司 /タイトル: Estimating the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in blood donors and pregnant women in Japan /著者: Koji Nabae, Hiroshi Satoh, Hiroshi Nishiura, Keiko Tanaka-Taya,Nobuhiko Okabe, Kazunori Oishi, Kunichika Matsumoto, Tomonori Hasegawa /掲載誌: PLoS ONE /巻号・発行年等: 9(3): e92519, 2014 /

  4. Acute Lung Injury Complicating Blood Transfusion in Post-Partum Hemorrhage: Incidence and Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Teofili, Luciana; Bianchi, Maria; Bruno A Zanfini; Catarci, Stefano; Sicuranza, Rossella; Spartano, Serena; Zini, Gina; Draisci, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the incidence and risk factors for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) among patients transfused for post-partum hemorrhage (PPH). Methods We identified a series of 71 consecutive patients with PPH requiring the urgent transfusion of three or more red blood cell (RBC) units, with or without transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and/or platelets (PLT). Clinical records were then retrieved and examined for respiratory distress events. Acco...

  5. Aging, Vascular Risk and Cognition: Blood Glucose, Pulse Pressure, and Cognitive Performance in Healthy Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Dahle, Cheryl L.; Jacobs, Bradley S.; Raz, Naftali

    2009-01-01

    Advanced age is associated with decline in many areas of cognition as well as increased frequency of vascular disease. Well-described risk factors for vascular disease such as diabetes and arterial hypertension have been linked to cognitive deficits beyond those associated with aging. To examine whether vascular health indices such as fasting blood glucose levels and arterial pulse pressure can predict subtle deficits in age-sensitive abilities, we studied 104 healthy adults (age 18 to 78 yea...

  6. Remodeling Strategic Staff Safety and Security Risks Management in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday S. AKPAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined safety and security risk management in tertiary institutions in Nigeria. The frequent attacks at workplace, especially schools, have placed safety and security in the front burner of discussion in both business and political circles. This therefore, forms the imperative for the conduct of this study. The work adopted a cross sectional survey research design and collected data from respondents who are security personnel of the University of Uyo. Analysis of data was done with simple percentage statistics while the research hypotheses were tested with mean and simple regression and correlation statistics. The findings of the study revealed that assassination, kidnappings and bombings were principal risk incidents threatening the safety and security of staff in University of Uyo. A significant positive relationship was found between the funding of security management and workers’ performance. It was discovered specifically that employment screening, regular training of security personnel, regular safety and security meetings and strategic security policy formation were the main strategies for managing safety and security in University of Uyo. The paper concluded that safety and security management and control involves every worker (management and staff of University of Uyo. It was recommended, among others, that management should be more committed to safety and security management in the University by means of making safety and security issues an integral part of University’s strategic plan and also by adopting the management line model – one form of management structure-where safety and security are located, with other general management responsibilities. This way, the resurgent cases of kidnapping, hired assassination, etc. would be reduced if not completely eradicated in the University.

  7. Bayesian Safety Risk Modeling of Human-Flightdeck Automation Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancel, Ersin; Shih, Ann T.

    2015-01-01

    Usage of automatic systems in airliners has increased fuel efficiency, added extra capabilities, enhanced safety and reliability, as well as provide improved passenger comfort since its introduction in the late 80's. However, original automation benefits, including reduced flight crew workload, human errors or training requirements, were not achieved as originally expected. Instead, automation introduced new failure modes, redistributed, and sometimes increased workload, brought in new cognitive and attention demands, and increased training requirements. Modern airliners have numerous flight modes, providing more flexibility (and inherently more complexity) to the flight crew. However, the price to pay for the increased flexibility is the need for increased mode awareness, as well as the need to supervise, understand, and predict automated system behavior. Also, over-reliance on automation is linked to manual flight skill degradation and complacency in commercial pilots. As a result, recent accidents involving human errors are often caused by the interactions between humans and the automated systems (e.g., the breakdown in man-machine coordination), deteriorated manual flying skills, and/or loss of situational awareness due to heavy dependence on automated systems. This paper describes the development of the increased complexity and reliance on automation baseline model, named FLAP for FLightdeck Automation Problems. The model development process starts with a comprehensive literature review followed by the construction of a framework comprised of high-level causal factors leading to an automation-related flight anomaly. The framework was then converted into a Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) using the Hugin Software v7.8. The effects of automation on flight crew are incorporated into the model, including flight skill degradation, increased cognitive demand and training requirements along with their interactions. Besides flight crew deficiencies, automation system

  8. Risk-informed regulation: handling uncertainty for a rational management of safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A risk-informed regulatory approach implies that risk insights be used as supplement of deterministic information for safety decision-making purposes. In this view, the use of risk assessment techniques is expected to lead to improved safety and a more rational allocation of the limited resources available. On the other hand, it is recognized that uncertainties affect both the deterministic safety analyses and the risk assessments. In order for the risk-informed decision making process to be effective, the adequate representation and treatment of such uncertainties is mandatory. In this paper, the risk-informed regulatory framework is considered under the focus of the uncertainty issue. Traditionally, probability theory has provided the language and mathematics for the representation and treatment of uncertainty. More recently, other mathematical structures have been introduced. In particular, the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence is here illustrated as a generalized framework encompassing probability theory and possibility theory. The special case of probability theory is only addressed as term of comparison, given that it is a well known subject. On the other hand, the special case of possibility theory is amply illustrated. An example of the combination of probability and possibility for treating the uncertainty in the parameters of an event tree is illustrated

  9. From mad cows to sensible blood transfusion: the risk of prion transmission by labile blood components in the United Kingdom and in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Hewitt, Patricia

    2009-04-01

    Transfusion transmission of the prion, the agent of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), is now established. Subjects infected through food may transmit the disease through blood donations. The two nations most affected to date by this threat are the United Kingdom (UK) and France. The first transfusion cases have been observed in the UK over the past 5 years. In France, a few individuals who developed vCJD had a history of blood donation, leading to a risk of transmission to recipients, some of whom could be incubating the disease. In the absence of a large-scale screening test, it is impossible to establish the prevalence of infection in the blood donor population and transfused patients. This lack of a test also prevents specific screening of blood donations. Thus, prevention of transfusion transmission essentially relies at present on deferral of "at-risk" individuals. Because prions are present in both white blood cells and plasma, leukoreduction is probably insufficient to totally eliminate the transfusion risk. In the absence of a screening test for blood donations, recently developed prion-specific filters could be a solution. Furthermore, while the dietary spread of vCJD seems efficiently controlled, uncertainty remains as to the extent of the spread of prions through blood transfusion and other secondary routes. PMID:19170997

  10. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary: main report. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the objectives and organization of the reactor safety study; the basic concepts of risk; the nature of nuclear power plant accidents; risk assessment methodology; reactor accident risk; and comparison of nuclear risks to other societal risks.

  11. Estimating the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in blood donors and pregnant women in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Nabae

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seroepidemiological study of parvovirus B19 has not taken place for some 20 years in Japan. To estimate the risk of parvovirus B19 infection in Japan among blood donors and pregnant women in this century, a seroepidemiological survey and statistical modeling of the force of infection were conducted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The time- and age-specific seroprevalence data were suggestive of strong age-dependency in the risk of infection. Employing a piecewise constant model, the highest forces of infection of 0.05 and 0.12 per year were observed among those aged 0-4 and 5-9 years, respectively, while estimates among older individuals were less than 0.01 per year. Analyzing the antigen detection data among blood donors, the age-specific proportion positive was highest among those aged 30-39 years, agreeing with the presence of dip in seroprevalence in this age-group. Among pregnant women, up to 107 fetal deaths and 21 hydrops fetalis were estimated to have occurred annually across Japan. CONCLUSIONS: Seroepidemiological profiles of PVB19 infection in Japan was characterized with particular emphasis on the risk of infection in blood donors and the burden of infection among pregnant women. When a vaccine becomes available in the future, a similar seroepidemiological study is expected to play a key role in planning the appropriate immunization policy.

  12. Introduction of reliability, safety and risk monitoring technology in BN-600 power unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenergoatom Concern OJSC Operating Entity set the task to introduce risk monitoring technology for continuous estimate and control of nuclear units quantitative safety measures change. JSC “Afrikantov OKBM” and “Beloyarsk NPP” developed risk monitor system “RIM” which is introducing now at Beloyarsk NPP BN-600 unit 3. To estimate quantitative safety measures Level 1 PSA for internal initiating events for full power operating conditions model of Beloyarsk NPP BN-600 unit 3 is used. PSA model was developed using national certified PSA software CRISS. To ensure NPP reliability and safety, implementation of comprehensive systematic study (monitoring) of NPP operating experience is of fundamental value. To solve this problem, JSC “Afrikantov OKBM” and “Beloyarsk NPP” developed and introduced the system for analytical reliability and safety monitoring of BN-600 power unit based on information retrieval system (IRS) “Istochnik-BN”. The paper describes system objectives, main characteristics and results of reliability, safety and risk monitoring technology introducing at Beloyarsk NPP BN-600 unit 3. (author)

  13. Risk Effect Analysis of Digital Safety-Critical I and C System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UCN 5 and 6 nuclear units (OPR1000) are being constructed and the Korean Next Generation Reactor (APR1400) is being designed by using digital I and C equipment for the safety functions such as a reactor protection system, an engineered safety feature actuation system, and a safety equipment control system. KAERI has performed safety assessment framework development by using conventional fault tree models. Even though the evaluation methods acceptable for some specific failure mechanisms in digital risk assessment (such as fault coverage, software failure probability) are not established yet, the trend analysis and rough risk effect analysis of digital safety-critical systems on a plant could be addressed based on the developed framework. Authors had proposed a research plan and a systematic three-step approach for assessing the safety of digital systems in nuclear power plants in Kang and Sung. Each step in the proposed research approach should be iteratively performed based on the feedback from the results of the other steps

  14. Software quality assurance for safety analysis and risk management at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its Reactor Operations Improvement Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), in cooperation with the Westinghouse Hanford Company, has developed and implemented quality assurance for safety-related software for technical programs essential to the safety and reliability of reactor operations. More specifically, the quality assurance process involved the development and implementation of quality standards and attendant procedures based on industry software quality standards. These procedures were then applied to computer codes in reactor safety and probabilistic risk assessment analyses. This paper provides a review of the major aspects of the WSRC safety-related software quality assurance. In particular, quality assurance procedures are described for the different life cycle phases of the software that include the Requirements, Software Design and Implementation, Testing and Installation, Operation and Maintenance, and Retirement Phases. For each phase, specific provisions are made to categorize the range of activities, the level of responsibilities, and the documentation needed to assure the control of the software. The software quality assurance procedures developed and implemented are evolutionary in nature, and thus, prone to further refinements. These procedures, nevertheless, represent an effective controlling tool for the development, production, and operation of safety-related software applicable to reactor safety and probabilistic risk assessment analyses

  15. Air pollution, blood pressure, and the risk of hypertensive complications during pregnancy: the generation R study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hooven, Edith H; de Kluizenaar, Yvonne; Pierik, Frank H; Hofman, Albert; van Ratingen, Sjoerd W; Zandveld, Peter Y J; Mackenbach, Johan P; Steegers, Eric A P; Miedema, Henk M E; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. We assessed the associations of exposure to particulate matter (PM(10)) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) levels with blood pressure measured in each trimester of pregnancy and the risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia in 7006 women participating in a prospective cohort study in the Netherlands. Information on gestational hypertensive disorders was obtained from medical records. PM(10) exposure was not associated with first trimester systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but a 10-μg/m(3) increase in PM(10) levels was associated with a 1.11-mm Hg (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.43 to 1.79) and 2.11-mm Hg (95% CI 1.34 to 2.89) increase in systolic blood pressure in the second and third trimester, respectively. Longitudinal analyses showed that elevated PM(10) exposure levels were associated with a steeper increase in systolic blood pressure throughout pregnancy (Ppregnancy-induced hypertension (odds ratio 1.72 [95% CI 1.12 to 2.63] per 10-μg/m(3) increase). In conclusion, our results suggest that air pollution may affect maternal cardiovascular health during pregnancy. The effects might be small but relevant on a population level. PMID:21220700

  16. Tattoos and transfusion-transmitted disease risk: implications for the screening of blood donors in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio de A. Nishioka

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Having a tattoo has been associated with serological evidence of hepatitis B and C viruses, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infections and syphilis; all of these are known to be transmissible by blood transfusion. These associations are of higher magnitude for individuals with nonprofessionally-applied tattoos and with two or more tattoos. Tattoos are common among drug addicts and prisoners, conditions that are also associated with transfusion-transmitted diseases. We examined the implications of these associations for the screening of blood donors in Brazil. Numbers of individuals who would be correctly or unnecessarily deferred from blood donation on the basis of the presence of tattoos, and on their number and type, were calculated for different prevalence situations based on published odds ratios. If having a tattoo was made a deferral criterion, cost savings (due to a reduced need for laboratory testing and subsequent follow-up would accrue at the expense of the deferral of appropriate donors. Restricting deferral to more `at-risk' sub-groups of tattooed individuals would correctly defer less individuals and would also reduce the numbers of potential donors unnecessarily deferred. Key factors in balancing cost savings and unnecessary deferrals include the magnitude of the pool of blood donors in the population, the prevalence of individuals with tattoos and the `culture' of tattoos in the population. Tattoos can therefore be an efficient criterion for the screening of blood donors in certain settings, a finding that requires corroboration from larger population-based studies.

  17. Elevated Blood Lead Levels Are Associated with Reduced Risk of Malaria in Beninese Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Alvarez, Violeta; Mireku, Michael Osei; Ayotte, Pierre; Cot, Michel; Bodeau-Livinec, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elevated blood lead levels (BLL) and malaria carry an important burden of disease in West Africa. Both diseases might cause anemia and they might entail long-term consequences for the development and the health status of the child. Albeit the significant impact of malaria on lead levels described in Nigeria, no evaluation of the effect of elevated BLL on malaria risk has been investigated so far. Materials and Methods Between 2010 and 2012, blood lead levels of 203 Beninese infants from Allada, a semi-rural area 50km North from Cotonou, were assessed at 12 months of age. To assess lead levels, blood samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In parallel, clinical, microbiological and hematological data were collected. More precisely, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, CRP, vitamin B12, folate levels, and Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia were assessed and stool samples were also analyzed. Results At 12 months, the mean BLL of infants was 7.41 μg/dL (CI: 65.2; 83), and 128 infants (63%) had elevated blood lead levels, defined by the CDC as BLL>5 μg/dL. Lead poisoning, defined as BLL>10 μg/dL, was found in 39 infants (19%). Twenty-five infants (12.5%) had a positive blood smear at 12 months and 144 infants were anemic (71%, hemoglobinprotect the population in West Africa. PMID:26866471

  18. International Fatigue Risk Management Forum: Safety Promotion and Feedback in FRMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, S.; Koornneef, F.; Akselsson, R.

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 8: International Fatigue Risk Management Forum - Safety Promotion and Feedback in FRMS The European Commission HILAS project (Human Integration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems - a project supported by the European Commission’s 6th Framework between 2005-2009) was focused on using hum

  19. A risk assessment approach to evaluating food safety based on product surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notermans, S.; Nauta, M.J.; Jansen, J.; Jouve, J.L.; Mead, G.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper outlines a risk assessment approach to food safety evaluation, which is based on testing a particular type of food, or group of similar foods, for relevant microbial pathogens. The results obtained are related to possible adverse effects on the health of consumers. The paper also gives an

  20. Evaluation of the "Respect Not Risk" Firearm Safety Lesson for 3rd-Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liller, Karen D.; Perrin, Karen; Nearns, Jodi; Pesce, Karen; Crane, Nancy B.; Gonzalez, Robin R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the MORE HEALTH "Respect Not Risk" Firearm Safety Lesson for 3rd-graders in Pinellas County, Florida. Six schools representative of various socioeconomic levels were selected as the test sites. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected. A total of 433 matched pretests/posttests were used to…

  1. Violence and Legalized Brothel Prostitution in Nevada: Examining Safety, Risk, and Prostitution Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brents, Barbara G.; Hausbeck, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    This article examines violence in legalized brothels in Nevada. Debates over prostitution policies in the United States have long focused on questions of safety and risk. These discourses inevitably invoke the coupling of violence and prostitution, though systematic examinations of the relationship between the two are sparse. This article explores…

  2. The Attitude of Civil Engineering Students towards Health and Safety Risk Management: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A. K.; Reynolds, J. H.; Ng, L. W. T.

    2008-01-01

    The highest rate of accidents and injuries in British industries has been reported by the construction industry during the past decade. Since then stakeholders have recognised that a possible solution would be to inculcate a good attitude towards health and safety risk management in undergraduate civil engineering students and construction…

  3. Risk-oriented approach for assessing the environmental safety of radioactive waste storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses the risk-oriented approach for assessing the ecological security of radioactive waste storage facilities. On the basis of probability indicators the condition of ecological safety is found to be met at Odessa State Multiregional Facility on the normative criteria of deaths

  4. Problems of making decisions with account of risk and safety factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New trends in making decisions on accidents when using large-scale technologies-NPPs, chemical plants etc., are considered. Three main directions in the investigations in this field are distinguished. One of them consists in risk measuring (its perception by people, ways of its quantitative determination). The second direction consists in increasing the safety of large-scale production systems. Here the following questions are considered: risk assessment (the safety standard statement), site selection for new systems, man-machine interaction problems, development of safer technologies, cost benefit safety analysis. The third direction is connected with the problem of accidents and their analysis. This direction includes considering the reasons and process of the accident development, preparing for the possible accidents, monitoring under extreme conditions, accident effect analysis

  5. Risk assessment of computer-controlled safety systems for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexity of fusion reactor systems and the need to display, analyze, and react promptly to large amounts of information during reactor operation will require a number of safety systems in the fusion facilities to be computer controlled. Computer software, therefore, must be included in the reactor safety analyses. Unfortunately, the science of integrating computer software into safety analyses is in its infancy. Combined plant hardware and computer software systems are often treated by making simple assumptions about software performance. This method is not acceptable for assessing risks in the complex fusion systems, and a new technique for risk assessment of combined plant hardware and computer software systems has been developed. This technique is an extension of the traditional fault tree analysis and uses structured flow charts of the software in a manner analogous to wiring or piping diagrams of hardware. The software logic determines the form of much of the fault trees

  6. Risk assessment of computer-controlled safety systems for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexity of fusion reactor systems and the need to display, analyze, and react promptly to large amounts of information during reactor operation will require a number of safety systems in the fusion facilities to be computer controlled. Computer software, therefore, must be included in the reactor safety analyses. Unfortunately, the science of integrating computer software into safety analyses is in its infancy. Combined plant hardware and computer software systems are often treated by making simple assumptions about software performance. This method is not acceptable for assessing risks in the complex fusion systems, and a new technique for risk assessment of combined plant hardware and computer software systems has been developed. This technique is an extension of the traditional fault tree analysis and uses structured flow charts of the software in a manner analogous to wiring or piping diagrams of hardware. The software logic determines the form of much of the fault tree

  7. SEROPREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS-C VIRUS IN BLOOD DONORS AND HIGH RISK INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Hepatitis C virus (HCV continues to be a major dis ease burden affecting about 200 million people in world. Using blood donors as a preva lence source may underestimate the real prevalence of the virus because the donors are highl y selected population. Presently more evidences support intravenous drug use as leading ris k factor for the spread of virus. OBJECTIVES: The study aims at finding out the seroprevelance of Hepatitis C virus in high risk individuals as well as healthy blood donors. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The study group comprise of 350 subjects which included 150 healthy voluntary donors as control group and 200 subjects taken from different high risk popu lation like intravenous drug abuser (50, patients on long term haemodialysis (40, patients with chronic liver disease (50, HIV positive cases (30, health care workers (30. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Percentage. RESULTS: Seropositivity for anti HCV antibody was found to b e 12% (24/200 among high risk population and 0.66 % (1/150 in healthy voluntary blood don ors. Among different high risk groups, maximum prevalence rate 28% (14/50 was found in I.V drug abusers. Fifty percent (7/14 of the seropositive parenteral drug abusers were male i n the age group of 21-30 years followed by 35.7% (5/14 in 31-40 years of age group. Only one f emale (7.14% between 21-30 years was found to be sero-reactive for antiHCV antibody. In HIV co-infected cases 13.33 % (4/30 were seropositive for antiHCV antibody. In chronic liver disease (two hepatocellular carcinoma, one cirrhosis and one chronic hepatitis and long standi ng haemodialysis, the prevalence rate for anti HCV was found to be 8% (4/50 and 5% (2/40 re spectively. None of the health workers (0/30 found to be sero-reactive for antiHCV antibo dy. CONCLUSIONS: HCV poses a serious worldwide health problem affecting people from all wal ks of life in every country. In the present study 12% and 0.66% HCV prevalence was noticed in hi gh risk

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Antifibrinolytic Agents in Reducing Perioperative Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements in Scoliosis Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    Full Text Available Routine use of antifibrinolytic agents in spine surgery is still an issue of debate.To gather scientific evidence for the efficacy and safety of antifibrinolytic agents including aprotinin, tranexamic acid (TXA and epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA, traditionally known as Amicar in reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in scoliosis surgery.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for randomized controlled trials (RCTs, retrospective case-control studies, and retrospective cohort studies on the use of antifibrinolytic agents in scoliosis surgery by searching in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Controlled Trials of papers published from January 1980 through July 2014. Safety of the antifibrinolytic agents was evaluated in all included studies, while efficacy was evaluated in RCTs.Eighteen papers with a total of 1,158 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. Among them, 8 RCTs with 450 patients were included for evaluation of pharmacologic efficacy (1 RCT was excluded because of a lack of standard deviation data. Mean blood loss was reduced in patients with perioperative use of antifibrinolytic agents by 409.25 ml intraoperatively (95% confidence interval [CI], 196.57-621.94 ml, 250.30 ml postoperatively (95% CI, 35.31-465.30, and 601.40 ml overall (95% CI, 306.64-896.16 ml. The mean volume of blood transfusion was reduced by 474.98 ml (95% CI, 195.30-754.67 ml. The transfusion rate was 44.6% (108/242 in the patients with antifibrinolytic agents and 68.3% (142/208 in the patients with placebo. (OR 0.38; 95% CI; 0.25-0.58; P<0.00001, I2 = 9%. All studies were included for evaluation of safety, with a total of 8 adverse events reported overall (4 in the experimental group and 4 in the control group.The systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that aprotinin, TXA, and EACA all significantly reduced perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements

  9. Microbes and blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion medicine has been constantly evolving through the years with improved technologies that enhance the capability of identifying existing and newer emerging transfusion transmissible infections (TTI. In spite of the efforts made by blood banks the risk of TTI remains. This article deals with the various steps involved in ensuring blood safety, i.e. donor selection, role of screening donated blood for known and emerging infections, issues and assessment of threat posed by the risk, methodologies employed for testing and possible suggestions to improve transfusion services. While the threat of TTI remains, with a concerted effort of private and government organisations, and co-operation from the diagnostic companies, it is possible to raise the levels of blood safety. A surveillance system is also essential to identify any new agents that might pose a threat in a geographic area and to include them too in the screening process.

  10. Hepatitis B Prevalence and Risk Factors in Blood Donors in Ghazvin, IR.Iran|

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Yektaparast

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study was done to find out the common routes of transmission of hepatitis B.Methods: We assessed 39598 volunteer blood donors for hepatitis B and C. Risk factors were obtained from 186 patients and 186 healthy donors. Independent risk factors were determined using logistic regression analysis.Results: Prevalence of HBV was 1.08%. Female sex, education level lower than secondary school, being married, and age more than 35 years old, were risk factors in univariate analysis. Logistic regression showed that only duration of marriage, close contact with an HBV infected person, extramarital sexual contact, history of sexually transmitted diseases and high risk jobs were independent risk factors for prediction of hepatitis B infection. Risk factors which were addressed in this study covered 95.7% of the patients. Conclusions: Ghazvin is one of the low prevalent regions for hepatitis B in Iran. Prevalence of hepatitis B is decreasing in comparison with past decades. Horizontal mode is more important than vertical transmission in this region of Iran.Screening programs, education and vaccination, specifically in high risk groups are essential for prevention of new cases

  11. The effectiveness and safety of L-amlodipine besylate for blood pressure control in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾坦

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of L-amlodipine besylate for blood pressure control in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension.Methods A total of 1051 mild to moderate essential

  12. The effects of safety and risk perception on the public acceptance of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Gook; Sung, Tae Yong [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Sung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    The public acceptance does not fully depend on the scientific safety. The safety of nuclear power plants in Korea has been improved by several ten times over 20 years. In the 1970s the public acceptance of nuclear power in Korea was very positive because of necessity. Nowadays, however, people consider other environmental factors such as nuclear waste and are looking for the other environmentally sound energy sources. This article shows the progress of nuclear power plant's safety from the viewpoint of science and tries to reveal the structure of publics' attitude toward nuclear power in the Korea from the viewpoint of a social study. We will quantitatively show that a significant improvement of the scientific safety has been made over last two decades and the public does not have any discriminative opinion against nuclear power in relation to risk management. However, as a matter of fact, there is considerable criticism toward the utilization of nuclear power. We establish a model in order to explain the relations among several important factors of public acceptance. It explains what the public thinks of the safety of nuclear power, what contributes to the perception of nuclear risk and what factors influence the acceptance of the risk. It is quantitatively found that Korean people regard nuclear power as necessary, but the nearby construction of a plant as another thing. The important factors for explaining such behavior are the judgment of safety and necessity as well as the subjective risk-perception on possible accident, health effect of radiation, and environmental damages. However we should point out that the variance of unexplained factors are high. We miss something important.

  13. The effects of safety and risk perception on the public acceptance of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public acceptance does not fully depend on the scientific safety. The safety of nuclear power plants in Korea has been improved by several ten times over 20 years. In the 1970s the public acceptance of nuclear power in Korea was very positive because of necessity. Nowadays, however, people consider other environmental factors such as nuclear waste and are looking for the other environmentally sound energy sources. This article shows the progress of nuclear power plant's safety from the viewpoint of science and tries to reveal the structure of publics' attitude toward nuclear power in the Korea from the viewpoint of a social study. We will quantitatively show that a significant improvement of the scientific safety has been made over last two decades and the public does not have any discriminative opinion against nuclear power in relation to risk management. However, as a matter of fact, there is considerable criticism toward the utilization of nuclear power. We establish a model in order to explain the relations among several important factors of public acceptance. It explains what the public thinks of the safety of nuclear power, what contributes to the perception of nuclear risk and what factors influence the acceptance of the risk. It is quantitatively found that Korean people regard nuclear power as necessary, but the nearby construction of a plant as another thing. The important factors for explaining such behavior are the judgment of safety and necessity as well as the subjective risk-perception on possible accident, health effect of radiation, and environmental damages. However we should point out that the variance of unexplained factors are high. We miss something important

  14. [Safety value of contaminant in water pollution accident based on human health risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bing-Hui; Luo, Jin-Hong; Fu, Qing; Qin, Yan-Wen; Hu, Lin-Lin

    2012-02-01

    The acute human health risk assessment of contaminant in water pollution accident is a new study field of environmental sciences. This study established a model for calculating acute safety value of contaminant in water pollutant. The acute safety value of contaminant in mainly water pollution during 2000-2010 was calculated by this model. The safety value of sodium cyanide, cadmium, formaldehyde, ammonia, toluene, nitrobenzene, microcystin-LR were 0.1, 0.6, 8, 20, 6, 0.07, 0.004 mg x L(-1), respectively. The differences of safety value calculate methods between acute and chronic exposure were compared from the following aspects, the toxicology exposure end-point, allocation of intake, exposure sensitive subpopulation. PMID:22509564

  15. Counterfeit phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors pose significant safety risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, G; Arver, S; Banks, I; Stecher, V J

    2010-03-01

    Counterfeit drugs are inherently dangerous and a growing problem; counterfeiters are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Growth of the counterfeit medication market is attributable in part to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) medications for erectile dysfunction (ED). Millions of counterfeit PDE5is are seized yearly and account for the bulk of all counterfeit pharmaceutical product seizures. It has been estimated that up to 2.5 million men in Europe are exposed to illicit sildenafil, suggesting that there may be as many illegal as legal users of sildenafil. Analysis of the contents of counterfeit PDE5is shows inconsistent doses of active pharmaceutical ingredients (from 0% to > 200% of labelled dose), contaminants (including talcum powder, commercial paint and printer ink) and alternative ingredients that are potentially hazardous. In one analysis, only 10.1% of samples were within 10% of the labelled tablet strength. Estimates place the proportion of counterfeit medications sold over the Internet from 44% to 90%. Of men who purchase prescription-only medication for ED without a prescription, 67% do so using the Internet. Counterfeit PDE5is pose direct and indirect risks to health, including circumvention of the healthcare system. More than 30% of men reported no healthcare interaction when purchasing ED medications. Because > 65% actually had ED, these men missed an opportunity for evaluation of comorbidities (e.g. diabetes and hypertension). Globally, increased obstacles for counterfeiters are necessary to combat pharmaceutical counterfeiting, including fines and penalties. The worldwide nature of the counterfeit problem requires proper coordination between countries to ensure adequate enforcement. Locally, physicians who treat ED need to inform patients of the dangers of ordering PDE5is via the Internet. PMID:20088883

  16. Aspects of probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear safety in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the current status of application and further development of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology in the Federal Republic of Germany. Referring to the experience obtained so far, especially to the insights gained from the German Risk Study, graduated levels for application of PRA methods are briefly described. Thereby the following items are pointed out: (a) the use of PRA to identify weak points in the systems and to evaluate plant system modifications; (b) evaluation of the database, identification and quantification of common-mode failures, human intervention, and (c) modelling of accident progression, description of core-melt sequences and containment response. In the second part of the paper, aspects concerning the assessment of risk and appropriate forms for setting up quantitative safety goals are considered. Although this topic is still under discussion the paper examines the possibility for quantitative criteria which can give guidance for further improvement of safety features. Two approaches are outlined briefly: (a) a plant-oriented engineering approach considering graduated levels of safety requirements, and (b) a risk criterion, setting limits to frequencies of dose commitments with respect to the individual mortality risk. (author)

  17. A holistic approach to control process safety risks: Possible ways forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursuing process safety in a world of continuously increasing requirements is not a simple matter. Keeping balance between producing quality and volume under budget constraints while maintaining an adequate safety level proves time and time again a difficult task given that evidently major accidents cannot be avoided. Lack of resilience from an organizational point of view to absorb unwanted and unforeseen disturbances has in recent years been put forward as a major cause, while organizational erosive drift is shown to be responsible for complacency and degradation of safety attitude. A systems approach to safety provides a new paradigm with the promise of new comprehensive tools. At the same time, one realizes that risk assessment will fall short of identifying and quantifying all possible scenarios. First, human error is in most assessments not included. It is even argued that determining human failure probability by decomposing it to basic elements of error is not possible. Second, the crux of the systemic approach is that safety is an emergent property, which means the same holds for the technological aspect: risk is not fully predictable from failure of components. By surveying and applying recent literature, besides analysing, this paper proposes a way forward by considering resilience of a socio-technical system both from an organizational and a technical side. The latter will for a large part be determined by the plant design. Sufficient redundancy and reserve shall be kept to preserve sufficient resilience, but the question that rises is how. Available methods are risk assessment and process simulation. It is helpful that the relation between risk and resilience analysis has been recently defined. Also, in a preliminary study the elements of resilience of a process have become listed. In the latter, receiving and interpreting weak signals to boost situational awareness plays an important role. To maintain alertness on the functioning of a safety management

  18. Early pregnancy peripheral blood gene expression and risk of preterm delivery: a nested case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhie Seid Y

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm delivery (PTD is a significant public health problem associated with greater risk of mortality and morbidity in infants and mothers. Pathophysiologic processes that may lead to PTD start early in pregnancy. We investigated early pregnancy peripheral blood global gene expression and PTD risk. Methods As part of a prospective study, ribonucleic acid was extracted from blood samples (collected at 16 weeks gestational age from 14 women who had PTD (cases and 16 women who delivered at term (controls. Gene expressions were measured using the GeneChip® Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. Student's T-test and fold change analysis were used to identify differentially expressed genes. We used hierarchical clustering and principle components analysis to characterize signature gene expression patterns among cases and controls. Pathway and promoter sequence analyses were used to investigate functions and functional relationships as well as regulatory regions of differentially expressed genes. Results A total of 209 genes, including potential candidate genes (e.g. PTGDS, prostaglandin D2 synthase 21 kDa, were differentially expressed. A set of these genes achieved accurate pre-diagnostic separation of cases and controls. These genes participate in functions related to immune system and inflammation, organ development, metabolism (lipid, carbohydrate and amino acid and cell signaling. Binding sites of putative transcription factors such as EGR1 (early growth response 1, TFAP2A (transcription factor AP2A, Sp1 (specificity protein 1 and Sp3 (specificity protein 3 were over represented in promoter regions of differentially expressed genes. Real-time PCR confirmed microarray expression measurements of selected genes. Conclusions PTD is associated with maternal early pregnancy peripheral blood gene expression changes. Maternal early pregnancy peripheral blood gene expression patterns may be useful for better understanding of PTD

  19. Risk-Informed Balancing Of Safety, Nonproliferation, And Economics For The SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A substantial barrier to the implementation of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) technology in the short term is the perception that they would not be economically competitive with advanced light water reactors. With increased acceptance of risk-informed regulation, the opportunity exists to reduce the costs of a nuclear power plant at the design stage without applying excessive conservatism that is not needed in treating low risk events. In the report, NUREG-1860, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes developmental activities associated with a risk-informed, scenario-based technology neutral framework (TNF) for regulation. It provides quantitative yardsticks against which the adequacy of safety risks can be judged. We extend these concepts to treatment of proliferation risks. The objective of our project is to develop a risk-informed design process for minimizing the cost of electricity generation within constraints of adequate safety and proliferation risks. This report describes the design and use of this design optimization process within the context of reducing the capital cost and levelized cost of electricity production for a small (possibly modular) SFR. Our project provides not only an evaluation of the feasibility of a risk-informed design process but also a practical test of the applicability of the TNF to an actual advanced, non-LWR design. The report provides results of five safety related and one proliferation related case studies of innovative design alternatives. Applied to previously proposed SFR nuclear energy system concepts We find that the TNF provides a feasible initial basis for licensing new reactors. However, it is incomplete. We recommend improvements in terms of requiring acceptance standards for total safety risks, and we propose a framework for regulation of proliferation risks. We also demonstrate methods for evaluation of proliferation risks. We also suggest revisions to scenario-specific safety risk acceptance standards

  20. RISK-INFORMED BALANCING OF SAFETY, NONPROLIFERATION, AND ECONOMICS FOR THE SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolakis, George; Driscoll, Michael; Golay, Michael; Kadak, Andrew; Todreas, Neil; Aldmir, Tunc; Denning, Richard; Lineberry, Michael

    2011-10-20

    A substantial barrier to the implementation of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) technology in the short term is the perception that they would not be economically competitive with advanced light water reactors. With increased acceptance of risk-informed regulation, the opportunity exists to reduce the costs of a nuclear power plant at the design stage without applying excessive conservatism that is not needed in treating low risk events. In the report, NUREG-1860, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission describes developmental activities associated with a risk-informed, scenario-based technology neutral framework (TNF) for regulation. It provides quantitative yardsticks against which the adequacy of safety risks can be judged. We extend these concepts to treatment of proliferation risks. The objective of our project is to develop a risk-informed design process for minimizing the cost of electricity generation within constraints of adequate safety and proliferation risks. This report describes the design and use of this design optimization process within the context of reducing the capital cost and levelized cost of electricity production for a small (possibly modular) SFR. Our project provides not only an evaluation of the feasibility of a risk-informed design process but also a practical test of the applicability of the TNF to an actual advanced, non-LWR design. The report provides results of five safety related and one proliferation related case studies of innovative design alternatives. Applied to previously proposed SFR nuclear energy system concepts We find that the TNF provides a feasible initial basis for licensing new reactors. However, it is incomplete. We recommend improvements in terms of requiring acceptance standards for total safety risks, and we propose a framework for regulation of proliferation risks. We also demonstrate methods for evaluation of proliferation risks. We also suggest revisions to scenario-specific safety risk acceptance standards

  1. An Investigation into Risks Awareness and E-Safety Needs of Children on the Internet: A Study of Devon, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annansingh, Fenio; Veli, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate children interaction in cyberspace and their use of Web 2.0 technologies. It sought their perception of internet risks as well as their knowledge and experience with electronic safety (e-safety) measures. It also considered parents', teachers' and other stakeholders' perception of internet risks, e-safety…

  2. 76 FR 63929 - Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and the Dermatologic and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... public. Name of Committees: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and Dermatologic and... Management Advisory Committee (DSaRM). On December 1, 2011, the DSaRM and the Dermatologic and Ophthalmic... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk...

  3. 78 FR 64957 - Joint Meeting of the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Joint Meeting AGENCY: Food... public. Name of Committees: Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and recommendations...

  4. 75 FR 17417 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... Management Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of March 8, 2010 (75 FR... Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice AGENCY: Food and Drug... meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory...

  5. 75 FR 36427 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. ] General Function... and efficacy findings for sodium oxybate in the fibromyalgia population and the proposed...

  6. Relationship among Food-Safety Knowledge, Beliefs, and Risk-Reduction Behavior in University Students in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Sayaka; Akamatsu, Rie; Horiguchi, Itsuko; Marui, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To identify whether university students who have both food-safety knowledge and beliefs perform risk-reduction behaviors. Design: Cross-sectional research using a questionnaire that included food-safety knowledge, perceptions, risk-reduction behavior, stages for the selection of safer food based on the Transtheoretical Model, and…

  7. Risk-Based Predictive Maintenance for Safety-Critical Systems by Using Probabilistic Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk-based maintenance (RBM aims to improve maintenance planning and decision making by reducing the probability and consequences of failure of equipment. A new predictive maintenance strategy that integrates dynamic evolution model and risk assessment is proposed which can be used to calculate the optimal maintenance time with minimal cost and safety constraints. The dynamic evolution model provides qualified risks by using probabilistic inference with bucket elimination and gives the prospective degradation trend of a complex system. Based on the degradation trend, an optimal maintenance time can be determined by minimizing the expected maintenance cost per time unit. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated and demonstrated by a collision accident of high-speed trains with obstacles in the presence of safety and cost constrains.

  8. Review of Research Trends and Methods in Nano Environmental, Health, and Safety Risk Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbis, Serkan; Ok, Zeynep; Isaacs, Jacqueline A; Benneyan, James C; Kamarthi, Sagar

    2016-08-01

    Despite the many touted benefits of nanomaterials, concerns remain about their possible environmental, health, and safety (EHS) risks in terms of their toxicity, long-term accumulation effects, or dose-response relationships. The published studies on EHS risks of nanomaterials have increased significantly over the past decade and half, with most focused on nanotoxicology. Researchers are still learning about health consequences of nanomaterials and how to make environmentally responsible decisions regarding their production. This article characterizes the scientific literature on nano-EHS risk analysis to map the state-of-the-art developments in this field and chart guidance for the future directions. First, an analysis of keyword co-occurrence networks is investigated for nano-EHS literature published in the past decade to identify the intellectual turning points and research trends in nanorisk analysis studies. The exposure groups targeted in emerging nano-EHS studies are also assessed. System engineering methods for risk, safety, uncertainty, and system reliability analysis are reviewed, followed by detailed descriptions where applications of these methods are utilized to analyze nanomaterial EHS risks. Finally, the trends, methods, future directions, and opportunities of system engineering methods in nano-EHS research are discussed. The analysis of nano-EHS literature presented in this article provides important insights on risk assessment and risk management tools associated with nanotechnology, nanomanufacturing, and nano-enabled products. PMID:26882074

  9. PERCEIVED RISK AND SAFETY-RELATED BEHAVIORS AFTER LEAVING A VIOLENT RELATIONSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaura González-Méndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that victim’ risk perception could improve risk assessment in cases of intimate partner violence research is paying attention to it. However, it is not clear whether perceived risk relates to safety-related behaviors. This study is aimed to analyze how perceived risk by women who have left a violent partner relates to their safety-related behaviors and post-separation violence. Participants were 249 women (from protection services and the community who had concluded a violent relationship. A structural equation model describes the relationships between three groups of factors: (1 women’s risk perception; (2 three types of conditions that increase the opportunity for victim/abuser contact: (a women’s actions that make them easier to track, (b women’s reasons for not protecting themselves, and (c batterers’ strategies to gain access to their former intimate partners; and (3 post-separation violence. Results indicate that psychological violence is positively related to perceived risk and helplessness. Moreover, while women’s risk perception predicts less contact and self-deception, male strategies predict greater contact and routines. In turn, contact predicts intimacy, whose absence fully accounts for 93.3% of the prediction of no re-abuse, six months later. The results’ implications for intervention are discussed.

  10. Patient safety risk assessment and risk management: A review on Indian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to discuss a critical need expressed by present healthcare system of India, and how to provide a better health facility and diluting the medication errors caused by inappropriate management of the hospitals. Adverse events related to medication occur due to pathetic infrastructures, corporal punishment by the patient if unsatisfied, doctors on strike and working only for riches, trivial financial aid, and lack of basic amenities in the government-run hospitals of India. Government should reduce the barriers of awareness, accountability, ability, and action into accelerators of patient safety in the government organizations. Physicians, nurses, and pharmacists are truly the critical ingredient to rapid safety practice adoption. Various approaches like Technological Iatrogenesis, Computerized Provider Order Entry, and Electronic Health Record should be used. Although patient safety is recognized as a serious issue in health system, there is an urgent need for development and implementation of strategies for prevention and early detection of errors.

  11. On a systematic perspective on risk for formal safety assessment (FSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the maritime domain, risk is evaluated within the framework of the Formal Safety Assessment (FSA), introduced by the International Maritime Organization in 2002. Although the FSA has become an internationally recognized and recommended method, the definition, which is adopted there, to describe the risk, seems to be too narrow to reflect the actual content of the FSA. Therefore this article discusses methodological requirements for the risk perspective, which is appropriate for risk management in the maritime domain with special attention to maritime transportation systems. A perspective that is proposed here considers risk as a set encompassing the following: a set of plausible scenarios leading to an accident, the likelihoods of unwanted events within the scenarios, the consequences of the events and description of uncertainty. All these elements are conditional upon the available knowledge (K) about the analyzed system and understanding (N) of the system behavior. Therefore, the quality of K and the level of N of a risk model should be reflected in the uncertainty description. For this purpose we introduce a qualitative scoring system, and we show its applicability on an exemplary risk model for a RoPax ship. - Highlights: • We present a risk perspective for the maritime domain. • A distinction between knowledge and understanding is made. • We describe risk as (Scenario, Consequences, Uncertainty/Knowledge, Understanding). • The perspective highlights the strength and weaknesses of a given risk analysis

  12. Blood magnesium, and the interaction with calcium, on the risk of high-grade prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Dai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ionized calcium (Ca and magnesium (Mg compete as essential messengers to regulate cell proliferation and inflammation. We hypothesized that inadequate Mg levels, perhaps relative to Ca levels (e.g. a high Ca/Mg ratio are associated with greater prostate cancer risk. STUDY DESIGN: In this biomarker sub-study of the Nashville Men's Health Study (NMHS, we included 494 NMHS participants, consisting of 98 high-grade (Gleason≥7 and 100 low-grade cancer cases, 133 prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN cases, and 163 controls without cancer or PIN at biopsy. Linear and logistic regression were used to determine associations between blood Ca, Mg, and the Ca/Mg ratio across controls and case groups while adjusting for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Serum Mg levels were significantly lower, while the Ca/Mg ratio was significantly higher, among high-grade cases vs. controls (p = 0.04, p = 0.01, respectively. Elevated Mg was significantly associated with a lower risk of high-grade prostate cancer (OR = 0.26 (0.09, 0.85. An elevated Ca/Mg ratio was also associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (OR = 2.81 (1.24, 6.36 adjusted for serum Ca and Mg. In contrast, blood Ca levels were not significantly associated with prostate cancer or PIN.Mg, Ca, or Ca/Mg levels were not associated with low-grade cancer, PIN, PSA levels, prostate volume, or BPH treatment. CONCLUSION: Low blood Mg levels and a high Ca/Mg ratio were significantly associated with high-grade prostate cancer. These findings suggest Mg affects prostate cancer risk perhaps through interacting with Ca.

  13. The role of hazard- and risk-based approaches in ensuring food safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Susan M.; Boobis, Alan R.; Bridges, Jim;

    2015-01-01

    action. Risk-based approaches allow consideration of exposure in assessing whether there may be unacceptable risks to health. Scope and approach The advantages and disadvantages of hazard- and risk-based approaches for ensuring the safety of food chemicals, allergens, ingredients and microorganisms were....../substance present in food. This separation of decision-making can result in hazard-based restrictions on marketing and use, whereas risk-based assessments for those exposed show there is reasonable certainty no harm will result. This in turn can lead to contradictory, confusing and ultimately unnecessary actions....... Use of hazard-based approaches for foods also means that comparisons with benefits for nutrition and food security cannot be undertaken. This has the potential to lead to bias in the overall conclusions of regulators and risk managers, who may not have been presented with the benefits of particular...

  14. Overview of critical risk factors in Power-Two-Wheeler safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahogianni, Eleni I; Yannis, George; Golias, John C

    2012-11-01

    Power-Two-Wheelers (PTWs) constitute a vulnerable class of road users with increased frequency and severity of accidents. The present paper focuses of the PTW accident risk factors and reviews existing literature with regard to the PTW drivers' interactions with the automobile drivers, as well as interactions with infrastructure elements and weather conditions. Several critical risk factors are revealed with different levels of influence to PTW accident likelihood and severity. A broad classification based on the magnitude and the need for further research for each risk factor is proposed. The paper concludes by discussing the importance of dealing with accident configurations, the data quality and availability, methods implemented to model risk and exposure and risk identification which are critical for a thorough understanding of the determinants of PTW safety. PMID:22579296

  15. Incidence and risk factors of occupational blood exposure: a nation-wide survey among Danish doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelsing, S; Nielsen, T L; Brønnum-Hansen, H; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1997-01-01

    .6-3.1 PCE/pry and 6.0-6.9 MCE/pry). Finally Pathology, Internal medicine, Radiology and Paediatrics had a considerable risk (0.8-1.3 PCE/pry and 1.3-2.9 MCE/pry). Potential risk factors were examined by Poisson regression. Employment as senior as compared to junior doctor was associated with a higher risk...... of PCE (RR 2.2) and MCE (RR up to 2.7 depending on experience) among surgeons and an increased risk of PCE in anaesthetists (RR 1.7). In contrast, senior physicians in Internal medicine, Radiology and Paediatrics had a several fold lower risk of PCE (RR 0.6) and MCE (RR 0.6 in males, 0.3 in females......). Only 35% adhered to the basic principles of universal precautions (UP) and non-compliance was associated with a considerably increased risk of both MCE and PCE, especially in non-surgical specialties. In conclusion, we found an unacceptably high incidence of occupational blood exposures among Danish...

  16. Risk management strategy to increase the safety of workers in the nanomaterials industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► On-site assessment of nanomaterials using physiochemical and cytotoxic analysis can help identify risks for each nanomaterials manufacturing plant. ► The risk of the nanomaterials manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on exposure routes (tier 1), aspect identification (tier 2), and toxicological screening (tier 3). ► According to the different risk levels, the precautionary risk management (PRM) such as technology control, engineering control, and personal protective equipment were applied. ► The PRM strategy can be effectively reduced workers risks for nanomaterial industries. - Abstract: In recent years, many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) have been produced, but increasing research has revealed that these may have toxicities far greater than conventional materials and cause significant adverse health effects. At present, there is insufficient data to determine the permissible concentrations of NMs in the workplace. There is also a lack of toxicity data and environmental monitoring results relating to complete health risk assessment. In view of this, we believe that workers in the NMs industry should be provided with simple and practical risk management strategy to ensure occupational health and safety. In this study, we developed a risk management strategy based on the precautionary risk management (PRM). The risk of the engineered NMs manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on aspect identification, solubility tests, dermal absorption, and cytotoxic analyses. The risk management strategies include aspects relating to technology control, engineering control, personal protective equipment, and monitoring of the working environment for each level. Here we report the first case in which a simple and practical risk management strategy applying in specific engineered NMs manufacturing plants. We are confident that our risk management strategy can be effectively reduced engineered NM industries risks for

  17. Risk management strategy to increase the safety of workers in the nanomaterials industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Min-Pei, E-mail: lingmp@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Health Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Wei-Chao; Liu, Chia-Chyuan [Department of Cosmetic Science, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 71710, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yi-Shiao; Chueh, Miao-Ju [Industrial Safety and Health Association of the ROC, Taipei 11670, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shih, Tung-Sheng [Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Council of Labor Affairs, Taipei 22143, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On-site assessment of nanomaterials using physiochemical and cytotoxic analysis can help identify risks for each nanomaterials manufacturing plant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The risk of the nanomaterials manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on exposure routes (tier 1), aspect identification (tier 2), and toxicological screening (tier 3). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer According to the different risk levels, the precautionary risk management (PRM) such as technology control, engineering control, and personal protective equipment were applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PRM strategy can be effectively reduced workers risks for nanomaterial industries. - Abstract: In recent years, many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) have been produced, but increasing research has revealed that these may have toxicities far greater than conventional materials and cause significant adverse health effects. At present, there is insufficient data to determine the permissible concentrations of NMs in the workplace. There is also a lack of toxicity data and environmental monitoring results relating to complete health risk assessment. In view of this, we believe that workers in the NMs industry should be provided with simple and practical risk management strategy to ensure occupational health and safety. In this study, we developed a risk management strategy based on the precautionary risk management (PRM). The risk of the engineered NMs manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on aspect identification, solubility tests, dermal absorption, and cytotoxic analyses. The risk management strategies include aspects relating to technology control, engineering control, personal protective equipment, and monitoring of the working environment for each level. Here we report the first case in which a simple and practical risk management strategy applying in specific engineered NMs manufacturing plants. We are

  18. Association of vitamin D status with arterial blood pressure and hypertension risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Cavadino, Alana; Berry, Diane J;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration is associated with high arterial blood pressure and hypertension risk, but whether this association is causal is unknown. We used a mendelian randomisation approach to test whether 25(OH)D concentration is causally associated with...... blood pressure and hypertension risk. METHODS: In this mendelian randomisation study, we generated an allele score (25[OH]D synthesis score) based on variants of genes that affect 25(OH)D synthesis or substrate availability (CYP2R1 and DHCR7), which we used as a proxy for 25(OH)D concentration. We meta......% increase, -0·12 mm Hg, 95% CI -0·20 to -0·04; p=0·003) and reduced odds of hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 0·98, 95% CI 0·97-0·99; p=0·0003), but not with decreased diastolic blood pressure (β per 10% increase, -0·02 mm Hg, -0·08 to 0·03; p=0·37). In meta-analyses in which we combined data from D-CarDia and...

  19. Some international perspectives on legislation for the management of human-induced safety risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Niemand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Legislation that governs the health and safety of communities near major-hazard installations in South Africa is largely based on existing legislation that had been developed in the United Kingdom and other European Union countries. The latter was developed as a consequence of several major human-induced technological disasters in Europe. The history of the evolution of health-and-safety legislation for the protection of vulnerable communities in European Union (EU countries, France, Malaysia and the USA is explored through a literature survey. A concise comparison is drawn between EU countries, the USA and South Africa to obtain an exploratory view of whether current South-African legislation represents an optimum model for the protection of the health-and-safety of workers and communities near major-hazard installations. The authors come to the conclusion that South-African legislation needs revision as was done in the UK in 2011. Specific areas in the legislation that need revision are an overlap between occupational health and safety and environmental legislation, appropriate land-use planning for the protection of communities near major-hazard installations, the inclusion of vulnerability studies and the refinement of appropriate decision-making instruments such as risk assessment. This article is the first in a series that forms part of a broader study aimed at the development of an optimised model for the regulatory management of human-induced health and safety risks associated with hazardous installations in South Africa.

  20. Risk-informed decision making a keystone in advanced safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) has provided extremely valuable complementary insight, perspective, comprehension, and balance to deterministic nuclear reactor safety assessment. This integrated approach of risk-informed management and decision making has been called Risk-Informed Decision Making (RIDM). RIDM provides enhanced safety, reliability, operational flexibility, reduced radiological exposure, and improved fiscal economy. Applications of RIDM continuously increase. Current applications are in the areas of design, construction, licensing, operations, and security. Operational phase safety applications include the following: technical specifications improvement, risk-monitors and configuration control, maintenance planning, outage planning and management, in-service inspection, inservice testing, graded quality assurance, reactor oversight and inspection, inspection finding significance determination, operational events assessment, and rulemaking. Interestingly there is a significant spectrum of approaches, methods, programs, controls, data bases, and standards. The quest of many is to assimilate the full compliment of PSA and RIDM information and to achieve a balanced international harmony. The goal is to focus the best of the best, so to speak, for the benefit of all. Accordingly, this presentation will address the principles, benefits, and applications of RIDM. It will also address some of the challenges and areas to improve. Finally it will highlight efforts by the IAEA and others to capture the international thinking, experience, successes, challenges, and lessons in RIDM. (authors)

  1. SPATIAL ANALYSIS BASED HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LINEAR CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Atay

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an on-going study that aims to develop a web-based spatial decision support system model for proactive health and safety management in linear construction projects. Currently, health and safety management is usually performed reactively instead of proactive management since hazard identification and risk assessment is mostly performed on paper based documents that are not effectively used at site. This leads to accidents and fatalities at construction sites. The proposed system automatically identifies the spatial risks according to the topographic and layout map of the site, project specification and health and safety regulations by means of spatial analysis. It enables the workers and management personnel to access the possible hazards and thematic risk map of any portion of the construction site for linear projects. Finally, the described approach provides the proposed mitigation measures for the identified hazards. The developed system is expected to raise awareness in H&S among workers and engineers, and increase participation of workers to health and safety management.

  2. Mobile phone radiation health risk controversy: the reliability and sufficiency of science behind the safety standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszczynski Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is ongoing discussion whether the mobile phone radiation causes any health effects. The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety and the World Health Organization are assuring that there is no proven health risk and that the present safety limits protect all mobile phone users. However, based on the available scientific evidence, the situation is not as clear. The majority of the evidence comes from in vitro laboratory studies and is of very limited use for determining health risk. Animal toxicology studies are inadequate because it is not possible to "overdose" microwave radiation, as it is done with chemical agents, due to simultaneous induction of heating side-effects. There is a lack of human volunteer studies that would, in unbiased way, demonstrate whether human body responds at all to mobile phone radiation. Finally, the epidemiological evidence is insufficient due to, among others, selection and misclassification bias and the low sensitivity of this approach in detection of health risk within the population. This indicates that the presently available scientific evidence is insufficient to prove reliability of the current safety standards. Therefore, we recommend to use precaution when dealing with mobile phones and, whenever possible and feasible, to limit body exposure to this radiation. Continuation of the research on mobile phone radiation effects is needed in order to improve the basis and the reliability of the safety standards.

  3. Pilot application of risk informed safety margin characterization to a total loss of feedwater event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present the results of application of a risk-informed safety margin characterization (RISMC) approach to the analysis of a loss of feedwater (LOFW) event at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). This application considered a LOFW event with the failure of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) for which feed and bleed cooling would be required to prevent core damage. For this analysis the main parameters which impact core damage for the scenario were identified and probability distributions were constructed to represent the uncertainties associated with the parameter values. These distributions were sampled using a Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) technique to generate sets of sample cases to simulate using the MAAP4 code. Simulation results were evaluated to determine the safety margins relative to those obtained using typical probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) modeling (success criteria) assumptions. -- Highlights: • We apply a risk-informed approach to characterize safety margins. • This approach was applied to of a loss of feedwater event at a pressurized water reactor. • Probability distributions for the important parameter values were constructed. • These distributions were sampled to generate MAAP4 code simulation cases. • Simulation results were evaluated to determine the safety margins

  4. The KSNPP risk-effect analysis of the digital safety-critical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H. G.; Eom, H. S.; Jang, S. C.; Ha, J. J

    2004-02-01

    The study was performed for evaluating the risk effect of digital systems on the total plant. Based on risk monitor, a fault tree model for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNPP), we integrate the fault-tree models for Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) and Digital Engineered SaFety Actuation System (DESFAS) which are the most important safety-critical I and C systems in the KSNPP. In this study, however, three important factors (the probabilities of manual actuation failure, the software failure probability, and the watchdog timer fault coverage) are treated as the variables of the sensitivity study because quantification methodologies for these factors are not developed yet. Not only the unavailability of digital safety-critical system itself, but also the risk effect of digital systems on the total plant should be assessed to prove the safety of digital systems. The result of sensitivity study shows that the Anticipated-Transient-Without-Scram (ATWS) frequency changes from 8.433E-06 (no./yr) to 1.269E-04. The Core-Damage Frequency (CDF) changes from 7.714E-06 to 9.994E-05. The Large-Early-Release Frequency (LERF) changes from 1.243E-05 to 6.744E-05.

  5. Spatial Analysis Based Health and Safety Risk Assessment for Linear Construction Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, H.; Toz, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes an on-going study that aims to develop a web-based spatial decision support system model for proactive health and safety management in linear construction projects. Currently, health and safety management is usually performed reactively instead of proactive management since hazard identification and risk assessment is mostly performed on paper based documents that are not effectively used at site. This leads to accidents and fatalities at construction sites. The proposed system automatically identifies the spatial risks according to the topographic and layout map of the site, project specification and health and safety regulations by means of spatial analysis. It enables the workers and management personnel to access the possible hazards and thematic risk map of any portion of the construction site for linear projects. Finally, the described approach provides the proposed mitigation measures for the identified hazards. The developed system is expected to raise awareness in H&S among workers and engineers, and increase participation of workers to health and safety management.

  6. Continuous Postoperative Pericardial Flushing: A Pilot Study on Safety, Feasibility, and Effect on Blood Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan S.J. Manshanden

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: CPPF after cardiac surgery was found to be safe and feasible in this experimental setting. The clinically relevant effect on blood loss needs to be confirmed in a randomized clinical trial.

  7. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Engineering-Initial High-Level Safety Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents an initial high-level safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the C-band communication system after the profile is finalized and system rollout timing is determined. A security risk assessment has been performed by NASA as a parallel activity. While safety analysis is concerned with a prevention of accidental errors and failures, the security threat analysis focuses on deliberate attacks. Both processes identify the events that affect operation of the system; and from a safety perspective the security threats may present safety risks.

  8. Efficacy and safety of intravenous iron therapy as an alternative/adjunct to allogeneic blood transfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, M.; Breymann, C.; J. A. García-Erce; S. Gómez-Ramírez; Comin, J; Bisbe, E

    2008-01-01

    Anaemia is a common condition among patients admitted to hospital medicosurgical departments, as well as in critically ill patients. Anaemia is more frequently due to absolute iron deficiency (e.g. chronic blood loss) or functional iron deficiency (e.g. chronic inflammatory states), with other causes being less frequent. In addition, preoperative anaemia is one of the major predictive factors for perioperative blood transfusion. In surgical patients, postoperative anaemia is mainly caused by ...

  9. Combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls and non-chemical risk factors on blood pressure in NHANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High blood pressure is associated with exposure to multiple chemical and non-chemical risk factors, but epidemiological analyses to date have not assessed the combined effects of both chemical and non-chemical stressors on human populations in the context of cumulative risk assessment. We developed a novel modeling approach to evaluate the combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and multiple non-chemical risk factors on four blood pressure measures using data for adults aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008). We developed predictive models for chemical and other stressors. Structural equation models were applied to account for complex associations among predictors of stressors as well as blood pressure. Models showed that blood lead, serum PCBs, and established non-chemical stressors were significantly associated with blood pressure. Lead was the chemical stressor most predictive of diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure, while PCBs had a greater influence on systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, and blood cadmium was not a significant predictor of blood pressure. The simultaneously fit exposure models explained 34%, 43% and 52% of the variance for lead, cadmium and PCBs, respectively. The structural equation models were developed using predictors available from public data streams (e.g., U.S. Census), which would allow the models to be applied to any U.S. population exposed to these multiple stressors in order to identify high risk subpopulations, direct intervention strategies, and inform public policy. - Highlights: • We evaluated joint impact of chemical and non-chemical stressors on blood pressure. • We built predictive models for lead, cadmium and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). • Our approach allows joint evaluation of predictors from population-specific data. • Lead, PCBs and established non-chemical stressors were related to blood pressure.

  10. Combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls and non-chemical risk factors on blood pressure in NHANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Junenette L., E-mail: petersj@bu.edu; Patricia Fabian, M., E-mail: pfabian@bu.edu; Levy, Jonathan I., E-mail: jonlevy@bu.edu

    2014-07-15

    High blood pressure is associated with exposure to multiple chemical and non-chemical risk factors, but epidemiological analyses to date have not assessed the combined effects of both chemical and non-chemical stressors on human populations in the context of cumulative risk assessment. We developed a novel modeling approach to evaluate the combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and multiple non-chemical risk factors on four blood pressure measures using data for adults aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008). We developed predictive models for chemical and other stressors. Structural equation models were applied to account for complex associations among predictors of stressors as well as blood pressure. Models showed that blood lead, serum PCBs, and established non-chemical stressors were significantly associated with blood pressure. Lead was the chemical stressor most predictive of diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure, while PCBs had a greater influence on systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, and blood cadmium was not a significant predictor of blood pressure. The simultaneously fit exposure models explained 34%, 43% and 52% of the variance for lead, cadmium and PCBs, respectively. The structural equation models were developed using predictors available from public data streams (e.g., U.S. Census), which would allow the models to be applied to any U.S. population exposed to these multiple stressors in order to identify high risk subpopulations, direct intervention strategies, and inform public policy. - Highlights: • We evaluated joint impact of chemical and non-chemical stressors on blood pressure. • We built predictive models for lead, cadmium and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). • Our approach allows joint evaluation of predictors from population-specific data. • Lead, PCBs and established non-chemical stressors were related to blood pressure.

  11. Risk of the processes in the aspect of quality, natural environment and occupational safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karkoszka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of the presented paper aimed at motivating the necessity of the simultaneous implementationof Quality Management System, Environmental Management System, as well as Occupational Healthand Safety Management System and showing the possibility of usage the simultaneous estimation ofincompatibilities, environmental impacts and results of threats to occupational health and safety; in this casein the process of thermal treatment.Design/methodology/approach: Methodology used for the research has covered the integrated method oftechnological processes’ analyzes and opinion taking advantage of general algorithm of estimating the risk connectedwith the presence of incompatibilities, environmental impacts and effects of threats to occupational health and safety.Findings: Findings of the carried out researches are as follows: the realization of quality, environmentaland occupational health and safety policy using the proposed model of processes’ estimation leads to theimprovement of the analyzed productive processes by the preventive and corrective actions, and in consequence- to their optimization from the point of view of products’ quality and in the aspect of quality of environmentalinfluence and occupational health and safety.Practical implications: Practical implication can refer to the replacement of different methods of estimationthe incompatibilities in Quality Management System, environmental impacts in Environmental ManagementSystem and the after-effects of threats to occupational health and safety in Occupational Health and SafetyManagement System by applying of the integrated estimation of the risk; what has been verified in the in theprocesses of thermal treatment of the steel wire.Originality/value: Originality of the presented paper belongs to the methodology comprising the usage ofintegrated estimation of technological processes.

  12. Safe patient care – safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St. Pierre, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization’s vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture (“top-down process”. A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization’s maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization’s general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed “informed culture”. An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. “Incident reporting systems” are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization’s safe surgery checklist” is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate

  13. Rapid Prototyping of the Central Safety System for Nuclear Risk in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In the current ITER Baseline design, the Central Safety System for Nuclear Risk (CSS-N) is the safety control system in charge to assure nuclear safety for the plant, personnel and environment. In particular it is envisaged that the CSS shall interface to the plant safety systems for nuclear risk and shall coordinate the individual protection provided by the intervention of these systems by the activation, where required, of additional protections. The design of such a system, together with its implementation, strongly depends on the requirements, particularly in terms of reliability. The CSS-N is a safety critical system, thus its validation and commissioning play a very important role, since the required level of reliability must be demonstrated. In such a scenario, where a new and non-conventional system has to be deployed, it is strongly recommended to use modeling and simulation tools since the early design phase. Indeed, the modeling tools will help in the definition of the system requirements, and they will be used to test and validate the control logic. Furthermore these tools can be used to rapid design the safety system and to carry out hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulations, which permit to assess the performance of the control hardware against a plant simulator. Both a control system prototype and a safety system oriented plant simulator have been developed to assess first the requirements and then the performance of the CSS-N. In particular the presented SW/HW framework permits to design and verify the CSS protection logics and to test and validate these logics by means of HIL simulations. This work introduces both the prototype and plant simulator architectures, together with the methodology adopted to design and implement these validation tools. (authors)

  14. Guidance on the implementation of a risk based safety performance monitoring system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of the present study is to review and evaluate existing Performance Indicator (PI) monitoring programs, and to develop and demonstrate an overall PSA-based methodology and framework for the monitoring and use of risk-based PIs and SIs (Safety Indicator), that would enable: Identification of trends and patterns in safety performance at a specific plant and a population of plants; Assessment of the significance of the trends and patterns; Identification of precursors of accident sequences and safety reductions; Identification of the most critical functional areas of concern, especially as they relate to a defense-in-depth safety philosophy; Comparison of safety performance trends at a plant with those at comparable plants; Incorporation of the PIs and SIs into a risk- and performance-based decision process. To support the overall project objective, it is important that information needs and data collection procedures are clearly outlined. Of key significance in this regard is the premise that a performance monitoring system should not be burdened by an excessive number of low-level PIs that may have only a peripheral relationship to safety. Other supporting objectives of the study include: To identify and discuss other issues pertaining to the practical implementation of a safety performance monitoring system (outlining the databases and algorithms needed); and to demonstrate implementation of the preliminary guidance for monitoring and use of the selected set of PIs and SIs, within the proposed framework, via application to the operating history of a NPP having a PSA and readily available event data

  15. Study on City Environment, Safety and Health from the Viewpoint of Ecological Risks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Qian-liang

    2011-01-01

    Urban ecological risk analysis is a relatively new study field.Rapid industrial moderni ation and urbanization have significantly improved the living standards of the city.However, as environmental, safety and health issues are causing widespread concern, these problems have potential serious threat on ecosystems and human health.So how to solve many problems arising from city has become a key to sustainable development of human civilization.The present article analyzed the major problems that the city confronts and pointed out the main measures from the aspects of urban environment, safety and health.

  16. Risks of nuclear energy technology safety concepts of light water reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter; Schlüter, Franz-Hermann

    2014-01-01

    The book analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. The security concept of reactors is explained. Measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident, accidents of core melting and a possible crash of an air plane on?reactor containment are discussed. The book covers three scientific subjects of the safety concepts of Light Water Reactors: ? A first part describes the basic safety design concepts of operating German Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors including accident management measures introduced after the reactor accidents of Three Mile Island and Ch

  17. Determination of safety margins for whole blood concentrations of alcohol and nineteen drugs in driving under the influence cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Lena; Strand, Dag Helge; Liane, Veronica Horpestad; Vindenes, Vigdis; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Aldrin, Magne

    2016-02-01

    Legislative limits for driving under the influence of 20 non-alcohol drugs were introduced in Norway in February 2012. Per se limits corresponding to blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of 0.2g/kg were established for 20 psychoactive drugs, and limits for graded sanctions corresponding to BACs of 0.5 and 1.2g/kg were determined for 13 of these drugs. This new legislation made it possible for the courts to make sentences based on the analytical results, similar to the situation for alcohol. To ensure that the reported concentration is as least as high as the true concentration, with a 99% safety level, safety margins had to be calculated for each of the substances. Diazepam, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and alcohol were used as model substances to establish a new model for estimating the safety margins. The model was compared with a previous used model established several years ago, by a similar yet much simpler model, and they were found to be in agreement. The measurement uncertainties depend on the standard batch used, the work list and the measurements' replicate. A Bayesian modelling approach was used to determine the parameters in the model, using a dataset of 4700 diazepam positive specimens and 5400 THC positive specimens. Different safety margins were considered for low and high concentration levels of diazepam (≤2μM (0.6mg/L) and >2μM) and THC (≤0.01μM (0.003mg/L) and >0.01μM). The safety margins were for diazepam 19.5% (≤2μM) and 34% (>2μM), for THC 19.5% (≤0.01μM) and 24.9% (>0.01μM). Concentration dependent safety margins for BAC were based on a dataset of 29500 alcohol positive specimens, and were in the range 10.4% (0.1g/kg) to 4.0% (4.0g/kg) at a 99% safety level. A simplified approach was used to establish safety margins for the compounds amphetamine, MDMA, methamphetamine, alprazolam, phenazepam, flunitrazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, oxazepam, buprenorphine, GHB, methadone, ketamine, cocaine, morphine, zolpidem and zopiclone. The

  18. Assessment of occupational safety risks in Floridian solid waste systems using Bayesian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastani, Mehrad; Celik, Nurcin

    2015-10-01

    Safety risks embedded within solid waste management systems continue to be a significant issue and are prevalent at every step in the solid waste management process. To recognise and address these occupational hazards, it is necessary to discover the potential safety concerns that cause them, as well as their direct and/or indirect impacts on the different types of solid waste workers. In this research, our goal is to statistically assess occupational safety risks to solid waste workers in the state of Florida. Here, we first review the related standard industrial codes to major solid waste management methods including recycling, incineration, landfilling, and composting. Then, a quantitative assessment of major risks is conducted based on the data collected using a Bayesian data analysis and predictive methods. The risks estimated in this study for the period of 2005-2012 are then compared with historical statistics (1993-1997) from previous assessment studies. The results have shown that the injury rates among refuse collectors in both musculoskeletal and dermal injuries have decreased from 88 and 15 to 16 and three injuries per 1000 workers, respectively. However, a contrasting trend is observed for the injury rates among recycling workers, for whom musculoskeletal and dermal injuries have increased from 13 and four injuries to 14 and six injuries per 1000 workers, respectively. Lastly, a linear regression model has been proposed to identify major elements of the high number of musculoskeletal and dermal injuries. PMID:26219294

  19. Components of the Complete Blood Count as Risk Predictors for Coronary Heart Disease: In-Depth Review and Update

    OpenAIRE

    Madjid, Mohammad; Fatemi, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, and several inflammatory biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein, have been used to predict the risk of coronary heart disease. High white blood cell count is a strong and independent predictor of coronary risk in patients of both sexes, with and without coronary heart disease. A high number of white blood cells and their subtypes (for example, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils) are associated with the presence of coronary heart di...

  20. PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS SIGNIFICANTLY ASSOCIATED WITH ELEVATED BLOOD LEAD LEVELS IN RURAL THAI CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Kavinum, Suporn; Papwijitsil, Ratchadaporn; Tontiwattanasap, Worawit; Khunyotying, Wanlee; Umpan, Jiraporn; BoonthuM, Ratchaneekorn; Kaewnate, Yingyot; Boonmee, Sasis; Thongchub, Winai; Rodsung, Thassanee

    2014-11-01

    A community-based study was conducted to determine personal risk factors and environmental sources of lead exposure for elevated blood lead levels (≥ 10 µg/dl, EBLLs) among rural children living at the Thailand-Myanmar border in Tak Province, northwestern Thailand. Six hundred ninety-five children aged 1-14 years old were screened for BLLs. Environmental specimens for lead measurements included samples of water from the streams, taps, and household containers, house floor dust, and foods. Possible lead release from the cooking ware was determined using the leaching method with acetic acid. The overall prevalence of EBLLs was 47.1% and the geometric mean level of blood lead was 9.16 µg/dl. Personal risk factors significantly associated with EBLLs included being male, younger age, anemia, and low weight-for-age. Significant environmental risk factors were exposure to a lead-acid battery of solar energy system and use of a non-certified metal cooking pot. Some families whose children had high BLLs reported production of lead bullets from the used batteries at home. About one-third of the house dust samples taken near batteries contained lead content above the recommended value, compared with none of those taken from other areas and from the houses with no batteries. The metal pots were safe for cooking rice but might be unsafe for acidic food preparation. Both nutritional intervention and lead exposure prevention programs are essential to reduce EBLLs in this population. PMID:26466436

  1. Safety and Risk Assessment. Chapter 4. [Risk and safety assessments for the disposal concepts, exposure definition, limits for safety/risk evaluation, methodologies available and results achieved from the evaluation of certain scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposal of waste/hazardous substances is an important issue concerning toxic substances, such as spent fuel (SF), high level waste (HLW) or carbon dioxide (CO2). Radioactive waste disposal considers the long term emplacement of radioactive material until its activity and (radio)toxicity decreases below acceptable levels or until the species decay to the levels similar to those of natural uranium ore bodies. The main goal of CO2 disposal in the geological environment is to contain large volumes of the gas in a safe and permanent way in order to avoid its release in the atmosphere. The main difference between CO2 and radioactive waste disposal is the form of the matter to be disposed. While disposal considers the allocation of small amounts of highly radioactive and radiotoxic material, CO2 disposal presumes the injection of large volumes of gas into rock structures. This chapter has been prepared on the basis of the information from the countries participating in the CRP that contributed to the topic of safety/risk assessments, i.e. the Czech Republic, India and Switzerland. Each of these countries had previous experience with radioactive waste disposal, though they are at different levels of programme development. Although the disposal of intermediate level waste (ILW) and low level waste (LLW) is also important, this CRP focused only on high level radioactive waste. CO2 disposal is still considered a ‘new’ technology in the countries involved in this study. Unfortunately, none of the countries with an advanced CO2 capture and disposal (CCD) status participated in this component of the CRP. Therefore, this chapter compares the state of the art in safety/risk assessment for a segment of the field based on the experience of the countries that share a similar vision that both technologies can exploit the knowledge and know-how of the other

  2. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  3. Half a decade of mini-pool nucleic acid testing: Cost-effective way for improving blood safety in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaram Chandrashekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: It is well established that Nucleic acid testing (NAT reduces window phase of transfusion transmissible infections (TTI and helps improve blood safety. NAT testing can be done individually or in pools. The objectives of this study were to determine the utility, feasibility and cost effectiveness of an in-house minipool-NAT(MP-NAT. Materials and Methods: Blood donors were screened by history, tested by ELISA and sero-negative samples were subjected to an in-house NAT by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Testing was done in mini-pools of size eight (8. Positive pools were repeated with individual samples. Results: During the study period of Oct 2005-Sept 2010 (5 years all blood donors (n=53729 were screened by ELISA. Of which 469 (0.87% were positive for HIV-1, HBV or HCV. Sero-negative samples (n=53260 were screened by in-house MP-NAT. HIV-NAT yield was 1/53260 (n=1 and HBV NAT yield (n=2 was 1/26630. Conclusion: NAT yield was lower than other India studies possibly due to the lower sero-reactivity amongst our donors. Nevertheless it intercepted 9 lives including the components prepared. The in-house assay met our objective of improving blood safety at nominal cost and showed that it is feasible to set up small molecular biology units in medium-large sized blood banks and deliver blood within 24-48 hours. The utility of NAT (NAT yield will vary based on the donor population, the type of serological test used, the nature of kit employed and the sensitivity of NAT test used. The limitations of our in-house MP-NAT consisted of stringent sample preparation requirements, with labor and time involved. The benefits of our MP-NAT were that it acted as a second level of check for ELISA tests, was relatively inexpensive compared to ID-NAT and did not need sophisticated equipment.

  4. Preliminary results from the application of risk matrix method for safety assessment in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the uses of ionizing radiation in industry are subject to procedures that provide a high level of safety, experience has shown that equipment failure, human errors, or the combination of both that can trigger accidental exposures may occur. Traditionally, the radiation safety checks whether these industrial practices (industrial radiography, industrial irradiators, among others) are sufficiently safe to prevent similar accidental exposures already occurred, so that becomes dependent on the published information and not always answers questions like: What other events can occur, or what other risks are present? Taking into account the results achieved by the Foro Iberoamericano de Organismos Reguladores Radiologicos y Nucleares, its leading position in the use of techniques of risk analysis in radioactive facilities and the need to develop a proactive approach to the prevention of accidents arising from the use of ionizing radiations in the industry, it intends to apply the risk analysis technique known as Risk Matrix to a hypothetical reference entity for the region in which industrial radiography is performed. In this paper the results of the first stage of this study are shown, that is the identification of initiating events (IE) and barriers that help mitigate the consequences of such IE, so that can appreciate the applicability of this method to industrial radiography services, to reduce the risk to acceptable levels. The fundamental advantage associated with the application of this methodology is that can be applied by the professionals working in the service and identifies specific weaknesses that from the point of view of safety there, so they can be prioritized resources depending on risk reduction. (Author)

  5. Use of a Computerized Tool (ORAM) to Help Manage Outage Safety and Risk at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outage Risk Assessment and Management (ORAM) is a computerized methodology developed by the U.S. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to help Nuclear Power Plant personnel manage the risk and safety associated with refueling and forced plant outages. Today, over 60 plants including NPP Krsko are using ORAM during the preparation and performance of plant outages. In fact, many plants are attributing much of the reductions in the duration of refueling outages to the use of ORAM. The success of the ORAM methodology is the capability to provide plant and management personnel with understandable results from both deterministic evaluations of plant safety and quantitative risk assessments. The Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) use of ORAM involves both of these approaches. The deterministic portion of ORAM is used to model the NPP Krsko Shutdown Technical Specifications and administrative considerations. The probabilistic portion of ORAM uses industry and NEK specific initiating events and other risk elements pertaining to shutdown to derive a quantitative risk assessment for various end states, including core damage and RCS boiling. This paper expands on the value of each approach and demonstrates the benefits of combining these elements in the decision-making process. Another key advantage of ORAM is the ability to apply the methodology to specific outages. Since no outage is identical, this provides tremendous benefits to plant personnel for managing the safety and risk of a particular outage. ORAM does this ba organizing all of the various plant configurations and equipment unavailability windows into numerous plant states. Furthermore, ORAM evaluations can be automatedby interfacing with outage scheduling software programs such as Primavera. For each plant state, the deterministic and the probabilistic logic evaluations are applied. This paper will demonstrate the ORAM evaluation for an actual NPP Krsko outage. (author)

  6. Exposure data and risk indicators for safety performance assessment in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George; Bijleveld, Frits; Cardoso, João L

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this paper is the analysis of the state-of-the-art in risk indicators and exposure data for safety performance assessment in Europe, in terms of data availability, collection methodologies and use. More specifically, the concepts of exposure and risk are explored, as well as the theoretical properties of various exposure measures used in road safety research (e.g. vehicle- and person-kilometres of travel, vehicle fleet, road length, driver population, time spent in traffic, etc.). Moreover, the existing methods for collecting disaggregate exposure data for risk estimates at national level are presented and assessed, including survey methods (e.g. travel surveys, traffic counts) and databases (e.g. national registers). A detailed analysis of the availability and quality of existing risk exposure data is also carried out. More specifically, the results of a questionnaire survey in the European countries are presented, with detailed information on exposure measures available, their possible disaggregations (i.e. variables and values), their conformity to standard definitions and the characteristics of their national collection methods. Finally, the potential of international risk comparisons is investigated, mainly through the International Data Files with exposure data (e.g. Eurostat, IRTAD, ECMT, UNECE, IRF, etc.). The results of this review confirm that comparing risk rates at international level may be a complex task, as the availability and quality of exposure estimates in European countries varies significantly. The lack of a common framework for the collection and exploitation of exposure data limits significantly the comparability of the national data. On the other hand, the International Data Files containing exposure data provide useful statistics and estimates in a systematic way and are currently the only sources allowing international comparisons of road safety performance under certain conditions. PMID:23769621

  7. Guidance on Expert Knowledge Elicitation in Food and Feed Safety Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative risk assessments facilitate the decisions of risk managers. In the EU, risk assessment in food and feed safety is the responsibility of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA. Quantitative risk models should be informed by systematically reviewed scientific evidence, however, in practice empirical evidence is often limited: in such cases it is necessary to turn to expert judgement. Psychological research has shown that unaided expert judgement of the quantities required for risk modelling - and particularly the uncertainty associated with such judgements - is often biased, thus limiting its value. Accordingly methods have been developed for eliciting knowledge from experts in as unbiased a manner as possible. In 2012, a working group was established to develop guidance on expert knowledge elicitation appropriate to EFSA's remit. The resulting Guidance first presents expert knowledge elicitation as a process beginning with defining the risk assessment problem, moving through preparation for elicitation (e.g. selecting the experts and the method to be used and the elicitation itself, culminating in documentation. Those responsible for managing each of these phases are identified. Next three detailed protocols for expert knowledge elicitation are given - that can be applied to real-life questions in food and feed safety - and the pros and cons of each of these protocols are examined. This is followed by principles for overcoming the major challenges to expert knowledge elicitation: framing the question; selecting the experts; eliciting uncertainty; aggregating the results of multiple experts; and documenting the process. The results of a web search on existing guidance documents on expert elicitation are then reported, along with case studies illustrating some of the protocols of the Guidance. Finally, recommendations are made in the areas of training, organisational changes, expert identification and management, and further

  8. [Blood-borne infections and the pregnant health care worker. Risks and preventive measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, S; Rabenau, H F; Haberl, A E; Bühren, A; Bechstein, W O; Sarrazin, C M

    2012-02-01

    Due to the increasing proportion of women in health care, as well as changes in working conditions (implementation of safety devices, minimally invasive/endoscopic procedures) the question arises whether the applicable laws and regulations for the protection of working mothers are outdated and should be updated.Individual risk analysis, as well as the inclusion of the pregnant health care worker in the decision-making process with regard to continuation or modification of the work practice serves as a protection of the expectant mother and unborn child and allows a continuation of the occupational activities. PMID:21901466

  9. Risk Assessment for Bridges Safety Management during Operation Based on Fuzzy Clustering Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Hanyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, large span and large sea-crossing bridges are built, bridges accidents caused by improper operational management occur frequently. In order to explore the better methods for risk assessment of the bridges operation departments, the method based on fuzzy clustering algorithm is selected. Then, the implementation steps of fuzzy clustering algorithm are described, the risk evaluation system is built, and Taizhou Bridge is selected as an example, the quantitation of risk factors is described. After that, the clustering algorithm based on fuzzy equivalence is calculated on MATLAB 2010a. In the last, Taizhou Bridge operation management departments are classified and sorted according to the degree of risk, and the safety situation of operation departments is analyzed.

  10. A software cost model with maintenance and risk costs for safety-critical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-wei; YANG Xiao-zong; QU Feng; DONG Jian

    2006-01-01

    According to the consequences of software failures, software faults remaining in safety-critical systems can be classified into two sets: common faults and fatal faults. Common faults cause slight loss when they are activated. A fatal fault can lead to significant loss, and even damage the safety-critical system entirely when it is activated. A software reliability growth model for safety-critical systems is developed based on G-O model. And a software cost model is proposed too. The cost model considers maintenance and risk costs due to software failures. The optimal release policies are discussed to minimize the total software cost. A numerical example is provided to illustrate how to use the results we obtained.

  11. Spent fuel transport in Romania by road: An approach considering safety, risk and radiological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of high-level radioactive wastes, involving Type B packages, is a part of the safety of the Romanian waste management programme and the overall aim of this activity is to promote the safe transport of radioactive materials in Romania. The paper presents a safety case analysis of the transport of a single spent fuel CANDU bundle, using a Romanian built Type B package, from the CANDU type nuclear power plant Cernavoda to the INR Pitesti, in order to be examined within INR's hot-cells facilities. The safety assessment includes the following main aspects: (1) evaluation and analysis of available data on road traffic accidents; (2) estimation of the expected frequency for severe road accident scenarios resulting in potential radionuclide release; and (3) evaluation of the expected radiological consequences and accident risks of transport operations. (author)

  12. Are the blood groups of women with preeclampsia a risk factor for the development of hypertension postpartum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Deniz; Karagoz, Hatice; Ozer, Ozerhan; Esmeray, Kubra; Bulut, Kadir; Aykas, Fatma; Cetinkaya, Ali; Uslu, Emine; Karahan, Samet; Basak, Mustafa; Erden, Abdulsamet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-related disorder characterized by hypertension (HT) and proteinuria noticeable after 20 weeks of gestation. PE is now considered as a cardiovascular disease risk factor and a number of studies have shown that experiencing PE increases the prevalence of various cardiovascular risk factors, such as metabolic syndrome and HT. In this study, we aimed to investigate any possible relationship between the ABO/Rh blood group system and PE in Turkey. In the second part of the study, we examined the relationship between the ABO blood group system and development of HT after PE. Patients and methods A total of 250 patients with PE from Kayseri Training and Research Hospital between 2002 and 2012 were included in the study. Patients were classified according to blood groups (A, B, AB, and O) and Rh status (+/−). Results There was a significant difference between the patients with PE and the control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups and the percentage of group AB was found to be higher in patients with PE compared to the control group (P=0.029). The risk of developing PE was significantly higher in group AB than other blood groups (P=0.006). The risk of developing HT after PE was significantly higher in group O than other blood groups (P=0.004). Discussion In this study, we found that the patients with blood group AB have a higher risk for PE. The patients with PE of blood group O are at high risk of developing HT, and Rh factor was identified as another risk at this point and these patients should be closely followed postpartum. PMID:27143904

  13. Probabilistic earthquake risk assessment as a tool to improve safety and explanatory adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explains the concept of probabilistic earthquake risk assessment, mainly from the viewpoint as a tool to improve safety and explanatory adequacy. The definition of risk is the expected value of undesirable effect in an engineering meaning that is likely to occur in the future, and it is defined in risk management as the triplet of scenario (what can happen), frequency, and impact. As for the earthquake risk assessment of a nuclear power plant, the fragility of structure / system / component (SSC) against earthquake (so-called earthquake fragility) is assessed, and by combining with the earthquake hazard that has been separately obtained, the occurrence frequency and impact of the accident are obtained. From the view of the authors, earthquake risk assessment is for the purpose of decision-making, and is not intended to calculate the probability in a scientifically rigorous manner. For ensuring the quality of risk assessment, the table of 'Expert utilization standards for the evaluation of epistemological uncertainty' is used. Sole quantitative risk assessment is not necessarily sufficient for risk management. It would be important to find how to build the 'framework for comprehensive decision-making.' (A.O.)

  14. A quantitative approach to the risk perception associated with nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subjective risk perception associated with nuclear safety is hard-wired into the general public psyche; but as real as this 'feels', and as much as it requires to be respected in a democracy, misguided risk perception on nuclear safety can create its own perils for humans. The objective of this paper is to create a better understanding of the phenomena of risk perception associated with nuclear safety presented by journalistic media. It will attempt to quantify the manifestation of risk perception associated with nuclear safety by providing comparison between the media coverage of nuclear and industrial accidents of similar magnitude. It will utilise the Fog Index, a mathematical formula that defines the readability of an article, allowing for an unbiased numerical comparison on 'readability' to be derived. Fog Index is expressed as: Fog Index = 0.4(N/S + 100*L/N), where N is the number of words in the article, S is the number of sentences and L is the number of words with 3 syllables or more. To provide consistency, the medium chosen to compare industrial accidents are reports extracted from 'The Times' newspaper, written at the time of the accidents and concerning Chernobyl and Bhopal disasters. 'The Times' is respected newspaper, written for a knowledgeable audience who have an in-depth interest in the news from the UK and abroad; subsequently this causes it to have a relatively high Fog index, compared to its tabloid counterparts. The higher the Fog Index, the more education the reader requires to fully understand the article, a Fog Index of 12 is the limit for the majority of the general public. Research found that reporting of nuclear safety accidents has a Fog Index of approximately 14 while it was only of 10 for Bhopal accident. These values go someway in demonstrating that the complexity of media information on nuclear safety transferred via journalistic media is beyond what can reasonably be expected to be

  15. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES and H activities and the ES and H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES and H performance and ES and H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S and H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S and H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S and H activities

  16. Hanford Site Environmental Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk management summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-05-12

    The Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Budget-Risk Management Summary report is prepared to support the annual request to sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex by DOE, Headquarters. The request requires sites to provide supplementary crosscutting information related to ES&H activities and the ES&H resources that support these activities. The report includes the following: (1) A summary status of fiscal year (FY) 1999 ES&H performance and ES&H execution commitments; (2)Status and plans of Hanford Site Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup activities; (3) Safety and health (S&H) risk management issues and compliance vulnerabilities of FY 2001 Target Case and Below Target Case funding of EM cleanup activities; (4) S&H resource planning and crosscutting information for FY 1999 to 2001; and (5) Description of indirect-funded S&H activities.

  17. Confirming criticality safety of TRU waste with neutron measurements and risk analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criticality safety of 239Pu in 55-gallon drums stored in TRU waste containers (culverts) is confirmed using NDA neutron measurements and risk analyses. The neutron measurements yield a 239Pu mass and keff for a culvert, which contains up to 14 drums. Conservative probabilistic risk analyses were developed for both drums and culverts. Overall 239Pu mass estimates are less than a calculated safety limit of 2800 g per culvert. The largest measured keff is 0.904. The largest probability for a critical drum is 6.9 x 10-8 and that for a culvert is 1.72 x 10-7. All examined suspect culverts, totaling 118 in number, are appraised as safe based on these observations

  18. Risk factors for fishermen’s health and safety in Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frantzeskou, Elpida; Kastania, Anastasia N; Riza, Elena;

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to determine the risks for health and safety in Greek fisheries workers by exploring their health status and the health risk factors present in their occupational environment, thus providing a current baseline for further research in the future and for documentation of......: The health effects observed are causally related to diet, smoking, and exercise, which in turn relate to the specific working conditions and culture in small-scale fishing that need to be taken into consideration in prevention programmes. The results are comparable withinternational fisheries...

  19. Prioritizing risks via several expert perspectives with application to runway safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factor hierarchies have been widely used in the literature to represent the view of an expert of what factors most contribute to reliability or safety. The methods for rating and aggregating the influences across a set of expert-elicited factors to risk or reliability are well known as multiple criteria decision analysis. This paper describes a method for distinguishing levels of risk across a set of locations via the use of multiple factor hierarchies. The method avoids averaging across experts and is thus useful for situations where experts disagree and where an absence of expert consensus on the causative or contributing factors is important information for risk management. A case study demonstrates using seven expert perspectives on the airport-specific factors that can contribute to runway incursions. The results are described for eighty towered airports in the US. The expert perspectives include differing relative emphases across the following set of factors: airport geometry, operations, weather, geography, and days since last safety review. Future work is suggested to include human factors issues as pilot-and-controller communications styles at airports. - Highlights: ► We examine influential factors in seven expert perspectives on the problem domain. ► We assess eighty US airports with qualitative measurement scales for each risk factor. ► Results show robustness and sensitivity of the risk index to expert perspective. ► We examine factors of several types including runway geometry, operations, weather, and geography.

  20. Procedures to relate the NII safety assessment principles for nuclear reactors to risk

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N; Hemming, C R

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of the Public Inquiry into the proposed pressurised water reactor (PWR) at Sizewell, estimates were made of the levels of individual and societal risk from a PWR designed in a manner which would conform to the safety assessment principles formulated by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). The procedures used to derive these levels of risk are described in this report. The opportunity has also been taken to revise the risk estimates made at the time of the Inquiry by taking account of additional data which were not then available, and to provide further quantification of the likely range of uncertainty in the predictions. This re-analysis has led to small changes in the levels of risk previously evaluated, but these are not sufficient to affect the broad conclusions reached before. For a reactor just conforming to the NII safety assessment principles a maximum individual risk of fatal cancer of about 10 sup - sup 6 per year of reactor operation has been estimated; the societal ris...