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Sample records for blood pressure control

  1. Controlling your high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlling hypertension ... when you wake up. For people with very high blood pressure, this is when they are most at risk ... 2014 evidence-based guideline for the management of high blood pressure in adults: report from the panel members appointed ...

  2. Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 29,2018 The importance of stress ... heart . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  3. Dietary fiber and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre, A; Miguel, M

    2016-04-01

    In the past few years, new strategies to control blood pressure levels are emerging by developing new bioactive components of foods. Fiber has been linked to the prevention of a number of cardiovascular diseases and disorders. β-Glucan, the main soluble fiber component in oat grains, was initially linked to a reduction in plasma cholesterol. Several studies have shown afterward that dietary fiber may also improve glycaemia, insulin resistance and weight loss. The effect of dietary fiber on arterial blood pressure has been the subject of far fewer studies than its effect on the above-mentioned variables, but research has already shown that fiber intake can decrease arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. Moreover, certain fibers can improve arterial blood pressure when administered to hypertensive and pre-hypertensive subjects. The present review summarizes all those studies which attempt to establish the antihypertensive effects of dietary fiber, as well as its effect on other cardiovascular risk factors.

  4. Blood pressure control among type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shehri, Ahmed M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess blood pressure BP control in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 DM type treated in primary health care. A cross-sectional study was conducted in primary health care at King Fahd Military Complex Hospital in Dhahran, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between August 2003 and February 2004, to assess blood control in type 2 diabetics. A sample of 403 medical records of type 2 diabetic patients was selected using systematic random sampling after ordering the medical record numbers. The data were collected through the pre-coded checklist. Hypertension was found in 57.8% of diabetic patients with no statistically significant difference between males and females. The mean age of diabetic patients was significantly highly in hypertensive than non-hypertensive p=0.001. The mean duration of hypertension was significantly higher in females p=0.02. There were only 14.2% of hypertensive diabetic patients in whom blood pressure was controlled. Poor control was significantly associated with obesity and a high rate of complications. Blood pressure control correlated positively and significantly with the age of patients and negatively with duration of diabetes and hypertension. The most commonly prescribed antihypertensive were angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in 29.3%, followed by angiotensin receptors blockers in 24.1%, and the least prescribed drug was thiazide diuretic. Blood pressure in diabetic patients needs to be given particular attention from all health care professionals, especially primary care family physicians, who should follow the new guideline for better control of blood pressure, and fewer complications. Patient's awareness should be increased, through continuous health education with different modalities. (author)

  5. Blood pressure control for diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Diana V; Wang, Xue; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Marrone, Michael; Sleilati, Gina; Hawkins, Barbara S; Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness. Research has established the importance of blood glucose control to prevent development and progression of the ocular complications of diabetes. Simultaneous blood pressure control has been advocated for the same purpose, but findings reported from individual studies have supported varying conclusions regarding the ocular benefit of interventions on blood pressure. Objectives The primary aim of this review was to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effect of interventions to control or reduce blood pressure levels among diabetics on incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy, preservation of visual acuity, adverse events, quality of life, and costs. A secondary aim was to compare classes of anti-hypertensive medications with respect to the same outcomes. Search methods We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL as well as ongoing trial registries. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 April 2014. We also reviewed reference lists of review articles and trial reports selected for inclusion. In addition, we contacted investigators of trials with potentially pertinent data. Selection criteria We included in this review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which either type 1 or type 2 diabetic participants, with or without hypertension, were assigned randomly to intense versus less intense blood pressure control, to blood pressure control versus usual care or no intervention on blood pressure, or to different classes of anti-hypertensive agents versus placebo. Data collection and analysis Pairs of review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from electronic and manual searches and the full text of any document that appeared to be relevant. We assessed included trials independently for risk of bias with respect to outcomes reported in this review. We extracted data regarding trial

  6. Blood pressure control for diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana V. Do

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness. Research has established the importance of blood glucose control to prevent development and progression of the ocular complications of diabetes. Simultaneous blood pressure control has been advocated for the same purpose, but findings reported from individual studies have supported varying conclusions regarding the ocular benefit of interventions on blood pressure.OBJECTIVES: The primary aim of this review was to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effect of interventions to control or reduce blood pressure levels among diabetics on incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy, preservation of visual acuity, adverse events, quality of life, and costs. A secondary aim was to compare classes of anti-hypertensive medications with respect to the same outcomes.METHODS:Search methods: We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL as well as ongoing trial registries. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 April 2014. We also reviewed reference lists of review articles and trial reports selected for inclusion. In addition, we contacted investigators of trials with potentially pertinent data. Selection criteria: We included in this review randomized controlled trials (RCTs in which either type 1 or type 2 diabetic participants, with or without hypertension, were assigned randomly to intense versus less intense blood pressure control, to blood pressure control versus usual care or no intervention on blood pressure, or to different classes of anti-hypertensive agents versus placebo. Data collection and analysis: Pairs of review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from electronic and manual searches and the full text of any document that appeared to be relevant. We assessed included trials independently for risk of bias with respect to outcomes reported in this review. We

  7. 10 Ways to Control High Blood Pressure without Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep (sleep apnea), which further raises your blood pressure. Weight loss is one of the most effective lifestyle changes for controlling blood pressure. Losing even a small amount of weight if you' ...

  8. Blood pressure and control of cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A Whitworth

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Judith A WhitworthJohn Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Two key early 20th century notions, the first the primacy of diastolic pressure in determining risk, and the second that hypertension is a discrete disorder, have proved to be incorrect. We now recognize the primacy of systolic pressure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that hypertension is an arbitrary definition. In the early 21st century, we are moving away from a dichotomous approach to risk classification, and away from notions of hypertension and normotension towards an appreciation that blood pressure-related risk is continuous. In parallel, there has been a paradigm shift from a single risk factor approach to comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk prevention. Accordingly, prevention of cardiovascular disease requires a focus on lowering of blood pressure and modification of associated risk factors rather than simply treatment of hypertension. This emphasis is reflected in the World Health Organization (WHO – International Society of Hypertension (ISH 2003 statement on management of hypertension.Keywords: blood pressure, hypertension, cardiovascular risk, treatment

  9. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  10. An Appraisal of Hospital Based Blood Pressure Control in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adequate blood pressure control is a major strategy, in the attempt to reduce the morbidity and mortality of hypertension related cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to determine the level of blood pressure control among patients receiving treatment for hypertension in a specialist medical ...

  11. An appraisal of blood pressure control and its determinants among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Achieving guideline-recommended blood pressure is imperative in reducing the rising tide of uncontrolled hypertension and its attendant sequelae, which are major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The aim of the study was to describe the pattern of blood pressure control and identify the factors ...

  12. How Potassium Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More How Potassium Can Help Control High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 29,2018 Understanding the heart-healthy ... tips . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  13. Effect of physical activity on controlling blood pressure among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A variety of lifestyle modifications including weight loss in the overweight and physical activity have been shown in clinical trials to lower blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Objective: To demonstrate the effect of physical activity on controlling blood pressure among hypertensive patients from Mishref area ...

  14. Control of blood pressure in liver transplant recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Saldivar, B.; Prieto, J.; Berenguer, M.; Mata, M. de la; Pons, J.A.; Serrano, T.; Rafael-Valdivia, L.; Aguilera, V.; Barrera, P.; Parrilla, P.; Lorente, S.; Rubin, A.; Fraga, E.; Rimola, A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased blood pressure (BP) is common after liver transplantation. However, there is scarce information on its control. METHODS: In this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study, we determined BP according to the recommended international standards in 921 liver transplant

  15. Blood pressure and control of cardiovascular risk

    OpenAIRE

    Judith A Whitworth

    2005-01-01

    Judith A WhitworthJohn Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Two key early 20th century notions, the first the primacy of diastolic pressure in determining risk, and the second that hypertension is a discrete disorder, have proved to be incorrect. We now recognize the primacy of systolic pressure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that hypertension is an arbitrary definition. In the early 21st century, we are moving a...

  16. Simultaneous control of blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-21

    Jan 21, 2016 ... A questionnaire was used to collect basic information and blood samples were drawn for laboratory measurements. Simultaneous control was defined as HbA1c <7%, BP <130/80 mmHg, and LDL‑C <2.6 mmol/L. Results: A total of 2274 individuals were included, of which 588 individuals (25.9%) achieved ...

  17. Circadian blood pressure patterns and blood pressure control in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Fegatelli, Danilo Alunni; Rovella, Valentina; Castagnola, Veronica; Gabriele, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo

    2017-12-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), and CKD progression is associated with suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control. Here we evaluate the impact of CKD on the attainment of BP control and the circadian BP profile in older subjects. In this observational study, we studied 547 patients referred to the hypertension clinic, of whom 224 (40.9%) had CKD. Blood pressure (BP) control and circadian BP patterns were evaluated by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Circadian BP variability was measured as the within-subject SD of BP, the percentage of measurements exceeding normal values, hypotension, and dipping status. The attainment of adequate BP control was similar in subjects with or without CKD (around 31%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that CKD was not a determinant of adequate BP control (OR 1.004; 95% CI 0.989-1.019; p = 0.58). Patients with CKD presented as twice as higher prevalence of reverse dipper (night-time peak) for systolic BP and episodes of hypotension during daytime, independently of BP control. Knowledge of the circadian pattern of BP in hypertensive subjects with CKD could inform better than attainment of BP target about risky condition for CKD progression and cognitive decline and allow a more personalized antihypertensive treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antihypertensive regimen and blood pressure control in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension is a major public health problem worldwide. In Nigeria, records have shown an increasing prevalence with suboptimal evaluation of blood pressure (BP) control. Generally, antihypertensives have recorded significant successes in BP control over the years. This study was aimed at investigating ...

  19. Cardiovascular Topics Blood pressure control at a hospital day clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CARDIOVASCULAR JOURNAL OF SOUTHERN AFRICA (SAMJ Supplement 1 February 1999) C15 ... 5 Afr Med J 1999: 89: Cardiovascular suppl 1. C 15 - C 18. ... ANTIHYPERTE SIVE THERAPY (%). TABLE m. BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL AND. SIDE-EFFECT PROFILE (%). Monotherapy. 7. Multiple drugs. 93. I agent.

  20. Patient related factors for optimal blood pressure control in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patient related factors hindering optimal blood pressure (BP) control in patients with hypertension are unclear. Objectives: To investigate the barriers to optimal hypertension management. Methods: A survey on the awareness and management of hypertension was conducted in 556 patients (365 males, mean ...

  1. Effect of advanced blood pressure control with nifedipine delayedrelease tablets on the blood pressure in patients underwent nasal endoscope surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Hua Xia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of advanced blood pressure control with nifedipine delayedrelease tablets on the blood pressure in patients underwent nasal endoscope surgery and its feasibility. Methods: A total of 80 patients who were admitted in ENT department from June, 2012 to June, 2015 for nasal endoscope surgery were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group with 40 cases in each group. The patients in the observation group were given nifedipine delayed-release tablets for advanced blood pressure control before operation, and were given routine blood pressure control during operation; while the patients in the control group were only given blood pressure control during operation. The changes of blood pressure, mean central arterial pressure, and heart rate before anesthesia (T0, after intubation (T1, during operation (T2, extubation when waking (T3, 30 min after extubation (T4, and 3 h after back to wards (T5 in the two groups were compared. The intraoperative situation and the surgical field quality in the two groups were compared. Results: SBP, DBP, and MAP levels at T1-5 in the two groups were significantly lower than those at T0. SBP, DBP, and MAP levels at T2 were significantly lower than those at other timing points, and were gradually recovered after operation, but were significantly lower than those at T0. The effect taking time of blood pressure reducing, intraoperative nitroglycerin dosage, and postoperative wound surface exudation amount in the observation group were significantly less than those in the control group. The surgical field quality scores in the observation group were significantly superior to those in the control group. Conclusions: Advanced blood pressure control with nifedipine delayed-release tablets can stabilize the blood pressure during the perioperative period in patients underwent nasal endoscope surgery, and enhance the surgical field qualities.

  2. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lifting and supporting weights) and have an important influence on blood pressure, it is essential to evaluate blood pressure response to iso- metric effort. This test can reveal high blood pressure that might otherwise not be detected. Only a few ...

  3. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure at rest is not predictive of roundthe- clock values. Blood pressure should therefore be measured during effort to evaluate hypertension and its response to treatment. The effect of sustained-release verapamil (240 mg taken once a day) on blood pressure at rest and during isometric effort was therefore ...

  4. Intensive Blood Pressure Control Affects Cerebral Blood Flow in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Davis, Shyrin C. A. T.; Truijen, Jasper; Stok, Wim J.; Secher, Niels H.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with microvascular complications, hypertension, and impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. Intensive blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients reduces their risk of stroke but may affect cerebral perfusion. Systemic hemodynamic

  5. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Card can help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for ... control your blood pressure before and during the pregnancy. Some women develop high blood pressure during pregnancy. ...

  6. Assessment of glycaemic, lipid and blood pressure control among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The frequency of patients achieving goal levels for blood sugar, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), total cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure were analyzed by reviewing medical records. Testing rates for fasting blood sugar (FBS), HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure were 99.7, 1.2, 43.4, 41.5 and ...

  7. Multidisciplinary Treatment of the Metabolic Syndrome Lowers Blood Pressure Variability Independent of Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Yonit; Segev, Elad; Shefer, Gabi; Sack, Jessica; Tal, Brurya; Yaron, Marianna; Carmeli, Eli; Shefer, Lili; Margaliot, Miri; Limor, Rona; Gilad, Suzan; Sofer, Yael; Stern, Naftali

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) variability (BPV) contributes to target organ damage independent of BP. The authors examined the effect of a 1-year multidisciplinary intervention on BPV in patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as defined by criteria from the Third Report of the Adult Treatment Panel. Forty-four nondiabetic patients underwent clinical and biochemical profiling, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), body composition, carotid intima-media thickness, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). The intervention targeted all MetS components. BPV was assessed by the standard deviation of daytime systolic BP derived from ABPM. Patients with low and high BPV (lower or higher than the median daytime standard deviation of 11.6 mm Hg) did not differ in regards to systolic and diastolic BP, age, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and body mass index, but the high-variability group had higher values of low-density lipoprotein and leg fat. The 1-year intervention resulted in weight reduction but not BP-lowering. BPV declined in the high-variability group in association with lowering of PWV, C-reactive protein, glycated hemoglobin, alanine aminotransferase, asymmetric dimethylarginine, and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A multidisciplinary intervention independent of BP-lowering normalized BPV, lowered PWV, and enhanced metabolic control. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Patient related factors for optimal blood pressure control in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... high blood pressure in clinics and hospitals is a major cause. Our earlier study on a rural Australian population showed that 56.7% of the patients with elevated blood pressure were unaware of the presence of hypertension 3. In the present study on a rural population in China, the unawareness was. 22.8%.

  9. Long-term blood pressure control prevents oxidative renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro, Alberto; Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Justo, Pilar; Esteban, Vanesa; Osende, Julio; Mezzano, Sergio; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a leading contributor to the progression of chronic renal disease. Short-term studies had addressed the role of oxidative stress in hypertensive nephropathy. We have now studied oxidative stress and caspase activation in a long-term model of hypertensive renal injury. Nontreated spontaneously hypertensive rats with uninephrectomy displayed severe arterial hypertension over a 36-week follow-up. Uncontrolled high blood pressure in the context of modest renal mass reduction resulted in significant histological renal injury. Blood pressure control by the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, quinapril, or the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, decreased the degree of renal injury. Hypertensive renal injury was associated with evidence of activation of the apoptotic pathway (increased activation of caspase-3) and local renal (increased staining for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal) and systemic [increased serum levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2alpha (8-iso-PGF2alpha)] lipid oxidation when compared with normotensive control rats. In addition, severe hypertension decreased the renal antioxidant defenses, as exemplified by decreased expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. Treatment with quinapril or losartan decreased caspase-3 activation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal staining, and 8-iso-PGF2alpha levels and increased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression. These results suggest that hypertension-associated oxidative stress and its consequences may be decreased by either ACE inhibition or AT1 receptor antagonist, emphasizing the role of angiotensin II in hypertensive renal damage.

  10. Out-of-office blood pressure: from measurement to control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baguet JP

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Philippe Baguet1,21Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, 2Bioclinic Radiopharmaceutics Laboratory, INSERM U1039, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, FranceAbstract: Hypertension is an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally, hypertension diagnosis and treatment and clinical evaluations of antihypertensive efficacy have been based on office blood pressure (BP measurements; however, there is increasing evidence that office measures may provide inadequate or misleading estimates of a patient’s true BP status and level of cardiovascular risk. The introduction, and endorsement by treatment guidelines, of 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and self (or home BP monitoring has facilitated more reliable and reproducible estimations of true BP, including the identification of white-coat and masked hypertension, and evaluation of BP variability. In addition, ambulatory BP monitoring enables accurate assessment of treatment effectiveness over 24 hours and both ambulatory and self BP monitoring may lead to better tailoring of therapy according to BP profile and concomitant disease. This review describes the clinical benefits and limitations of out-of-office assessments and their applications for effective management of hypertension and attainment of BP control.Keywords: ambulatory, ABPM, SBPM, blood pressure measurement, hypertension

  11. Does a colour-coded blood pressure diary improve blood pressure control for patients in general practice: The CoCo trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senn Oliver

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insufficient blood pressure control is a frequent problem despite the existence of effective treatment. Insufficient adherence to self-monitoring as well as to therapy is a common reason. Blood pressure self-measurement at home (Home Blood Pressure Measurement, HBPM has positive effects on treatment adherence and is helpful in achieving the target blood pressure. Only a few studies have investigated whether adherence to HBPM can be improved through simple measures resulting also in better blood pressure control. Objective Improvement of self-monitoring and improved blood pressure control by using a new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Outcome Primary outcome: Change in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure 6 months after using the new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Secondary outcome: Adherence to blood pressure self-measurement (number of measurements/entries. Methods/Design Randomised controlled study. Population: 138 adult patients in primary care with uncontrolled hypertension despite therapy. The control group uses a conventional blood pressure diary; the intervention group uses the new colour-coded blood pressure diary (green, yellow, red according a traffic light system. Expected results/conclusion The visual separation and entries in three colour-coded areas reflecting risk (green: blood pressure in the target range ≤ 140/≤ 90 mmHg, yellow: blood pressure >140/>90 mmHg, red: blood pressure in danger zone > 180 mmHg/>110 mmHg lead to better self-monitoring compared with the conventional (non-colour-coded blood pressure booklet. The colour-coded, visualised information supports improved perception (awareness and interpretation of blood pressure and triggers correct behaviour, in the means of improved adherence to the recommended treatment as well as better communication between patients and doctors resulting in improved blood pressure control. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01013467

  12. Nursing Education in High Blood Pressure Control. Report of the Task Force on the Role of Nursing in High Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. High Blood Pressure Information Center.

    This curriculum guide on high blood pressure (hypertension) for nursing educators has five sections: (1) Introduction and Objectives provides information regarding the establishment and objectives of the National Task Force on the Role of Nursing in High Blood Pressure Control and briefly discusses nursing's role in hypertension control; (2) Goals…

  13. [Is blood pressure control different in women than in men?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, A; Sans-Atxer, L; Vázquez, S

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) evolves with age; until the 50's it is higher in men than in women, equaling and even then increasing in women. The prevalence of controlled BP appears to be similar between the sexes, but the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is higher in women than in men. The possibility that BP influences the cardiovascular risk differently according to sex must therefore be considered. While some studies suggest no difference exists, others have shown evidence of an increased risk in women with respect to men despite equal BP. In this way, it seems that the measurement of ambulatory BP, but not office BP, would mark the differences in the association between BP-gender and cardiovascular risk. It should therefore be investigated the possibility of a different BP goal for women and men, especially by evaluating ambulatory BP. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of an embedded PID controller applied to blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Anna G C D; Maitelli, André L; de M Valentim, Ricardo A; Leite, Cicília R M; Soares, Heliana B; de Almeida, Nathalee C; Sizilio, Gláucia R M A; Guerreiro, Ana M G

    2011-01-01

    Some diseases, such as hypertension, require a close control of the patient's blood pressure. This is even more critical when that patient is going through--or has just underwent--a surgical procedure In such situations, reducing blood pressure to normal levels is of paramount importance. Usually, this demanding and time consuming monitoring is done manually by clinical personnel and are subject to mistakes and inconsistent practices. In this paper, we propose a solution to the manual monitoring through the design and implementation of an embedded PID controller to handle blood pressure, integrated to an automated monitoring system to assist in detecting anomalies and to optimize the process of patient care.

  15. Blood volume, blood pressure and total body sodium: internal signalling and output control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie, P

    2009-01-01

    Total body sodium and arterial blood pressure (ABP) are mutually dependent variables regulated by complex control systems. This review addresses the role of ABP in the normal control of sodium excretion (NaEx), and the physiological control of renin secretion. NaEx is a pivotal determinant of ABP......, and under experimental conditions, ABP is a powerful, independent controller of NaEx. Blood volume is a function of dietary salt intake; however, ABP is not, at least not in steady states. A transient increase in ABP after a step-up in sodium intake could provide a causal relationship between ABP...... and the regulation of NaEx via a hypothetical integrative control system. However, recent data show that subtle sodium loading (simulating salty meals) causes robust natriuresis without changes in ABP. Changes in ABP are not necessary for natriuresis. Normal sodium excretion is not regulated by pressure. Plasma...

  16. Socioeconomic and modifiable predictors of blood pressure control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High blood pressure is a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide.[1] In South Africa (SA), the prevalence of hypertension is estimated to be 21% in people aged ≥15 years,[2] and in a survey performed in public sector clinics in four provinces, hypertension was the most common diagnosis and reason for ...

  17. Factors Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Predialysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... guideline for the management of high blood pressure in adults: Report from the panel members appointed to the Eighth Joint. National Committee (JNC 8). JAMA 2014;311:507-20. 7. Atkins RC, Briganti EM, Lewis JB, Hunsicker LG, Braden G,. Champion de Crespigny PJ, et al. Proteinuria reduction and.

  18. An Appraisal of Hospital Based Blood Pressure Control in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. Lancet 2003; 42: 1206-1252. 8. Cooper R, Rotimi C, Ataman S, McGee D, Osotmehin B,. Kadiri S, et al. The prevalence of hypertension in seven populations of West African origin. Am J Public Health. 1997; 87: 160168. 9. Toure LA, Salissou O, Chapko MK. Hospitalizations ...

  19. Blood Pressure Control among Treated Hypertensives in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Goal blood pressure (BP) was defined by the JNC VI and the World Health Organization- International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) as <140 mm Hg systolic and <90 mm Hg diastolic for the general and <130 mm Hg systolic and <85 mm Hg diastolic for special high-risk populations. It is well established ...

  20. The Impact of Education Intervention on the Blood Pressure Control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension plays a major role in morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. Evidence from developed countries showed that intensive patient education has resulted in improved compliance to therapy reducing morbidity and mortality. There was a need to explore the impact of health educational intervention on the blood pressure ...

  1. Barriers to and strategies for effective blood pressure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Siegel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available David Siegel1,21Medical Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Northern California Health Care System, Mather, CA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USAAbstract: There are major differences between the current knowledge of the treatment of cardiac conditions derived from evidence-based medicine and the widespread application of this knowledge. This is particularly true in the treatment of hypertension. Hypertension is the most common chronic cardiovascular condition, affecting more than 50 million Americans and approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. However, many hypertensive patients are not receiving treatment, and of those that are, many are not adequately controlled. There is evidence that there are methods to improve blood pressure control and improve compliance with expert recommendations for the treatment of hypertension. These methods range from local initiatives such as academic detailing to national performance measures as have been developed by the US Department of Veterans Affairs. A challenge for the future will be to identify and broadly apply these and other programs to improve the quality and efficiency of hypertensive treatment.Keywords: academic detailing, antihypertensives, hypertension, medication prescribing

  2. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure monitors may have some limitations. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... more Stage 2 high blood pressure (hypertension) Elevated blood pressure and stages 1 and 2 high blood pressure ( ...

  3. Blood pressure control in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Alon; Grossman, Ehud

    2017-01-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and essential hypertension are common conditions that are frequently present together. Both are considered risk factors for cardiovascular disease and microvascular complications and therefore treatment of both conditions is essential. Many papers were published on blood pressure (BP) targets in diabetic patients, including several works published in the last 2 years. As a result, guidelines differ in their recommendations on BP targets in diabetic patients. The method by which to control hypertension, whether pharmacological or non-pharmacological, is also a matter of debate and has been extensively studied in the literature. In recent years, new medications were introduced for the treatment of DM, some of which also affect BP and the clinician treating hypertensive and diabetic patients should be familiar with these medications and their effect on BP. In this manuscript, we discuss the evidence supporting different BP targets in diabetics and review the various guidelines on this topic. In addition, we discuss the various options available for the treatment of hypertension in diabetics and the recommendations for a specific treatment over the other. Finally we briefly discuss the new diabetic drug classes and their influence on BP.

  4. Improved blood pressure control among school bus drivers with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Joseph; Severance-Fonte, Tina; Morandi-Matricaria, Elizabeth; Wogen, Jenifer; Frech-Tamas, Feride

    2010-04-01

    The impact of a hypertension awareness and educational program, BP DownShift, was evaluated among school bus drivers in a southern US state. At baseline (August 2007), blood pressure (BP) measurements, self-reported demographics, and hypertension awareness and management practices were collected from drivers who consented to participate in the study. Interventions included 4 educational mailings, installation of BP machines at all bus terminals, and access to free dietitian consultations and gym memberships. BP was evaluated using Department of Transportation guidelines. BP was remeasured and a survey was administered at follow-up (May 2008). At baseline, 208 drivers consented to the BP screening; 120 (58%) returned for a follow-up assessment. Most participants completing the study were female (73%) and African American (72%). Mean age was 50 years and mean body mass index was 32 kg/m(2); 52% of participants were obese. In all, 58% of participants reported a prior diagnosis of hypertension by a physician, and 63% reported taking antihypertensive medication. Both systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) were lower at follow-up (135/82 mmHg vs. 145/87 mmHg at baseline; P 10 mmHg, and 44% had a reduction in DBP > 5 mmHg. At follow-up, 58% were controlled to BP diet, and regular exercise as components of hypertension self-management. The implementation of our hypertension education, self-management, and awareness program was associated with an improvement in BP control, which may positively impact commercial driver's license recertification as well as improve employee health.

  5. [Vascular adrenal cyst causing difficult to control high blood pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Escudero, D; Torres Roca, M; Hernández Contreras, M E; Sánchez Rodríguez, C; Oñate Celdrán, J

    Hypertension is a prevalent disease in developed countries. Adrenal masses, and especially adrenal cysts, are a rare and usually asymptomatic finding, which can go unnoticed or be detected as incidental findings in imaging tests. These circumstances make the multidisciplinary approach mandatory. The case is presented on a 72 year-old woman with uncontrolled high blood pressure referred to the Urology Department due to the incidental finding of a right retroperitoneal mass. A functional and imaging study was performed, establishing a diagnosis of adrenal cyst causing hypertensive symptoms. A literature search was performed in order to assess diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. With the diagnosis of adrenal cyst causing uncontrolled high blood pressure, a right laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed. After surgery the patient has maintained blood pressure within the normal range. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for the management of rare diseases. The surgical approach, if possible, should be laparoscopic. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Intensive blood pressure control affects cerebral blood flow in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Davis, Shyrin C A T; Truijen, Jasper

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with microvascular complications, hypertension, and impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. Intensive blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients reduces their risk of stroke but may affect cerebral perfusion. Systemic hemodynamic...... · s-1). Cognitive function did not change during the 6 months. Static cerebrovascular autoregulation appears to be impaired in type 2 diabetes mellitus, with a transient reduction in CBFV in uncomplicated diabetic patients on tight BP control, but with a progressive reduction in CBFV in diabetic...... variables and transcranial Doppler-determined cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), cerebral CO2 responsiveness, and cognitive function were determined after 3 and 6 months of intensive BP control in 17 type 2 diabetic patients with microvascular complications (T2DM+), in 18 diabetic patients without (T2DM...

  7. Awareness of high blood pressure status, treatment and control in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    west LGA of Edo State to assess the level of awareness of high blood pressure status, treatment and control. Cluster sampling method was used to select participants and data collection was by researcher administered questionnaire. Blood ...

  8. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other risk factors, like diabetes, you may need treatment. How does high blood pressure affect pregnant women? A few women will get ... HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health ... High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Women and Diabetes Heart ...

  9. Blood pressure control among patients with hypertension and newly diagnosed diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, N N; Griffin, M R; Kaltenbach, L A; Greevy, R A; Roumie, C L

    2012-09-01

    To determine the proportion of patients who achieved blood pressure control during the 2 years following new diabetes diagnosis. A retrospective cohort of veterans ≥ 18 years with hypertension who initiated a diabetes medication from 2000 to 2007 in the Veterans Administration Mid-South Network was assembled. Blood pressure control at diabetes treatment initiation (baseline) was compared with blood pressure control 6, 12, 18 and 24 months later. The Veterans Affairs and American Diabetes Association definitions of control, ≤ 140/90 and ≤ 130/80 mmHg, respectively, were primary and secondary outcomes. At baseline, 59.5% of 16,182 patients had controlled blood pressure according to the Veterans Affairs guideline (31.5% using American Diabetes Association definition). Six months following initiation of diabetes treatment, 65.7% had their blood pressure controlled (P < 0.001). Blood pressure control was sustained but not further improved between 6 months and 2 years, with 66.5% controlled at 2 years following baseline. Higher initial systolic blood pressure, black race and hospitalization in the previous year were associated with higher likelihood of uncontrolled blood pressure at 6 months; whereas baseline cardiovascular disease, baseline dementia and later year of cohort entry were associated with lower likelihood of uncontrolled blood pressure. We found an increase in blood pressure control in the 6 months following initiation of diabetes treatment. However, overall blood pressure control remained suboptimal and with no further improvement over the next 18 months. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. The Association between Medication Adherence and Treatment Intensification with Blood Pressure Control in Resistant Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Stacie L.; Powers, J. David; Magid, David J.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Margolis, Karen L.; O'Connor, Patrick J; Schmittdiel, Julie; Ho, P. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Patients with resistant hypertension are at risk for poor outcomes. Medication adherence and intensification improve blood pressure control; however, little is known about these processes or their association with outcomes in resistant hypertension. This retrospective study included patients from 2002-2006 with incident hypertension from two health systems who developed resistant hypertension, or uncontrolled blood pressure despite adherence to ≥3 antihypertensive medications. Patterns of hypertension treatment, medication adherence (percentage of days covered) and treatment intensification (increase in medication class or dose) were described in the year after resistant hypertension identification. Then, the association between medication adherence and intensification with 1-year blood pressure control was assessed controlling for patient characteristics. Of the 3,550 patients with resistant hypertension, 49% were male and mean age 60. One year after resistance hypertension determination, fewer patients were taking diuretics (77.7% vs. 92.2%, pblood pressure control improved over 1-year (22% vs. 55%, p=blood pressure control (adjusted OR 1.18, 0.94-1.47). Treatment was intensified in 21.6% of visits with elevated blood pressure. Increasing treatment intensity was associated with 1-year blood pressure control (adjusted OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.58-1.71). In this cohort of patients with resistant hypertension, treatment intensification but not medication adherence was significantly associated with 1-year blood pressure control. These findings highlight the need to investigate why patients with uncontrolled blood pressure do not receive treatment intensification. PMID:22733464

  11. Intensive versus conventional blood pressure monitoring in a general practice population. The Blood Pressure Reduction in Danish General Practice trial: a randomized controlled parallel group trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Pia; Bang, Lia E; Schultz-Larsen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    To compare the effect of a conventional to an intensive blood pressure monitoring regimen on blood pressure in hypertensive patients in the general practice setting. Randomized controlled parallel group trial with 12-month follow-up. One hundred and ten general practices in all regions of Denmark....... One thousand forty-eight patients with essential hypertension. Conventional blood pressure monitoring ('usual group') continued usual ad hoc blood pressure monitoring by office blood pressure measurements, while intensive blood pressure monitoring ('intensive group') supplemented this with frequent...... to the usual group, and 533 (51%) to the intensive group. The reductions in day- and night-time 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure were similar (usual group: 4.6 ± 13.5/2.8 ± 82 mmHg; intensive group: 5.6 ± 13.0/3.5 ± 8.2 mmHg; P = 0.27/P = 0.20). Cardiovascular risk scores were reduced in both groups at follow...

  12. ABPM vs office blood pressure to define blood pressure control in treated hypertensive paediatric renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Jorge R; Ghezzi, Lidia; Waisman, Gabriel; Krmar, Rafael T

    2007-02-01

    While 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is an established tool for monitoring antihypertensive therapy in adults, data in children are scarce. We retrospectively analysed whether office blood pressure (BP) is reliable for the diagnosis of BP control in 26 treated hypertensive paediatric renal transplants. Controlled office BP was defined as the mean of three replicate systolic and diastolic BP recordings less than or equal to the 95th age-, sex- and height-matched percentile on the three-outpatient visits closest to ABPM. Controlled ABPM was defined as systolic and diastolic daytime BP ABPM reference. Eight recipients (30%) with controlled office BP were in fact categorized as having non-controlled BP by ABPM criteria. Overall, when office BP and ABPM were compared using the Bland and Altman method, the 95% limits of agreement between office and daytime values ranged from -12.6 to 34.1 mmHg for systolic and -23.9 to 31.7 mmHg for diastolic BP, and the mean difference was 10.7 and 3.9 mmHg respectively. Office readings miss a substantial number of recipients who are hypertensive by ABPM criteria. Undertreatment of hypertension could be avoided if ABPM is applied as an adjunct to office readings.

  13. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help you control high blood pressure. These habits include: Healthy eating Being physically active Maintaining a healthy weight Limiting alcohol intake Managing and coping with stress To help make lifelong lifestyle changes, try making ...

  14. Intensive versus conventional blood pressure monitoring in a general practice population. The Blood Pressure Reduction in Danish General Practice trial: a randomized controlled parallel group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarskov, Pia; Bang, Lia E; Schultz-Larsen, Peter; Gregers Petersen, Hans; Benee Olsen, David; Berg, Ronan M G; Abrahamsen, Henrik; Wiinberg, Niels

    2018-01-17

    To compare the effect of a conventional to an intensive blood pressure monitoring regimen on blood pressure in hypertensive patients in the general practice setting. Randomized controlled parallel group trial with 12-month follow-up. One hundred and ten general practices in all regions of Denmark. One thousand forty-eight patients with essential hypertension. Conventional blood pressure monitoring ('usual group') continued usual ad hoc blood pressure monitoring by office blood pressure measurements, while intensive blood pressure monitoring ('intensive group') supplemented this with frequent home blood pressure monitoring and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Mean day- and night-time systolic and diastolic 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Change in systolic and diastolic office blood pressure and change in cardiovascular risk profile. Of the patients, 515 (49%) were allocated to the usual group, and 533 (51%) to the intensive group. The reductions in day- and night-time 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure were similar (usual group: 4.6 ± 13.5/2.8 ± 82 mmHg; intensive group: 5.6 ± 13.0/3.5 ± 8.2 mmHg; P = 0.27/P = 0.20). Cardiovascular risk scores were reduced in both groups at follow-up, but more so in the intensive than in the usual group (P = 0.02). An intensive blood pressure monitoring strategy led to a similar blood pressure reduction to conventional monitoring. However, the intensive strategy appeared to improve patients' cardiovascular risk profile through other effects than a reduction of blood pressure. Clinical Trials NCT00244660. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypertension - infants ... and blood vessels The health of the kidneys High blood pressure in infants may be due to kidney or ... blood vessel of the kidney) In newborn babies, high blood pressure is often caused by a blood clot in ...

  16. Theoretical analysis of coronary blood flow and tissue oxygen pressure-control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, J. A.; Dankelman, J.

    1993-01-01

    Coronary blood flow is tightly coupled to the myocardial oxygen consumption. We have presented a control model based on the assumption that the tissue oxygen pressure is the controlled variable. The coronary blood flow in itself is not a controlled variable but merely the result of a different

  17. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... Top of Page CDC Fact Sheets Related to High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure Pulmonary Hypertension Heart Disease Signs ...

  18. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  19. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  20. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  1. Acculturation, Medication Adherence, Lifestyle Behaviors, and Blood Pressure Control Among Arab Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailakh, Ayman K; Evangelista, Lorraine S; Morisky, Donald E; Mentes, Janet C; Pike, Nancy A; Phillips, Linda R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between acculturation, medication adherence, lifestyle behaviors (e.g., physical activity, nutrition, weight control), and blood pressure control among hypertensive Arab Americans. The study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design. A convenience sample of 126 participants completed questionnaires and had measures of blood pressure, weight, and height. Forty-six participants were hypertensive and were included in the analysis. Only 29.2% of participants reported high medication adherence. High medication adherence was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure, eating a healthy diet, and following lifestyle modifications. Acculturation was significantly associated with physical activity and body mass index. Our study found that acculturated participants were more adherent to medications and physical activity and had better blood pressure control. Further studies are needed to explore how acculturation improves adherence and what factors contribute to better adherence in order to design culturally sensitive interventions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Autonomic control of body temperature and blood pressure: influences of female sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoudian, Nisha; Hart, Emma C J; Barnes, Jill N; Joyner, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Female reproductive hormones exert important non-reproductive influences on autonomic regulation of body temperature and blood pressure. Estradiol and progesterone influence thermoregulation both centrally and peripherally, where estradiol tends to promote heat dissipation, and progesterone tends to promote heat conservation and higher body temperatures. Changes in thermoregulation over the course of the menstrual cycle and with hot flashes at menopause are mediated by hormonal influences on neural control of skin blood flow and sweating. The influence of estradiol is to promote vasodilation, which, in the skin, results in greater heat dissipation. In the context of blood pressure regulation, both central and peripheral hormonal influences are important as well. Peripherally, the vasodilator influence of estradiol contributes to the lower blood pressures and smaller risk of hypertension seen in young women compared to young men. This is in part due to a mechanism by which estradiol augments beta-adrenergic receptor mediated vasodilation, offsetting alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction, and resulting in a weak relationship between muscle sympathetic nerve activity and total peripheral resistance, and between muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure. After menopause, with the loss of reproductive hormones, sympathetic nerve activity, peripheral resistance and blood pressure become more strongly related, and sympathetic nerve activity (which increases with age) becomes a more important contributor to the prevailing level of blood pressure. Continuing to increase our understanding of sex hormone influences on body temperature and blood pressure regulation will provide important insight for optimization of individualized health care for future generations of women.

  3. Effects of wet-cupping on blood pressure in hypertensive patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyeidi, Nouran A; Aseri, Khaled S; Matbouli, Shadia M; Sulaiamani, Albaraa A; Kobeisy, Sumayyah A

    2015-11-01

    Although cupping remains a popular treatment modality worldwide, its efficacy for most diseases, including hypertension, has not been scientifically evaluated. We aimed to determine the efficacy of wet-cupping for high blood pressure, and the incidence of the procedure's side effects in the intervention group. This is a randomized controlled trial conducted in the General Practice Department at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between May 2013 and February 2014. There were two groups (40 participants each): intervention group undergoing wet-cupping (hijama) in addition to conventional hypertension treatment, and a control group undergoing only conventional hypertension treatment. Three wet-cupping sessions were performed every other day. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured using a validated automatic sphygmomanometer. The follow-up period was 8 weeks. Wet-cupping provided an immediate reduction of systolic blood pressure. After 4 weeks of follow-up, the mean systolic blood pressure in the intervention group was 8.4 mmHg less than in the control group (P=0.046). After 8 weeks, there were no significant differences in blood pressures between the intervention and control groups. In this study, wet-cupping did not result in any serious side effects. Wet-cupping therapy is effective for reducing systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients for up to 4 weeks, without serious side effects. Wet-cupping should be considered as a complementary hypertension treatment, and further studies are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01987583.

  4. Impact of yoga on blood pressure and quality of life in patients with hypertension - a controlled trial in primary care, matched for systolic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Moa; Sundquist, Kristina; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Midlöv, Patrik

    2013-12-07

    Medical treatment of hypertension is not always sufficient to achieve blood pressure control. Despite this, previous studies on supplementary therapies, such as yoga, are relatively few. We investigated the effects of two yoga interventions on blood pressure and quality of life in patients in primary health care diagnosed with hypertension. Adult patients (age 20-80 years) with diagnosed hypertension were identified by an electronic chart search at a primary health care center in southern Sweden. In total, 83 subjects with blood pressure values of 120-179/≤109 mmHg at baseline were enrolled. At baseline, the patients underwent standardized blood pressure measurement at the health care center and they completed a questionnaire on self-rated quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF). There were three groups: 1) yoga class with yoga instructor (n = 28); 2) yoga at home (n = 28); and 3) a control group (n = 27). The participants were matched at the group level for systolic blood pressure. After 12 weeks of intervention, the assessments were performed again. At baseline a majority of the patients (92%) were on antihypertensive medication, and the patients were requested not to change their medication during the study. The yoga class group showed no improvement in blood pressure or self-rated quality of life, while in the yoga at home group there was a decline in diastolic blood pressure of 4.4 mmHg (p quality of life compared to the control group (p quality of life compared to controls. This implies that simple yoga exercises may be useful as a supplementary blood pressure therapy in addition to medical treatment when prescribed by primary care physicians.

  5. Economics of Team-based Care in Controlling Blood Pressure: A Community Guide Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Verughese; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K; Thota, Anilkrishna B; Proia, Krista K; Njie, Gibril; Hopkins, David P; Finnie, Ramona K C; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Kottke, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke, the leading cause of death in the U.S., and a substantial national burden through lost productivity and medical care. A recent Community Guide systematic review found strong evidence of effectiveness of team-based care in improving blood pressure control. The objective of the present review is to determine from the economic literature whether team-based care for blood pressure control is cost beneficial or cost effective. Electronic databases of papers published January 1980-May 2012 were searched to find economic evaluations of team-based care interventions to improve blood pressure outcomes, yielding 31 studies for inclusion. In analyses conducted in 2012, intervention cost, healthcare cost averted, benefit-to-cost ratios, and cost effectiveness were abstracted from the studies. The quality of estimates for intervention and healthcare cost from each study were assessed using three elements: intervention focus on blood pressure control, incremental estimates in the intervention group relative to a control group, and inclusion of major cost-driving elements in estimates. Intervention cost per unit reduction in systolic blood pressure was converted to lifetime intervention cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) saved using algorithms from published trials. Team-based care to improve blood pressure control is cost effective based on evidence that 26 of 28 estimates of $/QALY gained from ten studies were below a conservative threshold of $50,000. This finding is salient to recent U.S. healthcare reforms and coordinated patient-centered care through formation of Accountable Care Organizations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Physiological role for nitrate-reducing oral bacteria in blood pressure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapil, Vikas; Haydar, Syed M.A.; Pearl, Vanessa; Lundberg, Jon O.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2013-01-01

    Circulating nitrate (NO3−), derived from dietary sources or endogenous nitric oxide production, is extracted from blood by the salivary glands, accumulates in saliva, and is then reduced to nitrite (NO2−) by the oral microflora. This process has historically been viewed as harmful, because nitrite can promote formation of potentially carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. More recent research, however, suggests that nitrite can also serve as a precursor for systemic generation of vasodilatory nitric oxide, and exogenous administration of nitrate reduces blood pressure in humans. However, whether oral nitrate-reducing bacteria participate in “setting” blood pressure is unknown. We investigated whether suppression of the oral microflora affects systemic nitrite levels and hence blood pressure in healthy individuals. We measured blood pressure (clinic, home, and 24-h ambulatory) in 19 healthy volunteers during an initial 7-day control period followed by a 7-day treatment period with a chlorhexidine-based antiseptic mouthwash. Oral nitrate-reducing capacity and nitrite levels were measured after each study period. Antiseptic mouthwash treatment reduced oral nitrite production by 90% (p < 0.001) and plasma nitrite levels by 25% (p = 0.001) compared to the control period. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by 2–3 .5 mm Hg, increases correlated to a decrease in circulating nitrite concentrations (r2 = 0.56, p = 0.002). The blood pressure effect appeared within 1 day of disruption of the oral microflora and was sustained during the 7-day mouthwash intervention. These results suggest that the recycling of endogenous nitrate by oral bacteria plays an important role in determination of plasma nitrite levels and thereby in the physiological control of blood pressure. PMID:23183324

  7. Physiological role for nitrate-reducing oral bacteria in blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapil, Vikas; Haydar, Syed M A; Pearl, Vanessa; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2013-02-01

    Circulating nitrate (NO(3)(-)), derived from dietary sources or endogenous nitric oxide production, is extracted from blood by the salivary glands, accumulates in saliva, and is then reduced to nitrite (NO(2)(-)) by the oral microflora. This process has historically been viewed as harmful, because nitrite can promote formation of potentially carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. More recent research, however, suggests that nitrite can also serve as a precursor for systemic generation of vasodilatory nitric oxide, and exogenous administration of nitrate reduces blood pressure in humans. However, whether oral nitrate-reducing bacteria participate in "setting" blood pressure is unknown. We investigated whether suppression of the oral microflora affects systemic nitrite levels and hence blood pressure in healthy individuals. We measured blood pressure (clinic, home, and 24-h ambulatory) in 19 healthy volunteers during an initial 7-day control period followed by a 7-day treatment period with a chlorhexidine-based antiseptic mouthwash. Oral nitrate-reducing capacity and nitrite levels were measured after each study period. Antiseptic mouthwash treatment reduced oral nitrite production by 90% (p nitrite levels by 25% (p = 0.001) compared to the control period. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by 2-3 .5mmHg, increases correlated to a decrease in circulating nitrite concentrations (r(2) = 0.56, p = 0.002). The blood pressure effect appeared within 1 day of disruption of the oral microflora and was sustained during the 7-day mouthwash intervention. These results suggest that the recycling of endogenous nitrate by oral bacteria plays an important role in determination of plasma nitrite levels and thereby in the physiological control of blood pressure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Practices and effects of different measures for blood pressure control in hypertension patients in Beijing, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Dong, Z; Ma, A J; Dong, J; Fang, K; Xie, C; Qi, K; Xie, J; Zhou, Y; Zhao, Y

    2016-09-10

    Objective: To understand the practices and effects of different measures for blood pressure control in hypertension patients. Methods: Patients who have known hypertension from the subjects of "2014 Beijing adult (aged 18-79 years) chronic diseases and risk factors survey" were selected. The choices of different hypertension control measures, the relationship between the measures and demographic characteristics of hypertension patients, and the effects of different control measures were analyzed. Results: A total of 2 229 known hypertension patients were included, the analysis was conducted through a questionnaire survey. Those who answered "never taking any measures" , "taking medication according to doctor's instructions" and "taking medication when blood pressure rose" accounted for 7.0%, 79.8% and 8.3%, respectively. Those who had "diet control" , "physical exercises" and "blood pressure monitoring" accounted for 22.4%, 23.7% and 22.1%, respectively. In terms of "taking medicine according to doctor's instructions" , women (84.3%), those aged ≥60 years (87.6%), those living in urban area (81.5%), those living alone (83.8%), and Beijing local residents (82.3%) had higher compliance rates. As for "diet control" , women (24.4%), those aged ≥60 years (25.8%) and those with educational level of college or above (29.5%) had better practices. In terms of "physical exercise" , those aged ≥60 years (27.9%), those living in urban area (25.3%), those with educational level of college or above (32.5%) had better practice. Women (24.2%) and those aged ≥60 years (28.4%) had higher "blood pressure monitoring" rate. More men (9.7%), those aged 18-44 years (14.7%), those with educational level of high school (9.3%), the unmarried (18.2%), and non-Beijing local residents (14.7%) answered "never taking any measure" , and in terms of "taking medication when blood pressure rose" , non-Beijing local residents (12.8%) had higher rate. In the field survey, more patients who

  9. Factors associated with blood pressure control in predialysis chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor BP control was associated with middle age, proteinuric CKD, and prescription of 3 or more BP medication. Conclusion: BP control in predialysis CKD patients still needs to be optimized. Special attention should be given to middle‑aged patients who have proteinuric CKD and those on multiple BP drugs without optimal ...

  10. Blood Pressure, Sodium Intake, and Hypertension Control: Lessons From the North Karelia Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laatikainen, Tiina; Nissinen, Aulikki; Kastarinen, Mika; Jula, Antti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2016-06-01

    From the very beginning of the North Karelia Project, prevention, detection, and control of hypertension were included as key aims in the project. An intensive hypertension prevention and control program was established in North Karelia in 1972 that included community-based activities to reduce blood pressure levels in the entire population, detect people with hypertension, improve their treatment, establish standard diagnostic and therapeutic methods, and to monitor blood pressure levels, control of hypertension, and the performance of the health care. After the first 5 years of the project, most of these activities were also implemented on the national level. In late 1970s, work to reduce the salt intake was started, and substantial reductions have taken place in salt intake in the Finnish population. Remarkable improvements have been seen both in blood pressure levels and in treatment and control of hypertension in North Karelia and in the whole of Finland. Between 1972 and 2012 in North Karelia, the mean systolic blood pressure among 30- to 59-year-old men has decreased from 149 mm Hg to 135 mm Hg and among women from 153 mm Hg to 129 mm Hg. The decreases in mean diastolic blood pressure have been from 92 mm Hg to 84 mm Hg among men and from 92 mm Hg to 79 mm Hg among women. Copyright © 2016 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of Weight Reduction on Blood Pressure; A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neter, J.E.; Stam, B.E.; Kok, F.J.; Grobbee, D.E.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Increased body weight is a strong risk factor for hypertension. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was performed to estimate the effect of weight reduction on blood pressure overall and in population subgroups. Twenty-five randomized, controlled trials (comprising 34 strata) published

  12. Socioeconomic and modifiable predictors of blood pressure control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Low socioeconomic status is associated with the risk of hypertension. There are few reports of the effect of socioeconomic and potentially modifiable factors on the control of hypertension in South Africa (SA). Objectives. To investigate associations between patients' socioeconomic status and characteristics of ...

  13. Blood pressure control and left ventricular hypertrophy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surface area (BSA). When LVM was indexed to height, left ventricular hypertrophy was found in none of the subjects of the normotensive group, while it was found present in 43 (22.4%) and 14 (24.1%) subjects of the uncontrolled and controlled hypertensive groups, respectively. Significant difference in the prevalence of ...

  14. Low blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low blood pressure can usually be treated with success. Possible Complications Falls due to low blood pressure ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  15. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  16. High blood pressure - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007696.htm High blood pressure - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  17. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunosuppressant medicines Anxiety, depression and mental health Kidney rejection Lifestyle changes Donate a kidney Being a living ... take a blood pressure medicine. There are many types of blood pressure medicine and you may need to take ...

  18. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  19. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Feb 19,2018 What do your ... this chart: English | Spanish | Traditional Chinese Enter Your Blood Pressure Systolic mm Hg (upper #) Diastolic mm Hg (lower #) ...

  20. ABO blood group is a risk factor for coronary artery disease in patients with poor blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bingyang; Wu, Naqiong; Zhu, Chenggang; Gao, Ying; Guo, Yuanlin; Qing, Ping; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Yao; Dong, Qian; Li, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    Few studies had examined the role of ABO blood groups on CAD in hypertensive patients with different blood pressure (BP) controls. A total of 2708 patients with primary hypertension (HTN) were consecutively enrolled and underwent coronary angiography (CAG) due to angina-like chest pain. The severity of coronary artery stenosis was assessed by Gensini score (GS). Patients were divided into two groups due to results of CAG: HTN with CAD (n = 2185) and HTN without CAD (n = 523). Poor BP control was defined as systolic BP (SBP) ≥ mean in the study. Multivariable regression analysis was used to determine the potential impact of ABO blood groups on risk of the presence and severity of CAD. Compared to HTN without CAD group, the percentage of A blood group was statistically higher and O blood group was significantly lower in HTN with CAD group. Moreover, percentage of the angiography-proven CAD was higher in A blood group than that in non-A blood group (p < 0.05). After adjusting for confounding factors, A blood group was independently associated with CAD (odds ratio (OR): 1.422; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.017-1.987; p = 0.039) and GS (β = 0.055, p = 0.046) in patients with poor BP control. A blood group was an independent risk factor for the presence and severity of CAD in hypertensive patients with poor BP control.

  1. Awareness of high blood pressure status, treatment and control in a rural community in Edo State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omuemu, V O; Okojie, O H; Omuemu, C E

    2007-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in Udo, a rural community in Ovia South-west LGA of Edo State to assess the level of awareness of high blood pressure status, treatment and control. Cluster sampling method was used to select participants and data collection was by researcher administered questionnaire. Blood pressure measurement was by standardized method. A total of 590 respondents with mean age 30.7 +/- 14.6 years participated in the study. The prevalence of hypertension was 20.2% using the WHO/ISH criteria of SBP > or = 140 mmHg and/or DBP > or = 90 mmHg. Twenty two (18.5%) of the hypertensives were aware of their high blood pressure status. Awareness was higher in females, increased with age and decreased with higher educational status. Of those aware of their condition, 77.3% were on treatment and ofthese, 29.4% had adequate blood pressure control. This study has revealed a low level of awareness of high blood pressure status and control in this rural community. Therefore, there is urgent need for regular community-based hypertension screening programmes.

  2. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment plans for high blood pressure that include lifelong lifestyle changes and medicines to control high blood ... Managing and coping with stress To help make lifelong lifestyle changes, try making one healthy lifestyle change ...

  3. High blood pressure and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypertension - diet ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ... DIET The low-salt Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is proven to help lower blood ...

  4. Prevalence and control of high blood pressure in primary care: results from the German Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk Study (GEMCAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balijepalli, Chakrapani; Bramlage, Peter; Lösch, Christian; Zemmrich, Claudia; Humphries, Karin H; Moebus, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    Contemporary epidemiological data on blood pressure readings, hypertension prevalence and control in unselected patient populations covering a broad age range are scarce. The aim here is to report the prevalence of high blood pressure and to identify factors associated with blood pressure control in a large German primary care sample. We used data from the German Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk Study including 35 869 patients aged 18-99 years. High blood pressure was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg or using antihypertensive therapy. Factors associated with blood pressure control among patients receiving antihypertensive therapy were examined using multiple logistic regressions to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The prevalence of high blood pressure, uncontrolled high blood pressure and untreated high blood pressure was 54.8%, 21.3% and 17.6%, respectively. Age >50 years (1.52; 1.40-1.65), male sex (1.30; 1.20-1.41), elevated waist circumference (1.55; 1.45-1.65), high cholesterol (1.24; 1.16-1.33), high triglycerides (1.11; 1.04-1.19) and concomitant diabetes (1.29; 1.20-1.40) were independently associated with uncontrolled high blood pressure. In a majority of patients we observed hypertension despite treatment for high blood pressures. Studies examining the reasons for treatment failure are highly warranted.

  5. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effects on blood pressure. Finding out what genetic patterns contribute to high blood pressure risk. NHLBI-funded researchers identified dozens of ... whether a low-sodium and low-calorie eating pattern, along with aerobic exercise, can improve blood pressure in patients who do not respond to ...

  6. The effect of regular aquatic exercise on blood pressure: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yutaka; Nogami, Yoshie

    2018-01-01

    Background No meta-analysis has examined the effect of regular aquatic exercise on blood pressure. The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of regular aquatic exercise on blood pressure. Design A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods Databases were searched for literature published up to April 2017. The randomized controlled trials analysed involved healthy adults, an intervention group that only performed aquatic exercise and a control group that did not exercise, no other intervention, and trials indicated mean systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure. The net change in blood pressure was calculated from each trial, and the changes in blood pressure were pooled by a random effects model, and the risk of heterogeneity was evaluated. Subgroup analysis of subjects with hypertension, subjects who performed endurance exercise (or not), and subjects who only swam (or not) was performed, and the net changes in blood pressure were pooled. Results The meta-analysis examined 14 trials involving 452 subjects. Pooled net changes in blood pressure improved significantly (systolic blood pressure -8.4 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure -3.3 mmHg) and the changes in systolic blood pressure contained significant heterogeneity. When subjects were limited to those with hypertension, those who performed endurance exercise and subjects who did not swim, pooled net changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly, but the heterogeneity of systolic blood pressure did not improve. Conclusion Like exercise on land, aquatic exercise should have a beneficial effect by lowering blood pressure. In addition, aquatic exercise should lower the blood pressure of subjects with hypertension, and other forms of aquatic exercise besides swimming should also lower blood pressure.

  7. CoCo trial: Color-coded blood pressure Control, a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Corinne; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Del Prete, Valerio; Steurer-Stey, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate blood pressure (BP) control is a frequent challenge in general practice. The objective of this study was to determine whether a color-coded BP booklet using a traffic light scheme (red, >180 mmHg systolic BP and/or >110 mmHg diastolic BP; yellow, >140-180 mmHg systolic BP or >90-110 mmHg diastolic BP; green, ≤140 mmHg systolic BP and ≤90 mmHg diastolic BP) improves BP control and adherence with home BP measurement. In this two-group, randomized controlled trial, general practitioners recruited adult patients with a BP >140 mmHg systolic and/or >90 mmHg diastolic. Patients in the control group received a standard BP booklet and the intervention group used a color-coded booklet for daily home BP measurement. The main outcomes were changes in BP, BP control (treatment goal Color-coded BP self-monitoring significantly improved BP control (number needed to treat of 5, meaning that every fifth patient utilizing color-coded self-monitoring achieved better BP control after 6 months), but no significant between-group difference was observed in BP change. A markedly higher percentage of patients achieved BP values in the normal range. This simple, inexpensive approach of color-coded BP self-monitoring is user-friendly and applicable in primary care, and should be implemented in the care of patients with arterial hypertension.

  8. ORANGE JUICE AND BLOOD PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. VALIM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Blood pressure is the force of blood against artery walls. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg and recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (as the heart contracts over diastolic pressure (as the heart relaxes between beats. High blood pressure (hypertension is defined as chronically elevated high blood pressure, with systolic blood pressure (SBP of 140 mm Hg or greater, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP of 90 mm Hg or greater. High blood pressure (HBP, smoking, abnormal blood lipid levels, obesity and diabetes are risk factors for coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the US. Lifestyle modifications such as engaging in regular physical activity, quitting smoking and eating a healthy diet (limiting intake of saturated fat and sodium and increasing consumption of fiber, fruits and vegetables are advocated for the prevention, treatment, and control of HBP. As multiple factors influence blood pressure, the effects of each factor are typically modest, particularly in normotensive subjects, yet the combined effects can be substantial. Nutrition plays an important role in influencing blood pressure. Orange juice should be included as part of any low sodium diet and/or any blood pressure reducing eating plan, as it is sodium free, fat-free and can help meet recommended levels of potassium intake that may contribute to lower BP.

  9. Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients in the "Hiperdia Program": A Territory-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarita Silva de Souza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic hypertension is highly prevalent and an important risk factor for cardiovascular events. Blood pressure control in hypertensive patients enrolled in the Hiperdia Program, a program of the Single Health System for the follow-up and monitoring of hypertensive patients, is still far below the desired level. Objective: To describe the epidemiological profile and to assess blood pressure control of patients enrolled in Hiperdia, in the city of Novo Hamburgo (State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a stratified cluster random sample, including 383 adults enrolled in the Hiperdia Program of the 15 Basic Health Units of the city of Porto Alegre, conducted between 2010 and 2011. Controlled blood pressure was defined as ≤140 mmHg × 90 mmHg. The hypertensive patients were interviewed and their blood pressure was measured using a calibrated aneroid device. Prevalence ratios (PR with 95% confidence interval, Wald's χ2 test, and simple and multiple Poisson regression were used in the statistical analysis. Results: The mean age was 63 ± 10 years, and most of the patients were females belonging to social class C, with a low level of education, a sedentary lifestyle, and family history positive for systemic hypertension. Diabetes mellitus (DM was observed in 31%; adherence to the antihypertensive treatment in 54.3%; and 33.7% had their blood pressure controlled. DM was strongly associated with inadequate BP control, with only 15.7% of the diabetics showing BP considered as controlled. Conclusion: Even for hypertensive patients enrolled in the Hiperdia Program, BP control is not satisfactorily reached or sustained. Diabetic hypertensive patients show the most inappropriate BP control.

  10. Effects of â2-agonist therapy on blood pressure, glycaemic control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: the blood pressure, glycaemic control and electrolyte concentrations are influenced by autonomic nervous system and are expected to be affected by beta-2 agonist medications commonly used by asthmatic patients. Objective:The objective of this study is to detect the possible effects of beta-2 agonist ...

  11. Dietary fiber and blood pressure. A meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streppel, M.T.; Arends, L.R.; Veer, van 't P.; Grobbee, D.E.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dietary fiber is part of a healthy diet and may exert a protective effect in the cardiovascular system. The effect of fiber intake on blood pressure (BP) has not yet been established. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials to estimate the effect of

  12. Blood pressure control at a hospital day clinic - a medical audit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims. To examine prescribing habits and blood pressure control in a hospital day clinic population receiving calcium channel blockers. Setting. King Edward VIII Hospital day clinic, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal. Patients. 200 consecutive patients receiving a regimen containing calcium channel blockers. 190 patients with ...

  13. CoCo trial: Color-coded blood pressure Control, a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmiel C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Corinne Chmiel, Oliver Senn, Thomas Rosemann, Valerio Del Prete, Claudia Steurer-Stey Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Inadequate blood pressure (BP control is a frequent challenge in general practice. The objective of this study was to determine whether a color-coded BP booklet using a traffic light scheme (red, >180 mmHg systolic BP and/or >110 mmHg diastolic BP; yellow, >140–180 mmHg systolic BP or >90–110 mmHg diastolic BP; green, ≤140 mmHg systolic BP and ≤90 mmHg diastolic BP improves BP control and adherence with home BP measurement.Methods: In this two-group, randomized controlled trial, general practitioners recruited adult patients with a BP >140 mmHg systolic and/or >90 mmHg diastolic. Patients in the control group received a standard BP booklet and the intervention group used a color-coded booklet for daily home BP measurement. The main outcomes were changes in BP, BP control (treatment goal <140/90 mmHg, and adherence with home BP measurement after 6 months.Results: One hundred and twenty-one of 137 included patients qualified for analysis. After 6 months, a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic BP was achieved in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups (16.1/7.9 mmHg in the intervention group versus 13.1/8.6 mmHg in the control group, P=0.3/0.7. BP control (treatment target <140/90 mmHg was achieved significantly more often in the intervention group (43% versus 25%; P=0.037; number needed to treat of 5. Adherence with home BP measurement overall was high, with a trend in favor of the intervention group (98.6% versus 96.2%; P=0.1Conclusion: Color-coded BP self-monitoring significantly improved BP control (number needed to treat of 5, meaning that every fifth patient utilizing color-coded self-monitoring achieved better BP control after 6 months, but no significant between-group difference was

  14. Effect of bilateral carotid body resection on cardiac baroreflex control of blood pressure during hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Taylor, Jennifer L; Mozer, Michael T; Dube, Simmi; Basu, Ananda; Basu, Rita; Rizza, Robert A; Curry, Timothy B; Joyner, Michael J; Wehrwein, Erica A

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia results in a reduction in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity and a shift in the baroreflex working range to higher heart rates. This effect is mediated, in part, by the carotid chemoreceptors. Therefore, we hypothesized hypoglycemia-mediated changes in baroreflex control of heart rate would be blunted in carotid body-resected patients when compared with healthy controls. Five patients with bilateral carotid body resection for glomus tumors and 10 healthy controls completed a 180-minute hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic (≈3.3 mmol/L) clamp. Changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were assessed. Baseline baroreflex sensitivity was not different between groups (P>0.05). Hypoglycemia resulted in a reduction in baroreflex sensitivity in both the groups (main effect of time, P<0.01) and responses were lower in resected patients when compared with controls (main effect of group, P<0.05). Hypoglycemia resulted in large reductions in systolic (-17±7 mm Hg) and mean (-14±5 mm Hg) blood pressure in resected patients that were not observed in controls (interaction of group and time, P<0.05). Despite lower blood pressures, increases in heart rate with hypoglycemia were blunted in resected patients (interaction of group and time, P<0.01). Major novel findings from this study demonstrate that intact carotid chemoreceptors are essential for increasing heart rate and maintaining arterial blood pressure during hypoglycemia in humans. These data support a contribution of the carotid chemoreceptors to blood pressure control and highlight the potential widespread effects of carotid body resection in humans. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Intensive versus Standard Blood-Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bress, Adam P; Bellows, Brandon K; King, Jordan B; Hess, Rachel; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Zhang, Zugui; Berlowitz, Dan R; Conroy, Molly B; Fine, Larry; Oparil, Suzanne; Morisky, Donald E; Kazis, Lewis E; Ruiz-Negrón, Natalia; Powell, Jamie; Tamariz, Leonardo; Whittle, Jeff; Wright, Jackson T; Supiano, Mark A; Cheung, Alfred K; Weintraub, William S; Moran, Andrew E

    2017-08-24

    In the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), adults at high risk for cardiovascular disease who received intensive systolic blood-pressure control (target, target, costs associated with intensive control versus standard control. We used a microsimulation model to apply SPRINT treatment effects and health care costs from national sources to a hypothetical cohort of SPRINT-eligible adults. The model projected lifetime costs of treatment and monitoring in patients with hypertension, cardiovascular disease events and subsequent treatment costs, treatment-related risks of serious adverse events and subsequent costs, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for intensive control versus standard control of systolic blood pressure. We determined that the mean number of QALYs would be 0.27 higher among patients who received intensive control than among those who received standard control and would cost approximately $47,000 more per QALY gained if there were a reduction in adherence and treatment effects after 5 years; the cost would be approximately $28,000 more per QALY gained if the treatment effects persisted for the remaining lifetime of the patient. Most simulation results indicated that intensive treatment would be cost-effective (51 to 79% below the willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000 per QALY and 76 to 93% below the threshold of $100,000 per QALY), regardless of whether treatment effects were reduced after 5 years or persisted for the remaining lifetime. In this simulation study, intensive systolic blood-pressure control prevented cardiovascular disease events and prolonged life and did so at levels below common willingness-to-pay thresholds per QALY, regardless of whether benefits were reduced after 5 years or persisted for the patient's remaining lifetime. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others; SPRINT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01206062 .).

  16. Effect of Turkish classical music on blood pressure: a randomized controlled trial in hypertensive elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiroğlu, Tansel; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ergün, Yusuf; Ekerbiçer, Hasan Çetin

    2013-06-01

    Existing studies suggest that music therapy can have favorable effects on hypertension and anxiety. We therefore set out to investigate the effect of Turkish classical music. To investigate whether Turkish classical music has positive effects on blood pressures and anxiety levels in elderly patients. This was a randomized controlled trial performed on 60 hypertensive patients living in a local elderly home in Adana, Turkey. Following the completion of a socio-demographic form for each patient, Hamilton anxiety scale was applied. Thereafter, the subjects were randomly divided into two equal-size groups and were allowed to either listen to Turkish classical music (music therapy group) or have a resting period (control group) for 25 min. The primary and secondary outcome measures were blood pressure and Hamilton anxiety scale scores, respectively. The mean reduction in systolic blood pressure was 13.00 mmHg in the music therapy group and 6.50 mmHg in the control group. The baseline adjusted between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (95% CI 6.80-9.36). The median reductions in diastolic blood pressures were 10 mmHg both in the music therapy and control groups. The between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.839). The mean reduction in HAMA-A was 1.63 in the music therapy group and 0.77 in the control group. The baseline adjusted between treatment group difference was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.82-1.92). The study demonstrated that both Turkish classical music and resting alone have positive effects on blood pressure in patients with hypertension. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure on microvascular complications in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the effects of intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure on microvascular complications in patients with type II diabetes by comparing the therapeutic effects of intensive and standard treatment in patients with type II diabetes.METHODS: A total of 107 patients with type II diabetes were randomly assigned into intensive and standard treatment groups. Patients in the intensive treatment group received preterax (perindopril/ indapamide to control blood pressure, and gliclazide (diamicron MR to control blood glucose. Patients in the standard treatment group received routine medications or placebo. Urinary microalbumin (UMA, urinary creatinine (UCR, the UMA/UCR ratio, and visual acuity were monitored according to the study design of the ADVANCE trial. Direct ophthalmoscopy and seven-field stereoscopic retinal photography were used to examine the fundi at baseline, and repeated after 5 years of treatment.RESULTS: The characteristics of patients in both groups were well balanced at baseline. After 5 years of treatment, visual acuity was found to be decreased in the standard group (P=0.04, but remained stable in the intensive group. The severity of diabetic retinopathy had not progressed in patients in the intensive group, but had deteriorated in the standard group (P=0.0006. The UMA/UCR ratio was not obviously changed in patients in the intensive group, whereas it was significantly increased in the standard group (P=0.00.CONCLUSION: Intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure can decrease the incidence or slow the progression of microvascular complications in patients with type II diabetes, and maintain stable vision.

  18. Risk factors for hypertensive crisis: importance of out-patient blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, James E; Huang, Mike B; Borzak, Steven

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify independent risk factors for development of hypertensive crisis. This was a retrospective, case-controlled study. Cases were 143 patients who presented during a 3-year period to the Emergency Department with the diagnosis of hypertensive crisis, defined as systolic pressure >/=180 mmHg and/or diastolic pressure >/=110 mmHg and symptoms of hypertensive emergency during the Emergency Department presentation. Controls were 485 patients with hypertension, matched to cases on the basis of age, sex and race, who were not admitted to the Emergency Department with an episode of hypertensive crisis during the study period. Co-morbid conditions were identified from computerized health system databases and medical records. Out-patient blood pressures were obtained from medical records from randomly selected out-patient clinic visits. The average blood pressure during Emergency Department presentation in patients with hypertensive crisis was 197 +/- 21/108 +/- 14 mmHg. Less successful out-patient systolic blood pressure control was an independent risk factor for hypertensive crisis [odds ratio (OR) 1.30 (1.18-1.42), per 10 mmHg, P hypertensive crisis.

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Blood Pressure Control -- Helping Patients Take Their Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taking their blood pressure medicine as directed. Problem Medicines don’t work if people don’t take ... reasons people don’t take their blood pressure medicine as directed vary: Not filling the prescription – Nearly ...

  20. Effect of Grape Polyphenols on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Hua; Zhao, Peng; Tian, Hong-Bo; Chen, Liang-Hua; Cui, Lian-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of grape polyphenols on blood pressure remains unclear, which we aimed to address via a meta-analysis study. Methods We conducted study trial searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Summary estimates of weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were obtained by using fixed-effects models. Subgroup analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. The protocol details of our meta-analysis have been submitted to the international database of prospectively registered systematic reviews (registration number CRD42015019196). Results Ten studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Our results showed daily grape polyphenol intake could significantly reduce systolic blood pressure by 1.48 mmHg when compared to control subjects (12 comparisons; -1.48 [-2.79 to -0.16] mmHg; P = 0.03). Subgroup analyses indicated larger reduction was identified in the intake of low-dose of grape polyphenols (grape polyphenols group as compared to controls. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was detected in the meta-analysis of either systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions Daily grape polyphenol intake can significantly reduce the systolic blood pressure in humans, although the reduction is modest when compared with anti-hypertensive medications. Larger, better designed trials, that specifically include hypertensive subjects, are required to verify our results in the future. PMID:26375022

  1. Effect of Grape Polyphenols on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Hua; Zhao, Peng; Tian, Hong-Bo; Chen, Liang-Hua; Cui, Lian-Qun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of grape polyphenols on blood pressure remains unclear, which we aimed to address via a meta-analysis study. We conducted study trial searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Summary estimates of weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were obtained by using fixed-effects models. Subgroup analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. The protocol details of our meta-analysis have been submitted to the international database of prospectively registered systematic reviews (registration number CRD42015019196). Ten studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Our results showed daily grape polyphenol intake could significantly reduce systolic blood pressure by 1.48 mmHg when compared to control subjects (12 comparisons; -1.48 [-2.79 to -0.16] mmHg; P = 0.03). Subgroup analyses indicated larger reduction was identified in the intake of low-dose of grape polyphenols (grape polyphenols group as compared to controls. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was detected in the meta-analysis of either systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Daily grape polyphenol intake can significantly reduce the systolic blood pressure in humans, although the reduction is modest when compared with anti-hypertensive medications. Larger, better designed trials, that specifically include hypertensive subjects, are required to verify our results in the future.

  2. Role of olmesartan in combination therapy in blood pressure control and vascular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Ferrario

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Carlos M Ferrario, Ronald D SmithWake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USAAbstract: Angiotensin receptor blockers have emerged as a first-line therapy in the management of hypertension and hypertension-related comorbidities. Since national and international guidelines have stressed the need to control blood pressure to <140/90 mmHg in uncomplicated hypertension and <130/80 mmHg in those with associated comorbidities such as diabetes or chronic kidney disease, these goal blood pressures can only be achieved through combination therapy. Of several drugs that can be effectively combined to attain the recommended blood pressure goals, fixed-dose combinations of angiotensin receptor blockers and the calcium channel blocker amlodipine provide additive antihypertensive effects associated with a safe profile and increased adherence to therapy. In this article, we review the evidence regarding the beneficial effects of renin–angiotensin system blockade with olmesartan medoxomil and amlodipine in terms of blood pressure control and improvement of vascular function and target organ damage.Keywords: amlodipine, angiotensin receptor blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, hypertension, renin–angiotensin system

  3. Multimorbidity and blood pressure control in 37 651 hypertensive patients from danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Maja S; Andersen, Morten; Thomsen, Janus L

    2012-01-01

    Patients with hypertension are primarily treated in general practice. However, major studies of patients with hypertension are rarely based on populations from primary care. Knowledge of blood pressure (BP) control rates in patients with diabetes and/or cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), who have...... additional comorbidities, is lacking. We aimed to investigate the association of comorbidities with BP control using a large cohort of hypertensive patients from primary care practices....

  4. Organizational Leadership and Adaptive Reserve in Blood Pressure Control: The Heart Health NOW Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kamal H; DeWalt, Darren A; Halladay, Jacquie; Weiner, Bryan J; Kim, Jung I; Fine, Jason; Cykert, Samuel

    2018-04-01

    Our purpose was to assess whether a practice's adaptive reserve and high leadership capability in quality improvement are associated with population blood pressure control. We divided practices into quartiles of blood pressure control performance and considered the top quartile as the benchmark for comparison. Using abstracted clinical data from electronic health records, we performed a cross-sectional study to assess the association of top quartile hypertension control and (1) the baseline practice adaptive reserve (PAR) scores and (2) baseline practice leadership scores, using modified Poisson regression models adjusting for practice-level characteristics. Among 181 practices, 46 were in the top quartile, which averaged 68% or better blood pressure control. Practices with higher PAR scores compared with lower PAR scores were not more likely to reside in the top quartile of performance (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.92 for highest quartile; 95% CI, 0.9-4.1). Similarly, high quality improvement leadership capability compared with lower capability did not predict better blood pressure control performance (PR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.57-1.56). Practices with higher proportions of commercially insured patients were more likely than practices with lower proportions of commercially insured patients to have top quartile performance (37% vs 26%, P =.002), whereas lower proportions of the uninsured (8% vs 14%, P =.055) were associated with better performance. Our findings show that adaptive reserve and leadership capability in quality improvement implementation are not statistically associated with achieving top quartile practice-level hypertension control at baseline in the Heart Health NOW project. Our findings, however, may be limited by a lack of patient-related factors and small sample size to preclude strong conclusions. © 2018 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  5. Effect of Grape Polyphenols on Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Hua Li

    Full Text Available The effect of grape polyphenols on blood pressure remains unclear, which we aimed to address via a meta-analysis study.We conducted study trial searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Summary estimates of weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were obtained by using fixed-effects models. Subgroup analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. The protocol details of our meta-analysis have been submitted to the international database of prospectively registered systematic reviews (registration number CRD42015019196.Ten studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Our results showed daily grape polyphenol intake could significantly reduce systolic blood pressure by 1.48 mmHg when compared to control subjects (12 comparisons; -1.48 [-2.79 to -0.16] mmHg; P = 0.03. Subgroup analyses indicated larger reduction was identified in the intake of low-dose of grape polyphenols (< 733 mg/day, median level of the included studies or patients with metabolic syndrome. Contrarily, diastolic blood pressure was not significantly decreased in the grape polyphenols group as compared to controls. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was detected in the meta-analysis of either systolic or diastolic blood pressure.Daily grape polyphenol intake can significantly reduce the systolic blood pressure in humans, although the reduction is modest when compared with anti-hypertensive medications. Larger, better designed trials, that specifically include hypertensive subjects, are required to verify our results in the future.

  6. Diuretics vs. placebo for postpartum blood pressure control in preeclampsia (DIUPRE): a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cursino, Telma; Katz, Leila; Coutinho, Isabela; Amorim, Melania

    2015-08-05

    Hypertension affects about 10% of pregnancies and is responsible for both maternal and neonatal devastating complications such as eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, prematurity and maternal and neonatal death. The resolution of the disease occurs in the first twelve weeks postpartum. The behavior of blood pressure and occurrence of very high blood pressure episodes among women with severe preeclampsia is related to remodeling of the dynamics of body fluids with consequent increase in intravascular volume. The persistence of hypertension in critical levels results in increased puerperal morbidity. To evaluate the effectiveness of furosemide in accelerating blood pressure recovery among women with severe preeclampsia. A triple-masked placebo controlled clinical trial, will be conducted including 120 postpartum women with severe preeclampsia, after eclampsia prophylaxis with magnesium sulfate and with adequate diuresis. Women with chronic hypertension and users of diuretics will be deleted. Informed consent will be obtained from all participants. Patients will be randomized to receive furosemide (40 mg orally every twenty four hours) or placebo. The variables are systolic and diastolic blood pressure, frequency of hypertensive crises, need for maintenance of antihypertensive therapy, number of antihypertensive agents used to control blood pressure, urine output, length of hospital stay, adverse effects and maternal complications. This study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee in humans of our institution. All participants will be duly informed about the aims of the project and will be included only if they agree to participate voluntarily, signing the informed consent. This study was registered on Clinical Trials.gov under the number NCT02163655. ( http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02163655).

  7. The CHIPS Randomized Controlled Trial (Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy Study): Is Severe Hypertension Just an Elevated Blood Pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magee, Laura A.; von Dadelszen, Peter; Singer, Joel; Lee, Terry; Rey, Evelyne; Ross, Susan; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kellie E.; Menzies, Jennifer; Sanchez, Johanna; Gafni, Amiram; Helewa, Michael; Hutton, Eileen; Koren, Gideon; Lee, Shoo K.; Logan, Alexander G.; Ganzevoort, Wessel; Welch, Ross; Thornton, Jim G.; Moutquin, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether clinical outcomes differed by occurrence of severe hypertension in the international CHIPS trial (Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy Study), adjusting for the interventions of less tight (target diastolic blood pressure [dBP] 100 mmHg) versus tight control (target dBP 85

  8. Intensive Versus Standard Blood Pressure Control in SPRINT-Eligible Participants of ACCORD-BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Leo F; Dixon, Dave L; Wohlford, George F; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S; Baker, William L; Van Tassell, Benjamin W

    2017-12-01

    We sought to determine the effect of intensive blood pressure (BP) control on cardiovascular outcomes in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study was a post hoc, multivariate, subgroup analysis of ACCORD-BP (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Blood Pressure) participants. Participants were eligible for the analysis if they were in the standard glucose control arm of ACCORD-BP and also had the additional CVD risk factors required for SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) eligibility. We used a Cox proportional hazards regression model to compare the effect of intensive versus standard BP control on CVD outcomes. The "SPRINT-eligible" ACCORD-BP participants were pooled with SPRINT participants to determine whether the effects of intensive BP control interacted with T2DM. The mean baseline Framingham 10-year CVD risk scores were 14.5% and 14.8%, respectively, in the intensive and standard BP control groups. The mean achieved systolic BP values were 120 and 134 mmHg in the intensive and standard BP control groups ( P control reduced the composite of CVD death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), nonfatal stroke, any revascularization, and heart failure (hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.65-0.96; P = 0.02). Intensive BP control also reduced CVD death, nonfatal MI, and nonfatal stroke (hazard ratio 0.69; 95% CI 0.51-0.93; P = 0.01). Treatment-related adverse events occurred more frequently in participants receiving intensive BP control (4.1% vs. 2.1%; P = 0.003). The effect of intensive BP control on CVD outcomes did not differ between patients with and without T2DM ( P > 0.62). Intensive BP control reduced CVD outcomes in a cohort of participants with T2DM and additional CVD risk factors. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Correlation between compliance in patients with anti-hypertensive therapy and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huimin; Sun, Juan; Zhang, Haiyang; Zhu, Yuhua; Xujie Mao, Xujie Mao; Ai, Fang; Tang, Siyuan; Li, Rong

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to understand the blood pressure control status for hypertension patients, and discuss the relationship between social support, medication compliance and blood pressure for hypertensive patients. The survey objective was the hypertensive patients in chronic disease management system in Xinxiang city. The survey was conducted as the questionnaire survey filled by objectives. Social support rating scale and medication therapy compliance questionnaire was utilized to evaluate the patients' social support and medication therapy compliance. 1095 patients in medication were investigated, the blood pressure of 66.6% investigated objectives was controlled at target levels (social support score for hypertensive patients in medication was (40.01±6.54) points, the subjective support score, objective support score and support utilization degree score were respectively (24.43±4.61) points, (8.59±2.59) points and (7.00±2.06) points; Rank correlation coefficient of Spearman illustrated that the support utilization rating evaluation was apparently correlated to medication therapy compliance (rs=0.88, Ppressure control were male (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.47~0.79) and high hypertensive grade (OR 0.31, 95%CI 0.19~0.44); The protective factors for blood pressure control was good medication therapy compliance (OR 1.54, 95%CI 1.22~1.89), (average Psocial support system, increase patients' social support utilization degree, emphasized the intervention on low average monthly household incomes, male higher rate, higher hypertensive degree, and further improve the medication therapy compliance and hypertensive control rate of hypertensive patients.

  10. Randomized Controlled Ethanol Cookstove Intervention and Blood Pressure in Pregnant Nigerian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Donee; Northcross, Amanda; Wilson, Nathaniel; Dutta, Anindita; Pandya, Rishi; Ibigbami, Tope; Adu, Damilola; Olamijulo, John; Morhason-Bello, Oludare; Karrison, Theodore; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Olopade, Christopher O

    2017-06-15

    Hypertension during pregnancy is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Exposure to household air pollution elevates blood pressure (BP). To investigate the ability of a clean cookstove intervention to lower BP during pregnancy. We conducted a randomized controlled trial in Nigeria. Pregnant women cooking with kerosene or firewood were randomly assigned to an ethanol arm (n = 162) or a control arm (n = 162). BP measurements were taken during six antenatal visits. In the primary analysis, we compared ethanol users with control subjects. In subgroup analyses, we compared baseline kerosene users assigned to the intervention with kerosene control subjects and compared baseline firewood users assigned to ethanol with firewood control subjects. The change in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) over time was significantly different between ethanol users and control subjects (P = 0.040); systolic blood pressure (SBP) did not differ (P = 0.86). In subgroup analyses, there was no significant intervention effect for SBP; a significant difference for DBP (P = 0.031) existed among preintervention kerosene users. At the last visit, mean DBP was 2.8 mm Hg higher in control subjects than in ethanol users (3.6 mm Hg greater in control subjects than in ethanol users among preintervention kerosene users), and 6.4% of control subjects were hypertensive (SBP ≥140 and/or DBP ≥90 mm Hg) versus 1.9% of ethanol users (P = 0.051). Among preintervention kerosene users, 8.8% of control subjects were hypertensive compared with 1.8% of ethanol users (P = 0.029). To our knowledge, this is the first cookstove randomized controlled trial examining prenatal BP. Ethanol cookstoves have potential to reduce DBP and hypertension during pregnancy. Accordingly, clean cooking fuels may reduce adverse health impacts associated with household air pollution. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02394574).

  11. Casein improves brachial and central aortic diastolic blood pressure in overweight adolescents: a randomised, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina; Larnkjær, Anni; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, blood pressure (BP) and blood lipids may be improved by milk in adults and the effects may be mediated via proteins. However, limited is known about the effects of milk proteins on central aortic BP and no studies have examined the effects in children. Therefore, the present...... trial examined the effect of milk and milk proteins on brachial and central aortic BP, blood lipids, inflammation and arterial stiffness in overweight adolescents. A randomised controlled trial was conducted in 193 overweight adolescents aged 12–15 years. They were randomly assigned to drink 1 litre...... stiffness or blood lipid concentrations. A high intake of casein improves DBP in overweight adolescents. Thus, casein may be beneficial for younger overweight subjects in terms of reducing the longterm risk of CVD. In contrast, whey protein seems to increase BP compared with drinking water; however, water...

  12. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  13. Integration of a blood pressure controller and an infusion toolbox system using client-server technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, R H; Coussaert, E J; Cantraine, F R

    1998-05-01

    This paper shortly describes an Infusion Toolbox and a blood pressure (BP) control application. It explains how we applied an agent model and client-server technology to integrate them. We show that by using this framework and object oriented technologies the necessary changes to the existing applications are reduced. Many elements of the tested original systems could be re-used, which enhances safe development.

  14. Blood Pressure Control in Aging Predicts Cerebral Atrophy Related to Small-Vessel White Matter Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C. Kern

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small-vessel damage manifests as white matter hyperintensities and cerebral atrophy on brain MRI and is associated with aging, cognitive decline and dementia. We sought to examine the interrelationship of these imaging biomarkers and the influence of hypertension in older individuals. We used a multivariate spatial covariance neuroimaging technique to localize the effects of white matter lesion load on regional gray matter volume and assessed the role of blood pressure control, age and education on this relationship. Using a case-control design matching for age, gender, and educational attainment we selected 64 participants with normal blood pressure, controlled hypertension or uncontrolled hypertension from the Northern Manhattan Study cohort. We applied gray matter voxel-based morphometry with the scaled subprofile model to (1 identify regional covariance patterns of gray matter volume differences associated with white matter lesion load, (2 compare this relationship across blood pressure groups, and (3 relate it to cognitive performance. In this group of participants aged 60–86 years, we identified a pattern of reduced gray matter volume associated with white matter lesion load in bilateral temporal-parietal regions with relative preservation of volume in the basal forebrain, thalami and cingulate cortex. This pattern was expressed most in the uncontrolled hypertension group and least in the normotensives, but was also more evident in older and more educated individuals. Expression of this pattern was associated with worse performance in executive function and memory. In summary, white matter lesions from small-vessel disease are associated with a regional pattern of gray matter atrophy that is mitigated by blood pressure control, exacerbated by aging, and associated with cognitive performance.

  15. Follow-up of Antihypertensive Therapy Improves Blood Pressure Control: Results of HYT (HYperTension survey) Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fici, F; Seravalle, G; Koylan, N; Nalbantgil, I; Cagla, N; Korkut, Y; Quarti-Trevano, F; Makel, W; Grassi, G

    2017-09-01

    Although improved during the past few years, blood pressure control remains sub optimal. The impact of follow-up assessment on blood pressure control was evaluated in a group of patients of the HYT (HYperTension survey), treated with a combination of different dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (CCBs regimen) and inhibitors of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and with uncontrolled blood pressure. This was obtained assessing (a) the rate of blood pressure control at 3 and 6 months of follow-up in the whole group of patients, (b) the rate of blood pressure control and the average blood pressure values in subjects treated with different DHP-CCBs regimen. From the 4993 patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, (BP ≥ 140/90 or ≥140/85 in patients with diabetes), 3729 (mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), maintained CCBs regimen combined wih RAAS blockers and were evaluated at 3 and 6 months follow-up. At each visit BP (semiautomatic device, Omron-M6, 3 measurements), heart rate, adverse events and treatment persistence were collected. At 1st and 2nd follow-up the rate of controlled BP was 63.5 and 72.8% respectively (p blood pressure control; (b) there is no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect between different CCBs regimen; (c) lipophilic CCBs induce less ankle edema.

  16. Regular aerobic exercise and blood pressure in East Asians: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yutaka; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Maeda, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of regular aerobic exercise on blood pressure in East Asians. The inclusion criteria of the randomized controlled trials were healthy East Asian adults, exercise group performing regular aerobic exercise and control group not exercising, and a description of the mean systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure at rest. This study included 31 study groups and 1994 subjects. Pooled changes in blood pressure showed significant reductions (systolic blood pressure: -4.7 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure: -3.2 mmHg). In subgroup analyses, the change in systolic blood pressure for randomized controlled trials meeting the America Heart Association and American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for physical activity to maintain health was significantly larger than in randomized controlled trials not meeting the guidelines. In addition, meta-regression indicated that the change in systolic blood pressure was significantly related to "exercise time × exercise frequency." The ideal volume of exercise is that for a long time at a high frequency, such as the volume recommended in the America Heart Association and American College of Sports Medicine guidelines: moderate intensity and >150 min per week. List of abbreviations: BP: blood pressure; BMI: body mass index; SBP: systolic blood pressure; DBP: diastolic blood pressure; RCT: randomized controlled trial; AHA: America Heart Association; ACSM: America College of Sports Medicine; SD: standard deviation; HDL-C: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-C: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; TC: total cholesterol; TG: triglycerides; PEDro: Physiotherapy Evidence Database; CI: confidence intervals; %HR max : percentage of maximal heart rate.

  17. Evidence that blood pressure remains under the control of arterial baroreceptors in renal hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Trindade Jr.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine the range of the influence of the baroreflex on blood pressure in chronic renal hypertensive rats. Supramaximal electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve and section of the baroreceptor nerves (sinoaortic denervation were used to obtain a global analysis of the baroreceptor-sympathetic reflex in normotensive control and in chronic (2 months 1-kidney, 1-clip hypertensive rats. The fall in blood pressure produced by electrical baroreceptor stimulation was greater in renal hypertensive rats than in normotensive controls (right nerve: -47 ± 8 vs -23 ± 4 mmHg; left nerve: -51 ± 7 vs -30 ± 4 mmHg; and both right and left nerves: -50 ± 8 vs -30 ± 4 mmHg; P < 0.05. Furthermore, the increase in blood pressure level produced by baroreceptor denervation in chronic renal hypertensive rats was similar to that observed in control animals 2-5 h (control: 163 ± 5 vs 121 ± 1 mmHg; 1K-1C: 203 ± 7 vs 170 ± 5 mmHg; P < 0.05 and 24 h (control: 149 ± 3 vs 121 ± 1 mmHg; 1K-1C: 198 ± 8 vs 170 ± 5 mmHg; P < 0.05 after sinoaortic denervation. Taken together, these data indicate that the central and peripheral components of the baroreflex are acting efficiently at higher arterial pressure in renal hypertensive rats when the aortic nerve is maximally stimulated or the activity is abolished.

  18. Blood pressure control amongst patients living with hypertension presenting to an urban district hospital outpatient clinic in Kwazulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folafolu A. Adebolu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Background: The prevalence of hypertension in South Africa has been estimated to be 20% of the adult population with over six million people being affected. Poor adherence to treatment plans lead to inadequate blood pressure control and high morbidity. Many studies have looked at factors contributing to poor blood pressure control in South Africa but few studies actually focus on district hospitals in Kwazulu-Natal in particular, despite the fact that the province has the most heterogeneous population in South Africa.Method: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted at the chronic out patient clinic of an urban district hospital involving 370 participants aged 18–90 years.Result: The study showed poorly controlled blood pressure in 58% of the participants. Only 35% knew their blood pressure results on the day of interview and 19.2% were aware of their target blood pressure. Good adherence was self-reported by 95% of the participants, whist 51.4% reported significant side-effects to medication.Conclusion: The majority of patients had poor knowledge about blood pressure and little awareness of their blood pressure reading. These may be precursors to poor blood pressure control and this needs further investigation. A high level of self-reported adherence to medication did not translate into effective blood pressure control. A significant number reported medication side-effects which may have contributed to the poor blood pressure control. The high adherence rate may therefore have been over reported. An objective way tomeasure adherence will be necessary for future research. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  19. Home monitoring of blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    McGrath, Barry P

    2015-01-01

    Home blood pressure monitoring is the self-measurement of blood pressure by patients. In the diagnosis and management of high blood pressure it is complementary to 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and clinic blood pressure measurements. Home monitoring can also help to identify white-coat and masked hypertension.

  20. Dummy/pacifier use in preterm infants increases blood pressure and improves heart rate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Rosemary S C; Fyfe, Karinna L; Odoi, Alexsandria; Athukoralage, Anjalee; Yiallourou, Stephanie R; Wong, Flora Y

    2016-02-01

    Preterm infants are at increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Use of a dummy/pacifier is thought to be protective against SIDS; accordingly, we assessed the effects of dummy/pacifier use on blood pressure, cerebral oxygenation, and heart rate control over the first 6 mo of life after term corrected age (CA) when SIDS risk is greatest. Thirty-five preterm infants were studied longitudinally at 2-4 wk, 2-3 mo, and 5-6 mo CA. Cardiac control was assessed from spectral indices of heart rate variability (HRV) in the low frequency (LF) and the high frequency (HF) range, and the ratio of HF/LF indicating sympathovagal balance was calculated. Overall, at 2-3 mo, mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in the supine position in dummy/pacifier users in both quiet sleep (70 ± 2 vs. 60 ± 2 mm Hg; P pacifier users had higher LF HRV and LF/HF ratio and lower HF HRV. Dummy/pacifier use increased blood pressure during sleep, at the age of greatest SIDS risk. Overall, LF HRV was elevated and HF HRV reduced in dummy/pacifier users, suggesting that dummy use alters cardiac control in preterm infants.

  1. Blood pressure variability and cardiovascular autonomic control during hemodialysis in peripheral vascular disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titapiccolo, Jasmine Ion; Cerutti, Sergio; Signorini, Maria Gabriella; Ferrario, Manuela; Garzotto, Francesco; Cruz, Dinna; Ronco, Claudio; Moissl, Ulrich; Tetta, Ciro

    2012-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) are at higher risk of mortality. The main objectives of this work were to investigate the hypothesis of an association between the PVD and an altered control system on peripheral resistance in response to volume depletion induced by HD treatment; and to investigate whether HD induced increase of pulse pressure (PP) is associated with PVD. Continuous blood pressure (BP) was recorded during HD treatment at the beginning and at the end of HD. The overhydration condition was evaluated by means of whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy, measured before each HD treatment. BP variability, heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity were then analyzed. Patients affected by PVD reported a prevalence of peripheral local control as shown by higher values of very low frequency in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) variability and a reduced cardiac baroreflex with respect to patients not affected by this pathology. HD treatment induced a significant increase of PP and LF% in DBP series in PVD patients only. Our results suggested that differences in BP variability and PP changes could be related not only to an underlying vascular disease, but also to an alteration in autonomic control. (paper)

  2. Blood pressure and heart rate during ovariohysterectomy in pyometra and control dogs: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Odd Viking; Lövebrant, Johanna; Olsson, Ulf; Höglund, Katja

    2016-11-17

    Surgery causes a stress response, a physiologic response to trauma. The intraoperative surgical stress response in dogs diagnosed with pyometra has not previously been described. The aim of this study was to investigate the intraoperative surgical stress response, assessed by blood pressure and heart rate measurements, in dogs diagnosed with pyometra and healthy controls. All dogs were premedicated with acepromazine and methadone, anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane, where after the dogs were subjected to ovariohysterectomy. Eight dogs diagnosed with pyometra and eight healthy controls were used. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured to assess the surgical stress response. Additionally propofol dosage at induction of anaesthesia and the end-tidal isoflurane concentration were investigated. The surgery was split into four phases. Phase 0 was the period 10 min before the skin incision, phase 1 was skin incision and opening of abdomen, phase 2 was manipulation of uterine horns, lifting of the ovary with stretching of the mesovarium, ligation and transection of mesovarium and phase 3 was ligation and transection of cervix, removal of organs and closing of the abdomen. Dosage of propofol at induction of anaesthesia was 3.6 ± 1 mg/kg in dogs with pyometra and 4.1 ± 1 in healthy controls (P = 0.37). In both groups, systolic blood pressure increased between phase 1 and 2, from 87 ± 15 to 114 ± 19 mmHg in dogs with pyometra, and from 88 ± 18 to 106 ± 20 mmHg in healthy controls, (both P pyometra and healthy controls.

  3. Raisins compared with other snack effects on glycemia and blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James W; Weiter, Kathy M; Christian, Amber L; Ritchey, Michelle B; Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    To compare effects of raisin snacks with conventional snacks on glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors. A 12-week, randomized, controlled trial compared 3-times-a-day consumption of raisins with intake of processed snacks on glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors. Men and women were randomized to snacks (n = 15) or raisins (n = 31). Outcome measures were performed at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose levels were not significantly affected by intake of raisins or snacks. Mean subject post prandial glucose levels were significantly reduced by raisin intake at 12 weeks; changes with raisin intake were -13.1 mg/dL (P = 0.003 vs baseline; P = 0.03 vs snacks). Eating raisins significantly decreased glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (-0.12%; P = 0.004), a significantly greater level decrease than seen with snack intake (P = 0.036). Snack intake did not significantly affect subject systolic or diastolic blood pressure (BP). Raisin intake was associated with reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) at 4, 8, and 12 weeks with mean changes of -6.0 to 10.2 mmHg; all these changes were statistically significant (P = 0.015 to 0.001). Raisins were associated with significantly greater changes in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at 4, 8, and 12 weeks than snacks (P consumption of raisins may reduce glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors, including BP rate.

  4. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Add less salt to your food and avoid fast food and other foods that are high in salt. Know your blood pressure and have it ... a Health Problem Cholesterol Smart Snacking Yoga for Stress Relief ...

  5. Trends in blood pressure control and medication use during 20 years in a hypertension clinic in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansui, Yasuo; Ibaraki, Ai; Goto, Kenichi; Haga, Yoshie; Seki, Takunori; Takiguchi, Tomohiro; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Kitazono, Takanari; Matsumura, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of hypertension have recommended strict control of blood pressure to help prevent cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the current status of blood pressure control and trends over the past two decades. Four hundred patients treated for hypertension at Kyushu University Hospital were included in the present study. Blood pressure levels and prescribed antihypertensive drugs were examined in 2011. The average blood pressure was 129/74 mmHg, and the number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs was 2.2. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, alpha-blockers, and beta-blockers were prescribed in 66%, 5%, 78%, 21%, 12%, and 27% of the cases, respectively. Systolic blood pressure was significantly higher, and diastolic blood pressure was significantly lower in patients aged 80 years or older compared with the younger patients (blood pressure of these patients significantly decreased from 142/87 mmHg in 1991 to 128/71 mmHg in 2011, accompanied with an increase in the number of antihypertensive drugs from 1.6 in 1991 to 2.7 in 2011. These findings suggest that the revised guidelines for the management of hypertension may have contributed to increased awareness and better management of blood pressure levels.

  6. Skin Tone, Racism, Locus of Control, Hostility, and Blood Pressure in Hispanic College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Brandy; Ernst, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    There is some evidence that blood pressure is higher in persons with darker skin tone but the reasons for this remain unclear. When seen in minorities, the positive relationship between darkness of skin and blood pressure invites hypotheses about potential mediators of the relationship. We investigated the relationship in Hispanics of primarily…

  7. Compliance with the Prescription of Antihypertensive Medications and Blood Pressure Control in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Faria Novello

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hypertension is the most prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and its proper control can prevent the high morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. Objective: To assess the degree of compliance of antihypertensive prescriptions with the VI Brazilian Guidelines on Hypertension and the blood pressure control rate in primary care. Methods: Cross-sectional study conducted between August 2011 and November 2012, including 332 adults ≥ 45 years registered in the Family Doctor Program in Niteroi and selected randomly. The analysis included the prescribed antihypertensive classes, doses, and frequencies, as well as the blood pressure (BP of the individuals. Results: The rate of prescription compliance was 80%. Diuretics were the most prescribed medications, and dual therapy was the most used treatment. The most common non-compliances were underdosing and underfrequencies. The BP goal in all cases was < 140/90 mmHg, except for diabetic patients, in whom the goal was set at < 130/80 mmHg. Control rates according to these goals were 44.9% and 38.6%, respectively. There was no correlation between prescription compliance and BP control. Conclusions: The degree of compliance was considered satisfactory. The achievement of the targets was consistent with national and international studies, suggesting that the family health model is effective in BP management, although it still needs improvement.

  8. Using a low-sodium, high-potassium salt substitute to reduce blood pressure among Tibetans with high blood pressure: a patient-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingshan Zhao

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of a low-sodium and high-potassium salt-substitute on lowering blood pressure (BP among Tibetans living at high altitude (4300 meters.The study was a patient-blinded randomized controlled trial conducted between February and May 2009 in Dangxiong County, Tibetan Autonomous Region, China. A total of 282 Tibetans aged 40 or older with known hypertension (systolic BP≥140 mmHg were recruited and randomized to intervention (salt-substitute, 65% sodium chloride, 25% potassium chloride and 10% magnesium sulfate or control (100% sodium chloride in a 1: 1 allocation ratio with three months' supply. Primary outcome was defined as the change in BP levels measured from baseline to followed-up with an automated sphygmomanometer. Per protocol (PP and intention to treat (ITT analyses were conducted.After the three months' intervention period, the net reduction in SBP/DBP in the intervention group in comparison to the control group was -8.2/-3.4 mmHg (all p<0.05 in PP analysis, after adjusting for baseline BP and other variables. ITT analysis showed the net reduction in SBP/DBP at -7.6/-3.5 mmHg with multiple imputations (all p<0.05. Furthermore, the whole distribution of blood pressure showed an overall decline in SBP/DBP and the proportion of patients with BP under control (SBP/DBP<140 mmHg was significantly higher in salt-substitute group in comparison to the regular salt group (19.2% vs. 8.8%, p = 0.027.Low sodium high potassium salt-substitute is effective in lowering both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and offers a simple, low-cost approach for hypertension control among Tibetans in China.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01429246.

  9. Socio-economic status influences blood pressure control despite equal access to care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, M S; Andersen, M; Munck, A P

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Denmark has a health care system with free and equal access to care irrespective of age and socio-economic status (SES). We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate a possible association between SES and blood pressure (BP) control of hypertensive patients treated in general...... practice. METHODS: We enrolled 184 general practices and 5260 hypertensive patients. The general practitioners reported information about BP and diagnosis of diabetes. Information about education, income, antihypertensive drug treatment and other co-morbidity was retrieved from relevant registers from...

  10. Systolic blood pressure control among individuals with Type 2 Diabetes: A comparative effectiveness analysis of three interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intensive lifestyle management or frequent goal-based monitoring with pharmacological management can be successful strategies for blood pressure control in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes....

  11. Determinants of prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Sözmen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, awareness, treatment and control rates of hypertension (HT and associated factors among individuals over 30 years old living in Balcova District of Izmir. Methods: Data from 12,742 individuals who participated the baseline study of Heart of Balcova Project during 2007-2009 was evaluated. HT was defined as mean blood pressure ≥140/90mmHg or being on antihypertensive medication. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess the determinants of prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure. Results: The overall prevalence of HT was 39,5% in male, 41.6% in female and 40,9% in total. Among participants with HT, 73.3% were aware of it. Among participants aware of HT 90.9% were treated, 49.6% of those treated were controlled (BP <140/90 mmHg. HT presence was associated with increasing age, female gender, poor self assessed health, physical inactivity, high waist circumference, diagnosis of coronary heart disease(CHD, diabetes or hyperlipidemia, family history of CHD. Awareness of HT was positively associated with increasing age, male gender, CHD, stroke, DM, hyperlipidemia, and history of CHD. Awareness was lower among individuals who added salt without tasting the meal. HT control was significantly higher among men while it decreased with increasing age. Conclusion: In this study awareness, treatment and control rates for HT were higher compared to other studies. While female gender, presence of chronic diseases and family history of CHD increased awareness and control, male gender and obesity had negative impact on control rates. The reasons behind low control rates despite high awareness should be explored in further studies.

  12. Remission and regression in the nephropathy of type 1 diabetes when blood pressure is controlled aggressively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovind, P; Rossing, P; Tarnow, L

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetic nephropathy is a chronic, progressive kidney disease with a mean rate of decline of in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 10 to 12 mL/min/year (natural history). The introduction of aggressive antihypertensive treatment has improved the renal prognosis during the last decade...... and regression in a sizable fraction of patients with diabetic nephropathy. Lower arterial blood pressure, reduced albuminuria, and better glycemic control were predictors of regression of diabetic nephropathy....... years) in 301 consecutive type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy was diagnosed clinically if the following criteria were fulfilled: persistent albuminuria> 200 microg/min, presence of diabetic retinopathy, and no evidence of other kidney or renal tract disease. Blood......: The total number of patients who obtained remission was 92 (31%), with a duration of remission of [median (range)] 3.4 (1.0 to 14.1) years, and regression 67 (22%). The patients were stratified in quintiles by the average value of office mean arterial blood pressure (mean +/- SE): 93 +/- 0.5, 99 +/- 0...

  13. Pressure Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  14. Home and Office Blood Pressure Control among Treated Hypertensive Patients in Japan: Findings from the Japan Home versus Office Blood Pressure Measurement Evaluation (J-HOME Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariyasu Mano

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate control of blood pressure (BP is essential for prevention of future cardiovascular events. However, BP control among treated hypertensive patients has been insufficient. Recently, the usefulness of self-measured BP at home (home BP measurement for the management of hypertension has been reported in many studies. We evaluated BP control both at home and in the office among treated hypertensive patients in primary care settings in Japan (the J-HOME study. We found poor control of home and office BPs and clarified some factors affecting control. We also examined factors associated with the magnitude of the white-coat effect, the morning–evening BP difference, and home heart rate in this J-HOME study.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of fenoldopam mesylate for blood pressure control in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaster Myron

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fenoldopam mesylate, a selective dopamine1-receptor agonist, is used by intravenous infusion to treat hypertension in adults. Fenoldopam is not approved by the FDA for use in children; reports describing its use in pediatrics are limited. In a multi-institutional, placebo controlled, double-blind, multi-dose trial we determined the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD characteristics and side-effect profile of fenoldopam in children. Methods Seventy seven (77 children from 3 weeks to 12 years of age scheduled for surgery in which deliberate hypotension would be induced were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to one of five, blinded treatment groups (placebo or fenoldopam 0.05, 0.2, 0.8, or 3.2 mcg/kg/min iv for a 30-minute interval after stabilization of anesthesia and placement of vascular catheters. Following the 30-minute blinded interval, investigators adjusted the fenoldopam dose to achieve a target mean arterial pressure in the open-label period until deliberate hypotension was no longer indicated (e.g., muscle-layer closure. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were continuously monitored and were the primary endpoints. Results Seventy-six children completed the trial. Fenoldopam at doses of 0.8 and 3.2 mcg/kg/min significantly reduced blood pressure (p Conclusion Fenoldopam is a rapid-acting, effective agent for intravenous control of blood pressure in children. The effective dose range is significantly higher in children undergoing anesthesia and surgery (0.8–1.2 mcg/kg/min than as labeled for adults (0.05–0.3 mcg/kg/min. The PK and side-effect profiles for children and adults are similar.

  16. Effects of relative blood volume-controlled hemodialysis on blood pressure and volume status in hypertensive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dasselaar, J.J.; Huisman, R.M.; De Jong, P.E.; Burgerhof, J.G.M.; Franssen, C.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    In hypertensive hemodialysis (HD) patients, dry weight reduction to normalize blood pressure (BP) often results in increased frequency of HD hypotension. Because HD with blood volume tracking (BVT) has been shown to improve intra-HD hemodynamic stability, we performed a prospective, randomized study

  17. Role of triple fixed combination valsartan, amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide in controlling blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Doménech

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Monica Doménech, Antonio CocaHypertension Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Internal Medicine and Dermatology, Hospital Clinic (IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Hypertension is one of the main risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases and the search for new therapeutic strategies aimed at optimizing its control remains an ongoing research and clinical challenge. In recent years, there has been a marked increase in the use of combinations of antihypertensive drugs with complementary mechanisms of action, with the aims of reducing blood pressure levels more rapidly and vigorously than strategies employing monotherapy and improving treatment compliance and adhesion. Therefore, as recommended by the 2009 reappraisal of the European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology Guidelines, the use of a triple combination that combines a calcium channel blocker, an angiotensin II receptor blocker and a thiazide diuretic seems a reasonable and efficacious combination for the management of hypertensive patients with moderate, high or very high risk. This article reviews the clinical trials carried out with the fixed combination of amlodipine/valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide at the doses recommended for each drug in monotherapy. The data show that this combination achieved greater reductions in mean sitting diastolic and systolic blood pressure than amlodipine, valsartan or hydrochlorothiazide in monotherapy, with favorable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. The triple combination at high single doses should be used with caution in elderly patients and those with renal or liver failure. Although the tolerability and safety of the triple combination are good, the mostfrequently reported adverse effects were peripheral edema, headache and dizziness. Analytical alterations were consistent with the already-known biochemical effects of amlodipine, valsartan or hydrochlorothiazide in

  18. Subjective State, Blood Pressure, and Behavioral Control Changes Produced by an "Energy Shot"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczinski, Cecile A; Stamates, Amy L; Ossege, Julianne; Maloney, Sarah F; Bardgett, Mark E; Brown, Clifford J

    2014-06-01

    Background: Energy drinks and energy shots are popular consumer beverages that are advertised to increase feelings of alertness. Typically, these products include high levels of caffeine, a mild psychostimulant drug. The scientific evidence demonstrating the specific benefits of energy products to users in terms of subjective state and objective performance is surprisingly lacking. Moreover, there are rising health concerns associated with the use of these products. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of a popular energy shot (5-Hour Energy ® ) on subjective and objective measures that were assessed hourly for 6 hours following consumption. Methods: Participants ( n =14) completed a three-session study where they received the energy shot, a placebo control, and no drink. Following dose administration, participants completed subjective Profile of Mood States ratings hourly for 6 hours. Participants also repeatedly completed a behavioral control task (the cued go/no-go task) and provided blood pressure and pulse rate readings at each hour. Results: Consumption of the energy shot did improve subjective state, as measured by increased ratings of vigor and decreased ratings of fatigue. However, the energy shot did not alter objective performance, which worsened over time. Importantly, the energy shot elevated both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: Consumption of one energy shot may only result in modest benefits to subjective state. Individuals with preexisting hypertension or other medical conditions should be cautious about using these new consumer products.

  19. High blood pressure and sedentary behavior in adolescents are associated even after controlling for confounding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; De Andrade, Selma Maffei; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa; Mesas, Arthur Eumann; Codogno, Jamile Sanches; Fernandes, Rômulo Araújo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether high blood pressure (HBP) is associated with sedentary behavior in young people even after controlling for potential confounders (gender, age, socioeconomic level, tobacco, alcohol, obesity and physical activity). In this epidemiological study, 1231 adolescents were evaluated. Blood pressure was measured with an oscillometric device and waist circumference with an inextensible tape. Sedentary behavior (watching television, computer use and playing video games) and physical activity were assessed by a questionnaire. We used mean and standard deviation to describe the statistical analysis, and the association between HBP and sedentary behavior was assessed by the chi-squared test. Binary logistic regression was used to observe the magnitude of association and cluster analyses (sedentary behavior and abdominal obesity; sedentary behavior and physical inactivity). HBP was associated with sedentary behaviors [odds ratio (OR) = 2.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.41-3.96], even after controlling for various confounders (OR = 1.68, CI = 1.03-2.75). In cluster analysis the combination of sedentary behavior and elevated abdominal obesity contributed significantly to an increased likelihood of having HBP (OR = 13.51, CI 7.21-23.97). Sedentary behavior was associated with HBP, and excess fat in the abdominal region contributed to the modulation of this association.

  20. Improving the Blood Pressure Control With the ProActive Attitude of Hypertensive Patients Seeking Follow-up Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shangfeng; Bishwajit, Ghose; Ji, Lu; Feng, Da; Fang, Haiqing; Fu, Hang; Shao, Tian; Shao, Piaopiao; Liu, Chunyan; Feng, Zhanchun; Luba, Tegene R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Proactive attitude of hypertensive patients seeking follow-up services (FUS) lies at the core of self-efficacy. However, few evidence have shown the activeness of seeking FUS in the context of blood pressure control among hypertensive patients. Improvements in follow-up visits may not just by services itself cause better control of blood pressure among hypertensive patients, rather due to the patient's pro-active attitude of the patient in seeking FUS. A cross-sectional study was carried out in selected rural regions of China to explore the association between blood pressure control and sociodemographic and economic variables and activeness of hypertensive patients in seeking FUS. The primary clinical outcome for this study was blood pressure control (systolic blood pressure seekers were 3.17 times greater than those of passive seekers (odds ratio [OR] = 3.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.56–3.93, P passively. Proactive attitude of seeking follow-up services can improve blood pressure control among hypertensive patients. PMID:27057859

  1. Role of valsartan, amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide fixed combination in blood pressure control: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Destro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Destro1, Francesca Cagnoni1, Antonio D’Ospina1, Alessandra Rossi Ricci1, Elena Demichele1, Emmanouil Peros1, Augusto Zaninelli2, Paola Preti31Internal Medicine, Ospedale Unificato Broni-Stradella, Stradella (PV, Italy; 2General Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 3Internal Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, ItalyAbstract: The treatment of moderate or severe hypertension in most cases requires the contemporaneous use of multiple antihypertensive agents. The most available two-drug combinations have an agent that addresses renin secretion and another one that is statistically more effective in renin-independent hypertension. The practice of combining agents that counteract different mechanisms is the most likely explanation for the fact that most available two-drug combinations have an agent that addresses renin secretion (beta-blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin II receptor blocker or direct renin inhibitor and another one that is more effective in renin-independent hypertension (diuretic, dihydropyridine or non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker. Based on these considerations, addition of hydrochlorothiazide to the combination of an antagonist of the renin-angiotensin system with a calcium channel blocker would constitute a logical approach. Inclusion of a diuretic in the triple combination is based on the evidence that these agents are effective and cheap, enhance the effect of other antihypertensive agents, and add a specific effect to individuals with salt-sensitivity of blood pressure. The benefit of triple combination therapy with amlodipine, valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide over its dual component therapies has been demonstrated, and the use of a single pill will simplify therapy resulting in better blood pressure control.Keywords: valsartan, amlodipine, hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ, blood pressure, hypertension

  2. Regulator of G-protein signaling 5 controls blood pressure homeostasis and vessel wall remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holobotovskyy, Vasyl; Manzur, Mitali; Tare, Marianne; Burchell, Jennifer; Bolitho, Erin; Viola, Helena; Hool, Livia C; Arnolda, Leonard F; McKitrick, Douglas J; Ganss, Ruth

    2013-03-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 5 (RGS5) modulates G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and is prominently expressed in arterial smooth muscle cells. Our group first reported that RGS5 is important in vascular remodeling during tumor angiogenesis. We hypothesized that RGS5 may play an important role in vessel wall remodeling and blood pressure regulation. To demonstrate that RGS5 has a unique and nonredundant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and to identify crucial RGS5-regulated signaling pathways. We observed that arterial RGS5 expression is downregulated with chronically elevated blood pressure after angiotensin II infusion. Using a knockout mouse model, radiotelemetry, and pharmacological inhibition, we subsequently showed that loss of RGS5 results in profound hypertension. RGS5 signaling is linked to the renin-angiotensin system and directly controls vascular resistance, vessel contractility, and remodeling. RGS5 deficiency aggravates pathophysiological features of hypertension, such as medial hypertrophy and fibrosis. Moreover, we demonstrate that protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and Rho kinase signaling pathways are major effectors of RGS5-mediated hypertension. Loss of RGS5 results in hypertension. Loss of RGS5 signaling also correlates with hyper-responsiveness to vasoconstrictors and vascular stiffening. This establishes a significant, distinct, and causal role of RGS5 in vascular homeostasis. RGS5 modulates signaling through the angiotensin II receptor 1 and major Gαq-coupled downstream pathways, including Rho kinase. So far, activation of RhoA/Rho kinase has not been associated with RGS molecules. Thus, RGS5 is a crucial regulator of blood pressure homeostasis with significant clinical implications for vascular pathologies, such as hypertension.

  3. eMindfulness Therapy—A Study on Efficacy of Blood Pressure and Stress Control Using Mindful Meditation and Eating Apps among People with High Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Tedder

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the increasing availability of Smartphones and wearable tracking devices, it is now feasible and affordable to apply such mobile devices to delivering mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR and intermittent fasting (IF to lower blood pressure, as traditional MBSR and IF incur the burden of commuting to the intervention sites for the patients. Our study will develop and scientifically evaluate an MBSR app, an IF app and an MBSR + IF app in terms of their effectiveness for lowering blood pressure. We will further explore the possible interaction effect (synergistic effect between MBSR and IF intervention: will improved mindfulness enhance patients’ adherence to the IF protocol? Methods: We will develop an MBSR app, an IF app, and an MBSR+IF app. We will then conduct an 8-week randomized controlled trial with a factorial design to evaluate the efficacy of these new apps, especially the interaction effect between MBSR and IF. Eligible individuals will be randomly assigned to Group 1 (MBSR app, Group 2 (IF app, Group 3 (MBSR + IF app or Group 4 (usual care. Discussion: This will be the first attempt to explore the impact of mindfulness intervention on the adherence of a behavioral intervention. Nevertheless, our protocol is limited in that the effectiveness of intermittent fasting on lowering blood pressure has not been supported by large-sample randomized controlled trials. Thus if there is no significant effectiveness we cannot determine whether it is due to the intermittent fasting intervention itself or it is due to the limit of smartphone as a vehicle.

  4. Importance of sustained and "tight" blood pressure control in patients with high cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Peter A; Lloyd, Suzanne M; Ford, Ian; Elliott, Henry L

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective further analysis of the ACTION database evaluated the relationship between cardiovascular outcomes and the "quality" of the control of blood pressure (BP). The study population (n = 6287) comprised those patients with four BP measurements during year 1 subdivided according to the proportion of visits in which BP was controlled in relation to two BP targets: control groups for the major prespecified ACTION outcomes were investigated with Cox proportional hazards models. For all the prespecified cardiovascular endpoints the incidence declined as the proportion of visits with BP control increased. The greatest differences in outcomes between the different BP control groups were observed for the risk of stroke but were still apparent for all the other endpoints. For example, the risks for the primary outcome [hazard ratio (HR) 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67 to 0.90] were significantly less in the group with >_75% of visits with BP control than in the group with control. There were no significant treatment-related differences. Retrospective analyses are not definitive but these results highlight the importance of the attainment of BP control targets and the consistency of BP control during long-term follow-up.

  5. Physical activity in People with High Blood Pressure: A Case – control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Momayyezi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regular physical activity is one of the main factors in maintaining and improving health throughout life. International studies have shown that regular exercise can increase life expectancy and reduce morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases. This study was conducted to determine the amount of physical activity in people with high blood pressure and comparing them with healthy people. Methods: The present study was a case-control study on 160 people (80 patients with hypertension (case group and 80 healthy individuals (control group. People with normal blood pressure were in the case group and the control group (systolic 140 mmHg or above and diastolic 90 mmHg or above were in the case group. Data were collected using a questionnaire with the simple random sampling. The first part of questionnaire included background characteristics and socio-economic status; the second part of the questionnaire measured physical activity level using international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ. The statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann–Whitney test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis using SPSS/16. Assessment of physical activity in case and control groups showed that 13.8% of cases and 27.5% of controls had physical activity in the last week; this difference was statistically significant. Based on the results, the risk of hypertension in people without physical activity was 37.2 times more than the people who had physical activity in the last week. The results of logistic regression showed that physical activity, education level and income were effective factors on hypertension. The results showed that physical activity with moderate and severe levels have a protective effect against hypertension. Also, people with less income and less education had a greater chance of hypertension than others. The results indicated physical activity reduces the risk of hypertension. These findings emphasize

  6. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are two main types of high blood pressure: primary and secondary high blood pressure. Primary High Blood Pressure Primary, ... plan based on whether you were diagnosed with primary or secondary high blood pressure and if there is a ...

  7. Role of valsartan, amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide fixed combination in blood pressure control: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro, Maurizio; Cagnoni, Francesca; D’Ospina, Antonio; Ricci, Alessandra Rossi; Demichele, Elena; Peros, Emmanouil; Zaninelli, Augusto; Preti, Paola

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of moderate or severe hypertension in most cases requires the contemporaneous use of multiple antihypertensive agents. The most available two-drug combinations have an agent that addresses renin secretion and another one that is statistically more effective in renin-independent hypertension. The practice of combining agents that counteract different mechanisms is the most likely explanation for the fact that most available two-drug combinations have an agent that addresses renin secretion (beta-blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin II receptor blocker or direct renin inhibitor) and another one that is more effective in renin-independent hypertension (diuretic, dihydropyridine or non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker). Based on these considerations, addition of hydrochlorothiazide to the combination of an antagonist of the renin-angiotensin system with a calcium channel blocker would constitute a logical approach. Inclusion of a diuretic in the triple combination is based on the evidence that these agents are effective and cheap, enhance the effect of other antihypertensive agents, and add a specific effect to individuals with salt-sensitivity of blood pressure. The benefit of triple combination therapy with amlodipine, valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide over its dual component therapies has been demonstrated, and the use of a single pill will simplify therapy resulting in better blood pressure control. PMID:20407632

  8. Predictors of arterial blood pressure control during deliberate hypotension with sodium nitroprusside in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, David R; Barrett, Jeffrey S; Hammer, Gregory B; Drover, David R; Reece, Tammy; Cohane, Carol A; Schulman, Scott R

    2014-10-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) is used to decrease arterial blood pressure (BP) during certain surgical procedures. There are limited data regarding efficacy of BP control with SNP. There are no data on patient and clinician factors that affect BP control. We evaluated the dose-response relationship of SNP in infants and children undergoing major surgery and performed a quantitative assessment of BP control. One hundred fifty-three subjects at 7 sites received a blinded infusion followed by open-label SNP during operative procedures requiring controlled hypotension. SNP was administered by continuous infusion and titrated to maintain BP control (mean arterial BP [MAP] within ±10% of clinician-defined target). BP was recorded using an arterial catheter. Statistical process control methodology was used to quantify BP control. A multivariable model assessed the effects of patient and procedural factors. BP was controlled an average 45.4% (SD 23.9%; 95% CI, 41.5%-49.18%) of the time. Larger changes in infusion rate were associated with worse BP control (7.99% less control for 1 μg·kg·min increase in average titration size, P = 0.0009). A larger difference between a patient's baseline and target MAP predicted worse BP control (0.93% worse control per 1-mm Hg increase in MAP difference, P = 0.0013). Both effects persisted in multivariable models. SNP was effective in reducing BP. However, BP was within the target range less than half of the time. No clinician or patient factors were predictive of BP control, although 2 inverse relationships were identified. These relationships require additional study and may be best coupled with exposure-response modeling to propose improved dosing strategies when using SNP for controlled hypotension in the pediatric population.

  9. [Brief discussion on acupuncture technique "controlling Qihai to regulate blood pressure" proposed by academician SHI Xuemin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Xu, Xifa; Liu, Jian; Fan, Xiaonong

    2017-08-12

    According to Qihai theory, academician SHI Xuemin established the acupuncture technique "controlling Qihai to regulate blood pressure" which focused on Renying (ST 9), and achieved favorable effects in clinical application. In this paper, based on the Qihai theory, from aspects of Yuan qi , Zong qi , Ying qi and Wei qi and relations among qi , blood and veins in TCM, and cardiac output, sympathetic nerve activity and blood vessels in modern medicine, the understanding on hypertension was explained. As a result, both TCM and modern medicine had consistency in the understanding of hypertension, reflecting the scientificity and practicability of this acupuncture technique. Besides, according to Qihai theory and "wind leading to vertigo" theory, academician SHI Xuemin brought forward the key pathogenesis of hypertension was "dysfunction of Qihai ", and the acupoint selected Renying (ST 9), Quchi (LI 11), Hegu (LI 4), Zusanli (ST 36) and Taichong (LR 3). At the same time, the operation specification of each acupoint was mainly discussed, and the references of acupoint selection was explained based on TCM theory and modern clinical research.

  10. Prevalence of Atherogenic Dyslipidemia in Spanish Hypertensive Patients and Its Relationship With Blood Pressure Control and Silent Organ Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Gorostidi, Manuel; Aranda, Pedro; Corbella, Emili; Pintó, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of atherogenic dyslipidemia in hypertensive patients and its relationship with risk profile and blood pressure control. The study included 24 351 hypertensive patients from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry. Atherogenic dyslipidemia was defined as the presence of hypertriglyceridemia (> 150mg/dL) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (< 40mg/dL in men and < 46mg/dL in women). Blood pressure control was assessed by office and ambulatory monitoring. Atherogenic dyslipidemia was present in 2705 patients (11.1%). Of these, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia and 21.7% had low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Compared with patients without these risk factors, the former group were more often male (60% vs 52%), younger (57 years vs 59 years), had other risk factors and organ damage (microalbuminuria, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, and left ventricular hypertrophy), worse office, diurnal, and nocturnal blood pressure values (odds ratio 1.09, 1.06, and 1.10, respectively), and the lowest nocturnal blood pressure reduction (odds ratio=1.07), despite the greater use of antihypertensive drugs. Atherogenic dyslipidemia is present in more than 10% of hypertensive patients and is associated with other risk factors, organ damage, and poorer blood pressure control. Greater therapeutic effort is needed to reduce overall risk in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Blood pressure control in hypertensive pediatric renal transplants: role of repeated ABPM following transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmar, Rafael T; Berg, Ulla B

    2008-10-01

    Hypertension in pediatric renal transplants is a widespread condition associated with high mortality risk in early adult life. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was found to be superior to office blood pressure (BP) in identifying true hypertensive and responders to treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of repeated ABPM, performed at yearly intervals following transplantation, in the assessment and decision-making processes of post-transplant hypertension. Thirty-seven recipients (23 males; aged 10.5 +/- 4.3 years) who were followed for 4.3 +/- 2.2 years (range 2-9) after transplantation were eligible for analysis. The mean follow-up time between the baseline (1 year post-transplantation) and the most recent ABPM examination was 3.3 +/- 2.2 years (range 1-8). Throughout the follow-up period, antihypertensive therapy was either started or intensified in 27 recipients. These interventions were decided based on ABPM results obtained on 40 of 44 occasions. At last follow-up, 24 of 29 treated hypertensive recipients displayed controlled BP. This figure was significantly higher compared to our historical hypertensive control recipients in whom ABPM was applied for the first time in treatment at 6 +/- 3.3 years (range 2-15) after transplantation, while therapeutic decisions were driven by office BP measurements (95 % confidence interval (95% CI) for the difference between proportions (80.6-32 %) 36-60 %, P = 0.001). Our study shows that, in a population with high risk for hypertension, repeated ABPM may significantly help to improve BP control.

  12. Comparison of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Patterns in Patients With Intradialytic Hypertension and Hemodialysis Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hompesch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Intradialytic hypertension (IH patients have higher mortality risk than other hemodialysis patients and have been shown to have higher ambulatory blood pressure (BP. We hypothesized that interdialytic BP patterns would differ in IH patients and hypertensive hemodialysis controls. Methods: We consecutively screened hemodialysis patients at our university-affiliated units. Based on pre and post-HD BP measurements during the prior 2 week period, we identified IH patients and demographically matched hemodialysis controls. We measured ambulatory interdialytic BP, flow-mediated vasodilation, and intradialytic endothelin-1 (ET-1. Using linear mixed-models, we compared BP slopes during the following intervals: 1-24 hours post-dialysis, 25-44 hours post-dialysis, and 1-44 hours post-dialysis. Results: There were 25 case subjects with IH and 24 controls. Systolic BP during hours 1-44, 1-24, and 25-44 were 143.1 (16.5, 138.0 (21.2, and 150.8 (22.3 mmHg in controls. For IH subjects, they were 155.4 (14.2, 152.7 (22.8, and 156.5 (20.8 mmHg (p=0.008, 0.02, 0.4. In controls, the slopes were +0.6, +0.6, and +0.4 mmHg/hr. In IH subjects, they were +0.1, -0.3, and +0.3 mmHg/hr. The IH 1-24 hour slope differed from the IH 25-44 hour slope (p=0.001 and the control 1-24 hour slope (p=0.002. The change in ET-1 from pre to post dialysis was 0.5 (1.5 pg/mL in controls and 1.0 (2.3 pg/mL in IH patients (p=0.4. In a univariate model, there was an association with screening BP and BP slope (p=0.002 for controls and p=0.1 for IH patients. Conclusions: Interdialytic BP patterns differ in IH patients and hemodialysis controls. The elevated post dialysis blood pressure persists for many hours in IH patients contributing to the overall increased BP burden.

  13. Ambulatory (24 h) blood pressure and arterial stiffness measurement in Marfan syndrome patients: a case control feasibility and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Matthias; Nouri, Ghazaleh; Hametner, Bernhard; Parragh, Stephanie; Köster, Jelena; Mortensen, Kai; Schwarz, Achim; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Wassertheurer, Siegfried

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this work is the investigation of measures of ambulatory brachial and aortic blood pressure and indices of arterial stiffness and aortic wave reflection in Marfan patients. A case-control study was conducted including patients with diagnosed Marfan syndrome following Ghent2 nosology and healthy controls matched for sex, age and daytime brachial systolic blood pressure. For each subject a 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and 24 h pulse wave analysis measurement was performed. All parameters showed a circadian pattern whereby pressure dipping was more pronounced in Marfan patients. During daytime only Marfan patients with aortic root surgery showed increased pulse wave velocity. In contrast, various nighttime measurements, wave reflection determinants and circadian patterns showed a significant difference. The findings of our study provide evidence that ambulatory measurement of arterial stiffness parameters is feasible and that these determinants are significantly different in Marfan syndrome patients compared to controls in particular at nighttime. Further investigation is therefore indicated.

  14. Vitamin D therapy to reduce blood pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy in resistant hypertension: randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, Miles D; Ireland, Sheila; Houston, J Graeme; Gandy, Stephen J; Waugh, Shelley; Macdonald, Thomas M; Mackenzie, Isla S; Struthers, Allan D

    2014-04-01

    Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with higher prevalent blood pressure. We tested whether high-dose intermittent oral vitamin D therapy could reduce blood pressure and left ventricular mass in patients with hypertension resistant to conventional treatment. We conducted a parallel-group, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. Patients with supine office blood pressure >140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensive agents received 100 000 U oral vitamin D3 or matching placebo every 2 months. Office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, glucose, and cholesterol were measured at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 months; left ventricular mass index was measured by cardiac MRI on a subgroup at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was mean 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure at 6 months. A total of 68 participants were randomized, 34 in each group. Mean age was 63 (SD 11) years, mean baseline office blood pressure was 154/84 (13/10) mm Hg, and mean baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 42 (16) nmol/L. Treatment with vitamin D did not reduce 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (adjusted treatment effects: systolic, +3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -4 to +11; P=0.33; diastolic, -2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -6 to +2; P=0.29); similar results were seen for office blood pressure. Left ventricular mass index was measured in a subgroup (n=25); no reduction was seen with vitamin D treatment (adjusted treatment effect, +4 g/m(2); 95% confidence interval, 0 to +7; P=0.04). There was no significant change in cholesterol or glucose levels. Thus, 6 months of intermittent, high-dose oral vitamin D3 did not reduce blood pressure or left ventricular mass in patients with resistant hypertension.

  15. Role of the adrenal medulla in control of blood pressure and renal function during furosemide-induced volume depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg; Shalmi, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Farmakologi, furosemide, adrenaline, renal function, adrenal medullectomy, arterial blood pressure......Farmakologi, furosemide, adrenaline, renal function, adrenal medullectomy, arterial blood pressure...

  16. The influence of patient's consciousness regarding high blood pressure and patient's attitude in face of disease controlling medicine intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelec, Maria Aparecida A Moura; Pierin, Angela M G; Mion, Décio

    2003-10-01

    To assess the relation between blood pressure control and the following: the Morisky-Green test, the patient's consciousness regarding high blood pressure, the patient's attitude in face of medicine intake, the patient's attendance at medical consultations, and the subjective physician's judgment. We studied 130 hypertensive patients with the following characteristics: 73% females, 60 +/- 11 years, 58% married, 70% white, 45% retired, 45% with incomplete elementary schooling, 64% had a familial income of 1 to 3 minimum wages, body mass index of 30 +/- 7 kg/m , consciousness regarding the disease for a mean period of 11 +/- 9.5 years, and mean treatment duration of 8 +/- 7 years. Only 35% of the hypertensive individuals had blood pressure under control and a longer duration of treatment (10 +/- 7 vs 7 +/- 6.5 years; Pface of medicine intake, the controlled patients achieved significantly higher scores than did the noncontrolled patients (8 +/- 1.9 vs 7 +/- 2, Pconsciousness regarding their disease and its treatment, and most (70%) patients attended 3 or 4 medical consultations, which did not influence blood pressure control. The physicians attributed significantly higher scores regarding adherence to treatment to controlled patients (6 +/- 0.8 vs 5 +/- 1.2; PConsciousness regarding the disease, the Morisky-Green test, and attendance to medical consultations did not influence blood pressure control.

  17. Statin therapy reduces the likelihood of suboptimal blood pressure control among Ugandan adult diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumu W

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available William Lumu,1 Leaticia Kampiire,2 George Patrick Akabwai,3 Daniel Ssekikubo Kiggundu,4 Davis Kibirige5 1Department of Medicine and Diabetes/Endocrine Unit, Mengo Hospital, 2Infectious Disease Research Collaboration, 3Baylor College of Medicine Children’s Foundation, 4Nephrology Unit, Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, 5Department of Medicine, Uganda Martyrs Hospital Lubaga, Kampala, Uganda Background: Hypertension is one of the recognized risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in adult diabetic patients. High prevalence of suboptimal blood pressure (BP control has been well documented in the majority of studies assessing BP control in diabetic patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda, there is a dearth of similar studies. This study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of suboptimal BP control in an adult diabetic population in Uganda.Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study that enrolled 425 eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending three urban diabetic outpatient clinics over 11 months. Data about their sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history were collected using pre-tested questionnaires. Suboptimal BP control was defined according to the 2015 American Diabetes Association standards of diabetes care guideline as BP levels ≥140/90 mmHg.Results: The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, with the majority being females (283, 66.9%. Suboptimal BP control was documented in 192 (45.3% study participants and was independently associated with the study site (private hospitals; odds ratio 2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.18–3.43, P=0.01 and use of statin therapy (odds ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.26–0.96, P=0.037.Conclusion: Suboptimal BP control was highly prevalent in this study population. Strategies to improve optimal BP control, especially in the private hospitals, and the use of statin therapy should be encouraged in adult diabetic patients

  18. Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesuwa Olomu MD, MS

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension (HTN in people with diabetes doubles the risk of cardiovascular disease. Prior patient activation studies largely show improved communication but little impact on behavior or health outcomes. We sought to 1 assess the impact of Office-Based Guidelines Applied to Practice (Office-GAP Program on blood pressure (BP control; 2 determine the rate and predictors of BP control in patients with HTN and/or diabetes mellitus (DM in federally qualified health centers. Methods: Sample: Patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and/or DM with history of HTN; analyzed patients with DM and HTN compared to HTN without DM. Intervention: Office-GAP included physician training, patient activation, and an Office-GAP decision checklist. Two-site intervention/control design; data collection at baseline and after 3, 6, and 12 months. Logistic regression with propensity scoring assessed impact on BP control over time. Results: Of 243 patients, HTN was present in 75% at baseline; 32% had BP controlled. Consistent trend showed Office-GAP slightly improved the rate of BP control across time, while the control arm showed a nonsignificant decrease in the rate of BP control across time, compared to baseline. BP improved at 6 months at the intervention site compared to control site (odds ratio = 2.92; 95% confidence interval = 1.11–7.69. Conclusion: BP control was better at the intervention site compared to the control site at 6 months. Office-GAP shows promise to implement guidelines-based patient-centered care that improves BP.

  19. Willingness to pay and willingness to accept in a patient-centered blood pressure control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason-Comstock, Julie; Streater, Alicia; Goodman, Allen; Janisse, James; Brody, Aaron; Mango, LynnMarie; Dawood, Rachelle; Levy, Phillip

    2017-08-07

    Elevated blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke but patients often discount recommended behavioral changes and prescribed medications. While effective interventions to promote adherence have been developed, cost-effectiveness from the patient's perspective, has not been well studied. The valuation of patient time and out of pocket expenses should be included while performing cost effectiveness evaluation. The Achieve BP study uses the contingent valuation method to assess willingness to accept (WTA) and willingness to pay (WTP) among patients with a history of uncontrolled blood pressure discharged from an urban emergency department and enrolled in a larger randomized controlled trial. WTA and WTP were assessed by asking patients a series of questions about time and travel costs and time value related to their study participation. A survey was conducted during the final study visit with patients to investigate the effectiveness of a kiosk-based educational intervention on blood pressure control. All study patients, regardless of study arm, received the same clinical protocol of commonly prescribed antihypertensive medication and met with research clinicians four times as part of the study procedures. Thirty-eight patients were offered the opportunity to participate in the cost-effectiveness study and all completed the survey. Statistical comparisons revealed these 38 patients were similar in representation to the entire RCT study population. All 38 (100.0%) were African-American, with an average age of 49.1 years; 55.3% were male, 21.1% were married, 78.9% had a high school or higher education, and 44.7% were working. 55.9% did not have a primary care provider and 50.0% did not have health insurance. Time price linear regression analysis was performed to estimate predictors of WTA and WTP. WTP and WTA may generate different results, and the elasticities were proportional to the estimated coefficients, with WTP about twice as

  20. Occupational burnout and empathy influence blood pressure control in primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuguero, Oriol; Marsal, Josep Ramon; Esquerda, Montserrat; Soler-González, Jorge

    2017-05-12

    Good physician-patient communication can favor the adoption of healthy lifestyle habits, which is essential in high blood pressure (BP) management. More empathic physicians tend to have lower burnout and better communication skills. We analyzed the association between burnout and empathy among primary care physicians and nurses and investigated the influence on BP control performance. Descriptive study conducted in 2014 investigating burnout and empathy levels in 267 primary care physicians and nurses and BP control data for 301,657 patients under their care. We administered the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy and defined good BP control as a systolic BP empathy were observed in 58.8% and 33.7% of practitioners, respectively. Burnout and empathy were significantly negatively associated (p empathy and low burnout had significantly better BP control and performance than those with low empathy and high burnout (p empathy were significantly associated with improved BP control and performance, possibly in relation to better physician/nurse-patient communication.

  1. Controlled Blood Pressure in Iranian Patients: A Multi-Center Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Ezzatollah; Behnood-Rod, Azin; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Shobeiri, Elham; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Ormoz, Ehsan; Sadigh, Nader; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2016-01-01

    We decided to determine the percentage of hypertensive patients whose blood pressure (BP) measurements were within recommended controlled range and to identify predictive factors for controlled BP. In this study carried out in 2014, 280 patients were included consecutively through sampling from both university and private medical centers/pharmacies in four Iranian cities. Demographic data as well as information about duration of HTN and prescribed medications, admission to emergency department (ED) because of HTN crisis, comorbidities, and control of HTN during the last 6 months by a healthcare provider were gathered. Adherence to anti-hypertensives was also determined using the validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Controlled BP was defined as systolic BPcrisis (adjusted OR= 2.11, P= 0.01). Considerable number of the studied patients had uncontrolled BP. Regarding the dramatic consequences of uncontrolled high BP in long term, it is advisable that careful attention by health care providers to the aforementioned factors could raise the likelihood of achieving controlled BP. PMID:26573037

  2. Blood vessels, circulation and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series, describes the vessels of the body's blood and lymphatic circulatory systems. Blood pressure and its regulatory systems are examined. The causes and management of hypertension are also explored. It is important that nurses and other healthcare professionals understand the various mechanisms involved in the regulation of blood pressure to prevent high blood pressure or ameliorate its damaging consequences.

  3. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder High Blood Pressure & Kidney Disease What is high blood pressure? Blood pressure is ... are the symptoms of high blood pressure and kidney disease? Most people with high blood pressure do not ...

  4. The influence of patient's consciousness regarding high blood pressure and patient's attitude in face of disease controlling medicine intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida A Moura Strelec

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between blood pressure control and the following: the Morisky-Green test, the patient's consciousness regarding high blood pressure, the patient's attitude in face of medicine intake, the patient's attendance at medical consultations, and the subjective physician's judgment. METHODS: We studied 130 hypertensive patients with the following characteristics: 73% females, 60±11 years, 58% married, 70% white, 45% retired, 45% with incomplete elementary schooling, 64% had a familial income of 1 to 3 minimum wages, body mass index of 30±7 kg/m², consciousness regarding the disease for a mean period of 11±9.5 years, and mean treatment duration of 8 ±7 years. RESULTS: Only 35% of the hypertensive individuals had blood pressure under control and a longer duration of treatment (10±7 vs 7±6.5 years; P<0.05. The retiree predominated. The result of the Morisky-Green test did not relate to blood pressure control. In evaluating the attitude in face of medicine intake, the controlled patients achieved significantly higher scores than did the noncontrolled patients (8±1.9 vs 7 ±2, P<0.05. The hypertensive patients had higher levels of consciousness regarding their disease and its treatment, and most (70% patients attended 3 or 4 medical consultations, which did not influence blood pressure control. The physicians attributed significantly higher scores regarding adherence to treatment to controlled patients (6±0.8 vs 5±1.2; P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Consciousness regarding the disease, the Morisky-Green test, and attendance to medical consultations did not influence blood pressure control.

  5. A technology-supported collaboration between a health plan and a community pharmacy to improve blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frail, Caitlin K; Cooper, Susan; Gallagher, Tim; Sarkis, Josh; Topor, Laura; Bruzek, Richard J

    To assess the impact of a health plan and community pharmacy partnership to improve blood pressure control. A midwestern health plan and a regional community pharmacy chain. Health plan members with a hypertension diagnosis and attributed to the pharmacy chain based on prescription claims were invited to participate. Interested patients enrolled in the program at their pharmacies and were assigned a "smart card" for use with a blood pressure kiosk in the pharmacy. When the card was used at the kiosk, individual patient readings were linked directly to their electronic pharmacy record and an online patient portal. Pharmacists intervened with patients and prescribers as necessary to address adherence issues and adjust therapy as needed. Before and after blood pressure readings were assessed to determine the impact of patient self-monitoring and pharmacist intervention for patients with 1) uncontrolled blood pressure at first reading and 2) multiple readings throughout the pilot period. Fifty-six of 276 eligible patients (20%) were enrolled in the program. Fourteen patients qualified for before and after assessments, having uncontrolled blood pressure on initial reading and multiple readings throughout the pilot. These patients demonstrated a mean reduction in systolic blood pressure of 12 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure of 8 mm Hg. Nine of 16 eligible pharmacy locations enrolled patients at their sites. Challenges faced in the initiative included gaining adequate pharmacist and patient engagement. The pilot demonstrated promising early results in a model that has potential to improve blood pressure monitoring and management in a community pharmacy setting. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure and arterial stiffness : a fully controlled dietary intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Dower, J. I.; Mensink, M.; Siebelink, E.; Bakker, S. J. L.; Geleijnse, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study to examine the effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness in untreated (pre) hypertensive individuals. During the study, subjects were on a fully controlled diet that was relatively low

  7. Effects of blood pressure and blood pressure reactivity on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated whether the relationship between sex and experimental pain report was explained by blood pressure at rest, or during pain task, or both in healthy, young adult females. Univariate analyses indicated significant positive correlation between baseline systolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure ...

  8. Self-monitoring and self-management: new interventions to improve blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, David E; McManus, Richard J

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews recent developments in self-monitoring and self-management of hypertension aimed at the improvement of blood pressure (BP) control. There is an increasing body of evidence examining the effects of self-monitoring on BP control. Several landmark studies in recent years have demonstrated clinically relevant benefit from self-monitoring based interventions. Self-management of BP with self-titration has shown particular promise, as has self-monitoring combined with intensive health-care led support. There is a lack of evidence on the benefits of self-monitoring for those with important comorbidity such as coronary heart disease, chronic kidney disease, diabetes and previous stroke, and future research should be directed towards this. There is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of self-monitoring along with additional intervention including telemonitoring and self-titration in improving BP control. Further research is needed to understand which patients are likely to benefit most and how this is best integrated with routine care.

  9. Effect of soya protein on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jia-Yi; Tong, Xing; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Xun, Peng-Cheng; He, Ka; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2011-08-01

    Observational studies have indicated that soya food consumption is inversely associated with blood pressure (BP). Evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) on the BP-lowering effects of soya protein intake is inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of soya protein intake in lowering BP. The PubMed database was searched for published RCT in the English language through to April 2010, which compared a soya protein diet with a control diet. We conducted a random-effects meta-analysis to examine the effects of soya protein on BP. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were performed to explore possible explanations for heterogeneity among trials. Meta-analyses of twenty-seven RCT showed a mean decrease of 2·21 mmHg (95 % CI - 4·10, - 0·33; P = 0·021) for systolic BP (SBP) and 1·44 mmHg (95 % CI - 2·56, - 0·31; P = 0·012) for diastolic BP (DBP), comparing the participants in the soya protein group with those in the control group. Soya protein consumption significantly reduced SBP and DBP in both hypertensive and normotensive subjects, and the reductions were markedly greater in hypertensive subjects. Significant and greater BP reductions were also observed in trials using carbohydrate, but not milk products, as the control diet. Meta-regression analyses further revealed a significantly inverse association between pre-treatment BP and the level of BP reductions. In conclusion, soya protein intake, compared with a control diet, significantly reduces both SBP and DBP, but the BP reductions are related to pre-treatment BP levels of subjects and the type of control diet used as comparison.

  10. Clonidine versus captopril for treatment of postpartum very high blood pressure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (CLONCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha-Neto, Carlos; Katz, Leila; Coutinho, Isabela C; Maia, Sabina B; Souza, Alex Sandro Rolland; Amorim, Melania Maria Ramos

    2013-07-30

    The behavior of arterial blood pressure in postpartum of women with hypertension and pregnancy and the best treatment for very high blood pressure in this period still need evidence. The Cochrane systematic review assessing prevention and treatment of postpartum hypertension found only two trials (120 patients) comparing hydralazine with nifedipine and labetalol for the treatment of severe hypertension and did not find enough evidence to know how best to treat women with hypertension after birth. Although studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of treatment with captopril, side effects were reported. Because of these findings, new classes of antihypertensive drugs began to be administered as an alternative therapy. Data on the role of clonidine in this particular group of patients, its effects in the short and long term are still scarce in the literature. To determine the effectiveness of clonidine, compared to captopril, for the treatment of postpartum very high blood pressure in women with hypertension in pregnancy. The study is a triple blind randomized controlled trial including postpartum women with diagnosis of hypertension in pregnancy presenting very high blood pressure, and exclusion criteria will be presence of heart disease, smoking, use of illicit drugs, any contraindication to the use of captopril or clonidine and inability to receive oral medications.Eligible patients will be invited to participate and those who agree will be included in the study and receive captopril or clonidine according to a random list of numbers. The subjects will receive the study medication every 20 minutes until blood pressure is over 170 mmHg of systolic blood pressure and 110 mmHg diastolic blood pressure. A maximum of six pills a day for very high blood pressure will be administered. In case of persistent high blood pressure levels, other antihypertensive agents will be used.During the study the women will be subject to strict control of blood pressure and urine

  11. Blood pressure monitors for home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007482.htm Blood pressure monitors for home To use the sharing features ... ask you to keep track of your blood pressure at home. To do this, you will need ...

  12. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters September 26, 2011 Genes that Influence Blood Pressure In one of the largest genomic studies ever, ... consortium identified 29 genetic variations that influence blood pressure. More than half of these variants were previously ...

  13. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of physical activity Drinking too much alcohol Stress Family History A family history of high blood pressure raises the risk ... for high blood pressure and may run in families. Genetic causes of this condition are why family ...

  14. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Nov 13,2017 ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  15. Comparing the Effect of Labetalol versus Morphine on Controlling Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate During Emergence from Anesthesia after Craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Attari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergence from anesthesia is associated with sympathetic stimulation, increase in pulse and blood pressure. There are different methods, but the most appropriate method should be selected regarding the differences in nationalities. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of morphine and labetalol in controlling blood pressure and pulse during emergence from anesthesia in brain tumors craniotomy. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted at Al-Zahra Hospital of Isfahan - Iran on 60 patients suffering from brain tumor candidated for craniotomy and randomly classified into two groups of 30. One group received labetalol with dose of 10 mg over 10 min from 45 min before finishing dressing and then 0.75 mg/min until 35 min later; another group received morphine in bolus dose of 0.1 mg/kg during 2–3 min. Blood pressure and pulse were measured every 10 min over 40 min. After operation, they were measured every 5 min over 15 min. Results: The morphine group had higher systolic (133.3 ± 18.8 and diastolic blood pressure (87.1 ± 13.6 (P = 0.021 and 0.028, respectively at extubation and during 45 min before dressing, the diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in compares with labetalol (75.3 ± 10.5 (P < 0.05. And extubation time was significantly shorter in labetalol group (7.7 ± 0.84 (P < 0.001. Pulse had no significant difference in both groups. In labetalol group, blood pressure and pulse fluctuations were more stable. Conclusion: Administration of labetalol 45 min before finishing dressing can significantly control blood pressure during emergence from anesthesia and also shorten the time of extubation during emergence in patients undergoing craniotomy.

  16. Blood Pressure Control in Smokers with Arterial Hypertension Who Switched to Electronic Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Polosa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (ECs are battery-operated devices designed to vaporise nicotine, which may help smokers with quitting or reducing their tobacco consumption. No data is available regarding the health effects of ECs use among smokers with arterial hypertension and whether regular use results in blood pressure (BP changes. We investigated long-term changes in resting BP and level of BP control in hypertensive smokers who quit or reduced substantially their tobacco consumption by switching to ECs. A medical records review of patients with hypertension was conducted to identify patients reporting regular daily use of ECs on at least two consecutive follow-up visits. Regularly smoking hypertensive patients were included as a reference group. A marked reduction in cigarette consumption was observed in ECs users (n = 43 though consumption remained unchanged in the control group (n = 46. Compared to baseline, at 12 months (follow-up visit 2 decline in cigarette consumption was associated with significant reductions in median (25th-, 75th-centile systolic BP (140 (134.5, 144 to 130 (123.5, 138.5 mmHg; p < 0.001 and diastolic BP (86 (78, 90 to 80 (74.5, 90 mmHg; p = 0.006. No significant changes were observed in the control group. As expected, decline in cigarette consumption in the ECs users was also associated with improved BP control. The study concludes that regular ECs use may aid smokers with arterial hypertension reduce or abstain from cigarette smoking, with only trivial post-cessation weight gain. This resulted in improvements in systolic and diastolic BP as well as better BP control.

  17. The effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Aalami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are the main cause of maternal and fetal mortality; however, they have no definite effective treatment. The researchers aimed to study the effects of progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control technique on blood pressure (BP during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: This three-group clinical trial was conducted in Mashhad health centers and governmental hospitals. Sixty pregnant (after 20 weeks of gestational age women with systolic BP ≥ 135 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mmHg were assigned to three groups. Progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control exercises were administered to the two experimental groups once a week in person and in the rest of the days by instructions given on a CD for 4 weeks. BP was checked before and after the interventions. BP was measured before and after 15 min subjects' waiting without any especial intervention in the control group. Results: After 4 weeks of intervention, the systolic (by a mean of 131.3 to 117.2, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 131.05 to 120.5, P = 0.004, respectively and diastolic (by a mean of 79.2 to 72.3, P = 0.001 and by a mean of 80.1 to 76.5, P = 0.047, respectively BPs were significantly decreased in progressive muscular relaxation and breathing control groups, but they were not statistically significant in the control group. Conclusions: The interventions were effective on decreasing systolic and diastolic BP to normal range after 4 weeks in both the groups. The effects of both the interventions were more obvious on systolic BP compared to diastolic BP.

  18. Blood Pressure Treatment Adherence and Control after Participation in the ReHOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Silva de Jesus

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lack of adherence to pharmacological treatment is one of the main causes of low control rates in hypertension. Objective: To verify treatment adherence and associated factors, as well as blood pressure (BP control in participants of the Resistant Hypertension Optimal Treatment (ReHOT clinical trial. Method: Cross-sectional study including all 109 patients who had completed the ReHOT for at least 6 months. We excluded those participants who failed to respond to the new recruitment after three phone contact attempts. We evaluated the BP control by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM; controlled levels: 24-hour systolic and diastolic BP < 130 x 80 mmHg and analyzed the patients' treatment adherence using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS questionnaire validated by Bloch, Melo, and Nogueira (2008. The statistical analysis was performed with the software IBM SPSS statistics 21.0. We tested the normality of the data distribution with kurtosis and skewness. The variables tested in the study are presented with descriptive statistics. Comparisons between treatment adherence and other variables were performed with Student's t test for independent variables and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact test. To conduct analyses among patients considering adherence to treatment and BP control, we created four groups: G0, G1, G2, and G3. We considered a 5% significance level in all tests. Results: During the ReHOT, 80% of the patients had good BP control and treatment adherence. Of 96 patients reevaluated in the present study, only 52.1% had controlled hypertension when assessed by ABPM, while 31.3% were considered adherent by the MMAS. Regarding other ABPM measures, we observed an absence of a nocturnal dip in 64.6% of the patients and a white-coat effect and false BP control in 23% and 12.5%, respectively. Patients' education level showed a trend towards being a determinant factor associated with lack of adherence (p = 0

  19. Comparison of magnesium and methyldopa for the control of blood pressure in pregnancies complicated with hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudnicki, M; Frølich, A; Pilsgaard, K

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although magnesium is now the drug of choice for the prevention of eclamptic seizures only few studies have evaluated whether magnesium may reduce blood pressure in pregnancies complicated with hypertension. METHODS: A total of 33 patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension were rand...

  20. Creatine kinase inhibition lowers systemic arterial blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karamat, Fares A.; Oudman, Inge; Haan, Yentl C.; van Kuilenburg, Andre B. P.; Leen, Rene; Danser, Jan A. H.; Leijten, Frank P. J.; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Clark, Joseph F.; Brewster, Lizzy M.

    2016-01-01

    Creatine kinase is reported to be a main predictor of blood pressure (BP) in the general population, with a strong correlation between resistance artery creatine kinase expression and clinical BP in humans. The enzyme rapidly regenerates ATP near cytoplasmic ATPases involved in pressor responses,

  1. Relaxation therapy and continuous ambulatory blood pressure in mild hypertension: a controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Montfrans, G. A.; Karemaker, J. M.; Wieling, W.; Dunning, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the long term effects of relaxation therapy on 24 hour ambulatory intra-arterial blood pressure in patients with mild untreated and uncomplicated hypertension. Four week screening period followed by randomisation to receive either relaxation therapy or non-specific counselling for one

  2. Optimizing blood pressure control in hypertension: the need to use ABPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Roland E; Lehmann, Marina V; Schmidt, Stephanie

    2013-04-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent, treatable cause of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Patients with hypertension and one or more comorbidities increasingly form a significant part of the primary care practitioner's caseload. The emphasis on intensive blood pressure (BP) lowering has softened, encouraging any degree of BP lowering, since any fall in BP is beneficial for reducing CV risk. Consistency of BP control during long-term therapy (i.e. low visit-to-visit variability) and decreasing BP variability over 24-h may be as, if not more, important than degree of BP lowering per se. Fluctuations in BP between visits as well as within a 24-h period have been associated with increased CV risk. Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) is a crucial element of the clinician's armamentarium not only for assessing the "true" BP load and fluctuations under real-life conditions but for identification of various abnormal BP patterns that may require attention, including white- coat hypertension, masked hypertension, non-dipping and the morning BP surge. ABPM provides accurate assessment of treatment effectiveness over 24-h and may lead to better tailoring of therapy. This article reviews the benefits of ABPM and discusses the importance of selecting long-acting antihypertensive agents for optimizing BP control.

  3. Misery perfusion, blood pressure control, and 5-year stroke risk in symptomatic major cerebral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Shinya; Kishibe, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Masaaki; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of strict blood pressure (BP) control in high-risk patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery disease and misery perfusion (MP) is controversial. Our purposes were (1) to determine whether MP is a predictor of a 5-year risk of subsequent stroke and (2) to investigate the relationships among BP during follow-up, MP, and the stroke risk. We studied 130 nondisabled patients with symptomatic major cerebral artery disease. Baseline hemodynamic measurements were obtained from (15)O-gas positron emission tomography, and patients received medical treatment and they were followed for 5 years or until stroke recurrence or death. During 5 years, strokes occurred in 6 of 16 patients with MP and in 15 of 114 without MP (log-rank test; Pstrokes in patients with MP and 4 in those without MP (Pstroke declined markedly after 2 years, and there was only 1 ipsilateral ischemic stroke in a patient without MP. Normal systolic BP (strokes in patients with impaired perfusion (including MP), whereas systolic BP outside the 130 to 149 mm Hg range was associated with an increased risk of all strokes in patients without MP. Patients with MP showed a high-5-year stroke recurrence, but a large part of the 5-year stroke risk disappeared after 2 years. Aggressive BP control may be hazardous in patients with impaired perfusion, including MP. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. The Effect of Educational Intervention of Life Style Modification on Blood Pressure Control in Patients with Hypertension

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    Moreteza Babaei-Sis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Today, chronic diseases such as high blood pressure are increasing; this disease is closely associated with lifestyle. Therefore, the current study was conducted to assess the effect of lifestyle modifying educational intervention on blood pressure control in patients with hypertension. Materials and Methods: This Quasi-experimental study was conducted on 210 patients with hypertension, referring to health centers of Shabestar County, Iran in 2016. Patients were assigned into two groups of intervention (n = 105 and control (n = 105 using random multi-stage sampling method. The data was collected using standard life style questionnaire (LSQ in four dimensions of exercise, weight control, nutrition, and mental and spiritual health, before and two months after the educational intervention. Data were analyzed in SPSS-21 using descriptive and inferential statistics, such as chi-squared, paired t-test and independent t-test. Results: The results showed that the mean scores of exercise, weight control, nutrition and mental health in the intervention group increased significantly after the intervention (P 0.05. Also, the educational intervention had a significant effect on reducing blood pressure in the intervention group compared with the control group (P< 0.05. Conclusions: According to the findings of the study, educational intervention is effective in promoting physical activity, improving weight management, nutrition and mental health in patients with hypertension. In addition, the results indicated that controlled blood pressure can be achieved by improving the lifestyle.

  5. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups.

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    Tazeen H Jafar

    Full Text Available Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE and trained general practitioner (GP intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up.A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes.After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1-0.1] mm Hg compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04. Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl.The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still evident at 7- year follow-up. These

  6. Effects of Massage on Blood Pressure in Patients With Hypertension and Prehypertension: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, I-Chen; Chen, Shiah-Lian; Wang, Mei-Yeh; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Massage may help reduce blood pressure; previous studies on the effect of massage on blood pressure have presented conflicting findings. In addition, no systematic review is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence concerning the effect of massage on blood pressure in patients with hypertension or prehypertension. A search was performed on electronic database records up to October 31, 2013, based on the following medical subject headings or keywords: hypertension, massage, chiropractic, manipulation, and blood pressure. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials was assessed based on the Cochrane collaboration tool. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of massage on hypertension. The study selection, data extraction, and validation were performed independently by 2 reviewers. Nine randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria. The results of this study show that massage contributes to significantly enhanced reduction in both systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mean difference, -7.39 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (mean difference, -5.04 mm Hg) as compared with control treatments in patients with hypertension and prehypertension. The effect size (Hedges g) for SBP and DBP was -0.728 (95% confidence interval, -1.182 to -0.274; P = .002) and -0.334 (95% confidence interval, -0.560 to -0.107; P = .004), respectively. This systematic review found a medium effect of massage on SBP and a small effect on DBP in patients with hypertension or prehypertension. High-quality randomized controlled trials are urgently required to confirm these results, although the findings of this study can be used to guide future research.

  7. Recidivism to uncontrolled blood pressure in patients with previously controlled hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amneet; Ho, P Michael; Asche, Steve; Magid, David J; Margolis, Karen L; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn; Rush, Bill; Price, David W; Ekstrom, Heidi; Tavel, Heather; Godlevsky, Olga; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2015-06-01

    Control of hypertension has improved nationally with focus on identifying and treating elevated blood pressures (BPs) to guideline recommended levels. However, once BP control is achieved, the frequency in which BP falls out of control and the factors associated with BP recidivism is unknown. In this retrospective cohort study conducted at 2 large, integrated health care systems we sought to examine rates and predictors of BP recidivism in adults with controlled hypertension. No change for methods, results and conclusion. Patients with a prior diagnosis of hypertension based on a combination of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes, receipt of antihypertensive medications, and/or elevated BP readings were eligible to be included. We defined controlled hypertension as normotensive BP readings (recidivism defined by the date of the second of 2 consecutive BP readings >140/90 mmHg (>130/80 mmHg for diabetes or chronic kidney disease) during a median follow-up period of 16.6 months. Cox proportional hazards regression assessed the association between patient characteristics, comorbidities, medication adherence, and provider medication management with time to BP recidivism. A total of 23,321 patients with controlled hypertension were included in this study. The proportion of patients with hypertension recidivism was 24.1% over the 16.6-month study period. For those with BP recidivism, the median time to relapse was 7.3 months. In multivariate analysis, those with diabetes (hazard ratio [HR] 3.99, CI 3.67-4.33), high normal baseline BP (for systolic BP HR 1.03, CI 1.03-1.04), or low antihypertensive medication adherence (HR 1.20, CI 1.11-1.29) had significantly higher rates of hypertension recidivism. Limitations of this work include demographics of our patient sample, which may not reflect other communities in addition to the intrinsic limitations of office-based BP measurements. Hypertensive recidivism occurs in a significant portion of

  8. Amlodipine versus angiotensin II receptor blocker; control of blood pressure evaluation trial in diabetics (ADVANCED-J

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda Shunya

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coexistence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study has shown that blood pressure control as well as blood glucose control is efficient for prevention of complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. However, some reports have shown that it is difficult to control the blood pressure and the concomitant use of a plurality of drugs is needed in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. In recent years renin-angiotensin system depressants are increasingly used for the blood pressure control in diabetic patients. Particularly in Japan, angiotensin II (A II antagonists are increasingly used. However, there is no definite evidence of the point of which is efficient for the control, the increase in dose of A II antagonist or the concomitant use of another drug, in hypertensive patients whose blood pressure levels are inadequately controlled with A II antagonist. Methods/Design Hypertensive patients of age 20 years or over with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have been treated by the single use of AII antagonist at usual doses for at least 8 weeks or patients who have been treated by the concomitant use of AII antagonist and an antihypertensive drug other than calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors at usual doses for at least 8 weeks are included. Discussion We designed a multi-center, prospective, randomized, open label, blinded-endpoint trial, ADVANCED-J, to compare the increases in dose of A II antagonist and the concomitant use of a Ca-channel blocker (amlodipine and A II antagonist in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus, whose blood pressure levels were inadequately controlled with A II antagonist. This study is different from the usual previous studies in that home blood pressures are assessed as indicators of evaluation of blood pressure. The ADVANCED-J study may have much influence on selection of

  9. Cross-sectional Study on Blood Pressure Control in the Department of Nephrology of the Escola Paulista de Medicina - UNIFESP

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    Freitas João Batista de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE - To assess hypertension control rates in a specialized university-affiliated medical department, the influence of sex, diabetes, and obesity on that control, and the strategies for the treatment of hypertension. METHODS - We carried out a cross-sectional study with 1,210 patients followed up for at least 6 months. Information was gathered from medical and nursing records and comprised the following data: sex, age, weight, height, abdominal and hip circumferences, blood pressure, and class and number of the antihypertensive drugs prescribed. To assess obesity, we used body mass index and waist/hip ratio. Blood pressure was considered under control when its levels were below 140/90 mmHg. RESULTS - The study consisted of 73% females and 27% males. Most females (31.7% were 50 to 59 years of age, and most males (28.3% were 60 to 69 years. The blood pressure control rate found was 20.9% for the 1,210 patients and 23.4% for the hypertensive diabetic patients (n=290. Despite the low control rates found, 70% of the patients used 1 or 2 antihypertensive medications. A high prevalence of obesity (38% was observed, and females had a greater abdominal obesity index than males did (90% vs 82%, p<0.05. Patients with a greater body mass index had less control of blood pressure. CONCLUSION - The percentage of hypertensive patients with controlled blood pressure levels was low and was associated with a high prevalence of obesity. These data indicate the need for reviewing the strategies of global treatment for hypertension.

  10. Blood Pressure Control at Rest and during Exercise in Obese Children and Adults

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    Konstantina Dipla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic responses to exercise have been studied to a great extent over the past decades, and an exaggerated blood pressure response during an acute exercise bout has been considered as an indicator of cardiovascular risk. Obesity is a major factor influencing the blood pressure response to exercise since evidence indicates that the arterial pressure response to exercise is exacerbated in obese compared with lean adults. Signs of augmented responses (such as an exaggerated blood pressure response to physical exertion appear early in life (from the prepubertal years in obese individuals. Understanding the mechanisms that drive the altered hemodynamic responses during exercise in obese individuals and prevent the progression to hypertension is vitally important. This paper focuses on the evidence linking obesity with alterations of the autonomic nervous system and discusses the potential mechanisms and consequences of the altered sympathetic nervous system behavior in obese individuals at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, this paper presents the alterations in the reflex regulatory mechanisms (“exercise pressor reflex” and baroreflex in obese children and adults and addresses the effects of training on obesity-related disturbances.

  11. Parathyroidectomy Ameliorates Glucose and Blood Pressure Control in a Patient with Primary Hyperparathyroidism, Type 2 Diabetes, and Hypertension

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    Alok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of parathyroidectomy on glucose control and hypertension is controversial. Here, we report a case of a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension in whom parathyroidectomy ameliorated both glucose control and blood pressure. Once high serum calcium levels were noticed, ultrasonography of neck confirmed a well-defined oval hypoechoic mass posterior to the right lobe of the thyroid, confirmed by scintiscan. Parathyroidectomy resulted in improvement of blood pressure and blood glucose. We could stop insulin and antihypertensive medications. We conclude that in patients with type 2 diabetes with vague complaints like fatigue, body ache, and refractory hypertension, as a part of the diagnostic workup, clinicians should also check serum calcium levels and parathyroid hormone to rule out hyperparathyroidism. Correction of hyperparathyroidism may result in improvement of hypertension and glucose control.

  12. Lactotripeptides Show No Effect on Human Blood Pressure: Results from a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, M.F.; Schouten, E.G.; Kok, F.J.; Mierlo, van L.A.J.; Brouwer, I.A.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Milk-derived peptides with ACE-inhibiting properties may have antihypertensive effects in humans. We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial to examine the blood pressure lowering potential of 2 ACE-inhibiting lactotripeptides, ie, Isoleucine-Proline-Proline and

  13. Nurse-led care interventions for high blood pressure control: Implications for non-communicable disease programs in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Katende

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Nurses play a significant role in the control of high blood pressure when they employ effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of hypertension. Adapting effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of non-communicable diseases could improve patient outcomes in Uganda.

  14. Lactotripeptides show no effect on human blood pressure : Results from a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, Mariëlle F; Schouten, Evert G.; Kok, Frans J; Van Mierlo, Linda A J; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.; Geleijnse, Johanna M

    Milk-derived peptides with ACE-inhibiting properties may have antihypertensive effects in humans. We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial to examine the blood pressure lowering potential of 2 ACE-inhibiting lactotripeptides, ie, Isoleucine-Proline-Proline and

  15. Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This is the final report of National Black Health Providers Task Force (NBHPTF) on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The first chapter of the report recounts the history of the NBHPTF and its objectives. In the second chapter epidemiological evidence is presented to demonstrate the need for a suggested 20 year plan aimed at controlling…

  16. [Arterial hypertension and control in Brazzaville (Congo): role of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikama, M S; Nsitou, B M; Makani, J; Nkalla-Lambi, M; Passi-Louamba, C

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the rate control in the hypertensive patients and to identify the predictive factors of non-control. It was about a cross-sectional study with prospective collection of data over a period of 36 months. It has been held in Brazzaville, and included a consecutive series of 620 hypertensive patients known and treated for at least 6 weeks, having profited from an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with therapeutic aiming. We used the TONOPORT V and the software Cardiosoft 6.51 of GE Health Care, respectively for the recording and the data analysis. The threshold fixed on the average of 24-hour was BP<130/80 mmHg, and the patients divided into two groups according to whether they were or not controlled. They were 352 men (56.8%) and 268 women (43.2%), old on average of 53.8 ± 9.7 years (ranges: 29 and 89 years). The standard of living of the patients was average in 330 cases (53.2%), weak in 132 cases (21.3%), and high in 71 cases (11.5%). The other associated risk factors were sedentariness in 275 cases (44.4%), overweight/obesity in 134 cases (21.6%), dyslipidemia in 121 cases (19.5%), diabetes mellitus in 90 cases (14.5%), and tobacco addiction in 25 cases (4%). The hypertension, old of 5.8 ± 5.7 years on average, was controlled among 215 patients (34.7%). The 24- hour BP average was 139 ± 14 mmHg for the SBP and 88.2 ± 10.2 mmHg for the DBP. The awake and asleep BP averages were respectively 141 ± 14 mmHg and 133 ± 16.2 mmHg for the SBP, 90.5 ± 10.5 and 81.2 ± 11.1 mmHg for the DBP. The antihypertensive protocol used was a monotherapy in 130 cases (21%), bitherapy in 287 cases (46.3%), tritherapy in 154 cases (24.8%), quadritherapy or more in 27 cases (4.3%). Prevalence of non-dipping was 43%. Age and male gender were the significant predictors of poor control. The rate control of hypertension in our study population remains low. Its improvement passes by the education of the hypertensive patients and the improvement of their living

  17. The effectiveness of a life style modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring in control of hypertension: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tin Tin; Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Nahar, Azmi Mohamed; Azizan, Nurul Ain; Hairi, Farizah Mohd; Thangiah, Nithiah; Dahlui, Maznah; Bulgiba, Awang; Murray, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Death rates due to hypertension in low and middle income countries are higher compared to high income countries. The present study is designed to combine life style modification and home blood pressure monitoring for control of hypertension in the context of low and middle income countries. The study is a two armed, parallel group, un-blinded, cluster randomized controlled trial undertaken within lower income areas in Kuala Lumpur. Two housing complexes will be assigned to the intervention group and the other two housing complexes will be allocated in the control group. Based on power analysis, 320 participants will be recruited. The participants in the intervention group (n = 160) will undergo three main components in the intervention which are the peer support for home blood pressure monitoring, face to face health coaching on healthy diet and demonstration and training for indoor home based exercise activities while the control group will receive a pamphlet containing information on hypertension. The primary outcomes are systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Secondary outcome measures include practice of self-blood pressure monitoring, dietary intake, level of physical activity and physical fitness. The present study will evaluate the effect of lifestyle modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring on blood pressure control, during a 6 month intervention period. Moreover, the study aims to assess whether these effects can be sustainable more than six months after the intervention has ended.

  18. Effect of probiotic fermented milk on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jia-Yi; Szeto, Ignatius M Y; Makinen, Kimmo; Gao, Qiutao; Wang, Junkuan; Qin, Li-Qiang; Zhao, Youyou

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that probiotic fermented milk may possess blood pressure (BP)-lowering properties. In the present study, we aimed to systematically examine the effect of probiotic fermented milk on BP by conducting a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. PubMed, Cochrane library and the ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched up to March 2012 to identify eligible studies.The reference lists of the obtained articles were also reviewed. Either a fixed-effects or a random-effects model was used to calculate the combined treatment effect. Meta-analysis of fourteen randomised placebo-controlled trials involving 702 participants showed that probiotic fermented milk, compared with placebo, produced a significant reduction of 3·10 mmHg (95% CI 24·64, 21·56) in systolic BP and 1·09 mmHg (95% CI 22·11, 20·06) in diastolic BP. Subgroup analyses suggested a slightly greater effect on systolic BP in hypertensive participants than in normotensive ones (23·98 v. 22·09 mmHg). Analysis of trials conducted in Japan showed a greater reduction than those conducted in European countries for both systolic BP (26·12 v. 22·08 mmHg) and diastolic BP (23·45 v. 20·52 mmHg). Some evidence of publication bias was present, but sensitivity analysis excluding small trials that reported extreme results only affected the pooled effect size minimally. In summary, the present meta-analysis suggested that probiotic fermented milk has BP-lowering effects in pre-hypertensive and hypertensive subjects.

  19. Influence of room heating on ambulatory blood pressure in winter: a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Keigo; Obayashi, Kenji; Iwamoto, Junko; Tanaka, Yuu; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Takata, Shota; Kubo, Hiroko; Okamoto, Nozomi; Tomioka, Kimiko; Nezu, Satoko; Kurumatani, Norio

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have proposed that higher blood pressure (BP) in winter is an important cause of increased mortality from cardiovascular disease during the winter. Some observational and physiological studies have shown that cold exposure increases BP, but evidence from a randomised controlled study assessing the effectiveness of intensive room heating for lowering BP was lacking. The present study aimed to determine whether intensive room heating in winter decreases ambulatory BP as compared with weak room heating resulting in a 10°C lower target room temperature when sufficient clothing and bedclothes are available. We conducted a parallel group, assessor blinded, simple randomised controlled study with 1:1 allocation among 146 healthy participants in Japan from November 2009 to March 2010. Ambulatory BP was measured while the participants stayed in single experimental rooms from 21:00 to 8:00. During the session, participants could adjust the amount of clothing and bedclothes as required. Compared with the weak room heating group (mean temperature ± SD: 13.9 ± 3.3°C), systolic morning BP (mean BP 2 h after getting out of bed) of the intensive room heating group (24.2 ± 1.7°C) was significantly lower by 5.8 mm Hg (95% CI 2.4 to 9.3). Sleep-trough morning BP surges (morning BP minus lowest night-time BP) in the intensive room heating group were significantly suppressed to about two thirds of the values in the weak room heating group (14.3 vs 21.9 mm Hg; pheating decreased morning BP and the morning BP surge in winter.

  20. Relationships between blood lead, blood pressure, serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study examined the associations between blood – Pb, serum cholesterol, diastolic and, systolic blood pressures, hematocrit, body weight, age and body mass index in 528 study subjects comprising 50% cigarette smoking and 50% non-smoking male residents of Abeokuta, Nigeria, aged from 15 to 80 years. Blood Pb was ...

  1. [Control of blood pressure by using an intelligent telephone application with feedback and competitiveness strategy. HTApp Control project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Prieto, J; Sabatel, F; Villarrubia Mendez, G; Divisón, J A; Garcia-Donaire, J A; Rodríguez-Padial, L

    Arterial hypertension is a highly important cardiovascular risk factor, with low control percentages. New technologies can help to obtain a better control of this disease. The intention is to know if a mobile application can help achieve this goal. A mobile phone application is used to give feedback to physicians with the aim of generate competitiveness in achieving objectives. The application could, at any time, determine the rate of controlled patients (140/90mmHg, despite medical treatment, tracked for 4 visits. At the end of the follow-up, 69.03% achieved good control, compared to 12.8% in the baseline study (P<.001), with no differences between gender (control of 68.6 and 69.29% of women and men, respectively), nor among the different levels of cardiovascular risk. The use of interactive tools that allow the dynamic process of feedback on the results fosters the motivation and improves the therapeutic inertia in the control of blood pressure. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [Relationship of polymedication in controlling blood pressure: compliance, persistence, costs and incidence of new cardiovascular events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicras Mainar, Antoni; Muñoz Ortí, Genís; Font Ramos, Beatriu; Majós Oró, Núria; Navarro Artieda, Ruth; Ibáñez Nolla, Jordi

    2013-07-21

    To determine the relationship of polypharmacy on blood pressure (BP) control, compliance, persistence, the cost and incidence of cardiovascular events (CVD) in patients with moderate/severe hypertension. An observational multicenter retrospective study. We evaluated patients > 30 years who started a third antihypertensive treatment during 2004-2006. Depending on the number of chronic medications, we established 3 groups: regular consumption of 3-6 drugs, including between 7-10 and ≥ 11. Top-measures: sociodemographic, comorbidity, BP, compliance and persistence. For each group we determined the incidence of new CVD totals and total costs. We evaluated 1,906 patients, 765 between 3-6 drugs, 624 between 7-10 and 517 in ≥ 11 (P<.001). Overage age: 69.4 years and 55.5% women. The group of 3-6 drugs showed better BP control (51.8 vs. 47.0 and 41.1%, P<.001), compliance (71.4 vs. 69.9 and 67.1%, P=.017), persistence (50.1 vs. 45.5 and 46.2%, P=.044) and lower incidence of CVD (12.2 vs. 19.7 and 30.2%, P<.001), respectively. The average/unit total costs was 3,369.1 vs. 4,362.1 and € 4,902.3 (P<.001). The presence of CVD was associated with therapy noncompliance (odds ratio [OR] 1.9, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.1 to 3.6) and controlled by the lower BP control (OR 1.4 (95%CI 1.1-2.0) (P < .05). The use of antihypertensive fixed dose has greater compliance (72.8 vs. 68.2%), persistence (64.4 vs. 39.3%) and degree of BP control (52.6 vs. 43, 8%) (p<.001). Polypharmacy is associated with lower compliance and persistence to antihypertensive treatment, cardiovascular disease and increased health care costs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Pressure controlled clamp using shape memory alloy for minimal vessel invasion in blood flow occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Sano, Yuya; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Kudo, Tadaaki; Sato, Takumi; Shimizu, Yoshinaka

    2013-01-01

    Vessel damage after clamping may affect the success of surgical operations. A new pressure controlled clamp (SMA clamp) was designed using super elastic property of shape memory alloy (SMA) to realize atraumatic vessel occlusion. The ability and biological effect of the SMA clamp to control pressure was investigated in vivo. The loading-displacement curves of the SMA clamps (experimental group) and conventional clamp (control group) by occlusion of pig carotid arteries were evaluated using a clamping-pressure analyzing system. To investigate macroscopically and histologically the vessel damage of the SMA and conventional clamps, pig carotid arteries were stained with Evan's blue and its histological sections were stained with Elastica Massion after clamping for fifteen minutes. Constant value was shown in the loading-displacement curve of SMA clamp. In the control group, damaged area stained with Evan's blue in the vessel wall showed enlargement with the pressure increasing. Less areas in experimental groups are observed than that in the control group. Histological section in the experimental group showed no obvious except a slight compressive damage in the tunica intima. In the control group, vessel wall showed irreversible damages. This experiment indicated that the SMA clamp, which has a unique mechanical property, can be used without vessels damage. This pressure controlled clamp can be a selection in clinical apparatus to improve surgical safety.

  4. A micro control valve with integrated capacitive sensing for ambulant blood pressure waveform monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Maarten; Brookhuis, Robert Anton; van Houwelingen, M.J.; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Lötters, Joost Conrad; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated the first single-wafer proportional micro control valve with built-in capacitive dis-placement sensing. The displacement sensor can facilitate high-speed active proportional control of gas flow through the valve. This is an essential requirement for non-invasive blood

  5. THE EFFECT OF HORMONE THERAPY ON MEAN BLOOD PRESSURE AND VISIT-TO-VISIT BLOOD PRESSURE VARIABILITY IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN: RESULTS FROM THE WOMEN’S HEALTH INITIATIVE RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbo, Daichi; Wang, Lu; Lamonte, Michael J.; Allison, Matthew; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Bavry, Anthony A.; Martin, Lisa W.; Aragaki, Aaron; Newman, Jonathan D.; Swica, Yael; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mean and visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of blood pressure are associated with an increased cardiovascular disease risk. We examined the effect of hormone therapy on mean and VVV of blood pressure in postmenopausal women from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) randomized controlled trials. Methods Blood pressure was measured at baseline and annually in the two WHI hormone therapy trials in which 10,739 and 16,608 postmenopausal women were randomized to conjugated equine estrogens (CEE, 0.625 mg/day) or placebo, and CEE plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, 2.5 mg/day) or placebo, respectively. Results At the first annual visit (Year 1), mean systolic blood pressure was 1.04 mmHg (95% CI 0.58, 1.50) and 1.35 mmHg (95% CI 0.99, 1.72) higher in the CEE and CEE+MPA arms respectively compared to corresponding placebos. These effects remained stable after Year 1. CEE also increased VVV of systolic blood pressure (ratio of VVV in CEE vs. placebo, 1.03, Pblood pressure increased at Year 1, and the differences in the CEE and CEE+MPA arms vs. placebos also continued to increase after Year 1. Further, both CEE and CEE+MPA significantly increased VVV of systolic blood pressure (ratio of VVV in CEE vs. placebo, 1.04, Pblood pressure. PMID:24991872

  6. Types of Blood Pressure Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Nov 6,2017 Prescription blood ... will find an overview of the classes of blood pressure medication. To expand the information on a type of medication, simply click on the subject tab. ...

  7. A cluster-randomized trial of task shifting and blood pressure control in Ghana: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Gyamfi, Joyce; Chaplin, William; Ntim, Michael; Apusiga, Kingsley; Khurshid, Kiran; Cooper, Richard

    2014-06-12

    Countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are experiencing an epidemic of cardiovascular disease (CVD) propelled by rapidly increasing rates of hypertension. Barriers to hypertension control in SSA include poor access to care and high out-of-pocket costs. Although SSA bears 24% of the global disease burden, it has only 3% of the global health workforce. Given such limited resources, cost-effective strategies, such as task shifting, are needed to mitigate the rising CVD epidemic in SSA. Ghana, a country in SSA with an established community health worker program integrated within a national health insurance scheme provides an ideal platform to evaluate implementation of the World Health Organization (WHO) task-shifting strategy. This study will evaluate the comparative effectiveness of the implementation of the WHO Package targeted at CV risk assessment versus provision of health insurance coverage, on blood pressure (BP) reduction. Using a cluster randomized design, 32 community health centers (CHCs) and district hospitals in Ghana will be randomized to either the intervention group (16 CHCs) or the control group (16 CHCs). A total of 640 patients with uncomplicated hypertension (BP 140-179/90-99 mm Hg and absence of target organ damage) will be enrolled in this study (20 patients per CHC). The intervention consists of WHO Package of CV risk assessment, patient education, initiation and titration of antihypertensive medications, behavioral counseling on lifestyle behaviors, and medication adherence every three months for 12 months. The primary outcome is the mean change in systolic BP from baseline to 12 months. The secondary outcomes are rates of BP control at 12 months; levels of physical activity, percent change in weight, and dietary intake of fruits and vegetables at 12 months; and sustainability of intervention effects at 24 months. All outcomes will be assessed at baseline, six months and 12 months. Trained community health nurses will deliver the intervention as

  8. The effect of yoghurt and its probiotics on blood pressure and serum lipid profile; a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, K L; Hodgson, J M; Kerr, D A; Thompson, P L; Stojceski, B; Prince, R L

    2015-01-01

    Despite strong mechanistic data, and promising results from in vitro and animal studies, the ability of probiotic bacteria to improve blood pressure and serum lipid concentrations in humans remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis Bb12, provided in either yoghurt or capsule form, on home blood pressure and serum lipid profile. Following a 3-week washout period, 156 overweight men and women over 55 y were randomized to a 6-week double-blinded, factorial, parallel study. The four intervention groups were: A) probiotic yoghurt plus probiotic capsules; B) probiotic yoghurt plus placebo capsules; C) control milk plus probiotic capsules; and D) control milk plus placebo capsules. Each probiotic test article provided a minimum L. acidophilus La5 and B. animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 dose of 3.0 × 10⁹ CFU/d. Home blood pressure monitoring, consisting of 7-day bi-daily repeat measurements, were collected at baseline and week 6. Fasting total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), and serum triglyceride were performed at baseline and week 6. When compared to control milk, probiotic yoghurt did not significantly alter blood pressure, heart rate or serum lipid concentrations (P > 0.05). Similarly, when compared to placebo capsules, supplementation with probiotic capsules did not alter blood pressure or concentrations of total cholesterol LDLC, HDLC, or triglycerides (P > 0.05). The probiotic strains L. acidophilus La5 and B. animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 did not improve cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Model Reference Adaptive Scheme for Multi-drug Infusion for Blood Pressure Control

    OpenAIRE

    Enbiya, Saleh; Mahieddine, Fatima; Hossain, Alamgir

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple interacting drugs to control both the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac output (CO) of patients with different sensitivity to drugs is a challenging task which this paper attempts to address. A multivariable model reference adaptive control (MRAC) algorithm is developed using a two-input, two-output patient model. The control objective is to maintain the homodynamic variables MAP and CO at the normal values by simultaneously administering two drugs; sodium nitroprusside ...

  10. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... system activity , and blood vessel structure and function. Biology and High Blood Pressure Researchers continue to study ... and Your Heart U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Maintaining ...

  11. Progress of health plans toward meeting the million hearts clinical target for high blood pressure control - United States, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milesh M; Datu, Bennett; Roman, Dan; Barton, Mary B; Ritchey, Matthew D; Wall, Hilary K; Loustalot, Fleetwood

    2014-02-14

    High blood pressure is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor and contributed to >362,895 deaths in the United States during 2010. Approximately 67 million persons in the United States have high blood pressure, and only half of those have their condition under control. An estimated 46,000 deaths could be avoided annually if 70% of patients with high blood pressure were treated according to published guidelines. To assess blood pressure control among persons with health insurance, CDC and the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) examined data in the 2010-2012 Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS). In 2012, approximately 113 million adults aged 18-85 years were covered by health plans measured by HEDIS. The HEDIS controlling blood pressure (CBP) performance measure is the proportion of enrollees with a diagnosis of high blood pressure confirmed in their medical record whose blood pressure is controlled. Overall, only 64% of enrollees with diagnosed high blood pressure in HEDIS-reporting plans had documentation that their blood pressure was controlled. Although these findings signal that additional work is needed to meet the 70% target, modest improvements since 2010, coupled with focused efforts, might make it achievable.

  12. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body’s salt balance by retaining sodium and water and excreting potassium. Imbalances in this kidney function ... pressure. Medicines to lower blood pressure include: Diuretics (Water or Fluid Pills): Flush excess sodium from your ...

  13. Estimating the future burden of cardiovascular disease and the value of lipid and blood pressure control therapies in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Warren; Peneva, Desi; Li, Jim Z; Liu, Larry Z; Liu, Gordon; Gao, Runlin; Lakdawalla, Darius N

    2016-05-10

    Lifestyle and dietary changes reflect an ongoing epidemiological transition in China, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) playing an ever-increasing role in China's disease burden. This study assessed the burden of CVD and the potential value of lipid and blood pressure control strategies in China. We estimated the likely burden of CVD between 2016 and 2030 and how expanded use of lipid lowering and blood pressure control medication would impact that burden in the next 15 years. Accounting for the costs of drug use, we assessed the net social value of a policy that expands the utilization of lipid and blood pressure lowering therapies in China. Rises in prevalence of CVD risk and population aging would likely increase the incidence of acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) by 75 million and strokes by 118 million, while the number of CVD deaths would rise by 39 million in total between 2016 and 2030. Universal treatment of hypertension and dyslipidemia patients with lipid and blood pressure lowering therapies could avert between 10 and 20 million AMIs, between 8 and 30 million strokes, and between 3 and 10 million CVD deaths during the 2016-2030 period, producing a positive social value net of health care costs as high as $932 billion. In light of its aging population and epidemiological transition, China faces near-certain increases in CVD morbidity and mortality. Preventative measures such as effective lipid and blood pressure management may reduce CVD burden substantially and provide large social value. While the Chinese government is implementing more systematic approaches to health care delivery, prevention of CVD should be high on the agenda.

  14. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth / For Parents / High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) ... Is High Blood Pressure Treated? Print What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure of blood against ...

  15. Blood Pressure Treatment Adherence and Control after Participation in the ReHOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Nathália Silva de; Nogueira, Armando da Rocha; Pachu, Cacilda Oliveira; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes de

    2016-11-01

    Lack of adherence to pharmacological treatment is one of the main causes of low control rates in hypertension. To verify treatment adherence and associated factors, as well as blood pressure (BP) control in participants of the Resistant Hypertension Optimal Treatment (ReHOT) clinical trial. Cross-sectional study including all 109 patients who had completed the ReHOT for at least 6 months. We excluded those participants who failed to respond to the new recruitment after three phone contact attempts. We evaluated the BP control by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM; controlled levels: 24-hour systolic and diastolic BP software IBM SPSS statistics 21.0. We tested the normality of the data distribution with kurtosis and skewness. The variables tested in the study are presented with descriptive statistics. Comparisons between treatment adherence and other variables were performed with Student's t test for independent variables and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact test. To conduct analyses among patients considering adherence to treatment and BP control, we created four groups: G0, G1, G2, and G3. We considered a 5% significance level in all tests. During the ReHOT, 80% of the patients had good BP control and treatment adherence. Of 96 patients reevaluated in the present study, only 52.1% had controlled hypertension when assessed by ABPM, while 31.3% were considered adherent by the MMAS. Regarding other ABPM measures, we observed an absence of a nocturnal dip in 64.6% of the patients and a white-coat effect and false BP control in 23% and 12.5%, respectively. Patients' education level showed a trend towards being a determinant factor associated with lack of adherence (p = 0.05). Resistant hypertension and number of medications were significantly associated with BP control assessed by ABPM (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001, respectively). Resistant hypertension was also significantly associated with group G0 (patients with no control or adherence, p = 0.012). There was a

  16. Clinical study on influences of enteric coated aspirin on blood pressure and blood pressure variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, A-L; Chen, W-W; Huang, W-J

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the effects of oral administration of enteric coated aspirin (ASA) on blood pressure and blood pressure variability of hypertension patients before sleep. We observed 150 hypertension cases, classified as Grade 1-2, from September 2006 to March 2008. They are divided into a control group with 30 cases, ASA I group with 60 cases and ASA II group with 60 cases randomly. Subjects in the control group had proper diets, were losing weight, exercising and maintaining a healthy mentality and were taking 30 mg Adalat orally once a day. Based on the treatment of control group, patients in ASA I group were administered 0.1 g Bayaspirin (produced by Bayer Company) at drought in the morning. Also, based on the treatment of control group, patients in ASA II group were administered 0.1 g Bayaspirin at draught before sleep. The course of treatment is 3 months and then after the treatment, decreasing blood pressure and blood pressure variability conditions in three groups will be compared. Through the comparison of ASA II group with the control group, they have differences in terms of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), decreasing range of blood pressure and blood pressure variability (p sleep has synergistic effects on decreasing blood pressure of hypertension patients and improving blood pressure variability.

  17. Effects of exercise and custom-made orthotics on blood pressure and heart rate variability: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, John

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study is to use randomized controlled research design to investigate the effect of an exercise program and custom-made flexible orthotics on heart rate variability and blood pressure at varying stages of exercise over a 5-month period. Thirteen ping-pong players were recruited and randomly assigned into control and experimental groups. Both groups had the same exercise program, and only the experimental group wore custom-made flexible orthotics. Exercise effects were compared before and after the training using heart rate variability and blood pressure. The study lasted 5 months with 1 data collection per month except in the fourth month. Ten male players (6 in the experimental group) completed the study. The average age of the participants was 44 +/- 16 years. The blood pressure in the experimental group significantly decreased after the 5-month study period and after each exercise session. The blood pressure did not change significantly after each exercise session in the control group. The heart rate was significantly increased immediately after exercise and remained at a higher level after the 20 minutes of rest at the end of each day's exercise session. The average resting heart rate decreased from 69.7 +/- 1.708 to 66.8 +/- 4.480 (P .05) in the control group. The total power reflecting the total autonomic activity was significantly decreased immediately after exercise and after the 20-minute rest period at the end of the exercise session in both the control and experimental groups. There were positive changes in cardiac and vascular autonomic regulations with exercise training when combined with foot orthotics.

  18. Role of the carotid body chemoreceptors in baroreflex control of blood pressure during hypoglycaemia in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Taylor, Jennifer L; Dube, Simmi; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Joyner, Michael J; Wehrwein, Erica A

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the carotid body chemoreceptors with hypoxia alters baroreceptor mediated responses. We aimed to examine whether this relationship can be translated to other chemoreceptor stimuli (i.e. hypoglycaemia) and hypothesized: 1) activation of the carotid body chemoreceptors with hypoglycaemia would reduce spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (sCBRS) in healthy humans and, 2) desensitization of the carotid chemoreceptors with hyperoxia would restore sCBRS to baseline levels during hypoglycaemia. Ten young healthy adults completed two 180-min hyperinsulinaemic (2 mU.kg FFM−1.min−1), hypoglycaemic (~3.2 µmol.mL−1) clamps, separated by at least one week and randomized to normoxia (PaO2 122±10 mmHg) or hyperoxia (PaO2 424±123 mmHg; to blunt activation of the carotid body glomus cells). Changes in heart rate, blood pressure, plasma catecholamines, heart rate variability (HRV), and sCBRS were assessed. During hypoglycaemia, HRV and sCBRS were reduced (pbaroreflex working range was shifted to higher heart rates. When hyperoxia was superimposed on hypoglycaemia, there was a greater reduction in blood pressure and a blunted rise in heart rate when compared to normoxic conditions (p0.05). In summary, hypoglycaemia-mediated changes in HRV and sCBRS cannot be exclusively attributed to the carotid chemoreceptors; however, the chemoreceptors appear to play a role in resetting the baroreflex working range during hypoglycaemia. PMID:24414173

  19. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  20. Managing High Blood Pressure Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing High Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Jan 10,2018 When your doctor ... checkup. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  1. Common High Blood Pressure Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Common High Blood Pressure Myths Updated:May 4,2018 Knowing the facts ... health. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  2. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More What is High Blood Pressure? Updated:Feb 27,2018 First, let’s define high ... resources . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  3. High Blood Pressure and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure and Women Updated:Jan 29,2018 Pregnancy and ... Women . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  4. Changes in Angiotensin Receptor Distribution and in Aortic Morphology Are Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Aged Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Guarner-Lans

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS in blood pressure regulation in MS during aging is unknown. It participates in metabolic syndrome (MS and aging regulating vascular tone and remodeling. RAS might participate in a compensatory mechanism decreasing blood pressure and allowing MS rats to reach 18 months of age and it might form part of therapeutical procedures to ameliorate MS. We studied histological changes and distribution of RAS receptors in aortas of MS aged rats. Electron microscopy images showed premature aging in MS since the increased fibrosis, enlarged endothelium, and invasion of this layer by muscle cells that was present in control 18-month-old aortas were also found in 6-month-old aortas from MS rats. AT1, AT2, and Mas receptors mediate the effects of Ang II and Ang 1-7, respectively. Fluorescence from AT2 decreased with age in control and MS aortas, while fluorescence of AT1 increased in aortas from MS rats at 6 months and diminished during aging. Mas expression increased in MS rats and remained unchanged in control rats. In conclusion, there is premature aging in the aortas from MS rats and the elevated expression of Mas receptor might contribute to decrease blood pressure during aging in MS.

  5. Awareness of hypertension and its impact on blood pressure control among elderly nigerians: report from the Ibadan study of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, Yemi Raheem; Abiona, Taiwo; Gureje, Oye

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent among the elderly. Its awareness has a direct influence on control through drug adherence. Earlier studies have shown that awareness of hypertension is low among sub-Saharan African populations but only a few studies have looked at the prevalence and awareness of hypertension among the elderly. The Ibadan Study of Ageing is a longitudinal cohort study of the mental and physical health status as well as the functioning of elderly persons residing in the Yoruba-speaking areas of Nigeria. Study was conducted in multiple waves from 2003/2004 to 2009. This report is based on the sample studied in 2007 (N = 1469). Respondents, aged ≥ 65 years, were assessed for the presence of hypertension, its awareness, receipt of and adherence to medication for the condition, and effectiveness of treatment on the control of blood pressure. Blood pressure was measured with the use of digital monitors (Omron MS - 2 Basic Model). Awareness of the diagnosis of hypertension was ascertained by self-reports. We explored social, economic, demographic and clinical correlates of the presence of hypertension, its awareness and control using multiple logistic regression analyses. The sample was composed of 809 (55.1%) females and 666 (44.9%) males. The mean age of the participants was 76.9 ± 8.4 years. Hypertension (defined as previous diagnosis by a health provider or a measured blood pressure higher than or equal to 140/90 mm Hg) was recorded in 973 (62.2%) participants, with females having a prevalence of 61.4% and males that of 70.1%. Other than female gender, residing in urban/semi urban areas and being overweight or obesity were associated with the occurrence of hypertension. Among those assessed to have hypertension, 78% were not previously aware of its presence. Factors independently associated with lack of awareness of hypertension included low socioeconomic class (OR 8.21, 95% CI 3.72-18.11, P 25kg/m 2 (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.36-7.09, P hypertension and

  6. Improving Blood Pressure Control in Over-the-Road Truck Drivers: Is Provision of Medication Therapy Management by Pharmacists Feasible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri D. Hager

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This pilot sought to determine feasibility of studying the impact on hypertension in over-the-road truck drivers who met with pharmacists for Medication Therapy Management (MTM compared to those who did not. Design/methodology/approach Drivers were randomly assigned to control or treatment (MTM group for 52 weeks. Drivers assigned to the MTM arm could receive services in person or via secure videoconferencing technology located in a private space at the trucking company. All subjects were provided education and received a blood pressure monitor and log for recording daily blood pressures. Findings Eleven drivers enrolled and seven drivers completed the study. The primary barriers to participation included unpredictable driver schedules and lack of access to MTM provider while on the road. Research limitations/implications This pilot study was limited by small sample size. Pharmacists were not available to meet with truckers "on demand." Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test alternate opportunities to increase enrollment of drivers in studies and access to MTM services while drivers are on the road. Practical implications Hypertension is the second highest health-related cost burden, and over-the-road truck drivers have unique challenges that can make it difficult to attain blood pressure control. Pharmacist-provided MTM has been shown to improve blood pressure control. Improving access to MTM, perhaps using a national network of pharmacists or technology from the road, may decrease morbidity and mortality in drivers. Originality/value This paper fulfills an identified need to study how to improve driver access to care to reduce cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality.   Type: Clinical Experience

  7. Relationship between brain atrophy estimated by a longitudinal computed tomography study and blood pressure control in patients with essential hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamano, Shigeru; Sawai, Fuyuki; Yamamoto, Yuta

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between blood pressure control and the progression of brain atrophy in the elderly, patients with essential hypertension and brain atrophy were longitudinally evaluated using computerized tomography (CT). The study evaluated 48 patients with essential hypertension aged 46-78 years, and 30 sex- and age-matched normotensive control subjects. The extent of brain atrophy as determined by caudate head index (CHI), the inverse cella media index (iCMI), and Evans' ratio (ER) was estimated twice at an interval of 5-9 years (mean, 6.9 years). The mean annual increases in CHI (ΔCHI), iCMI (ΔiCMI), and ER (ΔER) were evaluated. Mean blood volume in the common carotid artery (BF) and the decrease in BF per year (ΔBF) were also determined. The ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER increased with age in the hypertensive subjects as well as the control group across all age groups evaluated. The ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER were significantly greater in the patients with essential hypertension in their 50s as compared with the controls. In patients with essential hypertension aged 65 years or older, the ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER were significantly lower in the group in whom the blood pressure was controlled within the range of borderline hypertension than the groups in which it was controlled in the range of normal or mild hypertension. In the younger patients under the age of 65 with essential hypertension, blood pressure control did not affect the ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER. The ΔCHI, ΔiCMI, and ΔER were significantly correlated with ΔBF in both groups. These findings indicate that control of systolic blood pressure within the range of borderline hypertension may delay the progression of brain atrophy in elderly patients with essential hypertension. (author)

  8. When tight blood pressure control is not for everyone: a new model for performance measurement in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Michael A; Goldstein, Mary K

    2010-04-01

    Many patients with hypertension have legitimate reasons to forego standard blood pressure targets yet are nonetheless included in performance measurement systems. An approach to performance measurement incorporating clinical reasoning was developed to determine which patients to include in a performance measure. A 10-member multispecialty advisory panel refined a taxonomy of situations in which the balance of benefits and harms of anti-hypertensive treatment does not clearly favor tight blood pressure control (measurement for blood pressure control. These included (1) patients who have suffered adverse effects from multiple classes of antihypertensive medications; (2) patients already taking four or more antihypertensive medications; (3) patients with terminal disease, moderate to severe dementia, or other conditions that overwhelmingly dominate the patient's clinical status; and (4) other patient factors, including comfort care orientation and poor medication adherence despite attempts to remedy adherence difficulties. Several general principles also emerged. Performance measurement should focus on patients for whom the benefits of treatment clearly outweigh the harms and should incorporate a longitudinal approach. In addition, the criteria for exempting a patient from performance measurement should be more strict in patients at higher risk of adverse health outcomes from hypertension and more lenient for patients at lower risk. Incorporating "real world" clinical principles and judgment into performance measurement systems may improve targeting of care and, by accounting for patient case mix, allow for better comparison of performance between institutions.

  9. Physician-Directed Versus Computerized Closed-Loop Control of Blood Pressure Using Phenylephrine in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Nicole Ribeiro; Whitehead, William E; Kallu, Upendar R; Kinsky, Michael P; Funston, Joe S; Wassar, Taoufik; Khan, Muzna N; Milosch, Mindy; Jupiter, Daniel; Grigoriadis, Karolos; Kramer, George C

    2017-07-01

    Vasopressors provide a rapid and effective approach to correct hypotension in the perioperative setting. Our group developed a closed-loop control (CLC) system that titrates phenylephrine (PHP) based on the mean arterial pressure (MAP) during general anesthesia. As a means of evaluating system competence, we compared the performance of the automated CLC with physicians. We hypothesized that our CLC algorithm more effectively maintains blood pressure at a specified target with less blood pressure variability and reduces the dose of PHP required. In a crossover study design, 6 swine under general anesthesia were subjected to a normovolemic hypotensive challenge induced by sodium nitroprusside. The physicians (MD) manually changed the PHP infusion rate, and the CLC system performed this task autonomously, adjusted every 3 seconds to achieve a predetermined MAP. The CLC maintained MAP within 5 mm Hg of the target for (mean ± standard deviation) 93.5% ± 3.9% of the time versus 72.4% ± 26.8% for the MD treatment (P = .054). The mean (standard deviation) percentage of time that the CLC and MD interventions were above target range was 2.1% ± 3.3% and 25.8% ± 27.4% (P = .06), respectively. Control statistics, performance error, median performance error, and median absolute performance error were not different between CLC and MD interventions. PHP infusion rate adjustments by the physician were performed 12 to 80 times in individual studies over a 60-minute period. The total dose of PHP used was not different between the 2 interventions. The CLC system performed as well as an anesthesiologist totally focused on MAP control by infusing PHP. Computerized CLC infusion of PHP provided tight blood pressure control under conditions of experimental vasodilation.

  10. An online spaced-education game among clinicians improves their patients' time to blood pressure control: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, B Price; Turchin, Alexander; Breydo, Eugene; Gagnon, David; Conlin, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Many patients with high blood pressure (BP) do not have antihypertensive medications appropriately intensified at clinician visits. We investigated whether an online spaced-education (SE) game among primary care clinicians can decrease time to BP target among their hypertensive patients. A 2-arm randomized trial was conducted over 52 weeks among primary care clinicians at 8 hospitals. Educational content consisted of 32 validated multiple-choice questions with explanations on hypertension management. Providers were randomized into 2 groups: SE clinicians were enrolled in the game, whereas control clinicians received identical educational content in an online posting. SE game clinicians were e-mailed 1 question every 3 days. Adaptive game mechanics resent questions in 12 or 24 days if answered incorrectly or correctly, respectively. Clinicians retired questions by answering each correctly twice consecutively. Posting of relative performance among peers fostered competition. Primary outcome measure was time to BP target (game was completed by 87% of clinicians (48/55), whereas 84% of control clinicians (47/56) read the online posting. In multivariable analysis of 17 866 hypertensive periods among 14 336 patients, the hazard ratio for time to BP target in the SE game cohort was 1.043 (95% confidence interval, 1.007-1.081; P=0.018). The number of hypertensive episodes needed to treat to normalize one additional patient's BP was 67.8. The number of clinicians needed to teach to achieve this was 0.43. An online SE game among clinicians generated a modest but significant reduction in the time to BP target among their hypertensive patients. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00904007. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Home blood pressure monitoring with nurse-led telephone support among patients with hypertension and a history of stroke: a community-based randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Sally M; Markus, Hugh S; Khong, Teck K; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Tulloch, Jenny; Coster, Denise; Ibison, Judith; Oakeshott, Pippa

    2013-01-08

    Adequate control of blood pressure reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. We conducted a randomized controlled study to determine whether home blood pressure monitoring with nurse-led telephone support would reduce blood pressure in patients with hypertension and a history of stroke. We recruited 381 participants (mean age 72 years) from outpatient and inpatient stroke clinics between Mar. 1, 2007, and Aug. 31, 2009. Nearly half (45%, 170) of the participants had some disability due to stroke. Participants were visited at home for a baseline assessment and randomly allocated to home blood pressure monitoring (n = 187) or usual care (n = 194). Those in the intervention group were given a monitor, brief training and telephone support. Participants who had home blood pressure readings consistently over target (target < 130/80 mm Hg) were advised to consult their family physician. The main outcome measure was a fall in systolic blood pressure after 12 months, measured by an independent researcher unaware of group allocation. Despite more patients in the intervention group than in the control group having changes to antihypertensive treatment during the trial period (60.1% [98/163] v. 47.6% [78/164], p = 0.02), the fall in systolic blood pressure from baseline did not differ significantly between the groups (adjusted mean difference 0.3 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval -3.6 to 4.2 mm Hg). Subgroup analysis showed significant interaction with disability due to stroke (p = 0.03 at 6 months) and baseline blood pressure (p = 0.03 at 12 months). Overall, home monitoring did not improve blood pressure control in patients with hypertension and a history of stroke. It was associated with a fall in systolic pressure in patients who had uncontrolled blood pressure at baseline and those without disability due to stroke. ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT00514800.

  12. Availability and affordability of blood pressure-lowering medicines and the effect on blood pressure control in high-income, middle-income, and low-income countries: an analysis of the PURE study data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaei, Marjan W; Khatib, Rasha; McKee, Martin; Lear, Scott; Dagenais, Gilles; Igumbor, Ehimario U; AlHabib, Khalid F; Kaur, Manmeet; Kruger, Lanthe; Teo, Koon; Lanas, Fernando; Yusoff, Khalid; Oguz, Aytekin; Gupta, Rajeev; Yusufali, Afzalhussein M; Bahonar, Ahmad; Kutty, Raman; Rosengren, Annika; Mohan, Viswanathan; Avezum, Alvaro; Yusuf, Rita; Szuba, Andrzej; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Chow, Clara; Yusuf, Salim

    2017-09-01

    Hypertension is considered the most important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, but its control is poor worldwide. We aimed to assess the availability and affordability of blood pressure-lowering medicines, and the association with use of these medicines and blood pressure control in countries at varying levels of economic development. We analysed the availability, costs, and affordability of blood pressure-lowering medicines with data recorded from 626 communities in 20 countries participating in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study. Medicines were considered available if they were present in the local pharmacy when surveyed, and affordable if their combined cost was less than 20% of the households' capacity to pay. We related information about availability and affordability to use of these medicines and blood pressure control with multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression models, and compared results for high-income, upper-middle-income, lower-middle-income, and low-income countries. Data for India are presented separately because it has a large generic pharmaceutical industry and a higher availability of medicines than other countries at the same economic level. The availability of two or more classes of blood pressure-lowering drugs was lower in low-income and middle-income countries (except for India) than in high-income countries. The proportion of communities with four drug classes available was 94% in high-income countries (108 of 115 communities), 76% in India (68 of 90), 71% in upper-middle-income countries (90 of 126), 47% in lower-middle-income countries (107 of 227), and 13% in low-income countries (nine of 68). The proportion of households unable to afford two blood pressure-lowering medicines was 31% in low-income countries (1069 of 3479 households), 9% in middle-income countries (5602 of 65 471), and less than 1% in high-income countries (44 of 10 880). Participants with known hypertension in communities that had

  13. Health-related quality of life and blood pressure control in hypertensive patients with and without complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Lima de Gusmão

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The goal of antihypertensive treatment is to reduce blood pressure without interfering in health-related quality of life (HRQL OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the influence of hypertension control upon HRQL in hypertensive patients with and without complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-seven hypertensive outpatients (71% women, 58% white, 60% with elementary school level education, average age 54 ± 8 years were observed during a 12-month special care program (phase 1: clinical visits every two months, donation of all antihypertensive medications, meetings with a multidisciplinary team, and active telephone calls and three years of standard care (phase 2: clinical visits every four months, medication provided by the drugstore of the hospital with a two-hour wait and a possible lack of medication, no meetings with a multidisciplinary team or active telephone calls. The patient HRQL was assessed using Bulpitt and Fletcher's Specific Questionnaire, as well as the SF-36 scores. Hypertensive patients were divided into "with complications" (n=37, diastolic blood pressure great than 110 mm Hg for patients with or without treatment, with clinically evident target-organ or other associated illness and "without complications" (n=40. The variables studied were quality of life, blood pressure control, hypertension gravity, and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: In hypertensive patients with and without complications, both the systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly higher (p<0.05 in phase 2 of observation (143±18/ 84±11 and 144±21/93±11 mm Hg for patients with and without complications , respectively relative to phase 1 (128±17/ 75±13 and 128±15/ 83±11mmHg. The proportion of patients with controlled blood pressure (defined as a blood pressure less than 140/90 mm Hg decreased from 70% to 49% in the "with complications" group and from 78% to 50% in the "without complications" group during phase 2 of

  14. Social adversity experience and blood pressure control following antihypertensive medication use in a community sample of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Nicholas W J; Levy, Sheldon; Pico, Jose; Luben, Robert N; Surtees, Paul G; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2014-06-01

    Psychosocial stress is a risk factor for hypertension and has been shown to affect response to treatment for psychiatric illnesses. We investigate the relationship between a history of social adversity experience and blood pressure control following antihypertensive medication use. A total of 1,186 participants selected from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Norfolk study (531 men and 655 women, aged 42 to 80 years) had attended two health checks at which blood pressure measurements were taken; were taking antihypertensive medication at the second, but not the first health check; and had completed a questionnaire assessment of their social and psychological circumstances which included details of traumatic experiences in childhood and of adverse life events, long-term difficulties, and perceived stress in adulthood. Experience of recent loss events in adulthood was associated with a smaller reduction in systolic blood pressure after starting hypertension treatment (β = 1.78, 95 % confidence interval 0.15-3.40, per life event), independently of age, sex, preexisting health conditions, cigarette smoking history, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and obesity. Results from this study suggest that stress caused by recent losses may be associated with reduced effectiveness of treatment for hypertension. Subject to replication, these findings may help determine the specific physiological mechanisms by which medication treatment effectiveness is affected by stress.

  15. Effect of Intensive Blood Pressure Control on Cardiovascular Remodeling in Hypertensive Patients with Nephrosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otelio Randall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse pressure (PP, a marker of arterial system properties, has been linked to cardiovascular (CV complications. We examined (a association between unit changes of PP and (i composite CV outcomes and (ii development of left-ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and (b effect of mean arterial pressure (MAP control on rate of change in PP. We studied 1094 nondiabetics with nephrosclerosis in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension. Subjects were randomly assigned to usual MAP goal (102–107 mmHg or a lower MAP goal (≤92 mmHg and randomized to beta-blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, or calcium channel blocker. After covariate adjustment, a higher PP was associated with increased risk of CV outcome (RR = 1.28, CI = 1.11–1.47, P<0.01 and new LVH (RR = 1.26, CI = 1.04–1.54, P=0.02. PP increased at a greater rate in the usual than in lower MAP groups (slope ± SE: 1.08 ± 0.15 versus 0.42 ± 0.15 mmHg/year, P=0.002, but not by the antihypertensive treatment assignment. Observations indicate that control to a lower MAP slows the progression of PP, a correlate of cardiovascular remodeling and complications, and may be beneficial to CV health.

  16. High Blood Pressure - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section High ...

  17. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Aim for a Healthy Weight . Limiting Alcohol Intake Limit alcohol intake. Too much alcohol will raise your blood pressure ... physically active. Maintain a healthy weight. Limit alcohol intake. Other lifestyle changes can improve your overall health, ...

  18. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... physical activity Drinking too much alcohol Stress Family History A family history of high blood pressure raises the risk of ... Genetic causes of this condition are why family history is a risk factor for this condition. Screening ...

  19. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hypertension tends to worsen with age and you cannot ...

  20. Effect of Sitagliptin on Glycemic Control, Body Weight, Blood Pressure and Serum Lipid Profile in Type 2 Diabetic Hyperlipidemic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.; Atif, M. A.; Akhtar, L.; Ali, B.; Tunio, A. G.; Serwar, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dyslipidaemia is a global health issue in developed as well as in developing countries. People with type 2 Diabetes mellitus are more susceptible to develop dyslipidaemia and its related complications. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of sitagliptin a (DPP-4 inhibitor) oral antidiabetic drug on blood sugar, body weight, blood pressure and dyslipidaemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: This 12 weeks open label observational study was conducted at outdoor of diabetic clinic of Sheikh Zayed Medical College/Hospital, Rahim Yar Khan in which newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients (n=78) with poor glycaemic control(HbA1c >7.2 percent) were selected. The patient received sitagliptin 50 mg twice daily for 12 weeks. Results: After 12 weeks treatment with sitagliptin, there was a significant reduction in the value of HbA1c from 8.184 percent±0.467 at baseline to 7.0200 percent±0.459 at 12 weeks (p<0.05). Body weight also decreased significantly from 80.21kg±7.156 at baseline to 71.74 kg±6.567 at 12 weeks (p<0.05).Systolic blood pressure decreased (SBP) decreased significantly from 138.17±6.050 mmHg at baseline to 131.22±6.311 mmHg at 12 weeks (p<0.05). Significant changes were also seen in diastolic blood pressure which decreased from 83.14±6.714 mmHg at baseline to 75.28±6.481 mmHg at 12 weeks (p<0.05). Significant reduction in the serum level of total Cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were detected (TC: 222.09±13.538 to 209.41±13.475 mg/dl, p<0.05; TG: 170.99±6.940 to 143.45±8.279 mg/dl, p<0.05; LDL-C 120.00±5.804 to 109.06±6.278 mg/dl, p<0.05). High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increased significantly from 42.99±4.836 mg/dl at baseline to 49.97±3.490 mg/dl at 12 weeks. Conclusion: Sitagliptin not only improves blood glucose control but also body weight, blood pressure and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic hyperlipidaemia patients. (author)

  1. Psoriasis and high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihbegovic, Eldina Malkic; Hadzigrahic, Nermina; Suljagic, Edin; Kurtalic, Nermina; Sadic, Sena; Zejcirovic, Alema; Mujacic, Almina

    2015-02-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin ailment which can be connected with an increased occurrence of other illnesses, including high blood pressure. A prospective study has been conducted which included 70 patients affected by psoriasis, both genders, older than 18 years. Average age being 47,14 (SD= ±15,41) years, from that there were 36 men or 51,43 and 34 women or 48,57%. Average duration of psoriasis was 15,52 (SD=±12,54) years. Frequency of high blood pressure in those affected by psoriasis was 54,28%. Average age of the patients with psoriasis and high blood pressure was 53,79 year (SD=±14,15) and average duration of psoriasis was 17,19 years (SD=±13,51). Average values of PASI score were 16,65. Increase in values of PASI score and high blood pressure were statistically highly related (r=0,36, p=0,0001). Psoriasis was related to high blood pressure and there was a correlation between the severity of psoriasis and high blood pressure.

  2. Prescription patterns and adequacy of blood pressure control among adult hypertensive patients in Kenya; findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbui, Jennifer M; Oluka, Margaret N; Guantai, Eric M; Sinei, Kipruto A; Achieng, Loice; Baker, Amanj; Jande, Mary; Massele, Amos; Godman, Brian

    2017-11-01

    Hypertension is a major cause of global morbidity and mortality, with high prevalence rates in Africa including Kenya. Consequently, it is imperative to understand current treatment approaches and their effectiveness in practice. Currently, there is paucity of such data in Kenya, which is a concern. The aim is to describe prescribing patterns and adequacy of blood pressure (BP) control in adult hypertensive patients to guide future practice. Retrospective study of patients attending a sub-county outpatient clinic combined with qualitative interviews. 247 hypertensive patients, predominantly female, mean age 55.8 years on antihypertensive therapy for 1-5 years, were analyzed. ACEIs and thiazide diuretics were the most commonly prescribed drugs, mainly as combination therapy. Treatment typically complied with guidelines, mainly for stage 2 hypertension (75%). BP control was observed in 46% of patients, with a significant reduction in mean systolic (155 to 144 mmHg) and diastolic (91 to 83 mmHg) BP (P < 0.001). Patients on ≥2 antihypertensive drugs were more likely to have uncontrolled BP (OR:1.9, p = 0.021). Encouragingly good adherence to guidelines was helped by training. Poor blood pressure control in the majority needs to be addressed. Additional training of prescribers and follow-up of measures to improve BP control will be introduced and followed up.

  3. A combination of isolated phytochemicals and botanical extracts lowers diastolic blood pressure in a randomized controlled trial of hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesinger, S; Michaels, H A; Quadros, A S; Qian, Y; Rabovsky, A B; Badger, R S; Jalili, T

    2016-01-01

    Isolated phytochemicals have been shown to reduce blood pressure; however, combinations of phytochemicals have rarely been tested in humans. We hypothesized that a combination of extracts from grape seed and skin (330 mg), green tea (100 mg), resveratrol (60 mg) and a blend of quercetin, ginkgo biloba and bilberry (60 mg) would reduce blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive subjects. Eighteen individuals meeting BP requirements (⩾130 mm Hg systolic or ⩾85 mm Hg diastolic) and criteria for metabolic syndrome were enrolled in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01106170). The 28-day placebo and supplement arms were separated by a 2-week washout period, and 14 -h daytime ambulatory BP was assessed at baseline and at the end point of each arm. BP was not altered after placebo. After supplement treatment, diastolic pressure was reduced by 4.4 mm Hg (P=0.024, 95% CI, 0.6-8.1), systolic pressure was unchanged and mean arterial pressure trended (P=0.052) toward reduction. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme activity was similar between placebo and supplement arms, but urinary nitrate and nitrite concentrations were significantly increased (P=0.022) after supplementation. Human aortic endothelial cells treated with metabolites of the polyphenols used in the human supplement trial had a significant increase (P=0.005) in insulin-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation and greater (P<0.001) accumulation of nitrates/nitrites. Our clinical and in vitro data support the theory that this combination of polyphenols reduced diastolic pressure by potentiating eNOS activation and nitric oxide production. Such supplements may have clinical relevance as stand-alone or adjunct therapy to help reduce BP.

  4. Anxiety: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause of high blood pressure? Can anxiety cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Anxiety doesn't cause long-term high blood pressure (hypertension). But episodes of anxiety can cause dramatic, ...

  5. African Americans and High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Lifestyle + Risk Reduction High Blood Pressure What About African Americans and High Blood Pressure? African Americans in the U.S. have a higher prevalence of high blood pressure (HBP) ...

  6. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Click here for the Color Version (PDF 533KB) High blood pressure is a serious illness. High blood pressure is ...

  7. Alcohol: Does It Affect Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol: Does it affect blood pressure? Does drinking alcohol affect your blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure to unhealthy levels. Having ...

  8. Polynomial analysis of ambulatory blood pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinderman, A. H.; Cleophas, T. A.; Cleophas, T. J.; van der Wall, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    In normotensive subjects blood pressures follow a circadian rhythm. A circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients is less well established, and may be clinically important, particularly with rigorous treatments of daytime blood pressures. Polynomial analysis of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

  9. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paige E; Van Elswyk, Mary; Alexander, Dominik D

    2014-07-01

    Although a large body of literature has been devoted to examining the relationship between eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA+DHA) and blood pressure, past systematic reviews have been hampered by narrow inclusion criteria and a limited scope of analytical subgroups. In addition, no meta-analysis to date has captured the substantial volume of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the past 2 years. The objective of this meta-analysis was to examine the effect of EPA+DHA, without upper dose limits and including food sources, on blood pressure in RCTs. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to generate weighted group mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between the EPA+DHA group and the placebo group. Analyses were conducted for subgroups defined by key subject or study characteristics. Seventy RCTs were included. Compared with placebo, EPA+DHA provision reduced systolic blood pressure (-1.52 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -2.25 to -0.79) and diastolic blood pressure (-0.99 mm Hg; 95% CI = -1.54 to -0.44) in the meta-analyses of all studies combined. The strongest effects of EPA+DHA were observed among untreated hypertensive subjects (systolic blood pressure = -4.51 mm Hg, 95% CI = -6.12 to -2.83; diastolic blood pressure = -3.05 mm Hg, 95% CI = -4.35 to - 1.74), although blood pressure also was lowered among normotensive subjects (systolic blood pressure = -1.25 mm Hg, 95% CI = -2.05 to -0.46; diastolic blood pressure = -0.62 mm Hg, 95% CI = -1.22 to -0.02). Overall, available evidence from RCTs indicates that provision of EPA+DHA reduces systolic blood pressure, while provision of ≥2 grams reduces diastolic blood pressure. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Journal of Hypertension.

  10. The effect of viscous soluble fiber on blood pressure: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, K; Jovanovski, E; Ho, H V T; Marques, A C R; Zurbau, A; Mejia, S B; Sievenpiper, J L; Vuksan, V

    2018-01-01

    Dietary fiber intake, especially viscous soluble fiber, has been established as a means to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors. Whether this is true for blood pressure remains controversial. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to investigate the effects of viscous soluble fiber supplementation on blood pressure and quantify the effect of individual fibers. MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. We included RCTs of ≥4-weeks in duration assessing viscous fiber supplementation from five types: β-glucan from oats and barley, guar gum, konjac, pectin and psyllium, on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Study data were pooled using the generic inverse variance method with random effects models and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Twenty-two (N = 1430) and twenty-one RCTs (N = 1343) were included in the final analysis for SBP and DBP, respectively. Viscous fiber reduced SBP (MD = -1.59 mmHg [95% CI: -2.72,-0.46]) and DBP (MD = -0.39 mmHg [95% CI: -0.76,-0.01]) at a median dose of 8.7 g/day (1.45-30 g/day) over a median follow-up of 7-weeks. Substantial heterogeneity in SBP (I 2  = 72%, P fiber types, SBP reductions were observed only for supplementation using psyllium fiber (MD = -2.39 mmHg [95% CI: -4.62,-0.17]). Viscous soluble fiber has an overall lowering effect on SBP and DBP. Inclusion of viscous fiber to habitual diets may have additional value in reducing CVD risk via improvement in blood pressure. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier-NCT02670967. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of vitamin C supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials123

    OpenAIRE

    Juraschek, Stephen P; Guallar, Eliseo; Appel, Lawrence J; Miller, Edgar R

    2012-01-01

    Background: In observational studies, increased vitamin C intake, vitamin C supplementation, and higher blood concentrations of vitamin C are associated with lower blood pressure (BP). However, evidence for blood pressure–lowering effects of vitamin C in clinical trials is inconsistent.

  12. CPAP therapy for patients with sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes mellitus improves control of blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jamie Chung Mei; Lai, Agnes Yuen Kwan; Tam, Terence Chi Chun; Yuen, Michele Mae Ann; Lam, Karen Siu Ling; Ip, Mary Sau Man

    2017-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and treatment of OSA may have a positive impact on cardiometabolic profile. This study investigates the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on glycemic control and cardiometabolic parameters in patients with diabetes. Diabetic patients, who were newly diagnosed of OSA with an apnea hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15 and HbA1c ≥7%, were randomly assigned to either CPAP treatment or no treatment (control) for 3 months. Measurements included HbA1c, blood pressure, fasting glucose and lipids, urinary albumin, and peripheral arterial tonometry (to assess endothelial function). Sixty-four patients (52 men) were randomized, with mean (±SD) age of 55.0 ± 9.6 years, body mass index of 29.9 ± 5.3 kg/m 2 , HbA1c of 8.1 ± 1.1%, and AHI of 45.3 ± 23.2 events/h. In the intention-to-treat analysis, no significant change in HbA1c but reduction of systolic (10 mmHg (-18 to -2), p blood pressures were found in the CPAP group compared to the control group. Excluding those with medication changes or initiated dietary program during the study period and those who dropped out, CPAP treatment decreased HbA1c (intervention group, n = 27; control group, n = 26) by 0.4% (-0.7 to -0.1), p = 0.027. In patients with type 2 DM and moderate to severe OSA, 3 months of CPAP therapy did not decrease HbA1c but lowered systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In view of a potentially limited effect size of CPAP treatment on glycemic control, sample size estimation for future randomized controlled studies must make adequate allowance for influence from external factors of medications/diet and CPAP use.

  13. A Nutritional Strategy for the Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podell, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Some physicians wonder if high blood pressure can be controlled without the use of drugs and their potential side effects. Current findings concerning nutrition and high blood pressure are presented. (RM)

  14. Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Home Blood Pressure: Make Control Your Goal Infographic Recommend on Facebook ... Compartir Copy the code below to use the Blood Pressure Infographic on your web page or social media ...

  15. Effects of supervised exercise on lipid profiles and blood pressure control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashino, Yasuaki; Jackson, Jeffrey L; Fukumori, Norio; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2012-12-01

    Our study's purpose was to perform a systematic review to assess the effect of supervised exercise interventions on lipid profiles and blood pressure control. We searched electronic databases and selected studies that evaluated the effect of supervised exercise intervention on cardiovascular risk factors in adult people with type 2 diabetes. We used random effect models to derive weighted mean differences of exercise on lipid profiles and blood pressure control. Forty-two RCTs (2808 subjects) met inclusion criteria and are included in our meta-analysis. Structured exercise was associated with a change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of -2.42 mmHg (95% CI, -4.39 to -0.45 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of -2.23 mmHg (95% CI, -3.21 to -1.25 mmHg), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) of 0.04 mmol/L (95% CI, 0.02-0.07 mmol/L), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) of -0.16 mmol/L (95% CI, -0.30 to -0.01 mmol/L). Heterogeneity was partially explained by age, dietary co-intervention and the duration and intensity of the exercise. Supervised exercise is effective in improving blood pressure control, lowering LDL-C, and elevating HDL-C levels in people with diabetes. Physicians should recommend exercise for their adult patients with diabetes who can safely do so. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ethnic differences in blood pressure control among men at Veterans Affairs clinics and other health care sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Shakaib U; Hutchison, Florence N; Hendrix, Katharine; Okonofua, Eni C; Egan, Brent M

    2005-05-09

    Differential access to health care may contribute to lower blood pressure (BP) control rates to under 140/90 mm Hg in African American compared with white hypertensive patients, especially men (26.5% vs 36.5% of all hypertensive patients in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2000). The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, which provides access to health care and medications across ethnic and economic boundaries, may reduce disparities in BP control. To test this hypothesis, BP treatment and control groups were compared between African American (VA, n = 4379; non-VA, n = 2754) and white (VA, n = 7987; non-VA, n = 4980) hypertensive men. In both groups, whites were older than African Americans (Pcardiovascular risk.

  17. [Improved Blood Pressure Control to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Mortality: The Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pragna; Ordunez, Pedro; DiPette, Donald; Escobar, María Cristina; Hassell, Trevor; Wyss, Fernando; Hennis, Anselm; Asma, Samira; Angell, Sonia

    2017-06-08

    Hypertension is the leading remediable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is responsible for more than 10 million preventable deaths globally each year. While hypertension can be successfully diagnosed and treated, only one in seven persons with hypertension have controlled blood pressure. To meet the challenge of improving the control of hypertension, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the authors developed the Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project, which involves a health systems-strengthening approach that advocates for standardized hypertension management using evidence-based interventions. These interventions include the use of standardized treatment protocols, a core set of medications along with improved procurement mechanisms to increase the availability and affordability of these medications, registries for cohort monitoring and evaluation, patient empowerment, team-based care (task shifting), and community engagement. With political will and strong partnerships, this approach provides the groundwork to reduce high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality.

  18. Improved Blood Pressure Control to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Mortality: The Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pragna; Ordunez, Pedro; DiPette, Donald; Escobar, Maria Cristina; Hassell, Trevor; Wyss, Fernando; Hennis, Anselm; Asma, Samira; Angell, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    Hypertension is the leading remediable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is responsible for more than 10 million preventable deaths globally each year. While hypertension can be successfully diagnosed and treated, only one in seven persons with hypertension have controlled blood pressure. To meet the challenge of improving the control of hypertension, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the authors developed the Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project, which involves a health systems-strengthening approach that advocates for standardized hypertension management using evidence-based interventions. These interventions include the use of standardized treatment protocols, a core set of medications along with improved procurement mechanisms to increase the availability and affordability of these medications, registries for cohort monitoring and evaluation, patient empowerment, team-based care (task shifting), and community engagement. With political will and strong partnerships, this approach provides the groundwork to reduce high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Urinary and dietary sodium and potassium associated with blood pressure control in treated hypertensive kidney transplant recipients: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saint-Remy Annie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In kidney transplant (Kt recipients , hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP control is therefore mandatory. Office BP (OBP remains frequently used for clinical decisions, however home BP (HBP have brought a significant improvement in the BP control. Sodium is a modifiable risk factor, many studies accounted for a decrease of BP with a sodium restricted diet. Increased potassium intake has been also recommended in hypertension management. Using an agreement between office and home BP, the present study investigated the relations between the BP control in Kt recipients and their urinary excretion and dietary consumption of sodium and potassium. Methods The BP control defined by OBP 30. Results Using an agreement between OBP and HBP, we identified controlled (21% and uncontrolled recipients (49%. Major confounding effects susceptible to interfere with the BP regulation did not differ between groups, the amounts of sodium excretion were similar (154 ± 93 vs 162 ± 88 mmol/24 h but uncontrolled patients excreted less potassium (68 ± 14 vs 54 ± 20 mmol/24 h; P = 0.029 and had significantly lower potassium intakes (3279 ± 753 vs 2208 ± 720 mg/24 h; P = 0.009, associated with a higher urinary Na+/K + ratio. Systolic HBP was inversely and significantly correlated to urinary potassium (r = −0.48; P = 0.002, a positive but non significant relation was observed with urinary sodium (r = 0,30;P = 0.074. Conclusions Half of the treated hypertensive Kt recipients remained uncontrolled in office and at home. Restoring a well-balanced sodium/potassium ratio intakes could be a non pharmacological opportunity to improve blood pressure control.

  20. The Effect of Concurrent Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise on Stress, Anxiety, Depressive Symptoms, and Blood Pressure in Renal Transplant Female Patients: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Shakoor

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and high blood pressure are known to be important issues among renal transplant patients. Objective: The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of selected exercises on blood pressure, stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and blood pressure among renal transplant patients. Method: Thirty two women patients (aged, 20-50 years with 2 to 3 years post renal transplantation history were voluntarily and objectively recruited. Participants were randomly divided into two groups, exercise (n=16 and control (n=16. The exercise group performed 10 weeks of exercise 3 days per week, and for 60-90 minutes per session. The control group involved no exercise. The DASS21 questionnaire was used to collect psychological data, and blood pressure was measured before and after 10 weeks of exercise. Data analysis was conducted using dependent and independent t-tests. Results: Concurrent exercise significantly reduced anxiety, stress, depressive symptoms, and systolic blood pressure in the exercise group only (p=0.000. Conclusion: Ten weeks of low-intensity exercise can be an effective measure to improve the stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and blood pressure in renal transplant patients. Our results suggest that a regular pattern of selected exercises can be effective on stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and blood pressure and may be beneficial for renal transplant patients. Keywords: Selected exercise, Stress, Anxiety, Depressive symptoms, Renal transplant

  1. Interarm difference in blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the interarm difference in blood pressure and its use as an indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were included from consecutive patients referred from their general practitioner to our vascular laboratory for possible PAD aged 50 years or older...... without known cardiac disease, renal disease, or diabetes mellitus. 824 patients (453 women) with mean age of 72 years (range: 50-101) were included. 491 patients had a diagnosis of hypertension and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) was present in 386 patients. Systolic blood pressure was 143 ± 24 mm......Hg and 142 ± 24 mmHg on the right and left arm, respectively (P = 0.015). The interarm difference was greater in patients with hypertension (P = 0.002) and PAD (P blood pressure was reproducible...

  2. BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL BY DRUG GROUP IN THE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AND LIPID-LOWERING TREATMENT TO PREVENT HEART ATTACK TRIAL (ALLHAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushma, William C.; Ford, Charles E.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Wright, Jackson T.; Preston, Richard A.; Davis, Barry R.; Basile, Jan N.; Whelton, Paul K.; Weiss, Robert J.; Bastien, Arnaud; Courtney, Donald L.; Hamilton, Bruce P.; Kirchner, Kent; Louis, Gail T.; Retta, Tamrat M.; Vidt, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control rates and number of antihypertensive medications were compared (average follow-up 4.9 years) by randomized groups: chlorthalidone, 12.5-25 mg/d (n=15,255), amlodipine 2.5-10 mg/d (n=9,048), or lisinopril 10-40 mg/d (n=9,054) in a randomized double-blind hypertension trial. Participants were hypertensives age t55 with additional cardiovascular risk factor(s), recruited from 623 centers. Additional agents from other classes were added as needed to achieve BP control. BP was reduced from 145/83 mmHg (27% control) to 134/76 mmHg (chlorthalidone, 68% control), 135/75 mmHg (amlodipine, 66% control), and 136/76 mmHg (lisinopril, 61% control) by 5 years; the mean number of drugs prescribed was 1.9, 2.0, and 2.1, respectively. Only 28% (chlorthalidone), 24% (amlodipine), and 24% (lisinopril) were controlled on monotherapy. A majority achieved BP control in each randomized group--a greater proportion with chlorthalidone. Over time, providers and patients should expect multidrug therapy to achieve BP<140/90 mmHg in a majority of patients. PMID:19090876

  3. Review and Response to the Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report presents the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) review of and response to the final report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The response includes a statement of NHLBI's involvement in health research, and descriptions of what steps can be taken to solve the…

  4. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring - comparison with office ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Available data on the use of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure recordings in private practice are limited. For this purpose we studied 39 consecutive hypertensive patients on treatment in a private practice. Method. Office blood pressure, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, daytime ambulatory blood pressure ...

  5. ROLE OF RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM AND OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INFLAMMATION TO THE BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL IN YOUNG SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiko Sato

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS, oxidative stress and inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension and salt sensitivity of hypertension. The present study was designed to evaluate the role of RAS, oxidative stress and inflammation to the regulation of blood pressure in young subjects. 111 young students (19.2±0.8 years old who have taken health checkup were randomly selected for the study. Urinary excretions of angiotensinogen (AGT, oxidative stress (TBARS, and inflammatory markers (MCP-1 were analyzed. Urinary excretions of these parameters were estimated by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion, age, height and body weight. Subjects were divided to two groups based on the blood pressure: below 140/90 mmHg (Normal and over 140/90 mmHg (High. Blood pressure was significantly increased with increased BMI. Urinary AGT, TBARS, and MCP-1 of high blood pressure group were significantly (p<0.05 increased compared to those of normal blood pressure. Urinary AGT has significant positive correlation with urinary TBARS, though it did not have a significant correlation with MCP-1. Estimated 24-h urinary Na excretion was significantly increased with increased urinary MCP-1, and TBARS. These results indicate that increase in blood pressure is accompanied with RAS, oxidative stress, and inflammation in young subjects, which is associated with salt intake.

  6. High blood pressure and eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  7. Vasculitis after blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Ribes, Olga; Machancoses, Francisco H; Rosel Remírez, Jesús F

    2016-01-01

    Description of appearance of ecchymosis on an arm, simultaneously with a classical Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis, the proposal of alternative utilities of measuring blood pressure, and the study of side effects to that measure. Case 80-year-old male came to ER with dyspnea, heart failure, predialysis renal failure with hyperkalemia and hemodynamic instability. During his stay he developed a skin lesion that looks like palpable purpura, from the lower limit of the blood pressure cuff to the distal area of the hand that not disappeared with vitropression, and pruritus. During admission the arm injury was extended to all members, both upper and lower. The study concluded with diagnosis of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis given the presence of eosinophils, that which suggested probable drug etiology to an antibiotic that had been taken since seven days prior to admission to ER. The need for serial monitoring of blood pressure, and the duration of such monitoring in unstable patients considering the side effects of those techniques was questioned. In addition, the study of other utilities of measuring blood pressure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  8. Vital Signs - High Blood Pressure

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-02

    In the U.S., nearly one third of the adult population have high blood pressure, the leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke - two of the nation's leading causes of death.  Created: 10/2/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  9. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  10. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z High Blood Pressure Hypertension Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... Pressure Targets are Different for Very Old Adults High blood pressure (also called hypertension) increases your chance of having ...

  11. Pulse pressure and diurnal blood pressure variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Tang; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In nondiabetic subjects pulse pressure (PP) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. Reduced circadian blood pressure (BP) variation is a potential risk factor for the development of diabetic complications. We investigated the association between...... retinopathy, nephropathy, macrovascular disease, PP, and diurnal BP variation in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In 80 type 2 diabetic patients we performed 24-h ambulatory BP (AMBP) and fundus photographs. Urinary albumin excretion was evaluated by urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Presence...... and 3-6 had higher PP and blunted diurnal BP variation: night PP 55 +/- 10 mm Hg, 64 +/- 10 mm Hg, 61 +/- 15 mm Hg, P groups (45 normo-, 19 micro-, and 15...

  12. Targets and self-management for the control of blood pressure in stroke and at risk groups (TASMIN-SR): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Claire; Bray, Emma P; Bryan, Stirling; Greenfield, Sheila M; Haque, M Sayeed; Hobbs, F D Richard; Jones, Miren I; Jowett, Sue; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Little, Paul; Mant, Jonathan; Penaloza, Cristina; Schwartz, Claire; Shackleford, Helen; Varghese, Jinu; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J

    2013-03-23

    Self-monitoring of hypertension with self-titration of antihypertensives (self-management) results in lower systolic blood pressure for at least one year. However, few people in high risk groups have been evaluated to date and previous work suggests a smaller effect size in these groups. This trial therefore aims to assess the added value of self-management in high risk groups over and above usual care. The targets and self-management for the control of blood pressure in stroke and at risk groups (TASMIN-SR) trial will be a pragmatic primary care based, unblinded, randomised controlled trial of self-management of blood pressure (BP) compared to usual care. Eligible patients will have a history of stroke, coronary heart disease, diabetes or chronic kidney disease and will be recruited from primary care. Participants will be individually randomised to either usual care or self-management. The primary outcome of the trial will be difference in office SBP between intervention and control groups at 12 months adjusted for baseline SBP and covariates. 540 patients will be sufficient to detect a difference in SBP between self-management and usual care of 5 mmHg with 90% power. Secondary outcomes will include self-efficacy, lifestyle behaviours, health-related quality of life and adverse events. An economic analysis will consider both within trial costs and a model extrapolating the results thereafter. A qualitative analysis will gain insights into patients' views, experiences and decision making processes. The results of the trial will be directly applicable to primary care in the UK. If successful, self-management of blood pressure in people with stroke and other high risk conditions would be applicable to many hundreds of thousands of individuals in the UK and beyond. ISRCTN87171227.

  13. Effect of cocoa on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, Karin; Fakler, Peter; Stocks, Nigel P

    2017-04-25

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, contributing to about 50% of cardiovascular events worldwide and 37% of cardiovascular-related deaths in Western populations. Epidemiological studies suggest that cocoa-rich products reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Flavanols found in cocoa have been shown to increase the formation of endothelial nitric oxide which promotes vasodilation and therefore blood pressure reduction. Here we update previous meta-analyses on the effect of cocoa on blood pressure. To assess the effects on blood pressure of chocolate or cocoa products versus low-flavanol products or placebo in adults with or without hypertension when consumed for two weeks or longer. This is an updated version of the review initially published in 2012. In this updated version, we searched the following electronic databases from inception to November 2016: Cochrane Hypertension Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase. We also searched international trial registries, and the reference lists of review articles and included trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of chocolate or cocoa products on systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adults for a minimum of two weeks duration. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risks of bias in each trial. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses on the included studies using Review Manager 5. We explored heterogeneity with subgroup analyses by baseline blood pressure, flavanol content of control group, blinding, age and duration. Sensitivity analyses explored the influence of unusual study design. Thirty-five trials (including 40 treatment comparisons) met the inclusion criteria. Of these, we added 17 trials (20 treatment comparisons) to the 18 trials (20 treatment comparisons) in the previous version of this updated review.Trials provided participants with 30 to 1218 mg of flavanols (mean = 670 mg) in 1.4 to 105

  14. Effect of aging on carotid baroreflex control of blood pressure and leg vascular conductance in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Holwerda, Seth W.; Boyle, Leryn J.; Vianna, Lauro C.; Jensen, Areum K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work suggests that β-adrenergic vasodilation offsets α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in young women, but this effect is lost after menopause. Given these age-related vascular changes, we tested the hypothesis that older women would exhibit a greater change in vascular conductance following baroreflex perturbation compared with young women. In 10 young (21 ± 1 yr) and 10 older (62 ± 2 yr) women, mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO; Modelflow), total vascular conductance (TVC), and leg vascular conductance (LVC, duplex-Doppler ultrasound) were continuously measured in response to 5-s pulses of neck suction (NS; −60 Torr) and neck pressure (NP; +40 Torr) to simulate carotid hypertension and hypotension, respectively. Following NS, decreases in MAP were similar between groups; however, MAP peak response latency was slower in older women (P baroreflex, whereas young women rely more on cardiac responsiveness. Furthermore, older women demonstrate a blunted ability to increase MAP to hypotensive stimuli. PMID:24682393

  15. A piezoelectric micro control valve with integrated capacitive sensing for ambulant blood pressure waveform monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Maarten; Wu, Kai; Brookhuis, Robert Anton; van Houwelingen, Marc J.; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Lötters, Joost Conrad; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and characterized a MEMS microvalve with built-in capacitive displacement sensing and fitted it with a miniature piezoelectric actuator to achieve active valve control. The integrated displacement sensor enables high bandwidth proportional control of the gas flow through the valve.

  16. Effect of device-guided breathing exercises on blood pressure in patients with hypertension: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altena, Mariette R; Kleefstra, Nanne; Logtenberg, Susan J; Groenier, Klaas H; Houweling, Sebastiaan T; Bilo, Henk J

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a chronic disorder with a high prevalence worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, it is sometimes hard to reach treatment goals for blood pressure (BP) with classical treatment options. Reducing breathing frequency has been advocated as a method to reduce BP. A randomized, single-blind, controlled trial was conducted in 30 non-diabetic patients with hypertension over a period of 9 weeks to evaluate the effect of a device that helps to slow breathing (Resperate) on BP and quality of life (QoL). The control group listened to music and used no other therapeutic device. There was no significant difference in change in BP between intervention and control; BP -4.2 mmHg (95% CI -12.4 to 3.9)/-2.6 mmHg (95% CI -8.4 to 3.3). This result did not alter in post hoc analyses, when patients not achieving target breathing frequency (<10 breaths/min) or non-compliant patients were excluded. QoL did not change over time. We found no effect of the Resperate on BP or QoL compared with the control group. We conclude that, at this moment, this device has no added value in the treatment of hypertension.

  17. Vagal Blocking Improves Glycemic Control and Elevated Blood Pressure in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shikora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. An active device that downregulates abdominal vagal signalling has resulted in significant weight loss in feasibility studies. Objective. To prospectively evaluate the effect of intermittent vagal blocking (VBLOC on weight loss, glycemic control, and blood pressure (BP in obese subjects with DM2. Methods. Twenty-eight subjects were implanted with a VBLOC device (Maestro Rechargeable System at 5 centers in an open-label study. Effects on weight loss, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and BP were evaluated at 1 week to 12 months. Results. 26 subjects (17 females/9 males, 51±2 years, BMI 37±1 kg/m2, mean ± SEM completed 12 months followup. One serious adverse event (pain at implant site was easily resolved. At 1 week and 12 months, mean excess weight loss percentages (% EWL were 9±1% and 25±4% (P<0.0001, and HbA1c declined by 0.3±0.1% and 1.0±0.2% (P=0.02, baseline 7.8±0.2%. In DM2 subjects with elevated BP (n=15, mean arterial pressure reduced by 7±3 mmHg and 8±3 mmHg (P=0.04, baseline 100 ± 2 mmHg at 1 week and 12 months. All subjects MAP decreased by 3 ± 2 mmHg (baseline 95 ± 2 mmHg at 12 months. Conclusions. VBLOC was safe in obese DM2 subjects and associated with meaningful weight loss, early and sustained improvements in HbA1c, and reductions in BP in hypertensive DM2 subjects. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00555958.

  18. Teaming Up Against High Blood Pressure

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-09-04

    This podcast is based on the September 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. A team-based approach by patients, health care systems, and health care providers is one of the best ways to treat uncontrolled high blood pressure.  Created: 9/4/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/4/2012.

  19. [Inflammation in high blood pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastelín Hernández, Gustavo; Rosas Peralta, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory status is involved in the pathophysiology of several cardiovascular disorders and in the genesis of high blood pressure. In this disease inflammation results from the activity of several hematological cells as well as the presence of chemotactic factors, immunological reactivity and hyperactivity of vasoconstrictor systems as that of the renin-angiotensin. Clinical evaluation of hypertension recommends secreening of several proinflammatory substances in hypertensive patients in order to evaluate their level of cardiovascular risk. Interleukin-6 and C reactive protein have been considered the most usual risk biomarkers. Interleukin 6 is a potent proinflammatory compound which participates in the acute fase of the tissular reaction to lesions associated to immunological, ischemic or oxidative stress. C reactive protein participates during inflammation activating the first component of complement with disorganization of the phospholipidic array of the endothelial sarcolemmal membrane and the consequent endothelial dysfunction related to the genesis of high blood pressure.

  20. [Control of blood pressure mean and its correlation with renal function in patients with severe preeclampsia treated with three oral antihypertensive agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Rodríguez, Juan Gustavo

    2009-05-01

    In severe preeclampsia, the lack of blood pressure average is a factor for adverse renal function. To describe the control of blood pressure mean and its correlation with the endogenous creatinine clearance in severe preeclampsia treated with three oral antihypertensive agents cross-sectional study on 123 pregnant women with severe preeclampsia, treated with 500 mg every 8 h methyldopa, hydralazine 50 mg every 6 h, or 100 mg of metoprolol every 12 hours from admission to the unit intensive care to the care delivery. At time of delivery were compared blood pressure average, endogenous creatinine clearance and the correlation between two of the 123 patients were divided into two groups with matching blood pressure treatment goal of 95 mmHg (98 cases, 79.67%). Was used to measures of central tendency and dispersion, T-test and Pearson correlation coefficient (r). Blood pressure mean (mmHg) initial vs final of all patients was similar (114.64 +/- 4.54 vs 103.88 +/- 10.65, p = 1.46) but not the medial blood group A vs B (89.16 +/- 4.54 vs 107.63 +/- 8.22, p = 0.05). Endogenous creatinine clearance (mL/min/1.73 m2 SC) of the total was similar (101.88 +/- 28.48 vs 98.73 +/- 29.96, p = 0.40) in group A increased by 2.5 (p = 0.71) and decreased in group B 5.69 (p = 0.0056). R of the total income to the intensive care unit was 0.11 and the birth of 0.06, 0.0033 in groupA and -0.44 and 0.13 in group B and 0.16, respectively. The satisfactory control of blood pressure was achieved in 20.33% of cases. The correlation between blood pressure mean and endogenous creatinine clearance was very low.

  1. Influence of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis on randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneei, P; Salehi-Abargouei, A; Esmaillzadeh, A; Azadbakht, L

    2014-12-01

    Findings were not consistent on the therapeutic effect of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on blood pressure. We aimed to review systematically and perform a meta-analysis to assess the magnitude of the effect of the DASH diet on blood pressure in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) among adults. We conducted a systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of all RCTs which evaluated the effect of the DASH diet on blood pressure including published papers until June 2013, using PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Scopus and Google scholar database. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were used to find out possible sources of between-study heterogeneity. Seventeen RCTs contributing 20 comparisons with 2561 participants were included. Meta-analysis showed that the DASH diet significantly reduced systolic blood pressure by 6.74 mmHg (95%CI: -8.25, -5.23, I(2) = 78.1%) and diastolic blood pressure by 3.54 mmHg (95%CI: -4.29, -2.79, I(2) = 56.7%). RCTs with the energy restriction and those with hypertensive subjects showed a significantly greater decrease in blood pressure. Meta-regression showed that mean baseline of SBP and DBP was explained 24% and 49% of the variance between studies for SBP and DBP, respectively. The results revealed the profitable reducing effect of the DASH-like diet on both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adults; although there was a variation in the extent of the fall in blood pressure in different subgroups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Heart rate-mediated blood pressure control in preterm fetal sheep under normal and hypoxic-ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Alex; Jellema, Reint K; Jennekens, Ward; Ophelders, Daan; Vullings, Rik; van Hunnik, Arne; van Pul, Carola; Bennet, Laura; Delhaas, Tammo; Kramer, Boris W; Andriessen, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The understanding of hypoxemia-induced changes in baroreflex function is limited and may be studied in a fetal sheep experiment before, during, and after standardized hypoxic conditions. Preterm fetal lambs were instrumented at 102 d gestation (term: 146 d). At 106 d, intrauterine hypoxia--ischemia was induced by 25 min of umbilical cord occlusion (UCO). Baroreflex-related fluctuations were calculated at 30-min intervals during the first week after UCO by transfer function (cross-spectral) analysis between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and R-R interval fluctuations, estimated in the low-frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) band. LF transfer gain (baroreflex sensitivity) and delay (s) reflect the baroreflex function. Baseline did not differ in LF transfer gain and delay between controls and the UCO group. In controls, LF gain showed postnatal increase. By contrast, LF gain gradually decreased in the UCO group, resulting in significantly lower values 4-7 d after UCO. In the UCO group, LF delay increased and differed significantly from controls. Our results show that intrauterine hypoxia-ischemia results in reduced baroreflex sensitivity over a period of 7 d, indicating limited efficacy to buffer BP changes by adapting heart rate. Cardiovascular dysregulation may augment already present cerebral damage after systemic hypoxia-ischemia in the reperfusion period.

  3. Best antihypertensive strategies to improve blood pressure control in Latin America: position of the Latin American Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca, Antonio; López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Thomopoulos, Costas; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    : Evidence from randomized trials has shown that effective treatment with blood pressure (BP)-lowering medications reduces the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with hypertension. Therefore, hypertension control and prevention of subsequent morbidity and mortality should be achievable for all patients worldwide. However, many people in Latin America remain undiagnosed, untreated or have inadequately controlled BP, even where this is access to health systems. Barriers to hypertension control in low-income countries include difficulties in transportation to health services; inappropriate opening hours; difficulties in making clinic appointments; inaccessible healthcare facilities, lack of insurance and high treatment costs. After a review of the best recent available evidence on the efficacy and tolerability of antihypertensive drugs and strategies, the Latin American Society of Hypertension experts conclude that all major classes of BP-lowering drugs be available to hypertensive patients, because all have been shown to reduce major cardiovascular outcomes compared with placebo, and have shown to be associated with a comparable risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality when compared between classes. Within each class, no evidence whatsoever is available to show that one compound is more effective than another in outcome prevention. Therefore, the selection of individual drugs may be based mainly on the capacity of Latin American governments to obtain the lowest prices of the different molecules manufactured by companies with high production quality standards.

  4. Left ventricular hypertrophy by electrocardiogram as a predictor of success in home blood pressure control: HOMED-BP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Ayumi; Asayama, Kei; Hanazawa, Tomohiro; Watabe, Daisuke; Nomura, Kyoko; Okamura, Tomonori; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2017-05-01

    Few studies have focused on the effect of organ damage on achievement of long-term home blood pressure (BP) control. Based on the nationwide home BP-based trial data, we aimed to investigate the factors associated with home BP control, in particular, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) using the electrocardiogram in patients who started antihypertensive drug treatment. According to the trial protocol, we defined BP as controlled when systolic home BP reached specified targets (125-134 mm Hg in usual control (UC), n=1261; <125 mm Hg in tight control (TC), n=1288). At baseline, before drug treatment started, the mean Sokolow-Lyon voltage was 2.57±0.87 mV, and the mean Cornell product was 1573±705 mm·ms. The numbers of patients who achieved the target BP level in the UC and TC groups were 892 (70.7%) and 576 (44.7%), respectively. In both the UC and TC groups, systolic home BP at baseline was significantly lower in patients who achieved target levels than in those who did not achieve target levels (P<0.0001). Sokolow-Lyon voltage was significantly lower in patients who achieved target levels than in those who did not (P⩽0.0055). The Cornell product levels in each group were similar (P⩾0.12), although significantly different between patients who did or did not achieve the target level when the UC and TC groups were combined for analysis (P=0.031). Sokolow-Lyon voltage was significantly associated with achievement of home BP control in the multivariable-adjusted model (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence intervals, 1.02-1.26; P=0.015), but Cornell product was not (P=0.13). These results indicate the difficulty of sufficient antihypertensive treatment when untreated patients had target organ damage, that is, LVH diagnosed by Sokolow-Lyon voltage.

  5. Clinical characteristics and management of patients with atrial fibrillation treated with direct oral anticoagulants according to blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Figuera, M; Cinza, S; Egocheaga, I; Marín, N; Prieto, M A

    2018-02-14

    To determine the clinical characteristics and management of hypertensive patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) according to blood pressure (BP) control. For this purpose, data from two observational, cross-sectional and multicenter studies were combined. In both studies, patients on chronic treatment with anticoagulants and that were on current treatment with DOACs at least for 3 months were included. Adequate BP was defined as a systolic BP<140mmHg and a diastolic BP<90mmHg (<140/85mmHg if diabetes). Overall, 1036 patients were included. Of these, 881 (85%) had hypertension that were finally analyzed. The presence of other risk factors and cardiovascular disease was common. Mean BP was 132.6±14.3/75.2±9.2mmHg and 70.5% of patients achieved BP goals. Those patients with a poor BP control had more frequently diabetes, and a history of prior labile INR. Patients had a high thromboembolic risk, but without significant differences according to BP control. By contrast, more patients with a poor BP control had a higher bleeding risk (HAS-BLED ≥3: 24.0% vs 35.4%; P<0.001). HAS-BLED score was an independent predictor of poor BP control (odds ratio 1.435; 95% confidence interval 1.216-1.693; P<0.001). Satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment was independent of BP control. More than two thirds of our patients with hypertension and AF anticoagulated with DOACs achieve BP targets, what is clearly superior to that reported in the general hypertensive population. Copyright © 2018 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Wine grape pomace flour improves blood pressure, fasting glucose and protein damage in humans: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Urquiaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean diet is a healthy diet with positive scientific evidence of preventing chronic diseases. Bioactive components support the healthy properties of the Mediterranean diet. Antioxidants and fiber, two components of the Mediterranean diet, are key functional nutrients for healthy eating and nutrition. Wine grape pomace is a rich source of these dietary constituents and may be beneficial for human health. Our hypothesis was that the intake of red wine grape pomace flour (WGPF prepared from red wine grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon variety reduced the metabolic syndrome in humans. To evaluate the effect of WGPF on components of metabolic syndrome we design a 16-week longitudinal intervention study. Thirty-eight males, 30-65 years of age, with at least one component of metabolic syndrome, were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n = 25 or the control group (n = 13. At lunch, the intervention group was given 20 g of WGPF per day, which contained 10 g of dietary fiber, 822 mg of polyphenols and an antioxidant capacity of 7258 ORAC units. Both groups were asked to maintain their regular eating habits and lifestyles. Clinical evaluation, anthropometric measurements and biochemical blood analyses were done at the beginning and the end of the study. RESULTS: WGPF intake significantly decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as fasting glucose levels. Plasma γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol increased and carbonyl group in plasma protein decreased in WGPT group, significantly. No significant effect was observed for waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, total antioxidant capacity and vitamin C in and between groups. The group-dependent magnitude of the differences between the baseline and final postprandial insulin values and γ-tocopherol concentrations was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The consumption of WGPF-rich in fiber and polyphenol antioxidants, as a food supplement in a

  7. Effects of guided imagery on blood pressure in pregnant women with hypertension: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Faith Wight; Hodnett, Ellen; Esplen, Mary Jane; Watt-Watson, Judy

    2010-12-01

    Hypertension occurs in nearly 10 percent of pregnancies, and is associated with higher risk of infant and maternal morbidity and mortality than in normal pregnancies. Previous studies have suggested that relaxation therapies reduce blood pressure in nonpregnant adults. The objectives of this pilot randomized trial were to provide preliminary evidence of whether relaxation by means of guided imagery would reduce blood pressure in hypertensive pregnant women, and to assess the feasibility of a larger trial. A total of 69 pregnant women with hypertension were randomized to periods of guided imagery or of quiet rest, twice daily for 4 weeks or until delivery, whichever came first. Daytime ambulatory mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and anxiety were measured weekly for up to 4 weeks. Women allocated to guided imagery had lower mean arterial pressure elevations over time than those allocated to quiet rest (guided imagery: M = 1.58 mmHg, SD = 7.63; quiet rest: M = 5.93 mmHg, SD = 6.55; t = 2.36, p = 0.02). However, when adjusted for baseline mean arterial pressure and gestation, the effect was not significant (p = 0.14). Numbers of women prescribed antihypertensive medication postrandomization were similar (guided imagery: n = 16; quiet rest: n = 13, χ(2) = 0.74, p = 0.46). There was also no evidence of an effect on women's anxiety. Nearly 90 percent (n = 26) of the guided imagery group indicated that they would use it again. Further rigorous study is warranted to determine effects of guided imagery on maternal blood pressure and perinatal health outcomes. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of High Blood Pressure: A Population-Based Survey in Thai Nguyen, Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Anh Ha

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam and hypertension (HTN is an important and prevalent risk factor for CVD in the adult Vietnamese population. Despite an increasing prevalence of HTN in this country, information about the awareness, treatment, and control of HTN is limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of HTN, and factors associated with these endpoints, in residents of a mountainous province in Vietnam.Data from 2,368 adults (age≥25 years participating in a population-based survey conducted in 2011 in Thai Nguyen province were analyzed. All eligible participants completed a structured questionnaire and were examined by community health workers using a standardized protocol.The overall prevalence of HTN in this population was 23%. Older age, male sex, and being overweight were associated with a higher odds of having HTN, while higher educational level was associated with a lower odds of having HTN. Among those with HTN, only 34% were aware of their condition, 43% of those who were aware they had HTN received treatment and, of these, 39% had their HTN controlled.Nearly one in four adults in Thai Nguyen is hypertensive, but far fewer are aware of this condition and even fewer have their blood pressure adequately controlled. Public health strategies increasing awareness of HTN in the community, as well as improvements in the treatment and control of HTN, remain needed to reduce the prevalence of HTN and related morbidity and mortality.

  9. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of High Blood Pressure: A Population-Based Survey in Thai Nguyen, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Duc Anh; Goldberg, Robert J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Chu, Thang Hong; Nguyen, Hoa L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam and hypertension (HTN) is an important and prevalent risk factor for CVD in the adult Vietnamese population. Despite an increasing prevalence of HTN in this country, information about the awareness, treatment, and control of HTN is limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of HTN, and factors associated with these endpoints, in residents of a mountainous province in Vietnam. Methods Data from 2,368 adults (age≥25 years) participating in a population-based survey conducted in 2011 in Thai Nguyen province were analyzed. All eligible participants completed a structured questionnaire and were examined by community health workers using a standardized protocol. Results The overall prevalence of HTN in this population was 23%. Older age, male sex, and being overweight were associated with a higher odds of having HTN, while higher educational level was associated with a lower odds of having HTN. Among those with HTN, only 34% were aware of their condition, 43% of those who were aware they had HTN received treatment and, of these, 39% had their HTN controlled. Conclusions Nearly one in four adults in Thai Nguyen is hypertensive, but far fewer are aware of this condition and even fewer have their blood pressure adequately controlled. Public health strategies increasing awareness of HTN in the community, as well as improvements in the treatment and control of HTN, remain needed to reduce the prevalence of HTN and related morbidity and mortality. PMID:23826134

  10. Effect of device-guided breathing exercises on blood pressure in patients with hypertension : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, Mariette R.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Logtenberg, Susan J.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Bilo, Henk J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Hypertension is a chronic disorder with a high prevalence worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, it is sometimes hard to reach treatment goals for blood pressure (BP) with classical treatment options. Reducing breathing frequency has been advocated as a method to reduce BP. Methods. A

  11. Clinical effectiveness of telmisartan alone or in combination therapy for controlling blood pressure and vascular risk in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodh I Jugdutt

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Bodh I JugduttDivision of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta and Hospital, Edmonton, CanadaAbstract: Elderly patients (age≥65 years with hypertension are at high risk for vascular complications, especially when diabetes is present. Antihypertensive drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system have been shown to be effective for controlling blood pressure in adult and elderly patients. Importantly, renin-angiotensin system inhibitors were shown to have benefits beyond their classic cardioprotective and vasculoprotective effects, including reducing the risk of new-onset diabetes and associated cardiovascular effects. The discovery that the renin-angiotensin system inhibitor and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 receptor blocker (ARB, telmisartan, can selectively activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ, an established antidiabetic drug target provides the unique opportunity to prevent and treat cardiovascular complications in high-risk elderly patients with hypertension and new-onset diabetes. Two large clinical trials, ONTARGET (Ongoing Telmisartan Alone in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial and TRANSCEND (Telmisartan Randomized AssessmeNt Study in ACE-I iNtolerant subjects with cardiovascular disease have assessed the cardioprotective and antidiabetic effects of telmisartan. The collective data suggest that telmisartan is a promising drug for controlling hypertension and reducing vascular risk in high-risk elderly patients with new-onset diabetes.Keywords: elderly, hypertension, telmisartan, angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, diabetes, vascular risk

  12. The effect of vitamin D on renin-angiotensin system activation and blood pressure: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Ciaran J; Borgi, Lea; Curhan, Gary C; Fisher, Naomi; Forman, John P

    2017-04-01

    Disruption of vitamin D signaling in rodents causes activation of the rennin-angiotensin system (RAS) and development of hypertension. Observational studies in humans found lower circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is associated with increased RAS activity and blood pressure (BP). We performed the first randomized control trial to investigate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on the RAS in humans. Vitamin D deficient, [25(OH)D ≤20 ng/ml), overweight individuals without hypertension were randomized into a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 8-weeks treatment with ergocalciferol or placebo. Kidney-specific RAS activity, measured using renal plasma flow response to captopril in high sodium balance, was assessed at baseline and 8 weeks, as was systemic RAS activity and 24-h ambulatory BP. In total, 84 participants completed the study. Mean 25[OH]D levels increased from 14.7 to 30.3 ng/ml in the ergocalciferol group, P value vitamin D deficiency on RAS activity or BP after 8 weeks. These findings are not consistent with the hypothesis that vitamin D is a modifiable target for lowering BP in vitamin D deficient individuals.

  13. Chronic resistance training does not affect post-exercise blood pressure in normotensive older women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerage, Aline Mendes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; do Nascimento, Matheus Amarante; Pina, Fábio Luiz Cheche; Gonçalves, Cássio Gustavo Santana; Sardinha, Luís B; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni

    2015-06-01

    Resistance training has been recommended for maintenance or improvement of the functional health of older adults, but its effect on acute cardiovascular responses remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of 12 weeks of resistance training on post-exercise blood pressure (BP) in normotensive older women. Twenty-eight normotensive and physically inactive women (≥ 60 years) were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or a control group (CG). The TG underwent a resistance training program (12 weeks, 8 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions, 3 days/week), while the CG performed stretching exercises (12 weeks, 2 sets, 20 s each, 2 days/week). At baseline and after the intervention, participants were randomly submitted to two experimental sessions: a resistance exercise session (7 exercises, 2 sets, 10-15 repetitions) and a control session. BP was obtained pre- and post-sessions (90 min), through auscultation. Post-exercise hypotension was observed for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP in the TG (-6.1, -3.4, and -4.3 mmHg, respectively; P After the intervention period, the magnitude and pattern of this phenomenon for systolic, diastolic, and mean BP were similar between groups (TG -8.8, -4.1, and -5.7 mmHg, respectively; P exercise promotes reduction in post-exercise BP and 12 weeks of resistance training program do not change the occurrence or magnitude of this hypotension. (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT02346981).

  14. Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ034 PREGNANCY Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy • What is high blood pressure? • What is chronic hypertension? • What is gestational hypertension? • ...

  15. Healthy Blood Pressure "It's worth the effort!" | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Healthy Blood Pressure: "It's worth the effort!" Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... Photo: Christopher Klose Cheryl Fells controls her high blood pressure through regular exercise and healthy eating By Christopher ...

  16. Blood pressure changes in dogs with babesiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Jacobson

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic arterial blood pressures were measured in 30 dogs with acute babesiosis, 10 each with mild uncomplicated, severe uncomplicated and complicated disease. Ten healthy dogs were used as controls. Hypotension was defined as more than 3 standard deviations below the control mean. Normal mean pressures (±SD were: systolic arterial pressure 151 (±11 mm Hg, diastolic arterial pressure 89 (±8 mm Hg and mean arterial pressure 107 (±10 mmHg. Hypotension was the most frequent abnormality, and increased strikingly in incidence as disease severity increased, with 5/10 dogs in the complicated group being hypotensive for systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures, compared with 2/10 in the severe uncomplicated group and 0/10 in the mild uncomplicated group. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures in the complicated group and severe uncomplicated group, and systolic pressure in the mild uncomplicated group, were significantly lower than in the controls. There were no significant relationships between arterial pressures and age, pulse rate, respiratory rate, temperature, mucous membrane colour or haematocrit. There was a significant negative correlation between arterial pressures and white cell and immature neutrophil counts. Arterial pressures differed significantly between dogs that were clinically collapsed and those that were not, but not between survivors and non-survivors. Pulse pressure (systolic - diastolic was low in 7/10 complicated, 1/10 mild uncomplicated, and 1/10 severe uncomplicated cases, and differed significantly between the complicated and control groups. The high incidence of hypotension in clinically severe babesiosis has important implications for therapy.

  17. HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: DOES THIS CONCERN ME?

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    To find out, the Medical Service's nurses are organising A HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING AND PREVENTION CAMPAIGN from Monday, 26th to Thursday, 29th March 2007 at the Infirmary - Building 57 - ground floor A blood pressure test, advice, information and, if necessary, referral for specialist medical treatment will be offered to any person working on the CERN site. High blood pressure is a silent threat to health. So come and get your blood pressure checked.

  18. HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: DOES THIS CONCERN ME?

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    To find out, the Medical Service's nurses are organising A HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING AND PREVENTION CAMPAIGN from Monday, 26th to Thursday, 29th March 2007 at the Infirmary - Building 57 - ground floor A blood pressure test, advice, information and, if necessary, referral for specialist medical treatment will be offered to any person working on the CERN site. High blood pressure is a stealth threat to health. So come and get your blood pressure checked.

  19. The hidden magnitude of raised blood pressure and elevated blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The prevalence of undiagnosed raised blood pressure and elevated blood sugar was high in Ethiopia and only very small percentage of people had been aware of their high blood pressure and elevated blood sugar. Policy makers in the health sector including other health development partners need to ...

  20. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived short-term blood pressure variability in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concistrè, A; Grillo, A; La Torre, G; Carretta, R; Fabris, B; Petramala, L; Marinelli, C; Rebellato, A; Fallo, F; Letizia, C

    2018-04-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is associated with a cluster of cardiovascular manifestations, including hypertension, leading to increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived short-term blood pressure variability in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, in comparison with patients with essential hypertension and normotensive controls. Twenty-five patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (7 normotensive,18 hypertensive) underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring at diagnosis, and fifteen out of them were re-evaluated after parathyroidectomy. Short-term-blood pressure variability was derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and calculated as the following: 1) Standard Deviation of 24-h, day-time and night-time-BP; 2) the average of day-time and night-time-Standard Deviation, weighted for the duration of the day and night periods (24-h "weighted" Standard Deviation of BP); 3) average real variability, i.e., the average of the absolute differences between all consecutive BP measurements. Baseline data of normotensive and essential hypertension patients were matched for age, sex, BMI and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring values with normotensive and hypertensive-primary hyperparathyroidism patients, respectively. Normotensive-primary hyperparathyroidism patients showed a 24-h weighted Standard Deviation (P blood pressure higher than that of 12 normotensive controls. 24-h average real variability of systolic BP, as well as serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels, were reduced in operated patients (P blood pressure variability is increased in normotensive patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and is reduced by parathyroidectomy, and may potentially represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor in this disease.

  1. Personal Continuity of Care in a University-Based Primary Care Practice: Impact on Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Abdullah, Adina; Lee, Ping Yein; Liew, Su May; Chia, Yook Chin; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2015-01-01

    Continuity of care is an important quality outcome of patient care. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between personal continuity and blood pressure (BP) control among the patients with hypertension in an academic primary care centre. Between January and May 2012, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of patients with hypertension who had been followed up for at least 1 year in the Primary Care Clinic, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. In this setting, doctors who provided care for hypertension included postgraduate family medicine trainees, non-trainee doctors and academic staff. Systematic random sampling (1:4) was used for patient selection. BP control was defined as less than 130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes mellitus, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease and less than 140/90 mm Hg for all other patients. Continuity of care was assessed using the usual provider continuity index (UPCI), which is the ratio of patient visits to the usual provider to the total number of visits to all providers in 1 year. A UPC index of zero denotes no continuity while an index of one reflects perfect continuity with only the usual provider. We reviewed a total of 1060 medical records. The patients' mean age was 62.0 years (SD 10.4). The majority was women (59.2%) and married (85.7%). The mean number of visits in a year was 3.85 (SD 1.36). A total of 72 doctors had provided consultations (55 postgraduate family medicine trainees, 8 non-trainee doctors and 9 academic staff). The mean UPCI was 0.43 (SD 0.34). Target BP was achieved in 42% of the patients. There was no significant relationship between BP control and personal continuity after adjustment for total number of visits. Continuity of care was not associated with BP control in our centre. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this.

  2. Personal Continuity of Care in a University-Based Primary Care Practice: Impact on Blood Pressure Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Sherina Hanafi

    Full Text Available Continuity of care is an important quality outcome of patient care. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between personal continuity and blood pressure (BP control among the patients with hypertension in an academic primary care centre. Between January and May 2012, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of patients with hypertension who had been followed up for at least 1 year in the Primary Care Clinic, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. In this setting, doctors who provided care for hypertension included postgraduate family medicine trainees, non-trainee doctors and academic staff. Systematic random sampling (1:4 was used for patient selection. BP control was defined as less than 130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes mellitus, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease and less than 140/90 mm Hg for all other patients. Continuity of care was assessed using the usual provider continuity index (UPCI, which is the ratio of patient visits to the usual provider to the total number of visits to all providers in 1 year. A UPC index of zero denotes no continuity while an index of one reflects perfect continuity with only the usual provider. We reviewed a total of 1060 medical records. The patients' mean age was 62.0 years (SD 10.4. The majority was women (59.2% and married (85.7%. The mean number of visits in a year was 3.85 (SD 1.36. A total of 72 doctors had provided consultations (55 postgraduate family medicine trainees, 8 non-trainee doctors and 9 academic staff. The mean UPCI was 0.43 (SD 0.34. Target BP was achieved in 42% of the patients. There was no significant relationship between BP control and personal continuity after adjustment for total number of visits. Continuity of care was not associated with BP control in our centre. Further studies are needed to explore the reasons for this.

  3. Women, Hypertension, and the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nanette K; Ferdinand, Keith C; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Walsh, Mary Norine; Gulati, Martha; Pepine, Carl J

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension accounts for approximately 1 in 5 deaths in American women and is the major contributor to many comorbid conditions. Although blood pressure lowering reduces cardiovascular disease outcomes, considerable uncertainty remains on best management in women. Specifically, female blood pressure treatment goals have not been established, particularly among older and African American and Hispanic women, for whom hypertension prevalence, related adverse outcomes, and poor control rates are high. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) planned to clarify optimal blood pressure management in both sexes. Although confirming that a lower blood pressure goal is generally better, because female enrollment and event rates were low and follow-up shortened, outcomes differences in women were not statistically significant. Thus optimal blood pressure goals for women have not been established with the highest evidence. This review addresses SPRINT's significance and key remaining knowledge gaps in optimal blood pressure management to improve women's health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring - comparison with office ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that 24-hour ambulatory and daytime ambulatory blood pressure values were lower than office blood pressure values in hypertensive patients in a private practice. REFERENCES. 1. The fifth report of the Joint National Committee on detection, evaluation and treatment of high blood pressure (JNC V). Arch Intern Med 1993; ...

  5. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiang; Lv, Yunhui; Li, Kai; Ma, Lei; Du, Guodong; Xiang, Yan; Li, Xuqing

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate systematically the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Cochrane Library, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and the Web of Science were searched for studies investigating the effects of CPAP on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and OSA. The selected studies underwent quality assessment and meta-analysis, as well as being tested for heterogeneity. Six randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled estimates of the changes in mean systolic blood pressure and mean diastolic blood pressure (as assessed by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring) were -5.40 mmHg (95% CI: -9.17 to -1.64; p = 0.001; I2 = 74%) and -3.86 mmHg (95% CI: -6.41 to -1.30; p = 0.00001; I2 = 79%), respectively. CPAP therapy can significantly reduce blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and OSA.

  6. Control of blood pressure and cardiovascular risk in Moroccan patients with newly diagnosed hypertension: a 3-month observational study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami, Mohamed; El Hattaoui, Mustapha; Seqat, Mehdi; Sadik, Jamaa; Aouad, Aicha; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed

    2017-02-01

    Control of blood pressure and reduction of cardiovascular risk factors are mandatory in patients with hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of patients with controlled hypertension and to describe the cardiovascular risk profile in hypertensive patients followed by general practitioners (GPs) in Morocco. This national, observational, multicentre, prospective, longitudinal study of patients with newly diagnosed hypertension was carried out between September 2011 and December 2011. The use of antihypertensive drugs was evaluated at inclusion and after 3 months of follow up. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ⩾ 140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ⩾ 90 mmHg at 3 months of follow up. The SCORE scale issued by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was used to assess overall cardiovascular risk and probability of experiencing a cardiovascular event within 10 years. A total of 909 hypertensive patients were recruited (62.4% female). Mean age was 56.8 ± 10.6 years. More than half of the patients (53.0%) were between 40-60 years and more than one-third (34.1%) were obese [body mass index (BMI) ⩾ 30 kg/m 2 ]. There were significantly more obese females than males ( p blood pressure was achieved in only 46.8% of patients. Poor compliance (17.1%) and a lack of treatment efficacy (16.9%) were the two main reasons for not achieving the blood pressure target. More than half (53.2%) of the hypertensive patients in our study did not achieve adequate blood pressure control during the 3-month follow-up period and had a high cardiovascular risk. More effective management of hypertension is required in primary care.

  7. Decrease in blood pressure and improved psychological aspects through meditation training in hypertensive older adults: A randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Rosas Marchiori, Márcia; Kozasa, Elisa Harumi; Miranda, Roberto Dischinger; Monezi Andrade, André Luiz; Perrotti, Tatiana Caccese; Leite, José Roberto

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Zen meditation on blood pressure (BP) and quality of life in elderly subjects. A total of 59 volunteers (21 men and 38 women), aged ≥60 years with systolic BP between 130 and 159 mmHg and diastolic BP between 85 and 99 mmHg, were randomly divided into a meditation group (MG), n = 28 and a control group (CG), n = 31. The MG meditated twice a day for 20 min for 3 months, and the CG remained on a waiting list. The BP levels were measured monthly in both groups. The volunteers' medication was kept stable. A quality of life assessment instrument was applied at the beginning and end of the study. For systolic BP, analysis of variance showed the influence of time (F(4,228)  = 4.74, P meditation practice when compared with the CG (Newman-Keuls test, P meditation is an interesting tool as a complementary treatment for hypertension in elderly subjects. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. Dietary Patterns and Blood Pressure in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndanuko, Rhoda N; Tapsell, Linda C; Charlton, Karen E; Neale, Elizabeth P; Batterham, Marijka J

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease, stroke, and kidney disease. To lower blood pressure (BP), several lifestyle changes are recommended such as weight loss, exercise, and following a healthy diet. Investigating the effect of single nutrients may have positive results, but food is consumed as part of a whole diet, resulting in nutrient interactions. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the effect of dietary patterns on BP in adults. Studies that were published between January 1999 and June 2014 were retrieved using Scopus, Web of Science, and the MEDLINE database. Seventeen randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. The results suggest that healthy dietary patterns such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet, Nordic diet, and Mediterranean diet significantly lowered systolic BP and diastolic BP by 4.26 mm Hg and 2.38 mm Hg, respectively. These diets are rich in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, seeds, nuts, fish, and dairy and low in meat, sweets, and alcohol. Lifestyle factors such as exercise and weight loss in combination with dietary changes may also reduce BP. Further research is needed to establish the effect of dietary patterns on BP in different cultures other than those identified in this review. The review was registered on PROSPERO (International prospective register of systematic reviews) as CRD42015016272. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  10. Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, April J; Cash, Katherine C; Champagne, Catherine M; Gupta, Alok K; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A; Johnson, William D; Cefalu, William T

    2015-05-27

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus -0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  11. Blueberries Improve Endothelial Function, but Not Blood Pressure, in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April J. Stull

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21. They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI, was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024. Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus −0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023. In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  12. Effects of spirulina consumption on body weight, blood pressure, and endothelial function in overweight hypertensive Caucasians: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miczke, A; Szulińska, M; Hansdorfer-Korzon, R; Kręgielska-Narożna, M; Suliburska, J; Walkowiak, J; Bogdański, P

    2016-01-01

    Some studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of Spirulina maxima (Arthrospira maxima) consumption on glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Spirulina maxima on body weight, blood pressure, and endothelial function. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 40 patients with hypertension but lacking evidence of cardiovascular disease were enrolled to receive daily either 2.0 g Hawaiian spirulina or placebo for three months. Anthropometric parameters, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and stiffness index (SI) using digital plethysmography were measured before and after the intervention. After three months, there was no change in body mass index (BMI) or weight in either the spirulina or the placebo group. However, a significant reduction in SBP and SI was observed. The patients in the spirulina group showed significant reductions in BMI (26.9 ± 3.1 vs. 25.0 ± 2.7 kg/m(2), p = 0.0032), weight (75.5 ± 11.8 vs. 70.5 ± 10.3 kg, p Spirulina maxima not only improves BMI and weight but also results in improvements in blood pressure and endothelial function spirulina in overweight patients with hypertension but lacking evidence of cardiovascular disease.

  13. The influence of low job control on ambulatory blood pressure and perceived stress over the working day in men and women from the Whitehall II cohort.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steptoe, A.; Willemsen, A.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Work stress contributes to risk of coronary heart disease and hypertension. This study tested the influence of job control on ambulatory blood pressure, and ratings of perceived stress and happiness in men and women systematically sampled by socio-economic status from the Whitehall II

  14. The effect of comorbidity on glycemic control and systolic blood pressure in type 2 diabetes: a cohort study with 5 year follow-up in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijks, H.; Biermans, M.; Bor, H.; Weel, C. van; Lagro-Janssen, T.; Grauw, W. de; Schermer, T.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To explore the longitudinal effect of chronic comorbid diseases on glycemic control (HbA1C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods: In a representative primary care cohort of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in The Netherlands (n = 610), we tested

  15. Effect of L-arginine supplementation on blood pressure in pregnant women: a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing; Yue, Xin; Tian, Qing-Yin; Saren, Gaowa; Wu, Ming-Hui; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Tong-Tao

    2013-01-01

    A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effect of L-arginine supplementation on blood pressure (BP) in pregnancy. Trials were searched in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library. A total of five trials were included in the meta-analysis. L-arginine supplementation exhibited a mean decrease of 3.07 mmHg (p = 0.004) for diastolic blood pressure and a mean increase of 1.23 weeks (p = 0.002) for gestation age at delivery in pregnancy, but did not reduce systolic BP (p = 0.19) as compared to placebo. L-arginine supplementation had a significant effect of lowering diastolic blood pressure and prolonging gestation age in pregnancy.

  16. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  17. Blood Pressure Abnormalities in Parkinson's Disease in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To compare the effect of posture on blood pressure in levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with that of age-matched controls. The design is a case control study. Blood pressure was recorded manually in the seated position with Accossons® mercury sphygmomanometer in 30 consecutive patients with PD on ...

  18. Control of blood pressure and prevention of end-organ damage in patients with accelerated hypertension by combination with arotinolol and extended release nifedipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Nakamoto, H; Nemoto, H; Sugahara, S; Okada, H

    2000-03-01

    In patients with accelerated (malignant) hypertension, end-organ damage is the determinant factor for prognosis. Although recent advances in antihypertensive therapy have improved the outcome of patients with accelerated hypertension, the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy still remains less convinced. In this study, we followed 13 patients clinically diagnosed with accelerated hypertension (defined as diastolic blood pressure > 130 mmHg, retinopathy with K-W IV and accelerated renal impairment) for 3 yr. One patient died due to acute myocardial infarction arising from poor compliance with antihypertensive therapy. One patient was maintained on hemodialysis for 3 yr. One patient was introduced for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for a year and then lived without dialysis therapy. The remaining 10 patients were followed for 3 yr. All patients were initially treated with intravenous administration of calcium antagonist for reduction of blood pressure, followed by hemodialysis therapy if needed. After stabilization of blood pressure, combination therapy with extended release nifedipine (40 to 80 mg daily) and arotinolol (20 mg daily) was started. The targets for blood pressure control were a systolic pressure of 135 mmHg and a diastolic pressure of 80 mmHg. If blood pressure control was unsatisfactory, guanabenz (2 to 4 mg before bedtime), a central acting drug, was added. At presentation, the mean diastolic blood pressure (mDBP) among the 10 remaining patients was 134 +/- 2 mmHg, the mean serum creatinine (mScr) was 4.5 +/- 0.7 mg/dl and the left ventricular mass index (LVMi) as measured by echocardiography was 150 +/- 9 g/m2. At 1 yr, the mDBP was reduced to 90 +/- 3 mmHg, the mScr to 2.9 +/- 0.9 mg/dl and the LVMi to 140 +/- 9 g/m2. At 3 yr, the mDBP was stabilized at 79 +/- 3 mmHg, the mScr maintained at 2.2 +/- 0.4 mg/dl, and the LVMi reduced to 128 +/- 9 g/m2. These results indicate that appropriate blood pressure control is important for

  19. The effect of black tea on blood pressure: a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Greyling

    Full Text Available Epidemiological evidence has linked consumption of black tea, produced from Camellia sinensis, with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, intervention studies on the effects of tea consumption on blood pressure (BP have reported inconsistent results. Our objective was to conduct a systematic literature review with meta-analysis of controlled human intervention studies examining the effect of tea consumption on BP.We systematically searched Medline, Biosis, Chemical Abstracts and EMBASE databases through July 2013. For inclusion, studies had to meet the following pre-defined criteria: 1 placebo controlled design in human adults, 2 minimum of 1 week black tea consumption as the sole intervention, 3 reported effects on systolic BP (SBP or diastolic BP (DBP or both. A random effects model was used to calculate the pooled overall effect of black tea on BP.Eleven studies (12 intervention arms, 378 subjects, dose of 4-5 cups of tea met our inclusion criteria. The pooled mean effect of regular tea ingestion was -1.8 mmHg (95% CI: -2.8, -0.7; P = 0.0013 for SBP and -1.3 mmHg (95% CI: -1.8, -0.8; P<0.0001 for DBP. In covariate analyses, we found that the method of tea preparation (tea extract powders versus leaf tea, baseline SBP and DBP, and the quality score of the study affected the effect size of the tea intervention (all P<0.05. No evidence of publication bias could be detected.Our meta-analysis indicates that regular consumption of black tea can reduce BP. Although the effect is small, such effects could be important for cardiovascular health at population level.

  20. The Use of COSTAR in a Retrolective Cohort Study of the Effect of Non-Steroidal Antiinflammatory Agents on Blood Pressure Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Thomas H.; Goroll, Allan H.; Webster, Sally A.; Morgan, Mary M.; Barnett, G. Octo

    1988-01-01

    We have used the Computer-Stored Ambulatory Record (COSTAR) database from the Primary Care Unit of the Massachusetts General Hospital to conduct a retrolective cohort study of the influence of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on blood pressure control in drug-treated hypertensive patients. The Medical Query Language (MQL) was used to select 91 patients with previously stable blood pressure meeting multiple criteria for study from among the 30,000 in the database, to select controls matched for the demographic and clinical characteristics of these patients, and to collect the relevant clinical information from their COSTAR records. Available blood pressure recordings and prescribing information allows analysis of changes in blood pressure and antihypertensive therapy following NSAID prescriptions in these patients and comparison with matched controls. Such studies are useful in questions where prospective clinical trials are impractical, and the ability to conduct studies of this type is an additional advantage of computer-based medical record systems over paper record systems.

  1. [Invasive blood pressure measurements. Factual safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L H

    1994-08-01

    Intra-arterial blood pressure measurement is often used in patients with unstable haemodynamics. The demand for accuracy in such measurements is high. Usually these demands are fulfilled, but situations can occur where the dynamic characteristics of the system are exceeded. In order to acknowledge this situation, one must be aware of these dynamic characteristics. The significance of the system's resonance frequency and damping is described. A method to control the usability of the system is described.

  2. Daily blueberry consumption improves blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah A; Figueroa, Arturo; Navaei, Negin; Wong, Alexei; Kalfon, Roy; Ormsbee, Lauren T; Feresin, Rafaela G; Elam, Marcus L; Hooshmand, Shirin; Payton, Mark E; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2015-03-01

    Postmenopausal women have a high prevalence of hypertension and often develop arterial stiffness thereby increasing cardiovascular disease risk. Although antihypertensive drug therapies exist, increasing numbers of people prefer natural therapies. In vivo studies and a limited number of clinical studies have demonstrated the antihypertensive and vascular-protective effects of blueberries. To examine the effects of daily blueberry consumption for 8 weeks on blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension. This was an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Forty-eight postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension recruited from the greater Tallahassee, FL, area participated. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 22 g freeze-dried blueberry powder or 22 g control powder. Resting brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated and arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, and superoxide dismutase were measured at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using a split plot model of repeated measures analysis of variance. After 8 weeks, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (131±17 mm Hg [Pblueberry powder group, whereas there were no changes in the group receiving the control powder. Nitric oxide levels were greater (15.35±11.16 μmol/L; Pblueberry powder group at 8 weeks compared with baseline values (9.11±7.95 μmol/L), whereas there were no changes in the control group. Daily blueberry consumption may reduce blood pressure and arterial stiffness, which may be due, in part, to increased nitric oxide production. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 2012 consensus document of the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA): strategies to improve blood pressure control in Italy: from global cardiovascular risk stratification to combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Massimo; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Ambrosioni, Ettore; Cottone, Santina; Cuspidi, Cesare; Borghi, Claudio; De Luca, Nicola; Fallo, Francesco; Ferri, Claudio; Morganti, Alberto; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Sarzani, Riccardo; Sechi, Leonardo; Virdis, Agostino; Tocci, Giuliano; Trimarco, Bruno; Filippi, Alessandro; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Observational clinical studies have demonstrated that only 30-40% of patients with arterial hypertension achieve the recommended blood pressure goals (below 140/90 mmHg). In contrast, interventional trials consistently showed that it is possible to achieve effective blood pressure targets in about 70% of treated hypertensive patients with different cardiovascular risk profiles, especially through the use of rational, effective and well tolerated combination therapies. In order to bridge the gap between current and desired blood pressure control and to achieve more effective prevention of cardiovascular diseases, the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA) has developed an interventional strategy aimed at reaching nearly 70% of treated controlled hypertensive patients by 2015. This ambitious goal can be realistically achieved by a more rational use of modern tools and supports, and also through the use of combination therapy in hypertension in daily clinical practice, especially if this approach can be simplified into a single pill (fixed combination therapy), which is a therapeutic option now also available in Italy. Since about 70-80% of treated hypertensive patients require a combination therapy based on at least two classes of drugs in order to achieve the recommended blood pressure goals, it is of key importance to implement this strategy in routine clinical practice. Amongst the various combination therapies currently available for hypertension treatment and control, the use of those strategies based on drugs that antagonize the renin-angiotensin system, such as angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers) and ACE inhibitors, in combination with diuretics and/or calcium channel blockers, has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events and to improve patient compliance to treatment, resulting in a greater antihypertensive efficacy and better tolerability compared with monotherapy. The present document

  4. Social Stress Induced Pressure Breathing and Consequent Blood Pressure Oscillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Dirk S.; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Meulen, Jan van der; Schoemaker, Regien

    1986-01-01

    A large amplitude blood pressure oscillation occurs during social defeat in a territorial fight between male rats, and during the application of a psychosocial stimulus associated with this defeat. Synchronous recording of blood pressure, intrathoracic pressure and diaphragm activity shows that the

  5. Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring in Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Ushida, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Keita; Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Imai, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akio; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques; Yamada, Ichiro

    Continuous monitoring of blood pressure in daily life could improve early detection of cardiovascular disorders, as well as promoting healthcare. Conventional ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) equipment can measure blood pressure at regular intervals for 24 hours, but is limited by long measuring time, low sampling rate, and constrained measuring posture. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for continuous real-time measurement of blood pressure during daily activities. Our method is based on blood pressure estimation from pulse wave velocity (PWV) calculation, which formula we improved to take into account changes in the inner diameter of blood vessels. Blood pressure estimation results using our new method showed a greater precision of measured data during exercise, and a better accuracy than the conventional PWV method.

  6. Randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial of the blood pressure-lowering effect of fermented milk with Lactococcus lactis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Barrientos, Lilia M; González-Córdova, Aarón F; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Torres-Inguanzo, Eduardo H; Astiazarán-García, Humberto; Esparza-Romero, Julián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2018-04-01

    The blood pressure-lowering effect of fermented milk with Lactococcus lactis NRRL B-50571 was evaluated in a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial with prehypertensive subjects. Participants were randomized into 2 groups (n = 18 each group): one group treated with fermented milk with Lactococcus lactis NRRL B-50571 and a control group treated with artificially acidified milk. Results revealed that during daily consumption of fermented milk for 5 wk, systolic [(116.55 ± 12.26 mmHg vs. 124.77 ± 11.04 mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (80.7 ± 9 vs. 84.5 ± 8.5 mmHg)] from the fermented milk group was lower than the control group. Additionally, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein in blood serum were lower in the fermented milk group than in the control group. Results demonstrated that daily consumption of fermented milk with Lactococcus lactis (NRRL B-50571) had a blood pressure-lowering effect on prehypertensive subjects. Regular consumption of this product may be used as a potential functional food. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of pomegranate juice on blood pressure: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Ferri, Claudio; Giorgini, Paolo; Bo, Simona; Nachtigal, Petr; Grassi, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate) has been claimed to provide several health benefits. Pomegranate juice is a polyphenol-rich fruit juice with high antioxidant capacity. Several studies suggested that pomegranate juice can exert antiatherogenic, antioxidant, antihypertensive, and anti-inflammatory effects. Nevertheless, the potential cardioprotective benefits of pomegranate juice deserve further clinical investigation. To systematically review and meta-analyze available evidence from randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of pomegranate juice consumption and blood pressure (BP). A comprehensive literature search in Medline and Scopus was carried out to identify eligible RCTs. A meta-analysis of eligible studies was performed using a random-effects model. Quality assessment, sensitivity analysisand publication bias evaluations were conducted using standard methods. Quantitative data synthesis from 8 RCTs showed significant reductions in both systolic [weighed mean difference (WMD): -4.96mmHg, 95% CI: -7.67 to -2.25, ppomegranate juice consumption. Effects on SBP remained stable to sensitivity analyses. Pomegranate juice reduced SBP regardless of the duration (>12 wks: WMD=-4.36mmHg, 95% CI: -7.89 to -0.82, p=0.016) and 240cc: WMD=-3.62mmHg, 95% CI: -6.62 to -0.63, p=0.018) and pomegranate juice per day) whereas doses >240cc provided a borderline significant effect in reducing DBP. The present meta-analysis suggests consistent benefits of pomegranate juice consumption on BP. This evidence suggests it may be prudent to include this fruit juice in a heart-healthy diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Polyphenol-rich juices reduce blood pressure measures in a randomised controlled trial in high normal and hypertensive volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjelle, Torunn Elisabeth; Holtung, Linda; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Aaby, Kjersti; Thoresen, Magne; Wiik, Siv Åshild; Paur, Ingvild; Karlsen, Anette Solli; Retterstøl, Kjetil; Iversen, Per Ole; Blomhoff, Rune

    2015-10-14

    Intake of fruits and berries may lower blood pressure (BP), most probably due to the high content of polyphenols. In the present study, we tested whether consumption of two polyphenol-rich juices could lower BP. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 12 weeks, 134 healthy individuals, aged 50-70 years, with high normal range BP (130/85-139/89 mmHg, seventy-two subjects) or stage 1-2 hypertension (140/90-179/109 mmHg, sixty-two subjects), were included. They consumed 500 ml/d of one of either (1) a commercially available polyphenol-rich juice based on red grapes, cherries, chokeberries and bilberries; (2) a juice similar to (1) but enriched with polyphenol-rich extracts from blackcurrant press-residue or (3) a placebo juice (polyphenol contents 245·5, 305·2 and 76 mg/100 g, respectively). Resting BP was measured three times, with a 1 min interval, at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks of intervention. Systolic BP significantly reduced over time (6 and 12 weeks, respectively) in the pooled juice group compared with the placebo group in the first of the three measurements, both for the whole study group (6·9 and 3·4 mmHg; P= 0·01) and even more pronounced in the hypertensive subjects when analysed separately (7·3 and 6·8 mmHg; P= 0·04). The variation in the BP measurements was significantly reduced in the pooled juice group compared with the placebo group (1·4 and 1·7 mmHg; P= 0·03). In conclusion, the present findings suggest that polyphenol-rich berry juice may contribute to a BP- and BP variability lowering effect, being more pronounced in hypertensive than in normotensive subjects.

  9. Taurine Supplementation Lowers Blood Pressure and Improves Vascular Function in Prehypertension: Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qianqian; Wang, Bin; Li, Yingsha; Sun, Fang; Li, Peng; Xia, Weijie; Zhou, Xunmei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Jing; Zeng, Xiangru; Zhao, Zhigang; He, Hongbo; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-03-01

    Taurine, the most abundant, semiessential, sulfur-containing amino acid, is well known to lower blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive animal models. However, no rigorous clinical trial has validated whether this beneficial effect of taurine occurs in human hypertension or prehypertension, a key stage in the development of hypertension. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we assessed the effects of taurine intervention on BP and vascular function in prehypertension. We randomly assigned 120 eligible prehypertensive individuals to receive either taurine supplementation (1.6 g per day) or a placebo for 12 weeks. Taurine supplementation significantly decreased the clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BPs, especially in those with high-normal BP. Mean clinic systolic BP reduction for taurine/placebo was 7.2/2.6 mm Hg, and diastolic BP was 4.7/1.3 mm Hg. Mean ambulatory systolic BP reduction for taurine/placebo was 3.8/0.3 mm Hg, and diastolic BP was 3.5/0.6 mm Hg. In addition, taurine supplementation significantly improved endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation and increased plasma H2S and taurine concentrations. Furthermore, changes in BP were negatively correlated with both the plasma H2S and taurine levels in taurine-treated prehypertensive individuals. To further elucidate the hypotensive mechanism, experimental studies were performed both in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that taurine treatment upregulated the expression of hydrogen sulfide-synthesizing enzymes and reduced agonist-induced vascular reactivity through the inhibition of transient receptor potential channel subtype 3-mediated calcium influx in human and mouse mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, the antihypertensive effect of chronic taurine supplementation shows promise in the treatment of prehypertension through improvement of vascular function. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. IPP-rich milk protein hydrolysate lowers blood pressure in subjects with stage 1 hypertension, a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kloek Joris

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milk derived peptides have been identified as potential antihypertensive agents. The primary objective was to investigate the effectiveness of IPP-rich milk protein hydrolysates (MPH on reducing blood pressure (BP as well as to investigate safety parameters and tolerability. The secondary objective was to confirm or falsify ACE inhibition as the mechanism underlying BP reductions by measuring plasma renin activity and angiotensin I and II. Methods We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind, crossover study including 70 Caucasian subjects with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension. Study treatments consisted of daily consumption of two capsules MPH1 (each containing 7.5 mg Isoleucine-Proline-Proline; IPP, MPH2 (each containing 6.6 mg Methionine-Alanine-Proline, 2.3 mg Leucine-Proline-Proline, 1.8 mg IPP, or placebo (containing cellulose for 4 weeks. Results In subjects with stage 1 hypertension, MPH1 lowered systolic BP by 3.8 mm Hg (P = 0.0080 and diastolic BP by 2.3 mm Hg (P = 0.0065 compared with placebo. In prehypertensive subjects, the differences in BP between MPH1 and placebo were not significant. MPH2 did not change BP significantly compared with placebo in stage I hypertensive or prehypertensive subjects. Intake of MPHs was well tolerated and safe. No treatment differences in hematology, clinical laboratory parameters or adverse effects were observed. No significant differences between MPHs and placebo were found in plasma renin activity, or angiotensin I and II. Conclusions MPH1, containing IPP and no minerals, exerts clinically relevant BP lowering effects in subjects with stage 1 hypertension. It may be included in lifestyle changes aiming to prevent or reduce high BP. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00471263

  11. Poor blood pressure control and its associated factors among older people with hypertension: A cross-sectional study in six public primary care clinics in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheong Ai Theng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is highly prevalent in the older people. Chronic disease care is a major burden in the public primary care clinics in Malaysia. Good blood pressure (BP control is needed to reduce the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD. This study aimed to determine the status of BP control and its associated factors among older people with hypertension in public primary care clinics.

  12. Early and late growth and blood pressure in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, B L; Barros, F C; Victora, C G; Cole, T J

    2003-03-01

    To assess the effect of growth during infancy and childhood on blood pressure in adolescence. Birth cohort study. Pelotas, southern Brazil. 749 adolescents with complete information on birth weight and gestational age, as well as on anthropometric data at all three follow up visits (mean age 20 months, 42 months, and 15 years). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure at adolescence. After controlling for possible confounding variables, birth weight was negatively associated with systolic blood pressure, one unit increase in standard deviation score of birth weight for gestational age was associated with a decrease of 1.23 mm Hg (95% confidence intervals -2.03 to -0.43) in systolic blood pressure. Weight for age z score at the age of 15 years showed a strong positive association with systolic blood pressure, one unit increase in standard deviation score of birth weight for gestational age was associated with an increase of 4.4 mm Hg (95% confidence intervals 3.50 to 5.3). Diastolic blood pressure was not associated with birth weight. For adequate for gestational age infants, the positive association between weight in adolescence and blood pressure became stronger when previous weights were added to the model. This study showed that early--as well as--late catch up growth is associated with increased systolic blood pressure in adolescence, whereas only late catch up is related with diastolic blood pressure. These findings suggest that catch up growth, irrespective of age, is associated with increased blood pressure in adolescence.

  13. Effect of resveratrol on blood pressure: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled, clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogacci, Federica; Tocci, Giuliano; Presta, Vivianne; Fratter, Andrea; Borghi, Claudio; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2018-01-23

    Results of previous clinical trials evaluating the effect of resveratrol supplementation on blood pressure (BP) are controversial. We aimed to assess the impact of resveratrol on BP through systematic review of literature and meta-analysis of available randomized, controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Literature search included SCOPUS, PubMed-Medline, ISI Web of Science and Google Scholar databases up to 17th October 2017 to identify RCTs investigating the impact of resveratrol on BP. Two review authors independently extracted data on study characteristics, methods and outcomes. Overall, the impact of resveratrol on BP was reported in 17 trials. Administration of resveratrol did not significantly affect neither systolic BP [weighted mean difference (WMD): -2.5 95% CI:(-5.5, 0.6) mmHg; p=0.116; I 2 =62.1%], nor diastolic BP [WMD: -0.5 95% CI:(-2.2, 1.3) mmHg; p=0.613; I 2 =50.8], nor mean BP [MAP; WMD: -1.3 95% CI:(-2.8, 0.1) mmHg; p=0.070; I 2 =39.5%] nor pulse pressure [PP; WMD: -0.9 95% CI:(-3.1, 1.4) mmHg; p=0.449; I 2 =19.2%]. However, significant WMDs were detected in subsets of studies categorized according to high resveratrol daily dosage (≥300 mg/day) and presence of diabetes. Meta-regression analysis revealed a positive association between systolic BP-lowering resveratrol activity (slope: 1.99; 95% CI: 0.05, 3.93; two-tailed p= 0.04) and Body Mass Index (BMI) at baseline, while no association was detected neither between baseline BMI and MAP-lowering resveratrol activity (slope: 1.35; 95% CI: -0.22, 2.91; two-tailed p= 0.09) nor between baseline BMI and PP-lowering resveratrol activity (slope: 1.03; 95% CI: -1.33, 3.39; two-tailed p= 0.39). Resveratrol was fairly well-tolerated and no serious adverse events occurred among most of the eligible trials. The favourable effect of resveratrol emerging from the current meta-analysis suggests the possible use of this nutraceutical as active compound in order to promote cardiovascular health, mostly when used in

  14. How to Prevent High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your diastolic pressure is 100 or higher For children and teens, the health care provider compares the blood pressure reading to what is normal for other kids who are the same age, height, and gender. People with diabetes or chronic kidney disease should keep their blood pressure below 130/80. ...

  15. Telemonitoring and/or self-monitoring of blood pressure in hypertension (TASMINH4): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Marloes; Farmer, Andrew; Grant, Sabrina; Greenfield, Sheila; Heneghan, Carl; Hobbs, Richard; Hodgkinson, James; Jowett, Susan; Mant, Jonathan; Martin, Una; Milner, Siobhan; Monahan, Mark; Ogburn, Emma; Perera-Salazar, Rafael; Schwartz, Claire; Yu, Ly-Mee; McManus, Richard J

    2017-02-13

    Self-monitoring of hypertension is associated with lower systolic blood pressure (SBP). However, evidence for the use of self-monitoring to titrate antihypertensive medication by physicians is equivocal. Furthermore, there is some evidence for the efficacy of telemonitoring in the management of hypertension but it is not clear what this adds over and above self-monitoring. This trial aims to evaluate whether GP led antihypertensive titration using self-monitoring results in lower SBP compared to usual care and whether telemonitoring adds anything to self-monitoring alone. This will be a pragmatic primary care based, unblinded, randomised controlled trial of self-monitoring of BP with or without telemonitoring compared to usual care. Eligible patients will have poorly controlled hypertension (>140/90 mmHg) and will be recruited from primary care. Participants will be individually randomised to either usual care, self-monitoring alone, or self-monitoring with telemonitoring. The primary outcome of the trial will be difference in clinic SBP between intervention and control groups at 12 months adjusted for baseline SBP, gender, BP target and practice. At least 1110 patients will be sufficient to detect a difference in SBP between self-monitoring with or without telemonitoring and usual care of 5 mmHg with 90% power with an adjusted alpha of 0.017 (2-sided) to adjust for all three pairwise comparisons. Other outcomes will include adherence of anti-hypertensive medication, lifestyle behaviours, health-related quality of life, and adverse events. An economic analysis will consider both within trial costs and a model extrapolating the results thereafter. A qualitative sub study will gain insights into the views, experiences and decision making processes of patients and health care professionals focusing on the acceptability of self-monitoring and telemonitoring in the routine management of hypertension. The results of the trial will be directly applicable to primary

  16. Blood Pressure: Does It Have a Daily Pattern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheps, M.D. Blood pressure has a daily pattern. Blood pressure is normally lower at night while you' ... begins dropping again. Having an abnormal blood pressure pattern, such as high blood pressure during the night or early in the ...

  17. Contributions of social context to blood pressure: findings from a multilevel analysis of social capital and systolic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Fujisawa, Yoshikazu; Yamasaki, Masayuki; Ito, Katsuhisa; Nabika, Toru; Shiwaku, Kuninori

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, few studies have quantified the effect of residential context on blood pressure. Although these studies have emphasized the importance of socioeconomic influences such as education or poverty levels, the association between the features of social structure such as social capital and blood pressure remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether social capital was associated with systolic blood pressure after controlling for individual potential confounders. We analyzed data from the Shimane Study conducted from 2006 to 2008 in rural mountainous regions of Japan. After excluding the missing data and data of participants taking hypertension medication, we conducted a multilevel analysis of the data for 335 individuals nested within 30 postcode sectors. Systolic blood pressure increased with increasing age and body mass index. We also found that a higher systolic blood pressure was observed among smokers and those taking medication for diabetes. Regarding the contextual effects of social capital, systolic blood pressure increased with an increasing proportion of lack of fairness, after adjustment for individual confounders. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the association between social capital and systolic blood pressure by using a multilevel methodological framework. Surprisingly, we found that lack of fairness had a strong effect on systolic blood pressure. However, we could not find any significant associations between other items of social capital and systolic blood pressure. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanism by which lack of fairness may have an effect on systolic blood pressure.

  18. Peripheral blood pressure by Dinamap and central blood pressure by applanation tonometry in outpatient general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Luiz Miguel; Simões, Ana Rita; Ricardo Miranda, Paula; Matias, Catarina; Rosendo, Inês; Constantino, Liliana; Santos, Tiago; Neto, Maria da Glória; Francisco, Maria dos Prazeres

    2013-06-01

    Central blood pressure (CBP) is the pressure exerted by the blood column at any given moment on the aortic and carotid artery walls, which is a close proxy for the blood pressure inside the brain and the heart, and is thus a better marker of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than peripheral blood pressure (PBP). To assess how the augmentation index (AI), peripheral pulse pressure (pPP), central pulse pressure (cPP) and subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) vary in hypertensive patients according to level of control of CBP and PBP. We performed an observational, cross-sectional study in a convenience sample from a general practice in Central Portugal over a period of four days in May 2010. Measurements were taken after a four-minute resting period. The following values were considered to reflect controlled pressures: PBP <140/90 mmHg, CBP <130/80 mmHg, pPP <55 mmHg and cPP <45 mmHg. The sample included 92 patients, 38 male (41.3%), mean age 62.3±11.1 years, with no significant difference in gender distribution. PBP was controlled in 55 (59.8%), and CBP in 53 (57.6%). Both PBP and CBP were controlled in 50 patients (54.3%) and neither was controlled in 34 (37.9%). pPP and cPP were significantly lower in those with controlled PBP (p<0.001) and CBP (p<0.001). AI was non-significantly lower in those with controlled PBP (78±9 vs. 80.7) and those with controlled CBP (78±9 vs.81±7) (p=0.02). SEVR was within the desirable range in 92 patients (92.2%). 78.4% of individuals were taking drugs acting on the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS). In a convenience sample of 92 patients, PBP and CBP were controlled in 59.8% and 57.6%, respectively. Those with controlled PBP had significantly better peripheral systolic and diastolic blood pressure, CBP, pPP and cPP; the same was true of those with controlled CBP, who also had a significantly better AI. The percentage of the cardiac cycle in diastole had a desirable value for 92,2% of the subjects. Copyright © 2011

  19. Improved control of blood pressure and albuminuria among patients with type-2 diabetes in Finnish open care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varis, Juha; Metsärinne, Kaj; Koivisto, Veikko; Niskanen, Leo; Rissanen, Aila; Virkamäki, Antti; Appelroth, Tina; Pöntynen, Nora; Poussa, Tuija; Kantola, Ilkka

    2017-04-01

    Risk of cardiovascular events within the diabetic population has decreased and survival increased with patients living longer and thus facing the development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This calls for good care of patient with diabetes with a focus on hypertension. Patient data were collected from 42 Finnish primary care centres. Each was asked to enrol 10-12 consecutive patients with type-2 diabetes between March 2011 and August 2012. Along with the office blood pressure measurements and laboratory tests, the presence of albuminuria was measured and glomerular filtration rate estimated (eGFR). The 2013 ESH criteria for diabetic hypertensive patients (albuminuria and hence ESRD prevention was achieved.

  20. DASH diet to lower high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000770.htm DASH diet to lower high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet can help lower high blood ...

  1. The effects of repeated administration of camphor-crataegus berry extract combination on blood pressure and on attentional performance - a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfurt, L; Schandry, R; Rubenbauer, S; Braun, U

    2014-09-25

    The present study investigated the effects of repeated administration of Korodin(®), a combination of camphor and crataegus berry extract, on blood pressure and attentional functioning. This study was conducted based on a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind design. 54 persons participated (33 female, 21 male) with a mean age of 24.3 years. Blood pressure and body mass index were in the normal range. Participants received 20 drops of either Korodin(®) or a placebo for four times with interjacent time intervals of about 10 min. Blood pressure was measured sphygmomanometrically before and after each administration. Attentional performance was quantified by using two paper-and-pencil tests, the d2 Test of Attention and Digit Symbol Test. Greater increases in blood pressure occurred after the four Korodin(®) administrations in comparison to the four placebo administrations. The performance in two parameters of d2 Test of Attention was consistently superior after the intake of Korodin(®). The excellent tolerability and safety of Korodin(®), even after a total consumption of 80 drops, was confirmed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. HYT-hypertension in Turkey: a cross-sectional survey on blood pressure control with calcium channel blockers alone or combined with other antihypertensive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalle, Gino; Koylan, Nevrez; Nalbantgil, Istemi; Caglar, Nail; Quarti-Trevano, Fosca; Makel, Wim; Grassi, Guido; Fici, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Although improved during the past few years, high blood pressure control still remains an unmet goal of antihypertensive drug treatment. Among different antihypertensive agents, calcium channel blockers (CCBs), either as monotherapy or in combination with other drugs are recommended by several guidelines for initiation and maintenance of antihypertensive treatment. The HYT-HYperTension survey, carried out in Turkey was aimed to assess (a) blood pressure control in hypertensive patients under treatment with dihydropyridine CCBs, either as monotherapy or in combination with other drugs and (b) the prevalence of blood pressure control in subgroups of patients with cardiovascular risk factors (previous cardiovascular disease, diabetes, renal disease, isolated systolic hypertension, visceral obesity, overweight, current smoking habit). More than 7000 hypertensive patients (60.0 % men, mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), routinely visited by either a specialist or a non-specialist physician in the Primary Care Units of 26 cities across Turkey, were enrolled in the survey. Only patients treated with dihydropyridine-type CCBs, as mono- or combination therapy were included in the study, whereas individuals treated with non-dihydropyridine-type CCBs or with other drug classes (as monotherapy or combination therapy), were excluded. Demographic data (age, gender, height, weight, waist circumference, current smoker habit), clinical data and drug treatments were collected at each visit. Blood pressure was measured with a semiautomatic device (Omron-M6) with the patient in sitting position and after at least 5 min of rest. Measurements were repeated three times, at intervals of 5 min each other. In the overall survey population blood pressure control (blood pressure blood pressure was 145.3/88.2 mmHg. Prevalence of patients treated with dihydropyridine-type CCBs, either as monotherapy or combined with other drugs, was superimposable (51.6 vs 48.4 %, P = NS). Dihydropyridine-type CCBs

  3. Effect of social deprivation on blood pressure monitoring and control in England: a survey of data from the quality and outcomes framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Mark; Medina, Jibby; Morgan, Myfanwy

    2008-10-28

    To determine levels of blood pressure monitoring and control in primary care and to determine the effect of social deprivation on these levels. Retrospective longitudinal survey, 2005 to 2007. General practices in England. Data obtained from 8515 practices (99.3% of all practices) in year 1, 8264 (98.3%) in year 2, and 8192 (97.8%) in year 3. Blood pressure indicators and chronic disease prevalence estimates contained within the UK quality and outcomes framework; social deprivation scores for each practice, ethnicity data obtained from the 2001 national census; general practice characteristics. In 2005, 82.3% of adults (n=52.8m) had an up to date blood pressure recording; by 2007, this proportion had risen to 88.3% (n=53.2m). Initially, there was a 1.7% gap between mean blood pressure recording levels in practices located in the least deprived fifth of communities compared with the most deprived fifth, but, three years later, this gap had narrowed to 0.2%. Achievement of target blood pressure levels in 2005 for practices located in the least deprived communities ranged from 71.0% (95% CI 70.4% to 71.6%) for diabetes to 85.1% (84.7% to 85.6%) for coronary heart disease; practices in the most deprived communities achieved 68.9% (68.4% to 69.5%) and 81.8 % (81.3% to 82.3%) respectively. Three years later, target achievement in the least deprived practices had risen to 78.6% (78.1% to 79.1%) and 89.4% (89.1% to 89.7%) respectively. Target achievement in the most deprived practices rose similarly, to 79.2% (78.8% to 79.6%) and 88.4% (88.2% to 88.7%) respectively. Similar changes were observed for the achievement of blood pressure targets in hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Since the reporting of performance indicators for primary care and the incorporation of pay for performance in 2004, blood pressure monitoring and control have improved substantially. Improvements in achievement have been accompanied by the near disappearance of the

  4. Non-hemodynamic predictors of blood pressure in recreational sport ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, there are evidences that regular physical activity is an efficient means to control high blood pressure. This cross-sectional study aims at identifying in subjects who exercise in non-institutional structures at Cotonou, the main factors that account for the inter-individual variations of the blood pressure. Four adiposity ...

  5. EDUCORE project: a clinical trial, randomised by clusters, to assess the effect of a visual learning method on blood pressure control in the primary healthcare setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido-Elustondo Sofia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High blood pressure (HBP is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD. European hypertension and cardiology societies as well as expert committees on CVD prevention recommend stratifying cardiovascular risk using the SCORE method, the modification of lifestyles to prevent CVD, and achieving good control over risk factors. The EDUCORE (Education and Coronary Risk Evaluation project aims to determine whether the use of a cardiovascular risk visual learning method - the EDUCORE method - is more effective than normal clinical practice in improving the control of blood pressure within one year in patients with poorly controlled hypertension but no background of CVD; Methods/Design This work describes a protocol for a clinical trial, randomised by clusters and involving 22 primary healthcare clinics, to test the effectiveness of the EDUCORE method. The number of patients required was 736, all between 40 and 65 years of age (n = 368 in the EDUCORE and control groups, all of whom had been diagnosed with HBP at least one year ago, and all of whom had poorly controlled hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic ≥ 90 mmHg. All personnel taking part were explained the trial and trained in its methodology. The EDUCORE method contemplates the visualisation of low risk SCORE scores using images embodying different stages of a high risk action, plus the receipt of a pamphlet explaining how to better maintain cardiac health. The main outcome variable was the control of blood pressure; secondary outcome variables included the SCORE score, therapeutic compliance, quality of life, and total cholesterol level. All outcome variables were measured at the beginning of the experimental period and again at 6 and 12 months. Information on sex, age, educational level, physical activity, body mass index, consumption of medications, change of treatment and blood analysis results was also recorded; Discussion The

  6. Effects of hormone therapy on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Zeinab; Seely, Ellen W; Rahme, Maya; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2015-04-01

    Although hormone therapy remains the most efficacious option for the management of vasomotor symptoms of menopause, its effects on blood pressure remain unclear. This review scrutinizes evidence of the mechanisms of action of hormone therapy on signaling pathways affecting blood pressure and evidence from clinical studies. Comprehensive Ovid MEDLINE searches were conducted for the terms "hypertension" and either of the following "hormone therapy and menopause" or "selective estrogen receptor modulator" from year 2000 to November 2013. In vitro and physiologic studies did not reveal a clear deleterious effect of hormone therapy on blood pressure. The effect of oral therapy was essentially neutral in large trials conducted in normotensive women with blood pressure as primary outcome. Results from all other trials had several limitations. Oral therapy had a neutral effect on blood pressure in hypertensive women. Transdermal estrogen and micronized progesterone had a beneficial effect on blood pressure in normotensive women and, at most, a neutral effect on hypertensive women. In general, tibolone and raloxifene had a neutral effect on blood pressure in both hypertensive and normotensive women. Large randomized trials are needed to assess the effect of oral hormone therapy on blood pressure as a primary outcome in hypertensive women and the effect of transdermal preparations on both normotensive and hypertensive women. Transdermal preparations would be the preferred mode of therapy for hypertensive women, in view of their favorable physiologic and clinical profiles. The decision regarding the use of hormone therapy should be individualized, and blood pressure should be monitored during the course of treatment.

  7. Weightlifting: Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals. American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2016;311:H1024. Carlson DJ, et al. Isometric exercise training for blood pressure management: A systematic review ...

  8. PRESSURE SYSTEM CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esselman, W.H.; Kaplan, G.M.

    1961-06-20

    The control of pressure in pressurized liquid systems, especially a pressurized liquid reactor system, may be achieved by providing a bias circuit or loop across a closed loop having a flow restriction means in the form of an orifice, a storage tank, and a pump connected in series. The subject invention is advantageously utilized where control of a reactor can be achieved by response to the temperature and pressure of the primary cooling system.

  9. Resistance or aerobic training decreases blood pressure and improves cardiovascular autonomic control and oxidative stress in hypertensive menopausal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Palma, Renata K; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; da Silva Dias, Danielle; Shimojo, Guilherme L; Conti, Filipe F; Bernardes, Nathalia; Barboza, Catarina A; Sanches, Iris C; da Rosa Araújo, Alex Sander; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2016-10-01

    We investigated whether resistance training (RT) vs. aerobic training (AT) differentially impacts on arterial pressure and related mechanisms in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Female SHRs were ovariectomized and assigned to one of the following groups: sedentary, AT, or RT; sham sedentary SHR were used as control group. AT was performed on a treadmill, whereas RT was performed on a vertical ladder. Both exercise protocols were performed for 8 wk, 5 days/wk. Arterial pressure, baroreflex sensitivity, autonomic modulation, and cardiac oxidative stress parameters (lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, redox balance, NADPH oxidase, and antioxidant enzymes activities) were analyzed. Ovariectomy increased mean arterial pressure (∼9 mmHg), sympathetic modulation (∼40%), and oxidative stress in sedentary rats. Both RT and AT reduced mean arterial pressure (∼20 and ∼8 mmHg, respectively) and improved baroreflex sensitivity compared with sedentary ovariectomized rats. However, RT-induced arterial pressure decrease was significantly less pronounced than AT. Lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were decreased while antioxidant enzymes were increased in both trained groups vs. sedentaries. The reduced gluthatione was higher after AT vs. other groups, whereas oxidized gluthatione was lower after RT vs. AT. Moreover, sympathetic and parasympathetic modulations were highly correlated with cardiac oxidative stress parameters. In conclusion, both RT and AT can decrease arterial pressure in a model of hypertension and menopause; although, at different magnitudes this decrease was related to attenuated autonomic dysfunction in association with cardiac oxidative stress improvement in both exercise protocols. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Effects of the L/N-type calcium channel antagonist cilnidipine on morning blood pressure control and peripheral edema formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Sumito; Yoshioka, Yasuko; Ide, Atsumi; Kadokami, Toshiaki; Momii, Hidetoshi; Yoshida, Masayoshi; Ando, Shin-ichi

    2011-01-01

    The L/N-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine has unique effects including sympathetic nerve suppression and the balanced vasodilatation of arteries and veins that may alleviate morning hypertension (MHT) or peripheral edema caused by calcium channel antagonists. We used ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and a unique peripheral edema measurement to evaluate the effect of morning and bedtime cilnidipine in patients with MHT. Forty-three patients with MHT (60 ± 12 years) were randomly assigned to a morning or bedtime cilnidipine (10-20 mg/day). MHT was defined as a mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 135 mm Hg by ABPM within 2 hours after awaking. After 3 months, greater SBP reductions were observed in the bedtime administration group (versus the morning administration group) at 3:30-6:00 AM (-24 ± 20 mm Hg vs. -10 ± 4 mm Hg; P < .05) and at 6:30-9:00 AM (-26 ± 15 mm Hg vs. -14 ± 17 mm Hg; P < .05). Although physical examinations showed leg edema in 16% of the patients, quantitative evaluations did not reveal significant volume gains. Cilnidipine had a greater effect on MHT, without causing significant leg edema, when administered at bedtime. Copyright © 2011 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute effects of traditional Thai massage on cortisol levels, arterial blood pressure and stress perception in academic stress condition: A single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Surussawadi; Bennett, Michael John; Chatchawan, Uraiwon; Jenjaiwit, Patcharaporn; Pantumethakul, Rungthip; Kunhasura, Soontorn; Eungpinichpong, Wichai

    2016-04-01

    Traditional Thai massage (TTM) has been applied widely to promote relaxation. However, there is little evidence to support its efficacy on academic stress. A randomised controlled trial was performed to examine the acute effects of TTM on cortisol level, blood pressure, heart rate and stress perception in academic stress. This prospective trial included 36 physiotherapy students with a self perceived stress score of between 3 and 5. They were randomly allocated into the TTM (18 people) group or the control group (18 people). Saliva cortisol level, blood pressure, heart rate and stress perception rating were measured before and after the intervention. Both groups showed a significant reduction in cortisol level and heart rate when compared with baseline (p stress of TTM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of patient-controlled abdominal compression on standing systolic blood pressure in adults with orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Juan J; Singer, Wolfgang; Sandroni, Paola; Sletten, David M; Gehrking, Tonette L; Gehrking, Jade A; Low, Phillip; Basford, Jeffrey R

    2015-03-01

    To assess the effects of patient-controlled abdominal compression on postural changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) associated with orthostatic hypotension (OH). Secondary variables included subject assessments of their preferences and the ease-of-use. Randomized crossover trial. Clinical research laboratory. Adults with neurogenic OH (N=13). Four maneuvers were performed: moving from supine to standing without abdominal compression; moving from supine to standing with either a conventional or an adjustable abdominal binder in place; application of subject-determined maximal tolerable abdominal compression while standing; and while still erect, subsequent reduction of abdominal compression to a level the subject believed would be tolerable for a prolonged period. The primary outcome variable included postural changes in SBP. Secondary outcome variables included subject assessments of their preferences and ease of use. Baseline median SBP in the supine position was not affected by mild (10mmHg) abdominal compression prior to rising (without abdominal compression: 146mmHg; interquartile range, 124-164mmHg; with the conventional binder: 145mmHg; interquartile range, 129-167mmHg; with the adjustable binder: 153mmHg, interquartile range, 129-160mmHg; P=.85). Standing without a binder was associated with an -57mmHg (interquartile range, -40 to -76mmHg) SBP decrease. Levels of compression of 10mmHg applied prior to rising with the conventional and adjustable binders blunted these drops to -50mmHg (interquartile range, -33 to -70mmHg; P=.03) and -46mmHg (interquartile range, -34 to -75mmHg; P=.01), respectively. Increasing compression to subject-selected maximal tolerance while standing did not provide additional benefit and was associated with drops of -53mmHg (interquartile range, -26 to -71mmHg; P=.64) and -59mmHg (interquartile range, -49 to -76mmHg; P=.52) for the conventional and adjustable binders, respectively. Subsequent reduction of compression to more

  13. Normalization effect of sports training on blood pressure in hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Liang; Liu, Yuh-Feng; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Harris, Brennan; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2010-02-01

    Exercise is recommended as a lifestyle intervention in preventing hypertension based on epidemiological findings. However, previous intervention studies have presented mixed results. This discrepancy could be associated with shortcomings related to sample sizes or the inclusion of normotensive participants. The aim of this prospective cohort study (N = 463) was to compare the chronic effect of increasing sports training time on resting blood pressure for normotensives and hypertensives. We assessed systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for 69 untreated hypertensive patients (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg) and 394 normotensive controls (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years) before training and at follow-up visits at 12 months. All participants enrolled in various sports training lessons for 8 hours a week. The baseline BMI and HOMA-IR in the hypertensive group were significantly higher than those in the control group. For the normotensive control group, no significant changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed after training. However, for the hypertensives, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly reduced after training by approximately 15 mmHg and approximately 4 mmHg, respectively, and HOMA-IR was reduced by approximately 25%. In conclusion, the effect of sports training to lower blood pressure was confined to the group of hypertensives, which may account for the overall minimal reduction in blood pressure observed in previous intervention studies.

  14. The devil is in the detail - a multifactorial intervention to reduce blood pressure in co-existing diabetes and chronic kidney disease: a single blind, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manias Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 30-60% of individuals are non-adherent to their prescribed medications and this risk increases as the number of prescribed medications increases. This paper outlines the development of a consumer-centred Medicine Self-Management Intervention (MESMI, designed to improve blood pressure control and medication adherence in consumers with diabetes and chronic kidney disease recruited from specialist outpatients' clinics. Methods We developed a multifactorial intervention consisting of Self Blood Pressure Monitoring (SBPM, medication review, a twenty-minute interactive Digital Versatile Disc (DVD, and follow-up support telephone calls to help consumers improve their blood pressure control and take their medications as prescribed. The intervention is novel in that it has been developed from analysis of consumer and health professional views, and includes consumer video exemplars in the DVD. The primary outcome measure was a drop of 3-6 mmHg systolic blood pressure at three months after completion of the intervention. Secondary outcome measures included: assessment of medication adherence, medication self-efficacy and general wellbeing. Consumers' adherence to their prescribed medications was measured by manual pill count, self-report of medication adherence, and surrogate biochemical markers of disease control. Discussion The management of complex health problems is an increasing component of health care practice, and requires interventions that improve patient outcomes. We describe the preparatory work and baseline data of a single blind, randomized controlled trial involving consumers requiring cross-specialty care with a follow-up period extending to 12 months post-baseline. Trial Registration The trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ACTRN12607000044426.

  15. Ambulatory blood pressure profiles in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lior; Bar-Aluma, Bat-El; Krauthammer, Alex; Efrati, Ori; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2018-02-12

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare genetic disease that involves extreme blood pressure fluctuations secondary to afferent baroreflex failure. The diurnal blood pressure profile, including the average, variability, and day-night difference, may have implications for long-term end organ damage. The purpose of this study was to describe the circadian pattern of blood pressure in the FD population and relationships with renal and pulmonary function, use of medications, and overall disability. We analyzed 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in 22 patients with FD. Information about medications, disease severity, renal function (estimated glomerular filtration, eGFR), pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, FEV1) and an index of blood pressure variability (standard deviation of systolic pressure) were analyzed. The mean (± SEM) 24-h blood pressure was 115 ± 5.6/72 ± 2.0 mmHg. The diurnal blood pressure variability was high (daytime systolic pressure standard deviation 22.4 ± 1.5 mmHg, nighttime 17.2 ± 1.6), with a high frequency of a non-dipping pattern (16 patients, 73%). eGFR, use of medications, FEV1, and disability scores were unrelated to the degree of blood pressure variability or to dipping status. This FD cohort had normal average 24-h blood pressure, fluctuating blood pressure, and a high frequency of non-dippers. Although there was evidence of renal dysfunction based on eGFR and proteinuria, the ABPM profile was unrelated to the measures of end organ dysfunction or to reported disability.

  16. Effects of metformin on the glycemic control, lipid profile, and arterial blood pressure of type 2 diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome already on insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Mourão-Júnior

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-seven type 2 diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome and on insulin were assessed by a paired analysis before and 6 months after addition of metformin as combination therapy to evaluate the impact of the association on glycemic control, blood pressure, and lipid profile. This was a historical cohort study in which the files of type 2 diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome on insulin were reviewed. The body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, lipid profile, A1C level, fasting blood glucose level, daily dose of NPH insulin, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure were assessed in each patient before the start of metformin and 6 months after the initiation of combination therapy. Glycemic control significantly improved (P < 0.001 after the addition of metformin (1404.4 ± 565.5 mg/day, with 14% of the 57 patients reaching A1C levels up to 7%, and 53% reaching values up to 8%. There was a statistically significant reduction (P < 0.05 of total cholesterol (229.0 ± 29.5 to 214.2 ± 25.0 mg/dL, BMI (30.7 ± 5.4 to 29.0 ± 4.0 kg/m², waist circumference (124.6 ± 11.7 to 117.3 ± 9.3 cm, and daily necessity of insulin. The reduction of total cholesterol occurred independently of the reductions of A1C (9.65 ± 1.03 to 8.18 ± 1.01% and BMI and the reduction of BMI and WC did not interfere with the improvement of A1C. In conclusion, our study showed the efficacy of the administration of metformin and insulin simultaneously without negative effects. No changes were detected in HDL-cholesterol or blood pressure.

  17. TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION USING TELEMEDICAL HOME BLOOD PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Petersen, N; Lauritzen, T; Bech, J N

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Telemonitoring of home blood pressure measurements (TBPM) is a new and promising supplement to diagnosis, control and treatment of hypertension. We wanted to compare the outcome of antihypertensive treatment based on TBPM and conventional monitoring of blood pressure. DESIGN AND METHOD...... of the measurements and subsequent communication by telephone or E-mail. In the control group, patients received usual care. Primary outcome was reduction in daytime ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM) from baseline to 3 months' follow-up. RESULTS: In both groups, daytime ABPM decreased significantly....../181), p = 0.34. Blood pressure reduction in the TBPM group varied with the different practices. CONCLUSIONS: No further reduction in ABPM or number of patients reaching blood pressure targets was observed when electronic transmission of TBPM was applied in the treatment of hypertension by GPs. Thus...

  18. Segmental blood pressure after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients due to have a total hip replacement had their systemic systolic and segmental blood pressures measured prior to operation and 1 and 6 weeks postoperatively. No patients had signs of ischemia. The segmental blood pressure was measured at the ankle and at the toes. A significant...... drop was found in all pressures 1 week postoperatively. The decrease followed the systemic pressure and was restored to normal after 6 weeks. In a group of six patients with preoperatively decreased ankle pressure, a significant transient further decrease in the ankle-toe gradient pressure was found...

  19. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in nonagenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, Francesc; Ferrer, Assumpta; Sobrino, Javier; Coca, Antonio; Riera, Antoni; Pujol, Ramón

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in a sample of Spanish nonagenarians. We also analyzed the misdiagnosis of hypertension and investigated blood pressure (BP) control in treated hypertensive nonagenarians. Twenty-four-hour ABPM was undertaken in a group of 42 nonagenarians. The 24-h mean, daytime BP, nighttime BP and heart rate (HR) were extracted from the ABPM. Sociodemographic data, the ability to perform basic daily activities, measured by the Barthel index (BI) or instrumental activities revealed by the Lawton and Brody index (LI), cognition, and comorbidity were evaluated. Thirty-one subjects were receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. Twenty-four hour, daytime and sleeping pressures averaged 130/65, 131/68 and 128/63mmHg, respectively. Seventeen (40.5%) of the 42 patients had a daytime BP of 135/85 or higher. In terms of the BP pattern, 8 (19%) subjects were dippers, 19 (45%) non-dippers, and 15 (36%) were risers. Five (45.46%) out of 11 patients with no evidence of hypertension (normotensive patients) had a daytime BP of 135/85 or higher. The mean daytime BP was 135/85 or higher in 12 (38.7%) out of 31 nonagenarians who had previously received therapy for hypertension. In, conclusion a high prevalence of hypertension, misdiagnosis and inadequate BP control was found in nonagenarians treated for hypertension.

  20. Reducing maternal mortality : systolic blood pressure | Whitworth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish whether systolic blood pressure management outlined in hospital guidelines for the management of severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia is in ... There was considerable variation in the level of blood pressure used as a target during treatment with antihypertensive medication and 32 (43.8%) of the ...

  1. Side effects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.S. van der; Lenders, J.W.M.; Thien, Th.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the experiences and complaints of patients who underwent 24 h blood pressure monitoring. METHODS: Two groups of hypertensive patients of a tertiary outpatient clinic were asked to fill in a nine-item questionnaire about the side effects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

  2. Segmental blood pressure after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients due to have a total hip replacement had their systemic systolic and segmental blood pressures measured prior to operation and 1 and 6 weeks postoperatively. No patients had signs of ischemia. The segmental blood pressure was measured at the ankle and at the toes. A significan...

  3. PATTERN OF BLOOD PRESSURE IN URBAN NIGERIAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pattern of blood pressure in a cross-section of urban apparently healthy Nigerian adolescents aged 13 to 18 years as well as the prevalence of elevated blood pressure (hypertension) in the group is presented. Four hundred and forty three (443) students attending two secondary schools in the city of Calabar formed ...

  4. Anthropometric characteristics, blood pressure profile and medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were calculated, and the blood pressure of the ... Contraceptive use was significantly associated with BMI classification (P=0.000), blood pressure classification (P=0.000) and history of hypertension among the ...

  5. Comparison of the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet and a higher-fat DASH diet on blood pressure and lipids and lipoproteins: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Sally; Bergeron, Nathalie; Williams, Paul T; Bray, George A; Sutherland, Barbara; Krauss, Ronald M

    2016-02-01

    The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) dietary pattern, which is high in fruit, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods, significantly lowers blood pressure as well as low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The study was designed to test the effects of substituting full-fat for low-fat dairy foods in the DASH diet, with a corresponding increase in fat and a reduction in sugar intake, on blood pressure and plasma lipids and lipoproteins. This was a 3-period randomized crossover trial in free-living healthy individuals who consumed in random order a control diet, a standard DASH diet, and a higher-fat, lower-carbohydrate modification of the DASH diet (HF-DASH diet) for 3 wk each, separated by 2-wk washout periods. Laboratory measurements, which included lipoprotein particle concentrations determined by ion mobility, were made at the end of each experimental diet. Thirty-six participants completed all 3 dietary periods. Blood pressure was reduced similarly with the DASH and HF-DASH diets compared with the control diet. The HF-DASH diet significantly reduced triglycerides and large and medium very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle concentrations and increased LDL peak particle diameter compared with the DASH diet. The DASH diet, but not the HF-DASH diet, significantly reduced LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-I, intermediate-density lipoprotein and large LDL particles, and LDL peak diameter compared with the control diet. The HF-DASH diet lowered blood pressure to the same extent as the DASH diet but also reduced plasma triglyceride and VLDL concentrations without significantly increasing LDL cholesterol. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01404897. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Effect of spiritual therapy on blood pressure, anxiety and quality of life in patients with high blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Kalhornia Golkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: High blood pressure is the most important risk factor of cardiovascular diseases. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of spiritual therapy on blood pressure, anxiety and quality of life in patients with high blood pressure. Method: This study was quasi-experimentalwith apretest-posttest and control group design. The sample consisted of 30 patients with high blood pressure refering to Kangavar Healthcare center that were selected through convenience sampling and randomly divided into two experimental and control groups. The instrument for data collection included Cattel’s Anxiety Scale, the World Health Organization Quality of Life and a manometer. After assigning the sample into two groups, the experimental group received spiritual therapy in addition to pharmaceutical therapy, while control group only received drug treatment. Results: Analysis of covariance showed spiritual therapy reduced the systolic blood pressure and anxiety of patients. Also, it increased the patients’ quality of life, however, it did not have a significant effect on the diastolic blood pressure of patients. Conclusion: It is concluded that spiritual therapy as a useful method to improve the anxiety, quality of life and blood pressure of patients with high blood pressure.

  7. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  8. Weight gain is associated with improved glycaemic control but with adverse changes in plasma lipids and blood pressure isn Type 1 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ferriss, J B

    2012-02-03

    AIMS: To assess the effects of weight gain on metabolic control, plasma lipids and blood pressure in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Patients in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study (n = 3250) were examined at baseline and 1800 (55%) were re-examined a mean of 7.3 years later. Patients had Type 1 diabetes, defined as a diagnosis made before age 36 years and with a need for continuous insulin therapy within a year of diagnosis. Patients were aged 15-60 years at baseline and were stratified for age, sex and duration of diabetes. RESULTS: The change in HbA(1c) from baseline to follow-up examination was significantly more favourable in those who gained 5 kg or more during follow-up (\\'marked weight gain\\') than in patients who gained less or no weight or lost weight (\\'less or no weight gain\\'). In those with marked weight gain, there was a significantly greater rise in plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol and significantly less favourable changes in low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with those with less or no weight gain, with or without adjustment for HbA(1c). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure also rose significantly more in the group with marked weight gain. CONCLUSION: Weight gain in patients with Type 1 diabetes has adverse effects on plasma lipids and blood pressure, despite a small improvement in glycaemic control.

  9. Effect of beetroot juice on lowering blood pressure in free-living, disease-free adults: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coles Leah T

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The consumption of beetroot juice on a low nitrate diet may lower blood pressure (BP and therefore reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. However, it is unknown if its inclusion as part of a normal diet has a similar effect on BP. The aim of the study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial with free-living adults to investigate if consuming beetroot juice in addition to a normal diet produces a measureable reduction in BP. Method Fifteen women and fifteen men participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Volunteers were randomized to receive 500 g of beetroot and apple juice (BJ or a placebo juice (PL. Volunteers had BP measured at baseline and at least hourly for 24-h following juice consumption using an ambulatory blood pressure monitor (ABPM. Volunteers remained at the clinic for 1-h before resuming normal non-strenuous daily activities. The identical procedure was repeated 2-wk later with the drink (BJ or PL not consumed on the first visit. Results Overall, there was a trend (P=0.064 to lower systolic blood pressure (SBP at 6-h after drinking BJ relative to PL. Analysis in men only (n=13 after adjustment for baseline differences demonstrated a significant (P Conclusions Beetroot juice will lower BP in men when consumed as part of a normal diet in free-living healthy adults. Trial registration anzctr.org.au ACTRN12612000445875

  10. Title: variations and sensitivities of some blood pressure monitors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure is the pressure exerted by circulating blood upon the walls of blood vessels. Accuracy in blood pressure meters is of essence to health, especially in blood pressure monitoring and treatment. The aim of this research was to compare the readings and the sensitivities of some blood pressure monitors in use ...

  11. Teaming Up Against High Blood Pressure PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-09-04

    Nearly one-third of American adults have high blood pressure, and more than half of them don’t have it under control. Simply seeing a doctor and taking medications isn’t enough for many people who have high blood pressure. A team-based approach by patients, health care systems, and health care providers is one of the best ways to treat uncontrolled high blood pressure.  Created: 9/4/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/4/2012.

  12. Prenatal glucocorticoid exposure in the sheep alters renal development in utero: implications for adult renal function and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Karen M; De Matteo, Robert; Dodic, Miodrag; Jefferies, Andrew J; Arena, Debbie; Wintour, E Marelyn; Probyn, Megan E; Bertram, John F; Singh, Reetu R; Zanini, Simone; Evans, Roger G

    2011-08-01

    Treatment of the pregnant ewe with glucocorticoids early in pregnancy results in offspring with hypertension. This study examined whether glucocorticoids can reduce nephron formation or alter gene expression for sodium channels in the late gestation fetus. Sodium channel expression was also examined in 2-mo-old lambs, while arterial pressure and renal function was examined in adult female offspring before and during 6 wk of increased dietary salt intake. Pregnant ewes were treated with saline (SAL), dexamethasone (DEX; 0.48 mg/h) or cortisol (CORT; 5 mg/h) over days 26-28 of gestation (term = 150 days). At 140 days of gestation, glomerular number in CORT and DEX animals was 40 and 25% less, respectively, compared with SAL controls. Real-time PCR showed greater gene expression for the epithelial sodium channel (α-, β-, γ-subunits) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (α-, β-, γ-subunits) in both the DEX and CORT group fetal kidneys compared with the SAL group with some of these changes persisting in 2-mo-old female offspring. In adulthood, sheep treated with dexamethasone or cortisol in utero had elevated arterial pressure and an apparent increase in single nephron glomerular filtration rate, but global renal hemodynamics and excretory function were normal and arterial pressure was not salt sensitive. Our findings show that the nephron-deficit in sheep exposed to glucocorticoids in utero is acquired before birth, so it is a potential cause, rather than a consequence, of their elevated arterial pressure in adulthood. Upregulation of sodium channels in these animals could provide a mechanistic link to sustained increases in arterial pressure in cortisol- and dexamethasone-exposed sheep, since it would be expected to promote salt and water retention during the postnatal period.

  13. Blood Pressure Home Monitoring in Hypertensive Patients Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , effect of HMBP on adherence to antihypertensive medications, and an assessment of blood pressure control for the patient. To ensure face validity, the questionnaire (in both. English and Arabic languages) was evaluated by three academics ...

  14. Morphine in ventilated neonates: Its effects on arterial blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.H. Simons (Sinno); D.W.E. Roofthooft (Daniella); M. van Dijk (Monique); R.A. Lingen (Richard); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J.N. van den Anker (John); D. Tibboel (Dick)

    2006-01-01

    markdownabstractObjective: To study the effects of continuous morphine infusion on arterial blood pressure in ventilatedneonates. Design: Blinded randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting: Level III neonatal intensive care unit in two centres. Patients: A total of 144 ventilated

  15. Office blood pressure or ambulatory blood pressure for the prediction of cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Jeppesen, Jørgen Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To determine the added value of (i) 24-h ambulatory blood pressure relative to office blood pressure and (ii) night-time ambulatory blood pressure relative to daytime ambulatory blood pressure for 10-year person-specific absolute risks of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. Methods...... and results: A total of 7927 participants were included from the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. We used cause-specific Cox regression to predict 10-year person-specific absolute risks of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events....... Discrimination of 10-year outcomes was assessed by time-dependent area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). No differences in predicted risks were observed when comparing office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure. The median difference in 10-year risks (1st; 3rd quartile) was -0...

  16. [Importance of the blood pressure exercise graph in the diabetic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauduceau, B; Mayaudon, H; Chanudet, X; Lecoules, S; Agrumi, C; Dupuy, O; Larroque, P

    1999-08-01

    The evaluation of the real blood pressure in the diabetic population has a major interest. Arterial blood pressure measure during standardised exercise test could be a supplementary aid in this field of research. This retrospective work is based on 134 diabetic patients compared with age, sex and body mass index matched controls. All of them were tested with a standardised protocol of bicycle ergometer. In the diabetic group, 62 patients present a microalbuminuria over 30 mg/day. The heart rate and arterial pressure do not differ between diabetics and controls before, during, and after the exercise. The registered parameters at the top of the effort are exactly the same for the pulse the systolic and the diastolic blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure gradient during effort is not different between the two groups. The presence of microalbuminuria into the diabetic group do not provoke any modification of cardiac frequency or pressure during the effort. Nevertheless a decrease in systolic blood pressure gradient is noted into the microalbuminuria group despite their older age is in favour of an increase in this parameter. Exercise test has a main place to track down coronary disease and the field of interest is the same that non diabetic patients to find white coat hypertension, to value arterial pressure reactivity during effort of hypertensive athletes or border line hypertensives. The signification and interest of the modification of systolic blood pressure gradient should to be evaluated by other works.

  17. Chronic hypertension: first-trimester blood pressure control and likelihood of severe hypertension, preeclampsia, and small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzelu, Diane; Dumitrascu-Biris, Dan; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Kametas, Nikos A

    2018-03-01

    There is extensive evidence that prepregnancy chronic hypertension is associated with a high risk of development of severe hypertension and preeclampsia and birth of small-for-gestational-age neonates. However, previous studies have not reported whether antihypertensive use, blood pressure control, or normalization of blood pressure during early pregnancy influences the rates of these pregnancy complications. The purpose of this study was to stratify women with prepregnancy chronic hypertension according to the use of antihypertensive medications and level of blood pressure control at the first hospital visit during the first trimester of pregnancy and to examine the rates of severe hypertension, preeclampsia, and birth of small-for-gestational-age neonates according to such stratification. We conducted a prospective study of 586 women with prepregnancy chronic hypertension, in the absence of renal or liver disease, that was booked at a dedicated clinic for the management of hypertension in pregnancy. The patients had singleton pregnancies and were subdivided according to findings in their first visit: group 1 (n=199), blood pressure age neonates (birthweight age). The incidence of these complications was compared in the 3 strata. The median gestational age at presentation was 10.0 weeks (interquartile range, 9.1-11.0 weeks). In groups 2 and 3, compared with group 1, there was a significantly higher body mass index, incidence of black racial origin, and history of preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy. There was a significant increase from group 1 to group 3 in the incidence of severe hypertension (10.6%, 22.2%, and 52.1%), preterm preeclampsia with onset at age (13.1%, 17.7%, and 21.1%), but not term preeclampsia with onset at ≥37 weeks of gestation (9.5%, 9.1%, and 6.6%). In women with prepregnancy chronic hypertension, the rates of development of severe hypertension, preterm preeclampsia, and small for gestational age are related to the use of antihypertensive

  18. A randomized controlled trial of the effects of brief mindfulness meditation on anxiety symptoms and systolic blood pressure in Chinese nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Yang, Xueling; Wang, Liyuan; Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies suggested that mindfulness meditation effectively reduced stress-related anxiety and depression symptoms, but no research has evaluated the efficacy of mindfulness meditation in nurses and nursing students in China. To evaluate the effects of brief mindfulness meditation on the anxiety and depression symptoms and autonomic nervous system activity in Chinese nursing students. A randomized controlled trial. A medical university in Guangzhou, China. One hundred and five nursing students were randomly approached by email and seventy-two responded. Sixty recruited students were randomized into meditation and control group (n=30 each) after screening and exclusion due to factors known to influence mood ratings and autonomic nervous system measures. The meditation group performed mindfulness meditation 30 min daily for 7 consecutive days. The control group received no intervention except pre-post treatment measurements. The Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and Self-Rating Depression Scale were administered to participants, and heart rate and blood pressure were measured. Pre- and post-treatment data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Differences between pre- and post-treatment Self-Rating Anxiety Scale scores were significantly larger in the meditation group than in the control group, but no similar effect was observed for Self-Rating Depression Scale scores. Systolic blood pressure was reduced more after the intervention in the meditation group than in the control group, with an average reduction of 2.2 mmHg. A moderate level of anxiety was associated with the maximum meditation effect. Brief mindfulness meditation was beneficial for Chinese nursing students in reducing anxiety symptoms and lowering systolic blood pressure. Individuals with moderate anxiety are most likely to benefit from a short-term mindfulness meditation program. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Influence of Socioeconomic Variables on Control of High Blood Pressure: Results of the ELSA-Brasil Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, Dóra; Pinho Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz; Sá Carvalho, Marilia; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Andrade Lotufo, Paulo; Araújo Nobre, Aline; de Aquino, Estela Mota Lima Leão; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Griep, Rosane Härter; Molina, Maria Del Carmen Bisi; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Passos, Valéria Maria de Azeredo; Benseñor, Isabela Judith Martins; Matos, Sheila Maria Alvim; Mill, José Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    High blood pressure (HBP) is the leading risk factor for years of life lost in Brazil. Factors associated with HBP awareness, treatment and control need to be understood better. Our aim is to estimate prevalence, awareness, and types of anti-hypertensive treatment and to investigate the association of HBP control with social position. Data of 15,103 (54% female) civil servants in six Brazilian state capitals collected at the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) baseline (2008-2010) were used to estimate prevalence and cross-sectional association of HBP control with education, per capita family income and self-reported race, using multiple logistic regression. Blood pressure was measured by the oscillometric method. 35.8% were classified as presenting HBP; 76.8% of these used anti-hypertensive medication. Women were more aware than men (84.8% v. 75.8%) and more often using medication (83.1% v. 70.7%). Adjusted HBP prevalence was, in ascending order, Whites (30.3%), Browns (38.2%) and Blacks (49.3%). The therapeutic schemes most used were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, in isolation (12.4%) or combined with diuretics (13.3%). Among those in drug treatment, controlled blood pressure was more likely in the (postgraduate) higher education group than among participants with less than secondary school education (PR = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.14–1.28), and among Asian (PR = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.12–1.32) and ‘Whites (PR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.12–1.26) compared to Blacks. Socioeconomic and racial inequality—as measured by different indicators—are strongly associated with HBP control, beyond the expected influence of health services access. PMID:26102079

  20. Balking blood pressure "control" by older persons of Bambuí, Minas Gerais State, Brazil: an ethno-epidemiological inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marilyn; Firmo, Josélia O A; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda; Uchôa, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This ethno-epidemiological inquiry aims to comprehend hypertension-related experiences in the elderly population of Bambuí, in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. It combines ethnographic descriptions with statistical data. The subjective significance of factors associated with adequate arterial pressure control is explored. A baseline cohort of 26 people with hypertension, randomly selected from a total number of 1,494 residents over the age of 60, was interviewed utilizing signs, meanings and actions methodology. Multivariate analysis shows an association (p free choice. Giving elderly people a voice regarding their social context can promote autonomy, well-being and happiness in later life.

  1. The Effects of a Gentle Yoga Program on Sleep, Mood, and Blood Pressure in Older Women with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS): A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effects of yoga versus an educational film program on sleep, mood, perceived stress, and sympathetic activation in older women with RLS. Methods. Participants were drawn from a larger trial regarding the effects of yoga on cardiovascular disease risk profiles in overweight, sedentary postmenopausal women. Seventy-five women were randomized to receive either an 8-week yoga (n = 38) or educational film (n = 37) program. All 75 participants completed an RLS screening questionnaire. The 20 women who met all four diagnostic criteria for RLS (n = 10 yoga, 10 film group) comprised the population for this nested study. Main outcomes assessed pre- and post-treatment included: sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), mood (Profile of Mood States, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), blood pressure, and heart rate. Results. The yoga group demonstrated significantly greater improvements than controls in multiple domains of sleep quality and mood, and significantly greater reductions in insomnia prevalence, anxiety, perceived stress, and blood pressure (all P's≤0.05). Adjusted intergroup effect sizes for psychosocial variables were large, ranging from 1.9 for state anxiety to 2.6 for sleep quality. Conclusions. These preliminary findings suggest yoga may offer an effective intervention for improving sleep, mood, perceived stress, and blood pressure in older women with RLS.

  2. The Effects of a Gentle Yoga Program on Sleep, Mood, and Blood Pressure in Older Women with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim E. Innes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the effects of yoga versus an educational film program on sleep, mood, perceived stress, and sympathetic activation in older women with RLS. Methods. Participants were drawn from a larger trial regarding the effects of yoga on cardiovascular disease risk profiles in overweight, sedentary postmenopausal women. Seventy-five women were randomized to receive either an 8-week yoga (=38 or educational film (=37 program. All 75 participants completed an RLS screening questionnaire. The 20 women who met all four diagnostic criteria for RLS (=10 yoga, 10 film group comprised the population for this nested study. Main outcomes assessed pre- and post-treatment included: sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, stress (Perceived Stress Scale, mood (Profile of Mood States, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, blood pressure, and heart rate. Results. The yoga group demonstrated significantly greater improvements than controls in multiple domains of sleep quality and mood, and significantly greater reductions in insomnia prevalence, anxiety, perceived stress, and blood pressure (all 's≤0.05. Adjusted intergroup effect sizes for psychosocial variables were large, ranging from 1.9 for state anxiety to 2.6 for sleep quality. Conclusions. These preliminary findings suggest yoga may offer an effective intervention for improving sleep, mood, perceived stress, and blood pressure in older women with RLS.

  3. Pharmacologic control of high blood pressure: up to date 2005 Control de la hipertensión arterial con medicamentos: actualización 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Toro Escobar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate use of antihypertensive drugs is one of the key elements to guarantee the achievement of blood pressure goals and the adherence of patients to treatment, in order to diminish the absolute cardiovascular risk. This article is a narrative review based on a systematic literature search in which randomized, controlled studies of initial antihypertensive therapy were selected and treatments with drugs of two or more groups were compared having as outcome the reduction of cardiovascular events. El uso adecuado de los medicamentos antihipertensivos es fundamental para garantizar el cumplimiento de las metas de presión arterial y la adherencia de los pacientes al tratamiento de la hipertensión, elementos necesarios para cumplir con el objetivo fundamental de disminuir el riesgo absoluto cardiovascular de los pacientes. Esta es una revisión narrativa basada en una búsqueda sistemática de la literatura, en la cual se seleccionaron los estudios aleatorizados controlados de terapia antihipertensiva inicial y se compararon tratamientos entre fármacos de dos o más grupos, que tengan como desenlace la reducción de eventos cardiovasculares.

  4. A practice-based trial of blood pressure control in African Americans (TLC-Clinic: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoenthaler Antoinette

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poorly controlled hypertension (HTN remains one of the most significant public health problems in the United States, in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Despite compelling evidence supporting the beneficial effects of therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC for blood pressure (BP reduction, the effectiveness of these approaches in primary care practices remains untested, especially among African Americans, who share a disproportionately greater burden of HTN-related outcomes. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial tests the effectiveness of a practice-based comprehensive therapeutic lifestyle intervention, delivered through group-based counseling and motivational interviewing (MINT-TLC versus Usual Care (UC in 200 low-income, African Americans with uncontrolled hypertension. MINT-TLC is designed to help patients make appropriate lifestyle changes and develop skills to maintain these changes long-term. Patients in the MINT-TLC group attend 10 weekly group classes focused on healthy lifestyle changes (intensive phase; followed by 3 monthly individual motivational interviewing (MINT sessions (maintenance phase. The intervention is delivered by trained research personnel with appropriate treatment fidelity procedures. Patients in the UC condition receive a single individual counseling session on healthy lifestyle changes and print versions of the intervention materials. The primary outcome is within-patient change in both systolic and diastolic BP from baseline to 6 months. In addition to BP control at 6 months, other secondary outcomes include changes in the following lifestyle behaviors from baseline to 6 months: a physical activity, b weight loss, c number of daily servings of fruits and vegetables and d 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Discussion This vanguard trial will provide information on how to refine MINT-TLC and integrate it into a standard treatment protocol for hypertensive African Americans

  5. A practice-based trial of blood pressure control in African Americans (TLC-Clinic): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Luerassi, Leanne; Teresi, Jeanne A; Silver, Stephanie; Kong, Jian; Odedosu, Taiye; Trilling, Samantha; Errico, Anna; Uvwo, Oshevire; Sebek, Kimberly; Adekoya, Adetutu; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2011-12-22

    Poorly controlled hypertension (HTN) remains one of the most significant public health problems in the United States, in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Despite compelling evidence supporting the beneficial effects of therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC) for blood pressure (BP) reduction, the effectiveness of these approaches in primary care practices remains untested, especially among African Americans, who share a disproportionately greater burden of HTN-related outcomes. This randomized controlled trial tests the effectiveness of a practice-based comprehensive therapeutic lifestyle intervention, delivered through group-based counseling and motivational interviewing (MINT-TLC) versus Usual Care (UC) in 200 low-income, African Americans with uncontrolled hypertension. MINT-TLC is designed to help patients make appropriate lifestyle changes and develop skills to maintain these changes long-term. Patients in the MINT-TLC group attend 10 weekly group classes focused on healthy lifestyle changes (intensive phase); followed by 3 monthly individual motivational interviewing (MINT) sessions (maintenance phase). The intervention is delivered by trained research personnel with appropriate treatment fidelity procedures. Patients in the UC condition receive a single individual counseling session on healthy lifestyle changes and print versions of the intervention materials. The primary outcome is within-patient change in both systolic and diastolic BP from baseline to 6 months. In addition to BP control at 6 months, other secondary outcomes include changes in the following lifestyle behaviors from baseline to 6 months: a) physical activity, b) weight loss, c) number of daily servings of fruits and vegetables and d) 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. This vanguard trial will provide information on how to refine MINT-TLC and integrate it into a standard treatment protocol for hypertensive African Americans as a result of the data obtained; thus maximizing the

  6. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ounces of liquor Managing and Coping With Stress Learning how to manage stress, relax, and cope with ... goes down. Central Acting Agents: Act in the brain to decrease nerve signals that narrow blood vessels, ...

  7. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... management techniques include: Being physically active Listening to music or focusing on something calm or peaceful Performing ... multidisciplinary researchers on June 10, 2016, to share current scientific k... View all events on High Blood ...

  8. Comparison of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and office blood pressure measurements in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Rahime

    2018-04-01

    Obesity in adults has been related to hypertension and abnormal nocturnal dipping of blood pressure, which are associated with poor cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Here, we aimed to resolve the relationship between the degree of obesity, the severity of hypertension and dipping status on ambulatory blood pressure in obese children. A total 72 patients with primary obesity aged 7 to 18 years (mean: 13.48 ± 3.25) were selected. Patients were divided into three groups based on body mass index (BMİ) Z-score. Diagnosis and staging of ambulatory hypertension based on 24-h blood pressure measurements, obtained from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Based on our ambulatory blood pressure data, 35 patients (48.6%) had hypertension, 7 (20%) had ambulatory prehypertension, 21 (60%) had hypertension, and 7 patients (20%) had severe ambulatory hypertension. There was a significant relationship between severity of hypertension and the degree of obesity (p lood pressure results and loads were similar between groups. Diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure levels during the night, diastolic blood pressure loads, and heart rate during the day were significantly higher in Group 3 (p lood pressure at night, mean arterial pressure at night, diastolic blood pressure loads and heart rate at day. Increase in BMI Z-score does not a significant impact on daytime blood pressure and nocturnal dipping status.

  9. Differences in blood pressure control and stroke mortality across Spain: the Prevención de Riesgo de Ictus (PREV-ICTUS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redón, Josep; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Lozano, José V; Martí-Canales, Juan C; Llisterri, José L; Aznar, Jose; González-Esteban, Jorge

    2007-04-01

    The objective was to assess the stroke risk and prevalence of the cardiovascular risk factors and to analyze their relationship with the specific stroke rates of mortality in each of the autonomic communities of Spain. We conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional study of population >60 years old in Spanish primary care centers. In all of the subjects, clinical, biochemical, and electrocardiographic data were obtained, and the 10-year stroke risk was calculated using the Framingham score. Mortality rates of stroke, age and sex adjusted, were obtained for each of the autonomic communities from the Ministry of Health. A total of 7343 subjects (mean age: 71.6 years, 53.4% women, 34.4% obese, and 27.1% diabetic subjects) were analyzed. A total of 73% were already diagnosed with hypertension. Among hypertensive subjects, 29.1% had blood pressure on therapeutic objective, and, of the total population, 35.7% had blood pressure under control. ECG-left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 12.9% of the subjects. The estimated stroke risk was 19.6%. Stroke mortality rates were significantly related to the estimated 10-year stroke risk (r=0.41; P<0.05) in each autonomic community. Poor hypertension control (P=-0.42; P<0.05) and prevalence of ECG-left ventricular hypertrophy (P=0.52; P<0.05) were the main factors related to the stroke mortality rates after controlling by age, sex, obesity, diabetes, and urban setting. Differences in stroke mortality throughout the autonomic communities of Spain were associated with indexes of worse blood pressure handling, low control rates, and high left-ventricular hypertrophy.

  10. Development of a blood pressure alarm detector based on seven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper introduces the development of a blood pressure alarm detector, meant to be incorporated into an electronic blood pressure tracking unit, from which it detects signals for the measured blood pressure (BP), that is, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). It simultaneously displays the ...

  11. Aerobic exercise reduces blood pressure in resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeo, Fernando; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Seibert, Felix; Arndt, Robert; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H

    2012-09-01

    Regular physical exercise is broadly recommended by current European and American hypertension guidelines. It remains elusive, however, whether exercise leads to a reduction of blood pressure in resistant hypertension as well. The present randomized controlled trial examines the cardiovascular effects of aerobic exercise on resistant hypertension. Resistant hypertension was defined as a blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg in spite of 3 antihypertensive agents or a blood pressure controlled by ≥4 antihypertensive agents. Fifty subjects with resistant hypertension were randomly assigned to participate or not to participate in an 8- to 12-week treadmill exercise program (target lactate, 2.0±0.5 mmol/L). Blood pressure was assessed by 24-hour monitoring. Arterial compliance and cardiac index were measured by pulse wave analysis. The training program was well tolerated by all of the patients. Exercise significantly decreased systolic and diastolic daytime ambulatory blood pressure by 6±12 and 3±7 mm Hg, respectively (P=0.03 each). Regular exercise reduced blood pressure on exertion and increased physical performance as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake and lactate curves. Arterial compliance and cardiac index remained unchanged. Physical exercise is able to decrease blood pressure even in subjects with low responsiveness to medical treatment. It should be included in the therapeutic approach to resistant hypertension.

  12. Acute Effects of Nitrate-Rich Beetroot Juice on Blood Pressure, Hemostasis and Vascular Inflammation Markers in Healthy Older Adults: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Raubenheimer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a vasoconstrictive, pro-coagulant, and pro-inflammatory profile of arteries and a decline in the bioavailability of the endothelium-derived molecule nitric oxide. Dietary nitrate elicits vasodilatory, anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory effects in younger individuals, but little is known about whether these benefits are evident in older adults. We investigated the effects of 140 mL of nitrate-rich (HI-NI; containing 12.9 mmol nitrate versus nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (LO-NI; containing ≤0.04 mmol nitrate on blood pressure, blood coagulation, vascular inflammation markers, plasma nitrate and nitrite before, and 3 h and 6 h after ingestion in healthy older adults (five males, seven females, mean age: 64 years, age range: 57–71 years in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Plasma nitrate and nitrite increased 3 and 6 h after HI-NI ingestion (p < 0.05. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure decreased 3 h relative to baseline after HI-NI ingestion only (p < 0.05. The number of blood monocyte-platelet aggregates decreased 3 h after HI-NI intake (p < 0.05, indicating reduced platelet activation. The number of blood CD11b-expressing granulocytes decreased 3 h following HI-NI beetroot juice intake (p < 0.05, suggesting a shift toward an anti-adhesive granulocyte phenotype. Numbers of blood CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocyte subtypes slightly increased 6 h after HI-NI beetroot juice ingestion (p < 0.05, but the clinical implications of this response are currently unclear. These findings provide new evidence for the acute effects of nitrate-rich beetroot juice on circulating immune cells and platelets. Further long-term research is warranted to determine if these effects reduce the risk of developing hypertension and vascular inflammation with aging.

  13. Effect of antenatal multiple micronutrient supplementation on anthropometry and blood pressure in mid-childhood in Nepal: follow-up of a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devakumar, Delan; Chaube, Shiva Shankar; Wells, Jonathan C K; Saville, Naomi M; Ayres, Jon G; Manandhar, Dharma S; Costello, Anthony; Osrin, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In 2002–04, we did a randomised controlled trial in southern Nepal, and reported that children born to mothers taking multiple micronutrient supplements during pregnancy had a mean birthweight 77 g greater than children born to mothers taking iron and folic acid supplements. Children born to mothers in the study group were a mean 204 g heavier at 2·5 years of age and their systolic blood pressure was a mean 2·5 mm Hg lower than children born to mothers in the control group. We aimed to follow up the same children to mid-childhood (age 8·5 years) to investigate whether these differences would be sustained. Methods For this follow-up study, we identified children from the original trial and measured anthropometry, body composition with bioelectrical impedance (with population-specific isotope calibration), blood pressure, and renal dimensions by ultrasound. We documented socioeconomic status, household food security, and air pollution. Main outcomes of the follow-up at 8 years were Z scores for weight-for-age, height-for-age, and body-mass index (BMI)-for-age according to WHO Child Growth Standards for children aged 5–19 years, and blood pressure. This study is registered with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial register, number ISRCTN88625934. Findings Between Sept 21, 2011, and Dec 7, 2012, we assessed 841 children (422 in the control group and 419 in the intervention group). Unadjusted differences (intervention minus control) in Z scores were 0·05 for weight-for-age (95% CI −0·09 to 0·19), 0·02 in height-for-age (−0·10 to 0·15), and 0·04 in BMI-for-age (−0·09 to 0·18). We recorded no difference in blood pressure. Adjusted differences were similar for all outcomes. Interpretation We recorded no differences in phenotype between children born to mothers who received antenatal multiple micronutrient or iron and folate supplements at age 8·5 years. Our findings did not extend to physiological differences or

  14. Blood Pressure Guided Profiling of Ultrafiltration during Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Reinhard

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis-induced hypotension is still a common complication in spite of the progress achieved in hemodialysis (HD treatment. Due to its multifactorial nature, dialysis-induced hypotension cannot be reliably prevented by conventional profiling of ultrafiltration in open-loop systems since they are unable to adapt themselves to actual decreases in blood pressure. A blood pressure guided closed-loop system for prevention of dialysis-induced hypotension by biofeedback-controlled profiling of ultrafiltration was clinically tested in 94 HD treatments of four patients prone to hypotension. Automatic profiling of ultrafiltration was based on frequent measurements of blood pressure at intervals of five minutes. Proper adaptation of control features to patients′ conditions was provided by the lower limit of systolic pressure which was individually set by the physician at the beginning of each treatment. During the initial and medium phases of the HD sessions, ultrafiltration rates up to 200% of the average rates were applied as long as this was tolerated. The additional ultrafiltrate volume was used for blood pressure stabilization by lowering the ultrafiltration rates in the final phase of HD session. Biofeedback-controlled profiling of ultrafiltration provides reliable blood pressure stabilization in all phases of HD. During the first half of treatment, the frequency of hypotensive episodes remained below that with conventional therapy although ultrafiltration rates up to 200% were used. During the second half of treatment, blood pressure guided reduction of ultrafiltration rate provided a decreasing frequency of hypotensive episodes in contrast to the increasing trend during conventional therapy. Stable blood pressure trends during the last hour of HD were achieved in 91% of biofeedback-controlled treatments in comparison with only 32% of conventional treatments. Ultrafiltration rates of 150%-200% and blood pressure measurements at intervals of

  15. Association between blood Pressure, waist circumference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates a positive correlation of blood pressure parameters with age, abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, thus the need for stakeholders to strengthen measures towards cardiovascular risk awareness and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) prevention in the general ...

  16. Effects of Swedish massage on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aourell, Moa; Skoog, Martina; Carleson, J

    2005-11-01

    Swedish massage technique includes mechanically activated muscular tissue and also skin, tendons, fascias, and connected tissue, which indirectly regulates the tonus of the autonomous nervous system. This study set out to examine the effects of Swedish massage on blood pressure. Healthy males were given massage treatment at the Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Treatment was over a 12-week period divided into three parts, each consisting of 4 weeks. Two treatment periods contained massage treatment either on back, neck and chest (BNC), or leg, arm and face (LAF), with an in between washout period. The first treatment period with massage decreased systolic blood pressure directly after treatment (BNC: Pmassage decreased systolic (Pmassage (Pmassage on the BNC resulted in a minor decrease in blood pressure possibly due to sympathetic inhibition. It may be suggested that massage may be tried as a complementary therapy in patients suffering from increased blood pressure due to stress.

  17. Progression of chronic kidney disease : The role of blood pressure control, proteinuria, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition - A patient-level meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafar, TH; Stark, PC; Schmid, CH; Landa, M; Maschio, G; de Jong, PE; de Zeeuw, D; Shahinfar, S; Toto, R; Levey, AS

    2003-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce blood pressure and urine protein excretion and slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Purpose: To determine the levels of blood pressure and urine protein excretion associated with the lowest risk for progression of chronic

  18. National Conference on High Blood Pressure Control in Native American Communities (2nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma, November 6-7, 1980). Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. National High Blood Pressure Education Program.

    As part of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program effort, the conference explored the impact of high blood pressure (hypertension) on Native Americans. Participants, including health professionals, health service consumers, and volunteers providing health services to Native Americans, discussed these issues: traditional Native American…

  19. The hidden magnitude of raised blood pressure and elevated blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The hidden magnitude of raised blood pressure and elevated blood glucose in Ethiopia: A call for initiating community based NCDs risk factors screening program. Abebe Bekele1, Terefe Gelibo1, Kassahun Amenu1, Theodros Getachew1, Atkure Defar1, Habtamu Teklie1,. Tefera Taddele1, Girum Taye1, Misrak Getnet1, ...

  20. The hidden magnitude of raised blood pressure and elevated blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    and only very small percentage of people had been aware of their high blood pressure and elevated blood sugar. Policy makers in the health sector including other health development partners need to strengthen health system and design nation-wide population based strategy to establish community based screening ...

  1. Influence of short-term blood pressure variability on blood pressure determinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W. J.; van Goudoever, J.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Wesseling, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blood pressure variability on Riva Rocci Korotkoff blood pressure determinations, we studied the intra-arterial pressure during Riva Rocci Korotkoff determinations in 25 patients. In 50 measurements with a cuff deflation rate of 2.5 mm Hg/sec, the systolic intra-arterial

  2. [High blood pressure and physical exercise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosner, P; Gremeaux, V; Bosquet, L; Herpin, D

    2014-06-01

    High blood pressure is a frequent pathology with many cardiovascular complications. As highlighted in guidelines, the therapeutic management of hypertension relies on non-pharmacological measures, which are diet and regular physical activity, but both patients and physicians are reluctant to physical activity prescription. To acquire the conviction that physical activity is beneficial, necessary and possible, we can take into account some fundamental and clinical studies, as well as the feedback of our clinical practice. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension contributes to increase this risk. Conversely, regular practice of physical activity decreases very significantly the risk by up to 60%. The acute blood pressure changes during exercise and post-exercise hypotension differs according to the dynamic component (endurance or aerobic and/or strength exercises), but the repetition of the sessions leads to the chronic hypotensive benefit of physical activity. Moreover, physical activity prescription must take into account the assessment of global cardiovascular risk, the control of the hypertension, and the opportunities and desires of the patient in order to promote good adherence and beneficial lifestyle change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure in individuals with insulin resistance, prediabetes, or noncommunicable chronic diseases: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibaba, Daniel T; Xun, Pengcheng; Song, Yiqing; Rosanoff, Andrea; Shechter, Michael; He, Ka

    2017-09-01

    Background: To our knowledge, the effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) in individuals with preclinical or noncommunicable diseases has not been previously investigated in a meta-analysis, and the findings from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been inconsistent. Objective: We sought to determine the pooled effect of magnesium supplementation on BP in participants with preclinical or noncommunicable diseases. Design: We identified RCTs that were published in English before May 2017 that examined the effect of magnesium supplementation on BP in individuals with preclinical or noncommunicable diseases through PubMed, ScienceDirect, Cochrane, clinicaltrials.gov, SpringerLink, and Google Scholar databases as well as the reference lists from identified relevant articles. Random- and fixed-effects models were used to estimate the pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% CIs in changes in BP from baseline to the end of the trial in both systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between the magnesium-supplementation group and the control group. Results: Eleven RCTs that included 543 participants with follow-up periods that ranged from 1 to 6 mo (mean: 3.6 mo) were included in this meta-analysis. The dose of elemental magnesium that was used in the trials ranged from 365 to 450 mg/d. All studies reported BP at baseline and the end of the trial. The weighted overall effects indicated that the magnesium-supplementation group had a significantly greater reduction in both SBP (SMD: -0.20; 95% CI: -0.37, -0.03) and DBP (SMD: -0.27; 95% CI: -0.52, -0.03) than did the control group. Magnesium supplementation resulted in a mean reduction of 4.18 mm Hg in SBP and 2.27 mm Hg in DBP. Conclusion: The pooled results suggest that magnesium supplementation significantly lowers BP in individuals with insulin resistance, prediabetes, or other noncommunicable chronic diseases. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Blood Pressure Management After Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shoichiro; Carcel, Cheryl; Anderson, Craig S

    2015-12-01

    Elevated blood pressure (BP), which presents in approximately 80 % of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), is associated with increased risk of poor outcome. The Second Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) study, a multinational, multicenter, randomized controlled trial published in 2013, demonstrated better functional outcomes with no harm for patients with acute spontaneous ICH within 6 h of onset who received target-driven, early intensive BP lowering (systolic BP target <140 mmHg within 1 h, continued for 7 days) and suggested that greater and faster reduction in BP might enhance the treatment effect by limiting hematoma growth. The trial resulted in revisions of guidelines for acute management of ICH, in which intensive BP lowering in patients with acute ICH is recommended as safe and effective treatment for improving functional outcome. BP lowering is also the only intervention that is proven to reduce the risk of recurrent ICH. Current evidences from several randomized trials, including PROGRESS and SPS3, indicate that long-term strict BP control in patients with ICH is safe and could offer additional benefits in major reduction in risk of recurrent ICH. The latest American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) guidelines recommended a target BP of <130/80 mmHg after ICH, but supporting evidence is limited. Randomized controlled trials are needed that focus on strict BP control, initiated early after onset of the disease and continued long-term, to demonstrate effective prevention of recurrent stroke and other major vascular events without additional harms in the ICH population.

  5. Cocoa, blood pressure, and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista; Ferri, Livia; Proietti, Ilenia; Di Agostino, Stefania; Martella, Letizia; Mai, Francesca; Di Giosia, Paolo; Grassi, Davide

    2015-11-18

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events worldwide. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that cocoa-rich products reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. According to this, cocoa has a high content in polyphenols, especially flavanols. Flavanols have been described to exert favorable effects on endothelium-derived vasodilation via the stimulation of nitric oxide-synthase, the increased availability of l-arginine, and the decreased degradation of NO. Cocoa may also have a beneficial effect by protecting against oxidative stress alterations and via decreased platelet aggregation, decreased lipid oxidation, and insulin resistance. These effects are associated with a decrease of blood pressure and a favorable trend toward a reduction in cardiovascular events and strokes. Previous meta-analyses have shown that cocoa-rich foods may reduce blood pressure. Long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa products are needed to determine whether or not blood pressure is reduced on a chronic basis by daily ingestion of cocoa. Furthermore, long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa on clinical outcomes are also needed to assess whether cocoa has an effect on cardiovascular events. A 3 mmHg systolic blood pressure reduction has been estimated to decrease the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. This paper summarizes new findings concerning cocoa effects on blood pressure and cardiovascular health, focusing on putative mechanisms of action and "nutraceutical " viewpoints.

  6. Fruits and vegetables moderate blood pressure, fibrinogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure, blood viscosity and plasma fibrinogen and nutrient intake were determined before and during intervention. The complementary fruits and vegetables included in the normal dietary regimen of the patients during the 10 weeks study increased the levels of potassium, calcium, phosphorus, antioxidants and ...

  7. Protocol for Past BP: a randomised controlled trial of different blood pressure targets for people with a history of stroke of transient ischaemic attack (TIA in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenfield Sheila

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood pressure (BP lowering in people who have had a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA leads to reduced risk of further stroke. However, it is not clear what the target BP should be, since intensification of therapy may lead to additional adverse effects. PAST BP will determine whether more intensive BP targets can be achieved in a primary care setting, and whether more intensive therapy is associated with adverse effects on quality of life. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial (RCT in patients with a past history of stroke or TIA. Patients will be randomised to two groups and will either have their blood pressure (BP lowered intensively to a target of 130 mmHg systolic, (or by 10 mmHg if the baseline systolic pressure is between 125 and 140 mmHg compared to a standard group where the BP will be reduced to a target of 140 mmHg systolic. Patients will be managed by their practice at 1-3 month intervals depending on level of BP and followed-up by the research team at six monthly intervals for 12 months. 610 patients will be recruited from approximately 50 general practices. The following exclusion criteria will be applied: systolic BP The primary outcome will be change in systolic BP over twelve months. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, adverse events and cardiovascular events. In-depth interviews with 30 patients and 20 health care practitioners will be undertaken to investigate patient and healthcare professionals understanding and views of BP management. Discussion The results of this trial will inform whether intensive blood pressure targets can be achieved in people who have had a stroke or TIA in primary care, and help determine whether or not further research is required before recommending such targets for this population. Trial Registration ISRCTN29062286

  8. The physical anthropometry, lifestyle habits and blood pressure of people presenting with a first clinical demyelinating event compared to controls: the Ausimmune study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lucas, Robyn M; Dear, Keith; van der Mei, Ingrid; Taylor, Bruce; Chapman, Caron; Coulthard, Alan; Dwyer, Terence; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; McMichael, Anthony J; Pender, Michael P; Valery, Patricia C; Williams, David

    2013-11-01

    Lifestyle factors prior to a first clinical demyelinating event (FCD), a disorder often preceding the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS), have not previously been examined in detail. Past tobacco smoking has been consistently associated with MS. This was a multicentre incident case-control study. Cases (n = 282) were aged 18-59 years with an FCD and resident within one of four Australian centres (from latitudes 27°S to 43°S), from 1 November 2003 to 31 December 2006. Controls (n = 558) were matched to cases on age, sex and study region, without CNS demyelination. Exposures measured included current and past tobacco and marijuana, alcohol and beverage use, physical activity patterns, blood pressure and physical anthropometry. A history of smoking ever was associated with FCD risk (AOR 1.89 (95%CL 1.82, 3.52)). Marijuana use was not associated with FCD risk after adjusting for confounders such as smoking ever but the estimates were imprecise because of a low prevalence of use. Alcohol consumption was common and not associated with FCD risk. No case-control differences in blood pressure or physical anthropometry were observed. Past tobacco smoking was positively associated with a risk of FCD but most other lifestyle factors were not. Prevention efforts against type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease by increasing physical activity and reducing obesity are unlikely to alter MS incidence, and more targeted campaigns will be required.

  9. Effects of the DASH Diet and Walking on Blood Pressure in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Uncontrolled Hypertension: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Tatiana P; Viana, Luciana V; Neto, Alessandra T Z; Leitão, Cristiane B; Gross, Jorge L; Azevedo, Mirela J

    2015-11-01

    Data on the potential beneficial effects of combining diet and exercise on blood pressure (BP) are still scarce. A 4-week randomized controlled clinical trial was undertaken in 40 hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes with uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) in office and daytime ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Patients were assigned to follow a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet associated with advice to increase walking using a pedometer (intervention group) or a diet based on the American Diabetes Association recommendations (control group). The lifestyle intervention caused a greater ABPM (mm Hg) reduction in systolic 24-hour, diastolic 24-hour, nighttime systolic, daytime systolic, and daytime diastolic measurements than observed in the control group. In the intervention group there was a decrease in urinary sodium and an increase in urinary potassium, plasma aldosterone, and the number of steps per day (PDASH diet and increased walking were associated with clinically significant reductions in ABPM values in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Improving actions to control high blood pressure in Hispanic communities - Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health Across the U.S. Project, 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Youlian; Siegel, Paul Z; White, Shannon; Dulin, Rick; Taylor, April

    2016-02-01

    Compared with the general population in the United States (U.S.), Hispanics with hypertension are less likely to be aware of their condition, to take antihypertensive medication, and to adopt healthy lifestyles to control high blood pressure. We examined whether a multi-community intervention successfully increased the prevalence of actions to control hypertension among Hispanics. Annual survey from 2009-2012 was conducted in six Hispanic communities in the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) Across the U.S. The survey used address based sampling design that matched the geographies of intervention program. Age- and sex-standardized prevalences of taking hypertensive medication, changing eating habits, cutting down on salt, and reducing alcohol use significantly increased among Hispanics with self-reported hypertension in REACH communities. The 3-year relative percent increases were 5.8, 6.8, 7.9, and 35.2% for the four indicators, respectively. These favorable (healthier) trends occurred in both foreign-born and U.S.-born Hispanics. This large community-based participatory intervention resulted in more Hispanic residents in the communities taking actions to control high blood pressure. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Calcium Supplements: Do They Interfere with Blood Pressure Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure drugs? Is it true that calcium supplements may interact with blood pressure medications? Answers from ... Sheps, M.D. Yes. In large amounts, calcium supplements may interact with some blood pressure medications. Interactions ...

  12. Blood Pressure Quiz | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents Blood pressure changes throughout the day. It… is highest while ...

  13. The effect of text messaging on hospital visits and blood pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non-attendance to hospital appointment and non-adherence to blood pressure lowering medication are major factors in sub-optimal control of high blood pressure. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of text messaging on improving hospital visits and blood pressure control in adult hypertensives in ...

  14. Economic evaluation of home blood pressure telemonitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Line Bille; Christiansen, Terkel; Kirkegaard, Peder

    2011-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of the present study was to compare the costs of home blood pressure (BP) telemonitoring (HBPM) with the costs of conventional office BP monitoring. In a randomized controlled trial, 105 hypertensive patients performed HBPM and 118 patients received usual care with conventional......-time ambulatory BP (ABP) were reduced in both groups. The uncertainty around the incremental cost effectiveness ratio point estimates was considerable for both systolic and diastolic ABP. For systolic ABP, the difference in cost effectiveness ratio between the two groups was 256 Danish kroner (DKK)/mmHg [95......% uncertainty interval, UI -860 to 4544]. For diastolic ABP, the difference in cost effectiveness ratio between the two groups was 655 DKK/mmHg [95% UI -674 to 69315]. Medication and consultation costs were lowest in the intervention group, but were offset by the cost of the telemonitoring equipment...

  15. Improvement in All-Cause Mortality With Blood Pressure Control in a Group of US Veterans With Drug-Resistant Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Omid; Goa, Cristobal; Faselis, Charles; Kokkinos, Peter; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    The current definition of drug-resistant hypertension includes patients with uncontrolled (URH) (taking ≥3 antihypertensive medications) and controlled hypertension (CRH; blood pressure [BP] ≤140/90 mm Hg) (taking ≥4 medications). The authors hypothesized that all-cause mortality is reduced when URH is controlled. Qualified patients followed at the Washington DC VA Medical Center were included. BPs were averaged for each year of follow-up. In 2006, among 2906 patients who met the criteria for drug-resistant hypertension, 628 had URH. During follow-up, 234 patients were controlled (group 1) and 394 patients remained uncontrolled (group 2). The mortality rate among patients with URH was 28% (110 of 394) and among patients with CRH was 13% (30 of 234), a 54% reduction (Phypertension markedly reduces all-cause mortality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tight intra-operative blood pressure control versus standard care for patients undergoing hip fracture repair - Hip Fracture Intervention Study for Prevention of Hypotension (HIP-HOP) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moppett, Iain Keith; White, Stuart; Griffiths, Richard; Buggy, Donal

    2017-07-25

    Hypotension during anaesthesia for hip fracture surgery is common. Recent data suggest that there is an association between the lowest intra-operative blood pressure and mortality, even when adjusted for co-morbidities. This is consistent with data derived from the wider surgical population, where magnitude and duration of hypotension are associated with mortality and peri-operative complications. However, there are no trial to data to support more aggressive blood pressure control. We are conducting a three-centre, randomised, double-blinded pilot study in three hospitals in the United Kingdom. The sample size will be 75 patients (25 from each centre). Randomisation will be done using computer-generated concealed tables. Both participants and investigators will be blinded to group allocation. Participants will be aged >70 years, cognitively intact (Abbreviated Mental Test Score 7 or greater), able to give informed consent and admitted directly through the emergency department with a fractured neck of the femur requiring operative repair. Patients randomised to tight blood pressure control or avoidance of intra-operative hypotension will receive active treatment as required to maintain both of the following: systolic arterial blood pressure >80% of baseline pre-operative value and mean arterial pressure >75 mmHg throughout. All participants will receive standard hospital care, including spinal or general anaesthesia, at the discretion of the clinical team. The primary outcome is a composite of the presence or absence of defined cardiovascular, renal and delirium morbidity within 7 days of surgery (myocardial injury, stroke, acute kidney injury, delirium). Secondary endpoints will include the defined individual morbidities, mortality, early mobility and discharge to usual residence. This is a small-scale pilot study investigating the feasibility of a trial of tight intra-operative blood pressure control in a frail elderly patient group with known high morbidity

  17. The Effects of Aroma Foot Massage on Blood Pressure and Anxiety in Japanese Community-Dwelling Men and Women: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Eguchi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aroma foot massage on blood pressure, anxiety, and health-related quality of life (QOL in Japanese community-dwelling men and women using a crossover randomized controlled trial.Fifty-seven eligible participants (5 men and 52 women aged 27 to 72 were randomly divided into 2 intervention groups (group A: n = 29; group B: n = 28 to participate in aroma foot massages 12 times during the 4-week intervention period. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively, heart rate, state anxiety, and health-related QOL were measured at the baseline, 4-week follow-up, and 8-week follow-up. The effects of the aroma foot massage intervention on these factors and the proportion of participants with anxiety were analyzed using a linear mixed-effect model for a crossover design adjusted for participant and period effects. Furthermore, the relationship between the changes in SBP and state anxiety among participants with relieved anxiety was assessed using a linear regression model.Aroma foot massage significantly decreased the mean SBP (p = 0.02, DBP (p = 0.006, and state anxiety (p = 0.003 as well as the proportion of participants with anxiety (p = 0.003. Although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.088, aroma foot massage also increased the score of mental health-related QOL. The change in SBP had a significant and positive correlation with the change in state anxiety (p = 0.01 among participants with relieved anxiety.The self-administered aroma foot massage intervention significantly decreased the mean SBP and DBP as well as the state anxiety score, and tended to increase the mental health-related QOL scores. The results suggest that aroma foot massage may be an easy and effective way to improve mental health and blood pressure.University Hospital Medical Information Network 000014260.

  18. The Effects of Aroma Foot Massage on Blood Pressure and Anxiety in Japanese Community-Dwelling Men and Women: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Eri; Funakubo, Narumi; Tomooka, Kiyohide; Ohira, Tetsuya; Ogino, Keiki; Tanigawa, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aroma foot massage on blood pressure, anxiety, and health-related quality of life (QOL) in Japanese community-dwelling men and women using a crossover randomized controlled trial. Fifty-seven eligible participants (5 men and 52 women) aged 27 to 72 were randomly divided into 2 intervention groups (group A: n = 29; group B: n = 28) to participate in aroma foot massages 12 times during the 4-week intervention period. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively), heart rate, state anxiety, and health-related QOL were measured at the baseline, 4-week follow-up, and 8-week follow-up. The effects of the aroma foot massage intervention on these factors and the proportion of participants with anxiety were analyzed using a linear mixed-effect model for a crossover design adjusted for participant and period effects. Furthermore, the relationship between the changes in SBP and state anxiety among participants with relieved anxiety was assessed using a linear regression model. Aroma foot massage significantly decreased the mean SBP (p = 0.02), DBP (p = 0.006), and state anxiety (p = 0.003) as well as the proportion of participants with anxiety (p = 0.003). Although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.088), aroma foot massage also increased the score of mental health-related QOL. The change in SBP had a significant and positive correlation with the change in state anxiety (p = 0.01) among participants with relieved anxiety. The self-administered aroma foot massage intervention significantly decreased the mean SBP and DBP as well as the state anxiety score, and tended to increase the mental health-related QOL scores. The results suggest that aroma foot massage may be an easy and effective way to improve mental health and blood pressure. University Hospital Medical Information Network 000014260.

  19. Trends in blood pressure among adults with hypertension: United States, 2003 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Sug; Gu, Qiuping; Nwankwo, Tatiana; Wright, Jacqueline D; Hong, Yuling; Burt, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe trends in the awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension; mean blood pressure; and the classification of blood pressure among US adults 2003 to 2012. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2012, a total of 9255 adult participants aged ≥18 years were identified as having hypertension, defined as measured blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or taking prescription medication for hypertension. Awareness and treatment among hypertensive adults were ascertained via an interviewer administered questionnaire. Controlled hypertension among hypertensive adults was defined as systolic blood pressure blood pressure Blood pressure was categorized as optimal blood pressure, prehypertension, and stage I and stage II hypertension. Between 2003 and 2012, the percentage of adults with controlled hypertension increased (P-trend Hypertensive adults with optimal blood pressure and with prehypertension increased from 13% to 19% and 27% to 33%, respectively (P-trend hypertensive adults who were taking antihypertensive medication, uncontrolled hypertension decreased from 38% to 30% (P-trend blood pressure was observed (P-trend blood pressure remained unchanged. The trend in the control of blood pressure has improved among hypertensive adults resulting in a higher percentage with blood pressure at the optimal or prehypertension level and a lower percentage in stage I and stage II hypertension. Overall, mean systolic blood pressure decreased as did the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension among the treated hypertensive population. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Hypertensive patients' knowledge of high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellgren, K I; Svensson, S; Ahlner, J; Säljö, R

    1997-12-01

    To investigate hypertensive patients' understanding of the circulatory system, in particular high blood pressure. Semi-structured audio-taped interviews of patients immediately after a regular follow-up appointment with their physician. A primary health care centre and a specialist clinic (hypertension unit) in southern Sweden. 33 hypertensive patients, consecutively selected. Focus was set on the exploration of patients' understanding/knowledge. In spite of a long history of hypertensive care, on average ten years, patients had a less than satisfactory understanding of their condition. Most patients knew their blood pressure values, but very few were able to give an account of what high blood pressure implies in functional terms. Knowledge of high blood pressure seems mainly to be derived from sources other than the health care system, in particular from the mass media. Knowledge of the risks associated with hypertension was quite good, as was the insight into how these risks could be managed. An assessment of patient knowledge of high blood pressure ought to be a starting point for educational strategies that aim to deepen patients' understanding of their state of health.

  1. Is glycine effective against elevated blood pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hafidi, Mohammed; Pérez, Israel; Baños, Guadalupe

    2006-01-01

    Glycine, a non-essential amino acid, has been found to protect against oxidative stress in several pathological situations, and it is required for the biosynthesis of structural proteins such as elastin. As hypertension is a disease in which free radicals and large vessel elasticity are involved, this article will examine the possible mechanisms by which glycine may protect against high blood pressure. The addition of glycine to the diet reduces high blood pressure in a rat model of the metabolic syndrome. Also, glycine supplemented to the low protein diet of rat dams during pregnancy has a beneficial effect on blood pressure in their offspring. The mechanism by which glycine decreases high blood pressure can be attributed to its participation in the reduction of the generation of free radicals, increasing the availability of nitric oxide. In addition, as glycine is required for a number of critical metabolic pathways, such as the synthesis of the structural proteins collagen and elastin, the perturbation of these leads to impaired elastin formation in the aorta. This involves changes in the aorta's elastic properties, which would contribute to the development of hypertension. The use of glycine to lower high blood pressure could have a significant clinical impact in patients with the metabolic syndrome and with limited resources. On the other hand, more studies are needed to explore the beneficial effect of glycine in other models of hypertension and to investigate possible side-effects of treatment with glycine.

  2. Blood Pressure Percentiles for School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Özanli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The prevalence of hypertension in childhood and adolescence is gradually increasing. We aimed to in­vestigate the blood pressure (BP values of children aged 7-18 years. Methods: This study was conducted in a total of 3375 (1777 females, 1598 males children from 27 schools. Blood pressures of children were measured using sphyg­momanometer appropriate to arm circumference. Results: A positive relationship was found between sys­tolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP and the body weight, height, age and body mass index (BMI in male and female children. SBP was high­er in males than females after the age of 13. DBP was higher in males than the females after the age of 14. The mean annual increase of SBP was 2.06 mmHg in males and 1.54 mmHg in females. The mean annual increase of DBP was 1.52 mmHg in males and 1.38 mmHg in fe­males. Conclusion: In this study, we identified the threshold val­ues for blood pressure in children between the age of 7 and 18 years in Erzurum province. It is necessary to com­bine and evaluate data obtained from various regions for the identification of BP percentiles according to the age, gender and height percentiles of Turkish children.

  3. Goat Meat Does Not Cause Increased Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Sunagawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While there are persistent rumors that the consumption of goat meat dishes increases blood pressure, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Two experiments were conducted to clarify whether or not blood pressure increases in conjunction with the consumption of goat meat dishes. In experiment 1, 24 Dahl/Iwai rats (15 weeks old, body weight 309.3±11.1 g were evenly separated into 4 groups. The control group (CP was fed a diet containing 20% chicken and 0.3% salt on a dry matter basis. The goat meat group (GM was fed a diet containing 20% goat meat and 0.3% salt. The goat meat/salt group (GS was fed a diet containing 20% goat meant and 3% to 4% salt. The Okinawan mugwort (Artemisia Princeps Pampan/salt group (GY was fed a diet containing 20% goat meat, 3% to 4% salt and 5% of freeze-dried mugwort powder. The experiment 1 ran for a period of 14 weeks during which time the blood pressure of the animals was recorded. The GS, and GY groups consumed significantly more water (p<0.01 than the CP and GM groups despite the fact that their diet consumption levels were similar. The body weight of animals in the CP, GM, and GS groups was similar while the animals in the GY group were significantly smaller (p<0.01. The blood pressure in the GM group was virtually the same as the CP group throughout the course of the experiment. In contrast, while the blood pressure of the animals in the GS and GY group from 15 to 19 weeks old was the same as the CP group, their blood pressures were significantly higher (p<0.01 after 20 weeks of age. The GY group tended to have lower blood pressure than the GS group. In experiment 2, in order to clarify whether or not the increase in blood pressure in the GS group and the GY group in experiment 1 was caused by an excessive intake of salt, the effects on blood pressure of a reduction of salt in diet were investigated. When amount of salt in the diet of the GS and GY group was reduced from 4% to 0.3%, the animal

  4. Effect of calcium supplementation on blood pressure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, M W; Hood, M Y; Moore, L L; Nguyen, U S; Singer, M R; Andon, M B

    1995-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of calcium supplementation on blood pressure in children. Randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial. One hundred one fifth-grade students in one inner-city school. Each child consumed 480 ml of juice beverages, containing either no calcium or 600 mg calcium (as calcium citrate malate) daily for 12 weeks. At baseline we obtained nutrient data from three sets of 2-day food records on each subject. We measured blood pressure four times on each of three weekly sittings at baseline and at follow-up. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we compared mean blood pressure change in the intervention group with that in the placebo group. There were 50 girls and 51 boys; 61 subjects were black. At baseline, mean age was 11.0 years, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 101.7 and 57.7 mm Hg, daily total energy intake was 1966 kcal, and calcium intake was 827 mg. With control for age, height, hours of television watched, and baseline blood pressure, systolic blood pressure increased 1.0 mm Hg in the intervention group and 2.8 mm Hg in the placebo group (effect estimate = -1.8 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval -4.0, 0.3). In black subjects the intervention effect estimate was -2.0 mm Hg (95% confidence interval -4.4, 0.4). From lowest to highest quartile of baseline calcium intake (per 1000 kcal), the intervention effect estimates were -3.5, -2.8, -1.3, and 0.0 mm Hg (p for trend = 0.009). There was little effect on diastolic blood pressure. These data suggest a blood pressure-lowering effect of calcium supplementation in children, especially in subjects with low baseline calcium intake.

  5. Blood pressure in childhood : epidemiological probes into the aetiology of high blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hofman (Albert)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractHigh arterial blood pressure takes a heavy toll in western populations (1 ). Its causes are still largely unknown, but its sequelae, a variety of cardiovascular and renal diseases, have been referred to as "a modern scourge" (2). High blood pressure of unknown cause, or

  6. The optimal scheme of self blood pressure measurement as determined from ambulatory blood pressure recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, Willem J.; Kroon, Abraham A.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.; Lenders, Jacques W. M.; Thien, Theo; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Smit, Andries J.; de Leeuw, Peter W.

    Objective To determine how many self-measurements of blood pressure (BP) should be taken at home in order to obtain a reliable estimate of a patient's BP. Design Participants performed self blood pressure measurement (SBPM) for 7 days (triplicate morning and evening readings). In all of them, office

  7. Letter to editor: Blood pressure, hypertension and lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Yi; Staessen, Jan A

    2018-02-19

    A significant association of office diastolic blood pressure with low-level blood lead exposure was reported in a Brazilian adult population. However, caution should be taken to interpret these results. The multivariable-adjusted association with blood pressure was positive for diastolic blood pressure, but inverse for systolic blood pressure. The association sizes were infinitesimal without clinical relevance. The outcome measures, i.e. blood pressure and the prevalence of hypertension were analysed across categories of the blood lead distribution - not in relation to blood lead as continuous variable. Blood pressure was the average of two oscillometric office readings, whereas ambulatory monitoring is the state-of-the-art.

  8. The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on cardiac patients' blood pressure, perceived stress, and anger: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Javad; Omidi, Abdollah; Raygan, Fariba; Akbari, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at assessing the effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on cardiac patients' blood pressure (BP), perceived stress, and anger. In total, 60 cardiac patients were recruited between April and June 2015 from a specialized private cardiac clinic located in Kashan, Iran. Patients were allocated to the intervention and control groups. Patients in the experimental group received MBSR in eight 2.5-hour sessions, while patients in the control group received no psychological therapy. The main outcomes were BP, perceived stress, and anger. Analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference between the study groups regarding the posttest values of systolic BP, perceived stress, and anger (P perceived stress, and anger. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood Pressure Control with a Single-Pill Combination of Indapamide Sustained-Release and Amlodipine in Patients with Hypertension: The EFFICIENT Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jadhav, Uday; Hiremath, Jagdish; Namjoshi, Deepak J.; Gujral, Vinod K.; Tripathi, Kamlakar K.; Siraj, Mohammad; Shamanna, Paramesh; Safar, Michel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite antihypertensive treatment, most hypertensive patients still have high blood pressure (BP), notably high systolic blood pressure (SBP). The EFFICIENT study examines the efficacy and acceptability of a single-pill combination of sustained-release (SR) indapamide, a thiazide-like diuretic, and amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker (CCB), in the management of hypertension. METHODS: Patients who were previously uncontrolled on CCB monotherapy (BP≥140/90 mm Hg) or were previousl...

  10. Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the blood pressure control in patients with newly diagnosed hypertension - a 1-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagge, Carina N; Strandhave, Charlotte; Skov, Charlotte M; Svensson, My; Schmidt, Erik B; Christensen, Jeppe H

    2017-02-01

    Marine long-chained n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are recognized for their cardio-protective effects, including potential lowering of blood pressure. We hypothesized that higher habitual fish intake and n-3 PUFA plasma levels were associated with lower blood pressure and being less likely to receive antihypertensive medication after one-year follow-up. In this prospective study of 115 patients, we assessed 24 h ambulatory and central blood pressure, plasma phospholipid fatty acid composition using gas chromatography and participants completed a food frequency questionnaire, including fish-eating habits. All measurements were repeated at one-year follow-up. At baseline, patients consuming fish ≥2 times per month for dinner had significantly higher plasma levels of total marine n-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid as well as significantly lower central blood pressure and a trend towards lower peripheral blood pressure. At follow-up, 21 patients (18%) without antihypertensive medication had significantly higher plasma levels of n-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid as well as a higher, but still acceptable 24 h ambulatory blood pressure (137/85 mmHg) compared to subjects receiving antihypertensive medication. The untreated group was more prone to take fish oil capsules and increased their plasma levels of n-3 PUFA compared to baseline. In patients with newly diagnosed, untreated hypertension, regular fish consumption was accompanied by lower blood pressure. After one year, patients without antihypertensive medication were characterized by a significant increase and higher plasma levels of n-3 PUFA. This supports a blood pressure-lowering effect and suggests an increase in marine n-3 PUFA intake as part of non-pharmacological treatment of hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Renal autoregulation and blood pressure management in circulatory shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Emiel Hendrik; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2018-03-22

    The importance of personalized blood pressure management is well recognized. Because renal pressure-flow relationships may vary among patients, understanding how renal autoregulation may influence blood pressure control is essential. However, much remains uncertain regarding the determinants of renal autoregulation in circulatory shock, including the influence of comorbidities and the effects of vasopressor treatment. We review published studies on renal autoregulation relevant to the management of acutely ill patients with shock. We delineate the main signaling pathways of renal autoregulation, discuss how it can be assessed, and describe the renal autoregulatory alterations associated with chronic disease and with shock.

  12. [Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palade, D; Iliescu, D; Cotârleţ, Laura; Pandele, G I

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of blood pressure values measured by two methods. 94 hypertensive patients (66 women and 28 men in relation to 2.36/1) were assessed classically and also by ABPM. For statistic evaluation we have used t - Student test, chi2 test, Pearson correlation coefficient and variation coefficient (cv%). It shows significant differences between mean values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure obtained by the 2 methods. ABPM measured values are more accurate compared to clinic, bringing also information on pattern hypertensive therapy.

  13. Predictive role of the nighttime blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine W; Li, Yan; Boggia, José

    2011-01-01

    of conclusive evidence proving that nondipping is a reversible risk factor, the option whether or not to restore the diurnal blood pressure profile to a normal pattern should be left to the clinical judgment of doctors and should be individualized for each patient. Current guidelines on the interpretation......Numerous studies addressed the predictive value of the nighttime blood pressure (BP) as captured by ambulatory monitoring. However, arbitrary cutoff limits in dichotomized analyses of continuous variables, data dredging across selected subgroups, extrapolation of cross-sectional studies...

  14. Effect of fenofibrate on blood pressure reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Lipatenkova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по материалам статей 1. Gilbert K, Nian H, Yu C, Luther JM, Brown NJ. Fenofibrate lowers blood pressure in salt-sensitive but not salt-resistant hypertension. J Hypertens. 2013 Apr;31(4:820-9. doi: 10.1097/HJH.0b013e32835e8227. 2. Kwang K. K. Does Fenofibrate Lower Blood Pressure? Hypertension. 2013 Mar;61(3:e27. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00792.

  15. A novel approach to office blood pressure measurement: 30-minute office blood pressure vs daytime ambulatory blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, M.C. van der; Buunk, I.E.; Weel, C. van; Thien, Th.; Bakx, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Current office blood pressure measurement (OBPM) is often not executed according to guidelines and cannot prevent the white-coat effect. Serial, automated, oscillometric OBPM has the potential to overcome both these problems. We therefore developed a 30-minute OBPM method that we compared

  16. Quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular characteristics and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carol Y; Tay, Wan T; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie J; Hsu, Wynne; Lee, Mong L; Lau, Qiangfeng P; Zhu, Ai L; Klein, Ronald; Saw, Seang M; Wong, Tien Y

    2011-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of blood pressure on a spectrum of quantitative and qualitative retinal microvascular signs. Retinal photographs from the Singapore Malay Eye Study, a population-based cross-sectional study of 3280 (78.7% response) persons aged 40-80 years, were analyzed. Quantitative changes in the retinal vasculature (branching angle, vascular tortuosity, fractal dimension, and vascular caliber) were measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. Qualitative signs, including focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN), arteriovenous nicking (AVN), opacification of the arteriolar wall (OAW), and retinopathy (e.g., microaneurysms, retinal hemorrhages), were assessed from photographs by trained technicians. After excluding persons with diabetes and ungradable photographs, 1913 persons provided data for this analysis. In multivariable linear regression models controlling for age, sex, BMI, use of antihypertensive medication, and other factors, retinal arteriolar branching asymmetry ratio, arteriolar tortuosity, venular tortuosity, fractal dimension, arteriolar caliber, venular caliber, FAN, AVN, and retinopathy were independently associated with mean arterial blood pressure. In contrast, arteriolar/venular branching angle, venular branching asymmetry ratio and OAW were not related to blood pressure. Retinal arteriolar caliber (sβ = -0.277) and FAN (sβ = 0.170) had the strongest associations with mean arterial blood pressure, and higher blood pressure levels were associated with increasing number of both quantitative and qualitative retinal vascular signs (P trend qualitative retinal vascular signs, with the number of signs increasing with higher blood pressure levels.

  17. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870.1100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts the signal from a blood pressure...

  18. Patient Blood Pressure and Pulse Rate Monitoring With an Alert ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure and pulse rate are two of the vital signs of humans and it is imperative that the chronically ill and the elderly patients need to have their blood pressure and pulse rate checked from time to time. This paper describes the use of the Omron 790it blood pressure monitor to check the blood pressure and the pulse ...

  19. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on arterial stiffness and blood pressure in resistant hypertensive individuals: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela-Martin, José Fernando; Giollo-Junior, Luiz Tadeu; Chiappa, Gaspar Rogério; Cipriano-Junior, Gerson; Vieira, Paulo José Cardoso; dos Santos Ricardi, Fábio; Paz-Landim, Manoel Ildefonso; de Andrade, Days Oliveira; Cestário, Elizabeth do Espírito Santo; Cosenso-Martin, Luciana Neves; Yugar-Toledo, Juan Carlos; Cipullo, José Paulo

    2016-03-29

    Resistant hypertension (RH) treatment requires an adequate and intense therapeutic approach. However, the results are not always satisfactory despite intensive treatment. Of the different pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of RH, sympathetic overstimulation and therapies that block the sympathetic system have been widely studied. These approaches, however, are invasive and expensive. Another possible approach is by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), a noninvasive method that modulates activity by using low-frequency transcutaneous electrical stimulation to inhibit primary afferent pathways. Thus, the current study will evaluate the effect of applying TENS in the cervicothoracic region of subjects with RH and will seek to develop a new low-cost and readily available therapy to treat this group of hypertensive individuals. This is a randomized, single blind (subject), parallel-assignment study controlled with a sham group and including participants aged 40 to 70 years with resistant hypertension. The trial has two arms: the treatment and control (sham group). The treatment group will be submitted to the stimulation procedure (TENS). The sham group will not be submitted to stimulation. The primary outcomes will be a reduction in the peripheral blood pressure and adverse events. The secondary outcomes will be a reduction the central blood pressure. The study will last 30 days. The sample size was calculated assuming an alpha error of 5 % to reject the null hypothesis with a statistical power of 80 %, thereby resulting in 28 participants per group (intervention versus sham). In recent decades, RH has become very common and costly. Adequate control requires several drugs, and in many cases, treatment is not successful. Sympathetic nervous system inhibition by renal denervation and central inhibition have significant effects in reducing BP; however, these treatments are costly and invasive. Another type of sympathetic nervous

  20. Associations between cadmium levels in blood and urine, blood pressure and hypertension among Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Rochelle E; Levallois, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Cadmium has been inconsistently related to blood pressure and hypertension. The present study seeks to clarify the relationship between cadmium levels found in blood and urine, blood pressure and hypertension in a large sample of adults. The study sample included participants ages 20 through 79 from multiple cycles of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007 through 2013) with measured blood cadmium (n=10,099) and urinary cadmium (n=6988). Linear regression models examined the association between natural logarithm transformed cadmium levels and blood pressure (separate models for systolic and diastolic blood pressure) after controlling for known covariates. Logistic regression models were used to examine the association between cadmium and hypertension. Models were run separately by sex, smoking status, and body mass index category. Men had higher mean systolic (114.8 vs. 110.8mmHg, pcadmium levels (0.48 vs. 0.38µg/L, pcadmium were associated with increased systolic (0.70mmHg, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.25-1.16, pcadmium, blood pressure and hypertension were not significant in overall models. Model stratification revealed significant and negative associations between urinary cadmium and hypertension among current smokers (OR=0.61, 95% CI=0.44-0.85, pcadmium levels, blood pressure and hypertension. However, the significance and direction of this association differs by sex, smoking status, and body mass index category. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in daily clinical practice - the Spanish ABPM Registry experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorostidi, Manuel; Banegas, José R; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Vinyoles, Ernest; Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Many patients are hypertensive at the medical settings but show normal blood pressure out of the doctor's office, and are classified as white-coat hypertensives. On the other hand, many patients with controlled hypertension at the clinic show ambulatory blood pressure levels above the thresholds considered for an adequate blood pressure control, known as having masked hypertension. Using data from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry (Spanish ABPM Registry), a national program developed to promote the use of the ambulatory technique for hypertension management in daily practice, we have reviewed the main strengths of this approach, that is the ability to detect discrepancies of blood pressure status with respect to office blood pressure measurement, and to better assess accurate rates of hypertension control. White-coat hypertension within patients with elevated office blood pressure, and masked hypertension within office-controlled patients affected one of three patients in each office status. On the other hand, rates of ambulatory blood pressure control (50%) doubled those of office blood pressure control (25%), still remaining half the patients uncontrolled. We think that a systematic use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and strategies to improve blood pressure control constitute key priorities in hypertension management. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  2. Circadian variation of blood pressure in patients with chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Ladefoged, Jens

    1995-01-01

    The circadian pattern of blood pressure variation was investigated in 10 patients with advanced chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and in an age-matched group of controls without renal disease with similar office blood pressure level. Monitoring was done using...... of abnormal 24-h blood pressure profiles among CAPD patients. In the group of controls these profiles were in accordance with the established normal pattern, whereas nocturnal blood pressure reductions were significantly less pronounced in the patient group. The reduction +/- SD in the mean arterial blood...... a non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure recorder. Average 24-h blood pressure was significantly higher in the group of CAPD patients than in the group of healthy controls, i.e. 141 +/- 22/82 +/- 8 mmHg (systolic and diastolic blood pressure +/- SD) vs. 126 +/- 18/80 +/- 7, p

  3. Blood pressure modifies retinal susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng He

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma affects more than 67 million people. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is a risk factor for glaucoma and may reduce nutrient availability by decreasing ocular perfusion pressure (OPP. An interaction between arterial blood pressure and IOP determines OPP; but the exact contribution that these factors have for retinal function is not fully understood. Here we sought to determine how acute modifications of arterial pressure will affect the susceptibility of neuronal function and blood flow to IOP challenge. Anaesthetized (ketamine:xylazine Long-Evan rats with low (∼60 mmHg, sodium nitroprusside infusion, moderate (∼100 mmHg, saline, or high levels (∼160 mmHg, angiotensin II of mean arterial pressure (MAP, n = 5-10 per group were subjected to IOP challenge (10-120 mmHg, 5 mmHg steps every 3 minutes. Electroretinograms were measured at each IOP step to assess bipolar cell (b-wave and inner retinal function (scotopic threshold response or STR. Ocular blood flow was measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry in groups with similar MAP level and the same IOP challenge protocol. Both b-wave and STR amplitudes decreased with IOP elevation. Retinal function was less susceptible to IOP challenge when MAP was high, whereas the converse was true for low MAP. Consistent with the effects on retinal function, higher IOP was needed to attenuated ocular blood flow in animals with higher MAP. The susceptibility of retinal function to IOP challenge can be ameliorated by acute high BP, and exacerbated by low BP. This is partially mediated by modifications in ocular blood flow.

  4. Stress and High Blood Pressure: What's the Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress and high blood pressure: What's the connection? Stress and long-term high blood pressure may not be linked, but taking steps to reduce your stress can improve your general health, including your blood ...

  5. Casual blood pressure among Tanzanian undergraduate students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite of the recommendations to use population specific blood pressure (BP) references which consider time, ethnicity and environmental factors, there is limited information regarding BP profile among Tanzanians. This cross sectional study was done to determine casual BP profile among healthy volunteer ...

  6. Renoprotection with and without blood pressure reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, GD; Andersen, S; Rossing, P; Navis, G; de Zeeuw, D; Parving, HH

    Background. AT1-receptor blockade dose dependently lowers blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria. Reduction of BP and albuminuria are independent treatment targets for renoprotection, but whether this requires similar dose titration is unknown. Methods. We tested this in two studies designed to find

  7. Familial Aggregation and Childhood Blood Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Snieder, Harold

    There is growing concern about elevated blood pressure (BP) in children. The evidence for familial aggregation of childhood BP is substantial. Twin studies have shown that a large part of the familial aggregation of childhood BP is due to genes. The first part of this review provides the latest

  8. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC-7),8 with the subjects sitting quietly and the right arm on a table at the level of the heart. An appropriately sized cuff, covering at least two-thirds of the upper arm with the lower border not less than 2.5 cm from the cubital fossa, was applied after restricting clothing had been removed.

  9. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Variations in Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathorall, Michelle L.; Xin, Huaibo; Peachey, Andrew; Bibeau, Daniel L.; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which neighborhood disadvantage accounts for variation in blood pressure. Methods: Demographic, biometric, and self-reported data from 19,261 health screenings were used. Addresses of participants were geocoded and located within census block groups (n = 14,510, 75.3%). Three hierarchical linear models were…

  10. Asymptomatic proteinuria and elevated blood pressure among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension and proteinuria are known risk factors for cardiovascular disease and renal impairment. Early detection and treatment will reduce morbidity and mortality associated with them. Objective: To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic proteinuria with or without elevated blood pressure among ...

  11. Relative and cumulative effects of lipid and blood pressure control in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Messig, Michael

    2009-01-01

    randomized 4731 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease to atorvastatin 80 mg per day or placebo. RESULTS: After 4.9 years, at each level of LDL-C reduction, subjects with HDL-C value above the median or systolic BP below the median had greater reductions......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The relative contributions of on-treatment low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, HDL-C), triglycerides, and blood pressure (BP) control on the risk of recurrent stroke or major cardiovascular events in patients with stroke is not well defined. METHODS: We...... in stroke and major cardiovascular events and those with a reduction in triglycerides above the median or diastolic BP below the median showed similar trends. There were no statistical interactions between on-treatment LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and BP values. In a further exploratory analysis, optimal...

  12. The effect of magnesium on maternal blood pressure in pregnancy-induced hypertension. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudnicki, M; Frölich, A; Rasmussen, W F

    1991-01-01

    The effects of magnesium were compared with those of placebo in a randomized double-blind controlled study of 58 patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension, of whom 27 received magnesium and 31 placebo. Twenty patients in each group were nulliparas. The treatment comprised 48 h of either...... intravenous magnesium or placebo infusion followed by daily oral magnesium or placebo tablets until one day after delivery. Magnesium supplementation significantly reduced maternal mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). The gestational age at delivery was the same in both groups, whereas the relative fetal birth...... appeared to be beneficial in the management of pregnancy-induced hypertension. The better outcome associated with magnesium supplementation may not have been due to reduction of MAP and further studies are needed to clarify whether magnesium influences birth weight....

  13. Blood pressure control status and relationship between salt intake and lifestyle including diet in hypertensive outpatients treated at a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yuko; Kimura, Yorio; Kitaoka, Chie; Sakata, Tomoko; Abe, Isao; Kawano, Yuhei

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate blood pressure (BP) control and salt intake in hypertensive outpatients treated at a general hospital and to examine the relationship between their lifestyles and amount of salt intake. Subjects comprised 429 hypertensive patients (206 males, 223 females, and average age of 71 ± 11 years). We estimated 24-hour salt excretion using spot urine samples and assessed lifestyle using a self-description questionnaire. Average clinic BP and the number of antihypertensive drugs were 132 ± 11/73 ± 8 mmHg and 1.8 ± 0.9, respectively. In all subjects, average estimated salt intake was 9.2 ± 2.8 g/day and the rate of achievement of the estimated salt intake of hospital. It may be important to provide data on actual salt intake and guide salt restriction in the individual management of hypertension.

  14. Iyengar Yoga versus Enhanced Usual Care on Blood Pressure in Patients with Prehypertension to Stage I Hypertension: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Debbie L; Bloedon, Leanne T; Rothman, Rand L; Farrar, John T; Galantino, Mary Lou; Volger, Sheri; Mayor, Christine; Szapary, Phillipe O; Townsend, Raymond R

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of prehypertension and Stage 1 hypertension continues to increase despite being amenable to non-pharmacologic interventions. Iyengar yoga (IY) has been purported to reduce blood pressure (BP) though evidence from randomized trials is lacking. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of 12 weeks of IY versus enhanced usual care (EUC) (based on individual dietary adjustment) on 24-h ambulatory BP in yoga-naïve adults with untreated prehypertension or Stage 1 hypertension. In total, 26 and 31 subjects in the IY and EUC arms, respectively, completed the study. There were no differences in BP between the groups at 6 and 12 weeks. In the EUC group, 24-h systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) significantly decreased by 5, 3 and 3 mmHg, respectively, from baseline at 6 weeks (P IY group, 24 h SBP was reduced by 6 mmHg at 12 weeks compared to baseline (P = .05). 24 h DBP (P IY group at 12 weeks. Twelve weeks of IY produces clinically meaningful improvements in 24 h SBP and DBP. Larger studies are needed to establish the long term efficacy, acceptability, utility and potential mechanisms of IY to control BP.

  15. Predictors of Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control among Saudi Hypertensive Patients Attending Primary Care Clinics: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Khayyat

    Full Text Available To assess the level of medication adherence and to investigate predictors of medication adherence and blood pressure control among hypertensive patients attending primary healthcare clinics in Makkah, Saudi Arabia.Hypertensive patients meeting the eligibility criteria were recruited from eight primary care clinics between January and May 2016 for this study. The patients completed Arabic version of Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8, an eight-item validated, self-reported measure to assess medication adherence. A structured data collection form was used to record patients' sociodemographic, medical and medication data.Two hundred and four patients, of which 71.6% were females, participated in the study. Patients' mean age was 59.1 (SD 12.2. The mean number of medication used by patients was 4.4 (SD 1.89. More than half (110; 54% of the patients were non-adherent to their medications (MMAS score 65 years (OR 2.0 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2; P = 0.04], and being diabetic (OR 0.25 [95% CI: 0.1-0.6; P = 0.04] were found to be independent predictors of medication adherence.Medication adherence is alarmingly low among hypertensive patients attending primary care clinics in Saudi Arabia which may partly explain observed poor blood pressure control. There is a clear need to educate patients about the importance of medication adherence and its impact on improving clinical outcomes. Future research should identify barriers to medication adherence among Saudi hypertensive patients.

  16. Effect of self-care education on lifestyle modification, medication adherence and blood pressure in hypertensive adults: Randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshahi, Jafar; Ahmadzadeh, Hamid; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Pourmoghaddas, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Self-care management has recently been suggested as an effective approach for secondary prevention of hypertension. This study was conducted to examine whether self-care behaviors could modulate blood pressure levels and also comparing the different training methods of self-care on patients' adherence and controlling hypertension. This study was a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial, conducted on 180 hypertensive patients referring to four centers in Isfahan, Iran, between July and December 2013. Block randomization method were applied to divide eligible subjects into four equal groups, including group A in which the patients and their family were educated by cardiology resident about self-care behaviors through eight sessions, group B and group C were obtained self-care education through four pamphlets or eight short message services (SMS), respectively and group D were obtained only usual care of hypertension without any training about self-care management. Increasing vegetable intake and frequency of subject who took antihypertensive medication regularly and the reduction in the frequency of subjects who consumed high salt were significantly more in group A than the others (P = 0.001, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The systolic and diastolic blood pressure had significantly more reduction in the group A than the other groups (-8.18 ± 18.3 and - 3.89 ± 4.1; P < 0.001, respectively). The self-care management education integration into the usual care along with using SMS and other educational materials may improve the efficient and effective adherence strategies.

  17. Contributions of mean and shape of blood pressure distribution to worldwide trends and variations in raised blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Background: Change in the prevalence of raised blood pressure could be due to both shifts in the entire distribution of blood pressure (representing the combined effects of public health interventions and secular trends) and changes in its high-blood-pressure tail (representing successful clinical...... was entirely driven by increasing mean blood pressure, offset partly by the change in the prevalence-mean association. Conclusions: Change in mean blood pressure is the main driver of the worldwide change in the prevalence of raised blood pressure, but change in the high-blood-pressure tail of the distribution...

  18. Studies Comparing Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Home Blood Pressure on Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbo, Daichi; Abdalla, Marwah; Falzon, Louise; Townsend, Raymond R.; Muntner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is more commonly recommended for assessing out-of-clinic blood pressure than home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM). We conducted a systematic review to examine whether ABPM or HBPM is more strongly associated with cardiovascular disease events and/or mortality. Of 1,007 abstracts published through July 20, 2015, nine articles, reporting results from seven cohorts, were identified. After adjustment for blood pressure on HBPM, blood pressure on ABPM was associated with an increased risk of outcomes in two of four cohorts for systolic blood pressure and two of three cohorts for diastolic blood pressure. After adjustment for blood pressure on ABPM, systolic blood pressure on HBPM was associated with outcomes in zero of three cohorts; an association was present in one of two cohorts for diastolic blood pressure on HBPM. There is a lack of strong empiric evidence supporting ABPM or HBPM over the other approach for predicting cardiovascular events or mortality. PMID:26822864

  19. Association between blood lead levels and blood pressures in a non-smoking healthy Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Rae; Ko, Ki Dong; Hwang, In Cheol; Suh, Heuy Sun; Kim, Kyoung Kon

    2017-09-01

    The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) has been performed every 3 years in Korea to help prevent cardiovascular mortality in the general population. Previous studies showed an association between blood lead levels and cardiovascular mortality. In order to assess the relationship between blood lead concentration and blood pressure in the healthy general population, we investigated whether blood lead levels were related to blood pressure in a non-smoking healthy population without any known medical diseases in the 2013 KNHANES. 896 (mean age 40.55±13.83 years; body mass index 23.06±3.33 kg/m 2 ) subjects who had no known diseases were included among 8018 subjects. Exclusion criteria were: hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, cerebrovascular events, renal insufficiency, liver cirrhosis, thyroid dysfunction, any cardiovascular or renal disease, and any malignancy. Blood pressures were measured three times by sphygmomanometers, 5 min apart. Blood pressures were then expressed as the average between the second and third values. Height, weight, waist circumferences and blood pressure, as well as total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), white blood cell count and blood lead levels were measured. In addition, dietary components were analysed by 24 hour recall. The association between log blood lead levels and systolic/diastolic pressure was stronger after it was controlled for age, sex, education, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (p=0.048, 0.002). Furthermore, the association between log blood lead levels and systolic pressure (p=0.048) and diastolic pressure (p=0.002) was more evident when controlled for age, sex, education, BMI, waist circumference, FPG, AST and ALT. Blood lead levels are significant determinants of systolic and diastolic blood pressure

  20. Poor blood pressure control and its associated factors among older people with hypertension: A cross-sectional study in six public primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, A T; Sazlina, S G; Tong, S F; Azah, A S; Salmiah, S

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in the older people. Chronic disease care is a major burden in the public primary care clinics in Malaysia. Good blood pressure (BP) control is needed to reduce the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aimed to determine the status of BP control and its associated factors among older people with hypertension in public primary care clinics. A cross-sectional study on hypertensive patients aged 18 years and above was conducted in six public primary care clinics in Federal Territory, Malaysia. A total of 1107 patients were selected via systematic random sampling. Data from 441 (39.8%) patients aged 60 years and more were used in this analysis. BP control was determined from the average of two BP readings measured twice at an interval of 5 min. For patients without diabetes, poor BP control was defined as BP of ≥140/90 mm Hg and ≥150/90 for the patients aged 80 years and more. For patients with diabetes, poor control was defined as BP of ≥140/80 mm Hg. A total of 51.7% (n = 228) of older patients had poor BP control. The factors associated with BP control were education level (p = 0.003), presence of comorbidities (p = 0.015), number of antihypertensive agents (p = 0.001) and number of total medications used (p = 0.002). Patients with lower education (less than secondary education) (OR = 1.7, p = 0.008) and the use of three or more antihypertensive agents (OR = 2.0, p = 0.020) were associated with poor BP control. Among older people with hypertension, those having lower education level, or using three or more antihypertensive agents would require more attention on their BP control.

  1. Effects of isoflavone-containing soya protein on ex vivo cholesterol efflux, vascular function and blood markers of CVD risk in adults with moderately elevated blood pressure: a dose-response randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Fleming, Jennifer A; Link, Christina J; Mukherjea, Ratna; Krul, Elaine S; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2017-05-01

    Emerging CVD risk factors (e.g. HDL function and central haemodynamics) may account for residual CVD risk experienced by individuals who meet LDL-cholesterol and blood pressure (BP) targets. Recent evidence suggests that these emerging risk factors can be modified by polyphenol-rich interventions such as soya, but additional research is needed. This study was designed to investigate the effects of an isoflavone-containing soya protein isolate (delivering 25 and 50 g/d soya protein) on HDL function (i.e. ex vivo cholesterol efflux), macrovascular function and blood markers of CVD risk. Middle-aged adults (n 20; mean age=51·6 (sem 6·6) years) with moderately elevated brachial BP (mean systolic BP=129 (sem 9) mmHg; mean diastolic BP=82·5 (sem 8·4) mmHg) consumed 0 (control), 25 and 50 g/d soya protein in a randomised cross-over design. Soya and control powders were consumed for 6 weeks each with a 2-week compliance break between treatment periods. Blood samples and vascular function measures were obtained at baseline and following each supplementation period. Supplementation with 50 g/d soya protein significantly reduced brachial diastolic BP (-2·3 mmHg) compared with 25 g/d soya protein (Tukey-adjusted P=0·03) but not the control. Soya supplementation did not improve ex vivo cholesterol efflux, macrovascular function or other blood markers of CVD risk compared with the carbohydrate-matched control. Additional research is needed to clarify whether effects on these CVD risk factors depend on the relative health of participants and/or equol producing capacity.

  2. Effect of oral L-arginine supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jia-Yi; Qin, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Zengli; Zhao, Youyou; Wang, Junkuan; Arigoni, Fabrizio; Zhang, Weiguo

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that L-arginine, an amino acid and a substrate of nitric oxide synthase, may have blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect. Because some studies were performed with limited number of patients with hypertension and therefore limited statistical power with sometimes inconsistent results, we aimed to examine the effect of oral L-arginine supplementation on BP by conducting a meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched through June 2011 to identify randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of oral L-arginine supplementation on BP in humans. We also reviewed reference lists of obtained articles. Either a fixed-effects or, in the presence of heterogeneity, a random-effects model was used to calculate the combined treatment effect. We included 11 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials involving 387 participants with oral L-arginine intervention ranging from 4 to 24 g/d. Compared with placebo, L-arginine intervention significantly lowered systolic BP by 5.39 mm Hg (95% CI -8.54 to -2.25, P = .001) and diastolic BP by 2.66 mm Hg (95% CI -3.77 to -1.54, P L-arginine supplementation significantly lowers both systolic and diastolic BP. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Blood pressure associates with standing balance in elderly outpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantsje H Pasma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Assessment of the association of blood pressure measurements in supine and standing position after a postural change, as a proxy for blood pressure regulation, with standing balance in a clinically relevant cohort of elderly, is of special interest as blood pressure may be important to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance in routine geriatric assessment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a cross-sectional cohort study, 197 community-dwelling elderly referred to a geriatric outpatient clinic of a middle-sized teaching hospital were included. Blood pressure was measured intermittently (n = 197 and continuously (subsample, n = 58 before and after a controlled postural change from supine to standing position. The ability to maintain standing balance was assessed during ten seconds of side-by-side, semi-tandem and tandem stance, with both eyes open and eyes closed. Self-reported impaired standing balance and history of falls were recorded by questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between blood pressure and 1 the ability to maintain standing balance; 2 self-reported impaired standing balance; and 3 history of falls, adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: Blood pressure decrease after postural change, measured continuously, was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance and falls. Presence of orthostatic hypotension was associated with reduced ability to maintain standing balance in semi-tandem stance with eyes closed for both intermittent and continuous measurements and with increased self-reported impaired standing balance for continuous measurements. CONCLUSION: Continuous blood pressure measurements are of additional value to identify patients at risk of having impaired standing balance and may therefore be useful in routine geriatric care.

  4. Acute Effects of Nitrate-Rich Beetroot Juice on Blood Pressure, Hemostasis and Vascular Inflammation Markers in Healthy Older Adults: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raubenheimer, Kyle; Hickey, Danica; Leveritt, Michael; Fassett, Robert; Ortiz de Zevallos Munoz, Joaquin; Briskey, David; Kerr, Graham; Peake, Jonathan M.; Pecheniuk, Natalie M.

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with a vasoconstrictive, pro-coagulant, and pro-inflammatory profile of arteries and a decline in the bioavailability of the endothelium-derived molecule nitric oxide. Dietary nitrate elicits vasodilatory, anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory effects in younger individuals, but little is known about whether these benefits are evident in older adults. We investigated the effects of 140 mL of nitrate-rich (HI-NI; containing 12.9 mmol nitrate) versus nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (LO-NI; containing ≤0.04 mmol nitrate) on blood pressure, blood coagulation, vascular inflammation markers, plasma nitrate and nitrite before, and 3 h and 6 h after ingestion in healthy older adults (five males, seven females, mean age: 64 years, age range: 57–71 years) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Plasma nitrate and nitrite increased 3 and 6 h after HI-NI ingestion (p beetroot juice intake (p beetroot juice ingestion (p effects of nitrate-rich beetroot juice on circulating immune cells and platelets. Further long-term research is warranted to determine if these effects reduce the risk of developing hypertension and vascular inflammation with aging. PMID:29165355

  5. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes mellitus and its relation to diabetic control and microalbuminuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Basiratnia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is now considered as the major cause of end-stage kidney failure, and hypertension (HTN is one of the main determinants of progression of renal disease. The aim of this study was to assess the role of blood pressure (BP by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM in children and adolescents with type-1 DM and its correlation with micro-albuminuria (MA and diabetic control. Eighty-one patients with type-1 DM (mean age 13 ± 4 years, whose duration of DM was at least two years, were enrolled in this study. The prevalence of HTN based on ABPM was 28.4%, while by casual method it was 32.1%. The pattern of HTN was as follows: mean systolic HTN 27.2%, mean diastolic HTN 11.2%, daytime systolic HTN 17.3%, daytime diastolic HTN 6.2%, night systolic HTN 30.9%, and night diastolic HTN 29.7%. The systolic and diastolic BP loads were 33.4 and 27.2%, respectively. About 70.4% of the patients were non-dippers, 12.4% had masked HTN, and 3.7% had white coat HTN. The pre-valence of MA was 34.6% and that of abnormal HbA 1 c was 82.7%. There was no correlation bet-ween HTN and both MA and HbA 1 c; also, no correlation was found between the duration of dia-betes and HbA 1 c. Moreover, no significant correlation was found between the duration of diabetes and MA (P = 0.080. Despite the high prevalence of abnormal BP profile among diabetic children, prospective longitudinal studies considering the other major risk factors, particularly genetic factors, which have an impact on the progression to diabetic nephropathy, are recommended.

  6. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  7. [Measurement of blood pressure variability and the clinical value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kékes, Ede; Kiss, István

    2014-10-19

    Authors have collected and analyzed literature data on blood pressure variability. They present the methods of blood pressure variability measurement, clinical value and relationships with target organ damages and risk of presence of cardiovascular events. They collect data about the prognostic value of blood pressure variability and the effects of different antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure variability. They underline that in addition to reduction of blood pressure to target value, it is essential to influence blood pressure fluctuation and decrease blood pressure variability, because blood pressure fluctuation presents a major threat for the hypertensive subjects. Data from national studies are also presented. They welcome that measurement of blood pressure variability has been included in international guidelines.

  8. Diagnosis of childhood hypertension: is blood pressure height ratio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure was also recorded according to the standard method. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure to height ratio were then calculated. Receiver operating curves was used to assess the ability of systolic blood and diastolic blood pressure height ratio to discriminate childhood prehypertension and hypertension.

  9. Associations between cadmium levels in blood and urine, blood pressure and hypertension among Canadian adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, Rochelle E.; Levallois, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cadmium has been inconsistently related to blood pressure and hypertension. The present study seeks to clarify the relationship between cadmium levels found in blood and urine, blood pressure and hypertension in a large sample of adults. Methods: The study sample included participants ages 20 through 79 from multiple cycles of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007 through 2013) with measured blood cadmium (n=10,099) and urinary cadmium (n=6988). Linear regression models examined the association between natural logarithm transformed cadmium levels and blood pressure (separate models for systolic and diastolic blood pressure) after controlling for known covariates. Logistic regression models were used to examine the association between cadmium and hypertension. Models were run separately by sex, smoking status, and body mass index category. Results: Men had higher mean systolic (114.8 vs. 110.8 mmHg, p<0.01) and diastolic (74.0 vs. 69.6 mmHg, p<0.01) blood pressure compared to women. Although, geometric mean blood (0.46 vs. 0.38 µg/L, p<0.01) and creatinine-adjusted standardized urinary cadmium levels (0.48 vs. 0.38 µg/L, p<0.01) were higher among those with hypertension, these differences were no longer significant after adjustment for age, sex and smoking status. In overall regression models, increases in blood cadmium were associated with increased systolic (0.70 mmHg, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.25–1.16, p<0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (0.74 mmHg, 95% CI=0.30–1.19, p<0.01). The associations between urinary cadmium, blood pressure and hypertension were not significant in overall models. Model stratification revealed significant and negative associations between urinary cadmium and hypertension among current smokers (OR=0.61, 95% CI=0.44–0.85, p<0.01), particularly female current smokers (OR=0.52, 95% CI=0.32–0.85, p=0.01). Conclusion: This study provides evidence of a significant association between cadmium levels, blood pressure

  10. Medication adherence and blood pressure control amongst adults with primary hypertension attending a tertiary hospital primary care clinic in Eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel UP. Iloh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the case detection rates of hypertension increase in adult Nigerians, achieving target blood pressure (BP control has become an important management challenge.Objectives: To describe medication adherence and BP control amongst adult Nigerians with primary hypertension attending a primary care clinic of a tertiary hospital in a resource-poor environment in Eastern Nigeria.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 140 adult patients with primary hypertension who have been on treatment for at least 6 months at the primary care clinic of Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia. A patient was said to have achieved goal BP control if the BP was < 140 per 90 mmHg. Adherence was assessed in the previous 30 days using a pretested researcher-administered questionnaire on 30 days of self-reported therapy. Adherence was graded using an ordinal scoring system of 0–4; an adherent patient was one who scored 4 points in the previous 30 days. Reasons for non-adherence were documented.Results: Adherence to medication and BP control rates were 42.9% and 35.0% respectively. BP control was significantly associated with medication adherence (p = 0.03, antihypertensive medication duration ≥3 years (p = 0.042, and taking ≥ one form of antihypertensive medication (p = 0.04. BP at the recruitment visit was significantly higher than at the end of the study (p = 0.036. The most common reason for non-adherence was forgetfulness (p = 0.046. Conclusion: The rate of BP control amongst the study population was low, which may be connected with low medication adherence. This study urges consideration of factors relating to adherence alongside other factors driving goal BP control.

  11. Blood pressure response to chronic intake of coffee and caffeine: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, M.; Uiterwaal, C.S.P.M.; Arends, L.R.; Kok, F.J.; Grobbee, D.E.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Coffee is a widely consumed beverage and small health effects of substances in coffee may have large public health consequences. It has been suggested that caffeine in coffee increases the risk of hypertension. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of coffee or

  12. Effect of blood pressure and glycemic control on the plasma cell-free DNA in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Wun Jeong

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: In patients with HD, cfDNA is elevated in diabetic patients and patients with cardiovascular diseases. Uncontrolled hypertension and poor glycemic control are independent determinants for the elevated cfDNA. Our data suggest that cfDNA might be a marker of vascular injury rather than proinflammatory condition in HD patients.

  13. Metformin Improves Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Diabetic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Independent from Glycemia Control : Comparison to Vildagliptin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamidi Shishavan, Mahdi; Henning, Robert H; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Goris, Maaike; Deelman, Leo E; Buikema, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Metformin confers vascular benefits beyond glycemia control, possibly via pleiotropic effects on endothelial function. In type-1-diabetes-mellitus (T1DM-)patients metformin improved flow-mediated dilation but also increased prostaglandin(PG)-F-2 alpha, a known endothelial-contracting factor. To

  14. Time Trends of High Blood Pressure Prevalence, Awareness and Control in the Italian General Population : Surveys of the National Institute of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lonardo, Anna; Donfrancesco, Chiara; Palmieri, Luigi; Vanuzzo, Diego; Giampaoli, Simona

    2017-06-01

    High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The urgency of the problem was underlined by the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases, which recommends a 25% relative reduction in the prevalence of raised BP by 2020. A surveillance system represents a useful tool to monitor BP in the general population. Since 1980s, the National Institute of Health has conducted several surveys of the adult general population, measuring cardiovascular risk factors by standardized procedures and methods. To describe mean BP levels and high BP prevalence from 1978 to 2012 by sex and quinquennia of age. Data were derived from the following three studies: (i) Risk Factors and Life Expectancy (RIFLE), conducted between 1978 and 2002 in 13 Italian regions (>70,000 persons); (ii) Osservatorio Epidemiologico Cardiovascolare (OEC), conducted between 1998-2002 in the general population from all Italian regions (>9000 persons); and (iii) Osservatorio Epidemiologico Cardiovascolare/Health Examination Survey (OEC/HES), conducted between 2008-2012 in the general population from all Italian regions (>9000 persons). A significant decrease in mean systolic and diastolic BP levels and prevalence of high BP from 1978 to 2012 was observed both in men and women. BP and high BP increased by age classes in all considered periods. BP awareness and control also improved. Our data suggest that BP control could be achieved by 2020, as recommended by WHO.

  15. Longitudinal Patterns of Glycemic Control and Blood Pressure in Pregnant Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Phenotypes from Functional Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczesniak, Rhonda D; Li, Dan; Duan, Leo L; Altaye, Mekibib; Miodovnik, Menachem; Khoury, Jane C

    2016-11-01

    Objective  To identify phenotypes of type 1 diabetes control and associations with maternal/neonatal characteristics based on blood pressure (BP), glucose, and insulin curves during gestation, using a novel functional data analysis approach that accounts for sparse longitudinal patterns of medical monitoring during pregnancy. Methods  We performed a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of women with type 1 diabetes whose BP, glucose, and insulin requirements were monitored throughout gestation as part of a program-project grant. Scores from sparse functional principal component analysis (fPCA) were used to classify gestational profiles according to the degree of control for each monitored measure. Phenotypes created using fPCA were compared with respect to maternal and neonatal characteristics and outcome. Results  Most of the gestational profile variation in the monitored measures was explained by the first principal component (82-94%). Profiles clustered into three subgroups of high, moderate, or low heterogeneity, relative to the overall mean response. Phenotypes were associated with baseline characteristics, longitudinal changes in glycohemoglobin A1 and weight, and to pregnancy-related outcomes. Conclusion  Three distinct longitudinal patterns of glucose, insulin, and BP control were found. By identifying these phenotypes, interventions can be targeted for subgroups at highest risk for compromised outcome, to optimize diabetes management during pregnancy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Gender disparity in antihypertensive utilization and blood pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and alpha methyldopa were more frequently prescribed in males (P=0.02) and females (P<0.001), respectively. Conclusion: Gender disparity occurs in the utilization of certain antihypertensives and blood pressure control in the study population. This may be related to biologic, ...

  17. Effect Of Interval Training On Blood Pressure And Exercise Capacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect Of Interval Training On Blood Pressure And Exercise Capacity In Hypertension: A Randomized Controlled Study. ... Tropical Journal of Health Sciences ... The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of interval training program on MAP in black African subjects with hypertension. Two hundred ...

  18. National High Blood Pressure 12-Month Kit. May 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. National High Blood Pressure Education Program.

    Part I of this kit provides information for program planners and health professionals on ways to overcome barriers to health care among the medically underserved, promote high blood pressure control through the media and other community channels, and improve adherence to treatment among hypertensive patients. It lists additional resources for…

  19. Systolic blood pressure of Nigerian children with sickle cell disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SCD) are reported to be lower than that of the general population but similar studies in children are unavailable. Objectives: To determine the systolic blood pressure (SBP) of children with SCD and compare it with that of healthy controls. Also ...

  20. Effects Of Quinghaosu Antimalaria Artemether On Blood Pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One group of rats received 3.2mg/kg artemether (Therapeutic dose) and a second group received 18mg/kg of artemether while the control group received vehicle (refined corn oil) for 28 days. The animals were anaesthetized thereafter and cannulated for recording of blood pressure and testing of cardiovascular reflexes.

  1. Office and ambulatory blood pressure control with a fixed-dose combination of candesartan and hydrochlorothiazide in previously uncontrolled hypertensive patients: results of CHILI CU Soon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramlage P

    2011-12-01

    day, 49.3% were nondippers, and 3.4% were inverted dippers. Forty-nine adverse events (1.19% were reported, of which seven (0.17% were regarded as serious.Conclusion: Candesartan 32 mg in a fixed-dose combination with either 12.5 mg or 25 mg HCTZ is safe and effective for further BP lowering irrespective of prior antihypertensive drug class not being able to control BP.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure, office blood pressure, normalization, response

  2. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 7. Recommendations on stress management. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J D; Barnett, P A; Linden, W; Ramsden, V; Taenzer, P

    1999-05-04

    To provide updated evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of stress management on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults (except pregnant women). Alternatives to stress management include other nonpharmacologic interventions and medical therapy; these options are not mutually exclusive. The health outcome considered was reduction of blood pressure. There is little evidence to date that stress management prevents death or vascular events. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. A systematic search of the literature (which yielded, among other sources, 3 meta-analyses) was conducted for the period 1966-1997 with the terms essential hypertension, treatment, psychological, behavioural, cognitive, relaxation, mediation, biofeedback and stress management. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of the articles identified, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to level of evidence. A high value was placed on the avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by uncontrolled hypertension. The magnitude of the reduction in blood pressure obtained with multicomponent, individualized cognitive behavioural intervention for stress management was comparable in some studies to that obtained with weight loss or drugs; single-component interventions such as biofeedback or relaxation were less effective. The adverse effects of stress-management techniques are minimal, but the cost for effective interventions is substantial, similar initially to drug costs; continuing costs are probably minimal. (1) In patients with hypertension, the contribution of stress should be considered. (2) For hypertensive patients in whom stress appears to be an important issue, stress management should be considered as an intervention

  3. Renal intercalated cells and blood pressure regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Wall

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type B and non-A, non-B intercalated cells are found within the connecting tubule and the cortical collecting duct. Of these cell types, type B intercalated cells are known to mediate Cl⁻ absorption and HCO₃⁻ secretion largely through pendrin-dependent Cl⁻/HCO₃⁻ exchange. This exchange is stimulated by angiotensin II administration and is also stimulated in models of metabolic alkalosis, for instance after aldosterone or NaHCO₃ administration. In some rodent models, pendrin-mediated HCO₃⁻ secretion modulates acid-base balance. However, the role of pendrin in blood pressure regulation is likely of more physiological or clinical significance. Pendrin regulates blood pressure not only by mediating aldosterone-sensitive Cl⁻ absorption, but also by modulating the aldosterone response for epithelial Na⁺ channel (ENaC-mediated Na⁺ absorption. Pendrin regulates ENaC through changes in open channel of probability, channel surface density, and channels subunit total protein abundance. Thus, aldosterone stimulates ENaC activity through both direct and indirect effects, the latter occurring through its stimulation of pendrin expression and function. Therefore, pendrin contributes to the aldosterone pressor response. Pendrin may also modulate blood pressure in part through its action in the adrenal medulla, where it modulates the release of catecholamines, or through an indirect effect on vascular contractile force. This review describes how aldosterone and angiotensin II-induced signaling regulate pendrin and the contributory role of pendrin in distal nephron function and blood pressure.

  4. Effect of lemon juice on blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    SARI, Aysel; SELİM, Nevzat; DİLEK, Melda; AYDOĞDU, Turkan; ADIBELLİ, Zelal; BÜYÜKKAYA, Piltan; AKPOLAT, Tekin

    2012-01-01

    Lemon juice has commonly been used by hypertensive patients in order to lower blood pressure (BP) acutely when BP is raised or as an alternative/complementary therapy for expectation of chronic improvement. Grapefruit, a citrus fruit like lemon, causes clinically significant interactions with a variety of drugs including calcium antagonists. The aims of this study were to investigate acute and chronic effects of lemon juice on BP among hypertensive patients. Ninty-eight patients were included...

  5. Blood pressure : trends, determinants and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leer, van E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Trends in blood pressure, prevalence and treatment of hypertension were studied in 30,000 men and women aged 37-43 years during the period 1974-1980, in 80,000 men aged 33-37 years during the period 1981-1986 and 36,000 in men and women aged 20-59 years during the period 1987-1991. Between

  6. Multiscale analysis of blood pressure signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrone, A.; Polosa, A. D.; Scioscia, G.; Stramaglia, S.; Zenzola, A.

    1999-07-01

    We describe the multiresolution wavelet analysis of blood pressure waves in vasovagal syncope-affected patients compared with those in healthy people, using Haar and Gaussian bases. A comparison between scale-dependent and scale-independent measures discriminating the two classes of subjects is made. What emerges is a sort of equivalence between these two methodological approaches, that is, both methods reach the same statistical significance of separation between the two classes.

  7. Perinatal development and adult blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ashton

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence supports the concept of fetal programming in cardiovascular disease in man, which asserts that an insult experienced in utero exerts a long-term influence on cardiovascular function, leading to disease in adulthood. However, this hypothesis is not universally accepted, hence animal models may be of value in determining potential physiological mechanisms which could explain how fetal undernutrition results in cardiovascular disease in later life. This review describes two major animal models of cardiovascular programming, the in utero protein-restricted rat and the cross-fostered spontaneously hypertensive rat. In the former model, moderate maternal protein restriction during pregnancy induces an increase in offspring blood pressure of 20-30 mmHg. This hypertensive effect is mediated, in part, by fetal exposure to excess maternal glucocorticoids as a result of a deficiency in placental 11-ß hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Furthermore, nephrogenesis is impaired in this model which, coupled with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, could also contribute to the greater blood pressure displayed by these animals. The second model discussed is the cross-fostered spontaneously hypertensive rat. Spontaneously hypertensive rats develop severe hypertension without external intervention; however, their adult blood pressure may be lowered by 20-30 mmHg by cross-fostering pups to a normotensive dam within the first two weeks of lactation. The mechanisms responsible for this antihypertensive effect are less clear, but may also involve altered renal function and down-regulation of the renin-angiotensin system. These two models clearly show that adult blood pressure is influenced by exposure to one of a number of stimuli during critical stages of perinatal development.

  8. Rise in albuminuria and blood pressure in patients who progressed to diabetic nephropathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, W; Shen, Y; Molitch, M E; Steffes, M W

    2001-02-01

    The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) enrolled 1441 participants to address the role of intensive therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus on the onset and progression of microvascular complications. To examine the timing of elevated systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) and increased albumin excretion rate (AER) in the progression to clinical diabetic nephropathy (AER > 300 mg/24 h on two consecutive visits from a baseline of AER AER and hemoglobin A(1c), but who did not progress to clinical diabetic nephropathy-matched controls. In the conventional treatment group, the 21 progressors exhibited a significant rise in mean AER (above their own baseline levels and above values in the matched controls) at year 2 of the DCCT. In contrast, the progressors' mean DBP and SBP were not significantly higher than baseline until year 3 (DBP) or year 4 (SBP) and not significantly higher than the matched controls until year 4 (both DBP and SBP). On the individual level, 19 of 21 (90%) progressors reached clinical diabetic nephropathy before the diagnosis of hypertension (140/90 mmHg). In the intensive treatment group, however, the rise in DBP preceded the rise in AER by 1 to 2 yr among the six progressors. Both intensively treated progressors who experienced hypertension reached this before AER > 300 mg/24 h. These results underline the early and prognostic rise in AER in diabetic patients, but only in those who received conventional treatment. The evolution of diabetic renal disease may follow a different course in patients who receive intensive diabetic treatment.

  9. Dietary spermidine for lowering high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Abdellatif, Mahmoud; Zimmermann, Andreas; Schroeder, Sabrina; Pendl, Tobias; Harger, Alexandra; Stekovic, Slaven; Schipke, Julia; Magnes, Christoph; Schmidt, Albrecht; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Dammbrueck, Christopher; Gross, Angelina S.; Herbst, Viktoria; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Pietrocola, Federico; Pieber, Thomas R.; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Linke, Wolfgang A.; Mühlfeld, Christian; Sadoshima, Junichi; Dengjel, Joern; Kiechl, Stefan; Kroemer, Guido; Sedej, Simon; Madeo, Frank

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Loss of cardiac macroautophagy/autophagy impairs heart function, and evidence accumulates that an increased autophagic flux may protect against cardiovascular disease. We therefore tested the protective capacity of the natural autophagy inducer spermidine in animal models of aging and hypertension, which both represent major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Dietary spermidine elicits cardioprotective effects in aged mice through enhancing cardiac autophagy and mitophagy. In salt-sensitive rats, spermidine supplementation also delays the development of hypertensive heart disease, coinciding with reduced arterial blood pressure. The high blood pressure-lowering effect likely results from improved global arginine bioavailability and protection from hypertension-associated renal damage. The polyamine spermidine is naturally present in human diets, though to a varying amount depending on food type and preparation. In humans, high dietary spermidine intake correlates with reduced blood pressure and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and related death. Altogether, spermidine represents a cardio- and vascular-protective autophagy inducer that can be readily integrated in common diets. PMID:28118075

  10. Multicomponent exercise decreases blood pressure, heart rate and double product in normotensive and hypertensive older patients with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Júnior, Hélio José; Asano, Ricardo Yukio; Gonçalvez, Ivan de Oliveira; Brietzke, Cayque; Pires, Flávio Oliveira; Aguiar, Samuel da Silva; Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Caperuto, Erico Chagas; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2018-02-26

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a 6-month multicomponent exercise program on blood pressure, heart rate, and double product of uncontrolled and controlled normotensive and hypertensive older patients. The study included 183 subjects, 97 normotensives, of which 53 were controlled normotensives (CNS), and 44 uncontrolled normotensives (UNS), as well as 86 hypertensives, of which 43 were controlled hypertensives (CHS), and 43 uncontrolled hypertensives (UHS). Volunteers were recruited and blood pressure and heart rate measurements were made before and after a 6-month multicomponent exercise program. The program of physical exercise was performed twice a week for 26 weeks. The physical exercises program was based on functional and walking exercises. Exercise sessions were performed at moderate intensity. The results indicated that UHS showed a marked decrease in systolic (-8.0mmHg), diastolic (-11.1mmHg), mean (-10.1mmHg), and pulse pressures, heart rate (-6.8bpm), and double product (-1640bpmmmHg), when compared to baseline. Similarly, diastolic (-5.5mmHg) and mean arterial (-4.8mmHg) pressures were significantly decreased in UNS. Concomitantly, significant changes could be observed in the body mass index (-0.9kg/m 2 ; -1.5kg/m 2 ) and waist circumference (-3.3cm; only UHS) of UNS and UHS, which may be associated with the changes observed in blood pressure. In conclusion, the data of the present study indicate that a 6-month multicomponent exercise program may lead to significant reductions in blood pressure, heart rate, and double product of normotensive and hypertensive patients with high blood pressure values. Copyright © 2018 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...... of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our...... reduction in frequency. An increase in days with use of medication was found. Increased awareness of low CSF pressure headache is emphasized and a controlled larger randomized study is needed to confirm the results. However the present results, allows us to conclude that EBP in treatment-refractory low CSF...

  12. Iyengar Yoga versus Enhanced Usual Care on Blood Pressure in Patients with Prehypertension to Stage I Hypertension: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)</