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  1. Renal rescue of dopamine D2 receptor function reverses renal injury and high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkalmatt, Prasad R.; Asico, Laureano D.; Zhang, Yanrong; Yang, Yu; Drachenberg, Cinthia; Zheng, Xiaoxu; Han, Fei; Jose, Pedro A.; Armando, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) deficiency increases renal inflammation and blood pressure in mice. We show here that long-term renal-selective silencing of Drd2 using siRNA increases renal expression of proinflammatory and profibrotic factors and blood pressure in mice. To determine the effects of renal-selective rescue of Drd2 expression in mice, the renal expression of DRD2 was first silenced using siRNA and 14 days later rescued by retrograde renal infusion of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector with DRD2. Renal Drd2 siRNA treatment decreased the renal expression of DRD2 protein by 55%, and DRD2 AAV treatment increased the renal expression of DRD2 protein by 7.5- to 10-fold. Renal-selective DRD2 rescue reduced the expression of proinflammatory factors and kidney injury, preserved renal function, and normalized systolic and diastolic blood pressure. These results demonstrate that the deleterious effects of renal-selective Drd2 silencing on renal function and blood pressure were rescued by renal-selective overexpression of DRD2. Moreover, the deleterious effects of 45-minute bilateral ischemia/reperfusion on renal function and blood pressure in mice were ameliorated by a renal-selective increase in DRD2 expression by the retrograde ureteral infusion of DRD2 AAV immediately after the induction of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, 14 days after ischemia/reperfusion injury, the renal expression of profibrotic factors, serum creatinine, and blood pressure were lower in mice infused with DRD2 AAV than in those infused with control AAV. These results indicate an important role of renal DRD2 in limiting renal injury and preserving normal renal function and blood pressure. PMID:27358912

  2. Renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in Thai children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Mahasakpan, Pranee; Jeekeeree, Wanpen; Funkhiew, Thippawan; Sanjum, Rungaroon; Apiwatpaiboon, Thitikarn; Phopueng, Ittipol

    2015-01-01

    Very few studies have shown renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. This population study examined associations between urinary cadmium excretion, a good biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, and renal dysfunctions and blood pressure in environmentally exposed Thai children. Renal functions including urinary excretion of β 2 -microglobulin, calcium (early renal effects), and total protein (late renal effect), and blood pressure were measured in 594 primary school children. Of the children studied, 19.0% had urinary cadmium ≥1 μg/g creatinine. The prevalence of urinary cadmium ≥1 μg/g creatinine was significantly higher in girls and in those consuming rice grown in cadmium-contaminated areas. The geometric mean levels of urinary β 2 -microglobulin, calcium, and total protein significantly increased with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. The analysis did not show increased blood pressure with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. After adjusting for age, sex, and blood lead levels, the analysis showed significant positive associations between urinary cadmium and urinary β 2 -microglobulin and urinary calcium, but not urinary total protein nor blood pressure. Our findings provide evidence that environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children. A follow-up study is essential to assess the clinical significance and progress of renal effects in these children. - Highlights: • Few studies show renal effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. • We report renal and blood pressure effects from cadmium exposure in Thai children. • Urinary β 2 -microglobulin and calcium increased with increasing urinary cadmium. • The study found no association between urinary cadmium levels and blood pressure. • Environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children

  3. Renal denervation decreases blood pressure and renal tyrosine hydroxylase but does not augment the effect of hypotensive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypecki, Janusz; Gawlak, Maciej; Huc, Tomasz; Szulczyk, Paweł; Ufnal, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The effect of renal denervation on the efficacy of antihypertensive drugs has not yet been elucidated. Twenty-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with metoprolol, losartan, indapamide, or saline (controls) and assigned to renal denervation or a sham procedure. Acute hemodynamic measurements were performed ten days later. Series showing a significant interaction between renal denervation and the drugs were repeated with chronic telemetry measurements. In the saline series, denervated rats showed a significantly lower mean arterial blood pressure (blood pressure) than the sham-operated rats. In contrast, in the metoprolol series denervated rats showed a significantly higher blood pressure than sham rats. There were no differences in blood pressure between denervated and sham rats in the losartan and indapamide series. In chronic studies, a 4-week treatment with metoprolol caused a decrease in blood pressure. Renal denervation and sham denervation performed 10 days after the onset of metoprolol treatment did not affect blood pressure. Denervated rats showed markedly reduced renal nerve tyrosine hydroxylase levels. In conclusion, renal denervation decreases blood pressure in hypertensive rats. The hypotensive action of metoprolol, indapamide, and losartan is not augmented by renal denervation, suggesting the absence of synergy between renal denervation and the drugs investigated in this study.

  4. Renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in Thai children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya, E-mail: swaddi@hotmail.com [Department of Community and Social Medicine, Mae Sot General Hospital, Tak 63110 (Thailand); Mahasakpan, Pranee [Department of Community and Social Medicine, Mae Sot General Hospital, Tak 63110 (Thailand); Jeekeeree, Wanpen [Department of Medical Technology, Mae Sot General Hospital, Tak 63110 (Thailand); Funkhiew, Thippawan [Department of Community and Social Medicine, Mae Sot General Hospital, Tak 63110 (Thailand); Sanjum, Rungaroon; Apiwatpaiboon, Thitikarn [Department of Medical Technology, Mae Sot General Hospital, Tak 63110 (Thailand); Phopueng, Ittipol [Department of Community and Social Medicine, Mae Sot General Hospital, Tak 63110 (Thailand)

    2015-01-15

    Very few studies have shown renal and blood pressure effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. This population study examined associations between urinary cadmium excretion, a good biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, and renal dysfunctions and blood pressure in environmentally exposed Thai children. Renal functions including urinary excretion of β{sub 2}-microglobulin, calcium (early renal effects), and total protein (late renal effect), and blood pressure were measured in 594 primary school children. Of the children studied, 19.0% had urinary cadmium ≥1 μg/g creatinine. The prevalence of urinary cadmium ≥1 μg/g creatinine was significantly higher in girls and in those consuming rice grown in cadmium-contaminated areas. The geometric mean levels of urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin, calcium, and total protein significantly increased with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. The analysis did not show increased blood pressure with increasing tertiles of urinary cadmium. After adjusting for age, sex, and blood lead levels, the analysis showed significant positive associations between urinary cadmium and urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin and urinary calcium, but not urinary total protein nor blood pressure. Our findings provide evidence that environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children. A follow-up study is essential to assess the clinical significance and progress of renal effects in these children. - Highlights: • Few studies show renal effects from environmental cadmium exposure in children. • We report renal and blood pressure effects from cadmium exposure in Thai children. • Urinary β{sub 2}-microglobulin and calcium increased with increasing urinary cadmium. • The study found no association between urinary cadmium levels and blood pressure. • Environmental cadmium exposure can affect renal functions in children.

  5. Casual and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children with renal scarring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloševski Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Renal scarring is the most common cause of arterial hypertension in children. High blood pressure (BP and microalbuminuria contribute to the progression of chronic renal disease. OBJECTIVE The aims of the study were: to assess BP in children with renal scarring by continuous ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM in comparison to the casual method (CBP, and to determine the correlation between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP and/or casual blood pressure (CBP values and proteinuria in children with renal scarring. METHOD This forward-looking study comprised thirty-five children (26 girls and 9 boys, aged between 3-13 years, 10.4±3.9, X+SD. Blood pressure was measured using the casual method (CBP with a mercury manometer; BP was measured three times and the average was taken as a referent value. ABPM was performed using the oscillometric method with the Space Labs device, model 90207. RESULTS 45.71% of patients were classified as hypertensive by ABPM, while only 22.6% of CBP measurements were above the 95th percentile (p<0.01. "White coat hypertension" was present in 40% of the patients. Non-dipping BP alteration was detected in 37.14% of the patients. CONCLUSION Nocturnal systolic hypertension (systolic non-dipping alteration is very frequent in children with renal scarring. Nocturnal diastolic blood pressure, detectable only via ABPM, is positively correlated with proteinuria and may be an initial sign of the progression of renal scarring. ABPM is more sensitive than CBP in the evaluation of BP in children with renal scarring.

  6. Prognostic value of renal fractional flow reserve in blood pressure response after renal artery stenting (PREFER study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kądziela, Jacek; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Michałowska, Ilona; Januszewicz, Magdalena; Florczak, Elżbieta; Kalińczuk, Łukasz; Norwa-Otto, Bożena; Warchoł, Ewa; Witkowski, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine a potential relationship between resting translesional pressures ratio (Pd/Pa ratio), renal fractional flow reserve (rFFR) and blood pressure response after renal artery stenting. Thirty five hypertensive patients (49% males, mean age 64 years) with at least 60% stenosis in angiography, underwent renal artery stenting. Translesional systolic pressure gradient (TSPG), Pd/Pa ratio (the ratio of mean distal to lesion and mean proximal pressures) and hyperemic rFFR - after intrarenal administration of papaverine - were measured before stent implantation. Ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM) were recorded before the procedure and after 6 months. The ABPM results were presented as blood pressure changes in subgroups of patients with normal (≥ 0.9) vs. abnormal (renal artery stenting. Median changes of 24-h systolic/diastolic blood pressure were comparable in patients with abnormal vs. normal Pd/Pa ratio (-4/-3 vs. 0/2 mm Hg; p = NS) and with abnormal vs. normal rFFR (-2/-1 vs. -2/-0.5 mm Hg, respectively). Physiological assessment of renal artery stenosis using Pd/Pa ratio and papaverine- induced renal fractional fl ow reserve did not predict hypertension response after renal artery stenting.

  7. Effects of adrenalectomy, adrenal regeneration, and renal irradiation on blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblum, M.; Casarett, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Adrenalectomized, adrenal-enucleated and adrenal-intact rats were sham-irradiated or received an x-ray dose of 1100 rad bilaterally to temporarily exteriorized kidneys. Systolic blood pressures were measured at 10, 25, 40, 60, and 80 days after irradiation. At 100 days after irradiation the rats were sacrificed for gross pathologic examination and renal histopathologic studies of the kidneys. Adrenalectomy alone caused a significant drop in blood pressure which persisted throughout the experiment; adrenal regeneration in adrenal-enucleated rats or in those adrenalectomized rats in which adrenal tissue regenerated caused a significant increase in systolic blood pressure after 80 days postirradiation. Irradiation of adrenal-intact, adrenal-regenerating, or adrenalectomized rats did not cause significant elevation of blood pressure in comparison with that of the corresponding nonirradiated controls. Rats showing subtle renal histological changes usually showed somewhat higher blood pressures than rats showing no renal histological changes; a few rats which became severely hypertensive showed considerable histopathological changes in kidneys and other organs

  8. Mechanisms of blood pressure changes following renal irradiation of intact, adrenalectomized, and adrenal regenerating rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblum, M.

    1977-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the differences in changes in systolic arterial blood pressure following renal x irradiation (1100 R) in adrenal-intact, adrenalectomized, and adrenal-regenerating rats and to elucidate the involvement or roles of the kidneys and of the adrenal glands in the blood pressure changes. The parameters studied included the following: systolic blood pressure; body weight; food and fluid consumption; urine output; plasma and urine electrolytes; sodium balance; plasma renin activity; plasma corticosterone; renal vascular volume; renal vascular permeability (using 125 I-polyvinylpyrrolidone extravasation rate as an indicator); renal blood flow (using 42 K extraction); kidney weight; hematocrit; and total vascular, plasma, and red cell volumes. Renal x irradiation of intact rats caused polydipsia, polyuria, and reduced urine concentrations of sodium and potassium without significantly affecting blood pressure during the period of study (80 days); plasma renin activity was significantly lowered and had a positive correlation with blood volume; an abnormal blood volume-plasma renin activity relationship is suggested. Adrenalectomy caused prolonged hypotension in saline-maintained rats even though their sodium balance was more positive than that in adrenal-intact or adrenal-regenerating rats with normal or elevated blood pressure. The blood pressure of renally irrradiated, adrenalectomized rats was greater than non-irradiated adrenalectomized rats, but with only borderline significance; it is concluded that the absence of the adrenal glands does not affect the degree or duration of the effects of renal irradiation on blood pressure

  9. Renal Nerve Stimulation-Induced Blood Pressure Changes Predict Ambulatory Blood Pressure Response After Renal Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Mark R; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Gal, Pim; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Persu, Alexandre; Staessen, Jan A; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; Steinberg, Jonathan S; Elvan, Arif

    2016-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) response to renal denervation (RDN) is highly variable and its effectiveness debated. A procedural end point for RDN may improve consistency of response. The objective of the current analysis was to look for the association between renal nerve stimulation (RNS)-induced BP increase before and after RDN and changes in ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) after RDN. Fourteen patients with drug-resistant hypertension referred for RDN were included. RNS was performed under general anesthesia at 4 sites in the right and left renal arteries, both before and immediately after RDN. RNS-induced BP changes were monitored and correlated to changes in ambulatory BP at a follow-up of 3 to 6 months after RDN. RNS resulted in a systolic BP increase of 50±27 mm Hg before RDN and systolic BP increase of 13±16 mm Hg after RDN (Pefficacy of RDN and predict BP response to RDN. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Effect of PTA on blood pressure, renal plasma flow and renal venous renin activity in renovascular hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Dewitz, H. von; Rosenthal, J.

    1983-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) is more and more accepted for interventional management of renal artery stenosis in hypertensive patients. This study was carried out to assess the behaviour of arterial blood-pressure, renal plasma flow and renal venous rening activity in renovascular hypertension following catheter dilatation. Using the data the possibility is calculated to predict the effect of PTA on blood pressure preinterventionally. The results demonstrate that a successful employment of PTA depends on a normal contralateral renal plasma flow and a normalization of plasma flow of the poststenotic kidney. Determination of plasma renin activity is only of restricted value. (orig.)

  11. Prospective blood pressure measurement in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, V G; Yadav, B; Jeyaseelan, L; Deborah, M N; Jacob, S; Alexander, S; Varughese, S; John, G T

    2014-05-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control at home is difficult when managed only with office blood pressure monitoring (OBPM). In this prospective study, the reliability of BP measurements in renal transplant patients with OBPM and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) was compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) as the gold standard. Adult patients who had living-related renal transplantation from March 2007 to February 2008 had BP measured by two methods; OBPM and ABPM at pretransplantation, 2(nd), 4(th), 6(th), and 9(th) months and all the three methods: OBPM, ABPM, and HBPM at 6 months after transplantation. A total of 49 patients, age 35 ± 11 years, on prednisolone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate were evaluated. A total of 39 were males (79.6%). Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) measured by OBPM were higher than HBPM when compared with ABPM. When assessed using OBPM and awake ABPM, both SBP and DBP were significantly overestimated by OBPM with mean difference of 3-12 mm Hg by office SBP and 6-8 mm Hg for office DBP. When HBPM was compared with mean ABPM at 6 months both the SBP and DBP were overestimated by and 7 mm Hg respectively. At 6 months post transplantation, when compared with ABPM, OBPM was more specific than HBPM in diagnosing hypertension (98% specificity, Kappa: 0.88 vs. 89% specificity, Kappa: 0.71). HBPM was superior to OBPM in identifying patients achieving goal BP (89% specificity, Kappa: 0.71 vs. 50% specificity Kappa: 0.54). In the absence of a gold standard for comparison the latent class model analysis still showed that ABPM was the best tool for diagnosing hypertension and monitoring patients reaching targeted control. OBPM remains an important tool for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in renal transplant recipients. HBPM and ABPM could be used to achieve BP control.

  12. Prospective blood pressure measurement in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V G David

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP control at home is difficult when managed only with office blood pressure monitoring (OBPM. In this prospective study, the reliability of BP measurements in renal transplant patients with OBPM and home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM was compared with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM as the gold standard. Adult patients who had living-related renal transplantation from March 2007 to February 2008 had BP measured by two methods; OBPM and ABPM at pretransplantation, 2 nd , 4 th , 6 th , and 9 th months and all the three methods : OBPM, ABPM, and HBPM at 6 months after transplantation. A total of 49 patients, age 35 ± 11 years, on prednisolone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate were evaluated. A total of 39 were males (79.6%. Systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP measured by OBPM were higher than HBPM when compared with ABPM. When assessed using OBPM and awake ABPM, both SBP and DBP were significantly overestimated by OBPM with mean difference of 3-12 mm Hg by office SBP and 6-8 mm Hg for office DBP. When HBPM was compared with mean ABPM at 6 months both the SBP and DBP were overestimated by and 7 mm Hg respectively. At 6 months post transplantation, when compared with ABPM, OBPM was more specific than HBPM in diagnosing hypertension (98% specificity, Kappa : 0.88 vs. 89% specificity, Kappa : 0.71. HBPM was superior to OBPM in identifying patients achieving goal BP (89% specificity, Kappa : 0.71 vs. 50% specificity Kappa : 0.54. In the absence of a gold standard for comparison the latent class model analysis still showed that ABPM was the best tool for diagnosing hypertension and monitoring patients reaching targeted control. OBPM remains an important tool for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in renal transplant recipients. HBPM and ABPM could be used to achieve BP control.

  13. Blood pressure response to conventional and low-dose enalapril in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, Thomas; Heisterberg, Jens; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: In chronic renal failure, the clearance of most ACE inhibitors including enalapril is reduced. Hence, with conventional dosage, plasma enalaprilat may be markedly elevated. It is unclear whether this excess of drug exposure affords an improved control of blood pressure. The aim of the present...... study was to evaluate short-term blood pressure response to two different plasma levels of enalaprilat. METHODS: As part of an open, randomized, controlled trial of the effect of high and low dosage of enalapril on the progression of renal failure, short-term blood pressure response was evaluated. Data...... potassium concentrations at day 90 and patients in the low group experienced a slight increase in GFR. CONCLUSIONS: In moderate to severe chronic renal insufficiency the same degree of blood pressure control was achieved on low as well as moderate daily doses of enalapril. This was irrespective...

  14. Circadian variation of blood pressure in patients with chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Ladefoged, Jens

    1995-01-01

    The circadian pattern of blood pressure variation was investigated in 10 patients with advanced chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and in an age-matched group of controls without renal disease with similar office blood pressure level. Monitoring was done using....... In patients with chronic renal failure undergoing CAPD, an otherwise unnoticed 24-h hypertension and nocturnal blood pressure elevation can be discovered by use of 24-h blood pressure monitoring and this may indicate a need of earlier start of antihypertensive treatment in CAPD patients with borderline...

  15. Blood pressure response to conventional and low-dose enalapril in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, Thomas; Heisterberg, Jens; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: In chronic renal failure, the clearance of most ACE inhibitors including enalapril is reduced. Hence, with conventional dosage, plasma enalaprilat may be markedly elevated. It is unclear whether this excess of drug exposure affords an improved control of blood pressure. The aim of the present...... study was to evaluate short-term blood pressure response to two different plasma levels of enalaprilat. METHODS: As part of an open, randomized, controlled trial of the effect of high and low dosage of enalapril on the progression of renal failure, short-term blood pressure response was evaluated. Data...

  16. Association of high blood pressure with renal insufficiency: role of albuminuria, from NHANES, 1999-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Zhu, Xiangzhu; Li, Haiming; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shi, Haiming; Zhang, Ming-zhi; Harris, Raymond C; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Dai, Qi

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between hypertension and kidney disease is complicated. Clinical trials found intense blood pressure control was not associated with alterations in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in all patients but did slow the rate of GFR decline among those with a higher baseline proteinuria. However, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the association between high blood pressure and renal function is modified by albuminuria status by conducting analyses in a cross-sectional study with 12,440 adult participants without known kidney diseases, diabetes or cardiovascular diseases, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2006. 1226 out of 12440 were found to have unknown high blood pressure and 4494 were found to have reduced renal function. Overall, a moderate association was found between high blood pressure and renal function insufficiency in all participants analyzed. However, among participants with albuminuria, the prevalence of moderate-severe renal insufficiency substantially and progressively increased from normal subjects to prehypertensive and undiagnosed hypertensive subjects (1.43%, 3.44%, 10.96%, respectively, P for trendhigh blood pressure and reduced renal function could be dependent upon the albuminuria status. This finding may provide a possible explanation for results observed in clinical trials of intensive blood pressure control. Further studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

  17. Achieving blood pressure control among renal transplant recipients by integrating electronic health technology and clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliozzi, Daniel R; Zullo, Andrew R; Collins, Christine; Elsaid, Khaled A

    2015-11-15

    The implementation and outcomes of a program combining electronic home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) and pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services in a renal transplantation clinic are described. Patients enrolled in the program were provided with a computer-enabled blood pressure monitor. A dedicated renal transplantation pharmacist was integrated into the renal transplantation team under a collaborative care practice agreement. The collaborative care agreement allowed the pharmacist to authorize medication additions, deletions, and dosage changes. Comprehensive disease and blood pressure education was provided by a clinical pharmacist. In the pretransplantation setting, the pharmacist interviewed the renal transplant candidate and documents allergies, verified the patient's medication profile, and identified and assessed barriers to medication adherence. A total of 50 renal transplant recipients with at least one recorded home blood pressure reading and at least one year of follow-up were included in our analysis. A significant reduction in mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were observed at 30, 90, 180, and 360 days after enrollment in the program (p services implemented in a renal transplant clinic was associated with sustained improvements in blood pressure control. Incorporation of a pharmacist in the renal transplant clinic resulted in the detection and resolution of medication-related problems. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of renal artery stent revascularization on blood pressure: 1-year follow-up of 110 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chao; Zou Yinghua; Yang Min; Wang Jian; Tong Xiaoqiang; Song Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of renal artery revascularization through renal artery stenting(PTRAS)on blood pressure in patients with renal artery stenosis. Methods: During April 2000 through May 2005 110 cases of renal artery stenosis received PTRAS and followed up for at least 1 year with blood pressure measurements pre-and 1 year post-PTRAS. Results: The technical success rate was 100% for all 110 cases. The renal artery stenosis were decreased from 60%-100% before PTRAS to 0%-15% after the stent placement. There was significant difference between blood pressure pre-and 1 year post PTRAS. Systolic pressures decreased from(153 ± 32) mmHg to(131 ± 27) mmHg and diastolic pressures from(87 ± 19) mmHg to(75 ± 19) mmHg. The administration of antihypertensive diugs reduced from(2.6 ± 0.9 ) sorts to(1.9 ± 0.9) sorts. Conclusions: PTRAS revascularization is an effective procedure for blood pressure control in renal vascular hypertension during one year follow up. (authors)

  19. Role of the adrenal medulla in control of blood pressure and renal function during furosemide-induced volume depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg; Shalmi, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Farmakologi, furosemide, adrenaline, renal function, adrenal medullectomy, arterial blood pressure......Farmakologi, furosemide, adrenaline, renal function, adrenal medullectomy, arterial blood pressure...

  20. Reduction of Blood Pressure Following After Renal Artery Adventitia Stripping During Total Nephroureterectomy: Potential Effect of Renal Sympathetic Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Keisuke; Satou, Shunsuke; Setojima, Keita; Shono, Shinjiro; Miyajima, Shigero; Ishii, Tatsu; Shirai, Kazuyuki; Urata, Hidenori

    2018-05-16

    BACKGROUND Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation has been reported to be effective for treatment resistance hypertension in Australia and Europe. However, in the blinded SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial, renal denervation did not achieve a significant decrease in blood pressure (BP) in comparison to sham controls. There have been various discussions on the factors that influenced this result. CASE REPORT Two men on antihypertensive therapy underwent unilateral radical nephroureterectomy for cancer of the renal pelvis. When the renal artery adventitia was stripped and cauterized just before renal artery ligation, the measured BP of the 2 men increased after stripping adventitia and decreased gradually after cauterization of the renal artery. This was presumably due to removal of renal artery sympathetic nerves, similar to the mechanism of catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation, although anesthesia, fluid infusion, and/or mesenteric traction may have had an influence. CONCLUSIONS A similar strategy involving thoracolumbar sympathectomy was reported about 50 years ago. The clinically significant blood pressure reduction in these patients suggests renal denervation is effective.

  1. Renal blood flow regulation and arterial pressure fluctuations: a case study in nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1994-01-01

    in which the kidney is obliged to operate. Were it not for renal blood flow autoregulation, it would be difficult to regulate renal excretory processes so as to maintain whole body variables within narrow bounds. Autoregulation is the noise filter on which other renal processes depend for maintaining...... a relatively noise-free environment in which to work. Because of the time-varying nature of the blood pressure, we have concentrated in this review on the now substantial body of work on the dynamics of renal blood flow regulation and the underlying mechanisms. Renal vascular control mechanisms are not simply....... The significance of deterministic chaos in the context of renal blood flow regulation is that the system regulating blood flow undergoes a physical change to a different dynamical state, and because the change is deterministic, there is every expectation that the critical change will yield itself to experimental...

  2. Adherence to Antihypertensive Treatment and the Blood Pressure-Lowering Effects of Renal Denervation in the Renal Denervation for Hypertension (DENERHTN) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Michel; Pereira, Helena; Hamdidouche, Idir; Gosse, Philippe; Monge, Matthieu; Bobrie, Guillaume; Delsart, Pascal; Mounier-Véhier, Claire; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Lantelme, Pierre; Denolle, Thierry; Dourmap-Collas, Caroline; Girerd, Xavier; Michel Halimi, Jean; Zannad, Faiez; Ormezzano, Olivier; Vaïsse, Bernard; Herpin, Daniel; Ribstein, Jean; Chamontin, Bernard; Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Ferrari, Emile; Plouin, Pierre-François; Jullien, Vincent; Sapoval, Marc; Chatellier, Gilles

    2016-09-20

    The DENERHTN trial (Renal Denervation for Hypertension) confirmed the blood pressure-lowering efficacy of renal denervation added to a standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment for resistant hypertension at 6 months. We report the influence of adherence to antihypertensive treatment on blood pressure control. One hundred six patients with hypertension resistant to 4 weeks of treatment with indapamide 1.5 mg/d, ramipril 10 mg/d (or irbesartan 300 mg/d), and amlodipine 10 mg/d were randomly assigned to renal denervation plus standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment, or the same antihypertensive treatment alone. For standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment, spironolactone 25 mg/d, bisoprolol 10 mg/d, prazosin 5 mg/d, and rilmenidine 1 mg/d were sequentially added at monthly visits if home blood pressure was ≥135/85 mm Hg after randomization. We assessed adherence to antihypertensive treatment at 6 months by drug screening in urine/plasma samples from 85 patients. The numbers of fully adherent (20/40 versus 21/45), partially nonadherent (13/40 versus 20/45), or completely nonadherent patients (7/40 versus 4/45) to antihypertensive treatment were not different in the renal denervation and the control groups, respectively (P=0.3605). The difference in the change in daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure from baseline to 6 months between the 2 groups was -6.7 mm Hg (P=0.0461) in fully adherent and -7.8 mm Hg (P=0.0996) in nonadherent (partially nonadherent plus completely nonadherent) patients. The between-patient variability of daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure was greater for nonadherent than for fully adherent patients. In the DENERHTN trial, the prevalence of nonadherence to antihypertensive drugs at 6 months was high (≈50%) but not different in the renal denervation and control groups. Regardless of adherence to treatment, renal denervation plus standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment resulted in

  3. Blood Pressure Characteristics in Moderate to Severe Renal Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheyou Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients has been extensively studied, but few investigations have attempted to relate ABPM with CKD stages. The objectives of this article were to compare ABPM parameters for the diagnosis and treatment determination of CKD with daytime clinic blood pressure (BP measurements. We also investigated BP and renal injury in combined hypertension and CKD. We supposed ABPM was important in combined hypertension and CKD. Methods: We compared ABPM in hypertension patients, including 152 patients with combined hypertension and CKD. Patients with combined hypertension and CKD were grouped according to severity into stages 1 through 3 (Stage 1-3 and stages 4 and 5 (Stage 4-5. Results: In the Stage 4-5 group, systolic BP (SBP (daytime, nighttime and 24 h mean, diastolic BP (DBP, pulse pressure and SBP standard deviations (SD (daytime and 24 h were higher. SBP and DBP loads were significantly higher in the Stage 4-5 group. The nighttime load was higher than the daytime load. Mean arterial pressure (MAP was higher and heart rates (HR were faster in the Stage 4-5 group. Conclusions: BP load should be a component employed in ABPM to determine cardiovascular risk stratification. MAP and HR might be associated with risk to develop end-stage renal disease.

  4. Disruption of transitional stages in 24-h blood pressure in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E Katz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with kidney replacement exhibit disrupted circadian rhythms. Most studies measuring blood pressure use the dipper/non-dipper classification, which does not consider analysis of transitional stages between low and high blood pressure, confidence intervals nor shifts in the time of peak, while assuming subjective onsets of night and day phases. In order to better understand the nature of daily variation of blood pressure in these patients, we analyzed 24h recordings from 41 renal transplant recipients using the non-symmetrical double-logistic fitting assessment which does not assume abruptness nor symmetry in ascending and descending stages of the blood pressure profile, and a cosine best-fitting regression method (Cosinor. Compared with matched controls, double-logistic fitting showed that the times for most of transitional stages (ascending systolic and descending systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure had a wider distribution along the 24 h. The proportion of individuals without daily blood pressure rhythm in the transplanted group was larger only for systolic arterial pressure, and the amplitude showed no significant difference. Furthermore, the transplant recipient group had a less pronounced slope in descending systolic and ascending mean blood pressure. Cosinor analysis confirmed the phase related changes, showing a wider distribution of times of peak (acrophases. We conclude that daily disruptions in renal transplant recipients can be explained not only by absence in diurnal variation, but also in changes in waveform-related parameters of the rhythm, and that distortions in the phase of the rhythm are the most consistent finding for the patients.

  5. Endothelial mineralocorticoid receptor ablation does not alter blood pressure, kidney function or renal vessel contractility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Sidsel B.; Finsen, Stine; Marcussen, Niels

    2018-01-01

    afferent arterioles. Urinary sodium excretion was determined by use of metabolic cages. EC-MR transgenics had markedly decreased MR expression in isolated aortic endothelial cells as compared to littermates (WT). Blood pressure and effective renal plasma flow at baseline and following AngII infusion...... vasculature and examined this by ablating the Nr3c2 gene in endothelial cells (EC-MR) in mice. Blood pressure, heart rate and PAH clearance were measured using indwelling catheters in conscious mice. The role of the MR in EC on contraction and relaxation was investigated in the renal artery and in perfused......Aldosterone blockade confers substantial cardiovascular and renal protection. The effects of aldosterone on mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) expressed in endothelial cells (EC) within the renal vasculature have not been delineated. We hypothesized that lack of MR in EC may be protective in renal...

  6. Does dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system affect success of renal denervation in reducing blood pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Lisa; Petroff, David; Desch, Steffen; Lurz, Philipp; Reinhardt, Sebastian; Sonnabend, Melanie; Classen, Joseph; Baum, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Renal denervation is an interventional approach aiming to reduce high blood pressure. Its efficacy is subject of controversial debate. We analyzed autonomic function in patients undergoing renal denervation to identify responders. A total of 21 patients with treatment-resistant hypertension scheduled for renal denervation were included. Heart rate variability, pupillary function and sympathetic skin response were examined prior to intervention. Before and 1 or 3 months after intervention, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure readings were taken. Patients were stratified according to sympathetic nervous system function. Sympathetic activity was reduced in 12 participants (group 1) and normal or enhanced in nine patients (group 2). The mean of daytime systolic blood pressure decreased in groups 1 and 2 from 168 to 157 mmHg (95% confidence interval for difference, 1-21 mmHg, p = 0.035) and from 166 to 145 mmHg (8-34 mmHg, p = 0.005), respectively. In a linear model, blood pressure reduction was 11.3 mmHg (0.3-22 mmHg) greater in group 2 than in group 1 (p = 0.045). Patients with preexisting reduced activity of the sympathetic nervous system benefited less from renal denervation.

  7. Does dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system affect success of renal denervation in reducing blood pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Fricke

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Renal denervation is an interventional approach aiming to reduce high blood pressure. Its efficacy is subject of controversial debate. We analyzed autonomic function in patients undergoing renal denervation to identify responders. Methods: A total of 21 patients with treatment-resistant hypertension scheduled for renal denervation were included. Heart rate variability, pupillary function and sympathetic skin response were examined prior to intervention. Before and 1 or 3 months after intervention, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure readings were taken. Results: Patients were stratified according to sympathetic nervous system function. Sympathetic activity was reduced in 12 participants (group 1 and normal or enhanced in nine patients (group 2. The mean of daytime systolic blood pressure decreased in groups 1 and 2 from 168 to 157 mmHg (95% confidence interval for difference, 1–21 mmHg, p = 0.035 and from 166 to 145 mmHg (8–34 mmHg, p = 0.005, respectively. In a linear model, blood pressure reduction was 11.3 mmHg (0.3–22 mmHg greater in group 2 than in group 1 (p = 0.045. Conclusion: Patients with preexisting reduced activity of the sympathetic nervous system benefited less from renal denervation.

  8. Mechanisms of blood pressure changes following renal irradiation of intact, adrenalectomized and adrenal regenerating rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblum, M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported from studies on the differences in changes in systolic arterial blood pressure following renal x-irradiation (1100 R) in adrenal-intact, adrenalectomized, and adrenal-regenerating rats and the roles of the kidneys and of the adrenal glands in the blood pressure changes

  9. Prediction of blood pressure and blood flow in stenosed renal arteries using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhunjhunwala, Pooja; Padole, P. M.; Thombre, S. B.; Sane, Atul

    2018-04-01

    In the present work an attempt is made to develop a diagnostive tool for renal artery stenosis (RAS) which is inexpensive and in-vitro. To analyse the effects of increase in the degree of severity of stenosis on hypertension and blood flow, haemodynamic parameters are studied by performing numerical simulations. A total of 16 stenosed models with varying degree of stenosis severity from 0-97.11% are assessed numerically. Blood is modelled as a shear-thinning, non-Newtonian fluid using the Carreau model. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis is carried out to compute the values of flow parameters like maximum velocity and maximum pressure attained by blood due to stenosis under pulsatile flow. These values are further used to compute the increase in blood pressure and decrease in available blood flow to kidney. The computed available blood flow and secondary hypertension for varying extent of stenosis are mapped by curve fitting technique using MATLAB and a mathematical model is developed. Based on these mathematical models, a quantification tool is developed for tentative prediction of probable availability of blood flow to the kidney and severity of stenosis if secondary hypertension is known.

  10. Long-term effects of maternal diabetes on blood pressure and renal function in rat male offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yan

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is increasing rapidly worldwide. Previous animal models were established to study consequences of offspring after exposure to severe intrauterine hyperglycemia. In this study we are aiming to characterize the blood pressure levels and renal function of male offspring obtained from diabetic mothers with moderate hyperglycemia. METHODS: We established a rat model with moderate hyperglycemia after pregnancy by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ. The male offspring were studied and fed with either normal diet or high salt diet after weaning. Arterial pressure and renal function were measured. RESULTS: Arterial pressure of male offspring increased from 12 weeks by exposure to intrauterine moderate hyperglycemia. At 20 weeks, high salt diet accelerated the blood pressure on diabetic offspring compared to diabetic offspring fed with normal diet. We found offspring exposed to intrauterine moderate hyperglycemia had a trend to have a higher creatinine clearance rate and significant increase of urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG excretion indicating an early stage of nephropathy progression. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We observed the high blood pressure level and early renal dysfunction of male offspring obtained from diabetic mothers with moderate hyperglycemia. Furthermore, we investigated high salt diet after weaning on offspring exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia could exacerbate the blood pressure and renal function. Renin angiotensin system (RAS plays an important role in hypertension pathogenesis and altered gene expression of RAS components in offspring with in utero hyperglycemia exposure may account for the programmed hypertension. Therefore, our study provides evidence "fetal programming" of maternal diabetes is critical for metabolic disease development.

  11. Renal denervation beyond the bifurcation: The effect of distal ablation placement on safety and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeftink, Martine M A; Spiering, Wilko; De Jong, Mark R; Doevendans, Pieter A; Blankestijn, Peter J; Elvan, Arif; Heeg, Jan-Evert; Bots, Michiel L; Voskuil, Michiel

    2017-04-01

    Renal denervation may be more effective if performed distal in the renal artery because of smaller distances between the lumen and perivascular nerves. The authors reviewed the angiographic results of 97 patients and compared blood pressure reduction in relation to the location of the denervation. No significant differences in blood pressure reduction or complications were found between patient groups divided according to their spatial distribution of the ablations (proximal to the bifurcation in both arteries, distal to the bifurcation in one artery and distal in the other artery, or distal to the bifurcation in both arteries), but systolic ambulatory blood pressure reduction was significantly related to the number of distal ablations. No differences in adverse events were observed. In conclusion, we found no reason to believe that renal denervation distal to the bifurcation poses additional risks over the currently advised approach of proximal denervation, but improved efficacy remains to be conclusively established. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Inherited renal tubulopathies associated with metabolic alkalosis: effects on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariceta, Gema; Rodríguez-Soriano, Juan

    2006-11-01

    Inherited tubular disorders associated with metabolic alkalosis are caused by several gene mutations encoding different tubular transporters responsible for NaCl renal handling. Body volume and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system status are determined by NaCl reabsorption in the distal nephron. Two common hallmarks in affected individuals: hypokalemia and normal / high blood pressure, support the differential diagnosis. Bartter's syndrome, characterized by hypokalemia and normal blood pressure, is a heterogenic disease caused by the loss of function of SLC12A1 (type 1), KCNJ1 (type 2), CLCNKB (type 3), or BSND genes (type 4). As a result, patients present with renal salt wasting and hypercalciuria. Gitelman's syndrome is caused by the loss of funcion of the SLC12A3 gene and may resemble Bartter's syndrome, though is associated with the very low urinary calcium. Liddle's syndrome, also with similar phenotype but with hypertension, is produced by the gain of function of the SNCC1B or SNCC1G genes, and must be distinguished from other entities of inherited hypertension such as Apparently Mineralocorticoid Excess, of glucocorticoid remediable hypertension.

  13. The Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor AR9281 Decreases Blood Pressure, Ameliorates Renal Injury and Improves Vascular Function in Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Shaw

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors (sEHIs are demonstrating promise as potential pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, inflammation, and kidney disease. The present study determined the ability of a first-inclass sEHI, AR9281, to decrease blood pressure, improve vascular function, and decrease renal inflammation and injury in angiotensin hypertension. Rats were infused with angiotensin and AR9281 was given orally during the 14-day infusion period. Systolic blood pressure averaged 180 ± 5 mmHg in vehicle treated and AR9281 treatment significantly lowered blood pressure to 142 ± 7 mmHg in angiotensin hypertension. Histological analysis demonstrated decreased injury to the juxtamedullary glomeruli. Renal expression of inflammatory genes was increased in angiotensin hypertension and two weeks of AR9281 treatment decreased this index of renal inflammation. Vascular function in angiotensin hypertension was also improved by AR9281 treatment. Decreased afferent arteriolar and mesenteric resistance endothelial dependent dilator responses were ameliorated by AR9281 treatment of angiotensin hypertensive rats. These data demonstrate that the first-in-class sEHI, AR9281, lowers blood pressure, improves vascular function and reduces renal damage in angiotensin hypertension.

  14. Renal denervation beyond the bifurcation : The effect of distal ablation placement on safety and blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeftink, Martine M A; Spiering, Wilko; De Jong, Mark R.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Elvan, Arif; Heeg, Jan Evert; Bots, Michiel L.; Voskuil, Michiel

    2017-01-01

    Renal denervation may be more effective if performed distal in the renal artery because of smaller distances between the lumen and perivascular nerves. The authors reviewed the angiographic results of 97 patients and compared blood pressure reduction in relation to the location of the denervation.

  15. Renal artery anatomy affects the blood pressure response to renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Marusic, Petra; Walton, Antony S; Duval, Jacqueline; Lee, Rebecca; Sata, Yusuke; Krum, Henry; Lambert, Elisabeth; Peter, Karlheinz; Head, Geoff; Lambert, Gavin; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) has been shown to reduce blood pressure (BP), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and target organ damage in patients with resistant hypertension (RH) and bilateral single renal arteries. The safety and efficacy of RDN in patients with multiple renal arteries remains unclear. We measured office and 24-hour BP at baseline, 3 and 6 months following RDN in 91 patients with RH, including 65 patients with single renal arteries bilaterally (group 1), 16 patients with dual renal arteries on either one or both sides (group 2) and 10 patients with other anatomical constellations or structural abnormalities (group 3). Thirty nine out of 91 patients completed MSNA at baseline and follow-up. RDN significantly reduced office and daytime SBP in group 1 at both 3 and 6 months follow-up (Pkidney function in any group. While RDN can be performed safely irrespective of the underlying renal anatomy, the presence of single renal arteries with or without structural abnormalities is associated with a more pronounced BP and MSNA lowering effect than the presence of dual renal arteries in patients with RH. However, when patients with dual renal arteries received renal nerve ablation in all arteries there was trend towards a greater BP reduction. Insufficient renal sympathetic nerve ablation may account for these differences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Central inhibitory effect of α-methyldopa on blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature of renal hypertensive rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, F.P.; Ezer, Joseph; Jong, Wybren de

    The central inhibitory effect of α-methyldopa on blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature was studied in conscious renal hypertensive rats. Systemic administration of α-methyldopa decreased mean arterial blood pressure and body temperature and caused a short lasting increase in heart rate

  17. The Role of Vitamin D in Blood Pressure, Endothelial and Renal Function in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne C. Ho

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D is a pro-hormone that plays an essential role in the vasculature and in kidney function. Aims: To review the extra-skeletal effects of vitamin D on blood pressure, endothelial and renal function with emphasis on recent findings in postmenopausal women. Methods: Included in this review was a PubMed database search for English language articles through March 2013. This review discussed the physiology and definition of vitamin D deficiency, the recent evidence for the role vitamin D in blood pressure, vascular and renal function. Results: Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D plays an important role in the vasculature and in kidney function. Low vitamin D concentrations appear to significantly associate with hypertension, endothelial and renal dysfunction. However, the results of clinical trials have generally been mixed. Studies specifically conducted among postmenopausal women are limited and findings are still inconsistent. Conclusions: Definitive studies are warranted to elucidate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on vascular and renal function and a more detailed work is needed to outline the route, duration and optimal dose of supplementation. It is premature to recommend vitamin D as a therapeutic option in the improvement of vascular and renal function at the current stage.

  18. Tubuloglomerular feedback dynamics and renal blood flow autoregulation in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Wagner, A J; Marsh, D J

    1991-01-01

    To decide whether tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) can account for renal autoregulation, we tested predictions of a TGF simulation. Broad-band and single-frequency perturbations were applied to arterial pressure; arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow and proximal tubule pressure were measured....... Data were analyzed by linear systems analysis. Broad-band forcings of arterial pressure were also applied to the model to compare experimental results with simulations. With arterial pressure as the input and tubular pressure, renal blood flow, or renal vascular resistance as outputs, the model...... correctly predicted gain and phase only in the low-frequency range. Experimental results revealed a second component of vascular control active at 100-150 mHz that was not predicted by the simulation. Forcings at single frequencies showed that the system behaves linearly except in the band of 33-50 m...

  19. Blood pressure-renal blood flow relationships in conscious angiotensin II- and phenylephrine-infused rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polichnowski, Aaron J; Griffin, Karen A; Long, Jianrui; Williamson, Geoffrey A; Bidani, Anil K

    2013-10-01

    Chronic ANG II infusion in rodents is widely used as an experimental model of hypertension, yet very limited data are available describing the resulting blood pressure-renal blood flow (BP-RBF) relationships in conscious rats. Accordingly, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 19) were instrumented for chronic measurements of BP (radiotelemetry) and RBF (Transonic Systems, Ithaca, NY). One week later, two or three separate 2-h recordings of BP and RBF were obtained in conscious rats at 24-h intervals, in addition to separate 24-h BP recordings. Rats were then administered either ANG II (n = 11, 125 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) or phenylephrine (PE; n = 8, 50 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) as a control, ANG II-independent, pressor agent. Three days later the BP-RBF and 24-h BP recordings were repeated over several days. Despite similar increases in BP, PE led to significantly greater BP lability at the heart beat and very low frequency bandwidths. Conversely, ANG II, but not PE, caused significant renal vasoconstriction (a 62% increase in renal vascular resistance and a 21% decrease in RBF) and increased variability in BP-RBF relationships. Transfer function analysis of BP (input) and RBF (output) were consistent with a significant potentiation of the renal myogenic mechanism during ANG II administration, likely contributing, in part, to the exaggerated reductions in RBF during periods of BP elevations. We conclude that relatively equipressor doses of ANG II and PE lead to greatly different ambient BP profiles and effects on the renal vasculature when assessed in conscious rats. These data may have important implications regarding the pathogenesis of hypertension-induced injury in these models of hypertension.

  20. Blood pressure in childhood : epidemiological probes into the aetiology of high blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hofman (Albert)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractHigh arterial blood pressure takes a heavy toll in western populations (1 ). Its causes are still largely unknown, but its sequelae, a variety of cardiovascular and renal diseases, have been referred to as "a modern scourge" (2). High blood pressure of unknown cause, or

  1. A dynamic model of renal blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1994-01-01

    To test whether a mathematical model combining dynamic models of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism and the myogenic mechanism was sufficient to explain dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow, we compared model simulations with experimental data. To assess the dynamic characteristics...... of renal autoregulation, a broad band perturbation of the arterial pressure was employed in both the simulations and the experiments. Renal blood flow and tubular pressure were used as response variables in the comparison. To better approximate the situation in vivo where a large number of individual...... data, which shows a unimodal curve for the admittance phase. The ability of the model to reproduce the experimental data supports the hypothesis that dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow is due to the combined action of TGF and the myogenic response....

  2. Pulse pressure and nocturnal fall in blood pressure are predictors of vascular, cardiac and renal target organ damage in hypertensive patients (LOD-RISK study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ortiz, Luis; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Martín-Moreiras, Javier; González-Elena, Luis J; Recio-Rodriguez, Jose I; Castaño-Sánchez, Yolanda; Grandes, Gonzalo; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    To analyse the relationship between various parameters derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and vascular, cardiac and renal target organ damage. A cross-sectional, descriptive study. It included 353 patients with short-term or recently diagnosed hypertension. ABPM, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), Cornell voltage-duration product (Cornell VDP), glomerular filtration rate and albumin/creatinine ratio to assess vascular, cardiac and renal damage. Two hundred and twenty-three patients (63.2%) were males, aged 56.12+/-11.21 years. The nocturnal fall in blood pressure was 11.33+/-8.41, with a dipper pattern in 49.0% (173), nondipper in 30.3% (107), extreme dipper in 12.7% (45) and riser in 7.9% (28). The IMT was lower in the extreme dipper (0.716+/-0.096 mm) and better in the riser pattern (0.794+/-0.122 mm) (P<0.05). The Cornell VDP and albumin/creatinine ratio were higher in the riser pattern (1818.94+/-1798.63 mm/ms and 140.78+/-366.38 mg/g, respectively) than in the other patterns. In the multivariate analysis after adjusting for age, sex and antihypertensive treatment, with IMT as dependent variable the 24-h pulse pressure (beta = 0.003), with Cornell VDP the rest pulse pressure (beta = 12.04), and with the albumin/creatinine ratio the percentage of nocturnal fall in systolic blood pressure (beta = -3.59), the rest heart rate (beta = 1.83) and the standard deviation of 24-h systolic blood pressure (beta = 5.30) remain within the equation. The estimated pulse pressure with ABPM is a predictor of vascular and cardiac organ damage. The nocturnal fall and the standard deviation in 24-h systolic blood pressure measured with the ABPM is a predictor of renal damage.

  3. Unilateral renal artery stenosis and hypertension. II. Angiographic findings correlated with blood pressure response after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, I; Bergentz, S E; Ericsson, B F; Dymling, J F; Hansson, B G; Hoekfelt, B [Department of Diagnostic Radiography, Surgery and Endocrinology, Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus, Malmoe, Sweden

    1979-01-01

    The findings at preoperative nephroanigiography of 42 hypertensive patients with unilateral renal artery stenosis or occlusion were correlated with the blood pressure response following surgery and also with the preoperative renal vein renin activity ratio. A stenosis reducing luminal area by at least 90 per cent (or occlusion) and the presence of collateral circulation are considered to be highly suggestive of renovascular hypertension.

  4. Ambulatory blood pressure profiles in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lior; Bar-Aluma, Bat-El; Krauthammer, Alex; Efrati, Ori; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2018-02-12

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare genetic disease that involves extreme blood pressure fluctuations secondary to afferent baroreflex failure. The diurnal blood pressure profile, including the average, variability, and day-night difference, may have implications for long-term end organ damage. The purpose of this study was to describe the circadian pattern of blood pressure in the FD population and relationships with renal and pulmonary function, use of medications, and overall disability. We analyzed 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in 22 patients with FD. Information about medications, disease severity, renal function (estimated glomerular filtration, eGFR), pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, FEV1) and an index of blood pressure variability (standard deviation of systolic pressure) were analyzed. The mean (± SEM) 24-h blood pressure was 115 ± 5.6/72 ± 2.0 mmHg. The diurnal blood pressure variability was high (daytime systolic pressure standard deviation 22.4 ± 1.5 mmHg, nighttime 17.2 ± 1.6), with a high frequency of a non-dipping pattern (16 patients, 73%). eGFR, use of medications, FEV1, and disability scores were unrelated to the degree of blood pressure variability or to dipping status. This FD cohort had normal average 24-h blood pressure, fluctuating blood pressure, and a high frequency of non-dippers. Although there was evidence of renal dysfunction based on eGFR and proteinuria, the ABPM profile was unrelated to the measures of end organ dysfunction or to reported disability.

  5. Anatomical and procedural determinants of ambulatory blood pressure lowering following catheter-based renal denervation using radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, Lucas; Ewen, Sebastian; Tzafriri, Abraham R; Edelman, Elazer R; Cremers, Bodo; Kulenthiran, Saarraaken; Ukena, Christian; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Tsioufis, Costas; Scheller, Bruno; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2018-03-02

    Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) has been introduced to lower blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic activity in patients with uncontrolled hypertension with at best equivocal results. It has been postulated that anatomic and procedural elements introduce unaccounted variability and yet little is known of the impact of renal anatomy and procedural parameters on BP response to RDN. Anatomical parameters such as length and diameter were analyzed by quantitative vascular analysis and the prevalence of accessory renal arteries and renal artery disease were documented in 150 patients with resistant hypertension undergoing bilateral RDN using a mono-electrode radiofrequency catheter (Symplicity Flex, Medtronic). Accessory renal arteries and renal artery disease were present in 56 (37%) and 14 patients (9%), respectively. At 6-months, 24 h-ambulatory BP was reduced by 11/6 mm Hg (p renal arteries (p = 0.543) or renal artery disease (p = 0.598). Patients with at least one main renal artery diameter ≤ 4 mm had a more pronounced reduction of 24 h-ambulatory SBP compared to patients where both arteries were >4 mm (-19 vs. -10 mmHg; p = 0.038). Neither the length of the renal artery nor the number of RF ablations influenced 24 h-ambulatory BP reduction at 6 months. 24 h-ambulatory BP lowering was most pronounced in patients with smaller renal artery diameter but not related to renal artery length, accessory arteries or renal artery disease. Further, there was no dose-response relationship observed with increasing number of ablations. Because little is known of the impact of renal anatomy and procedural parameters on blood pressure (BP) response to renal denervation (RDN), anatomical and procedural data were analyzed in 150 patients undergoing bilateral RDN. BP lowering was most pronounced in patients with smaller renal artery diameter but not related to renal artery length, the presence of renal artery disease or accessory renal

  6. Eppur Si Muove: The dynamic nature of physiological control of renal blood flow by the renal sympathetic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter Ricci; Zucker, Irving H

    2017-05-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback and the myogenic response are widely appreciated as important regulators of renal blood flow, but the role of the sympathetic nervous system in physiological renal blood flow control remains controversial. Where classic studies using static measures of renal blood flow failed, dynamic approaches have succeeded in demonstrating sympathetic control of renal blood flow under normal physiological conditions. This review focuses on transfer function analysis of renal pressure-flow, which leverages the physical relationship between blood pressure and flow to assess the underlying vascular control mechanisms. Studies using this approach indicate that the renal nerves are important in the rapid regulation of the renal vasculature. Animals with intact renal innervation show a sympathetic signature in the frequency range associated with sympathetic vasomotion that is eliminated by renal denervation. In conscious rabbits, this sympathetic signature exerts vasoconstrictive, baroreflex control of renal vascular conductance, matching well with the rhythmic, baroreflex-influenced control of renal sympathetic nerve activity and complementing findings from other studies employing dynamic approaches to study renal sympathetic vascular control. In this light, classic studies reporting that nerve stimulation and renal denervation do not affect static measures of renal blood flow provide evidence for the strength of renal autoregulation rather than evidence against physiological renal sympathetic control of renal blood flow. Thus, alongside tubuloglomerular feedback and the myogenic response, renal sympathetic outflow should be considered an important physiological regulator of renal blood flow. Clinically, renal sympathetic vasomotion may be important for solving the problems facing the field of therapeutic renal denervation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Aging increases oxidative stress and renal expression of oxidant and antioxidant enzymes that are associated with an increased trend in systolic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Pedro; Simão, Sónia; Silva, Elisabete; Pinto, Vanda; Amaral, João S; Afonso, Joana; Serrão, Maria Paula; Pinho, Maria João; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the effects of aging on oxidative stress markers and expression of major oxidant and antioxidant enzymes associate with impairment of renal function and increases in blood pressure. To explore this, we determined age-associated changes in lipid peroxidation (urinary malondialdehyde), plasma and urinary hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, as well as renal H(2)O(2) production, and the expression of oxidant and antioxidant enzymes in young (13 weeks) and old (52 weeks) male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Urinary lipid peroxidation levels and H(2)O(2) production by the renal cortex and medulla of old rats were higher than their young counterparts. This was accompanied by overexpression of NADPH oxidase components Nox4 and p22(phox) in the renal cortex of old rats. Similarly, expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms 2 and 3 and catalase were increased in the renal cortex from old rats. Renal function parameters (creatinine clearance and fractional excretion of sodium), diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were not affected by aging, although slight increases in systolic blood pressure were observed during this 52-week period. It is concluded that overexpression of renal Nox4 and p22(phox) and the increases in renal H(2)O(2) levels in aged WKY does not associate with renal functional impairment or marked increases in blood pressure. It is hypothesized that lack of oxidative stress-associated effects in aged WKY rats may result from increases in antioxidant defenses that counteract the damaging effects of H(2)O(2).

  8. High-fat diet amplifies renal renin angiotensin system expression, blood pressure elevation, and renal dysfunction caused by Ceacam1 null deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caixia; Culver, Silas A; Quadri, Syed; Ledford, Kelly L; Al-Share, Qusai Y; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Najjar, Sonia M; Siragy, Helmy M

    2015-11-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAMl), a substrate of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, regulates insulin action by promoting insulin clearance. Global null mutation of Ceacam1 gene (Cc1(-/-)) results in features of the metabolic syndrome, including insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, visceral adiposity, elevated blood pressure, and albuminuria. It also causes activation of the renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS). In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that high-fat diet enhances the expression of RAS components. Three-month-old wild-type (Cc1(+/+)) and Cc1(-/-) mice were fed either a regular or a high-fat diet for 8 wk. At baseline under regular feeding conditions, Cc1(-/-) mice exhibited higher blood pressure, urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR), and renal expression of angiotensinogen, renin/prorenin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, (pro)renin receptor, angiotensin subtype AT1 receptor, angiotensin II, and elevated PI3K phosphorylation, as detected by p85α (Tyr(508)) immunostaining, inflammatory response, and the expression of collagen I and collagen III. In Cc1(+/+) mice, high-fat diet increased blood pressure, UACR, the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II, PI3K phosphorylation, inflammatory response, and the expression of collagen I and collagen III. In Cc1(-/-) mice, high-fat intake further amplified these parameters. Immunohistochemical staining showed increased p-PI3K p85α (Tyr(508)) expression in renal glomeruli, proximal, distal, and collecting tubules of Cc1(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet. Together, this demonstrates that high-fat diet amplifies the permissive effect of Ceacam1 deletion on renal expression of all RAS components, PI3K phosphorylation, inflammation, and fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrani, Lara; Ergin, Bulent; Kapucu, Aysegul; Ince, Can

    2016-12-20

    The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Twenty-seven Wistar albino rats were randomized into four groups: a sham group (n = 6), a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group (n = 7), a LPS group that received fluid resuscitation (n = 7), and a LPS group that received blood transfusion (n = 7). The mean arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal microvascular oxygenation within the kidney cortex were recorded. Acute kidney injury was assessed using the serum creatinine levels, metabolic cost, and histopathological lesions. Nitrosative stress (expression of endothelial (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)) within the kidney was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Hemoglobin levels, pH, serum lactate levels, and liver enzymes were measured. Fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion both significantly improved the mean arterial pressure and renal blood flow after LPS infusion. Renal microvascular oxygenation, serum creatinine levels, and tubular damage significantly improved in the LPS group that received blood transfusion compared to the group that received fluids. Moreover, the renal expression of eNOS was markedly suppressed under endotoxin challenge. Blood transfusion, but not fluid resuscitation, was able to restore the renal expression of eNOS. However, there were no significant differences in lactic acidosis or liver function between the two groups. Blood transfusion significantly improved renal function in endotoxemic rats. The specific beneficial effect of blood transfusion on the kidney could have been mediated in part by the improvements in renal microvascular oxygenation and sepsis-induced endothelial dysfunction via the restoration of eNOS expression within the kidney.

  10. Impact of renal denervation on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure: results from SYMPLICITY HTN-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakris, George L; Townsend, Raymond R; Liu, Minglei; Cohen, Sidney A; D'Agostino, Ralph; Flack, John M; Kandzari, David E; Katzen, Barry T; Leon, Martin B; Mauri, Laura; Negoita, Manuela; O'Neill, William W; Oparil, Suzanne; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2014-09-16

    Prior studies of catheter-based renal artery denervation have not systematically performed ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) to assess the efficacy of the procedure. SYMPLICITY HTN-3 (Renal Denervation in Patients With Uncontrolled Hypertension) was a prospective, blinded, randomized, sham-controlled trial. The current analysis details the effect of renal denervation or a sham procedure on ABPM measurements 6 months post-randomization. Patients with resistant hypertension were randomized 2:1 to renal denervation or sham control. Patients were on a stable antihypertensive regimen including maximally tolerated doses of at least 3 drugs including a diuretic before randomization. The powered secondary efficacy endpoint was a change in mean 24-h ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP). Nondipper to dipper (nighttime blood pressure [BP] 10% to 20% lower than daytime BP) conversion was calculated at 6 months. The 24-h ambulatory SBP changed -6.8 ± 15.1 mm Hg in the denervation group and -4.8 ± 17.3 mm Hg in the sham group: difference of -2.0 mm Hg (95% confidence interval [CI]: -5.0 to 1.1; p = 0.98 with a 2 mm Hg superiority margin). The daytime ambulatory SBP change difference between groups was -1.1 (95% CI: -4.3 to 2.2; p = 0.52). The nocturnal ambulatory SBP change difference between groups was -3.3 (95 CI: -6.7 to 0.1; p = 0.06). The percent of nondippers converted to dippers was 21.2% in the denervation group and 15.0% in the sham group (95% CI: -3.8% to 16.2%; p = 0.30). Change in 24-h heart rate was -1.4 ± 7.4 in the denervation group and -1.3 ± 7.3 in the sham group; (95% CI: -1.5 to 1.4; p = 0.94). This trial did not demonstrate a benefit of renal artery denervation on reduction in ambulatory BP in either the 24-h or day and night periods compared with sham (Renal Denervation in Patients With Uncontrolled Hypertension [SYMPLICITY HTN-3]; NCT01418261). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by

  11. Blood Pressure Response to Main Renal Artery and Combined Main Renal Artery Plus Branch Renal Denervation in Patients With Resistant Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengler, Karl; Ewen, Sebastian; Höllriegel, Robert; Rommel, Karl-Philipp; Kulenthiran, Saaraaken; Lauder, Lucas; Cremers, Bodo; Schuler, Gerhard; Linke, Axel; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix; Lurz, Philipp

    2017-08-10

    Single-electrode ablation of the main renal artery for renal sympathetic denervation showed mixed blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects. Further improvement of the technique seems crucial to optimize effectiveness of the procedure. Because sympathetic nerve fibers are closer to the lumen in the distal part of the renal artery, treatment of the distal main artery and its branches has been shown to reduce variability in treatment effects in preclinical studies and a recent randomized trial. Whether this optimized technique improves clinical outcomes remains uncertain. We report a 2-center experience of main renal artery and combined main renal artery plus branches renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension using a multielectrode catheter. Twenty-five patients with therapy-resistant hypertension underwent renal sympathetic denervation with combined main renal artery and renal branch ablation and were compared to matched controls undergoing an ablation of the main renal artery only. BP change was assessed by ambulatory measurement at baseline and after 3 months. At baseline, BP was balanced between the groups. After 3 months, BP changed significantly in the combined ablation group (systolic/diastolic 24-hour mean and daytime mean BP -8.5±9.8/-7.0±10.7 and -9.4±9.8/-7.1±13.5 mm Hg, P renal artery and branches appears to improve BP-lowering efficacy and should be further investigated. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. Perivascular radiofrequency renal denervation lowers blood pressure and ameliorates cardiorenal fibrosis in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Su, Linan; Zhang, Yunrong; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Dachun; Li, De; Yang, Yongjian; Ma, Shuangtao

    2017-01-01

    Background Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) is a promising approach to treat hypertension, but innervation patterns limit the response to endovascular RDN and the post-procedural renal artery narrowing or stenosis questions the endovascular ablation strategy. This study was performed to investigate the anti-hypertensive and target organ protective effects of perivascular RDN in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were divided into sham group (n = 10), radiofrequency ablation group (n = 20) in which rats received bilateral perivascular ablation with radiofrequency energy (2 watts), and chemical (10% phenol in 95% ethanol) ablation group (n = 12). The tail-cuff blood pressure was measured before the ablation and on day 14 and day 28 after the procedure. The plasma levels of creatinine, urea nitrogen, and catecholamines, urinary excretion of electrolytes and protein, and myocardial and glomerular fibrosis were analyzed and compared among the groups on day 28 after the procedure. Results We identified that 2-watt is the optimal radiofrequency power for perivascular RDN in rats. Perivascular radiofrequency and chemical ablation achieved roughly comparable blood pressure reduction in SHR but not in WKY on day 14 and day 28 following the procedure. Radiofrequency-mediated ablation substantially destroyed the renal nerves surrounding the renal arteries of both SHR and WKY without damaging the renal arteries and diminished the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the enzyme marker for postganglionic sympathetic nerves. Additionally, perivascular radiofrequency ablation also decreased the plasma catecholamines of SHR. Interestingly, both radiofrequency and chemical ablation decreased the myocardial and glomerular fibrosis of SHR, while neither increased the plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen nor affected the urinary excretion of electrolytes and protein when compared to sham group. Conclusions Radiofrequency

  13. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  14. The giraffe kidney tolerates high arterial blood pressure by high renal interstitial pressure and low glomerular filtration rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Mads; Wang, T; Brøndum, E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The tallest animal on earth, the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is endowed with a mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) twice that of other mammals. The kidneys reside at heart level and show no sign of hypertension-related damage. We hypothesized that a species-specific evolutionary...... cava generated a pressure drop of 12 ± 2 mmHg. RI was 0.27. The renal capsule was durable with a calculated burst pressure of 600 mmHg. Plasma renin and AngII were 2.6 ± 0.5 mIU L(-1) and 9.1 ± 1.5 pg mL(-1) respectively. CONCLUSION: In giraffes, GFR, ERPF and RI appear much lower than expected based...... adaption in the giraffe kidney allows normal for size renal haemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) despite a MAP double that of other mammals. METHODS: Fourteen anaesthetized giraffes were instrumented with vascular and bladder catheters to measure glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective...

  15. Dynamic modeling of renal blood flow in Dahl hypertensive and normotensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Elmer, Henrik; Knudsen, Morten H

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed in this paper which allows characterization of renal autoregulatory dynamics and efficiency using quantitative mathematical methods. Based on data from rat experiments, where arterial blood pressure and renal blood flow are measured, a quantitative model for renal blood flow...

  16. Relationship between diurnal blood pressure and renal histopathological changes in white coat hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Erhan; Uslu, Adam; Tasli, Funda; Karatas, Murat

    2017-08-01

    Multiple epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated the macrovascular risks associated with white coat hypertension (WCH) or sustained hypertension (SH). In patients with WCH, there is no literature available on renal histopathological changes and that on blood pressure pattern and native kidney outcome is scant. We aimed to clarify the relationship between blood pressure variables and pathological features of kidney biopsies in living kidney donors with WCH. This cross-sectional study included living kidney donors with WCH (n = 10) and SH (n = 10), and 20 healthy kidney donors with similar demographic features (control group). Kidney allograft biopsy samples were obtained during transplantation and chronic glomerular, vascular and tubulointertitial changes were semiquantitatively scored according to the Banff classification. The mean age of the 20 hypertensive subjects (Group 1) and controls (Group 2) was 59.3 ± 8.5 versus 59.6 ± 7.6 years and almost half were female. There was no difference in renal function parameters between the groups; however, kidney histopathology in Group 1 was worse than Group 2 with a chronicity index of 2.80 ± 1.67 versus 1.75 ± 1.16 (p = 0.02). There was no difference between histopathological scores of patients with WCH or SH (chronicity index: 2.60 ± 1.43 vs. 2.70 ± 1.70, p = 0.88). Night-to-day mean arterial pressure (MAP) ratio was significantly associated with chronicity index in patients with WCH. Moreover, WCH patients with non-dipper hypertensive pattern had a worse chronicity index. Significant histopathological alterations in the kidney were observed in patients with WCH and SH, and were accentuated in WCH patients with non-dipper blood pressure pattern.

  17. ABPM vs office blood pressure to define blood pressure control in treated hypertensive paediatric renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Jorge R; Ghezzi, Lidia; Waisman, Gabriel; Krmar, Rafael T

    2007-02-01

    While 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is an established tool for monitoring antihypertensive therapy in adults, data in children are scarce. We retrospectively analysed whether office blood pressure (BP) is reliable for the diagnosis of BP control in 26 treated hypertensive paediatric renal transplants. Controlled office BP was defined as the mean of three replicate systolic and diastolic BP recordings less than or equal to the 95th age-, sex- and height-matched percentile on the three-outpatient visits closest to ABPM. Controlled ABPM was defined as systolic and diastolic daytime BP ABPM reference. Eight recipients (30%) with controlled office BP were in fact categorized as having non-controlled BP by ABPM criteria. Overall, when office BP and ABPM were compared using the Bland and Altman method, the 95% limits of agreement between office and daytime values ranged from -12.6 to 34.1 mmHg for systolic and -23.9 to 31.7 mmHg for diastolic BP, and the mean difference was 10.7 and 3.9 mmHg respectively. Office readings miss a substantial number of recipients who are hypertensive by ABPM criteria. Undertreatment of hypertension could be avoided if ABPM is applied as an adjunct to office readings.

  18. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on 24-hour blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Stefanie Zuern

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In patients with arterial hypertension, increased blood pressure (BP variability contributes to end organ damage independently from mean levels of arterial BP. Increased BP variability has been linked to alterations in autonomic function including sympathetic overdrive. We hypothesized that catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN confers beneficial effects on BPV. Methods and Results: Eleven consecutive patients with therapy-refractory arterial hypertension (age 68.9±7.0 years; baseline systolic BP 189±23mmHg despite medication with 5.6±2.1 antihypertensive drugs underwent bilateral RDN. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM was performed before RDN and six months thereafter. BPV was primarily assessed by means of standard deviation of 24-hour systolic arterial blood pressures (SDsys. Secondary measures of BPV were maximum systolic blood pressure (MAXsys and maximum difference between two consecutive readings of systolic BP (deltamaxsys over 24 hours. Six months after RDN, SDsys, MAXsys and deltamaxsys were significantly reduced from 16.9±4.6mmHg to 13.5±2.5mmHg (p=0.003, from 190±22mmHg to 172±20mmHg (p<0.001 and from 40±15mmHg to 28±7mmHg (p=0.006, respectively, without changes in concomitant antihypertensive therapy. Reductions of SDsys, MAXsys and deltamaxsys were observed in 10/11 (90.9%, 11/11 (100% and 9/11 (81.8% patients, respectively. Although we noted a significant reduction of systolic office blood pressure by 30.4±27.7mmHg (p=0.007, there was only a trend in reduction of average systolic BP assessed from ABPM (149±19mmHg to 142±18mmHg; p=0.086.Conclusions: In patients with therapy-refractory arterial hypertension, RDN leads to significant reductions of BP variability. Effects of RDN on BPV over 24 hours were more pronounced than on average levels of BP.

  19. βENaC acts as a mechanosensor in renal vascular smooth muscle cells that contributes to renal myogenic blood flow regulation, protection from renal injury and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Heather A; Stec, David E

    2015-06-01

    Pressure-induced constriction (also known as the "myogenic response") is an important mechanodependent response in small renal arteries and arterioles. The response is initiated by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) stretch due to an increase in intraluminal pressure and leads to vasoconstriction. The myogenic response has two important roles as a mechanism of local blood flow autoregulation and protection against systemic blood pressure-induced microvascular damage. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying initiation of myogenic response are unresolved. Although several molecules have been considered initiators of the response, our laboratory has focused on the role of degenerin proteins because of their strong evolutionary link to mechanosensing in the nematode. Our laboratory has addressed the hypothesis that certain degenerin proteins act as mechanosensors in VSMCs. This article discusses the importance of a specific degenerin protein, β Epithelial Na + Channel (βENaC), in pressure-induced vasoconstriction, renal blood flow and susceptibility to renal injury. We propose that loss of the renal myogenic constrictor response delays the correction of renal blood flow that occurs with fluctuations in systemic pressure, which allows pressure swings to be transmitted to the microvasculature, thus increasing the susceptibility to renal injury and hypertension. The role of βENaC in myogenic regulation is independent of tubular βENaC and thus represents a non-tubular role for βENaC in renal-cardiovascular homeostasis.

  20. The crosstalk between the kidney and the central nervous system: the role of renal nerves in blood pressure regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Erika E; Bergamaschi, Cássia T; Campos, Ruy R

    2015-04-20

    What is the topic of this review? This review describes the role of renal nerves as the key carrier of signals from the kidneys to the CNS and vice versa; the brain and kidneys communicate through this carrier to maintain homeostasis in the body. What advances does it highlight? Whether renal or autonomic dysfunction is the predominant contributor to systemic hypertension is still debated. In this review, we focus on the role of the renal nerves in a model of renovascular hypertension. The sympathetic nervous system influences the renal regulation of arterial pressure and body fluid composition. Anatomical and physiological evidence has shown that sympathetic nerves mediate changes in urinary sodium and water excretion by regulating the renal tubular water and sodium reabsorption throughout the nephron, changes in the renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate by regulating the constriction of renal vasculature, and changes in the activity of the renin-angiotensin system by regulating the renin release from juxtaglomerular cells. Additionally, renal sensory afferent fibres project to the autonomic central nuclei that regulate blood pressure. Hence, renal nerves play a key role in the crosstalk between the kidneys and the CNS to maintain homeostasis in the body. Therefore, the increased sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney and the renal afferent nerve activity to the CNS may contribute to the outcome of diseases, such as hypertension. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  1. Results and validity of renal blood flow measurements using Xenon 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, P.; Danet, B.; Guiraud, R.; Durand, D.; Ader, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The renal blood flow was measured by external recording of the xenon 133 excretion curve. The study involved 45 patients with permanent high blood pressure and 7 transplant patients. The validity of the method was checked on 10 dogs. From the results it seems that the cortical blood flow, its fraction and the mean flow rate are the most representative of the renal haemodynamics parameters, from which may be established the repercussions of blood pressure on kidney vascularisation. Experiments are in progress on animals to check the compartment idea by comparing injections into the renal artery and into various kidney tissues in situ [fr

  2. Aortic blood flow subtraction: an alternative method for measuring total renal blood flow in conscious dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandgaard, N C F; Andersen, J L; Holstein-Rathlou, N-H

    2002-01-01

    We have measured total renal blood flow (TRBF) as the difference between signals from ultrasound flow probes implanted around the aorta above and below the renal arteries. The repeatability of the method was investigated by repeated, continuous infusions of angiotensin II and endothelin-1 seven...... arterial blood pressure by 49% and decreased TRBF by 12%, providing an increase in renal vascular resistance of 69%. Dynamic analysis showed autoregulation of renal blood flow in the frequency range ... of TRBF by aortic blood flow subtraction is a practical and reliable method that allows direct comparison of excretory function and renal blood flow from two kidneys. The method also allows direct comparison between TRBF and flow in the caudal aorta....

  3. Correlation between the trajectory of systolic blood pressure and new renal damage in a nonhypertensive population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Jun; Jia, Dao; Tian, Jun; Liu, Jie; Li, Li-Jie; Huang, Yu-Ling; Cao, Xin-Ying; Ning, Chun-Hong; Zhao, Quan-Hui; Yu, Jun-Xing; Zhang, Rui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Jing; Gao, Jing-Sheng; Wu, Shou-Ling

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the correlation between the trajectory of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and new renal damage in a nonhypertensive population. This prospective cohort study included a total of 14 382 nonhypertensive individuals, employees of Kailuan Group of Companies, who took part in five healthy examinations in 2006-2007, 2008-2009, 2010-2011, 2012-2013, and 2014-2015, and had complete data. These individuals were divided into four groups according to the different trajectories of SBP: low-low, low-stable, middle-high, and high-high groups. The correlation between the trajectory of SBP and new renal damage in a nonhypertensive population was analyzed using a multivariate Cox's proportional hazard regression model. (a) A total of 14 382 individuals had complete data and the average age of these individuals was 44.6±10.8 years. Among these, 10 888 (75.7%) individuals were men and 3494 (24.3%) individuals were women. (b) These individuals were divided into four groups according to different trajectories of blood pressure: low-low group, accounting for 13.15% (blood pressure was group, accounting for 53.91% (blood pressure was between 115 and 116 mmHg); middle-high group, accounting for 28.77% (blood pressure was between 125 and 131 mmHg); and high-high group, accounting for 4.6% (blood pressure was between 126 and 151 mmHg). (c) With the increase in the trajectory of SBP, the detection rate of renal damage increased gradually. From the low-low group to the high-high group, the detection rates of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m were 2.3, 2.4, 3.6, and 4.3%, respectively; the positive rates of urinary protein were 1.7, 2.9, 3.8, and 5.5%, respectively; and the detection rates of eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m or positive urinary protein were 4, 5.2, 7.3, and 9.3%, respectively (Pgroup, the risk of eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m increased by nearly 1.5 times in the high-high group and in

  4. Renal function evaluation in the aged with normal blood pressure and high blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob Filho, W.; Carvalho Filho, E.T. de; Papaleo Netto, M.; Baptista, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-four patients older than 65 years were divided into two groups according to their ages: I - 66 to 74 years (17 patients), II - 75 and over (17 patients). These elderly patients were also divided according to their arterial blood pressure level (BP): A - normal BP (14 patients), B high BP (20 patients). None of these patients presented any other disease that could affect kidney function, nor have used drugs that could interfere on the BP or on the kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasmatic flow (ERPF) were analysed by radioisotopic techniques. Furthermore the filtration fraction (FF) was evaluated by the GFR/ERPF ratio. The observed GFR, ERPF and FF variations in the age groups or in normotensive and hypertensive patients were not significant, but we could assume that the physiopathological mechanisms that cause a decreased GFR in consequence of age or of systemic hypertension could be of different origins. Thus in the old hypertensive patients, alterations in the autoregulated hemodynamic mechanism could occur. (author) [pt

  5. Renal blood flow dynamics in inbred rat strains provides insight into autoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Mitrou, Nicholas G; Cupples, William A

    2014-01-01

    Renal autoregulation maintains stable renal blood flow in the face of constantly fluctuating blood pressure. Autoregulation is also the only mechanism that protects the delicate glomerular capillaries when blood pressure increases. In order to understand autoregulation, the renal blood flow response to changing blood pressure is studied. The steadystate response of blood flow is informative, but limits investigation of the individual mechanisms of autoregulation. The dynamics of autoregulation can be probed with transfer function analysis. The frequency-domain analysis of autoregulation allows investigators to probe the relative activity of each mechanism of autoregulation. We discuss the methodology and interpretation of transfer function analysis. Autoregulation is routinely studied in the rat, of which there are many inbred strains. There are multiple strains of rat that are either selected or inbred as models of human pathology. We discuss relevant characteristics of Brown Norway, Spontaneously hypertensive, Dahl, and Fawn-Hooded hypertensive rats and explore differences among these strains in blood pressure, dynamic autoregulation, and susceptibility to hypertensive renal injury. Finally we show that the use of transfer function analysis in these rat strains has contributed to our understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of autoregulation and hypertensive renal disease.Interestingly all these strains demonstrate effective tubuloglomerular feedback suggesting that this mechanism is not sufficient for effective autoregulation. In contrast, obligatory or conditional failure of the myogenic mechanism suggests that this component is both necessary and sufficient for autoregulation.

  6. Association of blood pressure with decline in renal function and time until the start of renal replacement therapy in pre-dialysis patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijpkens Yvo WJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate whether high blood pressure accelerates renal function decline in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD, we studied the association of systolic (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP with decline in renal function and time until the start of renal replacement therapy (RRT in patients with CKD stages IV-V on pre-dialysis care. Methods In the PREPARE-1 cohort 547 incident pre-dialysis patients, referred as part of the usual care to outpatient clinics of eight Dutch hospitals, were included between 1999 and 2001 and followed until the start of RRT, mortality, or end of follow-up (January 1st 2008. Main outcomes were rate of decline in renal function, estimated as the slope of available eGFR measurements, and time until the start of RRT. Results A total of 508 patients, 57% men and median (IQR age of 63 (50-73 years, were available for analyses. Mean (SD decline in renal function was 0.35 (0.75 ml/min/1.73 m2/month. Every 10 mmHg increase in SBP or DBP resulted in an accelerated decline in renal function (adjusted additional decline 0.04 (0.02;0.07 and 0.05 (0.00;0.11 ml/min/1.73 m2/month respectively and an earlier start of RRT (adjusted HR 1.09 (1.04;1.14 and 1.16 (1.05;1.28 respectively. Furthermore, patients with SBP and DBP above the BP target goal of 2/month and an earlier start of RRT (adjusted HR 2.08 (1.25;3.44, compared to patients who achieved the target goal (11%. Comparing the decline in renal function and risk of starting RRT between patients with only SBP above the target (≥ 130 mmHg and patients with both SBP and DBP below the target (2/month and adjusted HR 2.24 (1.26;3.97. Therefore, it seems that especially having SBP above the target is harmful. Conclusions In pre-dialysis patients with CKD stages IV-V, having blood pressure (especially SBP above the target goal for CKD patients (

  7. Endoluminal isoproterenol reduces renal pelvic pressure during semirigid ureterorenoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jørn S; Jung, Helene U; Gramsbergen, Jan B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects on the pressure-flow relation of renal pelvic pressure during semirigid ureterorenoscopy and endoluminal perfusion of isoproterenol (ISO) 0.1 microg/mL, with emphasis on local effects and cardiovascular side-effects, as topically administered ISO effectively...... and dose-dependently causes relaxation of the upper urinary tract in pigs with no concomitant cardiovascular side-effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS In anaesthetized female pigs (60 kg), 16 macroscopically normal upper urinary tract systems were subjected to ureterorenoscopy. Via a subcostal incision a 6-F...... catheter was placed in the renal pelvis for pressure measurements, and a semirigid ureteroscope (7.8 F) was inserted retrogradely in the renal pelvis, through which the pelvis was perfused. The blood pressure and heart rate were recorded. The increase in renal pelvic pressure was examined with increasing...

  8. Does the serum uric acid level have any relation to arterial stiffness or blood pressure in adults with congenital renal agenesis and/or hypoplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Raziye; Guney, İbrahim; Altintepe, Lutfullah; Yazici, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between serum uric acid and arterial stiffness or blood pressure is not clear. The serum uric acid level and its association with cardiovascular risk is not well known in patients with reduced renal mass. We aimed to investigate the relation between serum uric acid levels and arterial stiffness and also blood pressure in patients with congenital renal agenesis and/or hypoplasia. In this single center, cross-sectional study, a total of 55 patients (39 (% 70.9) with unilateral small kidney and 16 (%29.1) with renal agenesis) were included. The median age was 35 (21-50) years. The study population was divided into tertiles of serum uric acid (according to 2.40-3.96, 3.97-5.10, and 5.11-9.80 mg/dl cut-off values of serum uric acid levels). Official and 24-h ambulatory non-invasive blood pressures of all patients were measured. The arterial stiffness was assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWV values were increased from first to third tertile (5.5 ± 0.6, 5.7 ± 0.8, 6.1 ± 0.7, respectively), but this gradual increase between tertiles did not reach significance. Linear regression analyses showed a positive correlation between serum uric acid levels and PWV (β = 0.40, p = 0.010), but no correlation was found between uric acid and daytime systolic blood pressure (β = 0.24, p = 0.345). In congenital renal agenesis/hypoplasia, the serum uric acid level was positively correlated with arterial stiffness, but there was no correlation with blood pressure.

  9. Effect of kefir and low-dose aspirin on arterial blood pressure measurements and renal apoptosis in unhypertensive rats with 4 weeks salt diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbak, Güngör; Uzuner, Kubilay; Kuşat Ol, Kevser; Oğlakçı, Ayşegül; Kartkaya, Kazım; Şentürk, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We aim to study the effect of low-dose aspirin and kefir on arterial blood pressure measurements and renal apoptosis in unhypertensive rats with 4 weeks salt diet. Forty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: control, high-salt (HS) (8.0% NaCl), HS+aspirin (10 mg/kg), HS+kefir (10.0%w/v), HS+aspirin +kefir. We measured sistolic blood pressure (SBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), diastolic pressure, pulse pressure in the rats. Cathepsin B, L, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activities were determined from rat kidney tissues and rats clearance of creatinine calculated. Although HS diet increased significantly SBP, MAP, diastolic pressure, pulse pressure parameters compared the control values. They were not as high as accepted hypertension levels. When compared to HS groups, kefir groups significantly decrease Cathepsin B and DNA fragmentation levels. Caspase levels were elevated slightly in other groups according to control group. While, we also found that creatinine clearance was higher in HS+kefir and HS+low-dose aspirin than HS group. Thus, using low-dose aspirin had been approximately decreased of renal function damage. Kefir decreased renal function damage playing as Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. But, low-dose aspirin together with kefir worsened rat renal function damage. Cathepsin B might play role both apoptosis and prorenin-processing enzyme. But not caspase pathway may be involved in the present HS diet induced apoptosis. In conclusion, kefir and low-dose aspirin used independently protect renal function and renal damage induced by HS diet in rats.

  10. Efficacy of 24-Hour Blood Pressure Monitoring in Evaluating Response to Percutaneous Transluminal Renal Angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jujo, Kentaro; Saito, Katsumi; Ishida, Issei; Furuki, Yuho; Ouchi, Taisuke; Kim, Ahsung; Suzuki, Yuki; Sekiguchi, Haruki; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2016-08-25

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) improves patency in atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), but improvement in clinic blood pressure (BP) is seen in only 20-40% of patients who undergo PTRA. This study investigated the effects of PTRA on BP lowering, assessed on 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), and identified preoperative features predictive of satisfactory BP improvement after PTRA. Of 1,753 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography, 31 patients with angiographically significant ARAS and translesional pressure gradient (TLPG) >20 mmHg underwent PTRA. ABPM was performed before, at 1 month and at 1 year after PTRA; patients with average systolic ABPM-BP decrease >10 mmHg at 1 month from baseline were categorized as responders. There was no obvious relationship between clinic BP and ABPM-BP at baseline. ABPM-BP was significantly higher in responders at baseline (SBP: 148 vs. 126 mmHg, PABPM-BP achieved a larger decrease in ABPM-BP, but the severity of stenosis reflected by TLPG; renal duplex findings; and neurohumoral parameters other than baseline renal function, did not differ between the groups. Clinic BP does not represent daily hemodynamic status, whereas high ABPM-BP is a potent predictor of satisfactory BP response to PTRA. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1922-1930).

  11. [Salt, renal function and high blood pressure--reflections on a current issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, Mattias

    2002-11-21

    The role of salt intake for blood pressure control has been discussed for a long time. A brief review is given of some pertinent physiological facts to explain this relationship and evolutionary aspects of renal function are emphasized. Salt intake is very high in the modern society, often as high as 15 g sodium chloride per 24 hours while 3-6 g may be more than enough to maintain an adequate salt balance. If the kidneys cannot cope with this severe sodium overload, blood pressure will rise. Therefore, the kidneys' ability to excrete sodium is a key factor and the salt excretion capacity is the kidneys' major barostatic function. As barostats, the kidneys control the blood pressure by ultimately determining the sodium excretion. Reducing sodium intake is, however, difficult as more than 50% of the intake is contained in the food we buy such as bread, sausages, canned food, chips and fast-food. Food products should therefore be "salt declared", but information on this aspect is generally lacking. If the population's salt intake could be reduced by 50%, the prevalence of hypertension will be much reduced, perhaps also by as much as 50%. The cost to society for treating hypertension would be reduced accordingly. Salt intake is also an important aspect of the overweight problem among today's youth. Salt and overweight impose great health risks later in life. Preventive measures in this area must be given high priority in future health care work.

  12. Differences in dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow between SHR and WKY rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y M; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1993-01-01

    by chaotic fluctuations. We sought to determine whether this change was associated with a change in the dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow. In halothane-anesthetized 250- to 320-g SHR and WKY rats, renal blood flow was measured during "white noise" forcing of arterial blood pressure. The frequency...... conclude that the change in the dynamics of TGF leads to a change in the dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow between SHR and WKY rats. This change results in a more efficient dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow in the SHR compared with the WKY rats. The functional consequences of this......In halothane-anesthetized Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats the single-nephron blood flow and the proximal tubule pressure oscillate at a frequency of 35-50 mHz because of the operation of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) the oscillations are replaced...

  13. Early Determinants of Blood Pressure and Renal Function: Follow-up of very preterm born individuals until young adulcy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Keijzer-Veen (Mandy)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn summary, the studies described in this thesis suggest that premature birth affects renal function and blood pressure at (young) adult age, and especially when born both SGA and premature. Minor differences are already detectable at young adult age. The biological mechanism is

  14. Community Noise Exposure and its Effect on Blood Pressure and Renal Function in Patients with Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhambov Angel M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Road traffic noise (RTN is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD and hypertension; however, few studies have looked into its association with blood pressure (BP and renal function in patients with prior CVD.

  15. Renal Denervation Attenuates Progression of Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E–Deficient Mice Independent of Blood Pressure Lowering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Jintao; Guo, Chiao; Luo, Wei; Kleiman, Kyle; Eitzman, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The renal autonomic nervous system may contribute to hypertension and vascular disease. Although the effects of renal artery denervation on blood pressure lowering are controversial, there may be other beneficial vascular effects independent of blood pressure lowering. Bilateral renal denervation (RDN) or sham operation (SO) was performed in 14-week-old male apolipoprotein E–deficient mice on a Western diet starting at 10 weeks of age. Efficacy of RDN was confirmed by reduction of renal norepinephrine levels (SO: 3.8±0.1 versus RDN: 1.7±0.3 ng/mL; P<0.01) at 6 weeks after procedure. Compared with SO, RDN had no effect on blood pressure (SO: 101.0±2.4 versus RDN: 97.5±1.6 mm Hg; P=0.25), total cholesterol (SO: 536.7±28.5 versus RDN: 535.7±62.9 mg/dL; P=0.99), or triglycerides (SO: 83.7±3.5 versus RDN: 86.9±10.2 mg/dL; P=0.78). Quantification of atherosclerosis at 20 weeks of age demonstrated reduced atherosclerosis in mice receiving RDN compared with SO (arterial tree oil-red-O surface staining RDN: 4.2±0.5% versus SO: 6.3±0.7%; P<0.05). Reduced atherosclerosis was associated with increased smooth muscle cell content in atherosclerotic plaques (RDN: 13.3±2.1 versus SO: 8.1±0.6%; P<0.05). Serum levels of aldosterone, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and 8-isoprostane were lower in mice that received RDN compared with sham-operated mice (aldosterone; RDN: 206.8±33.2 versus SO: 405.5±59.4 pg/mL, P<0.05; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1; RDN: 51.7±7.9 versus SO: 91.71±4.6 pg/mL, P<0.05; 8-isoprostane; RDN: 331.9±38.2 versus SO: 468.5±42.0 pg/mL, P<0.05). RDN reduces progression of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice. These changes are associated with reduced aldosterone levels, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and markers of oxidative stress. PMID:25646301

  16. Nocturnal and Circadian Rhythm of Blood Pressure Is Associated with Renal Structure Damage and Function in Patients with IgAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lirong; Zhang, Huhai; Yang, Jurong; Zhang, Jianguo; Li, Kailong; Huo, Bengang; Dai, Huanzi; Zhang, Weiwei; Yang, Jie; Tan, Wei; He, Yani

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) is closely related to target organ damage in hypertension. However, the association between abnormal circadian rhythm of BP and renal injury is not clear. We investigated whether renal injury is associated with nocturnal BP and circadian rhythm of BP in Chinese IgAN patients. Clinic and 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring data were obtained from 330 Chinese IgAN patients with mean 24 h BP circadian BP, and 27% had nocturnal hypertension with a nondipping pattern. Compared with nocturnal normotensive patients, patients with nocturnal hypertension had significantly higher levels of blood cystatin C, blood uric acid, and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and significantly a higher mean renal tissue injury score. The nondipping hypertensive group had significantly higher nocturnal diastolic and systolic BP, blood uric acid, and glomerulosclerosis rates, whereas eGFR was lower. In nondipping hypertensive patients, urinary sodium excretion and renal tissue injury scores were significantly higher than dipping patients. Nocturnal hypertension and abnormal circadian BP correlated with renal tissue injury, renal interstitial fibrosis, and aortic arch atherosclerosis. Abnormal circadian rhythm of BP and nocturnal hypertension are common clinical manifestations in Chinese IgAN patients with normal mean 24 h BP. Abnormal circadian BP and nocturnal hypertension may accelerate IgAN progression by inducing renal dysfunction and histopathological damage. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical treatment reduces blood pressure in children with unilateral congenital hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashhadi, Ammar; Nevéus, Tryggve; Stenberg, Arne; Karanikas, Birgitta; Persson, A Erik G; Carlström, Mattias; Wåhlin, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Renal disorders can cause hypertension, but less is known about the influence of hydronephrosis on blood pressure. Hydronephrosis due to pelvo-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) is a fairly common condition (incidence in newborns of 0.5-1%). Although hypertensive effects of hydronephrosis have been suggested, this has not been substantiated by prospective studies in humans [1-3]. Experimental studies with PUJO have shown that animals with induced hydronephrosis develop salt-sensitive hypertension, which strongly correlate to the degree of obstruction [4-7]. Moreover, relief of the obstruction normalized blood pressure [8]. In this first prospective study our aim was to study the blood pressure pattern in pediatric patients with hydronephrosis before and after surgical correction of the ureteral obstruction. Specifically, we investigated if preoperative blood pressure is reduced after surgery and if split renal function and renographic excretion curves provide any prognostic information. Twelve patients with unilateral congenital hydronephrosis were included in this prospective study. Ambulatory blood pressure (24 h) was measured preoperatively and six months after surgery. Preoperative evaluations of bilateral renal function by Tc99m-MAG3 scintigraphy, and renography curves, classified according to O'Reilly, were also performed. As shown in the summary figure, postoperative systolic (103 ± 2 mmHg) and diastolic (62 ± 2 mmHg) blood pressure were significantly lower than those obtained preoperatively (110 ± 4 and 69 ± 2 mmHg, respectively), whereas no changes in circadian variation or pulse pressure were observed. Renal functional share of the hydronephrotic kidney ranged from 11 to 55%. There was no correlation between the degree of renal function impairment and the preoperative excretory pattern, or between the preoperative excretory pattern and the blood pressure reduction postoperatively. However, preoperative MAG3 function of the affected kidney correlated

  18. Vasomotion of renal blood flow in essential hypertension. Oscillations in xenon transit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, N.K.; Sandor, T.

    1984-01-01

    To assess the frequency and magnitude of phasic renal blood flow changes in essential hypertension, we applied an analytical method based on the estimation of power spectral density to xenon transit through the kidney. Despite similar age and gender distribution of the patients and exclusion of those with accelerated hypertension, mean renal blood flow was significantly lower in 100 patients with essential hypertension (299 +/- 8 ml/100 g/min) than in the 144 normal subjects (335 +/- 6 ml/100 g/min; p less than 0.001). Normalized power, the index of oscillatory behavior, was more than twice normal in patients with essential hypertension (p less than 0.001), but there was no difference in the frequency or cycle length of the oscillation. Two maneuvers that induced renal vasoconstriction, the application of cuffs to the thighs which were then inflated to diastolic blood pressure and an emotional provocation, reduced renal blood flow much more in patients with essential hypertension (p less than 0.01) in association with a striking increase in normalized power (p less than 0.001). The oscillations, which reflected not the phasic blood pressure change but rather the phasic change in renal perfusion, provided additional evidence that renal vasoconstriction plays an active role in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension

  19. Integrative Blood Pressure Response to Upright Tilt Post Renal Denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Erin J.; East, Cara; Lawley, Justin S.; Stickford, Abigail S.L.; Verhees, Myrthe; Fu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Whether renal denervation (RDN) in patients with resistant hypertension normalizes blood pressure (BP) regulation in response to routine cardiovascular stimuli such as upright posture is unknown. We conducted an integrative study of BP regulation in patients with resistant hypertension who had received RDN to characterize autonomic circulatory control. METHODS Twelve patients (60 ± 9 [SD] years, n = 10 males) who participated in the Symplicity HTN-3 trial were studied and compared to 2 age-matched normotensive (Norm) and hypertensive (unmedicated, HTN) control groups. BP, heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Qc), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and neurohormonal variables were measured supine, and 30° (5 minutes) and 60° (20 minutes) head-up-tilt (HUT). Total peripheral resistance (TPR) was calculated from mean arterial pressure and Qc. RESULTS Despite treatment with RDN and 4.8 (range, 3–7) antihypertensive medications, the RDN had significantly higher supine systolic BP compared to Norm and HTN (149 ± 15 vs. 118 ± 6, 108 ± 8 mm Hg, P < 0.001). When supine, RDN had higher HR, TPR, MSNA, plasma norepinephrine, and effective arterial elastance compared to Norm. Plasma norepinephrine, Qc, and HR were also higher in the RDN vs. HTN. During HUT, BP remained higher in the RDN, due to increases in Qc, plasma norepinephrine, and aldosterone. CONCLUSION We provide evidence of a possible mechanism by which BP remains elevated post RDN, with the observation of increased Qc and arterial stiffness, as well as plasma norepinephrine and aldosterone levels at approximately 2 years post treatment. These findings may be the consequence of incomplete ablation of sympathetic renal nerves or be related to other factors. PMID:28338768

  20. Impact of the NO-Sensitive Guanylyl Cyclase 1 and 2 on Renal Blood Flow and Systemic Blood Pressure in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergia, Evanthia; Thieme, Manuel; Hoch, Henning; Daniil, Georgios; Hering, Lydia; Yakoub, Mina; Scherbaum, Christina Rebecca; Rump, Lars Christian; Koesling, Doris; Stegbauer, Johannes

    2018-03-23

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates renal blood flow (RBF) and kidney function and is involved in blood pressure (BP) regulation predominantly via stimulation of the NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NO-GC), existing in two isoforms, NO-GC1 and NO-GC2. Here, we used isoform-specific knockout (KO) mice and investigated their contribution to renal hemodynamics under normotensive and angiotensin II-induced hypertensive conditions. Stimulation of the NO-GCs by S -nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reduced BP in normotensive and hypertensive wildtype (WT) and NO-GC2-KO mice more efficiently than in NO-GC1-KO. NO-induced increase of RBF in normotensive mice did not differ between the genotypes, but the respective increase under hypertensive conditions was impaired in NO-GC1-KO. Similarly, inhibition of endogenous NO increased BP and reduced RBF to a lesser extent in NO-GC1-KO than in NO-GC2-KO. These findings indicate NO-GC1 as a target of NO to normalize RBF in hypertension. As these effects were not completely abolished in NO-GC1-KO and renal cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels were decreased in both NO-GC1-KO and NO-GC2-KO, the results suggest an additional contribution of NO-GC2. Hence, NO-GC1 plays a predominant role in the regulation of BP and RBF, especially in hypertension. However, renal NO-GC2 appears to compensate the loss of NO-GC1, and is able to regulate renal hemodynamics under physiological conditions.

  1. Renal intercalated cells and blood pressure regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Wall

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type B and non-A, non-B intercalated cells are found within the connecting tubule and the cortical collecting duct. Of these cell types, type B intercalated cells are known to mediate Cl⁻ absorption and HCO₃⁻ secretion largely through pendrin-dependent Cl⁻/HCO₃⁻ exchange. This exchange is stimulated by angiotensin II administration and is also stimulated in models of metabolic alkalosis, for instance after aldosterone or NaHCO₃ administration. In some rodent models, pendrin-mediated HCO₃⁻ secretion modulates acid-base balance. However, the role of pendrin in blood pressure regulation is likely of more physiological or clinical significance. Pendrin regulates blood pressure not only by mediating aldosterone-sensitive Cl⁻ absorption, but also by modulating the aldosterone response for epithelial Na⁺ channel (ENaC-mediated Na⁺ absorption. Pendrin regulates ENaC through changes in open channel of probability, channel surface density, and channels subunit total protein abundance. Thus, aldosterone stimulates ENaC activity through both direct and indirect effects, the latter occurring through its stimulation of pendrin expression and function. Therefore, pendrin contributes to the aldosterone pressor response. Pendrin may also modulate blood pressure in part through its action in the adrenal medulla, where it modulates the release of catecholamines, or through an indirect effect on vascular contractile force. This review describes how aldosterone and angiotensin II-induced signaling regulate pendrin and the contributory role of pendrin in distal nephron function and blood pressure.

  2. Interankle systolic blood pressure difference and renal outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Lee, Su-Chu; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Interankle blood pressure (BP) difference has been associated with peripheral artery disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the relationship between interankle BP difference and renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) has never been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine whether interankle BP difference is associated with the rate of renal function decline and progression to renal end points in patients with stage 3-5 CKD. We enrolled 144 patients with CKD from one regional hospital. The BP in four limbs was simultaneously measured using an ABI-form device. The decline in renal function was evaluated using an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Rapid renal progression was defined as an eGFR slope < -3 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) per year. The renal end points were defined as ≥ 25% decline in eGFR or commencement of dialysis during the follow-up period. During a mean follow-up period of 3.1 years, 90 patients (62.5%) reached renal end points. Multivariate analysis showed that an increased interankle systolic BP difference (per 5 mmHg) was associated with a worse eGFR slope (regression β, -0.292; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.482 to -0.102; P = 0.003), rapid renal progression (odds ratio, 1.189; 95% CI, 1.015-1.394; P = 0.032), and an increased risk of progression to renal end points (hazard ratio, 1.126; 95% CI, 1.052-1.204, P = 0.001). Interankle systolic BP difference was associated with rapid renal progression and progression to renal end points in patients with stage 3-5 CKD in our study. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Doppler Flow Wire Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow Reserve in Hypertensive Patients with Normal Renal Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beregi, Jean-Paul; Mounier-Vehier, Claire; Devos, Patrick; Gautier, Corinne; Libersa, Christian; McFadden, Eugene P.; Carre, Alain

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the vasomotor responses of the renal microcirculation in patients with essential hypertension.Methods: We studied the reactivity of the renal microcirculation to papaverine, with intraarterial Doppler and quantitative arteriography, in 34 renal arteries of 19 hypertensive patients without significant renal artery stenosis. Isosorbide dinitrate was given to maximally dilate proximal renal arteries. APV (average peak blood flow velocity) was used as an index of renal blood flow.Results: Kidneys could be divided into two distinct subgroups based on their response to papaverine. An increase in APV of up to 55% occurred in 21 kidneys, an increase > 55% in 13 kidneys. Within each group the values were normally distributed. Both baseline APV and the effect of papaverine on mean velocity differed significantly between groups.Conclusion: There seems to be a subgroup of patients with essential hypertension that has an impaired reactivity to papaverine, consistent with a functional impairment of the renal microcirculation. Further studies are required to determine whether this abnormality contributes to or results from elevated blood pressure

  4. Comparison of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and office blood pressure measurements in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Rahime

    2018-04-01

    Obesity in adults has been related to hypertension and abnormal nocturnal dipping of blood pressure, which are associated with poor cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Here, we aimed to resolve the relationship between the degree of obesity, the severity of hypertension and dipping status on ambulatory blood pressure in obese children. A total 72 patients with primary obesity aged 7 to 18 years (mean: 13.48 ± 3.25) were selected. Patients were divided into three groups based on body mass index (BMİ) Z-score. Diagnosis and staging of ambulatory hypertension based on 24-h blood pressure measurements, obtained from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Based on our ambulatory blood pressure data, 35 patients (48.6%) had hypertension, 7 (20%) had ambulatory prehypertension, 21 (60%) had hypertension, and 7 patients (20%) had severe ambulatory hypertension. There was a significant relationship between severity of hypertension and the degree of obesity (p lood pressure results and loads were similar between groups. Diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure levels during the night, diastolic blood pressure loads, and heart rate during the day were significantly higher in Group 3 (p lood pressure at night, mean arterial pressure at night, diastolic blood pressure loads and heart rate at day. Increase in BMI Z-score does not a significant impact on daytime blood pressure and nocturnal dipping status.

  5. Transvenous stimulation of the renal sympathetic nerves increases systemic blood pressure: a potential new treatment option for neurocardiogenic syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Malini; Desimone, Christopher V; Ebrille, Elisa; Mulpuru, Siva K; Mikell, Susan B; Johnson, Susan B; Suddendorf, Scott H; Ladewig, Dorothy J; Gilles, Emily J; Danielsen, Andrew J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2014-10-01

    Neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS) is a common and sometimes debilitating disorder, with no consistently effective treatment. NCS is due to a combination of bradycardia and vasodilation leading to syncope. Although pacemaker devices have been tried in treating the bradycardic aspect of NCS, no device-based therapy exists to treat the coexistent vasodilation that occurs. The renal sympathetic innervation has been the target of denervation to treat hypertension. We hypothesized that stimulation of the renal sympathetic nerves can increase blood pressure and counteract vasodilation in NCS. High-frequency stimulation (800-900 pps, 10 V, 30-200 seconds) was performed using a quadripolar catheter in the renal vein of 7 dogs and 1 baboon. A significant increase in blood pressure (BP; mean [SD] systolic BP 117 [±28] vs. 128 [±33], diastolic BP 75 [±19] vs. 87 [±29] mmHg) was noted during the stimulation, which returned to baseline after cessation of stimulation. The mean increase in systolic and diastolic BP was 13.0 (±3.3) (P = 0.006) and 10.2 (±4.6) (P = 0.08), respectively. We report the first ever study of feasibility and safety of high-frequency electrical stimulation of the renal sympathetic innervation to increase BP in animal models. This has potential applications in the treatment of hypotensive states such as NCS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. High-NaCl diet impairs dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aso; DiBona, Gerald F; Grimberg, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 2 wk of high-NaCl diet on kidney function and dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation (RBFA) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an identical diet without...... arterial pressure variability (SAPV), and heart rate variability were assessed by spectral analytical techniques. Rats with ACRF showed marked reductions in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow (RBF), whereas mean arterial pressure and SAPV were significantly elevated. In addition, spontaneous...... adenine (controls). After 10 wk, rats were randomized to either remain on the same diet (0.6% NaCl) or to be switched to high 4% NaCl chow. Two weeks after randomization, renal clearance experiments were performed under isoflurane anesthesia and dynamic RBFA, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), systolic...

  7. High-NaCl diet impairs dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Aso; DiBona, Gerald F; Grimberg, Elisabeth; Nguy, Lisa; Mikkelsen, Minne Line Nedergaard; Marcussen, Niels; Guron, Gregor

    2014-03-15

    This study examined the effects of 2 wk of high-NaCl diet on kidney function and dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation (RBFA) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an identical diet without adenine (controls). After 10 wk, rats were randomized to either remain on the same diet (0.6% NaCl) or to be switched to high 4% NaCl chow. Two weeks after randomization, renal clearance experiments were performed under isoflurane anesthesia and dynamic RBFA, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), systolic arterial pressure variability (SAPV), and heart rate variability were assessed by spectral analytical techniques. Rats with ACRF showed marked reductions in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow (RBF), whereas mean arterial pressure and SAPV were significantly elevated. In addition, spontaneous BRS was reduced by ∼50% in ACRF animals. High-NaCl diet significantly increased transfer function fractional gain values between arterial pressure and RBF in the frequency range of the myogenic response (0.06-0.09 Hz) only in ACRF animals (0.3 ± 4.0 vs. -4.4 ± 3.8 dB; P renal failure by facilitating pressure transmission to the microvasculature.

  8. Effects of felodipine, a newly developed calcium antagonist, on blood pressure, and cerebral and renal blood flow in patients with essential hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Konno, Yoshio; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Kenji.

    1997-01-01

    Felodipine, a recently developed calcium channel antagonist, was administered twice daily (10 mg/day) for 1 month to 5 patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Its antihypertensive effect, as well as its effect on cerebral and renal blood flow, was investigated. After 1 month of therapy, sitting systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly decreased. The antihypertensive effect was well tolerated and sustained during the administration period. Total cerebral blood flow, as assessed by 99m Tc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime, increased to 46.8±6.4 ml/100 g/min from a pretreatment level of 43.6±6.4 ml/100 g/min (P 99m Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, unchanged: 70.2±19.9 ml/ min before and 71.8±13.6 ml/min after. Blood viscosity and the number of blood platelet tended to decrease during treatment. There were essentially no significant changes in biochemical parameters, and no severe side effects were encountered during the administration. These results not only confirmed the safety and usefulness of felodipine as an antihypertensive agent for the treatment of essential hypertension, but also suggested that this new calcium channel antagonist may exert beneficial effects on central as well as renal hemodynamics in essential hypertensives. (author)

  9. Renal blood flow and metabolism after cold ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Petersen, H K

    1984-01-01

    Peroperative measurements of renal blood flow (RBF), renal O2-uptake, and renal venous lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio were performed before and after a period of 30-71 min of hypothermic (10-15 degrees C) renal ischaemia in nine patients, undergoing surgery for renal calculi. Before ischaemia, RBF.......01) immediately after re-established perfusion and 36% (P less than 0.02) 30 min later. In one additional patient, who had a short warm ischaemia (8 min), the flow pattern was the same. As arterial pressure remained constant, the reduced RBF signifies an increased renal vascular resistance. Renal O2-uptake...... and renal venous L/P ratio were almost constant, indicating no significant anaerobic processes being involved in the flow response. None of the patients showed any signs of reactive hyperaemia. It is concluded that hypothermic renal ischaemia may be followed by an increased renal vascular resistance even...

  10. Frequency encoding in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, D.J.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    With a model of renal blood flow regulation, we examined consequences of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) coupling to the myogenic mechanism via voltage-gated Ca channels. The model reproduces the characteristic oscillations of the two mechanisms and predicts frequency and amplitude modulation...... of the myogenic oscillation by TGF. Analysis by wavelet transforms of single-nephron blood flow confirms that both amplitude and frequency of the myogenic oscillation are modulated by TGF. We developed a double-wavelet transform technique to estimate modulation frequency. Median value of the ratio of modulation...... TGF cycle to the next. We used a blood pressure signal recorded by telemetry from a conscious rat as the input to the model. Blood pressure fluctuations induced variability in the modulation records similar to those found in the nephron blood flow results. Frequency and amplitude modulation can...

  11. Renal nerves dynamically regulate renal blood flow in conscious, healthy rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Alicia M; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2016-01-15

    Despite significant clinical interest in renal denervation as a therapy, the role of the renal nerves in the physiological regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) remains debated. We hypothesized that the renal nerves physiologically regulate beat-to-beat RBF variability (RBFV). This was tested in chronically instrumented, healthy rabbits that underwent either bilateral surgical renal denervation (DDNx) or a sham denervation procedure (INV). Artifact-free segments of RBF and arterial pressure (AP) from calmly resting, conscious rabbits were used to extract RBFV and AP variability for time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear analysis. Whereas steady-state measures of RBF, AP, and heart rate did not statistically differ between groups, DDNx rabbits had greater RBFV than INV rabbits. AP-RBF transfer function analysis showed greater admittance gain in DDNx rabbits than in INV rabbits, particularly in the low-frequency (LF) range where systemic sympathetic vasomotion gives rise to AP oscillations. In the LF range, INV rabbits exhibited a negative AP-RBF phase shift and low coherence, consistent with the presence of an active control system. Neither of these features were present in the LF range of DDNx rabbits, which showed no phase shift and high coherence, consistent with a passive, Ohm's law pressure-flow relationship. Renal denervation did not significantly affect nonlinear RBFV measures of chaos, self-affinity, or complexity, nor did it significantly affect glomerular filtration rate or extracellular fluid volume. Cumulatively, these data suggest that the renal nerves mediate LF renal sympathetic vasomotion, which buffers RBF from LF AP oscillations in conscious, healthy rabbits. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Resistant Hypertension, Time-Updated Blood Pressure Values and Renal Outcome in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viazzi, Francesca; Piscitelli, Pamela; Ceriello, Antonio; Fioretto, Paola; Giorda, Carlo; Guida, Pietro; Russo, Giuseppina; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2017-09-22

    Apparent treatment resistant hypertension (aTRH) is highly prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and entails worse cardiovascular prognosis. The impact of aTRH and long-term achievement of recommended blood pressure (BP) values on renal outcome remains largely unknown. We assessed the role of aTRH and BP on the development of chronic kidney disease in patients with T2D and hypertension in real-life clinical practice. Clinical records from a total of 29 923 patients with T2D and hypertension, with normal baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate and regular visits during a 4-year follow-up, were retrieved and analyzed. The association between time-updated BP control (ie, 75% of visits with BP hypertension. BP control is not associated with a more-favorable renal outcome in aTRH. The relationship between time-updated BP and renal function seems to be J-shaped, with optimal systolic BP values between 120 and 140 mm Hg. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  13. Decreased systolic blood pressure is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment: A nationwide longitudinal observational study of 27,732 patients based on the Swedish National Diabetes Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Maria K; Afghahi, Henri; Franzen, Stefan; Björk, Staffan; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Eliasson, Björn

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have shown a U-shaped relationship between systolic blood pressure and risk of all-cause of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment. To evaluate the associations between time-updated systolic blood pressure and time-updated change in systolic blood pressure during the follow-up period and risk of all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment. A total of 27,732 patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment in the Swedish National Diabetes Register were followed for 4.7 years. Time-dependent Cox models were used to estimate risk of all-cause mortality. Time-updated mean systolic blood pressure is the average of the baseline and the reported post-baseline systolic blood pressures. A time-updated systolic blood pressure blood pressure > 10 mmHg between the last two observations was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality (-10 to -25 mmHg; hazard ratio: 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.17-1.32). Both low systolic blood pressure and a decrease in systolic blood pressure during the follow-up are associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment.

  14. Interarm difference in blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the interarm difference in blood pressure and its use as an indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were included from consecutive patients referred from their general practitioner to our vascular laboratory for possible PAD aged 50 years or older...... without known cardiac disease, renal disease, or diabetes mellitus. 824 patients (453 women) with mean age of 72 years (range: 50-101) were included. 491 patients had a diagnosis of hypertension and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) was present in 386 patients. Systolic blood pressure was 143 ± 24 mm......Hg and 142 ± 24 mmHg on the right and left arm, respectively (P = 0.015). The interarm difference was greater in patients with hypertension (P = 0.002) and PAD (P blood pressure was reproducible...

  15. The impact of serum uric acid reduction on renal function and blood pressure in chronic kidney disease patients with hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takayuki; Ohishi, Kazuhisa; Takeda, Asumi; Goto, Daiki; Sato, Taichi; Ohashi, Naro; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Kato, Akihiko; Yasuda, Hideo

    2018-04-26

    Febuxostat is tolerable in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with hyperuricemia. However, the long-term effect of lowering uric acid with febuxostat on renal function and blood pressure has not been elucidated. This was a 2 years retrospective observational study. 86 CKD patients with hyperuricemia who continued with allopurinol (allopurinol group, n = 30), switched from allopurinol to febuxostat (switched group, n = 25), or were newly prescribed febuxostat (febuxostat group, n = 31) were included in this study. Serum uric acid, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), blood pressure, and urinary protein were analyzed. Moreover, the impact of serum uric acid reduction on renal function and blood pressure was assessed. Serum uric acid in the switched and febuxostat groups was significantly reduced at 6 months (switched group; 8.49 ± 1.32-7.19 ± 1.14 mg/dL, p uric acid was increased (6.86 ± 0.87-7.10 ± 0.85 mg/dL, p = 0.0213). eGFR was significantly increased (35.2 ± 12.8-37.3 ± 13.9 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , p = 0.0232), while mean arterial pressure (93.1 ± 10.8-88.2 ± 9.5 mmHg, p = 0.0039) was significantly decreased at 6 months in the febuxostat group, resulting in the retention of eGFR for 2 years. The impact of serum uric acid reduction might have beneficial effects on CKD progression and blood pressure. However, a large prospective study is needed to determine the long-term efficacy of febuxostat therapy in CKD patients with hyperuricemia.

  16. Dynamics of renal blood flow autoregulation in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Wagner, A J; Marsh, D J

    1991-01-01

    Two separate components could be resolved in tests of the dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow. The slow component corresponds to the frequency at which spontaneous proximal tubular pressure oscillations are found, and are most likely due to the operation of the TGF. The high frequency...

  17. Renal Development and Blood Pressure in Offspring from Dams Submitted to High-Sodium Intake during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezila M. Coimbra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to an adverse environment in utero appears to programme physiology and metabolism permanently, with long-term consequences for health of the fetus or offspring. It was observed that the offspring from dams submitted to high-sodium intake during pregnancy present disturbances in renal development and in blood pressure. These alterations were associated with lower plasma levels of angiotensin II (AII and changes in renal AII receptor I (AT1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK expressions during post natal kidney development. Clinical and experimental evidence show that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS participates in renal development. Many effects of AII are mediated through MAPK pathways. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERKs play a pivotal role in cellular proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, high-sodium intake during pregnancy and lactation can provoke disturbances in renal development in offspring leading to functional and structural alterations that persist in adult life. These changes can be related at least in part with the decrease in RAS activity considering that this system has an important role in renal development.

  18. Effect of bariatric surgery-induced weight loss on renal and systemic inflammation and blood pressure: a 12-month prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Wiebke K; Dubb, Sukhpreet; Bueter, Marco; Seyfried, Florian; Patel, Karishma; Tam, Frederick W K; Frankel, Andrew H; le Roux, Carel W

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery improves arterial hypertension and renal function; however, the underlying mechanisms and effect of different surgical procedures are unknown. In the present prospective study, we compared the 12-month follow-up results after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on weight loss, hypertension, renal function, and inflammatory status. A total of 34 morbidly obese patients were investigated before, one and 12 months after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 10), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (n = 13), and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (n = 11) for hypertension, kidney function, urinary and serum cytokine levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and chemokine ligand-18. At 12 months after surgery, the patients in all 3 treatment arms showed a significant decrease in the mean body mass index, mean arterial pressure, and urinary and serum inflammatory markers (all P .8 mg/L) had a marked improvement in renal function 12 months after surgery (P < .05). Surgically induced weight loss is associated with a marked decrease in renal and systemic inflammation and arterial hypertension and improvement in renal function in patients with pre-existing renal impairment. These effects appear to be independent of surgical procedure. The improvement in renal inflammation could be 1 of the mechanisms contributing to the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery on arterial blood pressure, proteinuria, and renal function. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coupling-induced complexity in nephron models of renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Jakob Lund; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Mosekilde, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Marsh DJ. Coupling-induced complexity in nephron models of renal blood flow regulation. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298: R997-R1006, 2010. First published February 10, 2010; doi: 10.1152/ajpregu.00714.2009.-Tubular pressure and nephron blood flow time series display two interacting...... oscillations in rats with normal blood pressure. Tubulo-glomerular feedback (TGF) senses NaCl concentration in tubular fluid at the macula densa, adjusts vascular resistance of the nephron's afferent arteriole, and generates the slower, larger-amplitude oscillations (0.02-0.04 Hz). The faster smaller...... of glomerular pressure caused by fluctuations of blood pressure. The oscillations become irregular in animals with chronic high blood pressure. TGF feedback gain is increased in hypertensive rats, leading to a stronger interaction between the two mechanisms. With a mathematical model that simulates tubular...

  20. Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels and blood pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Baumunk, Daniel; Krause, Hans

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) cation channels are involved in the regulation of blood pressure, but this has not been studied using human renal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that the expression of TRPC3 in human renal tissue is associated with blood...

  1. Sodium-blood pressure interrelationship in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franx, A; Steegers, E A; de Boo, T; Thien, T; Merkus, J M

    1999-03-01

    In non-pregnant individuals, a strong positive association of sodium intake with blood pressure has been established, but the relationship between sodium intake and blood pressure in human pregnancy remains obscure up to date. The aim of this prospective observational cohort study was to assess the relationship between urinary sodium excretion (as a measure for intake) and blood pressure from the early second trimester onwards throughout pregnancy. The study group consisted of 667 low-risk women with singleton pregnancies, of whom 350 were nulliparous and 317 parous. Blood pressure was measured in a standardised fashion at predetermined intervals from the first antenatal visit prior to 16 weeks gestation until delivery. Urinary sodium excretion was measured in 24-h urine collections on at least four occasions between 16 and 38 weeks gestation. Main outcome measures were the coefficients of correlation between changes in urinary sodium output and changes in blood pressure during six different gestational epochs. No significant correlations were found between changes in urinary sodium output and changes in blood pressure. Correlation coefficients were alike for nulliparous and parous women and for different gestational intervals. Prior to 32 weeks gestation, no differences were observed in sodium excretion between women who remained normotensive and those who developed gestational hypertension. These results suggest that changes in sodium intake are not associated with blood pressure changes in low-risk pregnant women. Blood pressure increases as observed in the second half of normotensive and hypertensive pregnancies are unlikely to be caused by changes in renal sodium handling.

  2. Activation of GLP-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells reduces the autoregulatory response in afferent arterioles and increases renal blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Elisa Pouline; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Kissow, Hannelouise

    2015-01-01

    was to localize renal GLP-1 receptors and describe GLP-1 mediated effects on the renal vasculature. We hypothesized that renal GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal microcirculation and activation of these affects renal autoregulation and increases renal blood flow. In vivo autoradiography using 125I-GLP-1......, 125I-exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog) and 125I-exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) was performed in rodents to localize specific GLP-1 receptor binding. GLP-1 mediated effects on blood pressure (BP), renal blood flow (RBF), heart rate (HR), renin secretion, urinary flow rate and Na+ and K+ excretion were...... conclude that GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal vasculature including afferent arterioles. Activation of these receptors reduces the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles to acute pressure increases and increases renal blood flow in normotensive rats....

  3. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järnberg, P O; de Villota, E D; Eklund, J; Granberg, P O

    1978-01-01

    The effects were studied positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on renal function in eight patients with acute respiratory failure, requiring mechanical ventilation. On application of PEEP + 10 cm H2O, central venous pressure increased, systolic blood pressure decreased, urine flow and PAH-clearance were reduced, while inulin clearance remained stable. There was a marked increase in fractional sodium reabsorption and a concurrent decrease in fractional osmolal excretion. Fractional free-water clearance and the ratio UOsm/POsm did change.

  4. Renal-Specific Silencing of TNF (Tumor Necrosis Factor) Unmasks Salt-Dependent Increases in Blood Pressure via an NKCC2A (Na+-K+-2Cl- Cotransporter Isoform A)-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shoujin; Hao, Mary; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2018-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that TNF (tumor necrosis factor)-α produced within the kidney and acting on the renal tubular system is part of a regulatory mechanism that attenuates increases in blood pressure in response to high salt intake. Intrarenal administration of a lentivirus construct, which specifically silenced TNF in the kidney, did not affect baseline blood pressure. However, blood pressure increased significantly 1 day after mice with intrarenal silencing of TNF ingested 1% NaCl in the drinking water. The increase in blood pressure, which was continuously observed for 11 days, promptly returned to baseline levels when mice were switched from 1% NaCl to tap water. Silencing of renal TNF also increased NKCC2 (Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransporter) phosphorylation and induced a selective increase in NKCC2A (NKCC2 isoform A) mRNA accumulation in both the cortical and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle loop that was neither associated with a compensatory decrease of NKCC2F in the medulla nor NKCC2B in the cortex. The NaCl-mediated increases in blood pressure were completely absent when NKCC2A, using a lentivirus construct that did not alter expression of NKCC2F or NKCC2B, and TNF were concomitantly silenced in the kidney. Moreover, the decrease in urine volume and NaCl excretion induced by renal TNF silencing was abolished when NKCC2A was concurrently silenced, suggesting that this isoform contributes to the transition from a salt-resistant to salt-sensitive phenotype. Collectively, the data are the first to demonstrate a role for TNF produced by the kidney in the modulation of sodium homeostasis and blood pressure regulation. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Effects of levosimendan on glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and renal oxygenation after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2013-10-01

    Acute kidney injury develops in a large proportion of patients after cardiac surgery because of the low cardiac output syndrome. The inodilator levosimendan increases cardiac output after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, but a detailed analysis of its effects on renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, and renal oxygenation in this group of patients is lacking. We therefore evaluated the effects of levosimendan on renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renal oxygen consumption, and renal oxygen demand/supply relationship, i.e., renal oxygen extraction, early after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Prospective, placebo-controlled, and randomized trial. Cardiothoracic ICU of a tertiary center. Postcardiac surgery patients (n=30). The patients were randomized to receive levosimendan, 0.1 µg/kg/min after a loading dose of 12 µg/kg (n=15), or placebo (n=15). The experimental procedure started 4-6 hours after surgery in the ICU during propofol sedation and mechanical ventilation. Systemic hemodynamic were evaluated by a pulmonary artery thermodilution catheter. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were measured by the renal vein retrograde thermodilution technique and by renal extraction of Cr-EDTA, respectively. Central venous pressure was kept constant by colloid/crystalloid infusion. Compared to placebo, levosimendan increased cardiac index (22%), stroke volume index (15%), and heart rate (7%) and decreased systemic vascular resistance index (21%), whereas mean arterial pressure was not affected. Levosimendan induced significant increases in renal blood flow (12%, prenal vascular resistance (18%, prenal oxygen consumption, or renal oxygen extraction, compared to placebo. After cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, levosimendan induces a vasodilation, preferentially of preglomerular resistance vessels, increasing both renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate without jeopardizing renal oxygenation. Due to its

  6. βENaC is a molecular component of a VSMC mechanotransducer that contributes to renal blood flow regulation, protection from renal injury, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    Pressure-induced constriction (also known as the "myogenic response") is an important mechano-dependent response in certain blood vessels. The response is mediated by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and characterized by a pressure-induced vasoconstriction in small arteries and arterioles in the cerebral, mesenteric, cardiac, and renal beds. The myogenic response has two important roles; it is a mechanism of blood flow autoregulation and provides protection against systemic blood pressure-induced damage to delicate microvessels. However, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying initiation of myogenic response is unclear. Degenerin proteins have a strong evolutionary link to mechanotransduction in the nematode. Our laboratory has addressed the hypothesis that these proteins may also act as mechanosensors in certain mammalian tissues such as VSMCs and arterial baroreceptor neurons. This article discusses the importance of a specific degenerin protein, β Epithelial Na(+) Channel (βENaC) in pressure-induced vasoconstriction in renal vessels and arterial baroreflex function as determined in a mouse model of reduced βENaC (βENaC m/m). We propose that loss of baroreflex sensitivity (due to loss of baroreceptor βENaC) increases blood pressure variability, increasing the likelihood and magnitude of upward swings in systemic pressure. Furthermore, loss of the myogenic constrictor response (due to loss of VSMC βENaC) will permit those pressure swings to be transmitted to the microvasculature in βENaC m/m mice, thus increasing the susceptibility to renal injury and hypertension.

  7. Renal hyperfiltration and systemic blood pressure in patients with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary K Yang

    Full Text Available Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM and renal hyperfiltration also exhibit systemic microvascular abnormalities, including endothelial dysfunction. The effect of renal hyperfiltration on systemic blood pressure (BP is less clear. We therefore measured BP, renal hemodynamic function and circulating renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS mediators in type 1 DM patients with hyperfiltration (n = 36, DM-H, GFR≥135 ml/min/1.73 m(2 or normofiltration (n = 40, DM-N, and 56 healthy controls (HC. Since renal hyperfiltration represents a state of intrarenal RAAS activation, we hypothesized that hyperfiltration would be associated with higher BP and elevated levels of circulating RAAS mediators.BP, glomerular filtration rate (GFR - inulin, effective renal plasma flow (paraaminohippurate and circulating RAAS components were measured in DM-H, DM-N and HC during clamped euglycemia (4-6 mmol/L. Studies were repeated in DM-H and DM-N during clamped hyperglycemia (9-11 mmol/L.Baseline GFR was elevated in DM-H vs. DM-N and HC (167±6 vs. 115±2 and 115±2 ml/min/1.73 m(2, p<0.0001. Baseline systolic BP (SBP, 117±2 vs. 111±2 vs. 109±1, p = 0.004 and heart rate (76±1 vs. 67±1 vs. 61±1, p<0.0001 were higher in DM-H vs. DM-N and HC. Despite higher SBP in DM-H, plasma aldosterone was lower in DM-H vs. DM-N and HC (42±5 vs. 86±14 vs. 276±41 ng/dl, p = 0.01. GFR (p<0.0001 and SBP (p<0.0001 increased during hyperglycemia in DM-N but not in DM-H.DM-H was associated with higher heart rate and SBP values and an exaggerated suppression of systemic aldosterone. Future work should focus on the mechanisms that explain this paradox in diabetes of renal hyperfiltration coupled with systemic RAAS suppression.

  8. Post-partum trend in blood pressure levels, renal function and proteinuria in women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia in Sub-Saharan Africa: a 6-months cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaze, Francois Folefack; Njukeng, Francis A; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Mbu, Robinson; Halle, Marie Patrice; Asonganyi, Tazoacha

    2014-04-09

    Preeclampsia and eclampsia, which are the most frequent hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, are associated with renal involvements. We aimed to assess the time trend in blood pressure levels, renal function and proteinuria after delivery, and investigate their determinants in Cameroonian women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia. This was a prospective cohort study involving 54 women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia, conducted between July 2010 and February 2012 at the central maternity unit of the Yaoundé Central Hospital. Clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded from day-1 to 6 months after delivery. Mixed-linear and logistic regression models were used to relate baseline and within follow-up levels of covariates, with changes in blood pressure levels, renal function and proteinuria, as well as persisting hypertension, renal failure and proteinuria. During follow-up, a significant improvement was observed in blood pressure, renal function and proteinuria (all p post-delivery, respectively. Corresponding figures for persisting hypertension were 23 (42.6%), 15 (27.8%) and 8 (14.8%). Advanced age, higher body mass index, low gestational age at delivery, low fetal birth weight, and proteinuria at delivery were the main risk factors for persisting hypertension at 3 months, meanwhile low fetal birth weight, severe preeclampsia and proteinuria at delivery were correlated with persisting proteinuria at 3 months. Advanced age and higher body mass index were the only determinants of the composite outcome of persisting hypertension or proteinuria at three and six months. Hypertension and proteinuria are very common beyond the postpartum period in Cameroonian women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia. Long-term follow-up of these women will help preventing and controlling related complications.

  9. Preservation of renal blood flow by the antioxidant EUK-134 in LPS-treated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magder, Sheldon; Parthenis, Dimitrios G; Ghouleh, Imad Al

    2015-03-25

    Sepsis is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, the precise role of ROS in the septic process remains unknown. We hypothesized that treatment with EUK-134 (manganese-3-methoxy N,N'-bis(salicyclidene)ethylene-diamine chloride), a compound with superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, attenuates the vascular manifestations of sepsis in vivo. Pigs were instrumented to measure cardiac output and blood flow in renal, superior mesenteric and femoral arteries, and portal vein. Animals were treated with saline (control), lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 µg·kg-1·h-1), EUK-134, or EUK-134 plus LPS. Results show that an LPS-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) as well as a trend towards lower blood pressure (BP) were both attenuated by EUK-134. Renal blood flow decreased with LPS whereas superior mesenteric, portal and femoral flows did not change. Importantly, EUK-134 decreased the LPS-induced fall in renal blood flow and this was associated with a corresponding decrease in LPS-induced protein nitrotyrosinylation in the kidney. PO2, pH, base excess and systemic vascular resistance fell with LPS and were unaltered by EUK-134. EUK-134 also had no effect on LPS-associated increase in CO. Interestingly, EUK-134 alone resulted in higher CO, BP, PAP, mean circulatory filling pressure, and portal flow than controls. Taken together, these data support a protective role for EUK-134 in the renal circulation in sepsis.

  10. The Role of Central Blood Pressure Monitoring in the Management of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Adrian; Patarroyo-Aponte, Gabriel; Rahman, Mahboob

    2018-04-19

    Central blood pressure is a novel predictor of cardiovascular risk that can be measured in the clinical setting using currently available technology. This paper will review current available methods of central blood pressure monitoring as well as its impact in cardiac and renal disease. Both aortic and carotid systolic blood pressure are independently associated with cardiovascular mortality and serious cardiac events. Furthermore, studies show that systolic aortic blood pressure has been shown to be superior predictor of cardiovascular as compared to brachial blood pressure. Inhibitors of the renin angiotensin axis may have a beneficial effect on central blood pressure; however, long term studies evaluating the impact of lowering central blood pressure on clinical outcomes are lacking. Central blood pressure is a good predictor of cardiovascular risk. As more studies emerge demonstrating the value of central blood pressure as a therapeutic target, it is possible that targeting central blood pressure may become an important part of the armamentarium to lower cardiovascular risk.

  11. Blood pressure response to catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation in severe resistant hypertension: data from the Greek Renal Denervation Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsioufis, C; Ziakas, A; Dimitriadis, K; Davlouros, P; Marketou, M; Kasiakogias, A; Thomopoulos, C; Petroglou, D; Tsiachris, D; Doumas, M; Skalidis, E; Karvounis, C; Alexopoulos, D; Vardas, P; Kallikazaros, I; Stefanadis, C; Papademetriou, V; Tousoulis, D

    2017-05-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) in terms of blood pressure (BP) reduction has been questioned, while "real-world" data from registries are needed. In this study, we report the complete set of 12-month data on office and ambulatory BP changes as well as the predictors for BP response to RDN from a national registry. In 4 Greek hospital centers, 79 patients with severe drug-resistant hypertension (age 59 ± 10 years, 53 males, body mass index 33 ± 5 kg/m 2 ; office BP and 24-h ambulatory BP were 176 ± 15/95 ± 13 and 155 ± 14/90 ± 12 mmHg, respectively, 4.4 ± 0.9 antihypertensive drugs) underwent RDN and were followed-up for 12 months in the Greek Renal Denervation Registry. Bilateral RDN was performed using percutaneous femoral approach and standardized techniques. Reduction in office systolic/diastolic BP at 6 and 12 months from baseline was -30/-12 and -29/-12 mmHg, while the reduction in 24-h ambulatory BP was -16/-9 and -15/-9 mmHg, respectively (p renal function and any new serious device or procedure-related adverse events. In our "real-world" multicenter national registry, the efficacy of renal denervation in reducing BP as well as safety is confirmed during a 12-month follow-up. Moreover, younger age, obesity, and higher levels of baseline systolic BP are independently related to better BP response to RDN.

  12. Comparison of the effects of dopamine, dobutamine, and dopexamine upon renal blood flow: a study in normal healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mousdale, S; Clyburn, P A; Mackie, A M; Groves, N D; Rosen, M

    1988-01-01

    1. We compared the effects of dopexamine, dopamine and dobutamine on the heart rate, blood pressure and renal blood flow of six healthy volunteers in an open triple crossover trial. 2. The results suggest that at the dose ranges investigated dopamine was the most effective agent for increasing renal blood flow.

  13. Renal artery blood flow assessed by video dilution technique before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantz, B.M.T.; Link, D.P.; Lewis, E.L.; Foerster, J.M.; Lee, G.

    1981-01-01

    Successful percutaneous transluminal angioplasty was performed in 3 cases of renal artery stenosis where the effect upon renal blood flow was quantified by video dilution technique. This technique adds important information to pressure gradients and renin assays obtained during the dilatation procedure. (Auth.)

  14. Nonlinear interactions in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Donald J.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Chon, Ki H.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a model of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the myogenic mechanism in afferent arterioles to understand how the two mechanisms are coupled. This paper presents the model. The tubular model predicts pressure, flow, and NaCl concentration as functions of time and tubular length...... hydrostatic pressure, and plasma flow rate. The arteriolar model predicts fraction of open K channels, intracellular Ca concentration (Ca-i), potential difference, rate of actin - myosin cross bridge formation, force of contraction, and length of elastic elements, and was solved for two arteriolar segments...... resistance and glomerular capillary pressure. The model couples TGF input to voltage-gated Ca channels. It predicts autoregulation of GFR and renal blood flow, matches experimental measures of tubular pressure and macula densa NaCl concentration, and predicts TGF-induced oscillations and a faster smaller...

  15. [Effects of the renal blood flow at different levels by transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation combined general anesthesia induced controlled hypotension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Le-Le; Shao, Xiao-Mei

    2012-11-01

    To observe the intervention of transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on the renal blood flow at different levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in controlled hypotension. Forty-two male beagle dogs were randomly divided into seven groups, i. e., the general anesthesia group, the 50% controlled group, the 40% controlled group, the 30% controlled group, the 50% experimental group, the 40% experimental group, and the 30% experimental group, 6 in each group. Beagles in the general anesthesia group were not treated with controlled hypotension, and the target MAP was achieved in those of the rest groups and maintained for 60 min. In the experimental groups, TEAS was applied to bilateral Hegu (LI4), Zusanli (ST36), Sanyinjiao (SP6), and Quchi (LI11) at 2/100 Hz with the stimulation strength of (4 +/- 1) mA starting from the stability of their physiological conditions to 60 min of maintaining the target MAP level. The changes of the renal blood flow were monitored at different time points using laser Doppler. From starting pressure control to the target MAP level, the renal blood flow was significantly lower in the 30% controlled group than in the general anesthesia group and the basic level of the same group (P blood pressure, the renal blood flow was significantly lower in the 50% controlled group, the 40% controlled group, the 30% controlled group, and the 30% experimental group than in the general anesthesia group (P blood pressure recovery, the renal blood flow restored to the basic level in the 50% controlled group, the 50% experimental group, and the 40% experimental group (P > 0.05), while it was not restored to the basic level in the 40% controlled group, the 30% controlled group, and the 30% experimental group (P renal blood flow, thus protecting the kidney.

  16. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on blood pressure and glycaemic control in patients with true resistant hypertension: results of Polish Renal Denervation Registry (RDN-POL Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kądziela, Jacek; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kostka-Jeziorny, Katarzyna; Dudek, Dariusz; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Sadowski, Jerzy; Lekston, Andrzej; Gziut, Aneta; Więcek, Andrzej; Buszman, Paweł; Kleinrok, Andrzej; Kochman, Janusz; Czarnecka, Danuta; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Witkowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) efficacy in patients with true-resistant hypertension (true-RH) in a newly established net of Polish centres (RDN-POL Registry). Forty-four patients with true-RH (23 men, mean age 52.3 years) with daytime systolic blood pressure (SBP) in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) ≥ 135 mm Hg, on ≥ three antihypertensive agents, including diuretic, underwent RDN and completed 12-month follow-up. Mean reductions of office SBP/diastolic blood pressure were -23.8/-10.0, -12.5/-4.6, and -12.6/-6.1 mm Hg at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively (all significant except diastolic at 6 months). Diabetes was the only predictor of office SBP reduction at 6 months (OR 9.6, 95% CI 1.4-66.5, p < 0.05). Mean 24-h SBP change was -8.3 mm Hg at 6 months and -4.6 mm Hg at 12 months. Increased 2 h-glucose in oral glucose tolerance test was the only predictor of 24-h SBP reduction at 6 months (OR 1.24 for 10 mg/dL glucose increase, 95% CI 1.04-1.48, p < 0.05). At 12 months, 24-h SBP change predictors were: baseline office SBP (OR 4.93 for 10 mm Hg SBP increment, 95% CI 1.01-24.1, p < 0.05) and 2 h-glucose (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.08-2.00, p < 0.05). In ABPM responders, significant reduction of 2 h glucose was found as compared to the non-responders (-45.8 vs. -7.7 mg/dL, p < 0.005). The RDN-POL Registry demonstrated moderate blood pressure decrease after RDN. The predictors of blood pressure reduction were diabetes, 2 h-glucose, and baseline office SBP. Analysis of ABPM responders indicates a probable positive impact of RDN on glycaemic control.

  17. Elevated blood pressure in offspring of rats exposed to diverse chemicals during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adverse intrauterine environments are associated with increased risk of later disease, including cardiovascular disease and hypertension. As a potential bioindicator of such an adverse environment, we measured blood pressure (BP), renal nephron endowment, renal glucocorticoid rec...

  18. Blood Pressure Responses to Endovascular Stimulation: A Potential Therapy for Autonomic Disorders With Vasodilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naksuk, Niyada; Killu, Ammar M; Yogeswaran, Vidhushei; Desimone, Christopher V; Suddendorf, Scott H; Ladewig, Dorothy J; Powers, Joanne M; Weber, Sarah; Madhavan, Malini; Cha, Yong-Mei; Kapa, Suraj; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-09-01

    We have previously shown that sympathetic ganglia stimulation via the renal vein rapidly increases blood pressure. This study further investigated the optimal target sites and effective energy levels for stimulation of the renal vasculatures and nearby sympathetic ganglia for rapid increase in blood pressure. The pre-study protocol for endovascular stimulations included 2 minutes of stimulation (1-150 V and 10 pulses per second) and at least 2 minutes of rest during poststimulation. If blood pressure and/or heart rate were changed during the stimulation, time to return to baseline was allowed prior to the next stimulation. In 11 acute canine studies, we performed 85 renal artery, 30 renal vein, and 8 hepatic vasculature stimulations. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) rapidly increased during stimulation of renal artery (95 ± 18 mmHg vs. 103 ± 15 mmHg; P vein (90 ± 16 mmHg vs. 102 ± 20 mmHg; P = 0.001), and hepatic vasculatures (74 ± 8 mmHg vs. 82 ± 11 mmHg; P = 0.04). Predictors of a significant increase in MAP were energy >10 V focused on the left renal artery, bilateral renal arteries, and bilateral renal veins (especially the mid segment). Overall, heart rate was unchanged, but muscle fasciculation was observed in 22.0% with an output >10 V (range 15-150 V). Analysis after excluding the stimulations that resulted in fasciculation yielded similar results to the main findings. Stimulation of intra-abdominal vasculatures promptly increased the MAP and thus may be a potential treatment option for hypotension in autonomic disorders. Predictors of optimal stimulation include energy delivery and the site of stimulation (for the renal vasculatures), which informs the design of subsequent research. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Control of blood pressure mean and its correlation with renal function in patients with severe preeclampsia treated with three oral antihypertensive agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Rodríguez, Juan Gustavo

    2009-05-01

    In severe preeclampsia, the lack of blood pressure average is a factor for adverse renal function. To describe the control of blood pressure mean and its correlation with the endogenous creatinine clearance in severe preeclampsia treated with three oral antihypertensive agents cross-sectional study on 123 pregnant women with severe preeclampsia, treated with 500 mg every 8 h methyldopa, hydralazine 50 mg every 6 h, or 100 mg of metoprolol every 12 hours from admission to the unit intensive care to the care delivery. At time of delivery were compared blood pressure average, endogenous creatinine clearance and the correlation between two of the 123 patients were divided into two groups with matching blood pressure treatment goal of 95 mmHg (98 cases, 79.67%). Was used to measures of central tendency and dispersion, T-test and Pearson correlation coefficient (r). Blood pressure mean (mmHg) initial vs final of all patients was similar (114.64 +/- 4.54 vs 103.88 +/- 10.65, p = 1.46) but not the medial blood group A vs B (89.16 +/- 4.54 vs 107.63 +/- 8.22, p = 0.05). Endogenous creatinine clearance (mL/min/1.73 m2 SC) of the total was similar (101.88 +/- 28.48 vs 98.73 +/- 29.96, p = 0.40) in group A increased by 2.5 (p = 0.71) and decreased in group B 5.69 (p = 0.0056). R of the total income to the intensive care unit was 0.11 and the birth of 0.06, 0.0033 in groupA and -0.44 and 0.13 in group B and 0.16, respectively. The satisfactory control of blood pressure was achieved in 20.33% of cases. The correlation between blood pressure mean and endogenous creatinine clearance was very low.

  20. Systolic blood pressure, routine kidney variables and renal ultrasonographic findings in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffin, Elien Rl; Paepe, Dominique; Ghys, Liesbeth Fe; De Roover, Katrien; Van de Maele, Isabel; Saunders, Jimmy H; Duchateau, Luc; Daminet, Sylvie

    2017-06-01

    Objectives Hypertension is a common cause of proteinuria in HIV-infected people. In cats, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection appears to be associated with proteinuria. Therefore, the results from systolic blood pressure (SBP) measurements in naturally infected FIV-positive cats were reviewed to assess whether hypertension contributes to the observed proteinuria in these cats. Ultrasonographic findings in FIV-positive cats were reviewed to complete renal assessment and to extend the scant knowledge on renal ultrasonography in cats. Methods Data from client-owned, naturally infected FIV-positive cats were retrospectively reviewed. To obtain a control group, records were reviewed from age-matched, privately owned, FIV-negative cats. Results Data from 91 FIV-infected and 113 control cats were compared. FIV-infected cats showed a significantly lower SBP ( P 0.4) occurred more frequently in FIV-infected cats ( P <0.001). Renal ultrasonography showed abnormalities in 60/91 FIV-infected cats, with hyperechogenic cortices in 39/91 and enlarged kidneys in 31/91. Conclusions and relevance Hypertension can be excluded as a common cause of renal damage leading to proteinuria in FIV-infected cats. Proteinuria and poorly concentrated urine are common in naturally infected FIV-positive cats, in contrast to azotaemia. Clinicians should cautiously interpret ultrasonographic abnormalities as these occur in over half of FIV-infected cats.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF RENAL BLOOD FLOW REGULATION BASED ON WAVELET COEFFICIENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, A.N.; Pavlova, O.N.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the possibility of revealing new characteristic features of renal blood flow autoregulation in healthy and pathological states through the application of discrete wavelet transforms to experimental time series for normotensive and hypertensive rats....... A reduction in the variability of the wavelet coefficients in hypertension is observed at both the microscopic level of the blood flow in efferent arterioles of individual nephrons and at the macroscopic level of the blood pressure in the main arteries. The reduction is manifest in both of the main frequency...

  2. Simple technique for measuring relative renal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shames, D.M.; Korobkin, M.

    1976-01-01

    To determine whether externally monitored early renal uptake of 131 I-hippurate is proportional to renal blood flow, the renal uptake of 131 -hippurate at 1 to 2 min after injection was compared with the renal accumulation of radioactive carbonized microspheres in dogs. A renal artery catheter equipped with a balloon was used to decrease renal blood flow unilaterally. One minute after the intravenous injection of 100 μCi of 131 I-hippurate, about 1 μCi of either 85 Sr- or 95 Nb-labeled carbon microspheres was injected into the left ventricle. Radioactivity was measured over both kidneys. The total radioactivity within each kidney region of interest was corrected for background and integrated over the 1 to 2 min interval after injection. Thirteen measurements of relative renal blood flow were made for seven dogs. The dogs were then killed and both kidneys were excised and counted for the radioactivity of the microspheres. The 1 to 2-min relative renal uptake of 131 I-hippurate correlated well with relative microsphere uptake, suggesting that relative renal blood flow can be simply determined from the external measurements of renal uptake of 131 I-hippurate

  3. Impact of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation on Blood Pressure and Renal Function in Multiple Myeloma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Leah; Saad, Chadi; Arsene, Camelia; Fogel, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) reverses kidney failure in one-third of multiple myeloma (MM) patients, which may lead to blood pressure (BP) improvement. We evaluate the long term impact of ASCT on BP and renal function in MM patients. We studied 192 MM patients that underwent ASCT. We compared BP readings and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 4 weeks before ASCT, on day of ASCT and post-ASCT at 30, 100 and 180 days. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) on day of ASCT and at both 30 and 100 days post-ASCT was significantly lower as compared to pre-ASCT SBP and DBP. There was a significantly higher mean GFR at day of ASCT and 30 days post-ASCT and significantly lower mean GFR at 180 days post-ASCT as compared to pre-ASCT. White patients had similar patterns to the total group for SBP, DBP, and GFR except for SBP which was still significantly lower and GFR which was not significantly different at 180 days. African-American patients showed no significant reductions in the mean values of SBP and DBP and no significant increases for GFR in follow-up after day of ASCT. Furthermore, the mean value of GFR was significantly lower at 180 days post-ASCT. ASCT in MM patients had a positive impact on SBP and DBP and GFR but the impact was minimal for African-American patients. We recommend that clinicians consider closer follow-up of BP and kidney function and more intense therapy in African-Americans with MM. Copyright © 2017 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute renal haemodynamic and renin-angiotensin system responses to graded renal artery stenosis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W P; Johnston, C I; Korner, P I

    1979-01-01

    1. The acute renal haemodynamic and renin-angiotensin system responses to graded renal artery stenosis were studied in chronically instrumented, unanaesthetized dogs. 2. Stenosis was induced over 30 sec by inflation of a cuff around the renal artery to lower distal pressure to 60, 40 or 20 mmHg, with stenosis maintained for 1 hr. This resulted in an immediate fall in renal vascular resistance, but over the next 5--30 min both resistance and renal artery pressure were restored back towards prestenosis values. Only transient increases in systemic arterial blood pressure and plasma renin and angiotensin levels were seen with the two milder stenoses. Despite restoration of renal artery pressure, renal blood flow remained reduced at all grades of stenosis. 3. Pre-treatment with angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor or sarosine1, isoleucone8 angiotensin II greatly attenuated or abolished the restoration of renal artery pressure and renal vascular resistance after stenosis, and plasma renin and angiotensin II levels remained high. Renal dilatation was indefinitely maintained, but the normal restoration of resistance and pressure could be simulated by infusing angiotensin II into the renal artery. 4. The effective resistance to blood flow by the stenosis did not remain constant but varied with changes in the renal vascular resistance. PMID:219182

  5. Renal Blood Flow, Glomerular Filtration Rate, and Renal Oxygenation in Early Clinical Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skytte Larsson, Jenny; Krumbholz, Vitus; Enskog, Anders; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2018-06-01

    Data on renal hemodynamics, function, and oxygenation in early clinical septic shock are lacking. We therefore measured renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renal oxygen consumption, and oxygenation in patients with early septic shock. Prospective comparative study. General and cardiothoracic ICUs. Patients with norepinephrine-dependent early septic shock (n = 8) were studied within 24 hours after arrival in the ICU and compared with postcardiac surgery patients without acute kidney injury (comparator group, n = 58). None. Data on systemic hemodynamics and renal variables were obtained during two 30-minute periods. Renal blood flow was measured by the infusion clearance of para-aminohippuric acid, corrected for renal extraction of para-aminohippuric acid. Renal filtration fraction was measured by renal extraction of chromium-51 labeled EDTA. Renal oxygenation was estimated from renal oxygen extraction. Renal oxygen delivery (-24%; p = 0.037) and the renal blood flow-to-cardiac index ratio (-21%; p = 0.018) were lower, renal vascular resistance was higher (26%; p = 0.027), whereas renal blood flow tended to be lower (-19%; p = 0.068) in the septic group. Glomerular filtration rate (-32%; p = 0.006) and renal sodium reabsorption (-29%; p = 0.014) were both lower in the septic group. Neither renal filtration fraction nor renal oxygen consumption differed significantly between groups. Renal oxygen extraction was significantly higher in the septic group (28%; p = 0.022). In the septic group, markers of tubular injury were elevated. In early clinical septic shock, renal function was lower, which was accompanied by renal vasoconstriction, a lower renal oxygen delivery, impaired renal oxygenation, and tubular sodium reabsorption at a high oxygen cost compared with controls.

  6. Remote Blood Pressure Waveform Sensing Method and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-02

    test the effects of drugs, exercise, or other stimuli, whereby an increase or decrease in the ratio may indicate an improvement or worsening of systolic...even though high blood pressure in animals can be symptomatic of a variety of diseases including chronic renal failure, hyperthyroidism , Cushing’s

  7. Deletion of Cyclooxygenase-2 in the mouse increases arterial blood pressure with no impairment in renal NO production in response to chronic high salt intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr, Mette; Hansen, Pernille B L; Madsen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that COX-2 activity attenuates the blood pressure increase during high NaCl intake by stimulation of eNOS-mediated NO synthesis in the kidney medulla. COX-2(-/-) (C57BL6) and (+/+) mice were fed a diet with 0.004% (LS) or 4% (HS) NaCl for 18 days. ...... pressure during high salt intake and COX-2 activity is not necessary for increased renal NO formation during elevated NaCl intake....... pressure on salt intake and genotype: COX-2(-/-) exhibited higher blood pressure than COX-2(+/+) both on HS and LS intake. COX-2(+/+) littermates displayed an increase in blood pressure on HS vs. LS (102.3±1.1 mmHg vs. 91.9±0.9 mmHg) day and night. The mice exhibited significant blood pressure increases...... during the awake phase (night) that were larger in COX-2(-/-) on HS diet compared to COX-2(+/+). Water intake, diuresis, Na(+) and osmolyte excretions and NOx and cGMP excretions were significantly and similarly elevated with HS in COX-2(-/-) and COX-2(+/+). In summary, C57BL6 mice exhibit a salt intake...

  8. Differential effects of sulindac and indomethacin on blood pressure in treated essential hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddey, I B; Beilin, L J; Vandongen, R; Banks, R; Rouse, I

    1985-09-01

    Attenuation of the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drugs has been attributed to inhibition of systemic or renal vasodilator prostaglandin synthesis, or a combination of both. Indomethacin is a NSAI drug with both renal and extrarenal cyclo-oxygenase inhibition properties. Sulindac is a relatively selective cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor said not to affect urinary prostaglandin excretion. This study examines the relative effect on blood pressure of 4 weeks' treatment, with indomethacin 25 mg three times daily and sulindac 200 mg twice daily, in a randomized placebo controlled trial in 26 hypertensive subjects. In nine patients treated with indomethacin, supine blood pressure rose 11 mmHg systolic and 4 mmHg diastolic by the end of the first week, whereas nine subjects treated with sulindac showed a fall in blood pressure similar to the trend seen in placebo-treated subjects. Indomethacin treatment inhibited renal cyclo-oxygenase with a 78% reduction in urinary prostaglandin E2 excretion and 89% suppression of plasma renin activity. Neither measurement was affected by sulindac. Extrarenal cyclo-oxygenase activity was inhibited by both indomethacin and sulindac with serum thromboxane B2 decreasing by 96% and 69% respectively. The results suggest that the pressor effect of NSAI drugs is predominantly related to renal cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. the lack of effect of sulindac on blood pressure may make it a safer therapeutic option if NSAI drug therapy is necessary in the hypertensive patient.

  9. A Mathematical Model of Renal Blood Distribution Coupling TGF, MR and Tubular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ci-xiu; YANG Lin; WANG Ke-qiang; XU Shi-xiong; DAI Pei-dong

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between renal blood distribution and the physiological activities of the kidney. Methods:A mathematical model is developed based on Hagan-Poiseuille law and mass transport, coupling mechanics of myogenic response (MR), tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the tubular system in the renal medulla. The model parameters, including the permeability coefficients, the vascular lumen radius and the solute concentration at the inlet of the tubes, are derived from the experimental results. Simulations of the blood and water flow in the loop of Henel, the collecting duct and vas rectum, are carried out by the model of the tubular system in the renal medulla, based on conservations of water and solutes for transmural transport. Then the tubular model is coupled with MR and TGF mechanics. Results:The results predict the dynamics of renal autoregulation on its blood pressure and flow,and the distributions are 88.5% in the cortex, 10.3% in the medulla, and 1.2% at papilla,respectively. The fluid flow and solute concentrations along the tubules and vasa recta are obtained. Conclusion:The present model could assess renal functions qualitatively and quantitatively and provide a methodological approach for clinical research.

  10. Activation of GLP-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells reduces the autoregulatory response in afferent arterioles and increases renal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elisa P; Poulsen, Steen S; Kissow, Hannelouise; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Deacon, Carolyn F; Jensen, Boye L; Holst, Jens J; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2015-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has a range of extrapancreatic effects, including renal effects. The mechanisms are poorly understood, but GLP-1 receptors have been identified in the kidney. However, the exact cellular localization of the renal receptors is poorly described. The aim of the present study was to localize renal GLP-1 receptors and describe GLP-1-mediated effects on the renal vasculature. We hypothesized that renal GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal microcirculation and that activation of these affects renal autoregulation and increases renal blood flow. In vivo autoradiography using (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog), and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) was performed in rodents to localize specific GLP-1 receptor binding. GLP-1-mediated effects on blood pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), heart rate, renin secretion, urinary flow rate, and Na(+) and K(+) excretion were investigated in anesthetized rats. Effects of GLP-1 on afferent arterioles were investigated in isolated mouse kidneys. Specific binding of (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4, and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 was observed in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Infusion of GLP-1 increased blood pressure, RBF, and urinary flow rate significantly in rats. Heart rate and plasma renin concentrations were unchanged. Exendin 9-39 inhibited the increase in RBF. In isolated murine kidneys, GLP-1 and exendin-4 significantly reduced the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles in response to stepwise increases in pressure. We conclude that GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Activation of these receptors reduces the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles to acute pressure increases and increases RBF in normotensive rats. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The effect of borage tea on urine and blood biochemistry on non-dialysis chronic renal failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kobra Rezaei

    2004-06-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study show that the use of borage tea had an effect on patients’ urine and blood chemistry and renal function. Additionally, patients’ weight and blood pressure decreased.

  12. Renal denervation: Results of a single-center cohort study; Renale Denervation. Ergebnisse einer Single-Center Kohortenstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetkens, J.A.; Thomas, D.; Doerner, J.; Schild, H.H.; Naehle, C.P. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Wilhelm, K. [Johanniter Hospital, Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Duesing, R. [Hypertension Center, Bonn (Germany); Woitas, R.P.; Hundt, F. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine I

    2015-01-15

    To investigate the effect of renal denervation on office-based and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM) in a highly selective patient population with drug-resistant hypertension. Patients with drug resistant hypertension eligible for renal denervation were included in the study population. Office blood pressure and ABPM were assessed prior to and after renal denervation. To detect procedure related renal or renal artery damage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography (MRA) were performed pre-interventional, one day post-interventional, and one month after renal denervation. Mean follow-up time between renal denervation and blood pressure re-assessment was 9.5 ± 3.9 months. Between August 2011 and March 2013, 17 patients prospectively underwent renal denervation. Pre-interventional mean office blood pressure and ABPM were 177.3 ± 20.3/103.8 ± 20.4 mmHg and 155.2 ± 20.5/93.7 ± 14.5 mmHg, respectively. Post-interventional, office blood pressure was significantly reduced to 144.7 ± 14.9/89.5 ± 12.1 (p < 0.05). ABPM values remained unchanged (147.9 ± 20.3/90.3 ± 15.6, p > 0.05). The number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs was unchanged after renal denervation (4.7 ± 2.0 vs. 4.2 ± 1.2, p = 0.18). No renovascular complications were detected in follow-up MRI. After renal denervation, no significant decrease in ABPM was observed. These results may indicate a limited impact of renal denervation for drug resistant hypertension.

  13. Effects of fenoldopam on renal blood flow in hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovella, Valentina; Ferrannini, Michele; Tesauro, Manfredi; Marrone, Giulia; Busca, Andrea; Sorge, Roberto; Manca di Villahermosa, Simone; Casasco, Maurizio; Di Daniele, Nicola; Noce, Annalisa

    2018-05-15

    The synthetic drug fenoldopam mesylate (FM) may have a renoprotective role, and a "renal dose" of 0.1 µg/kg/min intravenous (IV) infusion of FM has been reported as able to increase renal blood flow without affecting systemic blood pressure. But conclusive data are still lacking. We aimed to investigate by color-Doppler ultrasonography the effects of IV administration of FM at this dosage in hypertensive chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and verify whether it may induce any systemic hemodynamic alteration. In 60 hypertensive CKD patients, we measured by duplex Doppler ultrasonography, at baseline and during infusion of 0.1 µg/kg/min of FM, the systolic and diastolic flow velocity (sampled at the renal hilum, intermediate section and origin of both renal arteries) and the intra-parenchymal renal resistive index (RRI) sampled on interlobular arteries of both kidneys. Patients were divided into four subgroups (I-IV) according to classification of National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-DOQI). Infusion of 0.1 µg/kg/min FM significantly decreased the RRI (0.73 ± 0.05 vs. 0.65 ± 0.06; p flow velocities in all renal artery tracts examined. No single episode of systemic hypotension was observed. Very low-dose FM may significantly increase renal blood flow and exert a renal protective effect in hypertensive CKD patients. Infusion of FM at such low dosage appears also to be quite safe, even in CKD and hypertensive patients.

  14. Dynamic autoregulation and renal injury in Dahl rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, F M; Andersen, C B; Leyssac, P P

    1997-01-01

    of hypertension, a gradual impairment of autoregulatory control of renal blood flow might expose the glomerular circulation to periods of elevated pressure, resulting in renal injuries in Dahl S rats. Dynamic autoregulatory capacity was assessed in Dahl S and Dahl salt-resistant (Dahl R) rats, SHR, and Sprague......-Dawley rats by inducing broad-band fluctuations in the arterial blood pressure and simultaneously measuring renal blood flow. Dynamic autoregulation was estimated by the transfer function using blood pressure as the input and renal blood flow as the output. Renal morphological injuries were evaluated in Dahl......The Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl S) rat develops hypertension and renal injuries when challenged with a high salt diet and has been considered to be a model of chronic renal failure. Renal injuries appear very early in life compared with the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). During the course...

  15. Effects of sodium nitrite on renal function and blood pressure in hypertensive vs. healthy study participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbæk, Jeppe B; Hornstrup, Bodil G; Jørgensen, Andreas N

    2018-01-01

    to determine the effects of NaNO2 on blood pressure (BP) and renal sodium and water regulation in patients with EHT compared with healthy control study participants (CON). METHODS: In a placebo-controlled, crossover study, we infused 240 μg NaNO2/kg/h or isotonic saline for 2 h in 14 EHT and 14 CON. During...... infusion, we measured changes in brachial and central BP, free water clearance, fractional sodium excretion, and urinary excretion rate of γ-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (U-ENaCγ), and aquaporin-2 (U-AQP2). RESULTS: Placebo-adjusted brachial SBP decreased 18 mmHg (P ... infusion in EHT and 12 mmHg (P fractional sodium excretion, free water clearance, and U...

  16. Blood pressure control in hypertensive pediatric renal transplants: role of repeated ABPM following transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmar, Rafael T; Berg, Ulla B

    2008-10-01

    Hypertension in pediatric renal transplants is a widespread condition associated with high mortality risk in early adult life. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was found to be superior to office blood pressure (BP) in identifying true hypertensive and responders to treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of repeated ABPM, performed at yearly intervals following transplantation, in the assessment and decision-making processes of post-transplant hypertension. Thirty-seven recipients (23 males; aged 10.5 +/- 4.3 years) who were followed for 4.3 +/- 2.2 years (range 2-9) after transplantation were eligible for analysis. The mean follow-up time between the baseline (1 year post-transplantation) and the most recent ABPM examination was 3.3 +/- 2.2 years (range 1-8). Throughout the follow-up period, antihypertensive therapy was either started or intensified in 27 recipients. These interventions were decided based on ABPM results obtained on 40 of 44 occasions. At last follow-up, 24 of 29 treated hypertensive recipients displayed controlled BP. This figure was significantly higher compared to our historical hypertensive control recipients in whom ABPM was applied for the first time in treatment at 6 +/- 3.3 years (range 2-15) after transplantation, while therapeutic decisions were driven by office BP measurements (95 % confidence interval (95% CI) for the difference between proportions (80.6-32 %) 36-60 %, P = 0.001). Our study shows that, in a population with high risk for hypertension, repeated ABPM may significantly help to improve BP control.

  17. Application of mobile blood purification system in the treatment of acute renal failure dog model in the field environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-min ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the stability, safety and efficacy of mobile blood purification system in the treatment of acute renal failure dog model in the field environment. Methods The acute renal failure model was established in 4 dogs by bilateral nephrectomy, which was thereafter treated with the mobile blood purification system. The evaluation of functional index of the mobile blood purification system was performed after a short-time (2 hours and conventional (4 hours dialysis treatment. Results The mobile blood purification system ran stably in the field environment at a blood flow of 150-180ml/min, a dialysate velocity of 2000ml/h, a replacement fluid velocity of 2000ml/h, and ultrafiltration rate of 100-200ml/h. All the functions of alarming system worked well, including static upper limit alarm of ultrafiltration pressure (>100 mmHg, upper limit alarm of ambulatory arterial pressure (>400mmHg, upper limit alarm of ambulatory venous pressure (>400mmHg, bubble alarm of vascular access, bubble alarm during the infusion of solutions, pressure alarm at the substitution pump segment and blood leaking alarm. The vital signs of the 4 dogs with acute renal failure kept stable during the treatment. After the treatment, a remarkable decrease was seen in the levels of serum urea nitrogen, creatinine and serum potassium (P0.05. Conclusions The mobile blood purification system runs normally even in a field environment. It is a flexible and portable device with a great performance in safety and stability in the treatment of acute renal failure. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.12.15

  18. The effect of two different renal denervation strategies on blood pressure in resistant hypertension: Comparison of full-length versus proximal renal artery ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Ling, Zhiyu; Du, Huaan; Song, Wenxin; Xu, Yanping; Liu, Zengzhang; Su, Li; Xiao, Peilin; Yuan, Yuelong; Lu, Jiayi; Zhang, Jianhong; Li, Zhifeng; Shao, Jiang; Zhong, Bin; Zhou, Bei; Woo, Kamsang; Yin, Yuehui

    2016-11-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) is used to manage blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant hypertension (rHT), but effectiveness is still a concern, and key arterial portion for successful RDN is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of proximal versus full-length renal artery ablation in patients with resistant hypertension (rHT). Forty-seven patients with rHT were randomly assigned to receive full-length ablation (n = 23) or proximal ablation (n = 24) of the renal arteries. All lesions were treated with radiofrequency energy via a saline-irrigated catheter. Office BP was measured during 12 months of follow-up and ambulatory BP at baseline and 6 months (n = 15 in each group). Compared with full-length ablation, proximal ablation reduced the number of ablation points in both the right (6.1 ± 0.7 vs. 3.3 ± 0.6, P renal arteries (6.2 ± 0.7 vs. 3.3 ± 0.8, P  0.5). Similar office BPs was reduced by -39.4 ± 11.5/-20.9 ± 7.1 mm Hg at 6 months and -38.2 ± 10.3/-21.5 ± 5.8 mm Hg at 12 months in the full-length group (P efficacy and safety profile compared with full-length RDN, and propose the proximal artery as the key portion for RDN. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Role of pressure in angiotensin II-induced renal injury: chronic servo-control of renal perfusion pressure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takefumi; Cowley, Allen W

    2004-04-01

    Renal perfusion pressure was servo-controlled chronically in rats to quantify the relative contribution of elevated arterial pressure versus angiotensin II (Ang II) on the induction of renal injury in Ang II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a 4% salt diet were administered Ang II for 14 days (25 ng/kg per minute IV; saline only for sham rats), and the renal perfusion pressure to the left kidney was continuously servo-controlled to maintain a normal pressure in that kidney throughout the period of hypertension. An aortic occluder was implanted around the aorta between the two renal arteries and carotid and femoral arterial pressure were measured continuously throughout the experiment to determine uncontrolled and controlled renal perfusion pressure, respectively. Renal perfusion pressure of uncontrolled, controlled, and sham kidneys over the period of Ang II or saline infusion averaged 152.6+/-7.0, 117.4+/-3.5, and 110.7+/-2.2 mm Hg, respectively. The high-pressure uncontrolled kidneys exhibited tubular necrosis and interstitial fibrosis, especially prominent in the outer medullary region. Regional glomerular sclerosis and interlobular artery injury were also pronounced. Controlled kidneys were significantly protected from interlobular artery injury, juxtamedullary glomeruli injury, tubular necrosis, and interstitial fibrosis as determined by comparing the level of injury. Glomerular injury was not prevented in the outer cortex. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and active NF-kappaB proteins determined by immunohistochemistry were colocalized in the uncontrolled kidney in regions of interstitial fibrosis. We conclude that the preferential juxtamedullary injury found in Ang II hypertension is largely induced by pressure and is probably mediated through the TGF-beta and NF-kappaB pathway.

  20. Effect of captopril on renal blood flow in renal artery stenosis assessed by positron tomography with rubidium-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, N.; Alpert, N.M.; Rabito, C.A.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Correia, J.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The sequence and magnitude of acute changes in renal blood flow following administration of captopril were determined in a canine model of acute unilateral renal artery stenosis using rubidium-82 and positron emission tomography. Data were recorded in each of nine dogs under three conditions: 1) during a baseline control interval, 2) during renal artery stenosis, and 3) during stenosis with intravenous injection of captopril (1.2 mg/kg). Mean arterial blood pressure was 108 +/- 12 mm Hg at control, increased significantly to 125 +/- 13 mm Hg (p less than 0.01) during stenosis, and decreased to 98 +/- 13 mm/Hg (p less than 0.01) after captopril infusion. Mean renal blood flow was calculated using a steady state single compartment model from the images produced by positron emission tomography. The estimated flow to the affected kidney was 3.37 +/- 1.48 ml/min/g at control, 0.86 +/- 0.62 ml/min/g during stenosis (p less than 0.01), and 0.64 +/- 0.57 ml/min/g after captopril administration (p = NS compared with precaptopril value). The estimated flow to the contralateral kidney was minimally reduced from a baseline of 3.84 +/- 0.95 to 3.24 +/- 1.13 ml/min/g (p = NS) during stenosis and increased after captopril infusion (4.08 +/- 0.94 ml/min/g; p = 0.01). These data suggest that repetitive imaging with positron emission tomography can be used to delineate acute changes in renal perfusion following captopril administration

  1. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  2. Blood pressure targets in type 2 diabetes. Evidence against or in favour of an aggressive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Grassi, Guido

    2018-03-01

    When associated with high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by a high risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) and renal outcomes. However, both can be effectively reduced by antihypertensive treatment. Current guidelines on the treatment of hypertension emphasize the need to effectively treat high blood pressure in diabetic individuals, but their recommendations differ in terms of the optimal target blood pressure value to aim for in order to maximise CV and renal protection. In some guidelines the recommended target blood pressure values are blood pressure values close or even less than 130/80 mmHg are recommended. This paper will discuss the evidence for and against a conservative or more aggressive blood pressure target for treated diabetic hypertensive individuals based on the evidence provided by randomised trials, trial meta-analyses and large observational studies. Based on the available evidence, it appears that blood pressure targets will probably have to be lower than <140/90 mmHg, and that values approaching 130/80 mmHg should be recommended. However, evidence in favour of even lower systolic values, i.e. <130 mmHg, is limited and is definitively against a reduction to <120 mmHg.

  3. Laparoscopic prototype for optical sealing of renal blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Larson, Eric R.; Gonzalez, David A.; Chang, Chun-Hung; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2017-02-01

    Energy-based, radiofrequency and ultrasonic devices provide rapid sealing of blood vessels during laparoscopic procedures. We are exploring infrared lasers as an alternative for vessel sealing with less collateral thermal damage. Previous studies demonstrated vessel sealing in an in vivo porcine model using a 1470-nm laser. However, the initial prototype was designed for open surgery and featured tissue clasping and light delivery mechanisms incompatible with laparoscopic surgery. In this study, a laparoscopic prototype similar to devices in surgical use was developed, and tests were conducted on porcine renal blood vessels. The 5-mm-OD prototype featured a traditional Maryland jaw configuration. Laser energy was delivered through a 550-μm-core fiber and side-delivery from the lower jaw, with beam dimensions of 18-mm-length x 1.2-mm-width. The 1470-nm diode laser delivered 68 W with 3 s activation time. A total of 69 porcine renal vessels with mean diameter of 3.3 +/- 1.7 mm were tested, ex vivo. Vessels smaller than 5 mm were consistently sealed (48/51) with burst pressures greater than malignant hypertension blood pressure (180 mmHg), averaging 1038 +/- 474 mmHg. Vessels larger than 5 mm were not consistently sealed (6/18), yielding burst pressures of only 174 +/- 221 mmHg. Seal width, thermal damage zone, and thermal spread averaged 1.7 +/- 0.8, 3.4 +/- 0.7, and 1.0 +/- 0.4 mm. A novel optical laparoscopic prototype with 5-mm- OD shaft integrated within a standard Maryland jaw design consistently sealed vessels less than 5 mm with minimal thermal spread. Further in vivo studies are planned to test performance across a variety of vessels and tissues.

  4. Cuff-Based Oscillometric Central and Brachial Blood Pressures Obtained Through ABPM are Similarly Associated with Renal Organ Damage in Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Fernández-Llama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Central blood pressure (BP has been suggested to be a better estimator of hypertension-associated risks. We aimed to evaluate the association of 24-hour central BP, in comparison with 24-hour peripheral BP, with the presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. Methods: Brachial and central (calculated by an oscillometric system through brachial pulse wave analysis office BP and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM data and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV were measured in 208 hypertensive patients. Renal organ damage was evaluated by means of the albumin to creatinine ratio and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Results: Fifty-four patients (25.9% were affected by renal organ damage, displaying either microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion ≥30 mg/g creatinine or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Compared to those without renal abnormalities, hypertensive patients with kidney damage had higher values of office brachial systolic BP (SBP and pulse pressure (PP, and 24-h, daytime, and nighttime central and brachial SBP and PP. They also had a blunted nocturnal decrease in both central and brachial BP, and higher values of aortic PWV. After adjustment for age, gender, and antihypertensive treatment, only ABPM-derived BP estimates (both central and brachial showed significant associations with the presence of renal damage. Odds ratios for central BP estimates were not significantly higher than those obtained for brachial BP. Conclusion: Compared with peripheral ABPM, cuff-based oscillometric central ABPM does not show a closer association with presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. More studies, however, need to be done to better identify the role of central BP in clinical practice.

  5. Cuff-Based Oscillometric Central and Brachial Blood Pressures Obtained Through ABPM are Similarly Associated with Renal Organ Damage in Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Pareja, Júlia; Yun, Sergi; Vázquez, Susana; Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Blanch, Pedro; Calero, Francesca; Sierra, Cristina; de la Sierra, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) has been suggested to be a better estimator of hypertension-associated risks. We aimed to evaluate the association of 24-hour central BP, in comparison with 24-hour peripheral BP, with the presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. Brachial and central (calculated by an oscillometric system through brachial pulse wave analysis) office BP and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) data and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) were measured in 208 hypertensive patients. Renal organ damage was evaluated by means of the albumin to creatinine ratio and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Fifty-four patients (25.9%) were affected by renal organ damage, displaying either microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion ≥30 mg/g creatinine) or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Compared to those without renal abnormalities, hypertensive patients with kidney damage had higher values of office brachial systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP), and 24-h, daytime, and nighttime central and brachial SBP and PP. They also had a blunted nocturnal decrease in both central and brachial BP, and higher values of aortic PWV. After adjustment for age, gender, and antihypertensive treatment, only ABPM-derived BP estimates (both central and brachial) showed significant associations with the presence of renal damage. Odds ratios for central BP estimates were not significantly higher than those obtained for brachial BP. Compared with peripheral ABPM, cuff-based oscillometric central ABPM does not show a closer association with presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. More studies, however, need to be done to better identify the role of central BP in clinical practice. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Magnitude of blood pressure reduction in the placebo arms of modern hypertension trials: implications for trials of renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh C; Hayward, Carl; Ozdemir, Baris Ata; Rosen, Stuart D; Krum, Henry; Lyon, Alexander R; Francis, Darrel P; di Mario, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Early phase studies of novel interventions for hypertension, such as renal sympathetic denervation, are sometimes single-armed (uncontrolled). We explored the wisdom of this by quantifying the blood pressure fall in the placebo arms of contemporary trials of hypertension. We searched Medline up to June 2014 and identified blinded, randomized trials of hypertension therapy in which the control arm received placebo medication or a sham (placebo) procedure. For nonresistant hypertension, we have identified all such trials of drugs licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration since 2000 (5 drugs). This US Food and Drug Administration-related restriction was not applied to resistant hypertension trials. This produced 7451 patients, who were allocated to a blinded control from 52 trials of nonresistant hypertension and 694 patients from 8 trials of resistant hypertension (3 drugs and 2 interventions). Systolic blood pressure fell by 5.92 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 5.14-6.71; Pefficacy explorations of novel therapies for hypertension, once safety is established, should be performed with a randomized, appropriately controlled, and blinded design. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Spiral blood flow in aorta-renal bifurcation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a spiral arterial blood flow pattern in humans has been widely accepted. It is believed that this spiral component of the blood flow alters arterial haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of spiral flow on haemodynamic changes in aorta-renal bifurcations. In this regard, a computational fluid dynamics analysis of pulsatile blood flow was performed in two idealised models of aorta-renal bifurcations with and without flow diverter. The results show that the spirality effect causes a substantial variation in blood velocity distribution, while causing only slight changes in fluid shear stress patterns. The dominant observed effect of spiral flow is on turbulent kinetic energy and flow recirculation zones. As spiral flow intensity increases, the rate of turbulent kinetic energy production decreases, reducing the region of potential damage to red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, the recirculation zones which form on the cranial sides of the aorta and renal artery shrink in size in the presence of spirality effect; this may lower the rate of atherosclerosis development and progression in the aorta-renal bifurcation. These results indicate that the spiral nature of blood flow has atheroprotective effects in renal arteries and should be taken into consideration in analyses of the aorta and renal arteries.

  8. Nocturnal blood pressure in normotensive subjects and those with white coat, primary, and secondary hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    Middeke, M.; Schrader, J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the mean nocturnal blood pressure of patients with various forms of renal and endocrine hypertension with that in patients with primary and white coat hypertension, and normal blood pressure. DESIGN--Ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure over 24 hours in a prospective study. SETTING--Two German centres for outpatients with hypertension and kidney diseases. SUBJECTS--176 normotensive subjects, 490 patients with primary hypertension including mild and severe forms, 42 wi...

  9. Effects of Restoration of Blood Flow on the Development of Aortic Atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- Mice With Unilateral Renal Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Alokkumar S; Huang, Jianhua; Rojas, Mauricio; Bazemore, Taylor C; Zhou, Ruihai; Stouffer, George A

    2016-04-03

    Chronic unilateral renal artery stenosis (RAS) causes accelerated atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice, but effects of restoration of renal blood flow on aortic atherosclerosis are unknown. Male ApoE(-/-) mice underwent sham surgery (n=16) or had partial ligation of the right renal artery (n=41) with the ligature being removed 4 days later (D4LR; n=6), 8 days later (D8LR; n=11), or left in place for 90 days (chronic RAS; n=24). Ligature removal at 4 or 8 days resulted in improved renal blood flow, decreased plasma angiotensin II levels, a return of systolic blood pressure to baseline, and increased plasma levels of neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin. Chronic RAS resulted in increased lipid staining in the aortic arch (33.2% [24.4, 47.5] vs 11.6% [6.1, 14.2]; Prenal blood flow at either 4 or 8 days after unilateral RAS had a beneficial effect on systolic blood pressure, aortic lipid deposition, and atheroma inflammation. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Abnormal albuminuria and blood pressure rise in incipient diabetic nephropathy induced by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Cramer

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of light to moderate dynamic work (450 kpm/min followed by 600 kpm/min during 20 min each) on the blood pressure and renal protein handling in insulin-dependent diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy (D3) (elevated baseline albumin excretion...... diastolic blood pressure was elevated [92.1 mm Hg +/- 6.0 (mean +/- SD)] compared to D2 (80.9 mm Hg +/- 4.8, 2P = 0.003%) and C (79.5 mm Hg +/- 12.4, 2P = 1.2%). Baseline systolic blood pressure was not significantly different in the three groups, but systolic blood pressure was more elevated at 600 kpm...... blood pressure and maximal exercise induced albumin excretion was demonstrable in D3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  11. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.S.; Passmore, J.C.; Hartupee, D.A.; Baker, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    The role of prostaglandins in the distribution of total renal blood flow (TRBF) between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments was investigated in anesthetized mongrel dogs. Renal blood flow distribution was assessed by the xenon 133 freeze-dissection technique and by rubidium 86 extraction after ibuprofen treatment. Ibuprofen (13 mg/kg) significantly decreased TRBF by 16.3% +/- 1.2% (mean +/- SEM electromagnetic flow probe; p less than 0.005), but did not alter blood flows to the outer cortex (3.7 vs 4.3 ml/min per gram), the inner cortex (2.6 vs 2.7 ml/min per gram), and the other medulla (1.5 vs 1.5 ml/min per gram), which suggests a decrease in nonnutrient flow. In a separate group of animals the effect of reduced blood flow on the nutrient and nonnutrient components was determined by mechanically reducing renal arterial blood flow by 48%. Unlike the ibuprofen group, nutrient blood flows were proportionally reduced with the mechanical decrease in TRBF in the outer cortex (1.9 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), the inner cortex (1.4 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), and the outer medulla (0.8 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.01). These results indicate no shift between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flows of the left kidney were also determined by 86Rb extraction. After ibuprofen treatment, nonextracted 86Rb decreased to 12.1% from the control value of 15.6% (p less than 0.05). Mechanical reduction of TRBF did not significantly decrease the proportion of unextracted 86Rb (18.7%)

  12. Renal blood flow and metabolism after cold ischaemia: peroperative measurements in patients with calculi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H K; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1984-01-01

    Peroperative measurements of renal blood flow (RBF), renal O2-uptake, and renal venous lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio were performed before and after a period of 30-71 min of hypothermic (10-15 degrees C) renal ischaemia in nine patients, undergoing surgery for renal calculi. Before ischaemia, RBF.......01) immediately after re-established perfusion and 36% (P less than 0.02) 30 min later. In one additional patient, who had a short warm ischaemia (8 min), the flow pattern was the same. As arterial pressure remained constant, the reduced RBF signifies an increased renal vascular resistance. Renal O2-uptake...... and renal venous L/P ratio were almost constant, indicating no significant anaerobic processes being involved in the flow response. None of the patients showed any signs of reactive hyperaemia. It is concluded that hypothermic renal ischaemia may be followed by an increased renal vascular resistance even...

  13. Salt-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in Dahl salt-sensitive rats is dependent on elevated blood pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Mu, J.J.; Liu, F.Q.; Ren, K.Y.; Xiao, H.Y. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Cardiovascular Department, Xi' an, China, Cardiovascular Department, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Xi' an, China, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Ministry of Education, Xi' an (China); Yang, Z. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Pathology, Xi' an, China, Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Yuan, Z.Y. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Cardiovascular Department, Xi' an, China, Cardiovascular Department, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Xi' an, China, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Ministry of Education, Xi' an (China)

    2014-03-03

    Dietary salt intake has been linked to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Accumulating evidence has indicated that salt-sensitive individuals on high salt intake are more likely to develop renal fibrosis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) participates in the development and progression of renal fibrosis in humans and animals. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of a high-salt diet on EMT in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Twenty-four male SS and consomic SS-13{sup BN} rats were randomized to a normal diet or a high-salt diet. After 4 weeks, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and albuminuria were analyzed, and renal fibrosis was histopathologically evaluated. Tubular EMT was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR with E-cadherin and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). After 4 weeks, SBP and albuminuria were significantly increased in the SS high-salt group compared with the normal diet group. Dietary salt intake induced renal fibrosis and tubular EMT as identified by reduced expression of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of α-SMA in SS rats. Both blood pressure and renal interstitial fibrosis were negatively correlated with E-cadherin but positively correlated with α-SMA. Salt intake induced tubular EMT and renal injury in SS rats, and this relationship might depend on the increase in blood pressure.

  14. Salt-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in Dahl salt-sensitive rats is dependent on elevated blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Mu, J.J.; Liu, F.Q.; Ren, K.Y.; Xiao, H.Y.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, Z.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary salt intake has been linked to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Accumulating evidence has indicated that salt-sensitive individuals on high salt intake are more likely to develop renal fibrosis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) participates in the development and progression of renal fibrosis in humans and animals. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of a high-salt diet on EMT in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Twenty-four male SS and consomic SS-13 BN rats were randomized to a normal diet or a high-salt diet. After 4 weeks, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and albuminuria were analyzed, and renal fibrosis was histopathologically evaluated. Tubular EMT was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR with E-cadherin and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). After 4 weeks, SBP and albuminuria were significantly increased in the SS high-salt group compared with the normal diet group. Dietary salt intake induced renal fibrosis and tubular EMT as identified by reduced expression of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of α-SMA in SS rats. Both blood pressure and renal interstitial fibrosis were negatively correlated with E-cadherin but positively correlated with α-SMA. Salt intake induced tubular EMT and renal injury in SS rats, and this relationship might depend on the increase in blood pressure

  15. Use of ambulatory blood pressure measurement in the definition of resistant hypertension: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persu, Alexandre; O'Brien, Eoin; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Resistant hypertension as defined by the European Society of Hypertension and American Heart Association is a blood pressure that remains uncontrolled despite concomitant intake of at least three antihypertensive drugs (one of them preferably being a diuretic) at full doses. This definition is still based on office rather than out-of-office blood pressure measurement. In this review we propose a new, stricter definition of resistant hypertension based on ambulatory blood pressure measurement. The main arguments in favor of this are: (1) in patients with resistant hypertension, ambulatory blood pressure is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity whereas, after adjustment for conventional risk factors, conventional blood pressure has little added value; (2) white-coat resistant hypertension (uncontrolled office with normal ambulatory blood pressure) is frequent (30-40% of patients with apparently resistant hypertension) carrying a prognosis similar to that of controlled hypertension, and intensification of blood pressure lowering treatment, or the use of nondrug treatment strategies such as renal denervation or carotid baroreceptor stimulation, is not justified; (3) masked resistant hypertension (controlled office with elevated ambulatory blood pressure) is frequent (approximately one-third of patients with controlled office blood pressure on triple antihypertensive therapy) and associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events; in such patients, treatment intensification should be considered; (4) the current definition of resistant hypertension (office blood pressure ⩾ 140/90 mm Hg on triple antihypertensive therapy) allows a substantial proportion of patients with spurious or white-coat resistant hypertension to undergo renal denervation in the absence of proven long-term benefits.

  16. [How does salt intake influence blood pressure? Associated aetiopathogenic mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llama, P; Calero, F

    2017-12-15

    Abundant evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies has established a link between salt and blood pressure. However, there is heterogeneity in the blood pressure responses of humans to changes in sodium intake. Those individuals in whom a severe, abrupt change in salt intake causes the least change in arterial pressure and are termed salt-resistant, whereas in those in whom this leads to large changes in blood pressure, are called salt sensitive. Classically, Guyton's theory of the pressure-natriuresis phenomenon has been accepted to explain the pressor effect of salt, as well as the fundamental role played by the different protein sodium transporters of the renal tubules. In recent years, new theories have emerged pointing to the possible role of the immune system and the existence of a third sodium store in the body as aetiopathogenic factors. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zafrani (Lara); B. Ergin (Bulent); Kapucu, A. (Aysegul); C. Ince (Can)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Methods: Twenty-seven Wistar

  18. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure monitors may have some limitations. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... more Stage 2 high blood pressure (hypertension) Elevated blood pressure and stages 1 and 2 high blood pressure ( ...

  19. Association of serum uric acid level and blood pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savira, M.; Rusdiana; Syahputra, M.

    2018-03-01

    Uric acid is an end product of purine degradation in humans and primarily excreted through urine. In adulthood, concentrations rise steadily over time and vary with height, body weight, blood pressure, renal function, and alcohol intake. Uric acid is known as anti-oxidant, it has a beneficial role in diseases. Elevated serum uric acid associated with anincreased risk of cardiovascular disease. It has been found that elevated levels of uric acid associated with high risks of acomplication of type 2 diabetes mellitus and It has astrong association between elevated uric acid levels and obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disorders. The aim of the study analyzed the association between serum uric acid level and blood pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. This research is descriptive analytic research with a cross sectional design included 50 diabetic subjects aged over 40 years old. Subjects picked by consecutive sampling then we examined the weight, height, waist size, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and serum uric acid level. Statistical analysis using chi-square found that there was no significant association between serum uric acid level and systole and diastole pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (p>0.005).

  20. Visit-to-Visit Variability in Blood Pressure and Kidney and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMullan, Ciaran J; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    -to-visit variability was calculated from the SD of the systolic blood pressure from 4 visits occurring 3-12 months postrandomization. OUTCOMES: The kidney disease outcome was defined as time to confirmed doubling of serum creatinine level, end-stage renal disease, or death; the cardiovascular outcome was defined......BACKGROUND: Increased systolic blood pressure variability between outpatient visits is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular end points. However, few studies have examined the association of visit-to-visit variability in systolic blood pressure with clinically relevant kidney...... disease outcomes. We analyzed the association of systolic blood pressure visit-to-visit variability with renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among individuals with diabetes and nephropathy. STUDY DESIGN: Observational analysis of IDNT (Irbesartan Diabetic Nephropathy Trial) and the RENAAL...

  1. Renal embolic protection devices improve blood flow after stenting for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Timir K; Lee, John H; White, Christopher J

    2012-11-15

    We sought to measure angiographic renal frame counts (RFC), as a quantitative angiographic assessment of renal blood flow, to evaluate microvascular compromise due to atheroembolism associated with RAS. Atheroembolism associated with renal artery stenting (RAS) has been implicated as a cause for worsening renal function following successful intervention. Use of a distal embolic protection device (EPD) during RAS has been shown to be safe with debris capture in a high percentage of cases. However, objective benefit for renal function with EPD has been difficult to demonstrate. A control group of 30 consecutive patients (33 kidneys) who underwent RAS without EPD were compared with 33 consecutive patients (33 kidneys) who underwent RAS with EPD using RFC measurement. The prestent and poststent mean RFC for the control group was 30.4 ± 12.1 vs. 23.7 ± 9.9 (P = 0.002) and for the EPD group it was 42.6 ± 12.6 vs. 28.3 ± 9.2 (P renal blood flow, manifested by a greater reduction of the RFC (Δ RFC) 14.2 ± 15.2 vs. 6.7 ± 11.7 (P = 0.03) compared with the control group. The use of an EPD was associated with a much larger improvement in renal blood flow (lower RFC) following RAS. This suggests that EPD's may be effective in preventing renal atheroembolic injury and that a controlled trial measuring the impact of EPD's on renal blood flow following RAS should be performed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafrani, Lara; Ergin, Bulent; Kapucu, Aysegul; Ince, Can

    2016-01-01

    The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Twenty-seven Wistar albino rats were randomized into

  3. Enhancing patient engagement and blood pressure management for renal transplant recipients via home electronic monitoring and web-enabled collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberger, Edward W; Migliozzi, Daniel; Follick, Michael J; Malick, Tom; Ahern, David K

    2014-09-01

    Effective management of hypertension in chronic kidney disease and renal transplantation is a clinical priority and has societal implications in terms of preserving and optimizing the value of scarce organs. However, hypertension is optimally managed in only 37% of people with chronic kidney disease, and poor control can contribute to premature graft loss in renal transplant recipients. This article describes a telehealth system that incorporates home electronic blood pressure (BP) monitoring and uploading to a patient portal coupled with a Web-based dashboard that enables clinical pharmacist collaborative care in a renal transplant clinic. The telehealth system was developed and implemented as a quality improvement initiative in a renal transplant clinic in a large, 700-bed, urban hospital with the aim of improving BP in posttransplant patients. A convenience sample of 66 posttransplant patients was recruited by the clinical pharmacist from consecutive referrals to the Transplant Clinic. Preliminary results show statistically significant reductions in average systolic and diastolic BP of 6.0 mm Hg and 3.0 mm Hg, respectively, at 30 days after enrollment. Two case reports describe the instrumental role of home BP monitoring in the context of medication therapy management. Optimizing BP control for both pre- and post-renal transplant patients is likely to benefit society in terms of preserving scarce resources and reducing healthcare costs due to premature graft failure. Connected health systems hold great promise for supporting team-based care and improved health outcomes.

  4. Low Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem. Sometimes blood pressure that is too low can also cause problems. Blood pressure is the ... reading is 90/60 or lower, you have low blood pressure. Some people have low blood pressure ...

  5. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...... hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...... nephropathy, effective blood pressure lowering is of paramount importance, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are agents of choice Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6/15...

  6. Renal denervation: Results of a single-center cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetkens, J.A.; Thomas, D.; Doerner, J.; Schild, H.H.; Naehle, C.P.; Woitas, R.P.; Hundt, F.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of renal denervation on office-based and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM) in a highly selective patient population with drug-resistant hypertension. Patients with drug resistant hypertension eligible for renal denervation were included in the study population. Office blood pressure and ABPM were assessed prior to and after renal denervation. To detect procedure related renal or renal artery damage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography (MRA) were performed pre-interventional, one day post-interventional, and one month after renal denervation. Mean follow-up time between renal denervation and blood pressure re-assessment was 9.5 ± 3.9 months. Between August 2011 and March 2013, 17 patients prospectively underwent renal denervation. Pre-interventional mean office blood pressure and ABPM were 177.3 ± 20.3/103.8 ± 20.4 mmHg and 155.2 ± 20.5/93.7 ± 14.5 mmHg, respectively. Post-interventional, office blood pressure was significantly reduced to 144.7 ± 14.9/89.5 ± 12.1 (p 0.05). The number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs was unchanged after renal denervation (4.7 ± 2.0 vs. 4.2 ± 1.2, p = 0.18). No renovascular complications were detected in follow-up MRI. After renal denervation, no significant decrease in ABPM was observed. These results may indicate a limited impact of renal denervation for drug resistant hypertension.

  7. Expression of renin-angiotensin system signalling compounds in maternal protein-restricted rats: effect on renal sodium excretion and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Flávia Fernandes; Gontijo, José Antonio Rocha; Boer, Patrícia Aline

    2010-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction due to low maternal dietary protein during pregnancy is associated with retardation of foetal growth, renal alterations and adult hypertension. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a coordinated hormonal cascade in the control of cardiovascular, renal and adrenal function that governs body fluid and electrolyte balance, as well as arterial pressure. In the kidney, all the components of the renin-angiotensin system including angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors are expressed locally during nephrogenesis. Hence, we investigated whether low protein diet intake during pregnancy altered kidney and adrenal expression of AT1(R) and AT2(R) receptors, their pathways and if the modified expression of the RAS compounds occurs associated with changes in urinary sodium and in arterial blood pressure in sixteen-week-old males' offspring of the underfed group. The pregnancy dams were divided in two groups: with normal protein diet (pups named NP) (17% protein) or low protein diet (pups LP) (6% protein) during all pregnancy. The present data confirm a significant enhancement in arterial pressure in the LP group. Furthermore, the study showed a significantly decreased expression of RAS pathway protein and Ang II receptors in the kidney and an increased expression in the adrenal of LP rats. The detailed immunohistochemical analysis of RAS signalling proteins in the kidney confirm the immunoblotting results for both groups. The present investigation also showed a pronounced decrease in fractional urinary sodium excretion in maternal protein-restricted offspring, compared with the NP age-matched group. This occurred despite unchanged creatinine clearance. The current data led us to hypothesize that foetal undernutrition could be associated with decreased kidney expression of AT(R) resulting in the inability of renal tubules to handle the hydro-electrolyte balance, consequently causing arterial hypertension.

  8. Daily rhythms in renal blood flow and urine production rate in the near-term sheep fetus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, FMI; Aarnoudse, JG

    Daily rhythmicity of renal blood flow (RBF) and urine flow (UF) was studied in fetal sheep between 121-125 d of gestation. Fetal arterial blood pressure, heart rate, UF, and right RBF were measured continuously for 24-h periods in 10 sheep, Rhythmic variations during a 24-h period were found for all

  9. Eligibility for renal denervation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persu, Alexandre; Jin, Yu; Baelen, Marie

    2014-01-01

    -resistant hypertension (ENCOReD). The analysis included 731 patients. Age averaged 61.6 years, office blood pressure at screening was 177/96 mm Hg, and the number of blood pressure-lowering drugs taken was 4.1. Specialists referred 75.6% of patients. The proportion of patients eligible for renal denervation according...... undetected secondary causes of hypertension (11.1%). In conclusion, after careful screening and treatment adjustment at hypertension expert centers, only ≈40% of patients referred for renal denervation, mostly by specialists, were eligible for the procedure. The most frequent cause of ineligibility...... (approximately half of cases) was blood pressure normalization after treatment adjustment by a hypertension specialist. Our findings highlight that hypertension centers with a record in clinical experience and research should remain the gatekeepers before renal denervation is considered....

  10. Renal sympathetic nerve ablation for treatment-resistant hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krum, Henry; Schlaich, Markus; Sobotka, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for increased cardiovascular events with accelerated sympathetic nerve activity implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of disease. Blood pressure is not adequately controlled in many patients, despite the availability of effective pharmacotherapy. Novel procedure- as well as device-based strategies, such as percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve denervation, have been developed to improve blood pressure in these refractory patients. Renal sympathetic denervation not only reduces blood pressure but also renal as well as systemic sympathetic nerve activity in such patients. The reduction in blood pressure appears to be sustained over 3 years after the procedure, which suggests absence of re-innervation of renal sympathetic nerves. Safety appears to be adequate. This approach may also have potential in other disorders associated with enhanced sympathetic nerve activity such as congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome. This review will focus on the current status of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve denervation, clinical efficacy and safety outcomes and prospects beyond refractory hypertension. PMID:23819768

  11. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD). Renal imaging. Concepts and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissen, Johanna C.; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J.

    2010-01-01

    Many renal diseases as well as several pharmacons cause a change in renal blood flow and/or renal oxygenation. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging takes advantage of local field inhomogeneities and is based on a T2 * -weighted sequence. BOLD is a non-invasive method allowing an estimation of the renal, particularly the medullary oxygenation, and an indirect measurement of blood flow without administration of contrast agents. Thus, effects of different drugs on the kidney and various renal diseases can be controlled and observed. This work will provide an overview of the studies carried out so far and identify ways how BOLD can be used in clinical studies. (orig.)

  12. Endpoint design for future renal denervation trials - Novel implications for a new definition of treatment response to renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Thomas; Nahler, Alexander; Rohla, Miklos; Reiter, Christian; Grund, Michael; Kammler, Jürgen; Blessberger, Hermann; Kypta, Alexander; Kellermair, Jörg; Schwarz, Stefan; Starnawski, Jennifer A; Lichtenauer, Michael; Weiss, Thomas W; Huber, Kurt; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-10-01

    Defining an adequate endpoint for renal denervation trials represents a major challenge. A high inter-individual and intra-individual variability of blood pressure levels as well as a partial or total non-adherence on antihypertensive drugs hamper treatment evaluations after renal denervation. Blood pressure measurements at a single point in time as used as primary endpoint in most clinical trials on renal denervation, might not be sufficient to discriminate between patients who do or do not respond to renal denervation. We compared the traditional responder classification (defined as systolic 24-hour blood pressure reduction of -5mmHg six months after renal denervation) with a novel definition of an ideal respondership (based on a 24h blood pressure reduction at no point in time, one, or all follow-up timepoints). We were able to re-classify almost a quarter of patients. Blood pressure variability was substantial in patients traditionally defined as responders. On the other hand, our novel classification of an ideal respondership seems to be clinically superior in discriminating sustained from pseudo-response to renal denervation. Based on our observations, we recommend that the traditional response classification should be reconsidered and possibly strengthened by using a composite endpoint of 24h-BP reductions at different follow-up-visits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Renal blood flow in sepsis: a complex issue

    OpenAIRE

    Molitoris, Bruce A

    2005-01-01

    The clinical complexity of sepsis and the regional variability in renal blood flow present a difficult challenge for the clinician or investigator in understanding the role and clinical importance of reduced blood flow in the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced acute renal failure. Understanding the role of regional microvasculature flow and interactions between endothelium and white blood cells in the local delivery of oxygen and substrates is of critical importance. Therefore, measuring total...

  14. The impact of intrarenal nitric oxide synthase inhibition on renal blood flow and function in mild and severe hyperdynamic sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ken; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2011-04-01

    In experimental hyperdynamic sepsis, renal function deteriorates despite renal vasodilatation and increased renal blood flow. Because nitric oxide is increased in sepsis and participates in renal blood flow control, we investigated the effects of intrarenal Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nonspecific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, in mild and severe sepsis. Prospective crossover and randomized control interventional studies. University-affiliated research institute. Thirty-two merino ewes. Examination of responses to intrarenal infusion of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester for 8 hrs in unilaterally nephrectomized normal sheep and in sheep administered Escherichia coli. : In normal sheep, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester decreased renal blood flow (301 ± 30 to 228 ± 26 mL/min) and creatinine clearance (40.0 ± 5.8 to 31.1 ± 2.8 mL/min), whereas plasma creatinine increased, but fractional excretion of sodium was unchanged. In sheep with nonhypotensive hyperdynamic sepsis, plasma creatinine increased and there were decreases in creatinine clearance (34.5 ± 4.6 to 20.1 ± 3.7 mL/min) and fractional excretion of sodium despite increased renal blood flow. Infusion of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester normalized renal blood flow and increased urine output, but creatinine clearance did not improve and plasma creatinine and fractional excretion of sodium increased. In sheep with severe hypotensive sepsis, creatinine clearance decreased further (31.1 ± 5.4 to 16.0 ± 1.7 mL/min) despite increased renal blood flow. Infusion of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester restored mean arterial pressure and reduced renal blood flow but did not improve plasma creatinine or creatinine clearance. In hyperdynamic sepsis, with or without hypotension, creatinine clearance decreased despite increasing renal blood flow. Intrarenal Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester infusion reduced renal blood flow but did not improve creatinine clearance. These data indicate that septic acute kidney

  15. Perinatal development and adult blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ashton

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence supports the concept of fetal programming in cardiovascular disease in man, which asserts that an insult experienced in utero exerts a long-term influence on cardiovascular function, leading to disease in adulthood. However, this hypothesis is not universally accepted, hence animal models may be of value in determining potential physiological mechanisms which could explain how fetal undernutrition results in cardiovascular disease in later life. This review describes two major animal models of cardiovascular programming, the in utero protein-restricted rat and the cross-fostered spontaneously hypertensive rat. In the former model, moderate maternal protein restriction during pregnancy induces an increase in offspring blood pressure of 20-30 mmHg. This hypertensive effect is mediated, in part, by fetal exposure to excess maternal glucocorticoids as a result of a deficiency in placental 11-ß hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Furthermore, nephrogenesis is impaired in this model which, coupled with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, could also contribute to the greater blood pressure displayed by these animals. The second model discussed is the cross-fostered spontaneously hypertensive rat. Spontaneously hypertensive rats develop severe hypertension without external intervention; however, their adult blood pressure may be lowered by 20-30 mmHg by cross-fostering pups to a normotensive dam within the first two weeks of lactation. The mechanisms responsible for this antihypertensive effect are less clear, but may also involve altered renal function and down-regulation of the renin-angiotensin system. These two models clearly show that adult blood pressure is influenced by exposure to one of a number of stimuli during critical stages of perinatal development.

  16. Diurnal blood pressure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, Kei; Satoh, Michihiro; Kikuya, Masahiro

    2018-05-23

    The definition of diurnal blood pressure changes varies widely, which can be confusing. Short-term blood pressure variability during a 24-h period and the dipping status of diurnal blood pressure can be captured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and these metrics are reported to have prognostic significance for cardiovascular complications. Morning blood pressure surge also indicates this risk, but its effect may be limited to populations with specific conditions. Meanwhile, the combined use of conventional office blood pressure and out-of-office blood pressure allows us to identify people with white-coat and masked hypertension. Current home devices can measure nocturnal blood pressure during sleep more conveniently than ambulatory monitoring; however, we should pay attention to blood pressure measurement conditions regardless of whether they are in a home, ambulatory, or office setting. The relatively poor reproducibility of diurnal blood pressure changes, including the nocturnal fall of blood pressure, is another underestimated issue to be addressed. Although information on diurnal blood pressure changes is expected to be used more effectively in the future, we should also keep in mind that blood pressure levels have remained central to the primary and secondary prevention of blood pressure-related cardiovascular diseases in clinical practice.

  17. Noninvasive measurement of an index of renal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, T.A.; Rees, R.S.; Bowen, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for the noninvasive measurement of an index of renal blood flow is described. The method utilizes ultrasound determined renal volume and radionuclide assessment of the mean transit time of a pertechnetate bolus through the kidneys. From this information a value for flow is calculated according to compartmental analysis principles. There is good correlation between renal blood flow estimated by this technique and that determined by microsphere injection

  18. Evaluation of the Levels of Renal Indices and Blood Pressure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ), it was revealed that diabetes ... function and blood pressure measurements in type 2 ... using a mercury sphygmomanometer, with the ... was determined by the diacetyl monoxime method as ... The formula takes into account various factors.

  19. Device-based approaches for renal nerve ablation for hypertension and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Ann Thorp

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Animal and human studies have demonstrated that chronic activation of renal sympathetic nerves is critical in the pathogenesis and perpetuation of treatment-resistant hypertension. Bilateral renal denervation has emerged as a safe and effective, non-pharmacological treatment for resistant hypertension that involves the selective ablation of efferent and afferent renal nerves to lower blood pressure. However, the most recent and largest randomized controlled trial failed to confirm the primacy of renal denervation over a sham procedure, prompting widespread re-evaluation of the therapy’s efficacy. Disrupting renal afferent sympathetic signalling to the hypothalamus with renal denervation lowers central sympathetic tone, which has the potential to confer additional clinical benefits beyond blood pressure control. Specifically, there has been substantial interest in the use of renal denervation as either a primary or adjunct therapy in pathological conditions characterized by central sympathetic over-activity such as renal disease, heart failure and metabolic-associated disorders. Recent findings from pre-clinical and proof-of–concept studies appear promising with renal denervation shown to confer cardiovascular and metabolic benefits, largely independent of changes in blood pressure. This review explores the pathological rationale for targeting sympathetic renal nerves for blood pressure control. Latest developments in renal nerve ablation modalities designed to improve procedural success are discussed along with prospective findings on the efficacy of renal denervation to lower blood pressure in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. Preliminary evidence in support of renal denervation as a possible therapeutic option in disease states characterized by central sympathetic over-activity is also presented.

  20. Device-based approaches for renal nerve ablation for hypertension and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Alicia A.; Schlaich, Markus P.

    2015-01-01

    Animal and human studies have demonstrated that chronic activation of renal sympathetic nerves is critical in the pathogenesis and perpetuation of treatment-resistant hypertension. Bilateral renal denervation has emerged as a safe and effective, non-pharmacological treatment for resistant hypertension that involves the selective ablation of efferent and afferent renal nerves to lower blood pressure. However, the most recent and largest randomized controlled trial failed to confirm the primacy of renal denervation over a sham procedure, prompting widespread re-evaluation of the therapy's efficacy. Disrupting renal afferent sympathetic signaling to the hypothalamus with renal denervation lowers central sympathetic tone, which has the potential to confer additional clinical benefits beyond blood pressure control. Specifically, there has been substantial interest in the use of renal denervation as either a primary or adjunct therapy in pathological conditions characterized by central sympathetic overactivity such as renal disease, heart failure and metabolic-associated disorders. Recent findings from pre-clinical and proof-of-concept studies appear promising with renal denervation shown to confer cardiovascular and metabolic benefits, largely independent of changes in blood pressure. This review explores the pathological rationale for targeting sympathetic renal nerves for blood pressure control. Latest developments in renal nerve ablation modalities designed to improve procedural success are discussed along with prospective findings on the efficacy of renal denervation to lower blood pressure in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. Preliminary evidence in support of renal denervation as a possible therapeutic option in disease states characterized by central sympathetic overactivity is also presented. PMID:26217232

  1. Device-based approaches for renal nerve ablation for hypertension and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Alicia A; Schlaich, Markus P

    2015-01-01

    Animal and human studies have demonstrated that chronic activation of renal sympathetic nerves is critical in the pathogenesis and perpetuation of treatment-resistant hypertension. Bilateral renal denervation has emerged as a safe and effective, non-pharmacological treatment for resistant hypertension that involves the selective ablation of efferent and afferent renal nerves to lower blood pressure. However, the most recent and largest randomized controlled trial failed to confirm the primacy of renal denervation over a sham procedure, prompting widespread re-evaluation of the therapy's efficacy. Disrupting renal afferent sympathetic signaling to the hypothalamus with renal denervation lowers central sympathetic tone, which has the potential to confer additional clinical benefits beyond blood pressure control. Specifically, there has been substantial interest in the use of renal denervation as either a primary or adjunct therapy in pathological conditions characterized by central sympathetic overactivity such as renal disease, heart failure and metabolic-associated disorders. Recent findings from pre-clinical and proof-of-concept studies appear promising with renal denervation shown to confer cardiovascular and metabolic benefits, largely independent of changes in blood pressure. This review explores the pathological rationale for targeting sympathetic renal nerves for blood pressure control. Latest developments in renal nerve ablation modalities designed to improve procedural success are discussed along with prospective findings on the efficacy of renal denervation to lower blood pressure in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. Preliminary evidence in support of renal denervation as a possible therapeutic option in disease states characterized by central sympathetic overactivity is also presented.

  2. Effects of combination treatment with losartan and trandolapril on office and ambulatory blood pressures in non-diabetic renal disease: a COOPERATE-ABP substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Naoyuki; Seno, Hachiro; Kasuga, Hirotake; Toriyama, Takanobu; Kawahara, Hirohisa; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2004-01-01

    In the COOPERATE trial, the combination treatment of the angiotensin-II receptor blocker losartan and the angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor trandolapril significantly retarded progression of non-diabetic kidney disease compared with each monotherapy. The benefit could be greatly attributable to the potent reduction of proteinuria, because the three treatment groups showed the same reductions of office blood pressure (OBP). Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) is reported to be better than OBP in predicting progression of kidney disease. Ninety-two patients enrolled in the COOPERATE trial underwent 24-hour ABP monitoring at randomization and at month 6, year 1, year 2 and year 3 on randomized treatment. Both OBP and ABP were similarly reduced among the three groups at all measurement points (p = NS) and throughout the whole study period (p = NS). No significant correlation between the change in 24-hour ABP and the change in proteinuria was seen (p = NS). A Cox-multivariable analysis showed that covariates affecting the renal outcomes (a doubling serum-Cr level and/or end-stage renal failure) were the change in proteinuria (hazard ratio 0.49, 95% CI 0.34-0.78, p = 0.01) and treatments (0.58, 0.45-0.99, 0.03), but not 24-hour ABP (0.98, 0.89-2.01, 0.17). The better renoprotective effect of the combination treatment is attributed to BP-independent mechanisms by more complete renin-angiotensin system blockade. 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Renal denervation: unde venis et quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nähle, C P; Düsing, R; Schild, H

    2015-04-01

    Renal denervation is a minimally invasive, catheter-based option for the treatment of refractory hypertension. Indications and contraindications for renal denervation have been defined in an interdisciplinary manner. The efficacy and safety of the procedure were evaluated. Currently, indication for renal denervation is limited to patients with primary hypertension and a systolic blood pressure of ≥ 160 mm Hg (or ≥ 150 mm Hg in diabetes type 2) despite optimal medical therapy with ≥ 3 different antihypertensive drugs. In this specific patient population, an average blood pressure reduction of 32/14 mmHg was observed in non-randomized/-controlled trials after renal denervation. These results were not confirmed in the first randomized controlled trial with a non-significantly superior blood pressure reduction of 14.1 ± 23.9 mm Hg compared to controls (-11.74 ± 25.94 mm Hg, difference -2.39 mm Hg p = 0.26 for superiority with a margin of 5 mm Hg) who underwent a sham procedure. The efficacy and long-term effects of renal denervation need to be re-evaluated in light of the HTN3 study results. To date, renal denervation should not be performed outside of clinical trials. Future trials should also assess if renal denervation can be performed with sufficient safety and efficacy in patients with hypertension-associated diseases. The use of renal denervation as an alternative therapy (e. g. in patients with drug intolerance) can currently not be advocated. The indication for renal denervation should be assessed in an interdisciplinary fashion and according to current guidelines with a special focus on ruling out secondary causes for arterial hypertension. 5 - 10 % of patients with hypertension suffer from refractory hypertension, but only about 1 % of patients meet the criteria for a renal denervation. Renal denervation leads to a significant decrease in office blood pressure; however, the impact on 24-hour blood pressure

  4. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  5. Role of the renin-angiotensin system in regulation and autoregulation of renal blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Leyssac, Paul Peter; Skøtt, Ole

    2000-01-01

    The role for ANG II in renal blood flow (RBF) autoregulation is unsettled. The present study was designed to test the effect of clamping plasma ANG II concentrations ([ANG II]) by simultaneous infusion of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril and ANG II on RBF autoregulation...... in halothane-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Autoregulation was defined as the RBF response to acute changes in renal perfusion pressure (RPP). Regulation was defined as changes in RBF during long-lasting changes in RPP. The results showed that a prolonged reduction of RPP reset the lower limit...

  6. Analysis of interaction between TGF and the myogenic response in renal blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldberg, R; Colding-Jørgensen, M; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1995-01-01

    . The contribution of TGF to smooth muscle activity is assumed to be a linear function of the glomerular capillary pressure. The results show that the myogenic response plays an important role in renal blood flow autoregulation. Without a myogenic response, mechanisms such as TGF that are localized in the distal......The present study investigates the interaction between the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) response and the myogenic mechanism by use of a mathematical model. The two control mechanisms are implemented in a spatially distributed model of the rat renal juxtamedullary afferent arteriole. The model...

  7. Effects of reducing blood pressure on renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes: Focus on SGLT2 inhibitors and EMPA-REG OUTCOME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J; Delanaye, P

    2017-04-01

    Empagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, has enabled remarkable reductions in cardiovascular and all-cause mortality as well as in renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and a history of cardiovascular disease in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME. These results have been attributed to haemodynamic rather than metabolic effects, in part due to the osmotic/diuretic action of empagliflozin and the reduction in arterial blood pressure (BP). The present narrative review includes the results of meta-analyses of trials evaluating the effects on renal outcomes of lowering BP in patients with T2D, with a special focus on the influence of baseline and achieved systolic BP, and compares the renal outcome results of the EMPA-REG OUTCOME with those of other major trials with inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system in patients with T2D and the preliminary findings with other SGLT2 inhibitors, and also evaluates post hoc analyses from the EMPA-REG OUTCOME of special interest as regards the BP-lowering hypothesis and renal function. While systemic BP reduction associated to empagliflozin therapy may have contributed to the renal benefits reported in EMPA-REG OUTCOME, other local mechanisms related to kidney homoeostasis most probably also played a role in the overall protection observed in the trial. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow and Oxygenation in CKD Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatir, Dinah S; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Buus, Niels H

    2015-09-01

    Animal studies suggest that progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is related to renal hypoxia. With renal blood supply determining oxygen delivery and sodium absorption being the main contributor to oxygen consumption, we describe the relationship between renal oxygenation, renal artery blood flow, and sodium absorption in patients with CKD and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study. 62 stable patients with CKD stages 3 to 4 (mean age, 61±13 [SD] years) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. CKD versus control status. Renal artery blood flow, tissue oxygenation (relative changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration of the renal medulla [MR2*] and cortex [CR2*]), and sodium absorption. Renal artery blood flow was determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); MR2* and CR2* were determined by blood oxygen level-dependent MRI. Ultrafiltered and reabsorbed sodium were determined from measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR) and 24-hour urine collections. mGFR in patients was 37% that of controls (36±15 vs 97±23 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P renal artery blood flow was 72% that of controls (319 vs 443 mL/min; P renal artery blood flow or sodium absorption. Increasing arterial blood oxygen tension by breathing 100% oxygen had very small effects on CR2*, but reduced MR2* in both groups. Only renal artery blood flow was determined and thus regional perfusion could not be related to CR2* or MR2*. In CKD, reductions of mGFR and reabsorbed sodium are more than double that of renal artery blood flow, whereas cortical and medullary oxygenation are within the range of healthy persons. Reduction in glomerular filtration fraction may prevent renal hypoxia in CKD. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The origin of extrarenal arterial blood supply of renal malignancy and its clinical value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Duanming; Tong Xiaoqiang; Song Li; Zou Yinghua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanisms of extrarenal arterial blood supply of renal malignancy for its interventional therapy. Methods: Routine abdominal aortography and selective questionable feeding arteriography were performed in 141 patients with renal malignancy. The characteristics and formation mechanisms of extrarenal arterial blood supply for renal malignancy were analyzed. Results: Of the 141 patients, extrarenal arterial blood supply of renal malignancy were found in 51 patients and there were 87 branchs. The breakthrough of renal capsule with malignancy were found in those 51 patients. No extrarenal arterial blood supply of renal malignancy was found in 90 patients, including 50 patients with and 40 patients without the renal capsule breakthrough with malignancy. The emerge of extrarenal arterial blood supply of renal malignancy were significantly different (χ 2 =31.64, P<0.01) between the patients with and without the breakthrough of renal capsule with malignancy. The origin of extrarenal arterial blood supply were correlated with the location of the tumor. Conclusions: It is important to determine the origin of the extrarenal arterial blood supply in renal malignancy for its interventional therapy. (authors)

  10. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest at night and rises sharply on waking. Blood pressure: How low can you go? What's considered low ... low blood pressure. Medications that can cause low blood pressure Some medications can cause low blood pressure, including: ...

  11. Effect of selective inhibition of renal inducible nitric oxide synthase on renal blood flow and function in experimental hyperdynamic sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ken; Calzavacca, Paolo; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bailey, Michael; May, Clive N

    2012-08-01

    Nitric oxide plays an important role in the control of renal blood flow and renal function. In sepsis, increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase produce excessive nitric oxide, which may contribute to the development of acute kidney injury. We, therefore, examined the effects of intrarenal infusion of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors in a large animal model of hyperdynamic sepsis in which acute kidney injury occurs in the presence of increased renal blood flow. Prospective crossover randomized controlled interventional studies. University-affiliated research institute. Twelve unilaterally nephrectomized Merino ewes. Infusion of a selective (1400W) and a partially selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (aminoguanidine) into the renal artery for 2 hrs after the induction of sepsis, and comparison with a nonselective inhibitor (Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). In sheep with nonhypotensive hyperdynamic sepsis, creatinine clearance halved (32 to 16 mL/min, ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.51 [0.28-0.92]) despite increased renal blood flow (241 to 343 mL/min, difference [95% confidence interval] 102 [78-126]). Infusion of 1400W did not change renal blood flow, urine output, or creatinine clearance, whereas infusion of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and a high dose of aminoguanidine normalized renal blood flow, but did not alter creatinine clearance. In hyperdynamic sepsis, intrarenal infusion of a highly selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor did not reduce the elevated renal blood flow or improve renal function. In contrast, renal blood flow was reduced by infusion of a nonselective NOS inhibitor or a high dose of a partially selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. The renal vasodilatation in septic acute kidney injury may be due to nitric oxide derived from the endothelial and neural isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, but their blockade did not restore renal function.

  12. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth / For Teens / Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) What's ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  13. Renal myogenic constriction protects the kidney from age-related hypertensive renal damage in the Fawn-Hooded rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavrinec, Peter; Henning, Robert H.; Goris, Maaike; Landheer, Sjoerd W.; Buikema, Hendrik; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.

    Introduction:Intact myogenic constriction plays a role in renal blood flow autoregulation and protection against pressure-related (renal) injury. However, to what extent alterations in renal artery myogenic constriction are involved in development of renal damage during aging is unknown. Therefore,

  14. Regional blood flows in the established stage of reduced renal mass (RRM) hypertension in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, G.J.; Lombard, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Regional blood flows were measured with 15 μm 153 Gd-labelled microspheres in 21 anesthetized (pentobarbital-50 mg/kg, i.p.) male Sprague Dawley rats 5-6 weeks after a 75% reduction in renal mass and in 6 sham operated controls (SOC). RRM rats were maintained on either a high salt (HS-RRM) diet, i.e., choice of 1% NaCl or tap water (n = 11), or on a salt-restricted (SR-RRM) diet (n = 10). Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly elevated (mean +/- SE) in the HS-RRM (168 +/- 5 mmHg) vs. either the SR-RRM (147 +/- 6 mmHg) or the SOC (138 +/- 4 mmHg). Although blood flow to the skin and femur were elevated in HS-RRM and SR-RRM relative to SOC, there were no significant differences in blood flow to skeletal muscle, spleen, liver, small intestine, stomach or testes between any of the groups. Absolute renal blood flow and renal blood flow/gm of tissue were significantly lower in HS-RRM (7.2 +/- 0.7 ml/min or 3.4 +/- 0.5 ml/min/gm) and SR-RRM (6.3 +/- 0.6 ml/min or 3.2 +/- 0.3 ml/min/gm) than in SOC (15.1 +/- 0.97 ml/min or 5.5 +/- 0.2 ml/min/gm). The present results suggest that regional blood flow is unchanged in most vascular beds during the established stage of RRM hypertension in rats

  15. Renal sympathetic nerve, blood flow, and epithelial transport responses to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thad E

    2017-05-01

    Thermal stress is a profound sympathetic stress in humans; kidney responses involve altered renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renal blood flow, and renal epithelial transport. During mild cold stress, RSNA spectral power but not total activity is altered, renal blood flow is maintained or decreased, and epithelial transport is altered consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with central volume loaded state. Hypothermia decreases RSNA, renal blood flow, and epithelial transport. During mild heat stress, RSNA is increased, renal blood flow is decreased, and epithelial transport is increased consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with a central volume unloaded state. Hyperthermia extends these directional changes, until heat illness results. Because kidney responses are very difficult to study in humans in vivo, this review describes and qualitatively evaluates an in vivo human skin model of sympathetically regulated epithelial tissue compared to that of the nephron. This model utilizes skin responses to thermal stress, involving 1) increased skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), decreased skin blood flow, and suppressed eccrine epithelial transport during cold stress; and 2) increased SSNA, skin blood flow, and eccrine epithelial transport during heat stress. This model appears to mimic aspects of the renal responses. Investigations of skin responses, which parallel certain renal responses, may aid understanding of epithelial-sympathetic nervous system interactions during cold and heat stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Twenty-Four-Hour Blood Pressure Monitoring to Predict and Assess Impact of Renal Denervation: The DENERHTN Study (Renal Denervation for Hypertension).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosse, Philippe; Cremer, Antoine; Pereira, Helena; Bobrie, Guillaume; Chatellier, Gilles; Chamontin, Bernard; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Delsart, Pascal; Denolle, Thierry; Dourmap, Caroline; Ferrari, Emile; Girerd, Xavier; Michel Halimi, Jean; Herpin, Daniel; Lantelme, Pierre; Monge, Matthieu; Mounier-Vehier, Claire; Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Ormezzano, Olivier; Ribstein, Jean; Rossignol, Patrick; Sapoval, Marc; Vaïsse, Bernard; Zannad, Faiez; Azizi, Michel

    2017-03-01

    The DENERHTN trial (Renal Denervation for Hypertension) confirmed the blood pressure (BP) lowering efficacy of renal denervation added to a standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment for resistant hypertension at 6 months. We report here the effect of denervation on 24-hour BP and its variability and look for parameters that predicted the BP response. Patients with resistant hypertension were randomly assigned to denervation plus stepped-care treatment or treatment alone (control). Average and standard deviation of 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime BP and the smoothness index were calculated on recordings performed at randomization and 6 months. Responders were defined as a 6-month 24-hour systolic BP reduction ≥20 mm Hg. Analyses were performed on the per-protocol population. The significantly greater BP reduction in the denervation group was associated with a higher smoothness index ( P =0.02). Variability of 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime BP did not change significantly from baseline to 6 months in both groups. The number of responders was greater in the denervation (20/44, 44.5%) than in the control group (11/53, 20.8%; P =0.01). In the discriminant analysis, baseline average nighttime systolic BP and standard deviation were significant predictors of the systolic BP response in the denervation group only, allowing adequate responder classification of 70% of the patients. Our results show that denervation lowers ambulatory BP homogeneously over 24 hours in patients with resistant hypertension and suggest that nighttime systolic BP and variability are predictors of the BP response to denervation. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01570777. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Association of various blood pressure variables and vascular phenotypes with coronary, stroke and renal deaths: Potential implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaoui, Brahim; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Milon, Hughes; Fauvel, Jean-Pierre; Khettab, Fouad; Mechtouff, Laura; Cassar, Emmanuel; Girerd, Nicolas; Lantelme, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular diseases has been extensively documented. However, the benefit of anti-hypertensive drugs differs according to the type of cardiovascular event. Aortic stiffness is tightly intertwined with BP and aorta cross-talk with small arteries. We endeavored to elucidate which BP component and type of vessel remodeling was predictive of the following outcomes: fatal myocardial infarction (MI), fatal stroke, renal -, coronary- or cerebrovascular-related deaths. Large vessel remodeling was estimated by an aortography-based aortic atherosclerosis score (ATS) while small vessel disease was documented by the presence of a hypertensive retinopathy. We included 1031 subjects referred for hypertension workup and assessed outcomes 30 years later. After adjustment for major risk factors, ATS and pulse pressure (PP) were predictive of coronary events while mean BP (MBP) and retinopathy were not. On the contrary, MBP was predictive of cerebrovascular and renal related deaths while ATS and PP were not. Retinopathy was only predictive of cerebrovascular related deaths. Lastly, the aortic atherosclerosis phenotype and increased PP identified patients prone to develop fatal MI whereas the retinopathy phenotype and increased MBP identified patients at higher risk of fatal stroke. These results illustrate the particular feature of the resistive coronary circulation comparatively to the brain and kidneys' low-resistance circulation. Our results advocate for a rational preventive strategy based on the identification of distinct clinical phenotypes. Accordingly, decreasing MBP levels could help preventing stroke in retinopathy phenotypes whereas targeting PP is possibly more efficient in preventing MI in atherosclerotic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Renal I-131-hippurate clearance overestimates true renal blood flow in the instrumented conscious dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, CA; DeZeeuw, D; Navis, G; VanZanten, AK; DeJong, PE; Huisman, RM

    We evaluated renal I-131-hippurate clearance (ERPF(hip)) as a measure of renal blood flow (RBF) in chronically instrumented conscious dogs. When adjusted for renal hippurate extraction (E(hip), 0.77 +/- 0.01) and hematocrit (Hct, 39.7 +/- 1%), calculated RBF(hip) (656 +/- 37 ml/min) markedly

  19. Experimental studies of renal blood flow by digitized functional angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buersch, J.H.; Ochs, C.; Hahne, H.J.; Heintzen, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    New techniques of digital image processing have been experimentally tested for the assessment of renal blood flow. The underlying principle in functional angiography is the extraction of flow parameters. Basically, density-time variations of the contrast medium are analayzed from to each picture element of a 256x256 matrix. The real-time acquisition rate of images was 25/sec. For the calculation of angiographic flow a PDP 11/40 computer was used to interactively perform a time dependent segmentation of the renal arteries and the aorta. Subsequently, volume flow was calculated in relative units for the specific vascular segments under study. 15 control angiograms were made in 5 animals with cardiac output ranging between 0.8 to 2.2l/min. Unilateral renal blood flow was calculated as 24+-3.4% of pre-renal aortic flow without systematic side differences. Reproducibility from repeated flow measurements showed an SD of +-1.8% of the individual pre-renal aortic flow. Renal flow was also measured in 3 animals with an experimentally created 50% flow reduction of the left kidney. Angiographic flow in the left renal artery dropped to 12+-2% of pre-renal flow. The present experimental data suggest that digital angiography has sufficient diagnostic capabilities for the detection of abnormal renal blood flow. The technique may serve as a useful diagnostic adjunct to conventional angiography and has the potential of assisting in the evaluation of renal vascular hypertension. (orig.) [de

  20. Improved interpretation of renal-vein-renin-ratio by simultaneous determination of renal 131I-hippuric-acid-clearance-ratio in patients with renovascular hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helber, A.; Boenner, G.; Hummerich, W.; Wambach, G.; Meurer, K.A.; Dvorak, K.; Lent, V.; Zehle, A.; Kaufmann, W.; Koeln Univ.; Staedtisches Krankenhaus Koeln-Merheim; Staedtisches Krankenhaus Koeln-Merheim; Koeln Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In patients with unilateral vascular kidney disease and hypertension, ratio of renal-vein-renin was compared with 131 I-Hippuric-acid clearance and change in blood pressure during Saralasininfusion. The ratio of renal-vein-renin was positively correlated with the ratio in renal plasma flow between the kidneys in all patients studied. The ratio of renins therefore is a result of two factors: The difference in renin secretion and the difference in blood flow in the two kidneys. In patients with angiotensin independent hypertension renin-ratios up to 2.0 were found without relevance to elevated blood pressure. When the difference in renal blood flow between both kidneys was small, even a slight difference in renal vein renin indicated hypertension related to increased renin secretion. (orig./AJ) [de

  1. Early determinants of blood pressure and renal function : follow-up of very preterm born individuals young adulcy [vroege determinanten van bloeddruk en nierfunctie : follow-up van zeer prematuur geborenen tot in young volwassenheid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer-Veen, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    In summary, the studies described in this thesis suggest that premature birth affects renal function and blood pressure at (young) adult age, and especially when born both SGA and premature. Minor differences are already detectable at young adult age. The biological mechanism is likely to originate

  2. Renal hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to urapidil in hypertensive man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Leeuw, P.W.; van Es, P.N.; de Bruyn, H.A.; Birkenhaeger, W.H.D.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the acute effects of urapidil on renal vascular tone and on pressor systems we performed a randomized placebo-controlled crossover study in 8 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension. Each subject received, on two separate days one week apart, an intravenous injection of either placebo or urapidil (25 mg, to be increased to 50 mg if blood pressure did not fall within 5 minutes). Before and following this injection we measured blood pressure and heart rate (Dinamap), renal plasma flow ( 125 I-hippuran), renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and catecholamines. The results show that urapidil, when compared to placebo, significantly reduced blood pressure, while increasing heart rate, renal blood flow, noradrenaline and adrenaline. Dopamine levels, on the other hand, were suppressed. While renin and angiotensin II were only mildly stimulated, aldosterone levels increased markedly. It is concluded that urapidil, given intravenously, has an immediate blood pressure lowering effect associated with a fall in renal vascular tone and an increase in renal perfusion. As a consequence both the sympathetic system and the renin-angiotensin system are stimulated, although the latter only to a mild degree. The rise in aldosterone may be related to withdrawal of dopaminergic tone

  3. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Jackson, Anne U.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Johnson, Toby; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Luan, Jian'an; Donnelly, Lousie A.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pihur, Vasyl; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Shungin, Dmitry; Hughes, Maria F.; Meirelles, Osorio; Kaakinen, Marika; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Kristiansson, Kati; Shah, Sonia; Kleber, Marcus E.; Guo, Xiuqing; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Fava, Cristiano; Eriksson, Niclas; Nolte, Ilja M.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Salfati, Elias L.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Theusch, Elizabeth; Smith, Andrew J.P.; Folkersen, Lasse; Witkowska, Kate; Pers, Tune H.; Joehanes, Roby; Kim, Stuart K.; Lataniotis, Lazaros; Jansen, Rick; Johnson, Andrew D.; Warren, Helen; Kim, Young Jin; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Ying; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Bochud, Murielle; Absher, Devin; Adair, Linda S.; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Axelsson, Tomas; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barnes, Michael R.; Barroso, Inês; Bevan, Stephen; Bis, Joshua C.; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnier, Michel; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Chambers, John C.; Chang, I-Shou; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chines, Peter S.; Chung, Ren-Hua; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Döring, Angela; Dallongeville, Jean; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; Delgado, Graciela; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S.F.; Drenos, Fotios; Edkins, Sarah; Eicher, John D.; Elosua, Roberto; Enroth, Stefan; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Per; Esko, Tonu; Evangelou, Evangelos; Evans, Alun; Fall, Tove; Farrall, Martin; Felix, Janine F.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Forrester, Terrence; Franceschini, Nora; Duran, Oscar H. Franco; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Fraser, Ross M.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gao, He; Gertow, Karl; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gigante, Bruna; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Gorski, Mathias; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassinen, Maija; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Jostein; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Howard, Phil; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hunt, Steven C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jensen, Richard A.; Kähönen, Mika; Kang, Hyun; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keating, Brendan J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Kim, Eric; Kivimaki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kolovou, Genovefa; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kosova, Gulum; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A; Lee, Nanette R.; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Levy, Daniel; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Kae-Woei; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Li; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Männistö, Satu; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Mach, François; Markus, Hugh S.; Marouli, Eirini; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Mijatovic, Vladan; Moilanen, Leena; Montasser, May E.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nikus, Kjell; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Ong, Ken K.; Paccaud, Fred; Palmer, Cameron D.; Parsa, Afshin; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poulter, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Rayner, N William N.W.R.; Renström, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rice, Kenneth M.; Roberts, Robert; Rose, Lynda M.; Rossouw, Jacques; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schunkert, Heribert; Sebert, Sylvain; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.; Shin, Young-Ah; Sim, Xueling; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert V.; Sosa, Maria X.; Spector, Tim D.; Stančáková, Alena; Stanton, Alice; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swift, Amy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Teumer, Alexander; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tobin, Martin D.; Tremoli, Elena; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vaez, Ahmad; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Aline; Wain, Louise V.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wilks, Rainford; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Wong, Tien Y.; Yang, Tsun-Po; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bovet, Pascal; Cooper, Richard S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Saleheen, Danish; Lee, Jong-Young; Elliott, Paul; Gierman, Hinco J.; Willer, Cristen J.; Franke, Lude; Hovingh, G Kees; Taylor, Kent D.; Dedoussis, George; Sever, Peter; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Njølstad, Inger; Schwarz, Peter EH.; Langenberg, Claudia; Snieder, Harold; Caulfield, Mark J.; Melander, Olle; Laakso, Markku; Saltevo, Juha; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Ingelsson, Erik; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hveem, Kristian; Palmas, Walter; März, Winfried; Kumari, Meena; Salomaa, Veikko; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Froguel, Philippe; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakatta, Edward G.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Franks, Paul W.; Hamsten, Anders; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Stefansson, Kari; Ridker, Paul M; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Deloukas, Panos; Morris, Andrew P.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2016-01-01

    To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target-organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66 blood pressure loci, of which 17 were novel and 15 harbored multiple distinct association signals. The 66 index SNPs were enriched for cis-regulatory elements, particularly in vascular endothelial cells, consistent with a primary role in blood pressure control through modulation of vascular tone across multiple tissues. The 66 index SNPs combined in a risk score showed comparable effects in 64,421 individuals of non-European descent. The 66-SNP blood pressure risk score was significantly associated with target-organ damage in multiple tissues, with minor effects in the kidney. Our findings expand current knowledge of blood pressure pathways and highlight tissues beyond the classic renal system in blood pressure regulation. PMID:27618452

  4. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Georg B; Ferreira, Teresa; Chasman, Daniel I; Jackson, Anne U; Schmidt, Ellen M; Johnson, Toby; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Luan, Jian'an; Donnelly, Lousie A; Kanoni, Stavroula; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pihur, Vasyl; Strawbridge, Rona J; Shungin, Dmitry; Hughes, Maria F; Meirelles, Osorio; Kaakinen, Marika; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Kristiansson, Kati; Shah, Sonia; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Fava, Cristiano; Eriksson, Niclas; Nolte, Ilja M; Magnusson, Patrik K; Salfati, Elias L; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Theusch, Elizabeth; Smith, Andrew J P; Folkersen, Lasse; Witkowska, Kate; Pers, Tune H; Joehanes, Roby; Kim, Stuart K; Lataniotis, Lazaros; Jansen, Rick; Johnson, Andrew D; Warren, Helen; Kim, Young Jin; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Ying; Tayo, Bamidele O; Bochud, Murielle; Absher, Devin; Adair, Linda S; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E; Axelsson, Tomas; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barnes, Michael R; Barroso, Inês; Bevan, Stephen; Bis, Joshua C; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Cabrera, Claudia P; Chambers, John C; Chang, I-Shou; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Ren-Hua; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Döring, Angela; Dallongeville, Jean; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; Delgado, Graciela; Dominiczak, Anna F; Doney, Alex S F; Drenos, Fotios; Edkins, Sarah; Eicher, John D; Elosua, Roberto; Enroth, Stefan; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Per; Esko, Tonu; Evangelou, Evangelos; Evans, Alun; Fall, Tove; Farrall, Martin; Felix, Janine F; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Forrester, Terrence; Franceschini, Nora; Duran, Oscar H Franco; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Fraser, Ross M; Ganesh, Santhi K; Gao, He; Gertow, Karl; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gigante, Bruna; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H; Goodarzi, Mark O; Gorski, Mathias; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassinen, Maija; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Jostein; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Howard, Phil; Hsiung, Chao A; Hunt, Steven C; Ikram, M Arfan; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jensen, Richard A; Kähönen, Mika; Kang, Hyun; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keating, Brendan J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Kim, Eric; Kivimaki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kolovou, Genovefa; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kosova, Gulum; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Levy, Daniel; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Kae-Woei; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Li; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Männistö, Satu; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Mach, François; Markus, Hugh S; Marouli, Eirini; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Mijatovic, Vladan; Moilanen, Leena; Montasser, May E; Morris, Andrew D; Morrison, Alanna C; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nikus, Kjell; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Reilly, Paul F; Ong, Ken K; Paccaud, Fred; Palmer, Cameron D; Parsa, Afshin; Pedersen, Nancy L; Penninx, Brenda W; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poulter, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rao, Dabeeru C; Rasheed, Asif; Rayner, N William N W R; Renström, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rice, Kenneth M; Roberts, Robert; Rose, Lynda M; Rossouw, Jacques; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schunkert, Heribert; Sebert, Sylvain; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shin, Young-Ah; Sim, Xueling; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert V; Sosa, Maria X; Spector, Tim D; Stančáková, Alena; Stanton, Alice; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Stringham, Heather M; Sundstrom, Johan; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tarasov, Kirill V; Teumer, Alexander; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tobin, Martin D; Tremoli, Elena; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Uusitupa, Matti; Vaez, Ahmad; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Iperen, Erik P A; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Verwoert, Germaine C; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Voight, Benjamin F; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Aline; Wain, Louise V; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wilks, Rainford; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Wong, Tien Y; Yang, Tsun-Po; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bovet, Pascal; Cooper, Richard S; Mohlke, Karen L; Saleheen, Danish; Lee, Jong-Young; Elliott, Paul; Gierman, Hinco J; Willer, Cristen J; Franke, Lude; Hovingh, G Kees; Taylor, Kent D; Dedoussis, George; Sever, Peter; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; Assimes, Themistocles L; Njølstad, Inger; Schwarz, Peter Eh; Langenberg, Claudia; Snieder, Harold; Caulfield, Mark J; Melander, Olle; Laakso, Markku; Saltevo, Juha; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Ingelsson, Erik; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hveem, Kristian; Palmas, Walter; März, Winfried; Kumari, Meena; Salomaa, Veikko; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Froguel, Philippe; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakatta, Edward G; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Franks, Paul W; Hamsten, Anders; Wichmann, H-Erich; Palmer, Colin N A; Stefansson, Kari; Ridker, Paul M; Loos, Ruth J F; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Deloukas, Panos; Morris, Andrew P; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B

    2016-10-01

    To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry, and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66 blood pressure-associated loci, of which 17 were new; 15 harbored multiple distinct association signals. The 66 index SNPs were enriched for cis-regulatory elements, particularly in vascular endothelial cells, consistent with a primary role in blood pressure control through modulation of vascular tone across multiple tissues. The 66 index SNPs combined in a risk score showed comparable effects in 64,421 individuals of non-European descent. The 66-SNP blood pressure risk score was significantly associated with target organ damage in multiple tissues but with minor effects in the kidney. Our findings expand current knowledge of blood pressure-related pathways and highlight tissues beyond the classical renal system in blood pressure regulation.

  5. Office blood pressure or ambulatory blood pressure for the prediction of cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Jeppesen, Jørgen Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To determine the added value of (i) 24-h ambulatory blood pressure relative to office blood pressure and (ii) night-time ambulatory blood pressure relative to daytime ambulatory blood pressure for 10-year person-specific absolute risks of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. Methods...... and results: A total of 7927 participants were included from the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. We used cause-specific Cox regression to predict 10-year person-specific absolute risks of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events....... Discrimination of 10-year outcomes was assessed by time-dependent area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). No differences in predicted risks were observed when comparing office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure. The median difference in 10-year risks (1st; 3rd quartile) was -0...

  6. Role of Mas receptor in renal blood flow response to angiotensin-(1-7) in ovariectomized estradiol treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Shadan; Dehghani, Aghdas; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7), is abundantly produced in kidneys and antagonizes the function of angiotensin II through Mas receptor (MasR) or other unknown mechanisms. In the current study, the role of MasR and steroid hormone estrogen on renal blood flow response to Ang 1-7 administration was investigated in ovariectomized (OV) female rats. OV female Wistar-rats received estradiol (500 μg/kg/week) or vehicle for two weeks. In the day of the experiment, the animals were anesthetized, cannulated, and the responses including mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance at the constant level of renal perfusion pressure to graded infusion of Ang 1-7 at 0, 100 and 300 ng/kg/min were determined in OV and OV estradiol-treated (OVE) rats, treated with vehicle or MasR antagonist; A779. RBF response to Ang 1-7 infusion increased dose-dependently in vehicle (Pdose <0.001) and A779-treated (Pdose <0.01) animals. However, when MasR was blocked, the RBF response to Ang 1-7 significantly increased in OV animals compared with OVE rats (P<0.05). When estradiol was limited by ovariectomy, A779 increased RBF response to Ang 1-7 administration, while this response was attenuated in OVE animals.

  7. Office blood pressure or ambulatory blood pressure for the prediction of cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Jeppesen, Jørgen Lykke; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2017-11-21

    To determine the added value of (i) 24-h ambulatory blood pressure relative to office blood pressure and (ii) night-time ambulatory blood pressure relative to daytime ambulatory blood pressure for 10-year person-specific absolute risks of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. A total of 7927 participants were included from the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. We used cause-specific Cox regression to predict 10-year person-specific absolute risks of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. Discrimination of 10-year outcomes was assessed by time-dependent area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). No differences in predicted risks were observed when comparing office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure. The median difference in 10-year risks (1st; 3rd quartile) was -0.01% (-0.3%; 0.1%) for cardiovascular mortality and -0.1% (-1.1%; 0.5%) for cardiovascular events. The difference in AUC (95% confidence interval) was 0.65% (0.22-1.08%) for cardiovascular mortality and 1.33% (0.83-1.84%) for cardiovascular events. Comparing daytime and night-time blood pressure, the median difference in 10-year risks was 0.002% (-0.1%; 0.1%) for cardiovascular mortality and -0.01% (-0.5%; 0.2%) for cardiovascular events. The difference in AUC was 0.10% (-0.08 to 0.29%) for cardiovascular mortality and 0.15% (-0.06 to 0.35%) for cardiovascular events. Ten-year predictions obtained from ambulatory blood pressure are similar to predictions from office blood pressure. Night-time blood pressure does not improve 10-year predictions obtained from daytime measurements. For an otherwise healthy population sufficient prognostic accuracy of cardiovascular risks can be achieved with office blood pressure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Efficacy of percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stent in elderly male patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Jiahui Zhao, Qingli Cheng, Xiaoying Zhang, Meihua Li, Sheng Liu, Xiaodan WangDepartment of Geriatric Nephrology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, ChinaObjectives: Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stent implantation (PTRAS has become the treatment of choice for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS. This study evaluates the long-term effects of PTRAS on hypertension and renal function in elderly patients with ARAS.Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent PTRAS in the geriatric division of a tertiary medical center during the period 2003–2010. The clinical data were extracted from the medical records of each patient. Changes in blood pressure, antihypertensive treatment, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were analyzed before and after PTRAS.Results: Eighty-six stents in 81 elderly patients were placed successfully. The average age of the patients was 76.2 years (65–89 years. Mean follow-up was 31.3 months (range 12 –49 months. There was a significant decrease in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure at the third day after the PTRAS procedure and the reduction in blood pressure was constant throughout the follow-up period until 36 months after PTRAS. However, there was no marked benefit to renal function outcome during the follow-up period. The incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy was 9.9% in this study group. The rate of renal artery restenosis was 14.8%. The survival rate was 96.3% for 4 years after the procedure.Conclusion: It is beneficial to control blood pressure in elderly patients with ARAS up to 36 months after a PTRAS procedure. However, their renal function improvement is limited.Keywords: angioplasty, hypertension, renal function, elderly, renal artery stenosis

  9. The feasibility of measuring renal blood flow using transesophageal echocardiography in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping-Liang; Wong, David T; Dai, Shuang-Bo; Song, Hai-Bo; Ye, Ling; Liu, Jin; Liu, Bin

    2009-05-01

    There is no reliable method to monitor renal blood flow intraoperatively. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and reproducibility of left renal blood flow measurements using transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac surgery. In this prospective noninterventional study, left renal blood flow was measured with transesophageal echocardiography during three time points (pre-, intra-, and postcardiopulmonary bypass) in 60 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Sonograms from 6 subjects were interpreted by 2 blinded independent assessors at the time of acquisition and 6 mo later. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility were quantified by calculating variability and intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients with Doppler angles of >30 degrees (20 of 60 subjects) were eliminated from renal blood flow measurements. Left renal blood flow was successfully measured and analyzed in 36 of 60 (60%) subjects. Both interobserver and intraobserver variability were renal blood flow measurements were good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.604-0.999). Left renal arterial luminal diameter for the pre, intra, and postcardiopulmonary bypass phases, ranged from 3.8 to 4.1 mm, renal arterial velocity from 25 to 35 cm/s, and left renal blood flow from 192 to 299 mL/min. In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, it was feasible in 60% of the subjects to measure left renal blood flow using intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. The interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of renal blood flow measurements was good to excellent.

  10. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is necessary to maintain renal blood flow during sepsis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Larissa; Galant, Letícia Selinger; Vuolo, Francieli; Guarido, Karla Lorena; Kist, Luiza Wilges; de Oliveira, Giovanna Medeiros Tavares; Pasquali, Matheus Augusto de Bittencourt; de Souza, Cláudio Teodoro; da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-12-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (ECSOD) protects nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability by decreasing superoxide levels and preventing peroxynitrite generation, which is important in maintaining renal blood flow and in preventing acute kidney injury. However, the profile of ECSOD expression after sepsis is not fully understood. Therefore, we intended to evaluate the content and gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms in the renal artery and their relation to renal blood flow. Sepsis was induced in Wistar rats by caecal ligation and perforation. Several times after sepsis induction, renal blood flow (12, 24 and 48 h); the renal arterial content of SOD isoforms, nitrotyrosine, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase (e-NOS and i-NOS), and phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (pVASP); and SOD activity (3, 6 and 12 h) were measured. The influence of a SOD inhibitor was also evaluated. An increase in ECSOD content was associated with decreased 3-nitrotyrosine levels. These events were associated with an increase in pVASP content and maintenance of renal blood flow. Moreover, previous treatment with a SOD inhibitor increased nitrotyrosine content and reduced renal blood flow. ECSOD appears to have a major role in decreasing peroxynitrite formation in the renal artery during the early stages of sepsis development, and its application can be important in renal blood flow control and maintenance during septic insult.

  11. Renal blood flow and oxygenation drive nephron progenitor differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, Christopher; Paredes, Jose; Halt, Kimmo; Schaefer, Caitlin; Wiersch, John; Zhang, Guangfeng; Potoka, Douglas; Vainio, Seppo; Gittes, George K; Bates, Carlton M; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2014-08-01

    During kidney development, the vasculature develops via both angiogenesis (branching from major vessels) and vasculogenesis (de novo vessel formation). The formation and perfusion of renal blood vessels are vastly understudied. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory role of renal blood flow and O2 concentration on nephron progenitor differentiation during ontogeny. To elucidate the presence of blood flow, ultrasound-guided intracardiac microinjection was performed, and FITC-tagged tomato lectin was perfused through the embryo. Kidneys were costained for the vasculature, ureteric epithelium, nephron progenitors, and nephron structures. We also analyzed nephron differentiation in normoxia compared with hypoxia. At embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), the major vascular branches were perfused; however, smaller-caliber peripheral vessels remained unperfused. By E15.5, peripheral vessels started to be perfused as well as glomeruli. While the interior kidney vessels were perfused, the peripheral vessels (nephrogenic zone) remained unperfused. Directly adjacent and internal to the nephrogenic zone, we found differentiated nephron structures surrounded and infiltrated by perfused vessels. Furthermore, we determined that at low O2 concentration, little nephron progenitor differentiation was observed; at higher O2 concentrations, more differentiation of the nephron progenitors was induced. The formation of the developing renal vessels occurs before the onset of blood flow. Furthermore, renal blood flow and oxygenation are critical for nephron progenitor differentiation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Effects of renal denervation with a standard irrigated cardiac ablation catheter on blood pressure and renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease and resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Márcio Galindo; Maia, George Luiz Marques; de Queiroz Carreira, Maria Angela Magalhães; Kiuchi, Tetsuaki; Chen, Shaojie; Andrea, Bruno Rustum; Graciano, Miguel Luis; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of renal denervation with a standard irrigated cardiac ablation catheter (SICAC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with refractory hypertension. Twenty-four patients were included and treated with a SICAC. Denervation was performed by a single operator following the standard technique. Patients included with CKD were on stages 2 (n = 16), 3 (n = 4), and 4 (n = 4). Data were obtained at baseline and monthly until 180th day of follow-up. Baseline values of blood pressure (mean ± SD) were 186 ± 19 mmHg/108 ± 13 mmHg in the office, and 151 ± 18 mmHg/92 ± 11 mmHg by 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Office blood pressure values at 180th day after the procedure were 135 ± 13 mmHg/88 ± 7 mmHg (P < 0.0001, for both comparisons). The mean ABPM decreased to 132 ± 15 mmHg/85 ± 11 mmHg at the 180th day after the procedure (P < 0.0001 for systolic and P = 0.0015 for diastolic). Estimated glomerular filtration (mean ± SD) increased from baseline (64.4 ± 23.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) to the 180th day (85.4 ± 34.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P < 0.0001) of follow-up. The median urine albumin:creatinine ratio decreased from baseline (48.5, IQR: 35.8-157.2 mg/g) to the 180th day after ablation (ACR = 15.7, IQR: 10.3-34.2 mg/g, P = 0.0017). No major complications were seen. The procedure using SICAC seemed to be feasible, effective, and safe resulting in a better control of BP, a short-term increase in estimated glomerular filtration rate, and reduced albuminuria. Although encouraging, our data are preliminary and need to be validated in the long term.

  13. Reassessment of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Improves Renal Risk Stratification in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-Term Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minutolo, Roberto; Gabbai, Francis B; Chiodini, Paolo; Garofalo, Carlo; Stanzione, Giovanna; Liberti, Maria Elena; Pacilio, Mario; Borrelli, Silvio; Provenzano, Michele; Conte, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Luca

    2015-09-01

    In nondialysis chronic kidney disease, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) performs better than clinic BP in predicting outcome, but whether repeated assessment of ABP further refines prognosis remains ill-defined. We recruited 182 consecutive hypertensive patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease who underwent 2 ABPs 12 months apart to evaluate the enhancement in risk stratification provided by a second ABP obtained 1 year after baseline on the risk (hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval) of composite renal end point (death, chronic dialysis, and estimated glomerular filtration rate decline ≥40%). The difference in daytime and nighttime systolic BP between the 2 ABPs (daytime and nighttime bias) was added to a survival model including baseline ABP. Net reclassification improvement was also calculated. Age was 65.6±13.4 years; 36% had diabetes mellitus and 36% had previous cardiovascular event; estimated glomerular filtration rate was 42.2±19.6 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), and clinic BP was 145±18/80±11 mm Hg. Baseline ABP (daytime, 131±16/75±10 and nighttime, 122±18/66±10 mm Hg) and daytime/nighttime BP goals (58.2% and 43.4%) did not change at month 12. Besides baseline ABP values, bias for daytime and nighttime systolic BP linearly associated with renal outcome (1.12, 1.04-1.21 and 1.18, 1.08-1.29 for every 5-mm Hg increase, respectively). Classification of patients at risk improved when considering nighttime systolic level at second ABP (net reclassification improvement, 0.224; 95% confidence interval, 0.005-0.435). Patients with first and second ABPs above target showed greater renal risk (2.15, 1.29-3.59 and 1.71, 1.07-2.72, for daytime and nighttime, respectively). In nondialysis chronic kidney disease, reassessment of ABP at 1 year further refines renal prognosis; such reassessment should specifically be considered in patients with uncontrolled BP at baseline. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Absolute renal blood flow quantification by dynamic MRI and Gd-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, J.P.; Lazeyras, F.; Khan, H.G.; Terrier, F.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of the absolute renal blood flow quantification using MRI and injection of contrast media. Using a T1-weighted fast gradient sequence following an intravenous bolus injection of Gd-DTPA, dynamic images of the kidney were obtained in patients with well-functioning native kidneys (n=7) or transplant (n=9), with significant renal artery stenosis (n=4) and with renal failure (n=7). After signal intensity calibration, the absolute renal perfusion was equal to the wash-in slope of the renal transit curve divided by the contrast medium concentration at the peak of the bolus in the aorta. The cortical blood flow was 2.54±1.16 ml/min per gram in well-functioning kidneys decreasing to 1.09±0.75 ml/min per gram in case of renal artery stenosis (p=0.04) and to 0.51 ± 0.34 ml/min per gram in case of renal failure (p<0.001). These measurements were in agreement with previous results obtained by other methods. A standard MRI imaging sequence and a simple model can provide realistic quantitative data on renal perfusion. This work justifies further studies to compare this model with a gold standard for renal blood flow measurements. (orig.)

  15. Investigation of association between donors' and recipients' NADPH oxidase p22(phox) C242T polymorphism and acute rejection, delayed graft function and blood pressure in renal allograft recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandegary, Ali; Rahmanian-Koshkaki, Sara; Mohammadifar, Mohammad-Amir; Pourgholi, Leila; Mehdipour, Mohammad; Etminan, Abbas; Ebadzadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Fazeli, Faramarz; Azmandian, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thereby induction of oxidative stress seem to be one of the major mediators of inflammatory adverse outcomes after renal transplantation. p22(phox) is a polymorphic subunit of NAD(P)H-oxidase that is critical for activation and stabilization of the enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the production of superoxide that triggers inflammatory injuries to the kidney. So in this study, the association between donors and recipients' C242T polymorphism of p22(phox) and acute rejection (AR), delayed graft function (DGF), creatinine clearance (CrCl), and blood pressure in renal-allograft recipients was studied. One hundred ninety six donor-recipient pairs were studied. The C242T polymorphism of p22(phox) was determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). According to p22 genotype, the subjects were divided in wild-type (CC) and T allele carriers (CT+TT). Transplantation outcomes were determined using acute rejection and delayed graft function criteria. The mean arterial pressure was also measured monthly after transplantation. There was a significant association between the recipients' p22(phox) polymorphism and DGF occurrence (OR=2.5, CI: 1.2-4.9, p=0.0009). No significant association was detected between donors' p22(phox) polymorphism and AR and DGF events. CrCl during the six months follow-up after transplantation was lower in the patients who received allograft from donors carrying 242T allele (B=-12.8, CI: -22.9-12.8 (-22.9 to -2.6)). Changes in the blood pressure were not different among the patients having different genotypes of p22(phox). These results suggest that the recipients' p22(phox) C242T polymorphism may be a major risk factor for DGF in renal transplantation. Moreover, the donors' 242T allele seems to affect the rate of CrCl in the renal allograft recipients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Abnormal albuminuria and blood pressure rise in incipient diabetic nephropathy induced by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Cramer

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of light to moderate dynamic work (450 kpm/min followed by 600 kpm/min during 20 min each) on the blood pressure and renal protein handling in insulin-dependent diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy (D3) (elevated baseline albumin excretion...

  17. Renal transplantant blood flow in patients with acute tubular necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huic, D; Crnkovic, S; Bubic-Filipi, L J; Grosev, D; Dodig, P; Porapat, M; Puretic, Z [Univ. Hospital Rebro, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1997-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the quantity of renal transport blood flow in patients affected by acute tubular necrosis (ATN). During the four years period two hundred and thirty-three studies were performed using {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate and {sup 131}I - OIH. Renal blood flow was calculated from the first-pass time activity curves generated over the kidney and aorta and expressed as a percentage of cardiac output (RBF/CO). Renal transplant blood flow is clearly diminished in ATN, similar as in acute rejection, and significantly related to the graft function, what means that RBF/CO value could potentially serve as a prognostic factor in the graft function recovery from ATN.

  18. [Influence of Sympathetic Denervation of the Renal Artery on the Level of Arterial Blood Pressure, Cerebral Blood Flow and Cognitive Function In Patients With Resistant Arterial Hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimova, Y N; Lichikaki, A V; Lishmanov, B Y

    2017-07-01

    To study the effect of radiofrequency ablation of renal arteries on regional cerebral blood flow and cognitive function in patients with resistant arterial hypertension (AH). Transcatheter renal denervation (TRD) was performed in 17 patients with resistant AH. Examination before and after TRD included SPECT with mTc-HMPAO, 24-hours blood pressure (BP) monitoring, and comprehensive neuropsychological testing. Fifteen patients without angiographic signs of carotid atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease and AH, neurological and psychiatric disorders were investigated as control group. Compared with control group patients with AH had decreases of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in right (by 13.5%, p=0.00002) and left (by 15.5%, p=0.0006) inferior frontal lobes, in right temporal brain region (by 11.5%, p=0.008); in right and left occipital lobes (by 8.2%, p=0.04). In 6 months after TRD we observed significant improvement of cognitive function, parameters of 24-hour BP monitoring, and rCBF. We also noted definite close interdependence between changes of rCBF, indices of 24-hours BP monitoring, and dynamics of cognitive function. Improvement of long-term verbal memory correlated with increases of rCBF in left superior frontal and right occipital regions while dynamics of mentation and attention correlated positively with augmentation of rCBF in right posterior parietal region. Changes of perfusion in inferior parts of left frontal lobe and in right occipital region correlated with dynamics of index of diurnal diastolic hypertension time (R2=0.64, p=0.001, and R2=0.60, p=0.03, respectively). Our results suggest, that in patients with resistant AH positive effect of TRD on levels of 24-hour mean BP as well as on indices of BP load leads to in augmentation of rCBF and improvement of cognitive function.

  19. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Top of Page CDC Fact Sheets Related to High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Pulmonary Hypertension Heart Disease Signs ...

  20. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  1. Ambulatory blood pressure and tubulointerstitial injury in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruhara, Kotaro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Koike, Kentaro; Kanzaki, Go; Okabayashi, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Yoichi; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Ogura, Makoto; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have been conducted to assess the ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients. This study aimed to determine the relationships between ABP and renal histopathological findings assessed using the Oxford classification (OC) and the Japanese classification (JC), which have recently established histopathological criteria for IgAN. This cross-sectional study included biopsy-diagnosed IgAN patients, in whom both a renal biopsy and ABP measurement were performed. The histopathological findings were assessed using the OC and the JC and were analyzed in relation to the ABP. A total of 111 IgAN patients were included. The score of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (T score) using the OC was a significantly associated factor with both the daytime and nighttime ABP values. In contrast, the other histopathological scores, including mesangial hypercellularity, endocapillary hypercellularity and segmental glomerulosclerosis, did not show significant associations with the ABP. The histological grade (H-grade) using the JC, which was based on the sum of injured glomeruli, was associated with the daytime ABP, but not with the nighttime ABP. The associations between the T score using the OC (%) and the daytime and nighttime ABP values were independent of age, gender, renal function, proteinuria and the use of antihypertensive medications, whereas the H-grade using the JC (%) did not show significant associations after adjusting for these clinical parameters. These results suggest that the T score using the OC is the most relevant renal histopathological parameter associated with abnormalities of circadian blood pressure in IgAN patients.

  2. Effect of additive renin inhibition with aliskiren on renal blood flow in patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Renal Dysfunction (Additive Renin Inhibition with Aliskiren on renal blood flow and Neurohormonal Activation in patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Renal Dysfunction)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroten, Nicolas F.; Damman, Kevin; Hemmelder, Marc H.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Navis, Gerjan; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Hillege, Hans L.

    AIMS: We examined the effect of the renin inhibitor, aliskiren, on renal blood flow (RBF) in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) and decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Renal blood flow is the main determinant of GFR in HFREF patients. Both reduced GFR and RBF

  3. Converting to increased Tc-99m DTPA renal flow from slight decrease in renal flow following angioplastic procedures in a patient with unequal renal artery stenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih Weijen; Mitchell, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of Tc-99m DTPA renal flow imaging has increased in importance since the introduction of catheter angioplasty. The high diagnostic accuracy and non-invasive technique as compared to digital subtraction angiography have done much to enhance its usage in the evaluation of renal functional status. This paper reports Tc-99m DTPA renal flow imaging findings before and after angioplasty in a patient with bilateral renal artery stenosis. The slight decrease in Tc-99m DTPA renal flow on the kidney before angioplasty converted to an increase in flow on the right kidney after angioplasty. Post procedural blood flow was much higher on the right, where stenosis was previously more severe. It is hypothesized that the right kidney was protected from elevated aterial pressure by its 90% arterial stenosis while the left kidney was exposed to elevated systemic blood pressure. Because of vascular damage to the unprotected left kidney, post-angioplasty blood flow was less in the left kidney than in the ischemic but protected right kidney. (orig.) [de

  4. Influence of short-term blood pressure variability on blood pressure determinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W. J.; van Goudoever, J.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Wesseling, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blood pressure variability on Riva Rocci Korotkoff blood pressure determinations, we studied the intra-arterial pressure during Riva Rocci Korotkoff determinations in 25 patients. In 50 measurements with a cuff deflation rate of 2.5 mm Hg/sec, the systolic intra-arterial

  5. Urinary albumin excretion is associated with nocturnal systolic blood pressure in resistant hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Martell-Clarós, Nieves; Ruilope, Luis M; de la Sierra, Alejandro

    2011-03-01

    Microalbuminuria is a known marker of subclinical organ damage. Its prevalence is higher in patients with resistant hypertension than in subjects with blood pressure at goal. On the other hand, some patients with apparently well-controlled hypertension still have microalbuminuria. The current study aimed to determine the relationship between microalbuminuria and both office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. A cohort of 356 patients (mean age 64 ± 11 years; 40.2% females) with resistant hypertension (blood pressure ≥ 140 and/or 90 mm Hg despite treatment with ≥ 3 drugs, diuretic included) were selected from Spanish hypertension units. Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were excluded. All patients underwent clinical and demographic evaluation, complete laboratory analyses, and good technical-quality 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was averaged from 3 first-morning void urine samples. Microalbuminuria (urinary albumin/creatinine ratio ≥ 2.5 mg/mmol in males or ≥ 3.5 mg/mmol in females) was detected in 46.6%, and impaired renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) was detected in 26.8%. Bivariate analyses showed significant associations of microalbuminuria with older age, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, increased nighttime systolic blood pressure, and elevated daytime, nighttime, and 24-hour diastolic blood pressure. In a logistic regression analysis, after age and sex adjustment, elevated nighttime systolic blood pressure (multivariate odds ratio, 1.014 [95% CI, 1.001 to 1.026]; P=0.029) and reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (multivariate odds ratio, 2.79 [95% CI, 1.57 to 4.96]; P=0.0005) were independently associated with the presence of microalbuminuria. We conclude that microalbuminuria is better associated with increased nighttime systolic blood pressure than with any other office and 24-hour ambulatory blood

  6. Comparison of two-dimensional MR angiography and microsphere measurement of renal blood flow for detection of renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, T.A.; Lorenz, C.H.; Shetty, A.N.; Holburn, G.E.; Price, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper compares depiction of the renal arteries by MR angiography to renal blood flow as determined with microspheres in a dog model of renal artery stenosis. A left renal artery stenosis was created by placement of a silk ligature. Nb-95-labeled microspheres were injected into the left ventricle and a reference blood sample was drawn. The dog was imaged in the 1.5-T MR imager with two-dimensional MR angiography sequences. The kidneys were excised, weighted, divided into sections, and counted. Two dogs were studied to date. In dog 1, left renal blood flow (RBF) was 42 mL/min/100 g and right RBF was 337 mL/min/100 g. In dog 2 left RBF was 44 mL/min/100 g and right RBF was 608 mL/min/100 g

  7. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth / For Parents / Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) What's ... High Blood Pressure) Treated? Print What Is Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)? Blood pressure is the pressure of blood against ...

  8. ORANGE JUICE AND BLOOD PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. VALIM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Blood pressure is the force of blood against artery walls. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg and recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (as the heart contracts over diastolic pressure (as the heart relaxes between beats. High blood pressure (hypertension is defined as chronically elevated high blood pressure, with systolic blood pressure (SBP of 140 mm Hg or greater, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP of 90 mm Hg or greater. High blood pressure (HBP, smoking, abnormal blood lipid levels, obesity and diabetes are risk factors for coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the US. Lifestyle modifications such as engaging in regular physical activity, quitting smoking and eating a healthy diet (limiting intake of saturated fat and sodium and increasing consumption of fiber, fruits and vegetables are advocated for the prevention, treatment, and control of HBP. As multiple factors influence blood pressure, the effects of each factor are typically modest, particularly in normotensive subjects, yet the combined effects can be substantial. Nutrition plays an important role in influencing blood pressure. Orange juice should be included as part of any low sodium diet and/or any blood pressure reducing eating plan, as it is sodium free, fat-free and can help meet recommended levels of potassium intake that may contribute to lower BP.

  9. Effect of dietary fish oil on renal function and rejection in cyclosporine-treated recipients of renal transplants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, J. J.; Bilo, H. J.; Donker, J. M.; Wilmink, J. M.; Tegzess, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    Dietary fish oil exerts effects on renal hemodynamics and the immune response that may benefit renal-transplant recipients treated with cyclosporine. To evaluate this possibility, we studied the effect of fish oil on renal function, blood pressure, and the incidence of acute rejection episodes in

  10. [Expert consensus statement on interventional renal sympathetic denervation for hypertension treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, F; Vonend, O; Bruck, H; Clasen, W; Eckert, S; Frye, B; Haller, H; Hausberg, M; Hoppe, U C; Hoyer, J; Hahn, K; Keller, T; Krämer, B K; Kreutz, R; Potthoff, S A; Reinecke, H; Schmieder, R; Schwenger, V; Kintscher, U; Böhm, M; Rump, L C

    2011-11-01

    This commentary summarizes the expert consensus and recommendations of the working group 'Herz und Niere' of the German Society of Cardiology (DGK), the German Society of Nephrology (DGfN) and the German Hypertension League (DHL) on renal denervation for antihypertensive treatment. Renal denervation is a new, interventional approach to selectively denervate renal afferent and efferent sympathetic fibers. Renal denervation has been demonstrated to reduce office systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension, defined as systolic office blood pressure ≥ 160 mm Hg and ≥ 150 mm Hg in patients with diabetes type 2, which should currently be used as blood pressure thresholds for undergoing the procedure. Exclusion of secondary hypertension causes and optimized antihypertensive drug treatment is mandatory in every patient with resistant hypertension. In order to exclude pseudoresistance, 24-hour blood pressure measurements should be performed. Preserved renal function was an inclusion criterion in the Symplicity studies, therefore, renal denervation should be only considered in patients with a glomerular filtration rate > 45 ml/min. Adequate centre qualification in both, treatment of hypertension and interventional expertise are essential to ensure correct patient selection and procedural safety. Long-term follow-up after renal denervation and participation in the German Renal Denervation (GREAT) Registry are recommended to assess safety and efficacy after renal denervation over time. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Assessing pharmacy students' ability to accurately measure blood pressure using a blood pressure simulator arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottenberg, Michelle M; Bryant, Ginelle A; Haack, Sally L; North, Andrew M

    2013-06-12

    To compare student accuracy in measuring normal and high blood pressures using a simulator arm. In this prospective, single-blind, study involving third-year pharmacy students, simulator arms were programmed with prespecified normal and high blood pressures. Students measured preset normal and high diastolic and systolic blood pressure using a crossover design. One hundred sixteen students completed both blood pressure measurements. There was a significant difference between the accuracy of high systolic blood pressure (HSBP) measurement and normal systolic blood pressure (NSBP) measurement (mean HSBP difference 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg vs NSBP 3.6 ± 6.4 mmHg; pdifference between the accuracy of high diastolic blood pressure (HDBP) measurement and normal diastolic blood pressure (NDBP) measurement (mean HDBP difference 6.8 ± 9.6 mmHg vs. mean NDBP difference 4.6 ± 4.5 mmHg; p=0.089). Pharmacy students may need additional instruction and experience with taking high blood pressure measurements to ensure they are able to accurately assess this important vital sign.

  12. Assessing Pharmacy Students’ Ability to Accurately Measure Blood Pressure Using a Blood Pressure Simulator Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ginelle A.; Haack, Sally L.; North, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare student accuracy in measuring normal and high blood pressures using a simulator arm. Methods. In this prospective, single-blind, study involving third-year pharmacy students, simulator arms were programmed with prespecified normal and high blood pressures. Students measured preset normal and high diastolic and systolic blood pressure using a crossover design. Results. One hundred sixteen students completed both blood pressure measurements. There was a significant difference between the accuracy of high systolic blood pressure (HSBP) measurement and normal systolic blood pressure (NSBP) measurement (mean HSBP difference 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg vs NSBP 3.6 ± 6.4 mmHg; pdifference between the accuracy of high diastolic blood pressure (HDBP) measurement and normal diastolic blood pressure (NDBP) measurement (mean HDBP difference 6.8 ± 9.6 mmHg vs. mean NDBP difference 4.6 ± 4.5 mmHg; p=0.089). Conclusions. Pharmacy students may need additional instruction and experience with taking high blood pressure measurements to ensure they are able to accurately assess this important vital sign. PMID:23788809

  13. Blood Pressure Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart ... kidney failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  14. Renal Denervation Using an Irrigated Catheter in Patients with Resistant Hypertension: A Promising Strategy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armaganijan, Luciana; Staico, Rodolfo; Moraes, Aline; Abizaid, Alexandre; Moreira, Dalmo; Amodeo, Celso; Sousa, Márcio; Borelli, Flávio; Armaganijan, Dikran; Sousa, J. Eduardo; Sousa, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is an important public health problem and a significant cause of cardiovascular mortality. Its high prevalence and the low rates of blood pressure control have resulted in the search for alternative therapeutic strategies. Percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation emerged as a perspective in the treatment of patients with resistant hypertension. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of renal denervation using an irrigated catheter. Ten patients with resistant hypertension underwent the procedure. The primary endpoint was safety, as assessed by periprocedural adverse events, renal function and renal vascular abnormalities at 6 months. The secondary endpoints were changes in blood pressure levels (office and ambulatory monitoring) and in the number of antihypertensive drugs at 6 months. The mean age was 47.3 (± 12) years, and 90% of patients were women. In the first case, renal artery dissection occurred as a result of trauma due to the long sheath; no further cases were observed after technical adjustments, thus showing an effect of the learning curve. No cases of thrombosis/renal infarction or death were reported. Elevation of serum creatinine levels was not observed during follow-up. At 6 months, one case of significant renal artery stenosis with no clinical consequences was diagnosed. Renal denervation reduced office blood pressure levels by 14.6/6.6 mmHg, on average (p = 0.4 both for systolic and diastolic blood pressure). Blood pressure levels on ambulatory monitoring decreased by 28/17.6 mmHg (p = 0.02 and p = 0.07 for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively). A mean reduction of 2.1 antihypertensive drugs was observed. Renal denervation is feasible and safe in the treatment of resistant systemic arterial hypertension. Larger studies are required to confirm our findings

  15. Renal Denervation Using an Irrigated Catheter in Patients with Resistant Hypertension: A Promising Strategy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armaganijan, Luciana, E-mail: luciana-va@hotmail.com; Staico, Rodolfo; Moraes, Aline; Abizaid, Alexandre; Moreira, Dalmo; Amodeo, Celso; Sousa, Márcio; Borelli, Flávio; Armaganijan, Dikran; Sousa, J. Eduardo; Sousa, Amanda [Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    Systemic hypertension is an important public health problem and a significant cause of cardiovascular mortality. Its high prevalence and the low rates of blood pressure control have resulted in the search for alternative therapeutic strategies. Percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation emerged as a perspective in the treatment of patients with resistant hypertension. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of renal denervation using an irrigated catheter. Ten patients with resistant hypertension underwent the procedure. The primary endpoint was safety, as assessed by periprocedural adverse events, renal function and renal vascular abnormalities at 6 months. The secondary endpoints were changes in blood pressure levels (office and ambulatory monitoring) and in the number of antihypertensive drugs at 6 months. The mean age was 47.3 (± 12) years, and 90% of patients were women. In the first case, renal artery dissection occurred as a result of trauma due to the long sheath; no further cases were observed after technical adjustments, thus showing an effect of the learning curve. No cases of thrombosis/renal infarction or death were reported. Elevation of serum creatinine levels was not observed during follow-up. At 6 months, one case of significant renal artery stenosis with no clinical consequences was diagnosed. Renal denervation reduced office blood pressure levels by 14.6/6.6 mmHg, on average (p = 0.4 both for systolic and diastolic blood pressure). Blood pressure levels on ambulatory monitoring decreased by 28/17.6 mmHg (p = 0.02 and p = 0.07 for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively). A mean reduction of 2.1 antihypertensive drugs was observed. Renal denervation is feasible and safe in the treatment of resistant systemic arterial hypertension. Larger studies are required to confirm our findings.

  16. Renal blood flow after selective injection of different dosages of diatrizoate into the renal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgener, F.A.; Fischer, H.W.; Weber, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristic biphasic renal haemodynamic response to diatrizoate injected into the renal artery was shown in the dog with the 133-xenon washout technique. A brief increase in renal blood flow (RBF) during the first ten seconds is followed by a more prolonged period of diminuished RBF. A dose of 4 ml. diatrizoate 60% resulted in the maximum RBF increase of 43% after ten seconds, but even 1 ml. diatrizoate raised the RBF 24%. The initial vasodilator effect of diatrizoate compares well in its extent with the most potent renal vasodilators. (orig.) [de

  17. “Transcollateral” Renal Angioplasty for a Completely Occluded Renal Artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Subash; Chadha, Davinder S.; Swamy, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function, and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However, the role of the procedure has not been fully established in the context of chronic total occlusion of renal artery. We report the successful use of this procedure in 57-year-old male patient who reported for evaluation of a recent episode of accelerated hypertension. A renal angiogram in this patient showed ostial stenosis of the right renal artery, which was filling by way of the collateral artery. Renal angioplasty for chronic total occlusion of right renal artery was successfully performed in a retrograde fashion through a collateral artery, thereby leading to improvement of renal function and blood pressure control.

  18. Cine-CT measurement of cortical renal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaschke, W.R.; Gould, R.G.; Cogan, M.G.; Sievers, R.; Lipton, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A modified indicator-dilution technique using radiographic contrast material and a cine-CT scanner was used to measure blood flow in the renal cortex of dogs. To validate this technique, CT measurements were correlated with simultaneous measurements of flow determined by radioactive microspheres. Measurements were taken during euvolemic conditions and after hemorrhage. Thirty-nine measurements were compared, covering a flow range from 1 to 7 ml min-1 g-1, and a good correlation was found between the cine-CT and microsphere results (r = 0.93; p less than 0.001). Additionally, cine-CT measurements were made of the mean transit time (MTT) of contrast material through the renal cortex, and the reciprocal of these MTT values was also well correlated to microsphere determined flow (r = 0.94; p less than 0.001). Thus, cine-CT appears to be a promising new technique for measuring renal blood flow

  19. Reinnervation following catheter-based radio-frequency renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C; Nishi, Erika E; Yao, Song T; Ramchandra, Rohit; Lambert, Gavin W; Schlaich, Markus P; May, Clive N

    2015-04-20

    What is the topic of this review? Does catheter-based renal denervation effectively denervate the afferent and efferent renal nerves and does reinnervation occur? What advances does it highlight? Following catheter-based renal denervation, the afferent and efferent responses to electrical stimulation were abolished, renal sympathetic nerve activity was absent, and levels of renal noradrenaline and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and calcitonin gene-related peptide were significantly reduced. By 11 months after renal denervation, both the functional responses and anatomical markers of afferent and efferent renal nerves had returned to normal, indicating reinnervation. Renal denervation reduces blood pressure in animals with experimental hypertension and, recently, catheter-based renal denervation was shown to cause a prolonged decrease in blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. The randomized, sham-controlled Symplicity HTN-3 trial failed to meet its primary efficacy end-point, but there is evidence that renal denervation was incomplete in many patients. Currently, there is little information regarding the effectiveness of catheter-based renal denervation and the extent of reinnervation. We assessed the effectiveness of renal nerve denervation with the Symplicity Flex catheter and the functional and anatomical reinnervation at 5.5 and 11 months postdenervation. In anaesthetized, non-denervated sheep, there was a high level of renal sympathetic nerve activity, and electrical stimulation of the renal nerve increased blood pressure and reduced heart rate (afferent response) and caused renal vasoconstriction and reduced renal blood flow (efferent response). Immediately after renal denervation, renal sympathetic nerve activity and the responses to electrical stimulation were absent, indicating effective denervation. By 11 months after denervation, renal sympathetic nerve activity was present and the responses to electrical stimulation

  20. Clinical study on influences of enteric coated aspirin on blood pressure and blood pressure variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, A-L; Chen, W-W; Huang, W-J

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the effects of oral administration of enteric coated aspirin (ASA) on blood pressure and blood pressure variability of hypertension patients before sleep. We observed 150 hypertension cases, classified as Grade 1-2, from September 2006 to March 2008. They are divided into a control group with 30 cases, ASA I group with 60 cases and ASA II group with 60 cases randomly. Subjects in the control group had proper diets, were losing weight, exercising and maintaining a healthy mentality and were taking 30 mg Adalat orally once a day. Based on the treatment of control group, patients in ASA I group were administered 0.1 g Bayaspirin (produced by Bayer Company) at drought in the morning. Also, based on the treatment of control group, patients in ASA II group were administered 0.1 g Bayaspirin at draught before sleep. The course of treatment is 3 months and then after the treatment, decreasing blood pressure and blood pressure variability conditions in three groups will be compared. Through the comparison of ASA II group with the control group, they have differences in terms of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), decreasing range of blood pressure and blood pressure variability (p sleep has synergistic effects on decreasing blood pressure of hypertension patients and improving blood pressure variability.

  1. Automated electronic monitoring of circuit pressures during continuous renal replacement therapy: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Baldwin, Ian; Zhu, Guijun; Tanaka, Aiko; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2015-03-01

    Automated electronic monitoring and analysis of circuit pressures during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has the potential to predict failure and allow intervention to optimise function. Current CRRT machines can measure and store pressure readings for downloading into databases and for analysis. We developed a procedure to obtain such data at intervals of 1 minute and analyse them using the Prismaflex CRRT machine, and we present an example of such analysis. We obtained data on pressures obtained at intervals of 1 minute in a patient with acute kidney injury and sepsis treated with continuous haemofiltration at 2 L/hour of ultrafiltration and a blood flow of 200 mL/minute. Data analysis identified progressive increases in transmembrane pressure (TMP) and prefilter pressure (PFP) from time 0 until 33 hours or clotting. TMP increased from 104 mmHg to 313 mmHg and PFP increased from from 131 mmHg to 185 mmHg. Effluent pressure showed a progressive increase in the negative pressure applied to achieve ultrafiltration from 0 mmHg to -168 mmHg. The inflection point for such changes was also identified. Blood pathway pressures for access and return remained unchanged throughout. Automated electronic monitoring of circuit pressure during CRRT is possible and provides useful information on the evolution of circuit clotting.

  2. Experimental selective elevation of renal medullary blood flow in hypertensive rats: evidence against short-term hypotensive effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bądzyńska, B; Sadowski, J

    2012-08-01

    Renal medullary blood flow (MBF) can be selectively increased by intrarenal or systemic infusion of bradykinin (Bk) in anaesthetized normotensive rats. We reproduced this effect in a number of rat models of arterial hypertension and examined whether increased perfusion of the renal medulla can cause a short-term decrease in blood pressure (BP) that is not mediated by increased renal excretion and depletion of body fluids. In uninephrectomized Sprague-Dawley rats, BP was elevated to approx. 145 mmHg by acute i.v. infusion of noradrenaline (NA) or angiotensin II (Ang II) (groups 1, 2), 2-week exposure to high-salt diet (3), high-salt diet + chronic low-dose infusion of Ang II using osmotic minipumps (4) or chronic high-dose Ang II infusion on normal diet (5). Uninephrectomized spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) were also examined (6,7). To selectively increase medullary perfusion, in anaesthetized rats, bradykinin was infused during 30-75 min into the renal medullary interstitium or intravenously. Bradykinin increased outer- and inner-medullary blood flow (laser-Doppler fluxes) by 10-20% in groups (1, 2), by 30-50% in groups (3, 4, 5) and approx. 20% in SHR (6, 7). The concurrent increase in total renal blood flow (Transonic probe) was < 3%. A minor (<3%) decrease in BP was seen only in rats acutely rendered hypertensive by NA or Ang II infusions; however, the decreases in BP and increases in medullary perfusion were not correlated. Thus, there was no evidence that in hypertensive rats, substantial selective increases in medullary perfusion can cause a short-term decrease in BP. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  3. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived short-term blood pressure variability in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concistrè, A; Grillo, A; La Torre, G; Carretta, R; Fabris, B; Petramala, L; Marinelli, C; Rebellato, A; Fallo, F; Letizia, C

    2018-04-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is associated with a cluster of cardiovascular manifestations, including hypertension, leading to increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived short-term blood pressure variability in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, in comparison with patients with essential hypertension and normotensive controls. Twenty-five patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (7 normotensive,18 hypertensive) underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring at diagnosis, and fifteen out of them were re-evaluated after parathyroidectomy. Short-term-blood pressure variability was derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and calculated as the following: 1) Standard Deviation of 24-h, day-time and night-time-BP; 2) the average of day-time and night-time-Standard Deviation, weighted for the duration of the day and night periods (24-h "weighted" Standard Deviation of BP); 3) average real variability, i.e., the average of the absolute differences between all consecutive BP measurements. Baseline data of normotensive and essential hypertension patients were matched for age, sex, BMI and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring values with normotensive and hypertensive-primary hyperparathyroidism patients, respectively. Normotensive-primary hyperparathyroidism patients showed a 24-h weighted Standard Deviation (P blood pressure higher than that of 12 normotensive controls. 24-h average real variability of systolic BP, as well as serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels, were reduced in operated patients (P blood pressure variability is increased in normotensive patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and is reduced by parathyroidectomy, and may potentially represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor in this disease.

  4. Neonatal changes in renal blood flow distribution in puppies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschinberg, L.C.; Goldsmith, D.I.; Olbing, H.; Spitzer, A.; Edelmann, C.M. Jr.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    The intrarenal distribution of blood flow was studied in 31 newborn mongrel puppies from 18 h to 70 days using xenon washout and krypton autoradiography. Mean renal blood flow increased from 0.39 +- 0.05 ml/g per min (SE) the 1st wk to 2.06 +- 0.12 ml/g per min at 6 wk. During the 1st wk of life the renal cortex was perfused homogeneously at 0.88 +- 0.19 ml/g min (SE) and accounted for 35 +- 4 percent of the renal blood flow. During the 2nd wk a narrow, rapidly perfused zone of outer cortex was identified which was perfused at 3.35 +- 0.26 ml/g per min, received 19.53 +- 5.05 percent of the total renal blood flow, and represented 15 +- 4 percent of the mass of the total cortex. The inner cortex and outer medulla at this time received 53.40 +- 4.12 percent of the flow at 1.07 +- 0.08 ml/g per min. Outer cortical flow increased with age reaching adult values by about 6 to 10 wk when the rapidly perfused area represented 40 +- 8 percent of the cortex. These changes are parallel to the results of previously reported studies with microspheres in newborn puppies and are compatible with the well-established maturational changes noted in neonates of several species. They represent the first gas-washout studies in animals during the first 6 wk of life

  5. Effect of renal venous pressure elevation on tubular sodium and water reabsorption in the dog kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, U; Amtorp, O; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1988-01-01

    of [51Cr]EDTA was used as a measure of the rate of glomerular filtration (GFR). GFR, urinary excretion rates of sodium and water, and lithium clearance were used for assessing the absolute and fractional reabsorption rates of sodium and water in the proximal as well as in more distal segments......This study was performed in order to quantify the effects of renal venous pressure (RVP) elevation on absolute and fractional reabsorption rates of sodium and water in proximal and distal segments of the nephron in dog kidneys. Renal blood flow (RBF) was measured electromagnetically. Clearance...

  6. Odors generated from the Maillard reaction affect autonomic nervous activity and decrease blood pressure through the olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lanxi; Ohata, Motoko; Owashi, Chisato; Nagai, Katsuya; Yokoyama, Issei; Arihara, Keizo

    2018-02-01

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) of rats decreases significantly following exposure to the odor generated from the Maillard reaction of protein digests with xylose. This study identified active odorants that affect blood pressure and demonstrated the mechanism of action. Among the four potent odorants that contribute most to the odor of the Maillard reaction sample, 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) and 5-methyl-2-pyrazinemethanol (MPM) decreased SBP significantly. The earliest decrease in blood pressure was observed 5 min after exposure to DMHF. Application of zinc sulfate to the nasal cavity eliminated the effect. Furthermore, gastric vagal (parasympathetic) nerve activity was elevated and renal sympathetic nerve activity was lowered after exposure to DMHF. It is indicated that DMHF affects blood pressure through the olfactory system, and the mechanism for the effect of DMHF on blood pressure involves the autonomic nervous system. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Renal Extraction and Acute Effects of Glucagon-like peptide-1 on Central and Renal Hemodynamics in Healthy Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Simonsen, Lene; Asmar, Meena

    2015-01-01

    of either GLP-1 (1.5 pmol kg-1 min-1) or saline, cardiac output was estimated non-invasively, and intra-arterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured continuously. Renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, and uptake/release of hormones and ions were measured by Fick's Principle after...... catheterization of a renal vein. The subjects remained supine during the experiments. During GLP-1 infusion, the systolic blood pressure and arterial pulse pressure both increased by 5 ± 1 mm Hg (p=0.015 and p=0.002, respectively). Heart rate increased by 5 ± 1 bpm (p=0.005) and cardiac output increased by 18...... % (p=0.016). Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate as well as clearance of sodium and lithium were not affected by GLP-1. However, plasma renin activity decreased (p=0.037), whereas plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were unaffected. Renal extraction of intact GLP-1 was 43% (p...

  8. Effect of blood pressure lowering on markers of kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2009-10-01

    Hypertension remains a common comorbidity and cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). As the number of patients with CKD grows, so does the need to identify modifiable risk factors for CKD progression. Data on slowing progression of CKD or preventing end-stage renal disease with aggressive blood pressure control have not yielded definitive conclusions regarding ideal blood pressure targets. Shifting the focus of antihypertensive therapy to alternative markers of end-organ damage, specifically proteinuria, has yielded some promise in preventing the progression of CKD. Nevertheless, proteinuria and decline in estimated GFR may represent an irreversible degree of injury to the kidney that limits the impact of any therapy. The identification and use of novel markers of kidney injury to assess the impact of antihyper-tensive therapy may yield clearer direction with regard to optimal management of hypertension in the setting of CKD.

  9. Evidence of low dimensional chaos in renal blood flow control in genetic and experimental hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, K.-P.; Marsh, D. J.; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    1995-01-01

    We applied a surrogate data technique to test for nonlinear structure in spontaneous fluctuations of hydrostatic pressure in renal tubules of hypertensive rats. Tubular pressure oscillates at 0.03-0.05 Hz in animals with normal blood pressure, but the fluctuations become irregular with chronic hypertension. Using time series from rats with hypertension we produced surrogate data sets to test whether they represent linearly correlated noise or ‘static’ nonlinear transforms of a linear stochastic process. The correlation dimension and the forecasting error were used as discriminating statistics to compare surrogate with experimental data. The results show that the original experimental time series can be distinguished from both linearly and static nonlinearly correlated noise, indicating that the nonlinear behavior is due to the intrinsic dynamics of the system. Together with other evidence this strongly suggests that a low dimensional chaotic attractor governs renal hemodynamics in hypertension. This appears to be the first demonstration of a transition to chaotic dynamics in an integrated physiological control system occurring in association with a pathological condition.

  10. Functional dilatation and medial remodeling of the renal artery in response to chronic increased blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roan, Jun-Neng; Yeh, Chin-Yi; Chiu, Wen-Cheng; Lee, Chou-Hwei; Chang, Shih-Wei; Jiangshieh, Ya-Fen; Tsai, Yu-Chuan; Lam, Chen-Fuh

    2011-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) is tightly regulated by several intrinsic pathways in maintaining optimal kidney blood supply. Using a rat model of aortocaval (AC) fistula, we investigated remodeling of the renal artery following prolonged increased blood flow. An AC fistula was created in the infrarenal aorta of anesthetized rats, and changes of blood flow in the renal artery were assessed using an ultrasonic flow probe. Morphological changes and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in the remodeled renal artery were analyzed. Blood flow in the renal artery increased immediately after creation of AC fistula, but normal RBF was restored 8 weeks later. The renal artery dilated significantly 8 weeks after operation. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and matrix metalloproteinase-2 was upregulated shortly after blood flow increase, and returned to baseline levels after 3 weeks. Histological sections showed luminal dilatation with medial thickening and endothelial cell-to-smooth muscle cell attachments in the remodeled renal artery. Increased RBF was accommodated by functional dilatation and remodeling in the medial layer of the renal artery in order to restore normal blood flow. Our results provide important mechanistic insight into the intrinsic regulation of the renal artery in response to increased RBF. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Renal cortical and medullary blood flow responses to altered NO availability in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Mads; Vafaee, Manoucher; Møller, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify regional renal blood flow in humans. In nine young volunteers on a controlled diet, the lower abdomen was CT-scanned, and regional renal blood flow was determined by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning using H(2)(15)O as tracer. Measurements were......-NMMA injection to 1.57 ± 0.17 ml·g tissue(-1)·min(-1) (P blood flow was 4.67 ± 0.31 ml·g tissue(-1)·min(-1) during control, unchanged by glyceryl nitrate, and decreased after L-NMMA [3.48 ± 0.23 ml·(g·min)(-1), P renal medullary region in which...... the measured blood flow is 1) low, 2) independent of reduction in the VOI, and 3) reactive to changes in systemic NO supply. The technique seems to provide indices of renal medullary blood flow in humans....

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 acutely affects renal blood flow and urinary flow rate in spontaneously hypertensive rats despite significantly reduced renal expression of GLP-1 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronn, Jonas; Jensen, Elisa P; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J

    2017-01-01

    to increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and increased renal blood flow (RBF). In hypertensive animal models, GLP-1 has been reported both to increase and decrease MAP. The aim of this study was to examine expression of renal GLP-1 receptors in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and to assess the effect......Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone increasing postprandial insulin release. GLP-1 also induces diuresis and natriuresis in humans and rodents. The GLP-1 receptor is extensively expressed in the renal vascular tree in normotensive rats where acute GLP-1 treatment leads...... in the kidney from SHR. However, acute intrarenal infusion of GLP-1 increased MAP, RBF, dieresis, and natriuresis without affecting heart rate in both rat strains. These results suggest that the acute renal effects of GLP-1 in SHR are caused either by extrarenal GLP-1 receptors activating other mechanisms (e...

  13. Benazepril slows progression of renal dysfunction in patients with non-diabetic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimitsu, Toshihiko; Akashiba, Akira; Kameda, Tomoko; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Ohta, Satoshi; Yoshii, Masayoshi; Minami, Junichi; Ono, Hidehiko; Numabe, Atsushi; Matsuoka, Hiroaki

    2007-06-01

    The present study examined the effects of benazepril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, on the progression of renal insufficiency in patients with non-diabetic renal disease. Fifteen patients with non-diabetic renal disease whose serum creatinine (Cr) ranged from 1.5 to 3.0 mg/dL were given either benazepril (2.5-5 mg) or placebo once daily for 1 year in a random crossover manner. In both periods, antihypertensive medications were increased if blood pressure was greater than 130/85 mmHg. Blood sampling and urinalysis were performed bimonthly throughout the study period. Blood pressure was similar when comparing the benazepril and the placebo periods (128+/-12/83+/-6 vs 129+/-10/83+/-7 mmHg). Serum Cr significantly increased from 1.62+/-0.18 to 1.72+/-0.30 mg/dL (P=0.036) during the placebo period, while there was no statistically significant increase in serum Cr during the benazepril period (from 1.67+/-0.17 to 1.71+/-0.27 mg/dL). The slope of decrease of the reciprocal of serum Cr was steeper in the placebo period than in the benazepril period (-0.073+/-0.067 vs-0.025+/-0.096/year, P=0.014). Urinary protein excretion was lower during the benazepril period than during the placebo period (0.57+/-0.60 vs 1.00+/-0.85 g/gCr, P=0.006). Serum K was significantly higher in the benazepril period than in the placebo period (4.4+/-0.5 vs 4.2+/-0.5 mEq/L, Pbenazepril therapy as a result of hyperkalemia. Long-term benazepril treatment decreased the progression of renal dysfunction in patients with non-diabetic renal disease by a mechanism that is independent of blood pressure reduction.

  14. Invasive assessment of renal artery atherosclerotic disease and resistant hypertension before renal sympathetic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribichini, Flavio; Pighi, Michele; Zivelonghi, Carlo; Gambaro, Alessia; Valvo, Enrico; Lupo, Antonio; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is emerging as a new therapeutic option for patients with severe hypertension refractory to medical therapy. The presence of a renal artery stenosis may be both a cause of secondary hypertension and a contraindication to RSD if a renal artery stent is implanted; therefore, the definition of the functional importance of a renal artery stenosis in a patient with refractory hypertension is crucial. We describe the imaging and functional intravascular assessment of an angiographically severe stenosis of the renal artery in a patient with severe refractory hypertension, by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and measurement of the translesional pressure gradient with a pressure wire. Pressure wire examination excluded any severity of the stenosis, and IVUS showed the presence of a dissected plaque that resolved spontaneously after 3 months of intensive medical therapy and high-dose statin. Subsequently the patient was treated with RSD, achieving a significant effect on blood pressure control. Intravascular imaging and functional assessment of renal artery anatomy in patients with atherosclerotic disease may prove particularly suited to patients with refractory hypertension and multilevel vascular disease who are considered for endovascular therapies, either renal artery stenting or RSD.

  15. Nitric oxide, prostaglandins and angiotensin II in the regulation of renal medullary blood flow during volume expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Carol; Llinás, María T; Rodriguez, Francisca; Moreno, Juan M; Salazar, F Javier

    2016-03-01

    Regulation of medullary blood flow (MBF) is essential in maintaining renal function and blood pressure. However, it is unknown whether outer MBF (OMBF) and papillary blood flow (PBF) are regulated independently when extracellular volume (ECV) is enhanced. The aim of this study was to determine whether OMBF and PBF are differently regulated and whether there is an interaction between nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandins (PGs) and angiotensin II (Ang II) in regulating OMBF and PBF when ECV is enhanced. To achieve these goals, OMBF and PBF were measured by laser-Doppler in volume-expanded rats treated with a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (meclofenamate, 3 mg/kg) and/or a NO synthesis inhibitor (L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 3 μg/kg/min) and/or Ang II (10 ng/kg/min). OMBF was unchanged by NO or PGs synthesis inhibition but decreased by 36 % (P blood flows to the outer medulla and renal papilla are differently regulated and showing that there is a complex interaction between NO, PGs and Ang II in regulating OMBF and PBF when ECV is enhanced.

  16. The impact of hormonal contraceptives on blood pressure, urinary albumin excretion and glomerular filtration rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atthobari, Jarir; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Visser, Sipke T.; de Jong, Paul E.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    Aim In short-term studies, hormonal contraceptives (HC) have been suggested to induce a rise in blood pressure (BP) and urinary albumin excretion (UAE), while the effect of HC in renal function (GFR) is still under debate. Data on long-term and withdrawal effects of HC use on these outcomes are,

  17. The renal transcriptome in experimental hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, S.

    2007-01-01

    The renal transcriptome in experimental hypertension The kidneys importantly determine blood pressure. Kidney dysfunction can result in hypertension, which in turn leads to renal damage. In primary hypertension the cause is unknown. The condition is polygenic, however, which genetic defects cause

  18. Types of Blood Pressure Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Nov 6,2017 Prescription blood pressure ... This content was last reviewed October 2017. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  19. Controlling your high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000101.htm Controlling your high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Hypertension is another term used to describe high blood pressure. High blood pressure can lead to: Stroke Heart ...

  20. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD). Renal imaging. Concepts and applications; Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD). Bildgebung der Nieren. Konzepte und Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, Johanna C.; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Mie, Moritz B.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (DE). Inst. fuer Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin (CKM)

    2010-07-01

    Many renal diseases as well as several pharmacons cause a change in renal blood flow and/or renal oxygenation. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging takes advantage of local field inhomogeneities and is based on a T2{sup *}-weighted sequence. BOLD is a non-invasive method allowing an estimation of the renal, particularly the medullary oxygenation, and an indirect measurement of blood flow without administration of contrast agents. Thus, effects of different drugs on the kidney and various renal diseases can be controlled and observed. This work will provide an overview of the studies carried out so far and identify ways how BOLD can be used in clinical studies. (orig.)

  1. Renal artery anatomy assessed by quantitative analysis of selective renal angiography in 1,000 patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, Lucas; Ewen, Sebastian; Tzafriri, Abraham Rami; Edelman, Elazer Reuven; Lüscher, Thomas Felix; Blankenstijn, Peter J; Dörr, Oliver; Schlaich, Markus; Sharif, Faisal; Voskuil, Michiel; Zeller, Thomas; Ukena, Christian; Scheller, Bruno; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2018-05-20

    With increasing attention to renovascular causes and targets for hypertension there arises a critical need for more detailed knowledge of renal arterial anatomy. However, a standardised nomenclature is lacking. The present study sought to develop a standardised nomenclature for renal anatomy considering the complexity and variation of the renal arterial tree and to assess the applicability of the nomenclature. One thousand hypertensive patients underwent invasive selective renal artery angiography in nine centres. Further, renovasography was performed in 249 healthy swine as a surrogate for normotensive anatomy. Anatomical parameters were assessed by quantitative vascular analysis. Patients' mean blood pressure was 168/90±26/17 mmHg. The right main renal artery was longer than the left (41±15 mm vs. 35±13 mm, prenal arteries and renal artery disease were documented in 22% and 9% of the patients, respectively. Other than exhibiting a longer left main renal artery in uncontrolled hypertensives (+2.7 mm, p=0.034) there was no anatomical difference between patients with controlled and uncontrolled hypertension. Main renal artery mean diameter was smaller in patients with impaired kidney function (GFR Renal arterial anatomy differs between sides but shows no difference between patients with and without blood pressure control. Impaired GFR was associated with small main renal artery diameter.

  2. PP108. Post-partum evaluation of the blood pressure and the kidney function in pre-eclamptic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechère-Bertschi, A; Montillier, P; Boulvain, M; Wuerzner, G; Gaspoz, J-M; Burnier, M; Irion, O P

    2012-07-01

    Recent data have shown that preeclampsia is not just a disease of pregnancy that resolves with delivery. Preeclampsia may be considered a 'risk marker' for later-life diseases, including cardiovascular and renal diseases and the metabolic syndrome. We aimed a longitudinal prospective study to analyze the renal abnormalities in the post-partum. We studied 127 post-preeclamptic women at 6 weeks post-partum. Twenty-four hour urine collection, ambulatory blood pressure and renal function were evaluated. The mean age (±SD) was 32±6years, BMI was 29.4±5.7, the race distribution was Caucasian 69%, Hispanic 14%, Black 12% and Orient 5%. Ten % were active smokers, 10% have been suffering from gestational diabetes. The mean duration of the pregnancy was 36 weeks 3/7±4. Our results show that the prevalence of hypertension defined by office blood pressure ⩾140/90 mmHg or ongoing antihypertensive treatment was 35%. The daytime ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM) was 122±16/85±11 mmHg, heart rate 84±8, and 111±20/75±11 mmHg at nighttime.Sixteen % had a daytime ABPM ⩾135/85mmHg corresponding to the definition of ambulatory hypertension. Ultrasensitive CRP was 4.9±5.1mg/ml, of them 31% had a frank elevation of the CRP >4. The glomerular filtration rate evaluated by the Gault-Cockroft equation showed a hyperfiltration with a mean value of 150±42ml/min. Eleven% had a decreased GFR post-partum period, women having suffered from a pre-eclampsia display many cardiovascular risk factors with a high prevalence of hypertension, microalbuminuria, renal hyperfiltration and elevated CRP. These women should be carefully screened, and sub-groups with the higher risk have to be targeted for prevention and treatment, and close follow-up. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Aging augments renal vasoconstrictor response to orthostatic stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christine M; Monahan, Kevin D; Drew, Rachel C

    2015-12-15

    The ability of the human body to maintain arterial blood pressure (BP) during orthostatic stress is determined by several reflex neural mechanisms. Renal vasoconstriction progressively increases during graded elevations in lower body negative pressure (LBNP). This sympathetically mediated response redistributes blood flow to the systemic circulation to maintain BP. However, how healthy aging affects the renal vasoconstrictor response to LBNP is unknown. Therefore, 10 young (25 ± 1 yr; means ± SE) and 10 older (66 ± 2 yr) subjects underwent graded LBNP (-15 and -30 mmHg) while beat-to-beat renal blood flow velocity (RBFV; Doppler ultrasound), arterial BP (Finometer), and heart rate (HR; electrocardiogram) were recorded. Renal vascular resistance (RVR), an index of renal vasoconstriction, was calculated as mean BP/RBFV. All baseline cardiovascular variables were similar between groups, except diastolic BP was higher in older subjects (P aging augments the renal vasoconstrictor response to orthostatic stress in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. The Effects of Dietary Factors on Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Lawrence J

    2017-05-01

    Evidence supports that multiple dietary factors affect blood pressure (BP). Dietary changes that effectively lower BP are weight loss, reduced sodium intake, increased potassium intake, moderation of alcohol intake, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-style and vegetarian dietary patterns. In view of the increasing levels of BP in children and adults and the continuing epidemic of BP-related cardiovascular and renal diseases, efforts to reduce BP in both nonhypertensive and hypertensive individuals are warranted. The challenge to health care providers, researchers, government officials, and the general public is developing and implementing clinical and public health strategies that lead to sustained dietary changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Renal sympathetic denervation in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Michael; Faselis, Charles; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2011-11-01

    Despite the abundance of antihypertensive drugs, resistant hypertension remains a major clinical problem. Recent technological advances render interventional management of resistant hypertension one of the hottest topics in the hypertension field. The aim of this review is to present the pathophysiologic background and the mechanisms mediating blood pressure reduction after renal sympathetic denervation, to analyze recent findings with this fascinating approach and to critically suggest future research directions. Catheter-based, ablation-induced renal sympathetic denervation was initially studied in 45 patients with resistant hypertension in a proof-of-concept study. Impressive blood pressure reductions of about 30/15  mmHg were achieved at 6 months, without serious complications. A second, controlled, randomized (but not blinded) study confirmed the results, verifying the efficacy and safety of the procedure. A recent report revealed the 2-year durability of blood pressure reduction. Data published so far indicate that ablation-induced renal denervation is a feasible, effective, and well tolerated interventional approach for the management of resistant hypertension. The groundbreaking studies of renal denervation in drug-resistant hypertension pave the way for further research in other disease conditions in which sympathetic overactivity seems to play a critical role. This initial wave of enthusiasm needs to be followed by rigorous investigation, for the proper identification of the potential and the limitations, indications, and contraindications of this approach.

  6. Heritability of blood pressure traits and the genetic contribution to blood pressure variance explained by four blood-pressure-related genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, M.J. van; Schut, A.F.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Deinum, J.; Sayed-Tabatabaei, F.A.; Yazdanpanah, M.; Isaacs, A.; Axenovich, T.I.; Zorkoltseva, I.V.; Zillikens, M.C.; Pols, H.A.; Witteman, J.C.; Oostra, B.A.; Duijn, C.M. van

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the heritability of four blood pressure traits and the proportion of variance explained by four blood-pressure-related genes. METHODS: All participants are members of an extended pedigree from a Dutch genetically isolated population. Heritability and genetic correlations of

  7. Asymmetry of renal blood flow in patients with moderate to severe hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Onna, Marieke; Houben, Alphons J. H. M.; Kroon, Abraham A.; Wierema, Thomas K. A.; Koster, Derk; van Engelshoven, Jos M. A.; de Leeuw, Peter W.

    2003-01-01

    It is generally assumed that renal blood flow is symmetric in the absence of renal artery stenosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether this is really the case. From a group of consecutive hypertensive patients who had undergone renal angiography, we selected those with patent renal

  8. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is recommended in the clinical management of children with a solitary functioning kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westland, R.; Schreuder, M.F.; Lof, D.F. van der; Vermeulen, A.; Meer, I.M. van der; Bokenkamp, A.; Wijk, J.A. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with a solitary functioning kidney are at increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease. Hypertension may be an early indicator of renal dysfunction in these patients. We determined blood pressure (BP) profiles of children with a solitary functioning kidney by using

  9. [Value of fractional flow reserve measurement in endovascular therapy for patients with Stanford B type aortic dissection complicated with renal blood flow injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xi; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangrui; Huang, Xiaoyong; Yong, Qiang; Wang, Guoqin; Huang, Lianjun

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the value of fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement on endovascular therapy for patients with renal artery stenosis. Clinical data of 12 patients with Stanford B type aortic dissection complicated with renal blood flow injury in Anzhen hospital hospitalized from May 2013 to February 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Renal artery angiography was performed and fractional flow reserve (FFR) was measured before Thoracic endovascular aortic repair. After operation, renal artery FFR was measured again, and renal artery stenting was performed in patients with FFR ≤ 0.90 or average pressure difference between proximal and distal of renal artery > 20 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) and not applied for patients with FFR > 0.90.The patients were then subsequently followed up clinically. Kidney function were measured after 1 month, and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography data were obtained at 1 and 3 months later, respectively. The FFR of 1 patient was 0.90, while the FFR of other patients were less than 0.90 before thoracic endovascular aortic repair. After the procedure,the angiography showed that the blood flow of renal artery in 8 patients were fluency, and the FFR index was over 0.90. There were 4 patients with FFR less than 0.90. After renal artery stenting, the FFR of these 4 patients were all above 0.90. Compared with pre-procedure, blood urea nitrogen ((8.84 ± 3.99) mmol/L vs. (5.18 ± 1.69) mmol/L, P = 0.011) and uric acid ((359.3 ± 77.3) µmol/L vs. (276.9 ± 108.3) µmol/L, P = 0.008) decreased significantly after 1 month, and there was no significant difference in serum creatinine (P = 0.760). Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography results showed that blood flow of renal artery were fluency after 1 month and 3 months. In patients with aortic dissection complicating renal blood flow injury, the FFR measurement is meaningful in evaluating the blood flow status of target organs and guide the endovascular revascularization.

  10. Diets containing salmon fillet delay development of high blood pressure and hyperfusion damage in kidneys in obese Zucker fa/fa rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikøren, Linn A; Drotningsvik, Aslaug; Mwakimonga, Angela; Leh, Sabine; Mellgren, Gunnar; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun A

    2018-04-01

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for cardiovascular and chronic renal diseases, affecting more than 1 billion people. Fish intake is inversely correlated with the prevalence of hypertension in several, but not all, studies, and intake of fish oil and fish proteins has shown promising potential to delay development of high blood pressure in rats. The effects of baked and raw salmon fillet intake on blood pressure and renal function were investigated in obese Zucker fa/fa rats, which spontaneously develop hypertension with proteinuria and renal failure. Rats were fed diets containing baked or raw salmon fillet in an amount corresponding to 25% of total protein from salmon and 75% of protein from casein, or casein as the sole protein source (control group) for 4 weeks. Results show lower blood pressure and lower urine concentrations of albumin and cystatin C (relative to creatinine) in salmon diet groups when compared to control group. Morphological examinations revealed less prominent hyperfusion damage in podocytes from rats fed diets containing baked or raw salmon when compared to control rats. In conclusion, diets containing baked or raw salmon fillet delayed the development of hypertension and protected against podocyte damage in obese Zucker fa/fa rats. Copyright © 2018 American Heart Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  12. Kidney Mass Reduction Leads to l-Arginine Metabolism-Dependent Blood Pressure Increase in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Samyuktha Muralidharan; Seebeck, Petra; Fingerhut, Ralph; Huang, Ji; Ming, Xiu-Fen; Yang, Zhihong; Verrey, François

    2018-02-25

    Uninephrectomy (UNX) is performed for various reasons, including kidney cancer or donation. Kidneys being the main site of l-arginine production in the body, we tested whether UNX mediated kidney mass reduction impacts l-arginine metabolism and thereby nitric oxide production and blood pressure regulation in mice. In a first series of experiments, we observed a significant increase in arterial blood pressure 8 days post-UNX in female and not in male mice. Further experimental series were performed in female mice, and the blood pressure increase was confirmed by telemetry. l-citrulline, that is used in the kidney to produce l-arginine, was elevated post-UNX as was also asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase that competes with l-arginine and is a marker for renal failure. Interestingly, the UNX-induced blood pressure increase was prevented by supplementation of the diet with 5% of the l-arginine precursor, l-citrulline. Because l-arginine is metabolized in the kidney and other peripheral tissues by arginase-2, we tested whether the lack of this metabolic pathway also compensates for decreased l-arginine production in the kidney and/or for local nitric oxide synthase inhibition and consecutive blood pressure increase. Indeed, upon uninephrectomy, arginase-2 knockout mice (Arg-2 -/- ) neither displayed an increase in asymmetric dimethylarginine and l-citrulline plasma levels nor a significant increase in blood pressure. UNX leads to a small increase in blood pressure that is prevented by l-citrulline supplementation or arginase deficiency, 2 measures that appear to compensate for the impact of kidney mass reduction on l-arginine metabolism. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  13. Interaction of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum and renal irradiation on renal function in the young and adult rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongejan, H.T.M.; Provoost, A.P.; Molenaar, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    In the present study the age-dependence has been investigated of renal injury following the combined administration of c-DDP and irradiation. Single doses of c-DDP and radiation, causing a limited renal function decline on their own, were applied in combination. Following treatment, renal function and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were measured for 6 months. 25 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Studies Comparing Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Home Blood Pressure on Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbo, Daichi; Abdalla, Marwah; Falzon, Louise; Townsend, Raymond R.; Muntner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is more commonly recommended for assessing out-of-clinic blood pressure than home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM). We conducted a systematic review to examine whether ABPM or HBPM is more strongly associated with cardiovascular disease events and/or mortality. Of 1,007 abstracts published through July 20, 2015, nine articles, reporting results from seven cohorts, were identified. After adjustment for blood pressure on HBPM, blood pressure on ABPM was associated with an increased risk of outcomes in two of four cohorts for systolic blood pressure and two of three cohorts for diastolic blood pressure. After adjustment for blood pressure on ABPM, systolic blood pressure on HBPM was associated with outcomes in zero of three cohorts; an association was present in one of two cohorts for diastolic blood pressure on HBPM. There is a lack of strong empiric evidence supporting ABPM or HBPM over the other approach for predicting cardiovascular events or mortality. PMID:26822864

  15. A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY TO FIND THE DIFFERENCE IN SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE BETWEEN ARMS AS A RISK MARKER FOR DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Subhash Bande

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic nephropathy is the commonest cause of end-stage renal disease in the developed world. Recent studies have demonstrated that a difference in systolic blood pressure between arms is associated with cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. It is considered a predictor for cardiovascular disease and a surrogate marker for early kidney damage among patients with both type 2 diabetes and hypertension. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The aim was to investigate an association between arm difference in systolic blood pressure and microalbuminuria which can serve as a marker for diabetic nephropathy. MATERIALS AND METHOD This study was conducted on 200 patients with diabetes mellitus and an inter-arm difference in systolic blood pressure was present in 35.7% of the study population. Presence of systolic blood pressure difference of more than 10 mmHg between arms correlated with microalbuminuria and duration of diabetes mellitus with a p value of <0.001. We also found a correlation between arm difference in blood pressure and duration of diabetes mellitus, presence of hypertension and body mass index. CONCLUSION The inter-arm difference in blood pressure could serve as a risk marker for renal damage in diabetes mellitus.

  16. Effects of endurance training on blood pressure, blood pressure-regulating mechanisms, and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Véronique A; Fagard, Robert H

    2005-10-01

    Previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials on the effects of chronic dynamic aerobic endurance training on blood pressure reported on resting blood pressure only. Our aim was to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis including resting and ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure-regulating mechanisms, and concomitant cardiovascular risk factors. Inclusion criteria of studies were: random allocation to intervention and control; endurance training as the sole intervention; inclusion of healthy sedentary normotensive or hypertensive adults; intervention duration of > or =4 weeks; availability of systolic or diastolic blood pressure; and publication in a peer-reviewed journal up to December 2003. The meta-analysis involved 72 trials, 105 study groups, and 3936 participants. After weighting for the number of trained participants and using a random-effects model, training induced significant net reductions of resting and daytime ambulatory blood pressure of, respectively, 3.0/2.4 mm Hg (Phypertensive study groups (-6.9/-4.9) than in the others (-1.9/-1.6; Pendurance training decreases blood pressure through a reduction of vascular resistance, in which the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system appear to be involved, and favorably affects concomitant cardiovascular risk factors.

  17. High blood pressure - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007696.htm High blood pressure - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  18. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  19. Mannitol increases renal blood flow and maintains filtration fraction and oxygenation in postoperative acute kidney injury: a prospective interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2012-08-17

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), which is a major complication after cardiovascular surgery, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diuretic agents are frequently used to improve urine output and to facilitate fluid management in these patients. Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is used in the perioperative setting in the belief that it exerts reno-protective properties. In a recent study on uncomplicated postcardiac-surgery patients with normal renal function, mannitol increased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), possibly by a deswelling effect on tubular cells. Furthermore, experimental studies have previously shown that renal ischemia causes an endothelial cell injury and dysfunction followed by endothelial cell edema. We studied the effects of mannitol on renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal oxygen consumption (RVO2), and extraction (RO2Ex) in early, ischemic AKI after cardiac surgery. Eleven patients with AKI were studied during propofol sedation and mechanical ventilation 2 to 6 days after complicated cardiac surgery. All patients had severe heart failure treated with one (100%) or two (73%) inotropic agents and intraaortic balloon pump (36%). Systemic hemodynamics were measured with a pulmonary artery catheter. RBF and renal filtration fraction (FF) were measured by the renal vein thermo-dilution technique and by renal extraction of chromium-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA), respectively. GFR was calculated as the product of FF and renal plasma flow RBF × (1-hematocrit). RVO2 and RO2Ex were calculated from arterial and renal vein blood samples according to standard formulae. After control measurements, a bolus dose of mannitol, 225 mg/kg, was given, followed by an infusion at a rate of 75 mg/kg/h for two 30-minute periods. Mannitol did not affect cardiac index or cardiac filling pressures. Mannitol increased urine flow by 61% (P renal vascular resistance (P renal FF. Mannitol treatment of postoperative AKI

  20. Digitalis-like activity in human plasma: Relation to blood pressure and sodium balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, A.; Yamada, K.; Ishii, M.; Sugimoto, T. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    PURPOSE: On the assumption that renal tubular cells are more important as the target cells for a natriuretic factor than blood cells, we used a well-characterized cultured renal tubular cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK), cells to monitor the circulating digitalis-like factor in human plasma and examine its role in the regulation of blood pressure and sodium balance. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We investigated the effects of plasma on binding of radioactive ouabain to monolayered MDCK cells in order to determine the level of a circulating digitalis-like factor. First, we measured specific 3H-ouabain binding to MDCK cells in the presence of plasma from 71 outpatients (34 normotensive subjects and 37 hypertensive patients) after incubation for 4 hours. Second, we measured specific 3H-ouabain binding after incubation of cells with plasma from 16 hospitalized subjects (eight normotensive subjects and eight hypertensive patients) receiving low and high sodium diets. RESULTS: In Study 1, ouabain binding was lower by 30% with plasma from hypertensive patients than with plasma from normotensive subjects (p less than 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between individual subject's systolic or mean blood pressure and ouabain binding (r = -0.34, p less than 0.01 or r = -0.29, p less than 0.01). In Study 2, ouabain binding was also significantly reduced by 25% in the presence of plasma from hypertensive subjects as compared with plasma from normotensive subjects irrespective of sodium intake (p less than 0.01). A significant negative correlation was also found for all subjects between either systolic, diastolic, or mean blood pressure and ouabain binding (r = -0.58, p less than 0.01, r = -0.51, p less than 0.01, or r = -0.55, p less than 0.01, respectively).

  1. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  2. Role of Mas receptor in renal blood flow response to angiotensin (1-7) in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Safari, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical studies have shown that progression of renal disease in male is faster than that in female. However, the exact mechanisms are not well recognized. Angiotensin (1-7) (Ang 1-7) receptor, called "Mas", is an element in the depressor arm of renin angiotensin system (RAS), and its expression is enhanced in females. We test the hypothesis that Mas receptor (MasR) blockade (A779) attenuates renal blood flow (RBF) in response to infusion of graded doses of Ang 1-7 in female rats. Male and female Wistar rats were anesthetized and catheterized. Then, the mean arterial pressure (MAP), RBF, and controlled renal perfusion pressure (RPP) responses to infusion of graded doses of Ang 1-7 (100-1000 ng/kg/min i.v.) with and without A779 were measured in the animals. Basal MAP, RPP, RBF, and renal vascular resistance (RVR) were not significantly different between the two groups. After Ang 1-7 administration, RPP was controlled at a constant level. However, RBF increased in a dose-related manner in response to Ang 1-7 infusion in both male and female rats (Pdoserenal diseases.

  3. Renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of resistant hypertension: Egyptian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Mohamed; Khamis, Hazem

    2014-08-01

    Among the Egyptian population with essential hypertension, a minority are under control (systolic pressure renal artery radiofrequency (RF) ablation. To evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of catheter-based radiofrequency renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of resistant hypertension in Egyptian patients. Patients with essential hypertension unresponsive to at least 3 types of antihypertensive medical therapy (baseline office systolic blood pressure ≥160 mmHg) (n = 55) were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013 and received percutaneous RF ablation. Patients were followed up for 6 months after treatment to detect any change in office-based measurement of blood pressure. Urine and blood samples were taken to evaluate the effects on renal function. A reduction of mean office blood pressure was seen from 174/103 ± 9/5 mmHg at baseline to 150/91 ± 8/5 mmHg at 6 months follow-up (P = 0.001). Also, we noted a significant decrease in plasma renin activity (3.66 ± 0.64 vs. 3.37 ± 0.47 ng/mL per hour; P = 0.003), and there were no periprocedural complications, no adverse events, and no change in renal function during the follow-up period. Also, no change was noted in the number of medications after 6 months (3.95 ± 1.64 vs. 3.67 ± 0.72; P = 0.27). In this observational study, catheter-based renal denervation causes sustained blood pressure reduction in patients with resistant hypertension, without serious adverse events. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Renal artery stenting in solitary functioning kidneys: Technical and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Sinan; Cimsit, Cagatay; Andac, Nurten; Baltacioglu, Feyyaz; Tuglular, Serhan; Akoglu, Emel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and technical results of renal artery stenting for the treatment of renovascular hypertension and renal failure in patients with solitary functioning kidney. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with solitary functioning kidney underwent renal artery stenting and were followed up for 12-60 months. Before the procedures, systolic and diastolic blood pressures and serum creatinine levels were measured and the number of antihypertensive drugs was recorded and followed up after stenting. In case of restenosis, either in-stent percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty or stent-in-stent placement was performed. Results: Primary technical success rate was 100%. One lesion was nonostial while 14 were ostial. Primary patency rates were 100% for 6 months, 92.3% for 12 months, and 69.2% for 24 months. The secondary patency rate at 24 months was 100%. The differences between the baseline and postprocedural values of systolic blood pressures, diastolic blood pressures and the number of antihypertensive drug were statistically significant (P < 0.05), except the values of serum creatinine. Hypertension was cured in 1 (6.7%) patient, improved in 4 (26.6%) and stabilized in 10 (66.7%) patients. Renal function improved in 9 (60%), stabilized in 4 (26.6%), and deteriorated in 2 (13.4%) patients. Minor complication rate was 13.4% and major complication rate was 13.4%. Conclusion: Revascularization of renal artery stenosis using stent in solitary functioning kidneys is a safe and efficient procedure with high primary technical results, low restenosis rates and acceptable complication rates. It has an improving and controlling effect on blood pressure and renal functions

  5. Renal artery stenting in solitary functioning kidneys: Technical and clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Sinan [Dr. Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: sinan.sahin@e-kolay.net; Cimsit, Cagatay [Marmara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Andac, Nurten [Marmara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Baltacioglu, Feyyaz [Marmara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Tuglular, Serhan [Marmara University, School of Medicine, Department of Nephrology, Istanbul (Turkey); Akoglu, Emel [Marmara University, School of Medicine, Department of Nephrology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and technical results of renal artery stenting for the treatment of renovascular hypertension and renal failure in patients with solitary functioning kidney. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with solitary functioning kidney underwent renal artery stenting and were followed up for 12-60 months. Before the procedures, systolic and diastolic blood pressures and serum creatinine levels were measured and the number of antihypertensive drugs was recorded and followed up after stenting. In case of restenosis, either in-stent percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty or stent-in-stent placement was performed. Results: Primary technical success rate was 100%. One lesion was nonostial while 14 were ostial. Primary patency rates were 100% for 6 months, 92.3% for 12 months, and 69.2% for 24 months. The secondary patency rate at 24 months was 100%. The differences between the baseline and postprocedural values of systolic blood pressures, diastolic blood pressures and the number of antihypertensive drug were statistically significant (P < 0.05), except the values of serum creatinine. Hypertension was cured in 1 (6.7%) patient, improved in 4 (26.6%) and stabilized in 10 (66.7%) patients. Renal function improved in 9 (60%), stabilized in 4 (26.6%), and deteriorated in 2 (13.4%) patients. Minor complication rate was 13.4% and major complication rate was 13.4%. Conclusion: Revascularization of renal artery stenosis using stent in solitary functioning kidneys is a safe and efficient procedure with high primary technical results, low restenosis rates and acceptable complication rates. It has an improving and controlling effect on blood pressure and renal functions.

  6. A controlled trial of renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Deepak L; Kandzari, David E; O'Neill, William W; D'Agostino, Ralph; Flack, John M; Katzen, Barry T; Leon, Martin B; Liu, Minglei; Mauri, Laura; Negoita, Manuela; Cohen, Sidney A; Oparil, Suzanne; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Townsend, Raymond R; Bakris, George L

    2014-04-10

    Prior unblinded studies have suggested that catheter-based renal-artery denervation reduces blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. We designed a prospective, single-blind, randomized, sham-controlled trial. Patients with severe resistant hypertension were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to undergo renal denervation or a sham procedure. Before randomization, patients were receiving a stable antihypertensive regimen involving maximally tolerated doses of at least three drugs, including a diuretic. The primary efficacy end point was the change in office systolic blood pressure at 6 months; a secondary efficacy end point was the change in mean 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure. The primary safety end point was a composite of death, end-stage renal disease, embolic events resulting in end-organ damage, renovascular complications, or hypertensive crisis at 1 month or new renal-artery stenosis of more than 70% at 6 months. A total of 535 patients underwent randomization. The mean (±SD) change in systolic blood pressure at 6 months was -14.13±23.93 mm Hg in the denervation group as compared with -11.74±25.94 mm Hg in the sham-procedure group (Pdenervation group and -4.79±17.25 mm Hg in the sham-procedure group, for a difference of -1.96 mm Hg (95% CI, -4.97 to 1.06; P=0.98 for superiority with a margin of 2 mm Hg). There were no significant differences in safety between the two groups. This blinded trial did not show a significant reduction of systolic blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension 6 months after renal-artery denervation as compared with a sham control. (Funded by Medtronic; SYMPLICITY HTN-3 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01418261.).

  7. Better Renal Resistive Index Profile in Subjects with Beta Thalassemia Minor .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basut, Fahrettin; Keşkek, Şakir Özgür; Gülek, Bozkurt

    2018-05-03

    Beta thalassaemia minor is a common genetic disorder without any characteristic symptoms except mild anemia. It is found to be associated with some cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. The renal resistive index (RRI) is a measure of renal arterial resistance to blood flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate the renal resistive index in subjects with beta thalassaemia minor (BTM). A total of 253 subjects were included in this cross-sectional study. The study group consisted of 148 subjects with BTM and the control group consisted of 105 healthy subjects. Beta thalassaemia minor was diagnosed by complete blood count and hemoglobin electrophoresis. Blood pressure measurement and biochemical tests were performed. Renal resistive index of all subjects was measured using renal Doppler ultrasonography. Subjects with beta thalassemia minor had lower renal resistive indices compared to healthy subjects (0.58 ± 0.04 vs. 0.60 ± 0.06, p = 0.0016). Additionally, the RRI levels of subjects with BTM were correlated with systolic blood pressure (p = 0.017, r = 0.194). In this study, lower renal resistive index was found in subjects with BTM. This may be associated with decreased vascular resistance and blood viscosity in these subjects. ©2018The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Interarm Difference in Blood Pressure: Reproducibility and Association with Peripheral Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Mehlsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at examining the interarm difference in blood pressure and its use as an indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Data were included from consecutive patients referred from their general practitioner to our vascular laboratory for possible PAD aged 50 years or older without known cardiac disease, renal disease, or diabetes mellitus. 824 patients (453 women with mean age of 72 years (range: 50–101 were included. 491 patients had a diagnosis of hypertension and peripheral arterial disease (PAD was present in 386 patients. Systolic blood pressure was 143 ± 24 mmHg and 142 ± 24 mmHg on the right and left arm, respectively (P=0.015. The interarm difference was greater in patients with hypertension (P=0.002 and PAD (P20 mmHg. This study confirmed the presence of a systematic but clinically insignificant difference in systolic blood pressure between arms. The interarm difference was larger in hypertension and PAD. Consistent lateralisation is present for differences ≥20 mmHg and an interarm difference >25 mmHg is a reliable indicator of PAD in the legs.

  9. Physical Exercise and Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Haoxiang; Feng, Ji; Wang, Lizhi; Zhou, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a severe clinical problem which has some significant socioeconomic impact worldwide and hemodialysis is an important way to maintain patients' health state, but it seems difficult to get better in short time. Considering these, the aim in our research is to update and evaluate the effects of exercise on the health of patients with chronic renal failure. The databases were used to search for the relevant studies in English or Chinese. And the association between physical exercise and health state of patients with chronic renal failure has been investigated. Random-effect model was used to compare the physical function and capacity in exercise and control groups. Exercise is helpful in ameliorating the situation of blood pressure in patients with renal failure and significantly reduces VO 2 in patients with renal failure. The results of subgroup analyses show that, in the age >50, physical activity can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with renal failure. The activity program containing warm-up, strength, and aerobic exercises has benefits in blood pressure among sick people and improves their maximal oxygen consumption level. These can help patients in physical function and aerobic capacity and may give them further benefits.

  10. Determination of the separate effective renal blood flow by mathematical interpretation of radionephrograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtereva, O.A.; Zvonova, I.A.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical model of nephrotropic compound kinetics was plotted, and using +t, the procedure of determination of separate effective, renal blood flow was developed. This procedure was based on radionephrograms obtained after intravenous injection of 131 I hippuran. Partial renal functions were found according summary gammachronograms of the precardiac and renal areas with double taking of blood samples. The technique of plotting of theoretical summary radionephrogram was solved according to calculated parameters [ru

  11. Psoriasis and high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihbegovic, Eldina Malkic; Hadzigrahic, Nermina; Suljagic, Edin; Kurtalic, Nermina; Sadic, Sena; Zejcirovic, Alema; Mujacic, Almina

    2015-02-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin ailment which can be connected with an increased occurrence of other illnesses, including high blood pressure. A prospective study has been conducted which included 70 patients affected by psoriasis, both genders, older than 18 years. Average age being 47,14 (SD= ±15,41) years, from that there were 36 men or 51,43 and 34 women or 48,57%. Average duration of psoriasis was 15,52 (SD=±12,54) years. Frequency of high blood pressure in those affected by psoriasis was 54,28%. Average age of the patients with psoriasis and high blood pressure was 53,79 year (SD=±14,15) and average duration of psoriasis was 17,19 years (SD=±13,51). Average values of PASI score were 16,65. Increase in values of PASI score and high blood pressure were statistically highly related (r=0,36, p=0,0001). Psoriasis was related to high blood pressure and there was a correlation between the severity of psoriasis and high blood pressure.

  12. Endovascular treatment of renal artery stenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashari, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the procedure success and effect on hypertension after stenting of incidentally diagnosed atherosclerotic renal artery stenoses. Study Design: An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: A multicentric study was conducted at the Plastic Surgery and General Hospital, National Medical Center and Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan from January 2009 to March 2013. Methodology: Hypertension (systolic blood pressure > 160 and diastolic > 90 mmHg with two or more than two medications) with coronary artery disease were initially evaluated for coronary angiography, Renal artery angiography was also endovascular performed and stent was deployed for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis when found. Blood pressure readings, reduction in need of antihypertensive medication and serum creatinine levels were taken as outcome measures. Patients having renal artery stenoses secondary to connective tissue disorders and fibromuscular dysplasia were excluded. Results: There were 25 patients, 14 (56%) male and 11 (44%) female, with mean age of 49 +- 6 years. Diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and smoking were seen in 11 (44%), 10 (40%) and 4 (16%) patients respectively. Renal insufficiency (serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dl) was seen in one (04%) patient. Bilateral, and isolated right and left renal artery stenoses was seen in 5 (20%), 9 (36%) and 11(44%) patients respectively. Mean percentage of renal artery stenoses was 89%, ranged from 70% to 99% while ostial lesion was found in 20 (80%) patients. A significant decrease in systolic (168.20 +- 9.987 vs. 140.60 +- 5.649 mmHg, p < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (88.60 +- 5.50 vs. 77.20 +- 5.017 mmHg, p < 0.001) and reduction of medication (2.72 +- 0.458 vs. 1.5 +- 0.510, p < 0.01) were noted without a change in renal function (p= 0.061) after renal artery stenting. Conclusion: Endovascular stenting of renal artery stenoses in patients with poorly controlled hypertension is a safe and effective treatment

  13. Management of Renal Artery Stenosis - an Update | Alhadad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of the renal vasculature in eliciting renovascular hypertension (RVH) was established in 1934, when Goldblatt et al. [1] in a classical experimental study demonstrated that partial obstruction of the renal artery increased mean arterial blood pressure (BP). The pathophysiology of renal artery stenosis (RAS) is ...

  14. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  15. Nonlinear Analysis of Renal Autoregulation Under Broadband Forcing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marmarelis, V Z; Chon, K H; Chen, Y M

    1994-01-01

    Linear analysis of renal blood flow fluctuations, induced experimentally in rats by broad-band (pseudorandom) arterial blood pressure forcing at various power levels, has been unable to explain fully the dynamics of renal autoregulation at low frequencies. This observation has suggested...... the possibility of nonlinear mechanisms subserving renal autoregulation at frequencies below 0.2 Hz. This paper presents results of 3rd-order Volterra-Wiener analysis that appear to explain adequately the nonlinearities in the pressure-flow relation below 0.2 Hz in rats. The contribution of the 3rd-order kernel...... in describing the dynamic pressure-flow relation is found to be important. Furthermore, the dependence of 1st-order kernel waveforms on the power level of broadband pressure forcing indicates the presence of nonlinear feedback (of sigmoid type) based on previously reported analysis of a class of nonlinear...

  16. Heavy Alcohol Consumption Effects on Blood Pressure and on Kidney Structure Persist After Long-Term Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Leal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Heavy ethanol consumption is a risk factor for hypertension and prompts organ damage. There is no information regarding the impact of long-term heavy ethanol consumption on kidney structure and function linking to their hypertensive effects nor the repercussions after withdrawal. Methods: Rats were exposed to ethanol for 24 weeks and, afterwards, a group was assigned to withdrawal for 8 weeks. Blood pressure (BP was measured and serum biochemical parameters were quantified. Glomerular volume density, areal density of glomerular tuft and renal corpuscles were determined. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R protein expression was evaluated. Results: Twenty-four weeks of ethanol consumption causes atrophy of renal corpuscles and glomeruli and reduces the volume of glomeruli. Glomerular changes induced by ethanol consumption were still evident after withdrawal. Renal AT1R levels were increased in ethanol-treated rats and returned to control levels during withdrawal. Ethanol consumption also induced an increase in BP, uric acid and albumin levels. Upon withdrawal, systolic and mean arterial pressures decreased, but were still higher than in controls rats. Conclusion: Ethanol consumption induces changes in glomerular morphology associated with increased BP and AT1R expression. Long-term withdrawal was inefficient to restore the structural integrity of renal corpuscles and in lowering systolic pressure.

  17. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emans, Tonja W.; Janssen, Ben J.; Pinkham, Maximilian I.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Evans, Roger G.; Joles, Jaap A.; Malpas, Simon C.; Krediet, C. T. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Key points Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary.We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats.This method provides stable and continuous measurements of cortical tissue oxygen tension (PO2) for more than 2 weeks and can reproducibly detect acute changes in cortical oxygenation.Exogenous angiotensin‐II reduced renal cortical tissue PO2 more than equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine, probably because it reduced renal oxygen delivery more than did phenylephrine.Activation of the endogenous renin–angiotensin system in transgenic Cyp1a1Ren2 rats reduced cortical tissue PO2; in this model renal hypoxia precedes the development of structural pathology and can be reversed acutely by an angiotensin‐II receptor type 1 antagonist.Angiotensin‐II promotes renal hypoxia, which may in turn contribute to its pathological effects during development of chronic kidney disease. Abstract We hypothesised that both exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II (AngII) can decrease the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in the renal cortex of unrestrained rats, which might in turn contribute to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rats were instrumented with telemeters equipped with a carbon paste electrode for continuous measurement of renal cortical tissue PO2. The method reproducibly detected acute changes in cortical oxygenation induced by systemic hyperoxia and hypoxia. In conscious rats, renal cortical PO2 was dose‐dependently reduced by intravenous AngII. Reductions in PO2 were significantly greater than those induced by equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine. In anaesthetised rats, renal oxygen consumption was not affected, and filtration fraction was increased only in the AngII infused animals. Oxygen delivery decreased by 50% after infusion of AngII and renal blood flow (RBF) fell by 3.3 ml min−1

  18. Role of vascular potassium channels in the regulation of renal hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    of one or more classes of K+ channels will lead to a change in hemodynamic resistance and therefore of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration pressure. Through these effects, the activity of renal vascular K+ channels influences renal salt and water excretion, fluid homeostasis, and ultimately blood...... pressure. Four main classes of K+ channels [calcium activated (KCa), inward rectifier (Kir), voltage activated (KV), and ATP sensitive (KATP)] are found in the renal vasculature. Several in vitro experiments have suggested a role for individual classes of K+ channels in the regulation of renal vascular...... function. Results from in vivo experiments are sparse. We discuss the role of the different classes of renal vascular K+ channels and their possible role in the integrated function of the renal microvasculature. Since several pathological conditions, among them hypertension, are associated with alterations...

  19. Diet, blood pressure, and multicollinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D; McGee, D; Yano, K; Hankin, J

    1985-01-01

    Recent reports of an inverse association between dietary calcium intake and hypertension stimulated this analysis of the relationship of blood pressure to more than 20 dietary factors among a group of 8000 Japanese men in Hawaii. Reported intakes of potassium, calcium, protein, and milk were all inversely associated with blood pressure levels when examined one at a time while controlling for other risk factors. Alcohol intake was directly associated with blood pressure, and was treated as a confounding variable in the analysis. The association of potassium intake with blood pressure was relatively stronger than the associations for other nutrients, but the intake of potassium was so highly correlated with intakes of calcium, milk, and protein that it was not statistically possible to identify the independent association of potassium and blood pressure. Calcium intake was strongly correlated with milk and potassium intakes, and only calcium from dairy sources was associated with blood pressure. These data thus indicate that several dietary factors are inversely related to blood pressure levels independently of other risk factors such as age, body mass, and alcohol intake. The high degree of intercorrelation (multicollinearity) among these dietary factors, however, indicates that the independent role of any specific nutrient cannot be conclusively separated from the possible effects of other nutrients in this type of study.

  20. Saline-induced natriuresis and renal blood flow in conscious dogs: effects of sodium infusion rate and concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandgaard, N C F; Andersen, J L; Holstein-Rathlou, N-H

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This study focused on static and dynamic changes in total renal blood flow (RBF) during volume expansion and tested whether a change in RBF characteristics is a necessary effector mechanism in saline-induced natriuresis. METHODS: The aortic flow subtraction technique was used to measure RBF...... continuously. Identical amounts of NaCl (2.4 mmol kg(-1)) were given as slow isotonic (Iso, 120 min), slow hypertonic (Hyper, 120 min), and rapid isotonic loads (IsoRapid, 30 min). RESULTS: During Iso and IsoRapid, arterial blood pressure increased slightly (6-7 mmHg), and during Hyper it remained unchanged...... saline loading simulating daily sodium intake, the rate of sodium excretion may increase 10-20-fold without any change in mean arterial blood pressure or in RBF. Regulatory responses to changes in total body NaCl levels appears, therefore, to be mediated primarily by neurohumoral mechanisms and may occur...

  1. Efficacy and safety of catheter-based radiofrequency renal denervation in stented renal arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Felix; Tunev, Stefan; Ruwart, Jennifer; Schulz-Jander, Daniel; Cremers, Bodo; Linz, Dominik; Zeller, Thomas; Bhatt, Deepak L; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Böhm, Michael; Melder, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    In selected patients with hypertension, renal artery (RA) stenting is used to treat significant atherosclerotic stenoses. However, blood pressure often remains uncontrolled after the procedure. Although catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) can reduce blood pressure in certain patients with resistant hypertension, there are no data on the feasibility and safety of RDN in stented RA. We report marked blood pressure reduction after RDN in a patient with resistant hypertension who underwent previous stenting. Subsequently, radiofrequency ablation was investigated within the stented segment of porcine RA, distal to the stented segment, and in nonstented RA and compared with stent only and untreated controls. There were neither observations of thrombus nor gross or histological changes in the kidneys. After radiofrequency ablation of the nonstented RA, sympathetic nerves innervating the kidney were significantly reduced, as indicated by significant decreases in sympathetic terminal axons and reduction of norepinephrine in renal tissue. Similar denervation efficacy was found when RDN was performed distal to a renal stent. In contrast, when radiofrequency ablation was performed within the stented segment of the RA, significant sympathetic nerve ablation was not seen. Histological observation showed favorable healing in all arteries. Radiofrequency ablation of previously stented RA demonstrated that RDN provides equally safe experimental procedural outcomes in a porcine model whether the radiofrequency treatment is delivered within, adjacent, or without the stent struts being present in the RA. However, efficacious RDN is only achieved when radiofrequency ablation is delivered to the nonstented RA segment distal to the stent. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Interarm Difference in Blood Pressure: Reproducibility and Association with Peripheral Vascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the interarm difference in blood pressure and its use as an indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were included from consecutive patients referred from their general practitioner to our vascular laboratory for possible PAD aged 50 years or older without known cardiac disease, renal disease, or diabetes mellitus. 824 patients (453 women) with mean age of 72 years (range: 50–101) were included. 491 patients had a diagnosi...

  3. Alcohol: Does It Affect Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol: Does it affect blood pressure? Does drinking alcohol affect your blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure to unhealthy levels. Having ...

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other risk factors, like diabetes, you may need treatment. How does high blood pressure affect pregnant women? A few women will get ... HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health ... High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Women and Diabetes Heart ...

  5. Contributions of mean and shape of blood pressure distribution to worldwide trends and variations in raised blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim

    2018-01-01

    interventions to control blood pressure in the hypertensive population). Our aim was to quantify the contributions of these two phenomena to the worldwide trends in the prevalence of raised blood pressure. Methods: We pooled 1018 population-based studies with blood pressure measurements on 88.6 million......, where relevant. We used a linear mixed effect model to quantify the association between (probit-transformed) prevalence of raised blood pressure and age-group- and sex-specific mean blood pressure. We calculated the contributions of change in mean SBP and DBP, and of change in the prevalence...... participants from 1985 to 2016. We first calculated mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and prevalence of raised blood pressure by sex and 10-year age group from 20-29 years to 70-79 years in each study, taking into account complex survey design and survey sample weights...

  6. African Americans and High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Lifestyle + Risk Reduction High Blood Pressure What About African Americans and High Blood Pressure? African Americans in the U.S. have a higher prevalence of high blood pressure (HBP) than ...

  7. Dependence of renal blood flow on renal artery stenosis measured using CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luedemann, Lutz [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Nafz, B.; Persson, P. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Vegetative Physiology; Elsner, F. [Krankenhaus am Urban, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Anesthesiology; Grosse-Siestrup, C.; Meissler, M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Experimental Animal Unit; Gutberlet, M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Univ. Leipzig/ Leipzig Heart Center (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Lengsfeld, P.; Voth, M. [Bayer-Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany). Global Medical Affairs Diagnostic Imaging

    2011-03-15

    The present study investigates the suitability of computed tomography angiography (CTA) depicting the degree of renal artery stenosis for estimating renal blood flow (RBF) in a kidney. Materials and Methods: We investigated renal artery stenosis assessment by CTA in eight adult female hybrid pigs with an ultrasound probe implanted at the renal vein for RBF measurement. An inflatable metal-free cuff was placed around the renal artery to control the RBF. The RBF was then reduced in four steps. For each reduced RBF value and baseline RBF, CTA with a reconstructed slice thickness of 0.625 mm was performed in the arterial phase following injection of 80 ml of nonionic intravenous contrast medium. The radius of the stenotic and non-stenotic renal artery segment was measured in the reconstructed images. Results: A significant linear correlation (p < 0.0001) was found between the relative apparent stenosis (calculated as the ratio of the radii of the actual stenotic segment and a non-stenotic renal artery segment) and RBF. The linear regression yielded a slope of 0.57 and a y-axis of 24.1 %. A significant linear correlation (p < 0.0001) was also found between the relative true stenosis (the ratio of the radii of the actual stenotic segment and a non-stenotic renal artery segment at baseline) and the RBF. The linear regression yielded a slope of 0.67 and a y-axis of 13.8 %. Conclusion: The results show that the relative stenosis apparent on CTA differs from the true degree of renal artery stenosis. Nevertheless, the degree of renal artery stenosis determined by CTA provides a reliable estimate of the resulting RBF reduction. (orig.)

  8. Dependence of renal blood flow on renal artery stenosis measured using CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luedemann, Lutz; Nafz, B.; Persson, P.; Elsner, F.; Grosse-Siestrup, C.; Meissler, M.; Gutberlet, M.; Univ. Leipzig/ Leipzig Heart Center; Lengsfeld, P.; Voth, M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the suitability of computed tomography angiography (CTA) depicting the degree of renal artery stenosis for estimating renal blood flow (RBF) in a kidney. Materials and Methods: We investigated renal artery stenosis assessment by CTA in eight adult female hybrid pigs with an ultrasound probe implanted at the renal vein for RBF measurement. An inflatable metal-free cuff was placed around the renal artery to control the RBF. The RBF was then reduced in four steps. For each reduced RBF value and baseline RBF, CTA with a reconstructed slice thickness of 0.625 mm was performed in the arterial phase following injection of 80 ml of nonionic intravenous contrast medium. The radius of the stenotic and non-stenotic renal artery segment was measured in the reconstructed images. Results: A significant linear correlation (p < 0.0001) was found between the relative apparent stenosis (calculated as the ratio of the radii of the actual stenotic segment and a non-stenotic renal artery segment) and RBF. The linear regression yielded a slope of 0.57 and a y-axis of 24.1 %. A significant linear correlation (p < 0.0001) was also found between the relative true stenosis (the ratio of the radii of the actual stenotic segment and a non-stenotic renal artery segment at baseline) and the RBF. The linear regression yielded a slope of 0.67 and a y-axis of 13.8 %. Conclusion: The results show that the relative stenosis apparent on CTA differs from the true degree of renal artery stenosis. Nevertheless, the degree of renal artery stenosis determined by CTA provides a reliable estimate of the resulting RBF reduction. (orig.)

  9. On the efficacy of linear system analysis of renal autoregulation in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chon, K H; Chen, Y M; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1993-01-01

    In order to assess the linearity of the mechanisms subserving renal blood flow autoregulation, broad-band arterial pressure fluctuations at three different power levels were induced experimentally and the resulting renal blood flow responses were recorded. Linear system analysis methods were...

  10. The investigation of in-vivo measurement of individual renal blood perfusion, effective renal plasma flow and quantitation of renogram and 15 min bladder collection percentage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Kangchu

    1991-01-01

    25 normals and 43 renal diseases were examined by the RBF-I multifunctioning renography. The result showed that the determination of ERPF has no difference between blood sampling and noin-blood sampling method, and actually the lattrer can replace the former one. Above method can be also used for the measurement of the individual renal blood perfusion, the quantitation of renogram and the 15 min bladder coolection percentage at the same time. Thereby it provides more complete diagnostic information for the renal vascular diseases, renal pancren chymations and other urologic diseases

  11. Alterations of the blood pool in the femoral head before and after renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Inoue, Shigehiro; Shibatani, Masahiko; Kubo, Toshikazu; Kubota, Takao; Ushijima, Yo; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2003-01-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ION) is thought to be an ischemic event. The purpose of this study is to investigate alterations of the blood pool in the femoral head before and after renal transplantation. After renal transplantation, all patients received the same immunosuppressive therapy: corticosteroids, cyclosporin-A, and azathioprine. We performed 3-phase bone scintigraphy on 16 renal allograft recipients within 1 week before renal transplantation, and between week 4 and 9 after renal transplantation. Regions of interest (ROI) were assigned bilaterally in the femoral head, diaphysis, and soft tissue. The head-to-diaphysis ratios (HD ratios) were then calculated. Idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 2 femoral heads of 1 patient. The HD ratio before renal transplantation (mean HD±SD, 1.52±0.30) and the HD ratio after renal transplantation (1.28±0.30) were significantly different (P=0.000024). The HD ratios before and after renal transplantation were significantly different, indicating that the administration of steroids diminished the blood pool in the femoral head. A low HD ratio before renal transplantation revealed a poor blood pool in the femoral head, which may be a risk factor for ION. (author)

  12. 12-month blood pressure results of catheter-based renal artery denervation for resistant hypertension: the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakris, George L; Townsend, Raymond R; Flack, John M; Brar, Sandeep; Cohen, Sidney A; D'Agostino, Ralph; Kandzari, David E; Katzen, Barry T; Leon, Martin B; Mauri, Laura; Negoita, Manuela; O'Neill, William W; Oparil, Suzanne; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2015-04-07

    Results of the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 (Renal Denervation in Patients With Uncontrolled Hypertension) trial confirmed the safety but not the efficacy of renal denervation for treatment-resistant hypertension at 6 months post procedure. This study sought to analyze the 12-month SYMPLICITY HTN-3 results for the original denervation group, the sham subjects who underwent denervation after the 6-month endpoint (crossover group), and the sham subjects who did not undergo denervation after 6 months (non-crossover group). Eligible subjects were randomized 2:1 to denervation or sham procedure. Subjects were unblinded to their treatment group after the 6-month primary endpoint was ascertained; subjects in the sham group meeting eligibility requirements could undergo denervation. Change in blood pressure (BP) at 12 months post randomization (6 months for crossover subjects) was analyzed. The 12-month follow-up was available for 319 of 361 denervation subjects and 48 of 101 non-crossover subjects; 6-month denervation follow-up was available for 93 of 101 crossover subjects. In denervation subjects, the 12-month office systolic BP (SBP) change was greater than that observed at 6 months (-15.5 ± 24.1 mm Hg vs. -18.9 ± 25.4 mm Hg, respectively; p = 0.025), but the 24-h SBP change was not significantly different at 12 months (p = 0.229). The non-crossover group office SBP decreased by -32.9 ± 28.1 mm Hg at 6 months, but this response regressed to -21.4 ± 19.9 mm Hg (p = 0.01) at 12 months, increasing to 11.5 ± 29.8 mm Hg. These data support no further reduction in office or ambulatory BP after 1-year follow-up. Loss of BP reduction in the non-crossover group may reflect decreased medication adherence or other related factors. (Renal Denervation in Patients With Uncontrolled Hypertension [SYMPLICITY HTN-3]; NCT01418261). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Melatonin attenuates prenatal dexamethasone-induced blood pressure increase in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Yu, Hong-Ren; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Li-Tung

    2014-04-01

    Although antenatal corticosteroid is recommended to accelerate fetal lung maturation, prenatal dexamethasone exposure results in hypertension in the adult offspring. Since melatonin is a potent antioxidant and has been known to regulate blood pressure, we examined the beneficial effects of melatonin therapy in preventing prenatal dexamethasone-induced programmed hypertension. Male offspring of Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups (n = 12/group): control, dexamethasone (DEX), control + melatonin, and DEX + melatonin. Pregnant rats received intraperitoneal dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) from gestational day 16 to 22. In the melatonin-treatment groups, rats received 0.01% melatonin in drinking water during their entire pregnancy and lactation. Blood pressure was measured by an indirect tail-cuff method. Gene expression and protein levels were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. At 16 weeks of age, the DEX group developed hypertension, which was partly reversed by maternal melatonin therapy. Reduced nephron numbers due to prenatal dexamethasone exposure were prevented by melatonin therapy. Renal superoxide and NO levels were similar in all groups. Prenatal dexamethasone exposure led to increased mRNA expression of renin and prorenin receptor and up-regulated histone deacetylase (HDAC)-1 expression in the kidneys of 4-month-old offspring. Maternal melatonin therapy augmented renal Mas protein levels in DEX + melatonin group, and increased renal mRNA expression of HDAC-1, HDAC-2, and HDAC-8 in control and DEX offspring. Melatonin attenuated prenatal DEX-induced hypertension by restoring nephron numbers, altering RAS components, and modulating HDACs. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gender Difference in Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin II Administration after Ischemia/Reperfusion in Rats: The Role of AT2 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is one of the major causes of kidney failure, and it may interact with renin angiotensin system while angiotensin II (Ang II) type 2 receptor (AT2R) expression is gender dependent. We examined the role of AT2R blockade on vascular response to Ang II after I/R in rats. Methods. Male and female rats were subjected to 30 min renal ischemia followed by reperfusion. Two groups of rats received either vehicle or AT2R antagonist, PD123319. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), and renal blood flow (RBF) responses were assessed during graded Ang II (100, 300, and 1000 ng/kg/min, i.v.) infusion at controlled renal perfusion pressure (RPP). Results. Vehicle or antagonist did not alter MAP, RPP, and RBF levels significantly; however, 30 min after reperfusion, RBF decreased insignificantly in female treated with PD123319 (P = 0.07). Ang II reduced RBF and increased renal vascular resistance (RVR) in a dose-related fashion (P dose renal I/R injury appears to be sexually dimorphic. PD123319 infusion promotes these hemodynamic responses in female more than in male rats.

  15. Effect of region assignment on relative renal blood flow estimates using radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, C.C.; Ford, K.K.; Coleman, R.E.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-01-01

    To determine the value of the initial phase of the Tc-99m DTPA renogram in the direct estimation of relative renal blood flow in dogs, the ratios of the slopes of renal time-activity curves were compared with the ratios of measured blood flow. Radionuclide results were dependent on region-of-interest (ROI) and background ROI assignment, and correlated well with measured relative flow only with a maximum renal outline region. Curve slope ratios correlated well with measured flow ratios with and without background correction, while 1- to 2-minute uptake ratios correlated well only when corrected for background

  16. Time-varying properties of renal autoregulatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Rui; Cupples, Will A; Yip, K P

    2002-01-01

    In order to assess the possible time-varying properties of renal autoregulation, time-frequency and time-scaling methods were applied to renal blood flow under broad-band forced arterial blood pressure fluctuations and single-nephron renal blood flow with spontaneous oscillations obtained from...... normotensive (Sprague-Dawley, Wistar, and Long-Evans) rats, and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Time-frequency analyses of normotensive and hypertensive blood flow data obtained from either the whole kidney or the single-nephron show that indeed both the myogenic and tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanisms...... have time-varying characteristics. Furthermore, we utilized the Renyi entropy to measure the complexity of blood-flow dynamics in the time-frequency plane in an effort to discern differences between normotensive and hypertensive recordings. We found a clear difference in Renyi entropy between...

  17. Does a colour-coded blood pressure diary improve blood pressure control for patients in general practice: The CoCo trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senn Oliver

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insufficient blood pressure control is a frequent problem despite the existence of effective treatment. Insufficient adherence to self-monitoring as well as to therapy is a common reason. Blood pressure self-measurement at home (Home Blood Pressure Measurement, HBPM has positive effects on treatment adherence and is helpful in achieving the target blood pressure. Only a few studies have investigated whether adherence to HBPM can be improved through simple measures resulting also in better blood pressure control. Objective Improvement of self-monitoring and improved blood pressure control by using a new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Outcome Primary outcome: Change in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure 6 months after using the new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Secondary outcome: Adherence to blood pressure self-measurement (number of measurements/entries. Methods/Design Randomised controlled study. Population: 138 adult patients in primary care with uncontrolled hypertension despite therapy. The control group uses a conventional blood pressure diary; the intervention group uses the new colour-coded blood pressure diary (green, yellow, red according a traffic light system. Expected results/conclusion The visual separation and entries in three colour-coded areas reflecting risk (green: blood pressure in the target range ≤ 140/≤ 90 mmHg, yellow: blood pressure >140/>90 mmHg, red: blood pressure in danger zone > 180 mmHg/>110 mmHg lead to better self-monitoring compared with the conventional (non-colour-coded blood pressure booklet. The colour-coded, visualised information supports improved perception (awareness and interpretation of blood pressure and triggers correct behaviour, in the means of improved adherence to the recommended treatment as well as better communication between patients and doctors resulting in improved blood pressure control. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01013467

  18. Does a colour-coded blood pressure diary improve blood pressure control for patients in general practice: the CoCo trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer-Stey, Claudia; Zoller, Marco; Chmiel Moshinsky, Corinne; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas

    2010-04-14

    Insufficient blood pressure control is a frequent problem despite the existence of effective treatment. Insufficient adherence to self-monitoring as well as to therapy is a common reason. Blood pressure self-measurement at home (Home Blood Pressure Measurement, HBPM) has positive effects on treatment adherence and is helpful in achieving the target blood pressure. Only a few studies have investigated whether adherence to HBPM can be improved through simple measures resulting also in better blood pressure control. Improvement of self-monitoring and improved blood pressure control by using a new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Change in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure 6 months after using the new colour-coded blood pressure diary.Secondary outcome: Adherence to blood pressure self-measurement (number of measurements/entries). Randomised controlled study. 138 adult patients in primary care with uncontrolled hypertension despite therapy. The control group uses a conventional blood pressure diary; the intervention group uses the new colour-coded blood pressure diary (green, yellow, red according a traffic light system). EXPECTED RESULTS/CONCLUSION: The visual separation and entries in three colour-coded areas reflecting risk (green: blood pressure in the target range 140/>90 mmHg, red: blood pressure in danger zone > 180 mmHg/>110 mmHg) lead to better self-monitoring compared with the conventional (non-colour-coded) blood pressure booklet. The colour-coded, visualised information supports improved perception (awareness and interpretation) of blood pressure and triggers correct behaviour, in the means of improved adherence to the recommended treatment as well as better communication between patients and doctors resulting in improved blood pressure control. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01013467.

  19. Blood volume studies in chronic renal failure using radioactive 51Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadda, V.S.; Mehta, S.R.; Mathur, D.

    1975-01-01

    Estimation of blood volume was carried out in 20 healthy subjects and in 25 patients suffering from chronic renal failure using radioactive 51 Cr. A detailed history, physical examination and investigations were also undertaken. On statistical evaluation, the red cell volume was diminished significantly in males and females but rise in blood volume was insignificant. Plasma volume was raised significantly in females but was insignificant in males. The reduction in red cell volume is due to reduced red cell mass because of chronic renal disease. Plasma volume may be elevated in order to compensate for decreased red cell volume. The variability in these two parameters results in variable blood volume. (author)

  20. QTL influencing blood pressure maps to the region of PPH1 on chromosome 2q31-34 in Old Order Amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, W C; Mitchell, B D; Schneider, J L; Wagner, M J; Bell, C J; Nanthakumar, E; Shuldiner, A R

    2000-06-20

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and peripheral vascular disease. Although the genetic contribution to variation in blood pressure is well recognized, the specific genes involved are mostly unknown. We carried out a genome-wide scan to identify loci influencing blood pressure in the Old Order Amish population of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Blood pressures were measured in 694 adult participants from families recruited without regard to blood pressure. We performed a quantitative linkage analysis by using 357 microsatellite markers. In multipoint analysis, strong evidence for linkage was observed with both diastolic (lod=3.36; P=0.00004) and to a lesser extent systolic (lod=1.64; P=0.003) blood pressure in the region of chromosome 2q31-34. Peak evidence for linkage occurred at map positions 217 and 221 cM from pter for diastolic and systolic blood pressure, respectively. A gene linked to familial primary pulmonary hypertension has recently been mapped to this same region, suggesting the intriguing hypothesis that other (attenuated) mutations in this same gene may influence variation in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in this population.

  1. Alterations in blood pressure, antioxidant status and caspase 8 expression in cobalt chloride-induced cardio-renal dysfunction are reversed by Ocimum gratissimum and gallic acid in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinrinde, A S; Oyagbemi, A A; Omobowale, T O; Asenuga, E R; Ajibade, T O

    2016-07-01

    The protective abilities of the chloroform extract of Ocimum gratissimum (COG) and gallic acid against cobalt chloride (CoCl2) - induced cardiac and renal toxicity were evaluated. Rats were exposed to CoCl2 (350ppm) for 7 days, either alone, or in combination with COG (100 and 200mg/kg) or gallic acid (120mg/kg). CoCl2 given alone, caused significant increases (pgallic acid treatment significantly reduced (pgallic acid by modulation of CoCl2-induced alterations in blood pressure, antioxidant status and pro-apoptotic caspase 8 in Wistar rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  3. Renal denervation after Symplicity HTN-3: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persu, Alexandre; Jin, Yu; Fadl Elmula, Fadl Elmula Mohamed; Jacobs, Lotte; Renkin, Jean; Kjeldsen, Sverre

    2014-08-01

    After three years of excessive confidence, overoptimistic expectations and performance of 15 to 20,000 renal denervation procedures in Europe, the failure of a single well-designed US trial--Symplicity HTN-3--to meet its primary efficacy endpoint has cast doubt on renal denervation as a whole. The use of a sound methodology, including randomisation and blinded endpoint assessment was enough to see the typical 25-30 mmHg systolic blood pressure decrease observed after renal denervation melt down to less than 3 mmHg, the rest being likely explained by Hawthorne and placebo effects, attenuation of white coat effect, regression to the mean and other physician and patient-related biases. The modest blood pressure benefit directly assignable to renal denervation should be balanced with unresolved safety issues, such as potentially increased risk of renal artery stenosis after the procedure (more than ten cases reported up to now, most of them in 2014), unclear long-term impact on renal function and lack of morbidity-mortality data. Accordingly, there is no doubt that renal denervation is not ready for clinical use. Still, renal denervation is supported by a strong rationale and is occasionally followed by major blood pressure responses in at-risk patients who may otherwise have remained uncontrolled. Upcoming research programmes should focus on identification of those few patients with truly resistant hypertension who may derive a substantial benefit from the technique, within the context of well-designed randomised trials and independent registries. While electrical stimulation of baroreceptors and other interventional treatments of hypertension are already "knocking at the door", the premature and uncontrolled dissemination of renal denervation should remain an example of what should not be done, and trigger radical changes in evaluation processes of new devices by national and European health authorities.

  4. [Renal denervation a treatment for resistant hypertension: a French experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamer, H; Mylotte, D; Garcia-Alonso, C; Unterseeh, T; Garot, P; Louvard, Y; Lefevre, T; Morice, M-C

    2013-12-01

    Arterial hypertension is the largest single contributor to global mortality, and is poorly controlled in approximately 50% of patients despite lifestyle and pharmacologic interventions. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation reduces blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant hypertension. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of this novel therapy in "Real World" clinical practice. Consecutive patients with treatment-resistant primary hypertension, as defined as home BP>160 mmHg despite treatment with ≥3 antihypertensive drugs, were selected for denervation following renal artery screening. Ambulatory and home BP monitoring was performed in all patients prior to and following percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation. In total, 35 patients were selected for catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation. The mean age was 63.6 ± 11.7 years, 37.1% were women, 37.1% were diabetic, and 11.4% had renal impairment (GFRdenervation was performed in 33/35 patients (1 renal artery stenosis on angiography [not ablated], 1 patient with renal artery spasm [unilateral denervation]), with an average 5.9 ± 1.6 ablations per renal artery. No procedural complications occurred. At 6 months, blood pressure was 15.5 ± 22.37/87.76 ± 13.97 mmHg (Prenal function was observed. Catheter-based renal denervation is safe and efficacious treatment, which results in significant reductions in blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension, stable at 2 years follow-up. These results are applicable to real-world patient populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Physical Exercise and Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Haoxiang; Feng, Ji; Wang, Lizhi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is a severe clinical problem which has some significant socioeconomic impact worldwide and hemodialysis is an important way to maintain patients' health state, but it seems difficult to get better in short time. Considering these, the aim in our research is to update and evaluate the effects of exercise on the health of patients with chronic renal failure. The databases were used to search for the relevant studies in English or Chinese. And the association between physical exercise and health state of patients with chronic renal failure has been investigated. Random-effect model was used to compare the physical function and capacity in exercise and control groups. Exercise is helpful in ameliorating the situation of blood pressure in patients with renal failure and significantly reduces VO2 in patients with renal failure. The results of subgroup analyses show that, in the age >50, physical activity can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with renal failure. The activity program containing warm-up, strength, and aerobic exercises has benefits in blood pressure among sick people and improves their maximal oxygen consumption level. These can help patients in physical function and aerobic capacity and may give them further benefits. PMID:28316986

  6. Renal autotransplantation--a possibility in the treatment of complex renal vascular diseases and ureteric injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Hans Michael; Bartels, Michael; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Morgul, Mehmet Haluk; Fellmer, Peter; Ho-Thi, Phuc; Benckert, Christoph; Uhlmann, Dirk; Moche, Michael; Thelen, Armin; Schmelzle, Moritz; Jonas, Sven

    2012-12-31

    We report our contemporary experiences with renal autotransplantation in patients with complicated renal vascular diseases and/or complex ureteral injuries. Since its first performance, renal autotransplantation has been steadily improved and become a safe and effective procedure. Between 1998 and 2006, 6 renal autotransplantations in 6 patients were performed at the University Medical Center of Leipzig. After nephrectomy and renal perfusion ex vivo, the kidney was implanted standardized in the fossa iliaca. The vessels were anastomized to the iliac vessels, the ureter was reimplanted in an extravesical tunneled ureteroneocystostomy technique according to Lich-Gregoir. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of the patients were collected and analyzed for pre-, intra-, and postoperative period. Indications for renal autotransplantation were complex renovascular diseases in 2 patients (1 with fibromuscular dysplasia and 1 with Takayasu's arteritis) and in 4 patients with complex ureteral injuries. The median duration of follow-up was 9.7 years (range: 5.6-13.3). The laboratory values of our 6 patients showed improvements of creatinine, urea and blood pressure levels in comparison to the preoperative status at the end of follow-up period. The present study reports excellent results of renal autotransplantation in patients with renovascular disease or complex ureteric injuries. After a median follow-up of 9.7 years all 6 patients present with stable renal function as well as normal blood pressure values. Postoperative complications were observed with a rate comparable to other studies.

  7. Dietary sodium and health: more than just blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, William B; Edwards, David G; Jurkovitz, Claudine T; Weintraub, William S

    2015-03-17

    Sodium is essential for cellular homeostasis and physiological function. Excess dietary sodium has been linked to elevations in blood pressure (BP). Salt sensitivity of BP varies widely, but certain subgroups tend to be more salt sensitive. The mechanisms underlying sodium-induced increases in BP are not completely understood but may involve alterations in renal function, fluid volume, fluid-regulatory hormones, the vasculature, cardiac function, and the autonomic nervous system. Recent pre-clinical and clinical data support that even in the absence of an increase in BP, excess dietary sodium can adversely affect target organs, including the blood vessels, heart, kidneys, and brain. In this review, the investigators review these issues and the epidemiological research relating dietary sodium to BP and cardiovascular health outcomes, addressing recent controversies. They also provide information and strategies for reducing dietary sodium. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin-II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emans, Tonja W; Janssen, Ben J; Pinkham, Maximilian I; Ow, Connie P C; Evans, Roger G; Joles, Jaap A; Malpas, Simon C; Krediet, C T Paul; Koeners, Maarten P

    2016-11-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary. We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats. This method provides stable and continuous measurements of cortical tissue oxygen tension (PO2) for more than 2 weeks and can reproducibly detect acute changes in cortical oxygenation. Exogenous angiotensin-II reduced renal cortical tissue PO2 more than equi-pressor doses of phenylephrine, probably because it reduced renal oxygen delivery more than did phenylephrine. Activation of the endogenous renin-angiotensin system in transgenic Cyp1a1Ren2 rats reduced cortical tissue PO2; in this model renal hypoxia precedes the development of structural pathology and can be reversed acutely by an angiotensin-II receptor type 1 antagonist. Angiotensin-II promotes renal hypoxia, which may in turn contribute to its pathological effects during development of chronic kidney disease. We hypothesised that both exogenous and endogenous angiotensin-II (AngII) can decrease the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in the renal cortex of unrestrained rats, which might in turn contribute to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rats were instrumented with telemeters equipped with a carbon paste electrode for continuous measurement of renal cortical tissue PO2. The method reproducibly detected acute changes in cortical oxygenation induced by systemic hyperoxia and hypoxia. In conscious rats, renal cortical PO2 was dose-dependently reduced by intravenous AngII. Reductions in PO2 were significantly greater than those induced by equi-pressor doses of phenylephrine. In anaesthetised rats, renal oxygen consumption was not affected, and filtration fraction was increased only in the AngII infused animals. Oxygen delivery decreased by 50% after infusion of AngII and renal blood flow (RBF) fell by 3.3 ml min -1 . Equi-pressor infusion of

  9. The Renal Renin-Angiotensin System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of sodium balance, extracellular fluid volume, vascular resistance, and, ultimately, arterial blood pressure. In the kidney, angiotensin II exerts its effects to conserve salt and water through a combination of the hemodynamic control of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and…

  10. Child Abuse, Resting Blood Pressure, and Blood Pressure Reactivity to Psychosocial Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Holly C; Milliren, Carly E; Austin, S Bryn; Sheridan, Margaret A; McLaughlin, Katie A

    2016-01-01

    Childhood trauma is associated with hypertension in adults. It is unknown whether childhood trauma predicts elevated blood pressure earlier in development. We investigated whether the trauma of child abuse was associated with blood pressure in adolescents. The sample included 145 adolescents aged 13-17 years, 40% with exposure to child abuse. The mean age of participants was 14.93 years (SD = 1.33); 58% were female. The majority self-identified as non-Hispanic White (43%), with the remainder identifying as non-Hispanic Black (17%), Hispanic (17%), or other/mixed race (23%). We used established age/sex/height-specific cutoffs to determine the prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension in the sample. We used two-sample t tests to examine associations of abuse with resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and blood pressure reactivity to the Trier Social Stress Test and a frustration task. We used linear regression to adjust for potential confounders including sociodemographic variables, body mass index, smoking, and psychopathology. Mean resting SBP and DBP were 114.07 mmHg and 61.35 mmHg in those with a history of abuse and 111.39 mmHg and 56.89 mmHg in those without a history of abuse. This difference was significant for DBP only. Twelve percent of participants met criteria for prehypertension or hypertension based on resting blood pressure values; this did not differ between those with and without an abuse history. Child abuse was associated with lower DBP and SBP reactivity to laboratory stress tasks and reduced DBP reactivity to frustration. These associations were robust to adjustment for potential confounders. Child abuse is associated with higher resting DBP and blunted DBP and SBP reactivity to laboratory stress in adolescence. These findings suggest a potential pathway by which child abuse leads to hypertension. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Activation Decreases Mean Arterial Pressure, Plasma Interleukin-6, and COX-2 While Increasing Renal CYP4A Expression in an Acute Model of DOCA-Salt Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexter L. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α activation by fenofibrate reduces blood pressure and sodium retention during DOCA-salt hypertension. PPAR-α activation reduces the expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6. Fenofibrate also induces cytochrome P450 4A (CYP4A and increases 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE production. This study tested whether the administration of fenofibrate would reduce blood pressure by attenuating plasma IL-6 and renal expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, while increasing expression of renal CYP4A during 7 days of DOCA-salt hypertension. We performed uni-nephrectomy on 12–14 week old male Swiss Webster mice and implanted biotelemetry devices in control, DOCA-salt (1.5 mg/g treated mice with or without fenofibrate (500 mg/kg/day in corn oil, intragastrically. Fenofibrate significantly decreased mean arterial pressure and plasma IL-6. In kidney homogenates, fenofibrate increased CYP4A and decreased COX-2 expression. There were no differences in renal cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily c, polypeptide 23 (CYP2C23 and soluble expoxide hydrolase (sEH expression between the groups. Our results suggest that the blood pressure lowering effect of PPAR-α activation by fenofibrate involves the reduction of plasma IL-6 and COX-2, while increasing CYP4A expression during DOCA-salt hypertension. Our results may also suggest that PPAR-α activation protects the kidney against renal injury via decreased COX-2 expression.

  12. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870.1100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts the signal from a blood pressure...

  13. Renal blood flow, diuresis and isotope nephrogram in experimental stenosis of the renal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pemsel, H.K.; Lange, H.; Mahlstedt, J.; Joseph, K.; Marburg Univ.; Marburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    After experimental stenosis of the renal artery of the dog, the isotope nephrogram shows a prolongation of the transit-time, when the renal blood flow is reduced to 40-70%. This finding was most significant in low diuresis (0,05-0,2 ml/min), sporadic in moderate diuresis (0,2-2,0 ml/min), no longer demonstrable in forced diuresis (>2,0 ml/min). The diuretic effect of X-ray contrast-medium (70% Na-Meglumin-Jotalamat, 0,5 ml/kg i.v.) normalizes a pathologic ING in low diuresis. (orig.) [de

  14. Albumin infusion improves renal blood flow autoregulation in patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis and acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Rita; Noiret, Lorette; Sen, Sambit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-02-01

    In cirrhotic patients with renal failure, renal blood flow autoregulation curve is shifted to the right, which is consequent upon sympathetic nervous system activation and endothelial dysfunction. Albumin infusion improves renal function in cirrhosis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. We aimed to determine the effect of albumin infusion on systemic haemodynamics, renal blood flow, renal function and endothelial function in patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis and acute kidney injury. Twelve patients with refractory ascites and 10 patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis and acute kidney injury were studied. Both groups were treated with intravenous albumin infusion, 40-60 g/days over 3-4 days. Cardiac and renal haemodynamics were measured. Endothelial activation/dysfunction was assessed using von Willebrand factor and serum nitrite levels. F2α Isoprostanes, resting neutrophil burst and noradrenaline levels were quantified as markers of oxidative stress, endotoxemia and sympathetic activation respectively. Albumin infusion leads to a shift in the renal blood flow autoregulation curve towards normalization, which resulted in a significant increase in renal blood flow. Accordingly, improvement of renal function was observed. In parallel, a significant decrease in sympathetic activation, inflammation/oxidative stress and endothelial activation/dysfunction was documented. Improvement of renal blood flow correlated with improvement in endothelial activation (r = 0.741, P renal function in acutely decompensated cirrhotic patients with acute kidney injury by impacting on renal blood flow autoregulation. This is possibly achieved through endothelial stabilization and a reduction in the sympathetic tone, endotoxemia and oxidative stress. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Association between ambient temperature and blood pressure and blood pressure regulators: 1831 hypertensive patients followed up for three years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    Full Text Available Several studies have suggested an association between ambient air temperature and blood pressure. However, this has not been reliably confirmed by longitudinal studies. Also, whether the reaction to temperature stimulation is modified by other factors such as antihypertensive medication is rarely investigated. The present study explores the relationship between ambient temperature and blood pressure, without and with antihypertensive medication, in a study of 1,831 hypertensive patients followed up for three years, in two or four weekly check ups, accumulating 62,452 follow-up records. Both baseline and follow-up blood pressure showed an inverse association with ambient temperature, which explained 32.4% and 65.6% of variation of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (P<0.05 respectively. The amplitude of individual blood pressure fluctuation with temperature throughout a year (a 29 degrees centigrade range was 9.4/7.3 mmHg. Medication with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor benazepril attenuated the blood pressure fluctuation by 2.4/1.3 mmHg each year, though the inverse association of temperature and blood pressure remained. Gender, drinking behavior and body mass index were also found to modify the association between temperature and diastolic blood pressure. The results indicate that ambient temperature may negatively regulate blood pressure. Hypertensive patients should monitor and treat blood pressure more carefully in cold days, and it could be especially important for the males, thinner people and drinkers.

  16. Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring in Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Ushida, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Keita; Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Imai, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akio; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques; Yamada, Ichiro

    Continuous monitoring of blood pressure in daily life could improve early detection of cardiovascular disorders, as well as promoting healthcare. Conventional ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) equipment can measure blood pressure at regular intervals for 24 hours, but is limited by long measuring time, low sampling rate, and constrained measuring posture. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for continuous real-time measurement of blood pressure during daily activities. Our method is based on blood pressure estimation from pulse wave velocity (PWV) calculation, which formula we improved to take into account changes in the inner diameter of blood vessels. Blood pressure estimation results using our new method showed a greater precision of measured data during exercise, and a better accuracy than the conventional PWV method.

  17. Pattern of blood pressure and hypertension in adolescents in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpere, A N; Anochie, I C; Eke, F U

    2013-01-01

    The rate and prevalence of hypertension in children is increasing. Childhood hypertensionif untreated can lead to hypertension in adulthood with its consequent cardiovascular and renal complications. Early detection of paediatric hypertension may lead to improvement in cardiovascular health in adults. This study aims to determine the blood pressure (BP) pattern and prevalence of hypertension in asymptomatic secondary school children and factors associated with hypertension in these adolescents. A cross-sectional study of 820 adolescents selected from 12 secondary schools in Port Harcourt was conducted. BP was measured by the auscultatory method. The average of three readings was taken as the actual blood pressure. Hypertension was defined as systolic and/or diastolic blood pressures equal to or greater than the 95th percentile for age, sex and height. Data was analysed using SPSS version 17.0. Systolic and diastolic BP increased with age in all subjects. Male subjects had a higher systolic BP compared to females. Hypertension was seen in 26 (3.2%) subjects; 13 males and 13 females. The proportional prevalence was higher in the age group 15-17 years (3.9%); in those in social classes V (9.1%) and with family history of hypertension (3.6%), (p à 0.05 in all cases). It was however significantly higher in the obese subjects (p = 0.000). The prevalence of hypertension in adolescents in Port Harcourt is high and is strongly associated with obesity. We recommend blood pressure measurement as part of the school health programme in secondary schools.

  18. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  19. High blood pressure - medicine-related

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by using a chemical substance or medicine. ... of the arteries There are several types of high blood pressure : Essential hypertension has no cause that can be ...

  20. Crisis de esclerodermia renal normotensiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Villaverde

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de sexo masculino de 60 años con esclerosis sistémica que evolucionó con crisis de esclerodermia renal normotensiva. Tenía compromiso poliarticular, esofágico, pulmonar y cutáneo. Antes de internarse en nuestro hospital recibió tratamiento con altas dosis de corticoides, lo que probablemente precipitó el daño renal que presentó en su evolución, caracterizado por falla renal, anemia hemolítica microangiopática sin elevación de la presión arterial. La ausencia de hipertensión se observa sólo en el 10% de los casos de esclerodermia renal. Recibió tratamiento con enalapril y hemodiálisis. Evolucionó en forma desfavorable, sin respuesta a la terapeútica y falleció a los siete días de internado.A 60 year old male patient having systemic scleroderma and normotensive scleroderma renal crisis was admitted in our hospital. He presented polyarticular, esophagic, lung and skin compromise. Before admission he had been treated with high doses of corticosteroids. We believe corticosteroids led to the worsening of renal damage with renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia without high blood pressure. The 10% of these cases have normal blood pressure. The patient was treated with enalapril and hemodyalisis. There was no favourable response to this treatment and he died seven days after admission.

  1. Renal denervation for the treatment of resistant hypertension: review and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Radu; Lohmeier, Thomas E; Tudorancea, Ionut; Laffin, Luke; Bakris, George L

    2015-10-01

    When introduced clinically 6 years ago, renal denervation was thought to be the solution for all patients whose blood pressure could not be controlled by medication. The initial two studies, SYMPLICITY HTN-1 and HTN-2, demonstrated great magnitudes of blood pressure reduction within 6 mo of the procedure and were based on a number of assumptions that may not have been true, including strict adherence to medication and absence of white-coat hypertension. The SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial controlled for all possible factors believed to influence the outcome, including the addition of a sham arm, and ultimately proved the demise of the initial overly optimistic expectations. This trial yielded a much lower blood pressure reduction compared with the previous SYMPLICITY trials. Since its publication in 2014, there have been many analyses to try and understand what accounted for the differences. Of all the variables examined that could influence blood pressure outcomes, the extent of the denervation procedure was determined to be inadequate. Beyond this, the physiological mechanisms that account for the heterogeneous fall in arterial pressure following renal denervation remain unclear, and experimental studies indicate dependence on more than simply reduced renal sympathetic activity. These and other related issues are discussed in this paper. Our perspective is that renal denervation works if done properly and used in the appropriate patient population. New studies with new approaches and catheters and appropriate controls will be starting later this year to reassess the efficacy and safety of renal denervation in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Decreased cerebral blood flow in renal transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamano, Chisako; Komaba, Yuichi; Sakayori, Osamu; Iino, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    We performed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to investigate the influence of renal transplantation on cerebral blood flow (CBF). Fifteen renal transplant recipients and twelve normal subjects underwent cerebral SPECT with N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine ( 123 I-IMP). All transplant recipients received prednisolone and cyclosporine (CyA). Regional CBF (rCBF) was measured by defining regions of interest in the cerebral cortex, deep white matter, striatum, thalamus, and cerebellum. In transplant recipients, correlations to the mean overall cortical CBF were assessed using the interval from transplantation to measurement of SPECT, as well as the serum creatinine concentration. Moreover, to investigate the influence of CyA on CBF, the correlation between mean overall cortical CBF and CyA trough concentrations was assessed. In all regions, CBF in renal transplant recipients was significantly lower than in normal subjects. No significant correlation was seen between serum creatinine, interval from transplantation, or CyA trough concentrations and mean overall cortical CBF. Renal transplant recipients demonstrated a decrease in CBF, that can have an associated secondary pathology. Therefore, renal transplant recipients may benefit from post-operative MRI or CT. (author)

  3. Renal Artery Stenosis in Patients with Resistant Hypertension: Stent It or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Niepen, Patricia; Rossignol, Patrick; Lengelé, Jean-Philippe; Berra, Elena; Sarafidis, Pantelis; Persu, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    After three large neutral trials in which renal artery revascularization failed to reduce cardiovascular and renal morbidity and mortality, renal artery stenting became a therapeutic taboo. However, this is probably unjustified as these trials have important limitations and excluded patients most likely to benefit from revascularization. In particular, patients with severe hypertension were often excluded and resistant hypertension was either poorly described or not conform to the current definition. Effective pharmacological combination treatment can control blood pressure in most patients with renovascular hypertension. However, it may also induce further renal hypoperfusion and thus accelerate progressive loss of renal tissue. Furthermore, case reports of patients with resistant hypertension showing substantial blood pressure improvement after successful revascularization are published over again. To identify those patients who would definitely respond to renal artery stenting, properly designed randomized clinical trials are definitely needed.

  4. Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System and Its Modulation in Renal Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Yusuke; Head, Geoffrey A; Denton, Kate; May, Clive N; Schlaich, Markus P

    2018-01-01

    The kidneys are densely innervated with renal efferent and afferent nerves to communicate with the central nervous system. Innervation of major structural components of the kidneys, such as blood vessels, tubules, the pelvis, and glomeruli, forms a bidirectional neural network to relay sensory and sympathetic signals to and from the brain. Renal efferent nerves regulate renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, tubular reabsorption of sodium and water, as well as release of renin and prostaglandins, all of which contribute to cardiovascular and renal regulation. Renal afferent nerves complete the feedback loop via central autonomic nuclei where the signals are integrated and modulate central sympathetic outflow; thus both types of nerves form integral parts of the self-regulated renorenal reflex loop. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) is commonly increased in pathophysiological conditions such as hypertension and chronic- and end-stage renal disease. Increased RSNA raises blood pressure and can contribute to the deterioration of renal function. Attempts have been made to eliminate or interfere with this important link between the brain and the kidneys as a neuromodulatory treatment for these conditions. Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation has been successfully applied in patients with resistant hypertension and was associated with significant falls in blood pressure and renal protection in most studies performed. The focus of this review is the neural contribution to the control of renal and cardiovascular hemodynamics and renal function in the setting of hypertension and chronic kidney disease, as well as the specific roles of renal efferent and afferent nerves in this scenario and their utility as a therapeutic target.

  5. The hidden magnitude of raised blood pressure and elevated blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The prevalence of undiagnosed raised blood pressure and elevated blood sugar was high in Ethiopia and only very small percentage of people had been aware of their high blood pressure and elevated blood sugar. Policy makers in the health sector including other health development partners need to ...

  6. Blood pressure and risk of renal cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weikert, Steffen; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Blood pressure was measured in 296,638 women and men, recruited in eight European countries during 1992-1998, 254,935 of whom provided information on antihypertensive medication. During a mean follow-up of 6.2 years, 250 cases of RCC were...... interval: 1.54, 3.55). Risk estimates did not significantly differ according to sex or use of antihypertensive medication. Individuals taking antihypertensive drugs were not at a significantly increased risk unless blood pressure was poorly controlled. These results support the hypothesis that hypertension...

  7. Renal sympathetic denervation for resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeschl, Michael; Hadziomerovic, Adnan; Ruzicka, Marcel

    2013-05-01

    Resistant hypertension is an increasingly prevalent health problem associated with important adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The pathophysiology that underlies this condition involves increased function of both the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system. A crucial link between these 2 systems is the web of sympathetic fibres that course within the adventitia of the renal arteries. These nerves can be targeted by applying radiofrequency energy from the lumen of the renal arteries to renal artery walls (percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation [RSD]), an approach that has attracted great interest. This paper critically reviews the evidence supporting the use of RSD. Small studies suggest that RSD can produce dramatic blood pressure reductions: In the randomized Symplicity HTN-2 trial of 106 patients, the mean fall in blood pressure at 6 months in patients who received the treatment was 32/12 mm Hg. However, there are limitations to the evidence for RSD in the treatment of resistant hypertension. These include the small number of patients studied; the lack of any placebo-controlled evidence; the fact that blood pressure outcomes were based on office assessments, as opposed to 24-hour ambulatory monitoring; the lack of longer-term efficacy data; and the lack of long-term safety data. Some of these concerns are being addressed in the ongoing Renal Denervation in Patients With Uncontrolled Hypertension (Symplicity HTN-3) trial. The first percutaneous RSD system was approved by Health Canada in the spring of 2012. But until more and better-quality data are available, this procedure should generally be reserved for those patients whose resistant hypertension is truly uncontrolled. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Blood pressure monitors for home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007482.htm Blood pressure monitors for home To use the sharing features ... may ask you to keep track of your blood pressure at home. To do this, you will need ...

  9. Blood pressure documentation in the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Ana Carolina Queiroz Godoy; Machado, Juliana Pereira; Veiga, Eugenia Velludo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the frequency of blood pressure documentation performed by nursing professionals in an emergency department. Methods This is a cross-sectional, observational, descriptive, and analytical study, which included medical records of adult patients admitted to the observation ward of an emergency department, between March and May 2014. Data were obtained through a collection instrument divided into three parts: patient identification, triage data, and blood pressure documentation. For statistical analysis, Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used, with a significance level of α<0.05. Results One hundred fifty-seven records and 430 blood pressure measurements were analyzed with an average of three measurements per patient. Of these measures, 46.5% were abnormal. The mean time from admission to documentation of the first blood pressure measurement was 2.5 minutes, with 42 minutes between subsequent measures. There is no correlation between the systolic blood pressure values and the mean time interval between blood pressure documentations: 0.173 (p=0.031). Conclusion The present study found no correlation between frequency of blood pressure documentation and blood pressure values. The frequency of blood pressure documentation increased according to the severity of the patient and decreased during the length of stay in the emergency department. PMID:28444085

  10. Mechanism of postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in the anesthetized dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katholi, R E; Oparil, S; Urthaler, F; James, T N

    1979-07-01

    The mechanism of postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction was studied in 28 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (30 mg/kg i.v.). Rapid atrial or ventricular pacing or induction of atrial fibrilation were used to produce at least 20% prompt decrease in cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Return to control cardiac output and blood pressure occurred within 3 minutes after cessation of the arrhythmia, but renal blood flow remained significantly decreased (26%) with gradual recovery by 17.7 +/- 6.6 min. Infusion of phentolamine (0.25 mg/min) into the renal artery, intravenous hexamethonium (l mg/kg), adrenal demedullation, or cooling the cervical vagi prevented postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. In contrast, renal denervation, intravenous bretylium (10 mg/kg), intravenous atropine (0.5 mg/kg) or intrarenal SQ 20881 (0.20 mg/min) has no effect on postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. Intravenous propranolol (0.5 mg/kg) intensified postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. These data suggested that the postarrhythmic renal vasoconstrictive response required intact vagi and was due to alpha adrenergic stimulation by adrenal catecholamines. However, femoral arterial catecholamine levels were not elevated above control during postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction. We therefore sought local vascular pathways by which catecholamines might reach the kidneys. An adrenorenal vascular network was found in each dog. Collection of catecholamines from these vessels during postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in six dogs revealed catecholamine concentrations threefold higher than simultaneously collected femoral arterial catecholamines levels. Because ligation of these vessels abolished postarrhythmic renal vasoconstriction in each dog, we conclude that postarrhythmic renal vasconstriction is due to adrenal catecholamines reaching the kidneys through an adreno-renal vascular network and that the response requires intact vagi.

  11. Anatomical and procedural determinants of catheter-based renal denervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Ukena, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas Felix; Bergmann, Martin; Blankestijn, Peter J; Blessing, Erwin; Cremers, Bodo; Dörr, Oliver; Hering, Dagmara; Kaiser, Lukas; Nef, Holger; Noory, Elias; Schlaich, Markus; Sharif, Faisal; Sudano, Isabella; Vogel, Britta; Voskuil, Michiel; Zeller, Thomas; Tzafriri, Abraham R; Edelman, Elazer R; Lauder, Lucas; Scheller, Bruno; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) can reduce blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic activity in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Less is known about the impact of renal anatomy and procedural parameters on subsequent BP response. METHODS/MATERIALS: A

  12. Evaluation of the renal blood flow by densitometry using cine-angiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, G.G.; Slobodzyan, B.M.; Mikhajlov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    A method of the quantitative determination of the blood flow in the renal artery and the arterial bed of the renal parenchyma was developed basing on roentgenocinematography and subsequent densitometric analysis of a roentgenocinefilm. Advantages of the utilization of this method are considered with reference to two groups of patients with chronic pyelonephritis and hypertension without change of a vascular pattern on the angiograms. They are associated with a possibility of separate determination of the hemodynamics on topographycatly Definite zones of the renal arterial bed and hemodynamic disturbances in morphological changes of the renal vessels that are invisible on the angiogra

  13. The renal blood flow reserve in healthy humans and patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease measured by positron emission tomography using [15O]H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päivärinta, Johanna; Koivuviita, Niina; Oikonen, Vesa; Iida, Hidehiro; Liukko, Kaisa; Manner, Ilkka; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Nuutila, Pirjo; Metsärinne, Kaj

    2018-06-11

    Microvascular function plays an important role in ARVD (atherosclerotic renovascular disease). RFR (renal flow reserve), the capacity of renal vasculature to dilate, is known to reflect renal microvascular function. In this pilot study, we assessed PET (positron emission tomography)-based RFR values of healthy persons and renal artery stenosis patients. Seventeen patients with ARVD and eight healthy subjects were included in the study. Intravenous enalapril 1 mg was used as a vasodilatant, and the maximum response (blood pressure and RFR) to it was measured at 40 min. Renal perfusion was measured by means of oxygen-15-labeled water PET. RFR was calculated as a difference of stress flow and basal flow and was expressed as percent [(stress blood flow - basal blood flow)/basal blood flow] × 100%. RFR of the healthy was 22%. RFR of the stenosed kidneys of bilateral stenosis patients (27%) was higher than that of the stenosed kidneys of unilateral stenosis patients (15%). RFR of the contralateral kidneys of unilateral stenosis patients was 21%. There was no difference of statistical significance between RFR values of ARVD subgroups or between ARVD subgroups and the healthy. In the stenosed kidneys of unilateral ARVD patients, stenosis grade of the renal artery correlated negatively with basal (p = 0.04) and stress flow (p = 0.02). Dispersion of RFR values was high. This study is the first to report [ 15 O]H 2 O PET-based RFR values of healthy subjects and ARVD patients in humans. The difference between RFR values of ARVD patients and the healthy did not reach statistical significance perhaps because of high dispersion of RFR values. [ 15 O]H 2 O PET is a valuable non-invasive and quantitative method to evaluate renal blood flow though high dispersion makes imaging challenging. Larger studies are needed to get more information about [ 15 O]H 2 O PET method in evaluation of renal blood flow.

  14. Common High Blood Pressure Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Common High Blood Pressure Myths Updated:May 4,2018 Knowing the facts ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  15. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Nov 13,2017 ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  16. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... age and you cannot tell if you have high blood pressure by the way you feel, so have your ...

  17. High blood pressure and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007483.htm High blood pressure and diet To use the sharing features on ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ...

  18. Inter-arm blood pressure differences in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, L C Y; Kametas, N; Strobl, I; Pachoumi, C; Nicolaides, K H

    2008-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of blood pressure inter-arm difference (IAD) in early pregnancy and to investigate its possible association with maternal characteristics. A cross-sectional observational study. Routine antenatal visit in a university hospital. A total of 5435 pregnant women at 11-14 weeks of gestation. Blood pressure was taken from both arms simultaneously with a validated automated device. The presence of inter-arm blood pressure difference of 10 mmHg or more. The IAD in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 10 mmHg or more in 8.3 and 2.3% of the women, respectively. Systolic IAD was found to be significantly related to systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, and diastolic IAD was found to be significantly related to maternal age, diastolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. The systolic and diastolic IAD were higher in the hypertensive group compared with the normotensive group and absolute IAD increased with increasing blood pressure. About 31.0 and 23.9% of cases of hypertension would have been underreported if the left arm and the right arm were used, respectively, in measuring the blood pressure. There is a blood pressure IAD in a significant proportion of the pregnant population, and its prevalence increases with increasing blood pressure. By measuring blood pressure only on one arm, there is a one in three chance of underreporting hypertension. Therefore, it would be prudent that during the booking visit blood pressure should be taken in both arms and thus provide guidance for subsequent blood pressure measurements during the course of pregnancy.

  19. Blood Pressure Drugs and AMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Research News: Blood Pressure Drugs and AMD Leer en Español: Noticias de ... also found an association between AMD and high blood pressure, but this has been inconsistent. To help clarify ...

  20. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More What is High Blood Pressure? Updated:Feb 27,2018 First, let’s define high ... resources . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  1. Hypertension in Renal Transplantation: Saudi Arabian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souqiyyeh Muhammad

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the prevalence, etiologic factors and therapy of hypertension in actively followed up transplant population in Saudi Arabia; we retrospectively reviewed the records of the active renal transplant patients at two large transplant centers in Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. These subjects were transplanted between January 1979 and November 1998. The patients were grouped according to the measurement of blood pressure; group 1 (considered normo-tensive: blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg, group2: blood pressure between 140-159/90-99, group 3: blood pressure 160-179/100-109 group 4: equal to or above 180/110. There were 1115 patients′ records included in the study. The mean duration of transplantation was 66.9 ± 50.1 months. According to the level of measured blood pressure, there were 641 (57.5% patients in the normotensive group (group 1, 404 (36.3% patients in the mildly hypertensive group (group 2 64 (5.7% patients in the moderately severe hypertension group (group 3 and only six (0.5% patients in the severe hypertension group (group 4. The estimated prevalence of hypertension in this study was almost 85%. We found no significant difference in the prevalence of hypertension in terms of gender, year of transplantation, duration of transplantation, type of donor, number of previous transplants, diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, etiology of kidney disease, diagnosis of diabetes after transplantation, diagnosis of cerebrovascular accidents, or mean dose of prednisolone and cyclosporine. There was a statistically significant association between increased level of blood pressure and old age (above 50 years, original disease associated with hypertension, history of hypertension on dialysis, acute rejection (once or more, presence of protienuria (more than 0.3 mg/day, abnormality of ECG, or serum creatinine above 300 µmol/L. We conclude that hypertension is highly prevalent in the renal transplant population in Saudi Arabia. Risk

  2. High blood pressure and eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  3. Smart blood pressure holter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlhan, İlhan

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a wireless blood pressure holter that can be used with smart mobile devices was developed. The developed blood pressure holter consists of two parts, which are a smart mobile device and a cuff. The smart mobile device is used as a recording, control and display device through a developed interface, while the cuff was designed to take measurements from the arm. Resistor-Capacitor (RC) and digital filters were used on the cuff that communicates with the smart mobile device via Bluetooth. The blood pressure was estimated using the Simple Hill Climbing Algorithm (HCA). It is possible to measure instantaneous or programmable blood pressure and heart rate values at certain intervals using this holter. The test was conducted with 30 individuals at different ages with the guidance of a specialist health personnel. The results showed that an accuracy at 93.89% and 91.95% rates could be obtained for systolic and diastolic pressure values, respectively, when compared with those obtained using a traditional sphygmomanometer. The accuracy level for the heart rate was measured as 97.66%. Furthermore, this device was tested day and night in the holter mode in terms of working time, the continuity of the Bluetooth connection and the reliability of the measurement results. The test results were evaluated separately in terms of measurement accuracy, working time, the continuity of the Bluetooth connection and the reliability of the measurement results. The measurement accuracy for systolic, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate values was obtained as 93.89%, 91.95% and 97.66%, respectively. The maximum number of measurements which can be conducted with four 1000 mA alkaline batteries at 20 min intervals was found approximately 79 (little more than 24 h). In addition, it was determined that the continuity of the Bluetooth connection and the reliability of the measurement results were automatically achieved through the features in the interface developed for the

  4. Anxiety: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of high blood pressure? Can anxiety cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Anxiety doesn't cause long-term high blood pressure (hypertension). But episodes of anxiety can cause dramatic, ...

  5. Occupational status moderates the association between current perceived stress and high blood pressure: evidence from the IPC cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiernik, Emmanuel; Pannier, Bruno; Czernichow, Sébastien; Nabi, Hermann; Hanon, Olivier; Simon, Tabassome; Simon, Jean-Marc; Thomas, Frédérique; Bean, Kathy; Consoli, Silla; Danchin, Nicolas; Lemogne, Cédric

    2013-01-01

    Although lay beliefs commonly relate high blood pressure to psychological stress exposure, research findings are conflicting. This study examined the association between current perceived stress and high blood pressure and explored the potential impact of occupational status on this association. Resting blood pressure was measured in 122,816 adults (84,994 men), aged ≥30 years (mean age ± standard deviation: 46.8±9.9 years), without history of cardiovascular and renal disease and not on either psychotropic or antihypertensive drugs. High blood pressure was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg. Perceived stress in the past month was measured with the 4-item perceived stress scale. A total of 33,154 participants (27.0%) had high blood pressure (151±14/90±9 mmHg). After adjustment for all variables except occupational status, perceived stress was associated with high blood pressure (odds ratio for a 5-point increase: 1.06, 95% confidence interval: [1.03–1.09]). This association was no longer significant after additional adjustment for occupational status (odds ratio: 1.01 [0.99–1.04]). There was a significant interaction (phigh blood pressure among individuals of high occupational status (odds ratio: 0.91, [0.87–0.96]) but positively associated among those of low status (odds ratio: 1.10, [1.03–1.17]) or unemployed (odds ratio: 1.13, [1.03–1.24]). Sensitivity analyses yielded similar results. The association between current perceived stress and blood pressure depends upon occupational status. This interaction may account for previous conflicting results and warrants further studies to explore its underlying mechanisms. PMID:23319539

  6. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  7. Anatomic Patterns of Renal Arterial Sympathetic Innervation: New Aspects for Renal Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imnadze, Guram; Balzer, Stefan; Meyer, Baerbel; Neumann, Joerg; Krech, Rainer Horst; Thale, Joachim; Franz, Norbert; Warnecke, Henning; Awad, Khaled; Hayek, Salim S; Devireddy, Chandan

    2016-12-01

    Initial studies of catheter-based renal arterial sympathetic denervation to lower blood pressure in resistant hypertensive patients renewed interest in the sympathetic nervous system's role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. However, the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 study failed to meet its prespecified blood pressure lowering efficacy endpoint. To date, only a limited number of studies have described the microanatomy of renal nerves, of which, only two involve humans. Renal arteries were harvested from 15 cadavers from the Klinikum Osnabruck and Schuchtermann Klinik, Bad Rothenfelde. Each artery was divided longitudinally in equal thirds (proximal, middle, and distal), with each section then divided into equal superior, inferior, anterior, and posterior quadrants, which were then stained. Segments containing no renal nerves were given a score value = 0, 1-2 nerves with diameter 4 nerves or nerve diameter ≥600 µm a score = 3. A total of 22 renal arteries (9 right-sided, 13 left-sided) were suitable for examination. Overall, 691 sections of 5 mm thickness were prepared. Right renal arteries had significantly higher mean innervation grade (1.56 ± 0.85) compared to left renal arteries (1.09 ± 0.87) (P renal artery has significantly higher innervation scores than the left. The anterior and superior quadrants of the renal arteries scored higher in innervation than the posterior and inferior quadrants did. The distal third of the renal arteries are more innervated than the more proximal segments. These findings warrant further evaluation of the spatial innervation patterns of the renal artery in order to understand how it may enhance catheter-based renal arterial denervation procedural strategy and outcomes. The SYMPLICITY HTN-3 study dealt a blow to the idea of the catheter-based renal arterial sympathetic denervation. We investigated the location and patterns of periarterial renal nerves in cadaveric human renal arteries. To quantify the density of the

  8. Role of nitric oxide and prostaglandin in the maintenance of cortical and renal medullary blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I Gomez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken in anesthetized dogs to evaluate the relative participation of prostaglandins (PGs and nitric oxide (NO in the maintenance of total renal blood flow (TRBF, and renal medullary blood flow (RMBF. It was hypothesized that the inhibition of NO should impair cortical and medullary circulation because of the synthesis of this compound in the endothelial cells of these two territories. In contrast, under normal conditions of perfusion pressure PG synthesis is confined to the renal medulla. Hence PG inhibition should predominantly impair the medullary circulation. The initial administration of 25 µM kg-1 min-1 NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester produced a significant 26% decrease in TRBF and a concomitant 34% fall in RMBF, while the subsequent inhibition of PGs with 5 mg/kg meclofenamate further reduced TRBF by 33% and RMBF by 89%. In contrast, the initial administration of meclofenamate failed to change TRBF, while decreasing RMBF by 49%. The subsequent blockade of NO decreased TRBF by 35% without further altering RMBF. These results indicate that initial PG synthesis inhibition predominantly alters the medullary circulation, whereas NO inhibition decreases both cortical and medullary flow. This latter change induced by NO renders cortical and RMBF susceptible to a further decrease by PG inhibition. However, the decrease in medullary circulation produced by NO inhibition is not further enhanced by subsequent PG inhibition.

  9. Social Stress Induced Pressure Breathing and Consequent Blood Pressure Oscillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Dirk S.; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Meulen, Jan van der; Schoemaker, Regien

    1986-01-01

    A large amplitude blood pressure oscillation occurs during social defeat in a territorial fight between male rats, and during the application of a psychosocial stimulus associated with this defeat. Synchronous recording of blood pressure, intrathoracic pressure and diaphragm activity shows that the

  10. Renal Denervation vs. Spironolactone in Resistant Hypertension: Effects on Circadian Patterns and Blood Pressure Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Pareja, Julia; Armario, Pedro; Barrera, Ángela; Yun, Sergi; Vázquez, Susana; Sans, Laia; Pascual, Julio; Oliveras, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Sympathetic renal denervation (SRD) has been proposed as a therapeutic alternative for patients with resistant hypertension not controlled on pharmacological therapy. Two studies have suggested an effect of SRD in reducing short-term blood pressure variability (BPV). However, this has not been addressed in a randomized comparative trial. We aimed to compare the effects of spironolactone and SRD on circadian BP and BPV. This is a post-hoc analysis of a randomized trial in 24 true resistant hypertensive patients (15 men, 9 women; mean age 64 years) comparing 50mg of spironolactone (n = 13) vs. SRD (n = 11) on 24-hour BP. We report here the comparative effects on daytime (8 am-10 pm) and nighttime (0 am-6 am) BP, night-to-day ratios and BP and heart rate variabilities (SD and coefficient of variation of 24-hour, day and night, as well as weighted SD and average real variability (ARV)). Spironolactone was more effective than SRD in reducing daytime systolic (P = 0.006), daytime diastolic (P = 0.006), and nighttime systolic (P = 0.050) BP. No differences were observed in the night-to-day ratios. In contrast, SRD-reduced diastolic BPV (24 hours, daytime, nighttime, weighted, and ARV; all P < 0.05) with respect to spironolactone, without significant differences in systolic BPV. Spironolactone is more effective than SRD in reducing ambulatory BP. However, BPV is significantly more reduced with SRD. This effect could be important in terms of potential prevention beyond BP reduction and deserves further investigation. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Contributions of social context to blood pressure: findings from a multilevel analysis of social capital and systolic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Fujisawa, Yoshikazu; Yamasaki, Masayuki; Ito, Katsuhisa; Nabika, Toru; Shiwaku, Kuninori

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, few studies have quantified the effect of residential context on blood pressure. Although these studies have emphasized the importance of socioeconomic influences such as education or poverty levels, the association between the features of social structure such as social capital and blood pressure remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether social capital was associated with systolic blood pressure after controlling for individual potential confounders. We analyzed data from the Shimane Study conducted from 2006 to 2008 in rural mountainous regions of Japan. After excluding the missing data and data of participants taking hypertension medication, we conducted a multilevel analysis of the data for 335 individuals nested within 30 postcode sectors. Systolic blood pressure increased with increasing age and body mass index. We also found that a higher systolic blood pressure was observed among smokers and those taking medication for diabetes. Regarding the contextual effects of social capital, systolic blood pressure increased with an increasing proportion of lack of fairness, after adjustment for individual confounders. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the association between social capital and systolic blood pressure by using a multilevel methodological framework. Surprisingly, we found that lack of fairness had a strong effect on systolic blood pressure. However, we could not find any significant associations between other items of social capital and systolic blood pressure. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanism by which lack of fairness may have an effect on systolic blood pressure.

  12. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings can be segmented into time windows of particular interest, e.g., mean daytime and nighttime values. During sleep, blood pressure typically decreases, or dips, such that mean sleep blood pressure is lower than mean awake blood pressure. A non-dipping pattern and nocturnal hypertension are strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Approximately 70% of individuals dip ≥10% at night, while 30% have non-dipping patterns, when blood pressure remains similar to daytime average, or occasionally rises above daytime average. The various blood pressure categorizations afforded by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are valuable for clinical management of high blood pressure since they increase accuracy for diagnosis and the prediction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25107387

  13. Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System and Its Modulation in Renal Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Sata

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The kidneys are densely innervated with renal efferent and afferent nerves to communicate with the central nervous system. Innervation of major structural components of the kidneys, such as blood vessels, tubules, the pelvis, and glomeruli, forms a bidirectional neural network to relay sensory and sympathetic signals to and from the brain. Renal efferent nerves regulate renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, tubular reabsorption of sodium and water, as well as release of renin and prostaglandins, all of which contribute to cardiovascular and renal regulation. Renal afferent nerves complete the feedback loop via central autonomic nuclei where the signals are integrated and modulate central sympathetic outflow; thus both types of nerves form integral parts of the self-regulated renorenal reflex loop. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA is commonly increased in pathophysiological conditions such as hypertension and chronic- and end-stage renal disease. Increased RSNA raises blood pressure and can contribute to the deterioration of renal function. Attempts have been made to eliminate or interfere with this important link between the brain and the kidneys as a neuromodulatory treatment for these conditions. Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation has been successfully applied in patients with resistant hypertension and was associated with significant falls in blood pressure and renal protection in most studies performed. The focus of this review is the neural contribution to the control of renal and cardiovascular hemodynamics and renal function in the setting of hypertension and chronic kidney disease, as well as the specific roles of renal efferent and afferent nerves in this scenario and their utility as a therapeutic target.

  14. Oscillometric blood pressure measurements: differences between measured and calculated mean arterial pressure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.D.; Hofstra, J.M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is often used as an index of overall blood pressure. In recent years, the use of automated oscillometric blood pressure measurement devices is increasing. These devices directly measure and display MAP; however, MAP is often calculated from systolic blood pressure (SBP)

  15. Relationship between renal hemodynamic status and aging in patients without diabetes evaluated by renal Doppler ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Kamide, Kei; Onishi, Miyuki; Hongyo, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto-Hanasaki, Hiroko; Oguro, Ryosuke; Maekawa, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Koichi; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2012-10-01

    Aging is well known as one of the major causes of a reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The resistive index (RI) measured by renal Doppler ultrasonography (RDU) is thought to be a good indicator of renal vascular resistance induced by arteriosclerosis. In this study, we investigated whether RI could be used to evaluate the pathogenesis of renal damage or the mechanisms of reduction of renal function by aging. We investigated the correlation between RI and multiple clinical parameters and the influence of aging on the renal hemodynamic status of 194 in-patients (mean age 66.2 years) who underwent RDU at our hospital between February 2009 and July 2010. RI was significantly correlated with the age, estimated GFR (eGFR), diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and degree of albuminuria. Subjects aged ≥75 years showed a significantly higher correlation coefficient between eGFR and RI. RI showed a stronger correlation with age in subjects aged ≥75 years compared to eGFR. The present study showed that renal vascular resistance and intra-renal arteriosclerosis had a greater impact on renal function in older than younger subjects, reflecting the possible mechanisms of renal function reduction due to aging.

  16. Home blood pressure measurement in elderly patients with cognitive impairment: comparison of agreement between relative-measured blood pressure and automated blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichart, Matthieu; Seux, Marie-Laure; Caillard, Laure; Chaussade, Edouard; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    Home blood pressure measurement (HBPM) is recommended by guidelines for hypertension management. However, this method might be difficult to use in elderly individuals with cognitive disorders. Our aim was to assess the agreement and the feasibility of HBPM by a relative as compared with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in elderly patients with dementia. Sixty outpatients with dementia aged 75 years and older with office hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) were subjected successively to HBPM by a trained relative and 24-h ABPM. The order of the two methods was randomized. Current guidelines' thresholds for the diagnosis of hypertension were used. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 80.8 (6.1) years (55% women) and the mean (SD) mini-mental state examination score was 20.1 (6.9). The feasibility of relative-HBPM was very high, with a 97% success rate (defined by ≥12/18 measurements reported). The blood pressure measurements were highly correlated between the two methods (r=0.75 and 0.64 for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, respectively; Pmethods for the diagnosis of sustained hypertension and white-coat hypertension was excellent (overall agreement, 92%; κ coefficient, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.61-0.93). Similar results were found for daytime-ABPM. In cognitively impaired elderly patients, HBPM by a relative using an automated device was a good alternative to 24-h ABPM.

  17. Polynomial analysis of ambulatory blood pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinderman, A. H.; Cleophas, T. A.; Cleophas, T. J.; van der Wall, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    In normotensive subjects blood pressures follow a circadian rhythm. A circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients is less well established, and may be clinically important, particularly with rigorous treatments of daytime blood pressures. Polynomial analysis of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

  18. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Click here for the Color Version (PDF 533KB) High blood pressure is a serious illness. High blood pressure is ...

  19. Leukocyte and platelet depletion improves blood flow and function in a renal transplant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Phillip J; Hosgood, Sarah A; Nicholson, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors are an important source of organs for transplantation. Due to warm and cold ischemic injury, DCD kidneys undergo a significant reperfusion insult when transplanted. This is manifested clinically as a high incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) and primary non-function (PNF). The importance of leukocytes in the generation of reperfusion injury is pivotal. Using an ex vivo porcine model of kidney transplantation, the effects of reperfusion with leukocyte and platelet depleted blood (LDB) and whole blood (WB) on renal blood flow and function were compared. Hemodynamic measurements were recorded, and biochemical, hematological, and histologic samples taken at set time-points. Reperfusion with LDB improved renal blood flow significantly compared with WB reperfusion. In addition, there was a significant improvement in creatinine clearance and renal oxygen consumption, but not fractional excretion of sodium, acid-base homeostasis, urinary nitric oxide (NO), or 8-isoprostane levels. This study represents a good model for the initial reperfusion period in renal transplantation. Improvement in only some functional markers and neither urinary NO nor 8-isoprostane levels indicates that improved blood flow alone is not sufficient to reverse the severe ischemic insult endured by DCD kidneys. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Induced renal artery stenosis in rabbits: magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, and radionuclide determination of blood volume and blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.G.; Tobin, M.; LeVeen, R.; Tomaczewski, J.; Alavi, A.; Staum, M.; Kundel, H.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the ability of MRI to detect alterations due to renal ischemia, a rabbit renal artery stenosis (RAS) model was developed. Seven rabbits had RAS induced by surgically encircling the artery with a polyethylene band which had a lumen of 1 mm, 1 to 2 weeks prior to imaging. The stenosis was confirmed by angiography, and the rabbits were then imaged in a 1.4 T research MRI unit. T1 was calculated using four inversion recovery sequences with different inversion times. Renal blood flow, using 113 Sn-microspheres, and regional water content by drying were then measured. The average T1 of the inner medulla was shorter for the ischemia (1574 msec) than for the contralateral kidney (1849 msec), while no change ws noted in the cortex. Ischemic kidneys had less distinct outer medullary zones on IR images with TI = 600 msec than did contralateral or control kidneys. Blood flow to both the cortex and medulla were markedly reduced in ischemic kidneys compared with contralateral kidneys (119.5 vs. 391 ml/min/100 gm for cortex and 19.8 vs. 50.8 ml/min/100 gm for medulla). Renal water and blood content were less affected. Our rabbit model of renal artery stenosis with MRI, radionuclide, and angiographic correlation has the potential to increase our understanding of MR imaging of the rabbit kidney

  1. Measurement of renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging during septic acute kidney injury: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowle, John R; Molan, Maurice P; Hornsey, Emma; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2012-06-01

    In septic patients, decreased renal perfusion is considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury. However, the accurate measurement of renal blood flow in such patients is problematic and invasive. We sought to overcome such obstacles by measuring renal blood flow in septic patients with acute kidney injury using cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Pilot observational study. University-affiliated general adult intensive care unit. Ten adult patients with established septic acute kidney injury and 11 normal volunteers. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging measurement of renal blood flow and cardiac output. The median age of the study patients was 62.5 yrs and eight were male. At the time of magnetic resonance imaging, eight patients were mechanically ventilated, nine were on continuous hemofiltration, and five required vasopressors. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging examinations were carried out without complication. Median renal blood flow was 482 mL/min (range 335-1137) in septic acute kidney injury and 1260 mL/min (range 791-1750) in healthy controls (p = .003). Renal blood flow indexed to body surface area was 244 mL/min/m2 (range 165-662) in septic acute kidney injury and 525 mL/min/m2 (range 438-869) in controls (p = .004). In patients with septic acute kidney injury, median cardiac index was 3.5 L/min/m2 (range 1.6-8.7), and median renal fraction of cardiac output was only 7.1% (range 4.4-10.8). There was no rank correlation between renal blood flow index and creatinine clearance in patients with septic acute kidney injury (r = .26, p = .45). Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging can be used to noninvasively and safely assess renal perfusion during critical illness in man. Near-simultaneous accurate measurement of cardiac output enables organ blood flow to be assessed in the context of the global circulation. Renal blood flow seems consistently reduced as a fraction of cardiac output in

  2. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drong, Alexander W; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Esko, Tõnu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Huaixing; Yu Mok, Zuan; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexessander; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N; Pereira, Mark A; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Inês; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D; Doevendans, Pieter A; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L N; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C M; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Ann Rozario, Michelle; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparsø, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M; Stott, David J; Stram, Daniel O; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W H Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, André G; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Viikari, Jorma S; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D; Young, Terri L; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J Wouter; kähönen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimäki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J; Franco, Oscar H; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T; Holbrook, Joanna D; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; März, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H W; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kleinjans, Jos C S; McCarthy, Mark I; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James

    2016-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10−11 to 5.0 × 10−21). The sentinel blood pressure SNPs are enriched for association with DNA methylation at multiple nearby CpG sites, suggesting that, at some of the loci identified, DNA methylation may lie on the regulatory pathway linking sequence variation to blood pressure. The sentinel SNPs at the 12 new loci point to genes involved in vascular smooth muscle (IGFBP3, KCNK3, PDE3A and PRDM6) and renal (ARHGAP24, OSR1, SLC22A7 and TBX2) function. The new and known genetic variants predict increased left ventricular mass, circulating levels of NT-proBNP, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P = 0.04 to 8.6 × 10−6). Our results provide new evidence for the role of DNA methylation in blood pressure regulation. PMID:26390057

  3. Perioperative optimal blood pressure as determined by ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy and its association with postoperative acute kidney injury in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Daijiro; Hogue, Charles; Adachi, Hideo; Max, Laura; Price, Joel; Sciortino, Christopher; Zehr, Kenton; Conte, John; Cameron, Duke; Mandal, Kaushik

    2016-04-01

    Perioperative blood pressure management by targeting individualized optimal blood pressure, determined by cerebral blood flow autoregulation monitoring, may ensure sufficient renal perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the optimal blood pressure for individual patients, determined during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and during early postoperative period in intensive care unit (ICU). A secondary aim was to examine if excursions below optimal blood pressure in the ICU are associated with risk of cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI). One hundred and ten patients undergoing cardiac surgery had cerebral blood flow monitored with a novel technology using ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy (UT-NIRS) during CPB and in the first 3 h after surgery in the ICU. The correlation flow index (CFx) was calculated as a moving, linear correlation coefficient between cerebral flow index measured using UT-NIRS and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Optimal blood pressure was defined as the MAP with the lowest CFx. Changes in optimal blood pressure in the perioperative period were observed and the association of blood pressure excursions (magnitude and duration) below the optimal blood pressure [area under the curve (AUC) blood pressure during early ICU stay and CPB was correlated (r = 0.46, P AUC blood pressure during CPB and in the ICU was correlated. Excursions below optimal blood pressure (AUC blood pressure management based on cerebral autoregulation monitoring during the perioperative period may help improve CSA-AKI-related outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Intravenous digital subtraction angiography for the evaluation of renal artery blood flow following the removal of a neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagiwa, Iwao; Obata, Kazuya; Saito, Hiroyuki; Washio, Masahiko

    1994-01-01

    There have been several reports of acute renal failure following the resection of an abdominal neuroblastoma combined with ipsilateral nephrectomy as well as the atrophy or disappearance of an unresected kidney after tumor resection. Spasms or thrombosis of the renal artery during tumor excision are considered to be the major cause. Since 1989, intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) has been used to evaluate the renal artery blood flow immediately following surgery in seven patients with abdominal neuroblastomas. IVDSA was performed using a central venous catheter inserted prior to surgery. In all seven patients, IVDSA provided clear images for the evaluation of renal artery blood flow. In one of the two patients whose kidneys briefly became cyanosed during tumor excision, IVDSA demonstrated an occlusion of the renal artery and prompt measures could be taken to reestablish the blood flow. No complications of IVDSA occurred in any of the seven patients. IVDSA using a central venous catheter was thus considered to be useful for evaluating the renal artery blood flow in patients with a suspected renal artery blood flow disturbance without any risk of complications, and this modality obviated the need for intraarterial angiography. (author)

  5. Renal cortical and medullary blood flow responses to altered NO availability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damkjær, Mads; Vafaee, Manoucher; Møller, Michael L; Braad, Poul Erik; Petersen, Henrik; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Bie, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify regional renal blood flow in humans. In nine young volunteers on a controlled diet, the lower abdomen was CT-scanned, and regional renal blood flow was determined by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning using H(2)(15)O as tracer. Measurements were performed at baseline, during constant intravenous infusion of nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl nitrate and after intravenous injection of NO synthase inhibitor N(ω)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Using the CT image, the kidney pole areas were delineated as volumes of interest (VOI). In the data analysis, tissue layers with a thickness of one voxel were eliminated stepwise from the external surface of the VOI (voxel peeling), and the blood flow subsequently was determined in each new, reduced VOI. Blood flow in the shrinking VOIs decreased as the number of cycles of voxel peeling increased. After 4-5 cycles, blood flow was not reduced further by additional voxel peeling. This volume-insensitive flow was measured to be 2.30 ± 0.17 ml·g tissue(-1)·min(-1) during the control period; it increased during infusion of glyceryl nitrate to 2.97 ± 0.18 ml·g tissue(-1)·min(-1) (P blood flow was 4.67 ± 0.31 ml·g tissue(-1)·min(-1) during control, unchanged by glyceryl nitrate, and decreased after L-NMMA [3.48 ± 0.23 ml·(g·min)(-1), P renal medullary region in which the measured blood flow is 1) low, 2) independent of reduction in the VOI, and 3) reactive to changes in systemic NO supply. The technique seems to provide indices of renal medullary blood flow in humans.

  6. Superselective transcatheter renal arterial embolization for acute renal bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency: its clinical efficacy and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Tingyang; Zhou Bing; Yu Wenqiang; Luo Zuyan; Mao Yingmin; Chen Fanghong; Li Bo; Yuan Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical efficacy and complications of super selective renal arterial embolization in treating acute renal arterial bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency, and to evaluate the influence of the treatment on the renal function. Methods: During the period of January 2000 December 2009, super selective renal arterial embolization was performed in our institution for acute renal bleeding in 13 patients with renal insufficiency. The complete clinical and imaging materials of all patients were properly collected. The clinical effectiveness, the renal function, the extent of embolization and the complications were observed and the relationship between each other was analyzed. Results: The embolization procedure was successfully completed in all patients with a technical success rate of 100%. The mean embolized territory was 22% of a single kidney. Three days after the procedure, the hemoglobin level, hematocrit, blood pressure and heart rate were considerably improved in all patients. Compared to the corresponding preoperative data, all the differences were statistically significant (P 0.05), while the blood urea nitrogen was markedly decreased (P=0.011). Post embolization syndrome occurred in 5 patients and progressive aggravation of the renal function was observed in one patient, who had to receive hemodialysis finally. The embolized territory in patients occurring complications was larger than that in patients without occurring complications (U=1.500, P=0.006). Conclusion: Super selective renal arterial embolization is an effective and safe treatment for acute renal arterial bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency, the therapy will not significantly worsen the renal function. Appropriate and reasonable extent of embolization, as small as possible, is the key point for reducing the complications. (authors)

  7. Twenty-four-hour central blood pressure is not better associated with hypertensive target organ damage than 24-h peripheral blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Pareja, Julia; Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Armario, Pedro; Yun, Sergi; Acosta, Eva; Calero, Francesca; Vázquez, Susana; Blanch, Pedro; Sierra, Cristina; Oliveras, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) is increasingly considered as a better estimator of hypertension associated risks. We aimed to evaluate the association of 24-h central BP, in comparison with 24-h peripheral BP, with the presence of target organ damage (TOD). Cross-sectional study of 208 hypertensive patients, aged 57 ± 12 years, 34% women. Office (mean of 4 measurements) and 24-h central and peripheral BP were measured by the oscillometric Mobil-O-Graph device. TOD was assessed at cardiac (left ventricular hypertrophy by echocardiography), renal (reduction of glomerular filtration rate and/or microalbuminuria), and arterial (increased aortic pulse wave velocity) levels. A total of 107 patients (51.4%) had TOD (77, 35% patients left ventricular hypertrophy; 54, 25.9% renal abnormalities; and 40, 19.2% arterial stiffness). All SBP and pulse BP estimates (office, 24-h, daytime, and night-time) were associated with the presence of TOD, after adjustment for age, sex, and antihypertensive treatment, with higher odds ratios for ambulatory-derived values. Odds ratios for central and peripheral BP were similar for all office, 24-h, daytime, and night-time BP. After simultaneous adjustment, peripheral, but not central, 24-h and night-time SBP and pulse pressures were associated with the presence of TOD. TOD in hypertension is associated with BP elevation, independently of the type of measurement (office or ambulatory, central or peripheral). Central BP, even monitored during 24 h, is not better associated with TOD than peripheral BP. These results do not support a routine measurement of 24-h central BP.

  8. High Blood Pressure - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Being 8 - High Blood Pressure - Amarɨñña / አማርኛ (Amharic) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center Arabic (العربية) Expand Section ... Being 8 - High Blood Pressure - myanma bhasa (Burmese) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) ( ...

  9. HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: DOES THIS CONCERN ME?

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    To find out, the Medical Service's nurses are organising A HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING AND PREVENTION CAMPAIGN from Monday, 26th to Thursday, 29th March 2007 at the Infirmary - Building 57 - ground floor A blood pressure test, advice, information and, if necessary, referral for specialist medical treatment will be offered to any person working on the CERN site. High blood pressure is a silent threat to health. So come and get your blood pressure checked.

  10. HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: DOES THIS CONCERN ME?

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    To find out, the Medical Service's nurses are organising A HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING AND PREVENTION CAMPAIGN from Monday, 26th to Thursday, 29th March 2007 at the Infirmary - Building 57 - ground floor A blood pressure test, advice, information and, if necessary, referral for specialist medical treatment will be offered to any person working on the CERN site. High blood pressure is a stealth threat to health. So come and get your blood pressure checked.

  11. Vascular and renal function in experimental thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Félix; Moreno, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Wangensteen, Rosemary; Osuna, Antonio; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; García-Estañ, Joaquín

    2006-02-01

    This review focuses on the effects of thyroid hormones in vascular and renal systems. Special emphasis is given to the mechanisms by which thyroid hormones affect the regulation of body fluids, vascular resistance and, ultimately, blood pressure. Vascular function is markedly affected by thyroid hormones that produce changes in vascular reactivity and endothelial function in hyper- and hypothyroidism. The hypothyroid state is accompanied by a marked decrease in sensitivity to vasoconstrictors, especially to sympathetic agonists, alteration that may play a role in the reduced blood pressure of hypothyroid rats, as well as in the preventive effects of hypothyroidism on experimental hypertension. Moreover, in hypothyroid rats, the endothelium-dependent and nitric oxide donors vasodilation is reduced. Conversely, the vessels from hyperthyroid rats showed an increased endothelium-dependent responsiveness that may be secondary to the shear-stress induced by the hyperdynamic circulation, and that may contribute to the reduced vascular resistance characteristic of this disease. Thyroid hormones also have important effects in the kidney, affecting renal growth, renal haemodynamics, and salt and water metabolism. In hyperthyroidism, there is a resetting of the pressure-natriuresis relationship related to hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system, which contributes to the arterial hypertension associated with this endocrine disease. Moreover, thyroid hormones affect the development and/or maintenance of various forms of arterial hypertension. This review also describes recent advances in our understanding of thyroid hormone action on nitric oxide and oxidative stress in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal function and in the long-term control of blood pressure.

  12. Effects of hormone therapy on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Zeinab; Seely, Ellen W; Rahme, Maya; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2015-04-01

    Although hormone therapy remains the most efficacious option for the management of vasomotor symptoms of menopause, its effects on blood pressure remain unclear. This review scrutinizes evidence of the mechanisms of action of hormone therapy on signaling pathways affecting blood pressure and evidence from clinical studies. Comprehensive Ovid MEDLINE searches were conducted for the terms "hypertension" and either of the following "hormone therapy and menopause" or "selective estrogen receptor modulator" from year 2000 to November 2013. In vitro and physiologic studies did not reveal a clear deleterious effect of hormone therapy on blood pressure. The effect of oral therapy was essentially neutral in large trials conducted in normotensive women with blood pressure as primary outcome. Results from all other trials had several limitations. Oral therapy had a neutral effect on blood pressure in hypertensive women. Transdermal estrogen and micronized progesterone had a beneficial effect on blood pressure in normotensive women and, at most, a neutral effect on hypertensive women. In general, tibolone and raloxifene had a neutral effect on blood pressure in both hypertensive and normotensive women. Large randomized trials are needed to assess the effect of oral hormone therapy on blood pressure as a primary outcome in hypertensive women and the effect of transdermal preparations on both normotensive and hypertensive women. Transdermal preparations would be the preferred mode of therapy for hypertensive women, in view of their favorable physiologic and clinical profiles. The decision regarding the use of hormone therapy should be individualized, and blood pressure should be monitored during the course of treatment.

  13. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  14. Exercise training attenuates chemoreflex-mediated reductions of renal blood flow in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Noah J; Pügge, Carolin; Mediratta, Jai; Schiller, Alicia M; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Zucker, Irving H; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-07-15

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), carotid body chemoreceptor (CBC) activity is increased and contributes to increased tonic and hypoxia-evoked elevation in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Elevated RSNA and reduced renal perfusion may contribute to development of the cardio-renal syndrome in CHF. Exercise training (EXT) has been shown to abrogate CBC-mediated increases in RSNA in experimental heart failure; however, the effect of EXT on CBC control of renal blood flow (RBF) is undetermined. We hypothesized that CBCs contribute to tonic reductions in RBF in CHF, that stimulation of the CBC with hypoxia would result in exaggerated reductions in RBF, and that these responses would be attenuated with EXT. RBF was measured in CHF-sedentary (SED), CHF-EXT, CHF-carotid body denervation (CBD), and CHF-renal denervation (RDNX) groups. We measured RBF at rest and in response to hypoxia (FiO2 10%). All animals exhibited similar reductions in ejection fraction and fractional shortening as well as increases in ventricular systolic and diastolic volumes. Resting RBF was lower in CHF-SED (29 ± 2 ml/min) than in CHF-EXT animals (46 ± 2 ml/min, P < 0.05) or in CHF-CBD animals (42 ± 6 ml/min, P < 0.05). In CHF-SED, RBF decreased during hypoxia, and this was prevented in CHF-EXT animals. Both CBD and RDNX abolished the RBF response to hypoxia in CHF. Mean arterial pressure increased in response to hypoxia in CHF-SED, but was prevented by EXT, CBD, and RDNX. EXT is effective in attenuating chemoreflex-mediated tonic and hypoxia-evoked reductions in RBF in CHF. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Jun 1,2018 What do your blood ... and Live Our Interactive Cardiovascular Library has detailed animations and illustrations to help you learn about conditions, ...

  16. Evaluation of renal first pass blood flow with a functional image technique in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Morita, Seiichiro; Umezaki, Noriyoshi; Ohtake, Hisashi

    1988-01-01

    The renal circulation of patients with essential hypertension and renovascular hypertension was evaluated using 99m Tc-DTPA. The first renal peak count (the first C max ; FC max ), time phase distribution (the first T max ; FT max ), and blood velocity (the FC max /FT max ) were calculated by digital imaging. This yields a visual image of the renal circulation. We consider that the increase in the renal first pass blood flow in patients with essential hypertension is best observed pixel by pixel. The FC max and FC max /FT max images before and after treatment by percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty in patients with renovascular hypertension clearly show its therapeutic effect. The FI technique, therefore, has the advantage that it can be performed at the same time as the conventional routine examinations of renal function. This makes it very useful clinically. (orig.)

  17. Effect of long-term high-fat diet intake on peripheral insulin sensibility, blood pressure, and renal function in female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi A. V. Roza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study determines whether -week high-fat diet (HFD consumption alters insulin sensitivity, kidney function, and blood pressure (BP in female rats when compared with standard rodent diet (ND intake in gender- and age-matched rats. Methods: The present study investigates, in female Wistar HanUnib rats, the effect of long-term high-fat fed group (HFD compared with standard chow on BP by an indirect tail-cuff method using an electrosphygmomanometer, insulin and glucose function, and kidney function by creatinine and lithium clearances. Results: The current study shows glucose tolerance impairment, as demonstrated by increased fasting blood glucose (ND: ±2.8 vs. HFD: 87±3.8 mg/dL associated with reduced insulin secretion (ND: 0.58±0.07 vs. HFD: 0.40±0.03 ng/mL in 8-week female HFD-treated rats. The incremental area under the curve (AUC, ND: 1,4558.0±536.0 vs. HFD: 1,6507.8±661.9, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index, and the first-order rate constant for the disappearance of glucose (Kitt were significantly enhanced in 8-week HFD-treated rats compared with age-matched ND group (respectively, P=0.03, P=0.002, and P<0.0001. The current study also shows a significantly higher systolic BP measured in 5 and 8 weeks posttreatment in HFD (5-week HFD-treated: 155.25±10.54 mmHg and 8-week HFD-treated: 165±5.8 mmHg (P=0.0001, when compared to BP values in 5-week ND, 137±4.24 mmHg and 8-week ND, 131.75±5.8 mmHg age-matched group. Otherwise, the glomerular filtration rate and renal sodium handling evaluated by FENa, FEPNa and FEPPNa, were unchanged in both groups. Conclusion: We may conclude that 8-week female HFD-fed rats compared with ND group stimulate harmful effects, such as BP rise and peripheral glucose intolerance. The increased BP occurs through insulin resistance and supposedly decreased vasodilatation response without any change on renal function.

  18. Effect of long-term high-fat diet intake on peripheral insulin sensibility, blood pressure, and renal function in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, Noemi A V; Possignolo, Luiz F; Palanch, Adrianne C; Gontijo, José A R

    2016-01-01

    This study determines whether 8-week high-fat diet (HFD) consumption alters insulin sensitivity, kidney function, and blood pressure (BP) in female rats when compared with standard rodent diet (ND) intake in gender- and age-matched rats. The present study investigates, in female Wistar HanUnib rats, the effect of long-term high-fat fed group (HFD) compared with standard chow on BP by an indirect tail-cuff method using an electrosphygmomanometer, insulin and glucose function, and kidney function by creatinine and lithium clearances. The current study shows glucose tolerance impairment, as demonstrated by increased fasting blood glucose (ND: 78±2.8 vs. HFD: 87±3.8 mg/dL) associated with reduced insulin secretion (ND: 0.58±0.07 vs. HFD: 0.40±0.03 ng/mL) in 8-week female HFD-treated rats. The incremental area under the curve (AUC, ND: 1,4558.0±536.0 vs. HFD: 1,6507.8±661.9), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, and the first-order rate constant for the disappearance of glucose (Kitt) were significantly enhanced in 8-week HFD-treated rats compared with age-matched ND group (respectively, P=0.03, P=0.002, and P<0.0001). The current study also shows a significantly higher systolic BP measured in 5 and 8 weeks posttreatment in HFD (5-week HFD-treated: 155.25±10.54 mmHg and 8-week HFD-treated: 165±5.8 mmHg) (P=0.0001), when compared to BP values in 5-week ND, 137±4.24 mmHg and 8-week ND, 131.75±5.8 mmHg age-matched group. Otherwise, the glomerular filtration rate and renal sodium handling evaluated by FENa, FEPNa and FEPPNa, were unchanged in both groups. We may conclude that 8-week female HFD-fed rats compared with ND group stimulate harmful effects, such as BP rise and peripheral glucose intolerance. The increased BP occurs through insulin resistance and supposedly decreased vasodilatation response without any change on renal function.

  19. Abdominal Aortic Calcifications Influences the Systemic and Renal Hemodynamic Response to Renal Denervation in the DENERHTN (Renal Denervation for Hypertension) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courand, Pierre-Yves; Pereira, Helena; Del Giudice, Costantino; Gosse, Philippe; Monge, Matthieu; Bobrie, Guillaume; Delsart, Pascal; Mounier-Vehier, Claire; Lantelme, Pierre; Denolle, Thierry; Dourmap, Caroline; Halimi, Jean Michel; Girerd, Xavier; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Ormezzano, Olivier; Vaisse, Bernard; Herpin, Daniel; Ribstein, Jean; Bouhanick, Beatrice; Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Ferrari, Emile; Chatellier, Gilles; Sapoval, Marc; Azarine, Arshid; Azizi, Michel

    2017-10-10

    The DENERHTN (Renal Denervation for Hypertension) trial confirmed the efficacy of renal denervation (RDN) in lowering daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure when added to standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment (SSAHT) for resistant hypertension at 6 months. This post hoc exploratory analysis assessed the impact of abdominal aortic calcifications (AAC) on the hemodynamic and renal response to RDN at 6 months. In total, 106 patients with resistant hypertension were randomly assigned to RDN plus SSAHT or to the same SSAHT alone (control group). Total AAC volume was measured, with semiautomatic software and blind to randomization, from the aortic hiatus to the iliac bifurcation using the prerandomization noncontrast abdominal computed tomography scans of 90 patients. Measurements were expressed as tertiles. The baseline-adjusted difference in the change in daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure from baseline to 6 months between the RDN and control groups was -10.1 mm Hg ( P =0.0462) in the lowest tertile and -2.5 mm Hg ( P =0.4987) in the 2 highest tertiles of AAC volume. Estimated glomerular filtration rate remained stable at 6 months for the patients in the lowest tertile of AAC volume who underwent RDN (+2.5 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ) but decreased in the control group (-8.0 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 , P =0.0148). In the 2 highest tertiles of AAC volume, estimated glomerular filtration rate decreased similarly in the RDN and control groups ( P =0.2640). RDN plus SSAHT resulted in a larger decrease in daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure than SSAHT alone in patients with a lower AAC burden than in those with a higher AAC burden. This larger decrease in daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure was not associated with a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01570777. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  20. Review of the State of Renal Nerve Ablation for Patients with Severe and Resistant Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Vinay; White, William B.

    2013-01-01

    Through modulation of renin secretion, glomerular filtration rate and renal absorption of sodium, the sympathetic innervation of the kidneys plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Renal nerve ablation technology is being developed for treatment of drug-treatment resistant hypertension worldwide. Preliminary research with the use of radiofrequency based renal denervation systems have demonstrated encouraging results with significant reduction of blood pressure in patients inadequately controlled despite nearly maximal drug therapy regimens. From work done thus far, the renal denervation procedure has not been associated with serious adverse effects. Long term efficacy and safety still needs to be established for renal nerve ablation. This review focuses on the impact of the renal sympathetic system on blood pressure regulation, the clinical rationale for renal nerve ablation in severe and drug-treatment resistant hypertension and current evidence from the more advanced renal denervation devices. PMID:23953998

  1. Clinical effectiveness of secondary interventions for restenosis after renal artery stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Thomas A.; Brooke, Benjamin S.; Goodney, Philip P.; Walsh, Daniel B.; Stone, David H.; Powell, Richard J.; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Nolan, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Secondary interventions for renal artery restenosis (RAS) after renal artery stenting are common, despite limited data about their effectiveness. This study was designed to evaluate the outcomes of endovascular treatment of recurrent RAS. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent renal artery stenting between 2001 and 2011 at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Patients who required secondary interventions were compared with control patients who underwent only primary interventions for RAS. Multivariate regression models were used to identify factors associated with successful outcomes, as measured by changes in blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and number of antihypertensive medications required. Results Sixty-five secondary (57 patients) renal interventions were undertaken for recurrent RAS associated with progressive hypertension or renal dysfunction and compared with outcomes after 216 primary (180 patients) renal artery stenting procedures. Patients undergoing primary vs secondary interventions did not differ significantly in the number of preoperative antihypertensive medications used, comorbid conditions, or blood pressure. All primary and secondary interventions were performed with stents and showed no difference in procedural complications. At a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 1–128 months), similar improvements in renal function and blood pressure were found between patients undergoing primary and secondary interventions, and there was no difference in rates of restenosis or survival between cohorts. Regression models showed that the use of embolic protection devices was associated with improved renal function after primary (odds ratio [OR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.8; P < .05) and secondary (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.7–12.5; P < .05) interventions, whereas statin therapy was associated with improved renal (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.3–3.2; P < .05) and blood pressure response (OR, 4

  2. [Ultrasonographic study of blood flow in the renal arteries of patients with arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, E S; Dombrovskiĭ, V I; Nelasov, N Iu

    2012-01-01

    Vascular duplex ultrasound duplex with simultaneous ECG registration was made to estimate the quantitative and time parameters of blood flow in the renal arteries with grade 1-2 arterial hypertension. There were increases in vascular resistance indices and acceleration phase index and a reduction in systolic phase index. There were correlations of the time parameters of blood flow in the renal arteries with age and lipidogram values.

  3. The optimal scheme of self blood pressure measurement as determined from ambulatory blood pressure recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, Willem J.; Kroon, Abraham A.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.; Lenders, Jacques W. M.; Thien, Theo; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Smit, Andries J.; de Leeuw, Peter W.

    Objective To determine how many self-measurements of blood pressure (BP) should be taken at home in order to obtain a reliable estimate of a patient's BP. Design Participants performed self blood pressure measurement (SBPM) for 7 days (triplicate morning and evening readings). In all of them, office

  4. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. We measured the blood pressures of 650 healthy, randomly ... In addition, blood pressure measurement should be a part of the routine clinical examination of children. ... familial risk factors.2 ... common cause of elevated blood pressure in children.4 They ... sphygmomanometer (Accoson, hospital model BS 274,.

  5. Rationale and design of a large registry on renal denervation: the Global SYMPLICITY registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix; Ukena, Christian; Bauer, Axel; Fleck, Eckart; Hoppe, Uta C; Kintscher, Ulrich; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Negoita, Manuela; Ruilope, Luis; Rump, L Christian; Schlaich, Markus; Schmieder, Roland; Sievert, Horst; Weil, Joachim; Williams, Bryan; Zeymer, Uwe; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-08-22

    Hypertension is a global healthcare concern associated with a wide range of comorbidities. The recognition that elevated sympathetic drive plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension led to the use of renal artery denervation to interrupt the efferent and afferent sympathetic nerves between the brain and kidneys to lower blood pressure. Clinical trials of the Symplicity™ renal denervation system have demonstrated that radiofrequency ablation of renal artery nerves is safe and significantly lowers blood pressure in patients with severe resistant (systolic BP >160 mmHg) hypertension. Smaller ancillary studies in hypertensive patients suggest a benefit from renal denervation in a variety of conditions such as chronic kidney disease, glucose intolerance, sleep apnoea and heart failure. The Global SYMPLICITY registry, which incorporates the GREAT SYMPLICITY registry initiated in Germany, is being conducted worldwide to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment with the Symplicity renal denervation system in real-world uncontrolled hypertensive patients, looking first at subjects with severe resistant hypertension to confirm the results of prior clinical trials, but then also subjects with a wider range of baseline blood pressure and coexisting comorbidities. The rationale, design and first baseline data from the Global SYMPLICITY registry are presented.

  6. Title: variations and sensitivities of some blood pressure monitors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure is the pressure exerted by circulating blood upon the walls of blood vessels. Accuracy in blood pressure meters is of essence to health, especially in blood pressure monitoring and treatment. The aim of this research was to compare the readings and the sensitivities of some blood pressure monitors in use ...

  7. Sleep deprivation increases blood pressure in healthy normotensive elderly and attenuates the blood pressure response to orthostatic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Rébecca; Lanfranchi, Paola A; Prince, François; Filipini, Daniel; Carrier, Julie

    2011-03-01

    To determine how aging affects the impact of sleep deprivation on blood pressure at rest and under orthostatic challenge. Subjects underwent a night of sleep and 24.5 h of sleep deprivation in a crossover counterbalanced design. Sleep laboratory. Sixteen healthy normotensive men and women: 8 young adults (mean 24 years [SD 3.1], range 20-28 years) and 8 elderly adults (mean 64.1 years [SD 3.4], range 60-69 years). Sleep deprivation. Brachial cuff arterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured in semi-recumbent and upright positions. These measurements were compared across homeostatic sleep pressure conditions and age groups. Sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in elderly but not young adults. Moreover, sleep deprivation attenuated the systolic blood pressure orthostatic response in both age groups. Our results suggest that sleep deprivation alters the regulatory mechanisms of blood pressure and might increase the risk of hypertension in healthy normotensive elderly.

  8. Interventional treatment of renal artery stenosis: a mid-term evaluation of clinical efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jing; Zhang Xitong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical efficacy of interventional management for the treatment of renal artery stenosis. Methods: Percutaneous transluminal balloon renal angioplasty and / or percutaneous transluminal renal artery stenting were performed in 47 patients with renal artery stenosis (55 stenosed arteries in total). A follow-up study on the blood pressure and renal function was conducted and the results were statistically analyzed. Results: Fifty-four stenosed renal arteries were successfully reopened, of which only percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty was adopted in 17 and percutaneous transluminal renal artery stenting in 37. One patient died during the procedure. A follow-up for a mean period of (2.5 ± 0.6) years was carried out. The blood pressure determined at one (n = 46), 6 (n = 46), 12 (n = 33) and 24 (n = 29) months after the treatment was significantly decreased when compared to that determined before the treatment (P < 0.01). The clinical effective rate was 89.13% (41 / 46), 72.73% (24 / 33) and 62.07% (18 / 29), respectively. After the therapy,the renal function was improved in 5, remained unchanged in 33 and became worse in 3 patients. The comparison of the post-operative renograms (obtained within 2 months) with the pre-operative ones showed that in eight patients there was an increase in renal blood flow with an improvement in renal function impairment, which took a turn from severe degree to mild or moderate degree. Nevertheless, severe impairment in renal blood flow remained in 3 patients. Conclusion: Percutaneous transluminal balloon renal angioplasty and percutaneous transluminal renal artery stenting are safe and effective treatments for the renal artery stenosis, which also has a beneficial effect on the related renal hypertension and renal insufficiency. (authors)

  9. High blood pressure - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure is found. This is called essential hypertension. High blood pressure that is caused by another medical condition or medicine you are taking is called secondary hypertension. Secondary hypertension may be due to: Chronic ...

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 Selectively Controls Renal Blood Flow Through a Novel PPARβ/δ-Dependent Vasodilator Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Nicholas S; Sampaio, Walkyria; Etelvino, Gisele; Alves, Daniele T; Anders, Katie L; Temponi, Rafael; Shala, Fisnik; Nair, Anitha S; Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Jiao, Jing; Herschman, Harvey R; Xiaomeng, Wang; Wahli, Walter; Santos, Robson A; Mitchell, Jane A

    2018-02-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme expressed in inflammation and cancer targeted by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. COX-2 is also expressed constitutively in discreet locations where its inhibition drives gastrointestinal and cardiovascular/renal side effects. Constitutive COX-2 expression in the kidney regulates renal function and blood flow; however, the global relevance of the kidney versus other tissues to COX-2-dependent blood flow regulation is not known. Here, we used a microsphere deposition technique and pharmacological COX-2 inhibition to map the contribution of COX-2 to regional blood flow in mice and compared this to COX-2 expression patterns using luciferase reporter mice. Across all tissues studied, COX-2 inhibition altered blood flow predominantly in the kidney, with some effects also seen in the spleen, adipose, and testes. Of these sites, only the kidney displayed appreciable local COX-2 expression. As the main site where COX-2 regulates blood flow, we next analyzed the pathways involved in kidney vascular responses using a novel technique of video imaging small arteries in living tissue slices. We found that the protective effect of COX-2 on renal vascular function was associated with prostacyclin signaling through PPARβ/δ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ). These data demonstrate the kidney as the principle site in the body where local COX-2 controls blood flow and identifies a previously unreported PPARβ/δ-mediated renal vasodilator pathway as the mechanism. These findings have direct relevance to the renal and cardiovascular side effects of drugs that inhibit COX-2, as well as the potential of the COX-2/prostacyclin/PPARβ/δ axis as a therapeutic target in renal disease. © 2018 The Authors.

  11. Longitudinal observations on circadian blood pressure variation in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, T.; Strandgaard, S.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that status as a 'non-dipper' determined from 24-h blood pressure (BP) recordings is associated with increased risk of end-organ damage but little is known about the consistency of dipper status in renal patients. The present post hoc analysis evaluated dipper...... were classified as dippers or non-dippers based on the presence or absence of a nighttime reduction in both systolic and diastolic BP > 10%. Antihypertensive treatment aimed at an office BP determined from 24-h...

  12. Hemodynamic Measurements for the Selection of Patients With Renal Artery Stenosis: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Peter M.; van de Hoef, Tim P.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Vogt, Liffert; van den Born, Bert-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Interventions targeting renal artery stenoses have been shown to lower blood pressure and preserve renal function. In recent studies, the efficacy of catheter-based percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with stent placement has been called into question. In the identification of functional

  13. Diurnal changes of blood pressure values (24 h blood pressures in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Grzechocińska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: More attention is being paid lately to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS not only in the aspect of fertility but also according to long-term metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities. Observations of women with PCOS show that the occurrence of blood hypertension is more frequent after the menopause. There are few articles concerning the predictable symptoms of blood hypertension. It seems that twenty-four hour blood pressure monitoring and assessment of changes of diurnal rhythm could be useful in this group of patients.Aim of the study: The purpose of this study was to assess diurnal changes of blood pressure in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.Material and methods: 26 women with PCOS diagnosed according to Rotterdam consensus criteria and Androgen Excess Society (AES criteria were included in our study. The mean age of the examined women was 29.5 years and the mean BMI (body mass index was 24.7 kg/m2. The control group consisted of 12 age-matched women, without PCOS. Twenty-four hour Holter monitoring of ambulatory blood pressure was performed during normal daily activity in all patients. Halberg’s cosinor method was used to analyse daily biorhythm.Results: Results show the diurnal changes of systolic blood pressure in the preclinical phase in 30% and diastolic in 15% of PCOS women. In this group no physiological decrease of blood pressure at night time was observed.

  14. Influence of extra virgin olive oil on blood pressure and kidney angiotensinase activities in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarejo, Ana Belén; Ramírez-Sánchez, Manuel; Segarra, Ana Belén; Martínez-Cañamero, Magdalena; Prieto, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    High-fat diets are associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. The efficacy of the current strategies of treatment is still not entirely satisfactory, and new approaches are being considered. To analyze the beneficial effects of extra virgin olive oil as a major component of the Mediterranean diet, we studied systolic blood pressure and angiotensinase activities, since this enzyme is involved in the metabolism of angiotensins, in the kidney of hypertensive rats fed during 12 weeks with a diet enriched with extra virgin olive oil compared with a standard diet. As a reflex of oxidative stress, 8-isoprostanes and nitric oxide were quantified in urine. Results demonstrated a progressive increase in systolic blood pressure until the end of the feeding period in both groups. However, this increase was delayed in the extra virgin olive oil group until week six, with the systolic blood pressure being always lower in this group. Nitric oxide and 8-isoprostanes were lower in the extra virgin olive oil group. While we can deduce a higher formation of angiotensin 2-10 in the renal cortex, a higher availability of angiotensin II may be presumed in the renal medulla of animals fed an extra virgin olive oil diet than in animals fed a standard diet. Our results support the beneficial influence of extra virgin olive oil on cardiovascular function and suggest that the Mediterranean diet may be beneficial in itself but it may also be an effective tool in the treatment of hypertension. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Blood pressure normalization post-jugular venous balloon angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Zohara; Grewal, Prabhjot; Cen, Steven; DeBarge-Igoe, Frances; Yu, Jinhee; Arata, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This study is the first in a series investigating the relationship between autonomic nervous system dysfunction and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in multiple sclerosis patients. We screened patients for the combined presence of the narrowing of the internal jugular veins and symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction (fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, sleeping disorders, headache, thermal intolerance, bowel/bladder dysfunction) and determined systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses to balloon angioplasty. The criteria for eligibility for balloon angioplasty intervention included ≥ 50% narrowing in one or both internal jugular veins, as determined by the magnetic resonance venography, and ≥ 3 clinical symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and post-balloon angioplasty. Among patients who were screened, 91% were identified as having internal jugular veins narrowing (with obstructing lesions) combined with the presence of three or more symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Balloon angioplasty reduced the average systolic and diastolic blood pressure. However, blood pressure categorization showed a biphasic response to balloon angioplasty. The procedure increased blood pressure in multiple sclerosis patients who presented with baseline blood pressure within lower limits of normal ranges (systolic ≤ 105 mmHg, diastolic ≤ 70 mmHg) but decreased blood pressure in patients with baseline blood pressure above normal ranges (systolic ≥ 130 mmHg, diastolic ≥ 80 mmHg). In addition, gender differences in baseline blood pressure subcategories were observed. The coexistence of internal jugular veins narrowing and symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysfunction suggests that the two phenomena may be related. Balloon angioplasty corrects blood pressure deviation in multiple sclerosis patients undergoing internal jugular vein dilation. Further studies should investigate the

  16. Reversible diminished renal sup(99m)Tc-DMSA uptake during converting-enzyme inhibition in a patient with renal artery stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer Hovinga, T K; Beukhof, J R; Donker, A J.M.; Luyk, W H.J. van; Piers, D A

    1984-03-01

    A patient is described who had accelerated hypertension and unilateral renal artery stenosis, and who developed further deterioration in renal function during treatment with captopril, an angiotension-I (AI) converting-enzyme inhibitor. sup(99m)Tc-DMSA uptake was greatly diminished in the stenotic kidney, although renal blood flow and handling of /sup 131/I hippurate was preserved. Uptake of sup(99m)Tc-DMSA in the affected kidney returned after substitution of captopril by the vasodilator minoxidil, while a comparable degree of blood pressure control was maintained. This, caution must be taken when interpreting results of sup(99m)Tc-DMSA scintigraphy in patients with proven or suspected renal artery stenosis treated with an AI converting-enzyme inhibiting drug. Moreover, our finding points to the importance of glomerular filtration in the renal handling of /sup 99/Tc-DMSA.

  17. Reversible diminished renal sup(99m)Tc-DMSA uptake during converting-enzyme inhibition in a patient with renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer Hovinga, T.K.; Beukhof, J.R.; Donker, A.J.M.; Luyk, W.H.J. van; Piers, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    A patient is described who had accelerated hypertension and unilateral renal artery stenosis, and who developed further deterioration in renal function during treatment with captopril, an angiotension-I (AI) converting-enzyme inhibitor. sup(99m)Tc-DMSA uptake was greatly diminished in the stenotic kidney, although renal blood flow and handling of 131 I hippurate was preserved. Uptake of sup(99m)Tc-DMSA in the affected kidney returned after substitution of captopril by the vasodilator minoxidil, while a comparable degree of blood pressure control was maintained. This, caution must be taken when interpreting results of sup(99m)Tc-DMSA scintigraphy in patients with proven or suspected renal artery stenosis treated with an AI converting-enzyme inhibiting drug. Moreover, our finding points to the importance of glomerular filtration in the renal handling of 99 Tc-DMSA. (orig.)

  18. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an inelastic...

  19. Synchronized renal blood flow dynamics mapped with wavelet analysis of laser speckle flowmetry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Alexey R; Marsh, Donald J; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    of rat kidneys. The regulatory mechanism in the renal microcirculation generates oscillations in arterial blood flow at several characteristic frequencies. Our approach to laser speckle image processing allows detection of frequency and phase entrainments, visualization of their patterns, and estimation......Full-field laser speckle microscopy provides real-time imaging of superficial blood flow rate. Here we apply continuous wavelet transform to time series of speckle-estimated blood flow from each pixel of the images to map synchronous patterns in instantaneous frequency and phase on the surface...... of the extent of synchronization in renal cortex dynamics....

  20. Effect of cocoa on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, Karin; Fakler, Peter; Stocks, Nigel P

    2017-04-25

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, contributing to about 50% of cardiovascular events worldwide and 37% of cardiovascular-related deaths in Western populations. Epidemiological studies suggest that cocoa-rich products reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Flavanols found in cocoa have been shown to increase the formation of endothelial nitric oxide which promotes vasodilation and therefore blood pressure reduction. Here we update previous meta-analyses on the effect of cocoa on blood pressure. To assess the effects on blood pressure of chocolate or cocoa products versus low-flavanol products or placebo in adults with or without hypertension when consumed for two weeks or longer. This is an updated version of the review initially published in 2012. In this updated version, we searched the following electronic databases from inception to November 2016: Cochrane Hypertension Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase. We also searched international trial registries, and the reference lists of review articles and included trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of chocolate or cocoa products on systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adults for a minimum of two weeks duration. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risks of bias in each trial. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses on the included studies using Review Manager 5. We explored heterogeneity with subgroup analyses by baseline blood pressure, flavanol content of control group, blinding, age and duration. Sensitivity analyses explored the influence of unusual study design. Thirty-five trials (including 40 treatment comparisons) met the inclusion criteria. Of these, we added 17 trials (20 treatment comparisons) to the 18 trials (20 treatment comparisons) in the previous version of this updated review.Trials provided participants with 30 to 1218 mg of flavanols (mean = 670 mg) in 1.4 to 105

  1. Cocoa, blood pressure, and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista; Ferri, Livia; Proietti, Ilenia; Di Agostino, Stefania; Martella, Letizia; Mai, Francesca; Di Giosia, Paolo; Grassi, Davide

    2015-11-18

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events worldwide. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that cocoa-rich products reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. According to this, cocoa has a high content in polyphenols, especially flavanols. Flavanols have been described to exert favorable effects on endothelium-derived vasodilation via the stimulation of nitric oxide-synthase, the increased availability of l-arginine, and the decreased degradation of NO. Cocoa may also have a beneficial effect by protecting against oxidative stress alterations and via decreased platelet aggregation, decreased lipid oxidation, and insulin resistance. These effects are associated with a decrease of blood pressure and a favorable trend toward a reduction in cardiovascular events and strokes. Previous meta-analyses have shown that cocoa-rich foods may reduce blood pressure. Long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa products are needed to determine whether or not blood pressure is reduced on a chronic basis by daily ingestion of cocoa. Furthermore, long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa on clinical outcomes are also needed to assess whether cocoa has an effect on cardiovascular events. A 3 mmHg systolic blood pressure reduction has been estimated to decrease the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. This paper summarizes new findings concerning cocoa effects on blood pressure and cardiovascular health, focusing on putative mechanisms of action and "nutraceutical " viewpoints.

  2. Fall in blood pressure during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.E.; Lindahl, J.; Unsgaard, B.

    1976-01-01

    Blood pressure and heart rate at rest in the supine and standing positions were followed before, during and after irradiation for malignant tumours in 114 patients. A statistically significant gradual reduction in blood pressure during the treatment period was established. This was more marked in older patients and in patients with higher initial blood pressure but was not related to the region irradiated or the type of tumour treated. Particularly if the patient experiences vertigo and nausea on change of position, it seems advisable to check the blood pressure during treatment. (author)

  3. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan René; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood...... pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. METHODS: For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends...... from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. FINDINGS...

  4. The intrinsic renal compartment syndrome: new perspectives in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrler, Tanja; Tischer, Anne; Meyer, Andreas; Feiler, Sergej; Guba, Markus; Nowak, Sebastian; Rentsch, Markus; Bartenstein, Peter; Hacker, Marcus; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2010-01-15

    Inflammatory edema after ischemia-reperfusion may impair renal allograft function after kidney transplantation. This study examines the effect of edema-related pressure elevation on renal function and describes a simple method to relieve pressure within the renal compartment. Subcapsular pressure at 6, 12, 24, 48 hr, and 18 days after a 45 min warm ischemia was determined in a murine model of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Renal function was measured by Tc-MAG3 scintigraphy and laser Doppler perfusion. Structural damage was assessed by histologic analysis. As a therapeutic approach, parenchymal pressure was relieved by a standardized circular 0.3 mm incision at the lower pole of the kidney capsule. Compared with baseline (0.9+/-0.3 mm Hg), prolonged ischemia was associated with a sevenfold increase in subcapsular pressure 6 hr after ischemia (7.0+/-1.0 mm Hg; P<0.001). Pressure levels remained significantly elevated for 24 hr. Without therapy, a significant decrease in functional parameters was found with considerably reduced tubular excretion rate (33+/-3.5%, P<0.001) and renal perfusion (64.5+/-6.8%, P<0.005). Histologically, severe tissue damage was found. Surgical pressure relief was able to significantly prevent loss of tubular excretion rate (62.5+/-6.8%, P<0.05) and renal blood flow (96.2+/-4.8%; P<0.05) and preserved the integrity of renal structures. Our data support the hypothesis of the existence of a renal compartment syndrome as a consequence of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Surgical pressure relief effectively prevented functional and structural renal impairment, and we speculate that this approach might be of value for improving graft function after renal transplantation.

  5. Redo renal denervation using a multi-electrode radiofrequency system in patients with persistent therapy-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daemen, J; Feyz, L; Van Zandvoort, L; Van Mieghem, N M

    2017-06-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation has been studied as a potential therapeutic option for patients with therapy-resistant hypertension; however, a significant proportion of patients do not show a significant reduction in blood pressure and are classified as non-responders. The objective of the present study was to assess whether a redo renal denervation procedure increases response rates. We present a case series of three consecutive renal denervation non-responders treated with the multi-electrode radiofrequency St. Jude EnligHTN catheter after an average of 22 months. Patients were followed for 6 months. Mean age was 66 years and two patients were male. Patients were previously treated using either ReCor's Paradise system, the Vessix V2 system or the Covidien OneShot system. Mean office blood pressure one year after the initial procedure was 187/102 mm Hg with a mean 24 h ambulatory blood pressure of 166/102 mm Hg. All patients underwent a successful redo procedure using the EnligHTN system because of persistent therapy-resistant hypertension. At 6 months a significant drop in both office and ambulatory blood pressure of -27/-6 mm Hg and -15/-13 mm Hg, respectively, was observed. No significant renal artery stenosis was observed at 6 months. In patients with therapy-resistant hypertension who do not respond to an initial renal denervation procedure, a redo procedure using the St. Jude EnligHTN system may help to significantly improve blood pressure control.

  6. How to manage hypertension with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Belmonte, Romain; Illuminati, Guilio; Barral, Xavier; Schneider, Fabrice; Chavent, Bertrand

    2017-04-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) in patients with hypertension has been the topic of great controversy. Major contemporary clinical trials such as the Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery lesions (CORAL) and Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic lesions (ASTRAL) have failed to show significant benefit of revascularization over medical management in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. We present here the implications and limitations of these trials and formulate recommendations for management of ARAS.

  7. Effect of l-arginine therapy on plasma NO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 3/ levels, and blood pressure in uremic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, M.; Khemomal, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Normal kidney function is regulated by Nitric oxide (NO) and Superoxide (O/sub 2/-) in the body, and consequently controls blood pressure. Nitric Oxide promotes natriuresis and diuresis, and therefore results in reduction of blood pressure. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of L-arginine supplementation on blood pressure, urinary protein, nitrite and nitrate in addition to blood urea, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance in uremic rabbits. Methods: This study was carried out in the Department of Biochemistry Basic Medical Sciences Institute, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi. A total of 48 rabbits were included in the study. Twenty-four of the rabbits on surgical intervention were prepared as uremic and so became hypertensive as well. Two groups were uremic, one group was given L-arginine and the other was remained untreated. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was measured on week 0, week 2, week 4, and week 6, while blood and urine was collected on week 0 and week 6. Results: On supplementation with L-arginine to uremic rabbits systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased significantly. Nitrite/nitrate and urinary protein were corrected to some extent while blood urea and serum creatinine were unaffected. Conclusion: L-arginine has a beneficial role as blood pressure lowering agent in uremic rabbits. It corrects NO/sub 2/NO/sub 3/ plasma level and proteinuria which is indicator of renal failure. (author)

  8. Methodology and technology for peripheral and central blood pressure and blood pressure variability measurement: current status and future directions - Position statement of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, George S; Parati, Gianfranco; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Achimastos, Apostolos; Andreadis, Emanouel; Asmar, Roland; Avolio, Alberto; Benetos, Athanase; Bilo, Grzegorz; Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Castiglioni, Paolo; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Dolan, Eamon; Head, Geoffrey; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Kollias, Anastasios; Kotsis, Vasilis; Manios, Efstathios; McManus, Richard; Mengden, Thomas; Mihailidou, Anastasia; Myers, Martin; Niiranen, Teemu; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Padfield, Paul; Palatini, Paolo; Papaioannou, Theodore; Protogerou, Athanasios; Redon, Josep; Verdecchia, Paolo; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Mancia, Giuseppe; O'Brien, Eoin

    2016-09-01

    Office blood pressure measurement has been the basis for hypertension evaluation for almost a century. However, the evaluation of blood pressure out of the office using ambulatory or self-home monitoring is now strongly recommended for the accurate diagnosis in many, if not all, cases with suspected hypertension. Moreover, there is evidence that the variability of blood pressure might offer prognostic information that is independent of the average blood pressure level. Recently, advancement in technology has provided noninvasive evaluation of central (aortic) blood pressure, which might have attributes that are additive to the conventional brachial blood pressure measurement. This position statement, developed by international experts, deals with key research and practical issues in regard to peripheral blood pressure measurement (office, home, and ambulatory), blood pressure variability, and central blood pressure measurement. The objective is to present current achievements, identify gaps in knowledge and issues concerning clinical application, and present relevant research questions and directions to investigators and manufacturers for future research and development (primary goal).

  9. What Is High Blood Pressure Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a medicine calendar. • Set a reminder on your smartphone. What types of medicine may be prescribed? One ... High Blood Pressure Medicine? What are their side effects? For many people, high blood pressure medicine can ...

  10. Letter to editor: Blood pressure, hypertension and lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Yi; Staessen, Jan A

    2018-02-19

    A significant association of office diastolic blood pressure with low-level blood lead exposure was reported in a Brazilian adult population. However, caution should be taken to interpret these results. The multivariable-adjusted association with blood pressure was positive for diastolic blood pressure, but inverse for systolic blood pressure. The association sizes were infinitesimal without clinical relevance. The outcome measures, i.e. blood pressure and the prevalence of hypertension were analysed across categories of the blood lead distribution - not in relation to blood lead as continuous variable. Blood pressure was the average of two oscillometric office readings, whereas ambulatory monitoring is the state-of-the-art.

  11. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  12. Blood Pressure Quiz | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents Blood pressure changes throughout the day. It… is highest while ...

  13. Reduction in renal blood flow following administration of norepinephrine and phenylephrine in septic rats treated with Kir6.1 ATP-sensitive and KCa1.1 calcium-activated K+ channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa Maggi Sant'Helena, Bruna; Guarido, Karla L; de Souza, Priscila; Crestani, Sandra; da Silva-Santos, J Eduardo

    2015-10-15

    We evaluated the effects of K+ channel blockers in the vascular reactivity of in vitro perfused kidneys, as well as on the influence of vasoactive agents in the renal blood flow of rats subjected to the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Both norepinephrine and phenylephrine had the ability to increase the vascular perfusion pressure reduced in kidneys of rats subjected to CLP at 18 h and 36 h before the experiments. The non-selective K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium, but not the Kir6.1 blocker glibenclamide, normalized the effects of phenylephrine in kidneys from the CLP 18 h group. Systemic administration of tetraethylammonium, glibenclamide, or the KCa1.1 blocker iberiotoxin, did not change the renal blood flow in control or septic rats. Norepinephrine or phenylephrine also had no influence on the renal blood flow of septic animals, but its injection in rats from the CLP 18 h group previously treated with either glibenclamide or iberiotoxin resulted in an exacerbated reduction in the renal blood flow. These results suggest an abnormal functionality of K+ channels in the renal vascular bed in sepsis, and that the blockage of different subtypes of K+ channels may be deleterious for blood perfusion in kidneys, mainly when associated with vasoactive drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Blood pressure reducing effects of Phalaris canariensis in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Clévia Santos; Carvalho, Lucimeire Nova; Pontes, Roberto Braz; Campos, Ruy Ribeiro; Ikuta, Olinda; Boim, Mirian Aparecida

    2012-02-01

    The birdseed Phalaris canariensis (Pc) is popularly used as an antihypertensive agent. The aqueous extract of Pc (AEPc) was administered in adult normotensive Wistar rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and in prehypertensive young SHR (SHR(Y), 3 weeks old). Animals received AEPc (400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), by gavage) for 30 days, then groups were divided into 2 subgroups: one was treated for another 30 days and the other received water instead of AEPc for 30 days. AEPc reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) in both adult groups; however, treatment interruption was followed by a gradual return of the SBP to baseline levels. SHR(Y) became hypertensive 30 days after weaning. AEPc minimized the increase in SBP in SHR(Y), but blood pressure rose to levels similar to those in the untreated group with treatment interruption. There were no changes in renal function, diuresis, or Na(+) excretion. Pc is rich in tryptophan, and the inhibition of the metabolism of tryptophan to kynurenine, a potential vasodilator factor, prevented the blood pressure reducing effect of AEPc. Moreover, AEPc significantly reduced sympathoexcitation. Data indicate that the metabolic derivative of tryptophan, kynurenine, may be a mediator of the volume-independent antihypertensive effect of Pc, which was at least in part mediated by suppression of the sympathetic tonus.

  15. Interventional therapy of atherosclerotic renal artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jian; Xu Ke; Xiao Liang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of interventional therapy for the atherosclerotic renal artery occlusion (ARAO). Methods: During the period of June 2001-Dec. 2007, 16 patients with ARAO (total of 16 occluded arteries) underwent interventional managements, including percutaneous endovascular renal artery revascularization, balloon dilatation angioplasty and stent placement. Follow-up survey was made at regular intervals. The patent condition of the renal artery was evaluated with ultrasonography and digital subtraction angiography. The blood pressure and the renal function were determined and the data were statistically analyzed in order to assess the intermediate and long-term effect of the interventional therapy. Results: Of 16 patients, technical success was achieved in 15 (93.8%) and failure occurred in one. During a follow-up period of 9 - 24 months, 3 patients died. According to the data obtained at each patient's last follow-up survey, the hypertension fell to normal in 3 (25.0%), was improved in 7 (58.3%) and showed no marked change in 2 patients (16.7%), with a clinical efficacy of 83.3% (10 / 12). The renal function was improved in 2 (16.7%), stabilized in 6 (50%) and deteriorated in 4 patients (33.3%), with an effective rate of 66.7% (8 / 12). Conclusion: For the treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery occlusion, the interventional therapy carries high successful rate and can effectively lower the blood pressure level, in addition, it can also protect the renal function in a certain degree. (authors)

  16. Is the area under blood pressure curve the best parameter to evaluate 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Fernando; Mion, Décio

    2005-10-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) provides relevant data about blood pressure over a 24-h period. The analysis of parameters to determine the blood pressure profile from these data is of great importance. To calculate areas under systolic and diastolic blood pressure curves (SBP-AUC/DBP-AUC) and compare with systolic and diastolic blood pressure load (SBPL/DBPL) and 24-h systolic and diastolic blood pressure (24-h SBP/24-h DBP) in order to determine which provides the best correlation with left ventricular mass index (LVMI). ABPM measurements (1143 individuals) were analyzed to obtain 24-h SBP/24-h DBP, SBPL/DBPL, and SBP-AUC/ DBP-AUC, using Spacelabs (90207) and CardioSistemas devices. Left ventricular mass was determined using an echocardiograph HP Sonos 5500 and LVMI was calculated. The correlations between all possible pairs within the group 24-h SBP/SBPL/SBP-AUC and 24-h DBP/DBPL/DBP-AUC were high and statistically significant. The correlations between 24-h SBP/24-h DBP and SBP-AUC/DBP-AUC with SBPL/DBPL close to 100%, were lower than those mentioned above. The correlations of the parameters obtained by ABPM with LVMI were also high and statistically significant, except for blood pressure load between 90 and 100%, and for 24-h SBP of 135 mmHg or less and SBPL higher than 50%. SBPL/DBPL and SBP-AUC/DBP-AUC can be used for the evaluation of ABPM data owing to the strong correlation with 24-h SBP/24-h DBP and with LVMI, except when SBPL is close to 100% or 24-h SBP is below 135 mmHg but SBPL is above 50%. SBP-AUC/DBP-AUC, however, are a better alternative because they do not have the limitations of blood pressure load or even of 24-h blood pressure present.

  17. Impact of diabetes mellitus on outcome of renal artery stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Li; Tong Xiaoqiang; Wang Jian; Yang Min; Lv Yongxing; Zou Yinghua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of diabetes mellitus on outcome of renal artery stenting. Methods: 85 consecutive cases of renal artery stenosis received renal angioplasty were retrospectively analyzed. 25 patients with related history were selected into diabetic group (DM), and 60 patients without diabetics into control group(NDM). Pre- and post- procedure serum creatinine and blood pressure between the 2 groups were collected and analyzed. Results: The average serum creatinine pre-intervention and post-intervention were(132.24 ± 33.71) μmol/L, (126.32 ± 29.65) μmol/L for DM group, and(125.02 ± 48.13) μmol/L, (118.31 ± 39.58) μmol/L for NDM group respectively with no significant statistical difference (P > 0.05). The blood pressure was controlled satisfactorily for both groups after the procedure, with statistical significance (P<0.05), but no difference between the two groups. Conclusions: The procedure with renal artery stenting is effective to maintain renal function and control hypertension, showing equal efficiency for both DM and NDM patients. (authors)

  18. [Comparison of invasive blood pressure measurement in the aorta with indirect oscillometric blood pressure measurement at the wrist and forearm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, F; Aristidou, Y; Klaus, D; Wiemeyer, A; Lösse, B

    1995-09-01

    Indirectly measured blood pressure at the wrist or upper arm was compared with directly measured values in the aortic arch during routinely performed diagnostic cardiac catheterization in 100 patients (31-80 years, mean 59.3 years, 60% males). The noninvasive measurements were carried out by oscillometric devices, NAiS Blood Pressure Watch for measurements at the wrist, and Hestia OZ80 at the upper arm. Systolic blood pressure measured at the wrist was 4.3 +/- 14.1 mm Hg, and the diastolic value 6.0 +/- 8.9 mm Hg higher than when measured at the aortic arch; the difference was significant in both cases. Correlation coefficients were 0.85 for systolic and 0.71 for diastolic blood pressure. In 16% of the patients the systolic blood pressure at the wrist differed more than +/- 20 mm Hg. The diastolic blood pressure at the wrist measured more than +/- 20 mm Hg higher than in the aorta in 5% of the patients. At the upper arm mean systolic values were not different to the aorta. The diastolic pressure was 9.3 +/- 9.8 mm Hg higher in the aorta than at the upper arm. To verify the accuracy of values measured with the NAiS Blood Pressure Watch compared with the standard technique at the upper arm, sequential measurements were made at wrist and ipsilateral upper arm in the same group of 100 patients. The systolic blood pressure at the left wrist was 3.4 +/- 13.3 mm Hg higher and the diastolic pressure 3.8 +/- 9.5 mm Hg lower than at the upper arm. Only 53% of systolic values lay within a range of +/- 10 mm Hg. The correspondence between wrist and upper arm values was better for diastolic blood pressure, the values differing by less than +/- 10 mm Hg in two-thirds of patients. Self-measurement of arterial blood pressure with an oscillometric device at the wrist can be recommended only in individual cases with a difference of simultaneously measured values at the upper arm of less than +/- 10 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The standard method for indirectly

  19. Directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure via the collateral network: correlations with changes in systemic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Yuya; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Inafuku, Hitoshi; Nagano, Takaaki; Hirayasu, Tsuneo; Yamashiro, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    During thoracoabdominal surgery in which segmental arteries are sacrificed over a large area, blood supply routes from collateral networks have received attention as a means of avoiding spinal cord injury. The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord blood supply through a collateral network by directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure experimentally. In beagle dogs (n = 8), the thoracoabdominal aorta and segmental arteries L1-L7 were exposed, and a temporary bypass was created for distal perfusion. Next, a laser blood flow meter was placed on the spinal dura mater in the L5 region to measure the spinal cord blood flow. The following were measured simultaneously when the direct blood supply from segmental arteries L2-L7 to the spinal cord was stopped: mean systemic blood pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure (blood pressure within the aortic clamp site), and spinal cord blood flow supplied via the collateral network. These variables were then investigated for evidence of correlations. Positive correlations were observed between mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord blood flow during interruption of segmental artery flow both with (r = 0.844, P flow with and without distal perfusion (r = 0.803, P network from outside the interrupted segmental arteries, and high systemic blood pressure (∼1.33-fold higher) was needed to obtain the preclamping spinal cord blood flow, whereas 1.68-fold higher systemic blood pressure was needed when distal perfusion was halted. Spinal cord blood flow is positively correlated with mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure under spinal cord ischemia caused by clamping a wide range of segmental arteries. In open and endovascular thoracic and thoracoabdominal surgery, elevating mean systemic blood pressure is a simple and effective means of increasing spinal cord blood flow, and measuring spinal cord perfusion pressure seems to be useful for monitoring

  20. Changes of renal blood flow after ESWL: assessment by ASL MR imaging, contrast enhanced MR imaging, and renal resistive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Ellah, Mohamed; Kremser, Christian; Pallwein, Leo; Aigner, Friedrich; Schocke, Michael; Peschel, Reinhard; Pedross, Florian; Pinggera, Germar-Michael; Wolf, Christian; Alsharkawy, Mostafa A M; Jaschke, Werner; Frauscher, Ferdinand

    2010-10-01

    The annual incidence of stone formation is increased in the industrialised world. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a non-invasive effective treatment of upper urinary tract stones. This study is aimed to evaluate changes of renal blood flow in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and renal resistive index (RI). Thirteen patients with nephrolithiasis were examined using MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound 12h before and 12h after ESWL. ASL sequence was done for both kidneys and followed by contrast enhanced MR imaging. In addition RI Doppler ultrasound measurements were performed. A significant increase in RI (pESWL causes changes in RI and ASL MR imaging, which seem to reflect changes in renal blood flow. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. DASH diet to lower high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patientinstructions/000770.htm DASH diet to lower high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... Hypertension. The DASH diet can help lower high blood pressure and cholesterol and other fats in your blood. ...

  2. [Preclinical diagnostics and correction of the disturbed renal blood flow in the children presenting with diabetic nephropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aver'ianov, A P; Tkacheva, E N; Bolotova, N V; Filina, N Iu; Ivanova, Iu V; Nikolaeva, N V; Tikhonova, L A

    2011-01-01

    The present study included 86 children aged between 7 and 17 years with type 1 diabetes mellitus from 1 to 15 years in duration. In all the patients, renal blood flow was investigated with the use of ultrasonic dopplerography. The results of the study suggest disturbances of intrarenal hemodynamics that manifested themselves as enhanced resistance of renal arteries from periphery to the centre in the patients at the hyperfiltration stage of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in conjunction with the reduced velocity of blood flow in inter-lobular and segmental arteries. In contrast, the patients at the microalbuminuric stage of diabetic nephropathy exhibited increased resistance and reduced velocity of blood flow in the main renal veins. In 35 patients presenting with diabetic nephropathy, hemodynamic correction was achieved by the application of the traveling pulsed magnetic field (TP-MF) to the renal region using an AMO-ATOS-E apparatus (Russia). This treatment resulted in normalization of the characteristics of renal blood flow. It is concluded that TPMF has good prospects for the use as a component of the combined treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Prevalence of pre-high blood pressure and high blood pressure among non-overweight children and adolescents using international blood pressure references in developed regions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Changwei; Xu, Shuang; Wang, Hua; Wang, Wenming; Shen, Hui

    2017-09-01

    There is a lack of data on the prevalence of pre-high blood pressure (PreHBP) and high blood pressure (HBP), based on recent international blood pressure references, in non-overweight children and adolescents. To describe the prevalence of PreHBP and HBP in non-overweight children and adolescents in developed regions of China. In total, 588 097 non-overweight children and adolescents aged 6-17 years from the National Surveys on Chinese Students' Constitution and Health in 2015 were included. The prevalence of PreHBP was 13.41% and subjects in urban areas had a higher prevalence of PreHBP (14.14%) than those in rural areas (12.92%). Subjects in regions with a high (13.56%) or moderate (13.61%) socioeconomic status showed a higher prevalence of PreHBP than those in regions with a relatively low socioeconomic status (12.76%). A similar pattern was found for the prevalence of HBP, and the prevalence of HBP was 18.25% for all participants, 20.55% for subjects in urban areas, 16.71% in rural areas, 18.76% in high socioeconomic areas, 18.62% in moderate socioeconomic areas and 16.70% in relatively low socioeconomic areas. A large proportion of non-overweight children and adolescents had elevated blood pressure and there were urban-rural and socioeconomic disparities in the prevalence of elevated blood pressure.

  4. Renal cortical and medullary blood flow responses to altered NO-availability in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjaer, Mads; Vafaee, Manoucher; Møller, Michael Lehd

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to quantify regional renal blood flow in humans. In nine young volunteers on a controlled diet, the lower abdomen was CT-scanned and regional renal blood flow determined by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning using H(2)(15)O as tracer. Measurements were performed...... of one voxel were eliminated stepwise from the external surface of the VOI ('voxel peeling'), and the blood flow subsequently determined in each new, reduced VOI. Blood flow in the shrinking volumes of interest (VOIs) decreased as the number of cycles of voxel peeling increased. After 4-5 cycles, blood...... flow was not reduced further by additional voxel peeling. This volume-insensitive flow was measured to be 2.30 ±0.17 ml·(g·min)(-1) during the control period; it increased during infusion of glyceryl nitrate to 2.97 ±0.18 ml·(g·min)(-1) (p...

  5. Definition of ambulatory blood pressure targets for diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in relation to clinic blood pressure: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Geoffrey A; Mihailidou, Anastasia S; Duggan, Karen A; Beilin, Lawrence J; Berry, Narelle; Brown, Mark A; Bune, Alex J; Cowley, Diane; Chalmers, John P; Howe, Peter R C; Hodgson, Jonathan; Ludbrook, John; Mangoni, Arduino A; McGrath, Barry P; Nelson, Mark R; Sharman, James E; Stowasser, Michael

    2010-04-14

    Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure thresholds have been defined for the diagnosis of mild hypertension but not for its treatment or for other blood pressure thresholds used in the diagnosis of moderate to severe hypertension. We aimed to derive age and sex related ambulatory blood pressure equivalents to clinic blood pressure thresholds for diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. We collated 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure data, recorded with validated devices, from 11 centres across six Australian states (n=8575). We used least product regression to assess the relation between these measurements and clinic blood pressure measured by trained staff and in a smaller cohort by doctors (n=1693). Mean age of participants was 56 years (SD 15) with mean body mass index 28.9 (5.5) and mean clinic systolic/diastolic blood pressure 142/82 mm Hg (19/12); 4626 (54%) were women. Average clinic measurements by trained staff were 6/3 mm Hg higher than daytime ambulatory blood pressure and 10/5 mm Hg higher than 24 hour blood pressure, but 9/7 mm Hg lower than clinic values measured by doctors. Daytime ambulatory equivalents derived from trained staff clinic measurements were 4/3 mm Hg less than the 140/90 mm Hg clinic threshold (lower limit of grade 1 hypertension), 2/2 mm Hg less than the 130/80 mm Hg threshold (target upper limit for patients with associated conditions), and 1/1 mm Hg less than the 125/75 mm Hg threshold. Equivalents were 1/2 mm Hg lower for women and 3/1 mm Hg lower in older people compared with the combined group. Our study provides daytime ambulatory blood pressure thresholds that are slightly lower than equivalent clinic values. Clinic blood pressure measurements taken by doctors were considerably higher than those taken by trained staff and therefore gave inappropriate estimates of ambulatory thresholds. These results provide a framework for the diagnosis and management of hypertension using ambulatory blood pressure values.

  6. MR measures of renal perfusion, oxygen bioavailability and total renal blood flow in a porcine model: noninvasive regional assessment of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentland, Andrew L; Artz, Nathan S; Fain, Sean B; Grist, Thomas M; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be a useful adjunct to current methods of evaluating renal function. MRI is a noninvasive imaging modality that has the ability to evaluate the kidneys regionally, which is lacking in current clinical methods. Other investigato