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Sample records for blood precursors implications

  1. Human Flt3L generates dendritic cells from canine peripheral blood precursors: implications for a dog glioma clinical trial.

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    Weidong Xiong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and carries a dismal prognosis. We have developed a conditional cytotoxic/immunotherapeutic approach using adenoviral vectors (Ads encoding the immunostimulatory cytokine, human soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (hsFlt3L and the conditional cytotoxic molecule, i.e., Herpes Simplex Type 1- thymide kinase (TK. This therapy triggers an anti-tumor immune response that leads to tumor regression and anti-tumor immunological memory in intracranial rodent cancer models. We aim to test the efficacy of this immunotherapy in dogs bearing spontaneous GBM. In view of the controversy regarding the effect of human cytokines on dog immune cells, and considering that the efficacy of this treatment depends on hsFlt3L-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs, in the present work we tested the ability of Ad-encoded hsFlt3L to generate DCs from dog peripheral blood and compared its effects with canine IL-4 and GM-CSF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results demonstrate that hsFlT3L expressed form an Ad vector, generated DCs from peripheral blood cultures with very similar morphological and phenotypic characteristics to canine IL-4 and GM-CSF-cultured DCs. These include phagocytic activity and expression of CD11c, MHCII, CD80 and CD14. Maturation of DCs cultured under both conditions resulted in increased secretion of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. Importantly, hsFlt3L-derived antigen presenting cells showed allostimulatory potential highlighting their ability to present antigen to T cells and elicit their proliferation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that hsFlt3L induces the proliferation of canine DCs and support its use in upcoming clinical trials for canine GBM. Our data further support the translation of hsFlt3L to be used for dendritic cells' vaccination and gene therapeutic approaches from rodent models to canine patients and its future

  2. PKP precursors : Implications for global scatterers

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    Waszek, Lauren; Thomas, Christine; Deuss, Arwen

    2015-01-01

    Precursors to the core phase PKP are generated by scattering of seismic energy from heterogeneities in the mantle. Here we examine a large global data set of PKP precursors in individual seismograms and array data, to better understand scattering locations. The precursor amplitudes from individual s

  3. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

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    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Carbohydrate Microarrays Identify Blood Group Precursor Cryptic Epitopes as Potential Immunological Targets of Breast Cancer

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    Denong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using carbohydrate microarrays, we explored potential natural ligands of antitumor monoclonal antibody HAE3. This antibody was raised against a murine mammary tumor antigen but was found to cross-react with a number of human epithelial tumors in tissues. Our carbohydrate microarray analysis reveals that HAE3 is specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope that is normally hidden in the cores of blood group substances. Using HAE3 to screen tumor cell surface markers by flow cytometry, we found that the HAE3 glycoepitope, gpHAE3, was highly expressed by a number of human breast cancer cell lines, including some triple-negative cancers that lack the estrogen, progesterone, and Her2/neu receptors. Taken together, we demonstrate that HAE3 recognizes a conserved cryptic glycoepitope of blood group precursors, which is nevertheless selectively expressed and surface-exposed in certain breast tumor cells. The potential of this class of O-glycan cryptic antigens in breast cancer subtyping and targeted immunotherapy warrants further investigation.

  5. NMR identification of hexamethylenetetramine and its precursor in Titan tholins: Implications for Titan prebiotic chemistry

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    He, Chao; Lin, Guangxin; Smith, Mark A.

    2012-08-01

    The reddish brown organic haze surrounding Titan has been investigated using methods including remote observation, direct exploration (the Cassini mission) and laboratory simulations, but its formation mechanism and the contributing chemical structures and prebiotic potential are still not well understood. We report here the structural investigation of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosol (tholin) using solution-state NMR. These spectra demonstrate a material composed of a mixture of moderate polymer and small molecules. Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) is identified as the major small molecule component in the Titan tholin and its precursor (1,3,5-hexahydrotriazine) is also detected. We discuss the formation mechanism of HMT and its implications for Titan and early Earth prebiotic chemistry.

  6. Exposure of CD34+ precursors to cytostatic anthraquinone-derivatives induces rapid dendritic cell differentiation: implications for cancer immunotherapy.

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    van de Ven, Rieneke; Reurs, Anneke W; Wijnands, Pepijn G J T B; van Wetering, Sandra; Kruisbeek, Ada M; Hooijberg, Erik; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2012-02-01

    Appropriate activation of dendritic cells (DC) is essential for successful active vaccination and induction of cell-mediated immunity. The scarcity of precursor cells, as well as long culture methods, have hampered wide-scale application of DC vaccines derived from CD34(+) precursors, despite their suggested superior efficacy over the more commonly applied monocyte-derived DC (MoDC). Here, employing the CD34(+)/CD14(+) AML-derived human DC progenitor cell line MUTZ3, we show that cytostatic anthraquinone-derivatives (i.e., the anthracenedione mitoxantrone and the related anthracyclin doxorubicin) induce rapid differentiation of CD34(+) DC precursors into functional antigen-presenting cells (APC) in a three-day protocol. The drugs were found to act specifically on CD34(+), and not on CD14(+) DC precursors. Importantly, these observations were confirmed for primary CD34(+) and CD14(+) DC precursors from peripheral blood. Mitoxantrone-generated DC were fully differentiated within three days and after an additional 24 h of maturation, were as capable as standard 9-day differentiated and matured DC to migrate toward the lymph node-homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21, to induce primary allogeneic T cell proliferation, and to prime functional MART1-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Our finding that anthraquinone-derivatives like mitoxantrone support rapid high-efficiency differentiation of DC precursors may have consequences for in vitro production of DC vaccines as well as for novel immunochemotherapy strategies.

  7. Blood Levels of Monoamine Precursors and Smoking in Patients with Schizophrenia

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    Ashwin Jacob Mathai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Smoking is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and exerts a negative impact on cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Smoking has complex interactions with monoamine metabolism through the ability of cigarette smoke to suppress Type 1 T helper cell (Th1 type immunity, the immunophenotype that is implicated in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH dysfunction and tryptophan breakdown to kynurenine via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. Nicotine also induces tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH expression, leading to increased synthesis of catecholamines. Furthermore, there is evidence for PAH dysfunction in schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare the plasma levels of selected monoamine precursors and their metabolites in smokers vs non-smokers in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia. We measured plasma phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and kynurenine levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and calculated phenylalanine: tyrosine (Phe: Tyr and kynurenine: tryptophan (Kyn: Trp ratios in 920 patients with schizophrenia. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and linear regression analyses were used to compare these endpoints between 3 groups of patients with schizophrenia; 1 current smokers, 2 past smokers and 3 non-smokers. There were significant differences among the three groups with regards to tyrosine levels [F(2,789=3.77, p=0.02], with current smokers having lower tyrosine levels when compared to non-smokers (p=0.02. Kynurenine levels and Kyn :Trp ratio were different among the 3 groups [F (2,738=3.17, p=0.04, F(2,738=3.61, p=0.03] with current smokers having lower kynurenine levels (p=0.04 and higher Kyn: Trp ratio (p=0.02 when compared to past smokers. These findings need to be replicated with protocols that include healthy controls to further elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of altered tyrosine and kynurenine levels in smokers. Results do suggest potential molecular links between schizophrenia and smoking

  8. Racial differences in hypertension: implications for high blood pressure management.

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    Lackland, Daniel T

    2014-08-01

    The racial disparity in hypertension and hypertension-related outcomes has been recognized for decades with African Americans with greater risks than Caucasians. Blood pressure levels have consistently been higher for African Americans with an earlier onset of hypertension. Although awareness and treatment levels of high blood pressure have been similar, racial differences in control rates are evident. The higher blood pressure levels for African Americans are associated with higher rates of stroke, end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure. The reasons for the racial disparities in elevated blood pressure and hypertension-related outcomes risk remain unclear. However, the implications of the disparities of hypertension for prevention and clinical management are substantial, identifying African American men and women with excel hypertension risk and warranting interventions focused on these differences. In addition, focused research to identify the factors attributed to these disparities in risk burden is an essential need to address the evidence gaps.

  9. Osteoblast precursors, but not mature osteoblasts, move into developing and fractured bones along with invading blood vessels.

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    Maes, Christa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Selig, Martin K; Torrekens, Sophie; Roth, Sanford I; Mackem, Susan; Carmeliet, Geert; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2010-08-17

    During endochondral bone development, the first osteoblasts differentiate in the perichondrium surrounding avascular cartilaginous rudiments; the source of trabecular osteoblasts inside the later bone is, however, unknown. Here, we generated tamoxifen-inducible transgenic mice bred to Rosa26R-LacZ reporter mice to follow the fates of stage-selective subsets of osteoblast lineage cells. Pulse-chase studies showed that osterix-expressing osteoblast precursors, labeled in the perichondrium prior to vascular invasion of the cartilage, give rise to trabecular osteoblasts, osteocytes, and stromal cells inside the developing bone. Throughout the translocation, some precursors were found to intimately associate with invading blood vessels, in pericyte-like fashion. A similar coinvasion occurs during endochondral healing of bone fractures. In contrast, perichondrial mature osteoblasts did not exhibit perivascular localization and remained in the outer cortex of developing bones. These findings reveal the specific involvement of immature osteoblast precursors in the coupled vascular and osteogenic transformation essential to endochondral bone development and repair.

  10. Msx genes define a population of mural cell precursors required for head blood vessel maturation.

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    Lopes, Miguel; Goupille, Olivier; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Lallemand, Yvan; Cumano, Ana; Robert, Benoît

    2011-07-01

    Vessels are primarily formed from an inner endothelial layer that is secondarily covered by mural cells, namely vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arteries and veins and pericytes in capillaries and veinules. We previously showed that, in the mouse embryo, Msx1(lacZ) and Msx2(lacZ) are expressed in mural cells and in a few endothelial cells. To unravel the role of Msx genes in vascular development, we have inactivated the two Msx genes specifically in mural cells by combining the Msx1(lacZ), Msx2(lox) and Sm22α-Cre alleles. Optical projection tomography demonstrated abnormal branching of the cephalic vessels in E11.5 mutant embryos. The carotid and vertebral arteries showed an increase in caliber that was related to reduced vascular smooth muscle coverage. Taking advantage of a newly constructed Msx1(CreERT2) allele, we demonstrated by lineage tracing that the primary defect lies in a population of VSMC precursors. The abnormal phenotype that ensues is a consequence of impaired BMP signaling in the VSMC precursors that leads to downregulation of the metalloprotease 2 (Mmp2) and Mmp9 genes, which are essential for cell migration and integration into the mural layer. Improper coverage by VSMCs secondarily leads to incomplete maturation of the endothelial layer. Our results demonstrate that both Msx1 and Msx2 are required for the recruitment of a population of neural crest-derived VSMCs.

  11. Evidence for the formation of endothelin by lysed red blood cells from endogenous precursor.

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    Tippler, B; Herbst, C; Simmet, T

    1994-12-12

    The release of endothelin from various blood cell fractions was investigated. Human as well as rat blood cell fractions homogenized by sonification were incubated in buffer for up to 60 min. Neither in platelet nor leukocyte homogenates from either species could immunoreactive endothelin be detected. In contrast, homogenates of red blood cells from both species showed a rapid and time-dependent rise of immunoreactive endothelin levels, reaching a peak at 15 min and decreasing thereafter. However, at time point 0 no immunoreactive endothelin could be detected. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography showed immunoreactive endothelin to consist of endothelin-1 as well as big endothelin-1. The release of immunoreactive endothelin in human and rat homogenates was concentration-dependently inhibited by the protease inhibitors, leupeptin, phosphoramidon, chymostatin and pepstatin A in order of increasing potency. Intact red blood cells did not incorporate [125I]endothelin-1 nor did they transform exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1. However, haemolysis of red blood cells with hypotonic saline (0.2%) or incubation with pore-forming staphylococcal alpha-toxin induced the release of immunoreactive endothelin into the buffer samples. Thus, apart from the indirect vasoconstrictor, haemoglobin, red blood cells can also liberate the direct vasoconstrictor, endothelin, a finding expected to be of considerable pathophysiological significance.

  12. Umbilical cord blood banking: implications for perinatal care providers.

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    Armson, B Anthony

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the risks and benefits of umbilical cord blood banking for future stem cell transplantation and to provide guidelines for Canadian perinatal care providers regarding the counselling, procedural, and ethical implications of this potential therapeutic option. Selective or routine collection and storage of umbilical cord blood for future autologous (self) or allogenic (related or unrelated) transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells to treat malignant and nonmalignant disorders in children and adults. Maternal and perinatal morbidity, indications for umbilical cord blood transplantation, short- and long-term risks and benefits of umbilical cord blood transplantation, burden of umbilical cord blood collection on perinatal care providers, parental satisfaction, and health care costs. MEDLINE and PubMed searches were conducted from January 1970 to October 2003 for English-language articles related to umbilical cord blood collection, banking, and transplantation; the Cochrane library was searched; and committee opinions of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists were obtained. The evidence collected was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal/Fetal Medicine Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC), and recommendations were made using the evaluation of evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam. Umbilical cord blood is a readily available source of hematopoietic stem cells used with increasing frequency as an alternative to bone marrow or peripheral stem cells for transplantation in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant conditions in children and adults. Umbilical cord blood transplantation provides a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells with several advantages, including prompt availability, decreased risk of transmissible viral infections and graft

  13. Reported geomagnetic and ionospheric precursors to earthquakes: Summary, reanalysis, and implications for short-term prediction

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    Thomas, J. N.; Masci, F.; Love, J. J.; Johnston, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Earthquakes are one of the most devastating natural phenomena on earth, causing high deaths tolls and large financial losses each year. If precursory signals could be regularly and reliably identified, then the hazardous effects of earthquakes might be mitigated. Unfortunately, it is not at all clear that short-term earthquake prediction is either possible or practical, and the entire subject remains controversial. Still, many claims of successful earthquake precursor observations have been published, and among these are reports of geomagnetic and ionospheric anomalies prior to earthquake occurrence. Given the importance of earthquake prediction, reports of earthquake precursors need to be analyzed and checked for reliability and reproducibility. We have done this for numerous such reports, including the Loma Prieta, Guam, Hector Mine, Tohoku, and L'Aquila earthquakes. We have found that these reported earthquake precursors: 1) often lack time series observations from long before and long after the earthquakes and near and far from the earthquakes, 2) are not statistically correlated with the earthquakes and do not relate to the earthquake source mechanisms, 3) are not followed by similar, but much larger, signals during the subsequent earthquake when the primary energy release occurs, 4) are nonuniform in that they occur at different spatial and temporal regimes relative to the earthquakes and with different magnitudes and frequencies, and 5) can often be explained by other non-earthquake related mechanisms or normal geomagnetic activity. Thus we conclude that these reported precursors could not be used to predict the time or location of the earthquakes. Based on our findings, we suggest a protocol for examining precursory reports, something that will help guide future research in this area.

  14. Blood pressure change and risk of hypertension associated with parental hypertension: the Johns Hopkins Precursors Study.

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    Wang, Nae-Yuh; Young, J Hunter; Meoni, Lucy A; Ford, Daniel E; Erlinger, Thomas P; Klag, Michael J

    2008-03-24

    Parental hypertension is used to classify hypertension risk in young adults, but the long-term association of parental hypertension with blood pressure (BP) change and risk of hypertension over the adult life span has not been well studied. We examined the association of parental hypertension with BP change and hypertension risk from young adulthood through the ninth decade of life in a longitudinal cohort of 1160 male former medical students with 54 years of follow-up. In mixed-effects models using 29 867 BP measurements, mean systolic and diastolic BP readings were significantly higher at baseline among participants with parental hypertension. The rate of annual increase was slightly higher for systolic (0.03 mm Hg, P= .04), but not diastolic, BP in those with parental hypertension. After adjustment for baseline systolic and diastolic BP and time-dependent covariates--body mass index, alcohol consumption, coffee drinking, physical activity, and cigarette smoking--the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) of hypertension development was 1.5 (1.2-2.0) for men with maternal hypertension only, 1.8 (1.4-2.4) for men with paternal hypertension only, and 2.4 (1.8-3.2) for men with hypertension in both parents compared with men whose parents never developed hypertension. Early-onset (at age

  15. Surface modification of blood-contacting biomaterials by plasma-polymerized superhydrophobic films using hexamethyldisiloxane and tetrafluoromethane as precursors

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    Hsiao, Chaio-Ru [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, No. 100, Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen District, Taichung City 40724, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Wei [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 666, Buzih Rd., Beitun District, Taichung City 40601, Taiwan (China); Chou, Chia-Man, E-mail: cmchou@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, No. 1650, Sec. 4, Taiwan Boulevard, Seatwen District, Taichung City 40705, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Beitou District, Taipei City 11221, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chi-Jen, E-mail: cjchung@seed.net.tw [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 666, Buzih Rd., Beitun District, Taichung City 40601, Taiwan (China); He, Ju-Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, No. 100, Wenhwa Rd., Seatwen District, Taichung City 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Biomaterials modified by nanoparticle-containing plasma polymerized films. • A superhydrophoic film was obtained, and the properties of the coating were examined. • In vitro blood compatibility tests revealed neither platelet adhesion nor fibrinogen adsorption. • Surface modification technology of medical devices: non-cytotoxic and no blood clot formation. - Abstract: This paper proposes a plasma polymerization system that can be used to modify the surface of the widely used biomaterial, polyurethane (PU), by employing low-cost hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}) as precursors; this system features a pulsed-dc power supply. Plasma-polymerized HMDSO/CF{sub 4} (pp-HC) with coexisting micro- and nanoscale morphology was obtained as a superhydrophobic coating material by controlling the HMDSO/CF{sub 4} (f{sub H}) monomer flow ratio. The developed surface modification technology can be applied to medical devices, because it is non-cytotoxic and has favorable hemocompatibility, and no blood clots form when the device surface direct contacts. Experimental results reveal that the obtained pp-HC films contained SiO{sub x} nanoparticles randomly dispersed on the micron-scale three-dimensional network film surface. The −CF functional group, −CF{sub 2} bonding, and SiO{sub x} were detected on the film surface. The maximal water contact angle of the pp-HC coating was 161.2°, apparently attributable to the synergistic effect of the coexisting micro- and nanoscale surface morphology featuring a low surface-energy layer. The superhydrophobic and antifouling characteristics of the coating were retained even after it was rubbed 20 times with a steel wool tester. Results of in vitro cytotoxicity, fibrinogen adsorption, and platelet adhesion tests revealed favorable myoblast cell proliferation and the virtual absence of fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion on the pp-HC coated specimens. These quantitative findings imply

  16. Surface modification of blood-contacting biomaterials by plasma-polymerized superhydrophobic films using hexamethyldisiloxane and tetrafluoromethane as precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chaio-Ru; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chou, Chia-Man; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a plasma polymerization system that can be used to modify the surface of the widely used biomaterial, polyurethane (PU), by employing low-cost hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4) as precursors; this system features a pulsed-dc power supply. Plasma-polymerized HMDSO/CF4 (pp-HC) with coexisting micro- and nanoscale morphology was obtained as a superhydrophobic coating material by controlling the HMDSO/CF4 (fH) monomer flow ratio. The developed surface modification technology can be applied to medical devices, because it is non-cytotoxic and has favorable hemocompatibility, and no blood clots form when the device surface direct contacts. Experimental results reveal that the obtained pp-HC films contained SiOx nanoparticles randomly dispersed on the micron-scale three-dimensional network film surface. The sbnd CF functional group, sbnd CF2 bonding, and SiOx were detected on the film surface. The maximal water contact angle of the pp-HC coating was 161.2°, apparently attributable to the synergistic effect of the coexisting micro- and nanoscale surface morphology featuring a low surface-energy layer. The superhydrophobic and antifouling characteristics of the coating were retained even after it was rubbed 20 times with a steel wool tester. Results of in vitro cytotoxicity, fibrinogen adsorption, and platelet adhesion tests revealed favorable myoblast cell proliferation and the virtual absence of fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion on the pp-HC coated specimens. These quantitative findings imply that the pp-HC coating can potentially prevent the formation of thrombi and provide an alternative means of modifying the surfaces of blood-contacting biomaterials.

  17. Human blood contains both the uncleaved precursor of anti-Mullerian hormone and a complex of the NH2- and COOH-terminal peptides.

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    Pankhurst, Michael W; McLennan, Ian S

    2013-11-15

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in blood is a marker of ovarian status in women and the presence of cryptic testes in babies. Despite this, the molecular form of AMH in blood has not been verified. AMH is synthesized as an inert proprotein precursor (proAMH), which can be cleaved to yield NH2-terminal (AMHN) and COOH-terminal (AMHC) fragments, that can complex noncovalently (AMHN,C). Developing males have 10-fold more AMH than young adults. We report here that human blood is a mixture of inactive proAMH and receptor-binding AMHN,C. The AMH in the blood of boys, men, and premenopausal women was immunoprecipitated using antibodies to the NH2- and COOH-terminal peptides. The precipitated proteins were then analyzed by Western blots, using recombinant proteins as markers. The glycosylation status of AMH was verified using deglycosylating enzymes. The NH2-terminal antibody precipitated a major protein that migrated alongside rhproAMH and was detected by anti-AMHN and anti-AMHC. This antibody also precipitated significant levels of AMHN and AMHC from all participants. Antibodies specific to AMHC precipitated rhAMHC but did not precipitate AMHC from human blood. Hence, all the AMHC in human blood appears to be bound to AMHN. Both AMHN and proAMH were glycosylated, independent of age and sex. In conclusion, boys and young adults have the same form of AMH, with a significant proportion being the inactive precursor. This raises the possibility that the endocrine functions of AMH are partly controlled by its cleavage in the target organ. The presence of proAMH in blood may confound the use of AMH for diagnosis.

  18. Cardiovascular risk factors and blood pressure in a primary care unit: Yugoslav Study of the Precursors of Atherosclerosis in School Children (YUSAD).

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    Bajcetic, Milica; Ilic, Katarina; Singh, Nada Majkic; Novakovic, Ivana; Vukotic, Milija; Nedeljkovic, Srecko; Simeunovic, Slavko

    2006-01-01

    The presence of cardiovascular risk factors in children may be important in the development of atherosclerosis in adulthood. Adequate control of blood pressure is a cornerstone in atherosclerosis prevention. The aim of the Yugoslav Study of the Precursors of Atherosclerosis in School Children (YUSAD) was to identify risk factors for elevated blood pressure in school children. The YUSAD study is a multicentre follow-up study comprised of two cross-sectional surveys conducted five years apart. At baseline, 10-year-old children (3226 boys and 3074 girls [n=6300]) were randomly selected during periodical visits to primary health care centres. The risk factors measured were heart rate, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, grade point average and current smoking status. Significant age and sex differences were identified in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and all investigated independent variables. In a multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure in 10-year-old boys was directly and significantly related to total cholesterol and height, whereas it was inversely related to weight. At follow-up, in the multivariate model, only BMI was a significant predictor of diastolic blood pressure in boys. In girls at baseline in the multivariate regression analysis, the only significant predictor of diastolic blood pressure was total cholesterol. In 15-year-old girls, diastolic blood pressure was significantly and directly related to BMI and heart rate, whereas it was inversely related to weight. For both 10- and 15-year-old male and female participants, none of the variables by multivariate analysis were a significant predictor of systolic blood pressure. Age, sex, heart rate, cholesterol and weight are the most important predictors of blood pressure in school children.

  19. Cardiovascular risk factors and blood pressure in a primary care unit: Yugoslav Study of the Precursors of Atherosclerosis in School Children (YUSAD)

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    Bajcetic, Milica; Ilic, Katarina; Singh, Nada Majkic; Novakovic, Ivana; Vukotic, Milija; Nedeljkovic, Srecko; Simeunovic, Slavko

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The presence of cardiovascular risk factors in children may be important in the development of atherosclerosis in adulthood. Adequate control of blood pressure is a cornerstone in atherosclerosis prevention. The aim of the Yugoslav Study of the Precursors of Atherosclerosis in School Children (YUSAD) was to identify risk factors for elevated blood pressure in school children. METHODS The YUSAD study is a multicentre follow-up study comprised of two cross-sectional surveys conducted five years apart. At baseline, 10-year-old children (3226 boys and 3074 girls [n=6300]) were randomly selected during periodical visits to primary health care centres. The risk factors measured were heart rate, weight, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, grade point average and current smoking status. RESULTS Significant age and sex differences were identified in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and all investigated independent variables. In a multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure in 10-year-old boys was directly and significantly related to total cholesterol and height, whereas it was inversely related to weight. At follow-up, in the multivariate model, only BMI was a significant predictor of diastolic blood pressure in boys. In girls at baseline in the multivariate regression analysis, the only significant predictor of diastolic blood pressure was total cholesterol. In 15-year-old girls, diastolic blood pressure was significantly and directly related to BMI and heart rate, whereas it was inversely related to weight. For both 10- and 15-year-old male and female participants, none of the variables by multivariate analysis were a significant predictor of systolic blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS Age, sex, heart rate, cholesterol and weight are the most important predictors of blood pressure in school children. PMID:18651041

  20. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression.

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    Lima, Luize G; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2013-09-04

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies.

  1. Incorporation of radio-labelled nucleic acid precursors by Theileria parva in bovine blood and salivary glands of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks

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    Irvin, A.D.; Boarer, C.D.H.; Kurtti, T.J.; Ocama, J.G.R. (International Lab. for Research on Animal Diseases, Nairobi (Kenya))

    1981-12-01

    The uptake of radio-labelled nucleic acid precursors by blood and tick salivary gland forms of Theileria parva was studied. Piroplasms took up tritiated purines, particularly hypoxanthine, but not pyrimidines. Similar uptake was recorded by T. parva, both in tick saliva and in salivary glands maintained in vitro. Intermediate parasite stages were those most readily labelled in glands; this reflected active nucleic acid synthesis associated with rapid parasite division. Radio-labelling of T. parva in tick salivary glands could be of value in procedures used for concentrating and purifying theilerial sporozoites.

  2. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

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    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  3. Effects of humoral factors on amplification of nonrecognizable erythrocytic and granulocytic precursors. [Rats, radiation effects on blood cell production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E P; Carsten, A L; Cohen, R; Miller, M E; Moccia, G

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of humoral factors on amplification of nonrecognizable erythrocytic and granulocytic precursors using the in vivo plasma clot diffusion chamber and the in vitro plasma clot culture methods. Plasma erythropoietin levels changes in the reticulocyte concentration and hematocrits of irradiated and non-irradiated Long-Evans rats exposed to hypoxia were also determined. While erythropoietin plasma levels appeared to effect BFU-E and CFU-E growth, results suggest erythropoietin may not be the sole regulator of red cell production and that inhibitors or chalone-like mechanisms may be involved. Measurements made on granulocyte precursors treated with CSF containing L-cell conditioned medium revealed granulocytic colonies and burst-like formations, similar to those seen for erythrocytic growth. There is strong evidence suggesting that CSF is a regulator of granulopoiesis; however, it is not the sole regulator and it appears that inhibitors may play an in vivo role. Growth of colonies with cell numbers not a power of 2 implies either asymmetric nitosis due to loss of genetic information required for continuing division, or differences in concentration of, or ability to recognize inhibitory factors. These possibilities are examined on the basis of results using in vivo and in vitro culture techniques.

  4. The immune system mediates blood-brain barrier damage; Possible implications for pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderWerf, YD; DeJongste, MJL; terHorst, GJ

    1995-01-01

    The immune system mediates blood-brain barrier damage; possible implications for pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses. In this investigation the effects of immune activation on the brain are characterized In order to study this, we used a model for chronic immune activation, the myocardial

  5. Calf blood pressure: clinical implications and correlations with arm blood pressure in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapanzano, M S; Strong, W B; Newman, I R; Hixon, R L; Casal, D; Linder, C W

    1996-02-01

    Indirect measurement of lower extremity blood pressure is often used in the clinical setting, although normative data after the newborn period are not readily available. Indirect blood pressure (BP) measurement was obtained in the right arms and right calves of 148 healthy infants and young children 2 weeks to 3 years of age. All measurements were made using an oscillometric device. The infants and children are quiet or asleep and in the supine position. A BP cuff of proper size was chosen. Three measurements were made in both extremities; the average of the second and third measurements was used for all analyses. Age correlated better with calf systolic blood pressure (SBPc) than with arm SBP (SBPa) (r = .52 vs .17). Calf diastolic blood pressure (DBPc) and calf mean blood pressure (MBPc) correlated moderately poorly with age (r = .37 and .39, respectively). There was no order effect. SBPc correlated best with height (r = .53), then age (r = .52), and, finally, weight (r = .51). The correlation between BPc and BPa was moderately low. The correlation of SBPc with SBPa was r = .46; that of DBPc with DBPa was r = .37; and that of MBPc with MBPa was r = .41. From birth to 6 months, SBPc was slightly lower than SBPa (1 to 3 mm Hg). SBPc increased linearly relative to SBPa and began to exceed SBPa at 6 months of age. The pattern of DBP and MBP was similar. Wide variability of blood pressure parameters was noted between the infants and children at all ages. Reference data are presented for BPc and the difference between BPc and BPa in healthy infants and children from 2 weeks to 3 years of age. BPc is not equivalent to BPa and should not be arbitrarily substituted. Because of the wide variability among healthy infants and children, SBPc measurements should be interpreted with caution when evaluating for coarctation of the aorta.

  6. Heart rate and blood pressure: any possible implications for management of hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reule, Scott; Drawz, Paul E

    2012-12-01

    Hypertension is a common clinical problem and a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke. Elevated heart rate is associated with elevated blood pressure, increased risk for hypertension, and, among hypertensives, increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Despite these important relationships, heart rate is generally not a major consideration in choosing antihypertensive medications. In part, this is due to a lack of evidence supporting heart rate lowering as a therapeutic strategy in hypertension. Additionally, while there is a positive correlation between heart rate and peripheral blood pressure, there is an inverse relationship between heart rate and central blood pressure. The use of antihypertensive medications, specifically medications that affect heart rate, may not reliably reduce central blood pressure to a similar extent as observed peripherally. We review the relationship between heart rate and peripheral and central blood pressure, with a focus on the implications for chronotropic therapy in hypertension.

  7. Whole blood viscosity issues VII: the correlation with leucocytosis and implication on leukapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood hyperviscosity has been acknowledged to be a complicating factor in polycythaemia and hyperproteinaemia. Hyperleucocytosis has also been implicated in hyperviscosity and may be a basis for therapeutic leukapheresis. Aims: This issue in the series seeks to determine the association and correlation between whole blood viscosity and white blood cell count (WBCC, with a view to advance the cause of a neglected clinical pathology index. Materials & Methods: Based on archived clinical pathology data, 10,857 cases that were concomitantly tested for full blood count and total proteins in the 2008 calendar year were audited for hyperleucocytosis. Whole blood viscosity level was determined and compared in the group with leucocytosis relative to the group with leucopenia and normal WBCC. The confounding effects of age, gender and red blood cell indices were evaluated. The correlation between whole blood viscosity and WBCC was also determined. Results: As a generalization, hypoviscosity is observed among individuals who presented hyperleucocytosis. There is no correlation (r = 0.20 between leucocytosis and blood viscosity. Conclusion: It is known that anaemia and thromboembolism, which can be associated with leucocytosis, predispose to hypoviscosity. The finding from this study provides evidence of association between hypoviscosity and leucocytosis. The absence of association and insignificant correlation between leucocytosis and hyperviscosity may be one explanation for ineffectiveness of therapeutic leukapheresis. Further, the non-correlation lends credence to specificity of blood viscosity, for which critical leucocytosis is not a substitute.

  8. Intravenous L-5-hydroxytryptophan in normal subjects: an interdisciplinary precursor loading study. Part 1: Implications of reproducible mood elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pühringer, W; Wirz-Justice, A; Graw, P; Lacoste, V; Gastpar, M

    1976-11-01

    L-5-hydroxytryptophan ethylester (Ro 3-5940), a new soluble form of this serotonin precursor, was administered to 26 healthy, non-depressed subjects after premedication with the peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor benserazide (Ro 4-6402) in a total of 51 infusions. Those conditions were chosen for the main trial which in a pre-trial investigation had proved to combine minimal side effects with clear central effects in particular the observed marked mood elevation after 1-5HTP. Using these standardized conditions of application, an interindividually similar pattern of the time course of substance effects could be shown, and convincing evidence was deducible for an objective mood elevating effect of 1-5HTP infusion. Amongst the most impressive results was the parallelity of the time course of mood changes and concomitant changes in serum growth hormone levels. Especially emphasized are the important questions of effectivity, specificity and clinical practicability or safety, which are essential for any precursor study. Arguments are presented supporting the assumption that primarily serotoninergic changes underlie these mood effects. In our opinion this mode of i.v. application of 1-5HTP represents a practicable strategy for investigating biochemical hypotheses as to serotonin mediated normal and deviant human behaviour, especially in affective disorders.

  9. Chemical composition of pseudo-phlobaphinite precursors: implications for the presence of aliphatic biopolymers in vitrinite from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etuan Zhang; Hatcher, P.G.; Davis, A. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    Pseudo-phlobaphinite cell inclusions in a buried stem of angiospermous wood of [ital Rhizophora mangle] from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda have been investigated petrographically and chemically. Optical and scanning electron microscopy reveal that the light wood from inner sections of the stem consists predominantly of cell walls with few cell inclusions, whereas the dark wood from outer portion of the stem is composed of both cell walls and cell inclusions which are believed to represent pseudophlobaphinite precursors. [sup 13]C NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence of lignin and tannin structures within the cell walls. The wood also displays resonances suggestive of aliphatic components. The NMR results are further supplemented and confirmed by flash pyrolysis gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses. The pyrogram of the cell-wall dominated light wood is characterized by peaks related to both syringyl and guaiacyl units. The major pyrolysis products from the dark wood, however, are a homologous series of long-chain n-alkanes, n-alk-l-enes and [alpha],[omega]-alkadienes extending from chain length C[sub 10] to C[sub 30]. These aliphatic components arise from the material associated with the pseudophlobaphinite cell inclusions. Py-gc/ms analysis of a humic acid extracted from the sediments surrounding the studied wood consists almost exclusively of a homologous series of straight-chain alkanes, alkenes and alkadienes up to C[sub 30]. The striking resemblance between programs of the pseudo-phlobaphinite precursor and humic acid suggests that the possible mechanism for the formation of the pseudo-phlobaphinite is migration and deposition of humic acid into cell lumina. 72 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Tattoos and transfusion-transmitted disease risk: implications for the screening of blood donors in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio de A. Nishioka

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Having a tattoo has been associated with serological evidence of hepatitis B and C viruses, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infections and syphilis; all of these are known to be transmissible by blood transfusion. These associations are of higher magnitude for individuals with nonprofessionally-applied tattoos and with two or more tattoos. Tattoos are common among drug addicts and prisoners, conditions that are also associated with transfusion-transmitted diseases. We examined the implications of these associations for the screening of blood donors in Brazil. Numbers of individuals who would be correctly or unnecessarily deferred from blood donation on the basis of the presence of tattoos, and on their number and type, were calculated for different prevalence situations based on published odds ratios. If having a tattoo was made a deferral criterion, cost savings (due to a reduced need for laboratory testing and subsequent follow-up would accrue at the expense of the deferral of appropriate donors. Restricting deferral to more `at-risk' sub-groups of tattooed individuals would correctly defer less individuals and would also reduce the numbers of potential donors unnecessarily deferred. Key factors in balancing cost savings and unnecessary deferrals include the magnitude of the pool of blood donors in the population, the prevalence of individuals with tattoos and the `culture' of tattoos in the population. Tattoos can therefore be an efficient criterion for the screening of blood donors in certain settings, a finding that requires corroboration from larger population-based studies.

  11. Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after delivery and implications for public cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, David S; Scrivens, Nicholas; Lawless, Tiffany; Mostert, Karen; Oppenheimer, Lawrence; Walker, Mark; Petraszko, Tanya; Elmoazzen, Heidi

    2016-03-01

    Public banking of umbilical cord blood units (CBUs) containing higher numbers of cells ensures timely engraftment after transplantation for increasing numbers of patients. Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord after birth may benefit some infants by preventing iron deficiency. Implications of delayed cord clamping for public cord blood banking remains unclear. CBUs collected by Canadian Blood Services at one collection site between November 1, 2014, and March 17, 2015, were analyzed. The delay in cord clamping after birth was timed and classified as "no delay," 20 to 60 seconds, more than 60 seconds, or more than 120 seconds. Of 367 collections, 100 reported no delay in clamping while clamping was delayed by 20 to 60 seconds (n = 69), more than 60 seconds (n = 98), or more than 120 seconds (n = 100) in the remaining cases. The mean volume and total nucleated cells (TNCs) in units with no delay in clamping were significantly greater than mean volumes for all categories of delayed clamping (Tukey's test, p clamping was delayed (p = 5.5 × 10(-8) ). The difference was most marked for cords that were clamped more than 120 seconds after delivery (6.2% compared with 39%). Delayed cord clamping greatly diminishes the volume and TNC count of units collected for a public cord blood bank. Creating an inventory of CBUs with high TNC content may take more time than expected. © 2015 AABB.

  12. Clinical implications of blood eosinophil count in patients with non-asthma–COPD overlap syndrome COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song JH

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jin Hwa Song,1 Chang-Hoon Lee,1 Jin Woo Kim,2 Won-Yeon Lee,3 Ji Ye Jung,4 Joo Hun Park,5 Ki Suck Jung,6 Kwang Ha Yoo,7 Yong Bum Park,8 Deog Keom Kim9 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 2Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Gangwon-do, 4Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, 6Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University Medical School, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do, 7Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, 8Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, 9Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: Recent studies that assessed the relevance of the blood eosinophil count as a biomarker in patients with COPD may have overestimated it because they included patients with asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS. We investigated the clinical implications of the blood eosinophil count in patients with non-ACOS COPD.Patients and methods: From a Korean COPD Subtype Study (KOCOSS cohort, we selected patients with non-ACOS COPD after excluding ACOS patients according to Spanish criteria. Clinical characteristics and the incidence of moderate-to-severe exacerbation were compared

  13. Comparison of the level of thrombus precursor protein in blood plasma between patients with acute cerebral infarction and healthy persons at different time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenghua Xiao; Peng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombus precursor protein (TpP) is the index of thrombus activity level, and it is also early referencing index in detecting thrombus diseases.OBJECTIVE: To dynamically observe the changes of TpP level in blood plasma of patients with acute cerebral infarction at different time after onset, and to compare the differences of plasma TpP level between patients with acute cerebral infarction and healthy persons who received health examination.DESIGN: Controlled observation.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 58 patients with acute cerebral infarction who received the treatment in the Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College between September 2004 and March 2005 were recruited in this study. They all met the diagnostic criteria revised by the 4th National Conference of Cerebrovascular Disorders in 1995 and were diagnosed by clinical and skull CT and (or) MRI examinations. The patients included 33 male and 25 female aged from 36 to 87 years. Time to onset < 6 hours, 6 to 11 hours, 12 to 23 hours, 24 to 48 hours and > 48 hours were found in 10,11,14,10 and 13 patients respectively. Another 51 persons who homeochronously received the health body examination in our hospital were recruited, including 34 male and 17 female, aged 38 to 85 years, serving as control group. Patients with cardio-cerebrovascualr diseases or liver and kidney diseases were excluded. All the involved subjects were informed of the detected items.METHODS: About 4 mL venous blood was respectively taken from patients admitted to the hospital within 6 hours, 6 to11 hours, 12 to 23 hours, 24 to 48 hours and more then 48 hours after onset, and healthy persons when receiving health examination. The level of TpP in blood plasma was measured with enzymelinked immunosorbent assay.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Comparison of the level of plasma TpP between patients and controls; ② Comparison of the level

  14. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Also, blood is either Rh-positive or Rh-negative. So if you have type A blood, it's either A positive or A negative. Which type you are is important if you need a blood transfusion. And your Rh factor could be important ...

  15. The Interrelationships of Mathematical Precursors in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the interrelations among cognitive precursors across quantitative, linguistic, and spatial attention domains that have been implicated for math achievement in young children. The dimensionality of the quantity precursors was evaluated in 286 kindergarteners via latent variable techniques, and the contribution of precursors…

  16. Analysis of leucocyte antibodies, cytokines, lysophospholipids and cell microparticles in blood components implicated in post-transfusion reactions with dyspnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, K; Uhrynowska, M; Łopacz, P; Wróbel, A; Smoleńska-Sym, G; Guz, K; Lachert, E; Ostas, A; Brojer, E

    2015-01-01

    Post-transfusion reactions with dyspnoea (PTR) are major causes of morbidity and death after blood transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) are most dangerous, while transfusion-associated dyspnoea (TAD) is a milder respiratory distress. We investigated blood components for immune and non-immune factors implicated in PTR. We analysed 464 blood components (RBCs, PLTs, L-PLTs, FFP) transfused to 271 patients with PTR. Blood components were evaluated for 1/antileucocyte antibodies, 2/cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, sCD40L, 3/lysophosphatidylcholines (LysoPCs), 4/microparticles (MPs) shed from plateletes (PMPs), erythrocytes (EMPs) and leucocytes (LMPs). Anti-HLA class I/II antibodies or granulocyte-reactive anti-HLA antibodies were detected in 18.2% of blood components (RBC and FFP) transfused to TRALI and in 0.5% of FFP transfused to TAD cases. Cytokines and LysoPCs concentrations in blood components transfused to PTR patients did not exceed those in blood components transfused to patients with no PTR. Only EMPs percentage in RBCs transfused to patients with TRALI was significantly higher (P Blood Transfusion.

  17. Blood-brain barrier pathology in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease: implications for drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Brinda S; Monahan, Angela J; Carvey, Paul M; Hendey, Bill

    2007-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a tightly regulated barrier in the central nervous system. Though the BBB is thought to be intact during neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), recent evidence argues otherwise. Dysfunction of the BBB may be involved in disease progression, eliciting of peripheral immune response, and, most importantly, altered drug efficacy. In this review, we will give a brief overview of the BBB, its components, and their functions. We will critically evaluate the current literature in AD and PD BBB pathology resulting from insult, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Specifically, we will discuss alterations in tight junction, transport and endothelial cell surface proteins, and vascular density changes, all of which result in altered permeability. Finally, we will discuss the implications of BBB dysfunction in current and future therapeutics. Developing a better appreciation of BBB dysfunction in AD and PD may not only provide novel strategies in treatment, but will prove an interesting milestone in understanding neurodegenerative disease etiology and progression.

  18. Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances in cord blood of newborns in Shanghai, China: Implications for risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Qian; Shen, Lixiao; Zhao, Shasha; Pang, Weiyi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are commonly used in industrial applications and consumer products, and their potential health impacts are of concern, especially for vulnerable population like fetuses. However, in utero exposure to PFASs and health implications are far from fully characterized in China. To fill in the gap, we analyzed 10 PFASs in cord plasma samples (N=687) collected in Shanghai between 2011 and 2012, one of the regions widely polluted with PFASs in China. A questionnaire survey on maternal and diet-related factors was conducted. Except for perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA), all other PFASs were detected in ˃90% of the samples. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the most predominant PFAS (median value: 6.96ng/mL), followed by perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (2.48ng/mL). PFOA and PFOS combined contributed to 80% of the total PFASs. The final multiple regression models showed that maternal factors including maternal age, body mass index, gestational age, economic status and educational level as well as consumption of fish and wheat were significantly related with concentrations of PFASs in cord blood. The risk assessment using the hazard quotients (HQs) approach on the basis of plasma PFAS levels indicated no potential concern for developmental toxicity in the local newborns. The results demonstrate the unique profiles of local prenatal exposure to PFASs, suggesting that PFOA has been the primary human exposure due to its widespread use and pollution. Special attention to high PFOA exposure and confirmation of potential determinants should be taken as a priority in the future plan for risk management and actions in this area.

  19. A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of γ-hydroxybutyrate and its precursors in forensic whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lambert K; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen B

    2012-10-10

    A liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass-spectrometry method using pneumatically assisted electrospray ionisation (LC-ESI-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) in human ante-mortem and post-mortem whole blood. The blood proteins were precipitated using a mixture of methanol and acetonitrile, and the extract was cleaned-up by passage through a polymeric strong cation exchange sorbent. Separation of the analytes and their structural isomers was obtained using a column with a zwitterionic stationary phase. Matrix-matched calibrants, combined with isotope dilution, were used for quantitative analysis. GHB was determined in both positive and negative ion modes. The relative intra-laboratory reproducibility standard deviations were better than 10% and 6% for blood samples at concentrations of 2 mg/L and 20-150 mg/L, respectively. The mean true extraction recoveries were 80% for GHB and greater than 90% for GBL and 1,4-BD at concentration levels of 20-50 mg/L. The limits of detection were approximately 0.5 mg/L for GHB and GBL, and 0.02 mg/L for 1,4-BD in ante-mortem blood. The corresponding lower limits of quantification were less than 1 mg/L for GHB and GBL, and less than 0.1 mg/L for 1,4-BD. GBL was unstable in whole blood freshly preserved with a sodium fluoride oxalate mixture, but the stability could be improved significantly by preservation with a sodium fluoride citrate EDTA mixture.

  20. Ultra-low frequency electromagnetic measurements associated with the 1998 Mw 5.1 San Juan Bautista, California earthquake and implications for mechanisms of electromagnetic earthquake precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakelian, D.; Klemperer, S. L.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.; Thompson, G. A.

    2002-11-01

    Ultra-low frequency (ULF: 0.01-10 Hz) magnetic field anomalies prior to M≥6.0 earthquakes have been reported in various regions of the world. Here, we test whether smaller magnitude earthquakes have associated ULF anomalies by using continuous measurements made ˜9 km above and ˜2 km NE of the epicenter of the Mw 5.1 8/12/98 San Juan Bautista, CA earthquake. Half-hour spectral averages of the magnetic field data in nine different ULF frequency bands show no long-term (days to weeks) magnetic field anomaly prior to the earthquake. In addition, magnetic and electric field polarization shows no anomalous behavior clearly associated with seismic activity. An ˜0.02 nT increase in activity for 2 h prior to the earthquake is close to the background noise levels precluding identification of a precursor. We present scaling calculations to show if precursory ULF anomalies are related to the size of the earthquake. The observed ˜0.02 nT increase is the approximately expected magnetic anomaly prior to the San Juan Bautista (SBJ) earthquake, based on the anomaly observed prior to the 1989 Loma Prieta (LP) earthquake. Our reexamination of previously proposed dilatant-conductive and piezomagnetic mechanisms for ULF precursors shows that these effects are consistent with the observations prior to the SJB earthquake based on the observations (i.e., lack of a strong precursor). In contrast, previously proposed electrokinetic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mechanisms do not appear to be appropriate for this particular earthquake. This analysis further supports the hypothesis that precursory ULF signals are related to the size of the earthquake.

  1. Concomitant detection of IFNα signature and activated monocyte/dendritic cell precursors in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated subjects at early times after repeated local cytokine treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizza Paola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons alpha (IFNα are the cytokines most widely used in clinical medicine for the treatment of cancer and viral infections. Among the immunomodulatory activities possibly involved in their therapeutic efficacy, the importance of IFNα effects on dendritic cells (DC differentiation and activation has been considered. Despite several studies exploiting microarray technology to characterize IFNα mechanisms of action, there is currently no consensus on the core signature of these cytokines in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated individuals, as well as on the existence of blood genomic and proteomic markers of low-dose IFNα administered as a vaccine adjuvant. Methods Gene profiling analysis with microarray was performed on PBMC isolated from melanoma patients and healthy individuals 24 hours after each repeated injection of low-dose IFNα, administered as vaccine adjuvant in two separate clinical trials. At the same time points, cytofluorimetric analysis was performed on CD14+ monocytes, to detect the phenotypic modifications exerted by IFNα on antigen presenting cells precursors. Results An IFNα signature was consistently observed in both clinical settings 24 hours after each repeated administration of the cytokine. The observed modulation was transient, and did not reach a steady state level refractory to further stimulations. The molecular signature observed ex vivo largely matched the one detected in CD14+ monocytes exposed in vitro to IFNα, including the induction of CXCL10 at the transcriptional and protein level. Interestingly, IFNα ex vivo signature was paralleled by an increase in the percentage and expression of costimulatory molecules by circulating CD14+/CD16+ monocytes, indicated as natural precursors of DC in response to danger signals. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the identification of a well defined molecular signature as biomarker of IFNα administered as immune adjuvants, and

  2. Hemorheological implications of perfluorocarbon based oxygen carrier interaction with colloid plasma expanders and blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Diana M; Ortiz, Daniel; Alvarez, Oscar A; Briceño, Juan C; Cabrales, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions used as artificial oxygen carriers lack colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and must be administered with colloid-based plasma expanders (PEs). Although PFC emulsions have been widely studied, there is limited information about PFC emulsion interaction with PEs and blood. Their interaction forms aggregates due to electrostatic and rheological phenomena, and change blood rheology and blood flow. This study analyzes the effects of the interaction between PFC emulsions with blood in the presence of clinically-used PEs. The rheological behavior of the mixtures was analyzed in vitro in parallel with in vivo analysis of blood flow in the microcirculation using intravital microscopy, when PEs were administered in a clinically relevant scenario. The interaction between the PFC emulsion and PE with blood produced PFC droplets and red blood cell (RBCs) aggregation and increased blood viscosity in a shear dependent fashion. The PFC droplets formed aggregates when mixed with PEs containing electrolytes, and the aggregation increased with the electrolyte concentration. Mixtures of PFC with PEs that produced PFC aggregates also induced RCBs aggregation when mixed with blood, increasing blood viscosity at low shear rates. The more viscous suspension at low shear rates produced a blunted blood flow velocity profile in vivo compared to nonaggregating mixtures of PFC and PEs. For the PEs evaluated, human serum albumin produced minimal to undetectable aggregation. PFC and PEs interaction with blood can affect sections of the microcirculation with low shear rates (e.g., arterioles, venules, and pulmonary circulation) when used in a clinical setting, because persistent aggregates could cause capillary occlusion, decreased perfusion, pulmonary emboli or focal ischemia.

  3. Changes in interstitial K+ and pH during exercise: implications for blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    of fatigue. It has also been demonstrated with microdialysis that the interstitial decrease in pH during muscle activity is larger than the reduction in blood pH. Ion changes in the interstitium may affect blood flow directly or indirectly. Infusion of K+ into the femoral artery in humans has demonstrated...... that blood flow is affected by changes in K+ as low as 0.1 mmol/L. The vasodilatory effect of K+ can be inhibited with simultaneous barium infusion, indicating that inward rectifier potassium (Kir)channels are involved. Acidosis has a direct effect on blood flow and an indirect effect, mediated by changes...

  4. Heart rate and blood pressure variability in cardiac diseases: pharmacological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloarec-Blanchard, L

    1997-01-01

    Even at rest, blood pressure and heart fluctuate continuously around their mean values. Considerable interest has recently focused on the assessment of spontaneous in fluctuations in heart rate and blood pressure, i.e., heart rate and blood pressure variability, using time or frequency domain indexes. Heart rate variability has been extensively studied in cardiovascular disease and has emerged as a valuable parameter for detecting abnormalities in autonomic cardiovascular control, evaluating the prognosis and assessing the impact of drug therapy on the autonomic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure or a heart transplant. In contrast, until the recent development of noninvasive methods for continuous blood pressure recording, blood pressure variability received little attention, and this parameter remains to be evaluated in cardiovascular disease.

  5. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells gener...... cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to vasopathological effects as seen, for instance, in sickle cell disease.......Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells...... generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and αv-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine...

  6. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 levels become elevated in neurons around amyloid plaques: implications for Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Fu, Yifan; Yasvoina, Marina; Shao, Peizhen; Hitt, Brian; O'Connor, Tracy; Logan, Sreemathi; Maus, Erika; Citron, Martin; Berry, Robert; Binder, Lester; Vassar, Robert

    2007-04-04

    Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) (beta-secretase) initiates generation of beta-amyloid (Abeta), which plays an early role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 levels are increased in postmortem AD brain, suggesting BACE1 elevation promotes Abeta production and AD. Alternatively, the BACE1 increase may be an epiphenomenon of late-stage AD. To distinguish between these possibilities, we analyzed BACE1 elevation using a highly specific BACE1 antibody, BACE-Cat1, made in BACE1-/- mice, which mount a robust anti-BACE1 immune response. Previous BACE1 immunohistochemical studies lack consistent results because typical BACE1 antibodies produce nonspecific background, but BACE-Cat1 immunolabels BACE1 only. BACE1 elevation was recapitulated in two amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse lines. 5XFAD mice form amyloid plaques at young ages and exhibit neuron loss. In contrast, Tg2576 form plaques at a more advanced age and do not show cell death. These two mouse lines allow differentiation between early Abeta-induced events and late phenomena related to neuron death. BACE1 levels became elevated in parallel with amyloid burden in each APP transgenic, starting early in 5XFAD and late in Tg2576. The increase in BACE1 protein occurred without any change in BACE1 mRNA level, indicating a posttranscriptional mechanism. In APP transgenic and AD brains, high BACE1 levels were observed in an annulus around Abeta42-positive plaque cores and colocalized with neuronal proteins. These results demonstrate that amyloid plaques induce BACE1 in surrounding neurons at early stages of pathology before neuron death occurs. We conclude that BACE1 elevation is most likely triggered by the amyloid pathway and may drive a positive-feedback loop in AD.

  7. Blood pressure recordings during hemodialysis access interventions: implications for acute management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Arif; Castro, Hector; Waheed, Ahmed Ameen; Kumar, Vishesh; Haqqie, Syed S; Siskin, Gary; Mathew, Roy O; Mason, Darius; Vachharajani, Tushar; Nayer, Ali; Merrill, Donna; Akmal, Muhammad U T; Salman, Loay

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective study evaluating the pattern of blood pressure and its related complications before, during, and after percutaneous hemodialysis interventions was performed in patients presenting with asymptomatic hypertension. Hemodialysis patients undergoing percutaneous interventions including tunneled hemodialysis catheter insertion, percutaneous balloon angioplasty and thrombectomy procedure, and stage II hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥160 mmHg) were included in this analysis. Blood pressure medications were not used while midazolam and fentanyl were routinely administered. Patients were followed for up to 4 weeks to monitor any complications. The mean blood pressure before, during, and after the procedures were 185 ± 18/96 ± 14, 172 ± 22/92 ± 15, and 153 ± 25/87 ± 14, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the blood pressure readings before and after the procedure (before = 185 ± 18/96 ± 14, after = 153 ± 25/87 ± 14; p = 0.001). None of the patients had a stroke, myocardial infarction, or acute pulmonary edema before, during, or after the procedure or during the 4-week follow-up period. A significant reduction in blood pressure was observed after the procedure without the administration of any antihypertensive medication. These results suggest that the reduction in blood pressure observed after percutaneous dialysis access interventions (particularly in the presence of midazolam and fentanyl) may make it unnecessary to treat asymptomatic hypertension prior to these procedures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Elevated blood-lead levels in first nation people of Northern Ontario Canada: policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, L J S; Wainman, B C; Martin, I D; Weber, J-P; Sutherland, C; Liberda, E N; Nieboer, E

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the preliminary impact of the Canadian "non-toxic" shotshell policy, for the hunting of migratory game birds, by examining blood-lead levels of First Nations people living in sub-arctic Canada. If the use of lead shotshell was the major source of lead exposure as has been postulated and the ban on the use of lead shotshell for hunting migratory birds was immediately effective, we would expect that blood-lead levels would be typical of a geographic area remote from industrialization. Our findings present some concern in that approximately 18% of the 196 First Nations people examined had blood-lead levels > or =100 microg/L.

  9. Toxicants in folk remedies: Implications of elevated blood lead in an American-born infant due to imported diaper powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Mateusz P.; Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Law, Terence; Kellogg, Mark; Woolf, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Though most childhood lead exposure in the USA results from ingestion of lead-based paint dust, non-paint sources are increasingly implicated. We present interdisciplinary findings from and policy implications of a case of elevated blood lead (13–18 mcg/dL, reference level arsenic (55 ppm), bismuth (110 ppm), and thallium (31 ppm). These metals are highly bioaccessible in simulated gastric fluids, but only slightly bioaccessible in simulated lung fluids and simulated urine, suggesting that the primary lead exposure routes were ingestion via hand-mouth transmission and ingestion of inhaled dusts cleared from the respiratory tract. Four weeks after discontinuing use of the powder, the infant’s venous blood lead level was 8 mcg/dL. Unregulated, imported folk remedies can be a source of toxicant exposure. Additional research on import policy, product regulation, public health surveillance, and culturally sensitive risk communication is needed to develop efficacious risk reduction strategies in the USA. The more widespread use of contaminated folk remedies in the countries from which they originate is a substantial concern.

  10. Toxicants in folk remedies: implications of elevated blood lead in an American-born infant due to imported diaper powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Mateusz P; Morman, Suzette A; Plumlee, Geoffrey S; Law, Terence; Kellogg, Mark; Woolf, Alan D

    2016-10-04

    Though most childhood lead exposure in the USA results from ingestion of lead-based paint dust, non-paint sources are increasingly implicated. We present interdisciplinary findings from and policy implications of a case of elevated blood lead (13-18 mcg/dL, reference level folk diaper powder. Analyses showed the powder contains 62 % lead by weight (primarily lead oxide) and elevated antimony [1000 parts per million (ppm)], arsenic (55 ppm), bismuth (110 ppm), and thallium (31 ppm). These metals are highly bioaccessible in simulated gastric fluids, but only slightly bioaccessible in simulated lung fluids and simulated urine, suggesting that the primary lead exposure routes were ingestion via hand-mouth transmission and ingestion of inhaled dusts cleared from the respiratory tract. Four weeks after discontinuing use of the powder, the infant's venous blood lead level was 8 mcg/dL. Unregulated, imported folk remedies can be a source of toxicant exposure. Additional research on import policy, product regulation, public health surveillance, and culturally sensitive risk communication is needed to develop efficacious risk reduction strategies in the USA. The more widespread use of contaminated folk remedies in the countries from which they originate is a substantial concern.

  11. A variant at 9p21.3 functionally implicates CDKN2B in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia aetiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Eric A.; Vora, Sapana R.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Moriyama, Takaya; Best, Timothy; Hulur, Imge; Lee, Younghee; Evans, Tiffany-Jane; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stanulla, Martin; Rudant, Jéremie; Orsi, Laurent; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Cox, Nancy J.; Loh, Mignon L.; Yang, Jun J.; Skol, Andrew D.; Onel, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) is the most common cancer of childhood, yet little is known about BCP-ALL predisposition. In this study, in 2,187 cases of European ancestry and 5,543 controls, we discover and replicate a locus indexed by rs77728904 at 9p21.3 associated with BCP-ALL susceptibility (Pcombined=3.32 × 10−15, OR=1.72) and independent from rs3731217, the previously reported ALL-associated variant in this region. Of correlated SNPs tagged by this locus, only rs662463 is significant in African Americans, suggesting it is a plausible causative variant. Functional analysis shows that rs662463 is a cis-eQTL for CDKN2B, with the risk allele associated with lower expression, and suggests that rs662463 influences BCP-ALL risk by regulating CDKN2B expression through CEBPB signalling. Functional analysis of rs3731217 suggests it is associated with BCP-ALL by acting within a splicing regulatory element determining CDKN2A exon 3 usage (P=0.01). These findings provide new insights into the critical role of the CDKN2 locus in BCP-ALL aetiology. PMID:26868379

  12. Constraints on the Small Scale Heterogeneity in D" from Precursors to Short Distance PcP Wave and Implication for Roughness of Core-Mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, S.; Zhang, B.

    2016-12-01

    Volumetric heterogeneity in D" layer and topography variation of the Core Mantle Boundary (CMB) are well established on large scales (thousand kms) to intermediate scales with seismological approaches. However, there are controversies regarding the level of heterogeneity in D" layer at small scales ( a few km - 10 km), with lower bound estimate of 0.1% to a few percent. And there are very limited reports of small scale topography of CMB. We take advantage of the small amplitude PcP waves at near podal distances (0-10 degree), and use the ratio of short period (1 Hz) PcP and its precursors to constrain level of small scale heterogeneity in the D" layer. We computed short period synthetic seismograms with 2D finite code for a series of volumetric heterogeneity models in the crust and in D", and find that PcP is not observable if the heterogeneity in D" is above 2%. We will present evidences of clearly observed PcP at short distances and argue for weak small scale heterogeneity in D". Assuming topography of CMB is related to isostasy, the volumetric heterogeneity in D" can be used to estimate CMB roughness.

  13. Turnover of hydrogen isotopes in lake sturgeon blood: implications for tracking movements of wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitals, Natasha M; Hobson, Keith A; Hoemsen, Brittney M; Crane, Adam L; Wishingrad, Van; Sloychuk, Janelle; Pollock, Michael S; Chivers, Douglas P; Phillips, Iain D

    2016-12-01

    Naturally occurring deuterium ((2)H) in biota can be used to trace movement, migration and geographic origin of a range of organisms. However, to evaluate movements of animals using δ(2)H measurements of tissues, it is necessary to establish the turnover time of (2)H in the tissues and the extent of isotopic discrimination from different environmental (2)H sources to those tissues. We investigated the turnover of (2)H in lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) blood by manipulating both environmental water δ(2)H and diet δ(2)H over a four-month period. The half-life of deuterium in lake sturgeon blood was 37.9 days after an increase in the environmental water δ(2)H of +714 ‰. However, no clear turnover in blood (2)H occurred over the same period in a separate trial following a change of -63.8 ‰ or +94.2 ‰ in diet. These findings suggest that environmental water (2)H exchanges much faster with blood than diets and that blood δ(2)H values can be used to trace movements of sturgeon and other fish moving among isotopically distinct waters.

  14. SMN Protein Can Be Reliably Measured in Whole Blood with an Electrochemiluminescence (ECL Immunoassay: Implications for Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Zaworski

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is caused by defects in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene that encodes survival motor neuron (SMN protein. The majority of therapeutic approaches currently in clinical development for SMA aim to increase SMN protein expression and there is a need for sensitive methods able to quantify increases in SMN protein levels in accessible tissues. We have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL-based immunoassay for measuring SMN protein in whole blood with a minimum volume requirement of 5μL. The SMN-ECL immunoassay enables accurate measurement of SMN in whole blood and other tissues. Using the assay, we measured SMN protein in whole blood from SMA patients and healthy controls and found that SMN protein levels were associated with SMN2 copy number and were greater in SMA patients with 4 copies, relative to those with 2 and 3 copies. SMN protein levels did not vary significantly in healthy individuals over a four-week period and were not affected by circadian rhythms. Almost half of the SMN protein was found in platelets. We show that SMN protein levels in C/C-allele mice, which model a mild form of SMA, were high in neonatal stage, decreased in the first few weeks after birth, and then remained stable throughout the adult stage. Importantly, SMN protein levels in the CNS correlated with SMN levels measured in whole blood of the C/C-allele mice. These findings have implications for the measurement of SMN protein induction in whole blood in response to SMN-upregulating therapy.

  15. Lifetime racism and blood pressure changes during pregnancy: implications for fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmert, Clayton J; Dominguez, Tyan Parker; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Srinivas, Sindhu K; Glynn, Laura M; Hobel, Calvin J; Sandman, Curt A

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that exposure to racism partially explains why African American women are 2 to 3 times more likely to deliver low birth weight and preterm infants. However, the physiological pathways by which racism exerts these effects are unclear. This study examined how lifetime exposure to racism, in combination with maternal blood pressure changes during pregnancy, was associated with fetal growth. African American pregnant women (n = 39) reported exposure to childhood and adulthood racism in several life domains (e.g., at school, at work), which were experienced directly or indirectly, meaning vicariously experienced when someone close to them was treated unfairly. A research nurse measured maternal blood pressure at 18 to 20 and 30 to 32 weeks gestation. Standardized questionnaires and trained interviewers assessed maternal demographics. Neonatal length of gestation and birth weight data were collected from medical charts. Childhood racism interacted with diastolic blood pressure to predict birth weight. Specifically, women with two or more domains of indirect exposure to racism in childhood and increases in diastolic blood pressure between 18 and 32 weeks had lower gestational age adjusted birth weight than the other women. A similar pattern was found for direct exposure to racism in childhood. Increases in diastolic blood pressure between the second and third trimesters predicted lower birth weight, but only when racism exposure in childhood (direct or indirect) was relatively high. Understanding pregnant African American women's lifetime direct and indirect experiences with racism in combination with prenatal blood pressure may improve identification of highest risk subgroups within this population. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  16. Muscle and Blood Metabolites during a Soccer Game: Implications for Sprint Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni; Steensberg, Adam

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose: To examine muscle and blood metabolites during soccer match play and relate it to possible changes in sprint performance. Methods: Thirty-one Danish fourth division players took part in three friendly games. Blood samples were collected frequently during the game, and muscle...... biopsies were taken before and after the game as well as immediately after an intense period in each half. The players performed five 30-m sprints interspersed by 25-s recovery periods before the game and immediately after each half (N = 11) or after an intense exercise period in each half (N = 20...

  17. Measurement of tissue optical properties with optical coherence tomography: Implication for noninvasive blood glucose concentration monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Kirill V.

    Approximately 14 million people in the USA and more than 140 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes mellitus. The current glucose sensing technique involves a finger puncture several times a day to obtain a droplet of blood for analysis. There have been enormous efforts by many scientific groups and companies to quantify glucose concentration noninvasively using different optical techniques. However, these techniques face limitations associated with low sensitivity, accuracy, and insufficient specificity of glucose concentrations over a physiological range. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a new technology, is being applied for noninvasive imaging in tissues with high resolution. OCT utilizes sensitive detection of photons coherently scattered from tissue. The high resolution of this technique allows for exceptionally accurate measurement of tissue scattering from a specific layer of skin compared with other optical techniques and, therefore, may provide noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration with high accuracy. In this dissertation work I experimentally and theoretically investigate feasibility of noninvasive, real-time, sensitive, and specific monitoring of blood glucose concentration using an OCT-based biosensor. The studies were performed in scattering media with stable optical properties (aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres and milk), animals (New Zealand white rabbits and Yucatan micropigs), and normal subjects (during oral glucose tolerance tests). The results of these studies demonstrated: (1) capability of the OCT technique to detect changes in scattering coefficient with the accuracy of about 1.5%; (2) a sharp and linear decrease of the OCT signal slope in the dermis with the increase of blood glucose concentration; (3) the change in the OCT signal slope measured during bolus glucose injection experiments (characterized by a sharp increase of blood glucose concentration) is higher than that measured in

  18. Novel 5' untranslated region directed blockers of iron-regulatory protein-1 dependent amyloid precursor protein translation: implications for down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay

    Full Text Available We reported that iron influx drives the translational expression of the neuronal amyloid precursor protein (APP, which has a role in iron efflux. This is via a classic release of repressor interaction of APP mRNA with iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1 whereas IRP2 controls the mRNAs encoding the L- and H-subunits of the iron storage protein, ferritin. Here, we identified thirteen potent APP translation blockers that acted selectively towards the uniquely configured iron-responsive element (IRE RNA stem loop in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of APP mRNA. These agents were 10-fold less inhibitory of 5'UTR sequences of the related prion protein (PrP mRNA. Western blotting confirmed that the 'ninth' small molecule in the series selectively reduced neural APP production in SH-SY5Y cells at picomolar concentrations without affecting viability or the expression of α-synuclein and ferritin. APP blocker-9 (JTR-009, a benzimidazole, reduced the production of toxic Aβ in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells to a greater extent than other well tolerated APP 5'UTR-directed translation blockers, including posiphen, that were shown to limit amyloid burden in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD. RNA binding assays demonstrated that JTR-009 operated by preventing IRP1 from binding to the IRE in APP mRNA, while maintaining IRP1 interaction with the H-ferritin IRE RNA stem loop. Thus, JTR-009 constitutively repressed translation driven by APP 5'UTR sequences. Calcein staining showed that JTR-009 did not indirectly change iron uptake in neuronal cells suggesting a direct interaction with the APP 5'UTR. These studies provide key data to develop small molecules that selectively reduce neural APP and Aβ production at 10-fold lower concentrations than related previously characterized translation blockers. Our data evidenced a novel therapeutic strategy of potential impact for people with trisomy of the APP gene on chromosome 21, which is a phenotype long associated with Down

  19. Novel 5' untranslated region directed blockers of iron-regulatory protein-1 dependent amyloid precursor protein translation: implications for down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Cahill, Catherine; Balleidier, Amelie; Huang, Conan; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Huang, Xudong; Rogers, Jack T

    2013-01-01

    We reported that iron influx drives the translational expression of the neuronal amyloid precursor protein (APP), which has a role in iron efflux. This is via a classic release of repressor interaction of APP mRNA with iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) whereas IRP2 controls the mRNAs encoding the L- and H-subunits of the iron storage protein, ferritin. Here, we identified thirteen potent APP translation blockers that acted selectively towards the uniquely configured iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of APP mRNA. These agents were 10-fold less inhibitory of 5'UTR sequences of the related prion protein (PrP) mRNA. Western blotting confirmed that the 'ninth' small molecule in the series selectively reduced neural APP production in SH-SY5Y cells at picomolar concentrations without affecting viability or the expression of α-synuclein and ferritin. APP blocker-9 (JTR-009), a benzimidazole, reduced the production of toxic Aβ in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells to a greater extent than other well tolerated APP 5'UTR-directed translation blockers, including posiphen, that were shown to limit amyloid burden in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). RNA binding assays demonstrated that JTR-009 operated by preventing IRP1 from binding to the IRE in APP mRNA, while maintaining IRP1 interaction with the H-ferritin IRE RNA stem loop. Thus, JTR-009 constitutively repressed translation driven by APP 5'UTR sequences. Calcein staining showed that JTR-009 did not indirectly change iron uptake in neuronal cells suggesting a direct interaction with the APP 5'UTR. These studies provide key data to develop small molecules that selectively reduce neural APP and Aβ production at 10-fold lower concentrations than related previously characterized translation blockers. Our data evidenced a novel therapeutic strategy of potential impact for people with trisomy of the APP gene on chromosome 21, which is a phenotype long associated with Down syndrome (DS

  20. New Zealand's breath and blood alcohol testing programs: further data analysis and forensic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, A R; Gainsford, A R; Gullberg, R G

    2008-07-01

    Paired blood and breath alcohol concentrations (BAC, in g/dL, and BrAC, in g/210 L), were determined for 11,837 drivers apprehended by the New Zealand Police. For each driver, duplicate BAC measurements were made using headspace gas chromatography and duplicate BrAC measurements were made with either Intoxilyzer 5000, Seres 679T or Seres 679ENZ Ethylometre infrared analysers. The variability of differences between duplicate results is described in detail, as well as the variability of differences between the paired BrAC and BAC results. The mean delay between breath and blood sampling was 0.73 h, ranging from 0.17 to 3.1 8h. BAC values at the time of breath testing were estimated by adjusting BAC results using an assumed blood alcohol clearance rate. The paired BrAC and time-adjusted BAC results were analysed with the aim of estimating the proportion of false-positive BrAC results, using the time-adjusted BAC results as references. When BAC results were not time-adjusted, the false-positive rate (BrAC>BAC) was 31.3% but after time-adjustment using 0.019 g/dL/h as the blood alcohol clearance rate, the false-positive rate was only 2.8%. However, harmful false-positives (defined as cases where BrAC>0.1 g/210L, while BACtest results were used as the evidential results instead of the means, the harmful false-positive rate dropped to 0.04%.

  1. Effect of blood storage on erythrocyte/wall interactions: implications for surface charge and rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, C; Caprani, A

    1997-01-01

    In this report, we study, under flow conditions, the interactions of stored erythrocytes with an artificial surface: a microelectrode whose charge density ranges from -15 to +27 microC/cm2. Interactions consist of red cells slowly circulating on the microelectrode and exerting a real contact with the electrode. Interaction is detected and measured by transient fluctuations of the electrolyte resistance obtained by impedance measurement of the microelectrode. Effects of aging induced by storage of whole blood at 4 degrees C show that the surface charge of erythrocytes rapidly decreases when blood is stored for more than 6 days under our experimental conditions. In comparison with trypsin-treated erythrocytes, an eight day storage induces a 60% decrease in the surface charge of red cells. After two weeks of storage, red cells are no longer negatively charged, presumably because of removal of sialic acid. Cells rigidity is significant after 6 days of storage and influences the electrical contact. Membrane rigidity increase could arise from the surface charge decrease. Finally the surface charge decrease could be importance in the use of stored blood.

  2. Variability in the blood/breath alcohol ratio and implications for evidentiary purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Dena H; Siman-Tov, Maya; Gopher, Asher; Peleg, Kobi

    2013-09-01

    The breath analyzer is an indispensable tool for identifying alcohol levels among drivers. While numerous studies have shown high correlations between blood and breath alcohol concentrations, most are limited by the study design. This study seeks to assess this relationship by minimizing potential measurement bias, document time from alcohol consumption to testing, and adjusting for potential confounders. A blinded study was performed using conditions closely resembling those in the field. The Draeger 7110 MKIII IL breath analyzer was used to assess breath alcohol concentrations (BrAC). Participants were 61 healthy volunteers aged 21-37 years with body mass index ≤30 and no history of alcoholism. A total of 242 valid blood/breath tests were performed in four test sets. The study results showed a high correlation coefficient between BrAC and blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels (r = 0.983) with high sensitivity (97%) and specificity (93%). This strong association between the breath analyzer and BAC persisted even after adjustment for various stages of alcohol absorption. These results illustrate the high diagnostic sensitivity of the breath analyzer in field-tested conditions.

  3. Signatures of reproductive events on blood counts and biomarkers of inflammation: Implications for chronic disease risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Whether inflammation mediates how reproductive events affect chronic-disease risk is unclear. We studied inflammatory biomarkers in the context of reproductive events using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. From 15,986 eligible women from the 1999–2011 data cycles, we accessed information on reproductive events, blood counts, C-reactive protein (CRP), and total homocysteine (tHCY). We calculated blood-count ratios including: platelet-lymphocyte (PLR), lymphocyte-monocyte (LMR), platelet-monocyte (PMR), and neutrophil-monocyte (NMR). Using sampling weights per NHANES guidelines, means for counts, ratios, or biomarkers by reproductive events were compared using linear regression. We performed trend tests and calculated p-values with partial sum of squares F-tests. Higher PLR and lower LMR were associated with nulliparity. In postmenopausal women, lower PMR was associated with early age at first birth and higher NMR with later age at and shorter interval since last birth. Lower PNR and higher neutrophils and tHCY were associated with early natural menopause. In all women, the neutrophil count correlated positively with CRP; but, in premenopausal women, correlated inversely with tHCY. Reproductive events leave residual signatures on blood counts and inflammatory biomarkers that could underlie their links to chronic disease risk. PMID:28234958

  4. Meta-analysis of blood pressure tracking from childhood to adulthood and implications for the design of intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschke, A M; Kohl, L; Mansmann, U; von Kries, R

    2010-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is related with cardiovascular disease. BP tracking in childhood and its implication for intervention trials are unknown. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate BP tracking. In 29 independent studies on 27,820 subjects, follow-up length and baseline age were associated with systolic BP tracking (both p childhood to adulthood affects trials assessing long-term effects on BP and was low-to-moderate. Therefore, regular BP controls are also needed in children with normal BP measurements possibly identifying hypertensive children earlier. A slight short-term intervention effect on BP may not have any long-term effects because of low BP tracking and its decrease by age.

  5. Whole Grains, Legumes, and the Subsequent Meal Effect: Implications for Blood Glucose Control and the Role of Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine A. Higgins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole grains and legumes are known to reduce postprandial glycemia and, in some instances, insulinemia. However, the subsequent meal effect of ingesting whole grains and legumes is less well known. That is, inclusion of whole grains or legumes at breakfast decreases postprandial glycemia at lunch and/or dinner on the same day whereas consumption of a whole grain or lentil dinner reduces glycemia at breakfast the following morning. This effect is lost upon milling, processing, and cooking at high temperatures. The subsequent meal effect has important implications for the control of day-long blood glucose, and may be partly responsible for the reduction in diabetes incidence associated with increased whole grain and legume intake. This paper describes the subsequent meal effect and explores the role of acute glycemia, presence of resistant starch, and fermentation of indigestible carbohydrate as the mechanisms responsible for this effect.

  6. Whole grains, legumes, and the subsequent meal effect: implications for blood glucose control and the role of fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Janine A

    2012-01-01

    Whole grains and legumes are known to reduce postprandial glycemia and, in some instances, insulinemia. However, the subsequent meal effect of ingesting whole grains and legumes is less well known. That is, inclusion of whole grains or legumes at breakfast decreases postprandial glycemia at lunch and/or dinner on the same day whereas consumption of a whole grain or lentil dinner reduces glycemia at breakfast the following morning. This effect is lost upon milling, processing, and cooking at high temperatures. The subsequent meal effect has important implications for the control of day-long blood glucose, and may be partly responsible for the reduction in diabetes incidence associated with increased whole grain and legume intake. This paper describes the subsequent meal effect and explores the role of acute glycemia, presence of resistant starch, and fermentation of indigestible carbohydrate as the mechanisms responsible for this effect.

  7. 1-hour time resolution data of PM2.5 composition and gaseous precursors in background Milan: pollution sources and atmospheric processes, and their implications for air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Alessandro; Bianchi, Federico; De Gennaro, Gianluigi; Di Gilio, Alessia; Fermo, Paola; Ghermandi, Grazia; Prévôt, André; Urbani, Monia; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Piazzalunga, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Aim of this study is the investigation of processes leading to atmospheric pollutants formation and ageing in Milan, Po valley, i.e. one of the main hotspot region in Europe. Few 1-hour time resolution campaigns were accomplished in Milan urban area and none of these dealt with simultaneous characterization of atmospheric pollutants in both gas and particle phase. The present study is based on a thorough analysis of hourly data of atmospheric pollutants and of main PM2.5 compounds, and it includes several soluble inorganic aerosols (Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, SO42-, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, NH4+), gases (HCl, HNO2, HNO3, NH3, NO, NO2, O3, SO2) organic, elemental and black carbon and meteorological parameters. The data proceed from an intensive sampling campaign in urban background Milan in summer 2012 (Bigi et al., 2017). Data analysis methods used include mean diurnal pattern on weekdays and Sundays, pollution roses, bivariate polar plots and statistical models using backtrajectories. Results show how nitrous acid (HONO) was mainly formed heterogeneously at nighttime, with a dependence of its formation rate on NO2 consistent with observations during the last HONO campaign in Milan in summer 1998, although since 1998 a drop in HONO levels occurred following to the decrease of its precursors. Nitrate showed two main formation mechanisms: one occurring through N2O5 at nighttime and leading to nitrate formation onto existing particles; another occurring both daytime and nighttime following the homogeneous reaction of ammonia gas with nitric acid gas. Air masses reaching Milan influenced nitrate formation depending on their content in ammonia and the timing of arrival. Notwithstanding the low level of SO2 in Milan, its peaks were associated to point source emissions in the Po valley or shipping and power plant emissions SW of Milan, beyond the Apennines. A distinctive pattern for HCl was observed, featured by an afternoon peak and a morning minimum, and best correlated to

  8. Interactions of methylamine and ammonia with atmospheric nucleation precursor H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and common organic acids: Thermodynamics and atmospheric implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, L.; Bai, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Nadykto, A. B., E-mail: anadykto@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Interactions of the two common atmospheric bases, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and methylamine MA (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}), which are considered to be important stabilizers of binary clusters in the Earth’s atmosphere, with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the key atmospheric precursor, and 14 common atmospheric organic acids (COA) (formic (CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}), acetic (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}), oxalic (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}), malonic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), succinic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 4}), glutaric acid (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}), adipic (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}), benzoic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COOH), phenylacetic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}COOH), pyruvic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 3}), maleic acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), malic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 5}), tartaric (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}) and pinonic acid (C{sub 10}H{sub 16}O{sub 3})) have been studied using the composite high-accuracy G3MP2 method. The thermodynamic stability of mixed (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), (COA)(B1) and (COA)(B2) dimers and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) trimers, where B1 and B2 represent methylamine (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), respectively, have been investigated and their impacts on the thermodynamic stability of clusters containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} have been analyzed. It has been shown that in many cases the interactions of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with COA, ammonia and methylamine lead to the formation of heteromolecular dimers and trimers, which are certainly more stable than (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 2} and (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. It has also been found that free energies of (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})+ CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}⇔(COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) reactions exceed 10-15 kcal mol{sup −1}. This is a clear indication that mixed trimers composed of COA, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and methylamine are very stable and can thus serve as possible nucleation sites. The present study leads us to conclude that the interactions of COA coexisting with H

  9. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among blood donors from the Brazilian Amazon: implications for transfusion policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresco, M. N. dos S.; Virgolino, H. de A.; de Morais, M. P. E.; da Motta-Passos, I.; Gomes-Gouvêa, M. S.; de Assis, L. M. S.; Aguiar, K. R. de L.; Lombardi, S. C. F.; Malheiro, A.; Cavalheiro, N. de P.; Levi, J. E.; Torres, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Brazil requires the performance of both a test for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and a test for antibodies to the core of hepatitis B for blood donor screening. Blood centres in regions of high HBV endemicity struggle to maintain adequate stocks in face of the high discard rates due to anti-HBc reactivity. We evaluated the potential infectivity of donations positive for anti-HBc in search of a rational approach for the handling of these collections. Study Design and Methods We tested anti-HBc reactive blood donations from the state of Amazonas for the presence of HBV DNA and for titres of anti-HBs. The study population consists of village-based donors from the interior of Amazonas state. Results Among 3600 donations, 799 were anti-HBc reactive (22·2%). We were able to perform real-time PCR for the HBV S gene on specimens from 291 of these donors. Eight of these samples were negative for HBsAg and positive for HBV DNA and were defined as occult B virus infections (2·7%). Six of those eight specimens had anti-HBs titres above 100 mIU/ml, indicating the concomitant presence of the virus with high antibody titres. Conclusion A small proportion of anti-HBc reactive donors carry HBV DNA and anti-HBs testing is not useful for predicting viremia on them. This finding indicates the possibility of HBV transmission from asymptomatic donors, especially in areas of high HBV prevalence. Sensitive HBV DNA nucleic acid testing may provide another level of safety, allowing eventual use of anti-HBc reactive units in critical situations. PMID:24697276

  10. Neuronal changes after chronic high blood pressure in animal models and its implication for vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gonzalo; Flores-Gómez, Gabriel D; de Jesús Gomez-Villalobos, Ma

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dementia is a devastating disorder not only for the patient, but also for the family because this neurocognitive disorder breaks the patient's independence, and leads to family care of the patient with a high cost for the family. This complex disorder alters memory, learning, judgment, emotional control and social behavior and affects 4% of the elderly world population. The high blood pressure or arterial hypertension is a major risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, which in most cases leads to vascular dementia. Interestingly, this neurocognitive disorder starts after long lasting hypertension, which is associated with reduced cerebral blood flow or hypoperfusion, and complete or incomplete ischemia with cortical thickness. Animal models have been generated to elucidate the pathophysiology of this disorder. It is known that dendritic complexity determines the receptive synaptic contacts, and the loss of dendritic spine and arbor stability are strongly associated with dementia in humans. This review evaluates relevant data of human and animal models that have investigated the link between long-lasting arterial hypertension and neural morphological changes in the context of vascular dementia. We examined the effect of chronic arterial hypertension and aged in vascular dementia. Neural dendritic morphology in the prefrontal cortex and the dorsal hippocampus and nucleus accumbens after chronic hypertension was diskussed in the animal models of hypertension. Chronic hypertension reduced the dendritic length and spine density in aged rats.

  11. Radiation-induced blood-brain barrier changes: pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avella, D; Cicciarello, R; Angileri, F F; Lucerna, S; La Torre, D; Tomasello, F

    1998-01-01

    The pathophysiology of whole-brain radiation (WBR) toxicity remains incompletely understood. The possibility of a primary change in blood-brain barrier (BBB) associated with microvascular damage was investigated. Rats were exposed to conventional fractionation in radiation (200 +/- cGy/d, 5d/wk; total dose, 4,000 cGy). BBB changes were assessed by means of the quantitative 14C-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) technique coupled with standard electron microscopy (EM) and morphometric techniques as well as studies of the transcapillary passage of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). At 15 days after WBR, AIB transport across BBB increased significantly in cerebral cortex. EM disclosed vesicular transport of HRP across the intact endothelium without opening of the tight junctions. Ninety days after WBR, well-defined alterations of the microvasculature were observed. The main feature of cortical microvessels was their collapsed aspect, associated with perivascular edema containing cell debris. Data suggest a possible association between damage of the microvascular/glial unit of tissue injury and development of radiation-induced brain cerebral dysfunction. We hypothesize the following sequence of pathophysiological events: WBR causes an early increase in BBB permeability, which produces perivascular edema and microvascular collapse. The interference with microcirculation affects blood flow and energy supply to the tissue, resulting in structural damage on an ischemic/dysmetabolic basis.

  12. Modeling of Stenotic Coronary Artery and Implications of Plaque Morphology on Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Moreno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A diseased coronary artery has been modeled to study the implications of plaque morphology on the fluid dynamics. In our previous study, we have successfully classified the coronary plaques of 42 patients who underwent intravascular ultrasound (IVUS into four-types (Type I, Type II, Type III, and Type IV based on the plaque morphology. In this study, we demonstrate that, for the same degree of stenosis (height of the plaques, hemodynamics parameters are strongly dependent on the plaque shape. This study is the first one to clearly demonstrate that in addition to wall shear stress, presence of turbulence and location of transition from laminar to turbulence state are additional hemodynamics parameters to identify plaques vulnerable to rupture.

  13. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption And Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Jade Turner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB, increased risk of hemorrhagic complications and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke.

  14. PSP activates monocytes in resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: immunomodulatory implications for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhon, Bhagwant Kaur; Sze, Daniel Man-Yuen; Chan, Wing Keung; Fan, Kei; Li, George Qian; Moore, Douglas Edwin; Roubin, Rebecca Heidi

    2013-06-15

    Polysaccharopeptide (PSP), from Coriolus versicolor, has been used as an adjuvant to chemotherapy, and has demonstrated anti-tumor and immunomodulating effects. However its mechanism remains unknown. To elucidate how PSP affects immune populations, we compared PSP treatments both with and without prior incubation in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) - a process commonly used in immune population experimentation. We first standardised a capillary electrophoresis fingerprinting technique for PSP identification and characterisation. We then established the proliferative capability of PSP on various immune populations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, using flow cytometry, without prior PHA treatment. It was found that PSP significantly increased the number of monocytes (CD14(+)/CD16(-)) compared to controls without PHA. This increase in monocytes was confirmed using another antibody panel of CD14 and MHCII. In contrast, proliferations of T-cells, NK, and B-cells were not significantly changed by PSP. Thus, stimulating monocyte/macrophage function with PSP could be an effective therapeutic intervention in targeting tumors.

  15. Vertebrate blood cell volume increases with temperature: implications for aerobic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Gillooly

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic activity levels increase with body temperature across vertebrates. Differences in these levels, from highly active to sedentary, are reflected in their ecology and behavior. Yet, the changes in the cardiovascular system that allow for greater oxygen supply at higher temperatures, and thus greater aerobic activity, remain unclear. Here we show that the total volume of red blood cells in the body increases exponentially with temperature across vertebrates, after controlling for effects of body size and taxonomy. These changes are accompanied by increases in relative heart mass, an indicator of aerobic activity. The results point to one way vertebrates may increase oxygen supply to meet the demands of greater activity at higher temperatures.

  16. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption and Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Renée J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB), increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke. PMID:26973468

  17. Radiation-induced vasculopathy implicated by depressed blood flow and metabolism in a pineal glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineura, K.; Sasajima, T.; Kowada, M. (Akita University Hospital (Japan). Neurosurgical Service); Saitoh, H. (Oodate Municipal Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Shishido, F. (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    A case of radiation-induced vasculopathy of a pineal glioma was presented with haemodynamic and metabolic changes before and after radiotherapy. After radiation of 60 Gy with conventional fractionation (1.8-2.0 Gy daily, 5 days per week), regional blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction, metabolic rate of oxygen, kinetic metabolic rate of glucose and the rate constants (K2, K3) were markedly depressed (20% or greater) compared with the pre-irradiated study. 7 months after radiotherapy, the patient developed transient episodes of both right and left upper limb convulsion, terminating in generalized convulsion. When she developed status epilepticus, computed tomography showed extensive low density areas in the territory supplied by the right middle cerebral and the right posterior cerebral arteries. (author).

  18. Productive infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by feline immunodeficiency virus: implications for vector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J; Power, C

    1999-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 10(1.3) to 10(2.1) 50% tissue culture infective doses/10(6) cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy.

  19. Blood parasites in Owls with conservation implications for the Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, H.D.; Dumbacher, J.P.; Anderson, N.L.; Keane, J.J.; Valkiunas, G.; Haig, S.M.; Tell, L.A.; Sehgal, R.N.M.

    2008-01-01

    The three subspecies of Spotted Owl (Northern, Strix occidentalis courina; California, S. o. occidentalis; and Mexican, S. o. lucida) are all threatened by habitat loss and range expansion of the Barred Owl (S. varia). An unaddressed threat is whether Barred Owls could be a source of novel strains of disease such as avian malaria (Plasmodium spp.) or other blood parasites potentially harmful for Spotted Owls. Although Barred Owls commonly harbor Plasmodium infections, these parasites have not been documented in the Spotted Owl. We screened 111 Spotted Owls, 44 Barred Owls, and 387 owls of nine other species for haemosporidian parasites (Leucocytozoon, Plasmodium, and Haemoproteus spp.). California Spotted Owls had the greatest number of simultaneous multi-species infections (44%). Additionally, sequencing results revealed that the Northern and California Spotted Owl subspecies together had the highest number of Leucocytozoon parasite lineages (n=17) and unique lineages (n=12). This high level of sequence diversity is significant because only one leucocytozoon species (L. danilewskyi) has been accepted as valid among all owls, suggesting that L. danilewskyi is a cryptic species. Furthermore, a Plasmodium parasite was documented in a Northern Spotted Owl for the first time. West Coast Barred Owls had a lower prevalence of infection (15%) when compared to sympatric Spotted Owls (S. o. caurina 52%, S. o. occidentalis 79%) and Barred Owls from the historic range (61%). Consequently, Barred Owls on the West Coast may have a competitive advantage over the potentially immune compromised Spotted Owls. ?? 2008 Ishak et al.

  20. Blood-Brain Barrier Abnormalities Caused by HIV-1 gp120: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Louboutin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB is compromised in many systemic and CNS diseases, including HIV-1 infection of the brain. We studied BBB disruption caused by HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120 as a model. Exposure to gp120, whether acute [by direct intra-caudate-putamen (CP injection] or chronic [using SV(gp120, an experimental model of ongoing production of gp120] disrupted the BBB, and led to leakage of vascular contents. Gp120 was directly toxic to brain endothelial cells. Abnormalities of the BBB reflect the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. These target laminin and attack the tight junctions between endothelial cells and BBB basal laminae. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were upregulated following gp120-injection. Gp120 reduced laminin and tight junction proteins. Reactive oxygen species (ROS activate MMPs. Injecting gp120 induced lipid peroxidation. Gene transfer of antioxidant enzymes protected against gp120-induced BBB abnormalities. NMDA upregulates the proform of MMP-9. Using the NMDA receptor (NMDAR-1 inhibitor, memantine, we observed partial protection from gp120-induced BBB injury. Thus, (1 HIV-envelope gp120 disrupts the BBB; (2 this occurs via lesions in brain microvessels, MMP activation and degradation of vascular basement membrane and vascular tight junctions; (3 NMDAR-1 activation plays a role in this BBB injury; and (4 antioxidant gene delivery as well as NMDAR-1 antagonists may protect the BBB.

  1. Riboflavin status, MTHFR genotype and blood pressure: current evidence and implications for personalised nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, E; McNulty, H; Hughes, C; Strain, J J; Ward, M

    2016-08-01

    Clinical deficiency of the B-vitamin riboflavin (vitamin B2) is largely confined to developing countries; however accumulating evidence indicates that suboptimal riboflavin status is a widespread problem across the developed world. Few international data are available on riboflavin status as measured by the functional biomarker, erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient, considered to be the gold standard index. One important role of riboflavin in the form of flavin dinucleotide is as a co-factor for the folate-metabolising enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Homozygosity for the common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR, affecting over 10 % of the UK and Irish populations and up to 32 % of other populations worldwide, has been associated with an increased risk of CVD, and more recently with hypertension. This review will explore available studies reporting riboflavin status worldwide, the interaction of riboflavin with the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and the potential role of riboflavin in personalised nutrition. Evidence is accumulating for a novel role of riboflavin as an important modulator of blood pressure (BP) specifically in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype, with results from a number of recent randomised controlled trials demonstrating that riboflavin supplementation can significantly reduce systolic BP by 5-13 mmHg in these genetically at risk adults. Studies are however required to investigate the BP-lowering effect of riboflavin in different populations and in response to doses higher than 1·6 mg/d. Furthermore, work focusing on the translation of this research to health professionals and patients is also required.

  2. On the shape of the common carotid artery with implications for blood velocity profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manbachi, Amir; Hoi, Yiemeng; Wasserman, Bruce A; Lakatta, Edward G; Steinman, David A

    2011-12-01

    Clinical and engineering studies typically assume that the common carotid artery (CCA) is straight enough to assume fully developed flow, yet recent studies have demonstrated the presence of skewed velocity profiles. Toward elucidating the influence of mild vascular curvatures on blood flow patterns and atherosclerosis, this study aimed to characterize the three-dimensional shape of the human CCA. The left and right carotid arteries of 28 participants (63 ± 12 years) in the VALIDATE (Vascular Aging--The Link that Bridges Age to Atherosclerosis) study were digitally segmented from 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiograms, from the aortic arch to the carotid bifurcation. Each CCA was divided into nominal cervical and thoracic segments, for which curvatures were estimated by least-squares fitting of the respective centerlines to planar arcs. The cervical CCA had a mean radius of curvature of 127 mm, corresponding to a mean lumen:curvature radius ratio of 1:50. The thoracic CCA was significantly more curved at 1:16, with the plane of curvature tilted by a mean angle of 25° and rotated close to 90° with respect to that of the cervical CCA. The left CCA was significantly longer and slightly more curved than the right CCA, and there was a weak but significant increase in CCA curvature with age. Computational fluid dynamic simulations carried out for idealized CCA geometries derived from these and other measured geometric parameters demonstrated that mild cervical curvature is sufficient to prevent flow from fully-developing to axisymmetry, independent of the degree of thoracic curvature. These findings reinforce the idea that fully developed flow may be the exception rather than the rule for the CCA, and perhaps other nominally long and straight vessels.

  3. The effect of time from last food intake on arterial blood gases: Implication on reference values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedpour Anaraki M

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Arterial blood gas parameters were analyzed in forty-nine healthy persons (31 males, 18 females to detemine reference values fo these parameters and their relation to the time from last food intake to arterial puncture (T. The mean ± standard deviation of arterial oxygen pressure, arterial carbon dioxide pressure and pH at core body temperature were 84.4±7.0 mmHg (Male: 83.0±6.5, Female: 86.7±73, 37.7±2.8 mmHg (Male: 38.5±2.7, Female: 36.2±2.4 respectively 7.41±0.02 (Male: 7.41±0.02 Female: 7.42±0.03. the mean PCO2 was lower in comparison with most of the studies at sea level. The difference between males and females was significant in PCO2 and PH (P=0.004, P=0.02 respectively but in was not significant in PO2 (P=0.07. The PCO2 and pH had no statistically significant relatioship with age (P=0.42, P=0.25 respectively. The relationship between Po2 with age, PCO2 and T was significant (P=0.02, P=0.017, and P=0.019 respectively. The best linear predictive equation was: Po2= 1.28 AO2-29.4 for T10hours Þ AO2 = 0.21(Baro-47 – (1.2PCO2

  4. Incidence and clinical implication of TT virus in patients with hepatitis and its frequency in blood donors in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magu, S.K.; Kalghatgi, A.T.; Bhagat, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transfusion Transmitted Virus (TTV), also known as Torque Teno Virus is a new novel viral agent which appears to correlate with some acute and chronic hepatitis cases and may produce liver damage under specific circumstances. Aim of this study was to detect TT virus by real-time PCR, study its clinical implications and effects of its co-infection in HBV and HCV chronic liver diseases. Methods The study population comprised 50 acute hepatitis, 50 chronic hepatitis patients and 100 voluntary blood donors. All samples were tested for serum bilirubin, AST, ALT and alkaline phosphatase levels and for all available viral markers for hepatitis. The detection of TT viral genome was carried out by real-time PCR using TTV sequences as reported by Takahashi et al with modifications on the basis of database of the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank (GenBank accession no. AB008394). Result Serum was positive for TTV in 72% of volunteer blood donors, 77.4% (24/31) of hepatitis A cases, 87.6% (36/41) of HBV-positive, 77% (10/13) of HCV-positive, and 92.8% (13/14) of non-B, non-C cases. Co-infection of TTV with other hepatitis viruses was detected in some patients. Conclusion TTV is a frequent virus detected in patients with various types of viral hepatitis, in cases of hepatitis without obvious viral agent, and from the healthy population in India. Rate of TTV was found to be significantly higher (92.8%) for Non A–E hepatitis group. PMID:26663961

  5. Earthquakes: hydrogeochemical precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

  6. Chronobiology of arterial hypertension in hemodialysis patients: implications for home blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Light, Robert P

    2009-10-01

    Hemodialysis patients have a steady increase in blood pressure (BP) during the 44-hour interdialytic interval when ambulatory BP monitoring is used. Home BP recording allows for a longer period of monitoring between dialysis treatments and may better define the chronobiological characteristics of arterial hypertension. This study sought to determine the optimal time to perform home BP monitoring in hemodialysis patients to improve the strength of prediction of 44-hour interdialytic ambulatory BP. Diagnostic test study. This is an ancillary analysis of patients participating in the Dry-weight Reduction in Hypertensive Hemodialysis Patients (DRIP) trial. Home BP measured 3 times daily for 1 week by using a validated oscillometric monitor on 3 occasions at 4-week intervals after randomization. Home BP measured during the first third, second third, and last third of time elapsed after the dialysis treatment, as well as each third of the dialysis treatment, was compared with the overall ambulatory BP. Interdialytic ambulatory BP measured on 3 occasions at 4-week intervals after randomization. During the interdialytic interval, we found an increase in systolic ambulatory BP of 0.30 +/- 0.36 mm Hg/h and an increase in systolic home BP of 0.40 +/- 0.25 mm Hg/h. This relationship in home BP reached a plateau after approximately 48 hours. A similar pattern was seen for diastolic home BP. Probing dry weight steepened the slope of ambulatory BP, but did not alter the time-dependent relationship of home BP. Home BP was on average higher (bias) by 14.1 (95% confidence interval, 12.0 to 16.2)/5.7 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 4.6 to 6.9). The SD of differences between methods (precision) was 4.6/2.8 mm Hg. Measurement of BP during each third of the interdialytic interval gave the best precision, measured by using model fit compared with ambulatory BP measurements. Our cohort was overrepresented by African American hemodialysis patients. Whether African American participants

  7. Cell-type dependent modulation of Notch signaling by the amyloid precursor protein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oh, Sun Young; Chen, Ci-Di; Abraham, Carmela R

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that has been long implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease but its normal biological function has remained...

  8. Voxel-wise relationships between distribution volume ratio and cerebral blood flow: implications for analysis of β-amyloid images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojkova, Jitka; Goh, Joshua; Bilgel, Murat; Landman, Bennett; Yang, Xue; Zhou, Yun; An, Yang; Beason-Held, Lori L.; Kraut, Michael A.; Wong, Dean F.; Resnick, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of β-amyloid (Aβ) in vivo is often accomplished using the distribution volume ratio (DVR), based on a simplified reference tissue model. We investigated the local relationships between DVR and cerebral blood flow (CBF), as well as relative blood flow (R1), in nondemented older adults. Methods Fifty-five nondemented participants (mean age 78.5 years) in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging underwent 15O-H2O PET CBF and dynamic 11C-PiB-PET. 15O-H2O PET images were normalized and smoothed using SPM. A simplified reference tissue model with linear regression and spatial constraints was used to generate parametric DVR images. The DVR images were regressed on CBF images on a voxel-by-voxel basis using robust Biological Parametric Mapping, adjusting for age and sex (FDR p=0.05, k=50). DVR images were also regressed on R1 images, a measure of the transport rate constant from vascular space to tissue. All analyses were performed in the entire sample, and in high and low tertiles of mean cortical DVR. Results Voxel-based analyses showed that increased DVR is associated with increased CBF in frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortices. However, this association appears to spare regions that typically show early β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition. A more robust relationship between DVR and CBF was observed in the lowest tertile of DVR, i.e., negligible cortical Aβ load, compared to the highest tertile of cortical DVR and Aβ load. Spatial distributions of the DVR-CBF and DVR-R1 correlations showed similar patterns. No reliable negative voxel-wise relationships between DVR and CBF or R1 were observed. Conclusion Robust associations between DVR and CBF at negligible Aβ levels, together with similar spatial distributions of DVR-CBF and DVR-R1 correlations, suggest that regional distribution of DVR reflects blood flow and tracer influx rather than pattern of Aβ deposition in those with minimal Aβ load. DVR-CBF associations in individuals with higher DVR

  9. Red Blood Cell Dysfunction Induced by High-Fat Diet: Potential Implications for Obesity-Related Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Dusten; Srinivasan, Ramprasad; Benson, Tyler; Haigh, Stephen; Coyle, Danielle; Batra, Neil; Keil, Ryan; Sturm, Robert; Blanco, Victor; Palascak, Mary; Franco, Robert S; Tong, Wilson; Chatterjee, Tapan; Hui, David Y; Davidson, W Sean; Aronow, Bruce J; Kalfa, Theodosia; Manka, David; Peairs, Abigail; Blomkalns, Andra; Fulton, David J; Brittain, Julia E; Weintraub, Neal L; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y

    2015-11-17

    High-fat diet (HFD) promotes endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory monocyte activation, which contribute to atherosclerosis in obesity. We investigated whether HFD also induces the dysfunction of red blood cells (RBCs), which serve as a reservoir for chemokines via binding to Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC). A 60% HFD for 12 weeks, which produced only minor changes in lipid profile in C57/BL6 mice, markedly augmented the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 bound to RBCs, which in turn stimulated macrophage migration through an endothelial monolayer. Levels of RBC-bound KC were also increased by HFD. These effects of HFD were abolished in DARC(-/-) mice. In RBCs from HFD-fed wild-type and DARC(-/-) mice, levels of membrane cholesterol and phosphatidylserine externalization were increased, fostering RBC-macrophage inflammatory interactions and promoting macrophage phagocytosis in vitro. When labeled ex vivo and injected into wild-type mice, RBCs from HFD-fed mice exhibited ≈3-fold increase in splenic uptake. Finally, RBCs from HFD-fed mice induced increased macrophage adhesion to the endothelium when they were incubated with isolated aortic segments, indicating endothelial activation. RBC dysfunction, analogous to endothelial dysfunction, occurs early during diet-induced obesity and may serve as a mediator of atherosclerosis. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity, a worldwide epidemic. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Identification of Desirable Precursor Properties for Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muoto, Chigozie K.; Jordan, Eric H.; Gell, Maurice; Aindow, Mark

    2011-06-01

    In solution precursor plasma spray chemical precursor solutions are injected into a standard plasma torch and the final material is formed and deposited in a single step. This process has several attractive features, including the ability to rapidly explore new compositions and to form amorphous and metastable phases from molecularly mixed precursors. Challenges include: (a) moderate deposition rates due to the need to evaporate the precursor solvent, (b) dealing on a case by case basis with precursor characteristics that influence the spray process (viscosity, endothermic and exothermic reactions, the sequence of physical states through which the precursor passes before attaining the final state, etc.). Desirable precursor properties were identified by comparing an effective precursor for yttria-stabilized zirconia with four less effective candidate precursors for MgO:Y2O3. The critical parameters identified were a lack of major endothermic events during precursor decomposition and highly dense resultant particles.

  11. Quantification of erythroid and granulocytic precursor cells in plateletpheresis residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, C.N.; Brennan, J.K.; Lichtman, M.A.; Nusbacher, J.

    1978-01-01

    Mononuclear cell fractions of human blood and plateletpheresis residues were compared for their content of hemopoietic precursor cells. Erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) averaged 560 +- 130 per ml of blood and granulocyte--monocyte colony forming units (CFU-C) averaged 240 +- 90 per ml blood. Estimates based on a blood volume of 7% of body weight indicate that the total blood pools of BFU-E and CFU-C are about 3.5 x 10/sup 6/ and 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ cells respectively. Sequential studies were performed over 3 days following one plateletpheresis in 4 donors. CFU-C and BFU-E approximately doubled between 48 and 72 hours after a plateletpheresis. During this time there was no significant alteration in the percent of null, T or B lymphocytes in blood. Thus, plateletpheresis appears to lead to a mobilization of precursor cells, which results in a transient increase in their concentration in blood. Therefore, pheresis 48 to 72 hours after an initial short-term procedure could harvest much larger numbers of precursor cells. Moreover, such techniques would put blood precursor cell content of plateletpheresis residues within reach of the precursor cell content in the volume of human marrow used for transplantation.

  12. DISTRIBUTION OF ABO AND RH-D BLOOD GROUPS IN THE CACHAR DISTRICT OF BARAK VALLEY OF ASSAM: IMPLICATION FOR REGIONAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmakanta Kumbhakar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND ABO and Rhesus (Rh-D blood group antigens are integrated parts of the red blood cell membranes. They are hereditary characters and are useful in population genetic studies, in resolving medico-legal issues and more importantly in compatibility test in blood transfusion and organ transplant practices. They show a wide geographical and racial variation. The knowledge of the distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups among different population is essential in health care and transfusion practices. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To study the distribution of ABO and Rh-D blood groups amongst the population of Cachar district of Barak valley of Assam. MATERIALS AND METHODS We did a retrospective analysis of records of 1,60,500 blood samples grouped for ABO and Rh-D typing at Silchar Medical College and Hospital Blood Bank, Silchar, over a period of 10 years from 1st January 1999 to 31st December 2008. RESULTS AND OBSERVATIONS Out of total 1,60,500 blood samples grouped for ABO and Rh-D typing during the period in the centre, the distribution of phenotype A, B, AB and O were 24.80% (39,804, 32.00% (51,360, 5.60% (8,986 and 37.60% (60,350 respectively. The Rh-D positive phenotype was 95.40% (1, 53,117 and remaining 4.60% (7,383 was Rh-D negative. The frequency of Rh-D phenotypes in the various ABO blood groups was as - A Positive 23.70% (38,039, A Negative 1.10% (1,765, B Positive 30.80% (49,433, B Negative 1.20% (1,927, AB Positive 5.40% (8,665, AB Negative 0.20% (321, O Positive 35.50% (56,980 and O Negative 2.10% (3,370 respectively. DISCUSSION Silchar Medical College and Hospital Blood Bank receives blood samples for grouping of almost all population of Cachar district. Hence, the data revealed in the present study fairly reflects the prevalence of ABO and Rh-D groups distribution in the Cachar district in Barak valley of Assam. CONCLUSION The present study provide information on the status of ABO and Rh-D blood groups distribution of the region and

  13. Occult Hepatitis B virus infection in previously screened, blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: implications for blood transfusion and stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olotu, Amadin A; Oyelese, Adesola O; Salawu, Lateef; Audu, Rosemary A; Okwuraiwe, Azuka P; Aboderin, Aaron O

    2016-05-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission through blood transfusion is reduced by screening for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). However this method cannot detect the presence of occult hepatitis B virus infection. This study sought to determine the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection among blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. For the first time in Nigeria we employed an automated real-time PCR- method to investigate the prevalence of occult HBV in blood donors. Blood donors screened with HBsAg immunochromatographic rapid test kits at the blood transfusion units of two hospitals and found to be negative were recruited into the study. Questionnaires to elicit risk factors for HBV infection were administered and then 10 ml of blood was collected from each donor. Plasma samples obtained from these HBsAg negative blood donors were screened again for HBsAg using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, and those found negative were screened for the presence of total antibody to the HBV core antigen (anti-HBc) using ELISA method. Those positive to anti-HBc were then tested for HBV DNA, using an automated real-time PCR method. Five hundred and seven blood donors found HBsAg negative by immunochromatographic rapid test kits at both blood transfusion units, were tested for HBsAg using ELISA and 5 (1 %) were HBsAg positive. The 502 found negative were tested for anti-HBc and 354 (70.5 %) were found positive implying previous exposure to HBV and 19 (5.4 %) of the 354 anti-HBc positive had HBV DNA signifying occult HBV infection. No risk factors were found to be associated with the presence of HBV DNA among those who tested positive. Occult HBV infection exists in blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria and the use of HBsAg alone for screening prospective donors will not eliminate the risk of HBV transmission in blood transfusion or stem cell transplantation.

  14. Human embryonic epidermis contains a diverse Langerhans cell precursor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Mairhofer, Mario; Bauer, Wolfgang; Fiala, Christian; Prior, Marion; Eppel, Wolfgang; Kolbus, Andrea; Tschachler, Erwin; Stingl, Georg; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2014-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the exact phenotype of the epidermal Langerhans cell (LC) precursors during human ontogeny has not been determined yet. These elusive precursors are believed to migrate into the embryonic skin and to express primitive surface markers, including CD36, but not typical LC markers such as CD1a, CD1c and CD207. The aim of this study was to further characterize the phenotype of LC precursors in human embryonic epidermis and to compare it with that of LCs in healthy adult skin. We found that epidermal leukocytes in first trimester human skin are negative for CD34 and heterogeneous with regard to the expression of CD1c, CD14 and CD36, thus contrasting the phenotypic uniformity of epidermal LCs in adult skin. These data indicate that LC precursors colonize the developing epidermis in an undifferentiated state, where they acquire the definitive LC marker profile with time. Using a human three-dimensional full-thickness skin model to mimic in vivo LC development, we found that FACS-sorted, CD207(-) cord blood-derived haematopoietic precursor cells resembling foetal LC precursors but not CD14(+)CD16(-) blood monocytes integrate into skin equivalents, and without additional exogenous cytokines give rise to cells that morphologically and phenotypically resemble LCs. Overall, it appears that CD14(-) haematopoietic precursors possess a much higher differentiation potential than CD14(+) precursor cells.

  15. Seroprevalence of Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus-1/2 in Blood Donors in Northern Pakistan: Implications for Blood Donor Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Saifullah Khan; Bhatti, Farhat Abbas; Salamat, Nuzhat

    2015-12-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus-1/2 (HTLV-1/2) in blood donors in Northern Pakistan. Descriptive study. Armed Forces Institute of Transfusion, Rawalpindi, from July to August 2013. A total of 2100 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies during the study period, in a pool of six, on a highly sensitive, Chemiluminiscent Microparticle Immunoassay (CMIA) based system. The screening test-reactive donors were recalled, counseled and interviewed, and a fresh sample was obtained for confirmatory testing. Confirmation was performed using additional immunoassays including Line Immunoassay (LIA); with additional testing for HTLV-1 pvDNAPCR. Frequency and percentages were determined. Four donors (0.19%) were repeatedly screening test-reactive and were subsequently confirmed to be HTLV-1 infected by line immunoassay and HTLV-1 pvDNAPCR. All four donors were male with mean age of 27 ± 6.27 years. Two (50%) of the positive donors gave history of Multiple Sexual Partners (MSP). HTLV-1 seroprevalence in Northern Pakistan blood donors was determined to be 0.19%. Large scale studies, including the cost effectiveness of screening blood donations for anti-HTLV-1/2 in Pakistan, are recommended.

  16. Discrepancies Between Blood Glucose and Interstitial Glucose-Technological Artifacts or Physiology: Implications for Selection of the Appropriate Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Thorsten; Heinemann, Lutz; Kolassa, Ralf; Thomas, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    For decades, the major source of information used to make therapeutic decisions by patients with diabetes has been glucose measurements using capillary blood samples. Knowledge gained from clinical studies, for example, on the impact of metabolic control on diabetes-related complications, is based on such measurements. Different to traditional blood glucose measurement systems, systems for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) measure glucose in interstitial fluid (ISF). The assumption is that glucose levels in blood and ISF are practically the same and that the information provided can be used interchangeably. Thus, therapeutic decisions, that is, the selection of insulin doses, are based on CGM system results interpreted as though they were blood glucose values. We performed a more detailed analysis and interpretation of glucose profiles obtained with CGM in situations with high glucose dynamics to evaluate this potentially misleading assumption. Considering physical activity, hypoglycemic episodes, and meal-related differences between glucose levels in blood and ISF uncover clinically relevant differences that can make it risky from a therapeutic point of view to use blood glucose for therapeutic decisions. Further systematic and structured evaluation as to whether the use of ISF glucose is more safe and efficient when it comes to acute therapeutic decisions is necessary. These data might also have a higher prognostic relevance when it comes to long-term metabolic consequences of diabetes. In the long run, it may be reasonable to abandon blood glucose measurements as the basis for diabetes management and switch to using ISF glucose as the appropriate therapeutic target.

  17. Altered free radical metabolism in acute mountain sickness: implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D M; Evans, K A; James, P E

    2008-01-01

    (2)) and following 6 h passive exposure to hypoxia (12% O(2)). Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAv) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were measured for determination of CA following calculation of transfer function analysis and rate of regulation (RoR). Nine subjects......We tested the hypothesis that dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) function would be compromised in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subsequent to a hypoxia-mediated alteration in systemic free radical metabolism. Eighteen male lowlanders were examined in normoxia (21% O...

  18. Blood-feeding patterns of Culex quinquefasciatus and other culicines and implications for disease transmission in Mwea rice scheme, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Muriu, Simon; Shililu, Josephat; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Jacob, Benjamin G; Mbogo, Charles; Githure, John; Novak, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Studies were conducted in Mwea Rice Scheme, Kenya during the period April 2005 and January 2007 to determine the host-feeding pattern of culicine mosquitoes. Mosquitoes were collected indoors and outdoors and tested for human, bovine, goat, and donkey blood meals by an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. A total of 1,714 blood-engorged samples comprising Culex quinquefasciatus Say (96.1%), Culex annulioris Theobald (1.8%), Culex poicilipes Theobald (0.9%), Aedes cuminsi Theobald (1.0%), Aedes taylori Edwards (0.1%), and Mansonia africana Theobald (0.1%) were tested. Except for A. taylori, in which the single blood meal tested was of bovine origin, the other species fed mostly on both bovine (range 73.3-100%) and goats (range 50-100%). Donkeys were also common hosts for all species (range 19.4-23.5%) except A. taylori and M. africana. C. quinquefasciatus was the only species containing human blood meals (0.04), and indoor collected populations of this species had significantly higher frequency of human blood meals (9.8%) compared with outdoor-collected populations (3.0%). Mixed blood feeding was dominant among culicine species comprising 50.0%, 73.3%, 73.5%, 80.6%, and 94.1% of the samples for M. africana, C. poicilipes, C. quinquefasciatus, C. annulioris, and A. cuminsi, respectively. Ten mixed blood meal combinations including a mixture of all the four hosts were observed in C. quinquefasciatus, compared to one blood meal combination for M. Africana, and two combinations for C. poicilipes, C. annulioris, and A. cuminsi. Mixed bovine and goat blood meal was the most common combination among the five culicine species followed by a mixture of donkey, bovine, and goat blood meals. We conclude that culicine species in Mwea are least likely to be vectors of lymphatic filariasis due to their high "preference" for livestock over human hosts, but they present an increased risk for arbovirus transmission particularly Rift Valley Fever virus, in which domestic animals serve

  19. A new method for the determination of carboxyhemoglobin in blood of newborns. Possible clinical implications of elevated levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, A; Siepel, H; Heerspink, W

    1990-01-01

    Spectral differences between hemoglobin derivatives from adult-(HbA) and fetal-hemoglobin (HbF) make the accurate determination of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) troublesome in blood of newborns. Only the newest dedicated instruments for the determination of COHb take these differences into account. However, since there are virtually no spectral differences between both hemoglobins in the deoxygenated state, reduction of neonatal blood with sodium dithionite eliminates that spectrophotometric error. Based on this principle, an easy, fast and accurate method for the determination of COHb in minimal amounts of blood was developed; equally well suited for blood of newborns and adults. The instrument used with this new method is a general purpose centrifugal clinical chemistry analyzer (COBAS-FARA, Roche, Basle, Switzerland). After the reduction of blood with sodium dithionite, a simple two component system (Hb and COHb) is formed, which can be spectrophotometrically quantitated by measuring at two suitable wavelengths, i.e., 579 nm and 534 nm. The COHb fraction is calculated with the help of: COHb % = 177.73.(A534/A579)-176.66. Comparison with the OSM3 Hemoximeter (Radiometer A/S, Denmark) for 145 adult blood samples with varying COHb levels (0-30%) yielded a mean difference in COHb % of about 0.06% (SD = 0.38). For fetal blood (N = 63) about the same difference was found when the OSM3 was used in the so-called fetal mode, while comparison with the regular adult mode yielded a difference of about 3.1%. This indicates that the new method is indeed not disturbed by the spectral differences between HbA and HbF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Interindividual methylomic variation across blood, cortex, and cerebellum: implications for epigenetic studies of neurological and neuropsychiatric phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Eilis; Lunnon, Katie; Schalkwyk, Leonard; Mill, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Given the tissue-specific nature of epigenetic processes, the assessment of disease-relevant tissue is an important consideration for epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS). Little is known about whether easily accessible tissues, such as whole blood, can be used to address questions about interindividual epigenomic variation in inaccessible tissues, such as the brain. We quantified DNA methylation in matched DNA samples isolated from whole blood and 4 brain regions (prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and cerebellum) from 122 individuals. We explored co-variation between tissues and the extent to which methylomic variation in blood is predictive of interindividual variation identified in the brain. For the majority of DNA methylation sites, interindividual variation in whole blood is not a strong predictor of interindividual variation in the brain, although the relationship with cortical regions is stronger than with the cerebellum. Variation at a subset of probes is strongly correlated across tissues, even in instances when the actual level of DNA methylation is significantly different between them. A substantial proportion of this co-variation, however, is likely to result from genetic influences. Our data suggest that for the majority of the genome, a blood-based EWAS for disorders where brain is presumed to be the primary tissue of interest will give limited information relating to underlying pathological processes. These results do not, however, discount the utility of using a blood-based EWAS to identify biomarkers of disease phenotypes manifest in the brain. We have generated a searchable database for the interpretation of data from blood-based EWAS analyses ( http://epigenetics.essex.ac.uk/bloodbrain/).

  1. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in the upper arm tissues under an inflatable cuff: Implications for noninvasive blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhipeng; Liang, Fuyou

    2016-07-01

    An inflatable cuff wrapped around the upper arm is widely used in noninvasive blood pressure measurement. However, the mechanical interaction between cuff and arm tissues, a factor that potentially affects the accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure measurement, remains rarely addressed. In the present study, finite element (FE) models were constructed to quantify intra-arm stresses generated by cuff compression, aiming to provide some theoretical evidence for identifying factors of importance for blood pressure measurement or explaining clinical observations. Obtained results showed that the simulated tissue stresses were highly sensitive to the distribution of cuff pressure on the arm surface and the contact condition between muscle and bone. In contrast, the magnitude of cuff pressure and small variations in elastic properties of arm soft tissues had little influence on the efficiency of pressure transmission in arm tissues. In particular, it was found that a thickened subcutaneous fat layer in obese subjects significantly reduced the effective pressure transmitted to the brachial artery, which may explain why blood pressure overestimation occurs more frequently in obese subjects in noninvasive blood pressure measurement.

  2. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in the upper arm tissues under an inflatable cuff: Implications for noninvasive blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhipeng; Liang, Fuyou

    2016-10-01

    An inflatable cuff wrapped around the upper arm is widely used in noninvasive blood pressure measurement. However, the mechanical interaction between cuff and arm tissues, a factor that potentially affects the accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure measurement, remains rarely addressed. In the present study, finite element (FE) models were constructed to quantify intra-arm stresses generated by cuff compression, aiming to provide some theoretical evidence for identifying factors of importance for blood pressure measurement or explaining clinical observations. Obtained results showed that the simulated tissue stresses were highly sensitive to the distribution of cuff pressure on the arm surface and the contact condition between muscle and bone. In contrast, the magnitude of cuff pressure and small variations in elastic properties of arm soft tissues had little influence on the efficiency of pressure transmission in arm tissues. In particular, it was found that a thickened subcutaneous fat layer in obese subjects significantly reduced the effective pressure transmitted to the brachial artery, which may explain why blood pressure overestimation occurs more frequently in obese subjects in noninvasive blood pressure measurement.

  3. Precursors of extreme increments

    CERN Document Server

    Hallerberg, S; Holstein, D; Kantz, H; Hallerberg, Sarah; Altmann, Eduardo G.; Holstein, Detlef; Kantz, Holger

    2006-01-01

    We investigate precursors and predictability of extreme events in time series, which consist in large increments within successive time steps. In order to understand the predictability of this class of extreme events, we study analytically the prediction of extreme increments in AR(1)-processes. The resulting strategies are then applied to predict sudden increases in wind speed recordings. In both cases we evaluate the success of predictions via creating receiver operator characteristics (ROC-plots). Surprisingly, we obtain better ROC-plots for completely uncorrelated Gaussian random numbers than for AR(1)-correlated data. Furthermore, we observe an increase of predictability with increasing event size. Both effects can be understood by using the likelihood ratio as a summary index for smooth ROC-curves.

  4. Effects of blood transportation on human peripheral mononuclear cell yield, phenotype and function: implications for immune cell biobanking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Posevitz-Fejfár

    Full Text Available Human biospecimen collection, processing and preservation are rapidly emerging subjects providing essential support to clinical as well as basic researchers. Unlike collection of other biospecimens (e.g. DNA and serum, biobanking of viable immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and/or isolated immune cell subsets is still in its infancy. While certain aspects of processing and freezing conditions have been studied in the past years, little is known about the effect of blood transportation on immune cell survival, phenotype and specific functions. However, especially for multicentric and cooperative projects it is vital to precisely know those effects. In this study we investigated the effect of blood shipping and pre-processing delay on immune cell phenotype and function both on cellular and subcellular levels. Peripheral blood was collected from healthy volunteers (n = 9: at a distal location (shipped overnight and in the central laboratory (processed immediately. PBMC were processed in the central laboratory and analyzed post-cryopreservation. We analyzed yield, major immune subset distribution, proliferative capacity of T cells, cytokine pattern and T-cell receptor signal transduction. Results show that overnight transportation of blood samples does not globally compromise T- cell subsets as they largely retain their phenotype and proliferative capacity. However, NK and B cell frequencies, the production of certain PBMC-derived cytokines and IL-6 mediated cytokine signaling pathway are altered due to transportation. Various control experiments have been carried out to compare issues related to shipping versus pre-processing delay on site. Our results suggest the implementation of appropriate controls when using multicenter logistics for blood transportation aiming at subsequent isolation of viable immune cells, e.g. in multicenter clinical trials or studies analyzing immune cells/subsets. One important conclusion might

  5. Precursor flares in OJ 287

    OpenAIRE

    Pihajoki, P.; Valtonen, M.; Zola, S.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Provencal, J.; Nilsson, K.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpää, A.; Takalo, L.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black...

  6. Blood-brain barrier transport and protein binding of flumazenil and iomazenil in the rat: implications for neuroreceptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbaek, C; Ott, P; Paulson, O B

    1999-01-01

    of blood-brain barrier permeability for two benzodiazepine antagonists were performed in 44 rats by the double-indicator technique. Cerebral blood flow was measured by intracarotid Xe-injection. The apparent permeability-surface product (PSapp) was measured while CBF or bolus composition was changed....... Comparison of PSapp obtained in the absence and presence of 5% albumin in the injectate yielded f(avail), whereas f(eq) was measured by equilibrium dialysis. Iomazenil and flumazenil f(avail) was 62% and 82%, respectively, whereas f(eq) was significantly lower, 42% and 61%. The PSapp for iomazenil...

  7. Generation of nonlinear vortex precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex har- monics are generated in the transmitted field due to ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provide a straightforward way of measuring precursors. By the virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical informa- tion and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity and high speed communication are required.

  8. Diagnostic thresholds for ambulatory blood pressure moving lower: a review based on a meta-analysis-clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Kikuya, M.; Thijs, L.

    2008-01-01

    Upper limits of normal ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) have been a matter of debate in recent years. Current diagnostic thresholds for ABP rely mainly on statistical parameters derived from reference populations. Recent findings from the International Database of Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Rela...... database is therefore being updated with additional population cohorts to enable the construction of multifactorial risk score charts, which also include ABP Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5......Upper limits of normal ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) have been a matter of debate in recent years. Current diagnostic thresholds for ABP rely mainly on statistical parameters derived from reference populations. Recent findings from the International Database of Ambulatory Blood Pressure...... in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO) provide outcome-driven thresholds for ABP. Rounded systolic/diastolic thresholds for optimal ABP were found to be 115/75 mm Hg for 24 hours, 120/80 mm Hg for daytime, and 100/65 mm Hg for nighttime. The corresponding rounded thresholds for normal ABP were 125...

  9. Blood-brain barrier transport and protein binding of flumazenil and iomazenil in the rat: implications for neuroreceptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbaek, C; Ott, P; Paulson, O B;

    1999-01-01

    The calculated fraction of receptor ligands available for blood-brain barrier passage in vivo (f(avail)) may differ from in vitro (f(eq)) measurements. This study evaluates the protein-ligand interaction for iomazenil and flumazenil in rats by comparing f(eq) and f(avail). Repeated measurements...

  10. Nurse-led care interventions for high blood pressure control: Implications for non-communicable disease programs in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Katende

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Nurses play a significant role in the control of high blood pressure when they employ effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of hypertension. Adapting effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of non-communicable diseases could improve patient outcomes in Uganda.

  11. Impact of neonate haematocrit variability on the longitudinal relaxation time of blood: Implications for arterial spin labelling MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. De Vis

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We demonstrated a wide variability of the T1b in neonates and the implications it could have in methods relying on the actual T1b as for instance ASL. It was concluded that arterial-drawn Hct values obtained from a point-of-care device can be used to infer the T1b whereas our data did not support the use of capillary-drawn Hct for T1b correction.

  12. Clinical Implications of the 2013 ESH/ESC Hypertension Guidelines: Targets, Choice of Therapy, and Blood Pressure Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.; Aksnes, Tonje A.; Ruilope, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension included simplified blood pressure (BP) targets across patient groups, more balanced discussion on monotherapy vs. combination therapy, as well as reconfirmation of the importance of out-of-office BP measurements. In light of these updates, we wished to review some issues raised and take a fresh look at the role of calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy; a...

  13. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropa...

  14. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, PL-30-244 Krakow (Poland); Liakos, A. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, GR 157 84 Zografos, Athens, Hellas (Greece); Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W. [Mount Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, PL-30-084 Krakow (Poland); Provencal, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Santangelo, M. M. M. [O.A.C. Osservatorio Astronomico di Capannori, Via di Valle, I-55060 Vorno, Capannori (Italy); Salo, H. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S., E-mail: popiha@utu.fi [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  15. Cellular Kinetics of Perivascular MSC Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. W. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs and MSC-like multipotent stem/progenitor cells have been widely investigated for regenerative medicine and deemed promising in clinical applications. In order to further improve MSC-based stem cell therapeutics, it is important to understand the cellular kinetics and functional roles of MSCs in the dynamic regenerative processes. However, due to the heterogeneous nature of typical MSC cultures, their native identity and anatomical localization in the body have remained unclear, making it difficult to decipher the existence of distinct cell subsets within the MSC entity. Recent studies have shown that several blood-vessel-derived precursor cell populations, purified by flow cytometry from multiple human organs, give rise to bona fide MSCs, suggesting that the vasculature serves as a systemic reservoir of MSC-like stem/progenitor cells. Using individually purified MSC-like precursor cell subsets, we and other researchers have been able to investigate the differential phenotypes and regenerative capacities of these contributing cellular constituents in the MSC pool. In this review, we will discuss the identification and characterization of perivascular MSC precursors, including pericytes and adventitial cells, and focus on their cellular kinetics: cell adhesion, migration, engraftment, homing, and intercellular cross-talk during tissue repair and regeneration.

  16. Adsorption of natural organic matter and disinfection byproduct precursors from surface water onto TiO2 nanoparticles: pH effects, isotherm modelling and implications for using TiO2 for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Stephanie L; Andrews, Susan A

    2017-05-01

    Titanium dioxide is a photocatalyst that can remove organic contaminants of interest to the drinking water treatment industry, including natural organic matter (NOM) and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors. The photocatalytic reaction occurs in two steps: adsorption of the contaminant followed by degradation of the adsorbed contaminant upon irradiation with UV light. The second part of this process can lead to the formation of reactive intermediates and negative impacts on treated water quality, such as increased DBP formation potential (DBPfp). Adsorption alone does not result in the formation of reactive intermediates and thus may prove to be a safe way to incorporate TiO2 into drinking water treatment processes. The goal of this study was to expand on the current understanding of NOM adsorption on TiO2 and examine it in a drinking water context by observing NOM adsorption from real water sources and evaluating the effects of the resulting reductions on the DBPfp of the treated water. Bottle point isotherm tests were conducted with raw water from two Canadian water treatment plants adjusted to pH 4, pH 6 and pH 8 and dosed with TiO2 nanoparticles. The DOC results were a good fit to a modified Freundlich isotherm. DBP precursors and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection NOM fractions associated with DBP formation were removed to some extent at all pHs, but most effectively at pH 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmental temperature affects prevalence of blood parasites of birds on an elevation gradient: implications for disease in a warming climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzel Zamora-Vilchis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising global temperature is predicted to expand the distribution of vector-borne diseases both in latitude and altitude. Many host communities could be affected by increased prevalence of disease, heightening the risk of extinction for many already threatened species. To understand how host communities could be affected by changing parasite distributions, we need information on the distribution of parasites in relation to variables like temperature and rainfall that are predicted to be affected by climate change. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined relations between prevalence of blood parasites, temperature, and seasonal rainfall in a bird community of the Australian Wet Tropics along an elevation gradient. We used PCR screening to investigate the prevalence and lineage diversity of four genera of blood parasites (Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon and Trypanosoma in 403 birds. The overall prevalence of the four genera of blood parasites was 32.3%, with Haemoproteus the predominant genus. A total of 48 unique lineages were detected. Independent of elevation, parasite prevalence was positively and strongly associated with annual temperature. Parasite prevalence was elevated during the dry season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low temperatures of the higher elevations can help to reduce both the development of avian haematozoa and the abundance of parasite vectors, and hence parasite prevalence. In contrast, high temperatures of the lowland areas provide an excellent environment for the development and transmission of haematozoa. We showed that rising temperatures are likely to lead to increased prevalence of parasites in birds, and may force shifts of bird distribution to higher elevations. We found that upland tropical areas are currently a low-disease habitat and their conservation should be given high priority in management plans under climate change.

  18. Abdominal insufflation decreases blood loss without worsening the inflammatory response: implications for prehospital control of internal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmahos, George C; Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Tabbara, Malek; Duggan, Michael; Li, Yongqing; De Moya, Marc; Alam, Hasan B

    2008-04-01

    Abdominal insufflation (AI) by carbon dioxide has been shown to decrease the rate of bleeding in different swine models of abdominal organ injuries. With development of appropriate tools, AI could be used to control bleeding temporarily in the prehospital setting. Concerns have been raised about the inflammatory response to AI, which could damage organs at a later stage despite initial hemostasis. We hypothesized that AI controls bleeding without inducing an unfavorable inflammatory response. An experimental splenic injury was caused in 28 Yorkshire pigs, which were randomized to: 1) standard resuscitation (n = 14) with crystalloids to a mean arterial pressure of 60 mm Hg, or 2) standard resuscitation and AI (n = 14) to an abdominal pressure of 20 cmH2O. The experiment lasted for 30 minutes, and intra-abdominal blood loss was measured. Blood serum interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), transforming growth factor beta1, and lung tissue heat shock protein 70 gene expression were measured at 0, 15, and 30 minutes, as markers of the inflammatory response. All animals survived to the end of the experiment. Total blood loss was significantly less in the AI group compared with the other standard resuscitation animals (733 +/- 76 vs 1094 +/- 153 mL, P = 0.049). The pH at the end of the experiment was significantly lower in the AI group (7.28 +/- 0.02 vs 7.44 +/- 0.05, P < 0.01) but there was no difference in lactate levels (1.5 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.3, P = 0.7). Similarly, there was no difference in IL-1beta, transforming growth factor beta1, or lung tissue heat shock protein 70 gene expression between the two groups at any time point, although there was a trend towards lower IL-1beta levels in the AI group. Our conclusion is that AI reduces blood loss from splenic injury without a measurable effect on the early inflammatory response in a clinically relevant animal model.

  19. Magnitude of blood pressure reduction in the placebo arms of modern hypertension trials: implications for trials of renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh C; Hayward, Carl; Ozdemir, Baris Ata; Rosen, Stuart D; Krum, Henry; Lyon, Alexander R; Francis, Darrel P; di Mario, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Early phase studies of novel interventions for hypertension, such as renal sympathetic denervation, are sometimes single-armed (uncontrolled). We explored the wisdom of this by quantifying the blood pressure fall in the placebo arms of contemporary trials of hypertension. We searched Medline up to June 2014 and identified blinded, randomized trials of hypertension therapy in which the control arm received placebo medication or a sham (placebo) procedure. For nonresistant hypertension, we have identified all such trials of drugs licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration since 2000 (5 drugs). This US Food and Drug Administration-related restriction was not applied to resistant hypertension trials. This produced 7451 patients, who were allocated to a blinded control from 52 trials of nonresistant hypertension and 694 patients from 8 trials of resistant hypertension (3 drugs and 2 interventions). Systolic blood pressure fell by 5.92 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 5.14-6.71; Pplacebo) illustrates that efficacy explorations of novel therapies for hypertension, once safety is established, should be performed with a randomized, appropriately controlled, and blinded design.

  20. Brillouin precursors in Debye media

    CERN Document Server

    Macke, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study the formation of Brillouin precursors in Debye media. We point out that the precursors are only visible at propagation distances such that the impulse response of the medium is essentially determined by the frequency-dependence of its absorption and is practically Gaussian. By simple convolution, we then obtain explicit analytical expressions of the transmitted waves generated by reference incident waves, distinguishing precursor and main signal by physical arguments. These expressions are in good agreement with the signals obtained in numerical or real experiments performed on water and explain some features of these signals that remained mysterious or unnoticed. In addition, we show quite generally that the shape of the Brillouin precursor appearing alone at large enough propagation distance and the law giving its amplitude as a function of this distance do not depend on the precise form of the incident wave but only on its integral properties. The incidence of a static conductivity o...

  1. Oestradiol levels in varicose vein blood of patients with and without pelvic vein incompetence (PVI): diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asciutto, G; Mumme, A; Asciutto, K C; Geier, B

    2010-07-01

    To assess the difference in the oestradiol levels of blood taken from varicose veins in patients with and without pelvic vein incompetence (PVI). Women of child-bearing age with symptomatic primary or recurrent varicose veins of the great saphenous vein (GSV) were included in a prospective study. Patients underwent duplex ultrasonography and pelvic vein phlebography. They were divided into a group with PVI (PVI group) and a control group with GSV reflux alone (VV group). Blood samples were collected from the GSV at the sapheno-femoral junction or lower in the thigh as well as from the arm. Oestradiol levels were determined by electroluminescence. Between January and December 2007, 40 women were studied, of which 19 showed phlebographic evidence of PVI (PVI group), while 21 were included in the VV group. Phlebography revealed an incompetent ovarian vein in 14 (74%) patients of the PVI group, dilated uterine and ovarian plexuses in 12 (63%) and an incompetent internal iliac vein in six cases (32%). In the PVI group, the median oestradiol level in GSV samples was 121 pgml(-1) (range: 12-4300), while in the VV group the median level was 75 pgml(-1) (range: 9-1177). In the upper limb, the PVI group patients had a median level of 78 pgml(-1) (range: 15-121) and the VV group patients 68 pgml(-1) (range: 13-568). The ratio of lower limb/upper extremity was significantly higher (pPVI group (median: 1.9; range: 0.7-33) than in those of the VV group (median: 1.1; range: 0.8-13). A threshold ratio of 1.4 showed the highest combined sensitivity and specificity in differentiating patients with PVI from those without. In patients with varicose veins arising from the GSV, oestradiol levels were significantly higher in the lower limb than in the upper extremity in the subgroup with associated PVI. It may be possible to use this observation as a diagnostic test in patients with suspected PVI. This deserves further study. Copyright 2010 European Society for Vascular Surgery

  2. Crosstalk between adipose tissue and blood vessels in cardiometabolic syndrome: implication of steroid hormone receptors (MR/GR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Sarah Elisabeth Louise; Dulak-Lis, Maria Gabriela; Touyz, Rhian M; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie

    2014-08-01

    Crosstalk between adipose tissue and blood vessels is vital to vascular homeostasis and is disturbed in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) refers to the clustering of obesity-related metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, glucose and lipid profile alterations, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Mechanisms underlying these associations remain unclear. Adipose tissue associated with the vasculature [known as perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT)] has been shown to produce myriads of adipose tissue-derived substances called adipokines, including hormones, cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which actively participate in the regulation of vascular function and local inflammation by endocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. As a result, the signaling from PVAT to the vasculature is emerging as a potential therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes-related vascular dysfunction. Accumulating evidence supports a shift in our understanding of the crucial role of elevated plasma levels of aldosterone in obesity, promoting insulin resistance and hypertension. In obesity, aldosterone/mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling induces an abnormal secretion of adipokines, ROS production and systemic inflammation, which in turn contribute to impaired insulin signaling, reduced endothelial-mediated vasorelaxation, and associated cardiovascular abnormalities. Thus, aldosterone excess exerts detrimental metabolic and vascular effects that participate to the development of the CMS and its associated cardiovascular abnormalities. In this review, we focus on the physiopathological roles of corticosteroid receptors in the interplay between PVAT and the vasculature, which underlies their potential as key regulators of vascular function.

  3. The Changes of Protein Kinase C Activity in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes in the Patients with Obstructive Jaundice and the Implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The roles of protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway in the pathogenesis of obstructive jaundice were studied. PKC from cytosolic and membrane fractions of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in 51 patients with obstructive jaundice and 16 cases of normal controls was isolated and purified. The activities of PKC were determined by radioactive isotope γ-32P-ATP-catalyzing assay. The results showed that the total PKC activities in PBL in the patients with obstructive jaundice were significantly increased as compared with those in the normal controls (P<0.01). Moreover, the membrane PKC activities and their percentages of the total PKC activities were higher in obstructive jaundice group than in those in the normal controls (P<0.05). The total PKC activities in PBL in the patients with obstructive jaundice were significantly positively correlated with the levels of soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) (r=0.58, P<0.01) and the degree of jaundice (T-BIL) (r=0.67, P<0.01) in serum. It was concluded that the activities of PKC signal pathway was related with the degree of T-BIL. PKC signal pathway might took part in the activation of T-lymphocytes in the patients with obstructive jaundice and play an important role in the immune regulation and the assessment of pathosis in the patients with obstructive jaundice.

  4. Variation of Perioperative Blood cTnT Levels in Patients Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Its Clinical Implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The clinical value of cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) as a marker in assessing myocardial cell damage in the patients undergoing open heart surgery was studied. Serum cTnT and CK-MB levels were measured in serial blood samples from 20 patients undergoing open heart surgery before operation, at aorta clamping, aorta opening, the end of CPB and the operation, and subsequently one h, one day, 3 days and one week after operation respectively. Ten patients receiving thoracic surgery were also subjected to the measurement of cTnT and CK-MB before and 24 h after operation. The results showed that peak concentrations were reached earlier in cTnT than in CK-MB, and the circulation cTnT remained high when CK-MB had already decreased to normal. In 10 patients receiving thoracic surgery, cTnT level was normal and CK-MB was increased in 4 patients after surgery. It was concluded that the sensitivity and specificity of cTnT was more than those of CK-MB and cTnT could be used as a routine indicator for myocardiac protection.

  5. Cord blood natural killer cells expressing a dominant negative TGF-β receptor: Implications for adoptive immunotherapy for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon, Eric S; Burga, Rachel; Powell, Allison; Cruz, Conrad R; Fernandes, Rohan; Barese, Cecilia; Nguyen, Tuongvan; Abdel-Baki, Mohamed S; Bollard, Catherine M

    2017-03-01

    Cord blood (CB) natural killer (NK) cells are promising effector cells for tumor immunotherapy but are currently limited by immune-suppressive cytokines in the tumor microenvironment, such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β). We observed that TGF-β inhibits expression of activating receptors such as NKG2D and DNAM1 and decreases killing activity against glioblastoma tumor cells through inhibition of perforin secretion. To overcome the detrimental effects of TGF-β, we engrafted a dominant negative TGF-β receptor II (DNRII) on CB-derived NK cells by retroviral transduction and evaluated their ability to kill glioblastoma cells in the presence of TGF-β. After manufacture using Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant methodologies and transduction with DNRII, CB-derived DNRII-transduced NK cells expanded to clinically relevant numbers and retained both their killing ability and their secretion of interferon-γ upon activation. More important, these cells maintained both perforin expression and NKG2D/DNMA1 expression in the presence of TGF-β allowing for recognition and killing of glioblastoma tumor cells. Hence, NK cells expressing a DNRII should have a functional advantage over unmodified NK cells in the presence of TGF-β-secreting tumors and may be an important therapeutic approach for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier via mucosal engrafting: implications for drug delivery to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S Bleier

    Full Text Available Utilization of neuropharmaceuticals for central nervous system(CNS disease is highly limited due to the blood-brain barrier(BBB which restricts molecules larger than 500Da from reaching the CNS. The development of a reliable method to bypass the BBB would represent an enormous advance in neuropharmacology enabling the use of many potential disease modifying therapies. Previous attempts such as transcranial catheter implantation have proven to be temporary and associated with multiple complications. Here we describe a novel method of creating a semipermeable window in the BBB using purely autologous tissues to allow for high molecular weight(HMW drug delivery to the CNS. This approach is inspired by recent advances in human endoscopic transnasal skull base surgical techniques and involves engrafting semipermeable nasal mucosa within a surgical defect in the BBB. The mucosal graft thereby creates a permanent transmucosal conduit for drugs to access the CNS. The main objective of this study was to develop a murine model of this technique and use it to evaluate transmucosal permeability for the purpose of direct drug delivery to the brain. Using this model we demonstrate that mucosal grafts allow for the transport of molecules up to 500 kDa directly to the brain in both a time and molecular weight dependent fashion. Markers up to 40 kDa were found within the striatum suggesting a potential role for this technique in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This proof of principle study demonstrates that mucosal engrafting represents the first permanent and stable method of bypassing the BBB thereby providing a pathway for HMW therapeutics directly into the CNS.

  7. Permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier via mucosal engrafting: implications for drug delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleier, Benjamin S; Kohman, Richie E; Feldman, Rachel E; Ramanlal, Shreshtha; Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Utilization of neuropharmaceuticals for central nervous system(CNS) disease is highly limited due to the blood-brain barrier(BBB) which restricts molecules larger than 500Da from reaching the CNS. The development of a reliable method to bypass the BBB would represent an enormous advance in neuropharmacology enabling the use of many potential disease modifying therapies. Previous attempts such as transcranial catheter implantation have proven to be temporary and associated with multiple complications. Here we describe a novel method of creating a semipermeable window in the BBB using purely autologous tissues to allow for high molecular weight(HMW) drug delivery to the CNS. This approach is inspired by recent advances in human endoscopic transnasal skull base surgical techniques and involves engrafting semipermeable nasal mucosa within a surgical defect in the BBB. The mucosal graft thereby creates a permanent transmucosal conduit for drugs to access the CNS. The main objective of this study was to develop a murine model of this technique and use it to evaluate transmucosal permeability for the purpose of direct drug delivery to the brain. Using this model we demonstrate that mucosal grafts allow for the transport of molecules up to 500 kDa directly to the brain in both a time and molecular weight dependent fashion. Markers up to 40 kDa were found within the striatum suggesting a potential role for this technique in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This proof of principle study demonstrates that mucosal engrafting represents the first permanent and stable method of bypassing the BBB thereby providing a pathway for HMW therapeutics directly into the CNS.

  8. Mycolactone diffuses into the peripheral blood of Buruli ulcer patients--implications for diagnosis and disease monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred S Sarfo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer (BU, is unique among human pathogens in its capacity to produce a polyketide-derived macrolide called mycolactone, making this molecule an attractive candidate target for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Whether mycolactone diffuses from ulcerated lesions in clinically accessible samples and is modulated by antibiotic therapy remained to be established.Peripheral blood and ulcer exudates were sampled from patients at various stages of antibiotic therapy in Ghana and Ivory Coast. Total lipids were extracted from serum, white cell pellets and ulcer exudates with organic solvents. The presence of mycolactone in these extracts was then analyzed by a recently published, field-friendly method using thin layer chromatography and fluorescence detection. This approach did not allow us to detect mycolactone accurately, because of a high background due to co-extracted human lipids. We thus used a previously established approach based on high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. By this means, we could identify structurally intact mycolactone in ulcer exudates and serum of patients, and evaluate the impact of antibiotic treatment on the concentration of mycolactone.Our study provides the proof of concept that assays based on mycolactone detection in serum and ulcer exudates can form the basis of BU diagnostic tests. However, the identification of mycolactone required a technology that is not compatible with field conditions and point-of-care assays for mycolactone detection remain to be worked out. Notably, we found mycolactone in ulcer exudates harvested at the end of antibiotic therapy, suggesting that the toxin is eliminated by BU patients at a slow rate. Our results also indicated that mycolactone titres in the serum may reflect a positive response to antibiotics, a possibility that it will be interesting to examine further through longitudinal studies.

  9. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna C Davidson

    Full Text Available Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND, indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1 positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  10. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Donna C; Hirschman, Michael P; Sun, Anita; Singh, Meera V; Kasischke, Karl; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L) are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1) positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  11. Clinical implications of the 2013 ESH/ESC hypertension guidelines: targets, choice of therapy, and blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Aksnes, Tonje A; Ruilope, Luis M

    2014-06-01

    The European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2013 guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension included simplified blood pressure (BP) targets across patient groups, more balanced discussion on monotherapy vs. combination therapy, as well as reconfirmation of the importance of out-of-office BP measurements. In light of these updates, we wished to review some issues raised and take a fresh look at the role of calcium channel blocker (CCB) therapy; an established antihypertensive class that appears to be a favorable choice in many patients. Relaxed BP targets for high-risk hypertensive patients in the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines were driven by a lack of commanding evidence for an aggressive approach. However, substantial evidence demonstrates cardiovascular benefits from more intensive BP lowering across patient groups. Individualized treatment of high-risk patients may be prudent until more solid evidence is available. Individual patient profiles and preferences and evidence for preferential therapy benefits should be considered when deciding upon the optimal antihypertensive regimen. CCBs appear to be a positive choice for monotherapy, and in combination with other agent classes, and may provide specific benefits beyond BP lowering. Ambulatory and home BP monitoring have an increasing role in defining the diagnosis and prognosis of hypertension (especially non-sustained); however, their value for comprehensive diagnosis and appropriate treatment selection should be more widely acknowledged. In conclusion, further evidence may be required on BP targets in high-risk patients, and optimal treatment selection based upon individual patient profiles and comprehensive diagnosis using out-of-office BP measurements may improve patient management.

  12. Experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The excitation of precursor solitons ahead of a rapidly moving object in a fluid, a spectacular phenomenon in hydrodynamics that has often been observed ahead of moving ships, has surprisingly not been investigated in plasmas where the fluid model holds good for low frequency excitations such as ion acoustic waves. In this Rapid Communication we report an experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing dusty plasma. The nonlinear solitary dust acoustic waves (DAWs) are excited by a supersonic mass flow of the dust particles over an electrostatic potential hill. In a frame where the fluid is stationary and the hill is moving the solitons propagate in the upstream direction as precursors while wake structures consisting of linear DAWs are seen to propagate in the downstream region. A theoretical explanation of these excitations based on the forced Korteweg-deVries model equation is provided and their practical implications in situations involving a charged object moving in a plasma are discussed.

  13. Germline genes hypomethylation and expression define a molecular signature in peripheral blood of ICF patients: implications for diagnosis and etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Guillaume; Walton, Emma L; Sterlin, Delphine; Hédouin, Sabrine; Nitta, Hirohisa; Ito, Yuya; Fouyssac, Fanny; Mégarbané, André; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Picard, Capucine; Francastel, Claire

    2014-04-17

    Immunodeficiency Centromeric Instability and Facial anomalies (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by reduction in serum immunoglobulins with severe recurrent infections, facial dysmorphism, and more variable symptoms including mental retardation. ICF is directly related to a genomic methylation defect that mainly affects juxtacentromeric heterochromatin regions of certain chromosomes, leading to chromosomal rearrangements that constitute a hallmark of this syndrome upon cytogenetic testing. Mutations in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, the protein ZBTB24 of unknown function, or loci that remain to be identified, lie at its origin. Despite unifying features, common or distinguishing molecular signatures are still missing for this disease. We used the molecular signature that we identified in a mouse model for ICF1 to establish transcriptional biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis and understanding of etiology of the disease. We assayed the expression and methylation status of a set of genes whose expression is normally restricted to germ cells, directly in whole blood samples and epithelial cells of ICF patients. We report that DNA hypomethylation and expression of MAEL and SYCE1 represent robust biomarkers, easily testable directly from uncultured cells to diagnose the most prevalent sub-type of the syndrome. In addition, we identified the first unifying molecular signatures for ICF patients. Of importance, we validated the use of our biomarkers to diagnose a baby born to a family with a sick child. Finally, our analysis revealed unsuspected complex molecular signatures in two ICF patients suggestive of a novel genetic etiology for the disease. Early diagnosis of ICF syndrome is crucial since early immunoglobulin supplementation can improve the course of disease. However, ICF is probably underdiagnosed, especially in patients that present with incomplete phenotype or born to families with no affected relatives. The specific and robust

  14. Impaired training-induced adaptation of blood pressure in COPD patients: implication of the muscle capillary bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouzi F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fares Gouzi,1,2 Jonathan Maury,1,3 François Bughin,1,2 Marine Blaquière,1,2 Bronia Ayoub,1,2 Jacques Mercier,1,2 Antonia Perez-Martin,4,5 Pascal Pomiès,1 Maurice Hayot1,2 1PhyMedExp, INSERM U1046, CNRS UMR 9214, University of Montpellier, 2Department of Clinical Physiology, Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier, 3Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center “La Solane”, 5 Santé Group, Osséja, 4Dysfunction of Vascular Interfaces Laboratory, EA 2992, University of Montpellier, 5Department of Vascular Medicine and Investigations, Nîmes University Hospital, Nîmes, France Background and aims: Targeting the early mechanisms in exercise-induced arterial hypertension (which precedes resting arterial hypertension in its natural history may improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in COPD patients. Capillary rarefaction, an early event in COPD before vascular remodeling, is a potential mechanism of exercise-induced and resting arterial hypertension. Impaired training-induced capillarization was observed earlier in COPD patients; thus, this study compares the changes in blood pressure (BP during exercise in COPD patients and matches control subjects (CSs after a similar exercise training program, in relationship with muscle capillarization. Methods: Resting and maximal exercise diastolic pressure (DP and systolic pressure (SP were recorded during a standardized cardiopulmonary exercise test, and a quadriceps muscle biopsy was performed before and after training.Results: A total of 35 CSs and 49 COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second=54%±22% predicted completed a 6-week rehabilitation program and improved their symptom-limited maximal oxygen uptake (VO2SL: 25.8±6.1 mL/kg per minute vs 27.9 mL/kg per minute and 17.0±4.7 mL/kg per minute vs 18.3 mL/kg per minute; both P<0.001. The improvement in muscle capillary-to-fiber (C/F ratio was significantly greater in CSs vs COPD patients (+11%±9% vs +23%±21%; P<0.05. Although maximal

  15. Genetic effects on variation in red-blood-cell folate in adults: Implications for the familial aggregation of neural tube defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, L.E. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Duffy, P.; Bellingham, G. [Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Recent studies have implicated folic acid as an important determinant of normal human growth, development, and function. Insufficient folate levels appear to be a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTD), as well as for several chronic diseases of adulthood. However, relatively little is known about the factors that influence folate status in the general population. To estimate the relative contribution of genetic and nongenetic factors to variation in folate, we have evaluated red blood cell (RBC) folate levels in 440 pairs of MZ twins and in 331 pairs of DZ twins. The data were best described by a model in which 46% of the variance in RBC folate was attributable to additive genetic effects, 16% of the variance was due to measured phenotypic covariates, and 38% of the variance was due to random environmental effects. Moreover, the correlations for RBC folate in MZ co-twins (r = .46) and in repeat measures from the same individual (r = .51) were very similar, indicating that virtually all repeatable variation in RBC folate is attributable to genetic factors. On the basis of these results, it would seem reasonable to initiate a search for the specific genes that influence RBC folate levels in the general population. Such genes ultimately may be used to identify individuals at increased risk for NTD and other folate-related diseases. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Characterizing the signature of flame flashback precursor through recurrence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Loizos; Kabiraj, Lipika; Saurabh, Aditya; Karimi, Nader

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, it is shown that prior to flashback, small dynamical changes appear in the system. These changes appear as a drift in the recurrence plots and are found to be associated with a gradual increase in the determinism and recurrence rate. Thus, this study indicates that precursors to flame flashback exist and can be detected in the multidimensional phase space reconstructed from pressure measurements acquired during flashback. This observation could have broad academic as well as industrial implications.

  17. Trending analysis of precursor events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-01-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) Program of United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S.NRC) identifies and categorizes operational events at nuclear power plants in terms of the potential for core damage. The ASP analysis has been performed on yearly basis and the results have been published in the annual reports. This paper describes the trends in initiating events and dominant sequences for 459 precursors identified in the ASP Program during the 1969-94 period and also discusses a comparison with dominant sequences predicted in the past Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) studies. These trends were examined for three time periods, 1969-81, 1984-87 and 1988-94. Although the different models had been used in the ASP analyses for these three periods, the distribution of precursors by dominant sequences show similar trends to each other. For example, the sequences involving loss of both main and auxiliary feedwater were identified in many PWR events and those involving loss of both high and low coolant injection were found in many BWR events. Also, it was found that these dominant sequences were comparable to those determined to be dominant in the predictions by the past PRAs. As well, a list of the 459 precursors identified are provided in Appendix, indicating initiating event types, unavailable systems, dominant sequences, conditional core damage probabilities, and so on. (author)

  18. PAGOSA Sample Problem. Elastic Precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weseloh, Wayne N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clancy, Sean Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-03

    A PAGOSA simulation of a flyer plate impact which produces an elastic precursor wave is examined. The simulation is compared to an analytic theory for the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and an elastic-perfectly-plastic strength model.

  19. Blood sugar test - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood glucose level ( hypoglycemia ) may be due to: Hypopituitarism (a pituitary gland disorder) Underactive thyroid gland or ... tonic-clonic seizure Glucagon blood test Glucagonoma Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Hypothyroidism Insulinoma Low blood sugar Multiple endocrine neoplasia ( ...

  20. Cell-type dependent modulation of Notch signaling by the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sun Young; Chen, Ci-Di; Abraham, Carmela R

    2010-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that has been long implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease but its normal biological function has remained elusive despite extensive effort. We have previously reported the identification of Notch2 as an amyloid precursor protein interacting protein in E18 rat neurons. Here, we sought to reveal the physiologic consequences of this interaction. We report a functional relationship between amyloid precursor protein and Notch1, which does not affect Delta ligand binding. First, we observed interactions between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch in mouse embryonic stem cells lacking both presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, the active proteolytic components of the gamma-secretase complex, suggesting that these two transmembrane proteins can interact in the absence of presenilin. Next, we demonstrated that the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling by using Notch-dependent luciferase assays in two cell lines, the human embryonic kidney 293 and the monkey kidney, COS7. We found that the amyloid precursor protein exerts opposing effects on Notch signaling in human embryonic kidney 293 vs. COS7 cells. Finally, we show that more Notch Intracellular Domain is found in the nucleus in the presence of exogenous amyloid precursor protein or its intracellular domain, suggesting the mechanism by which the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling in certain cells. Our results provide evidence of potentially important communications between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch.

  1. Precursor polymer compositions comprising polybenzimidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.

    2015-07-14

    Stable, high performance polymer compositions including polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a melamine-formaldehyde polymer, such as methylated, poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde), for forming structures such as films, fibers and bulky structures. The polymer compositions may be formed by combining polybenzimidazole with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form a precursor. The polybenzimidazole may be reacted and/or intertwined with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form the polymer composition. For example, a stable, free-standing film having a thickness of, for example, between about 5 .mu.m and about 30 .mu.m may be formed from the polymer composition. Such films may be used as gas separation membranes and may be submerged into water for extended periods without crazing and cracking. The polymer composition may also be used as a coating on substrates, such as metal and ceramics, or may be used for spinning fibers. Precursors for forming such polymer compositions are also disclosed.

  2. The Innate Lymphoid Cell Precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Constantinides, Michael G; Gudjonson, Herman; Bendelac, Albert

    2016-05-20

    The discovery of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cell populations effecting different forms of type 1, 2, and 3 immunity; tissue repair; and immune regulation has transformed our understanding of mucosal immunity and allergy. The emerging complexity of these populations along with compounding issues of redundancy and plasticity raise intriguing questions about their precise lineage relationship. Here we review advances in mapping the emergence of these lineages from early lymphoid precursors. We discuss the identification of a common innate lymphoid cell precursor characterized by transient expression of the transcription factor PLZF, and the lineage relationships of innate lymphoid cells with conventional natural killer cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. We also review the rapidly growing understanding of the network of transcription factors that direct the development of these lineages.

  3. Precursor polymer compositions comprising polybenzimidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.

    2015-07-14

    Stable, high performance polymer compositions including polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a melamine-formaldehyde polymer, such as methylated, poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde), for forming structures such as films, fibers and bulky structures. The polymer compositions may be formed by combining polybenzimidazole with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form a precursor. The polybenzimidazole may be reacted and/or intertwined with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form the polymer composition. For example, a stable, free-standing film having a thickness of, for example, between about 5 .mu.m and about 30 .mu.m may be formed from the polymer composition. Such films may be used as gas separation membranes and may be submerged into water for extended periods without crazing and cracking. The polymer composition may also be used as a coating on substrates, such as metal and ceramics, or may be used for spinning fibers. Precursors for forming such polymer compositions are also disclosed.

  4. Soluble Precursor Route to Polyanilines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    condensation were not successful, but further work produced polymer under the following conditions: Synthesis Diketone I (2.40 g, 10.0 mmol) in 10 mL...goal of producing a processible form of the conducting polymer polyaniline (PANI), the Phase I program concentrated on development of the synthesis of...extension of the original research to a Phase II effort. Diketone - Diamine Polycondensation Towards a Soluble PAni Precursor To achieve the

  5. Electron Heating, Magnetic Field Amplification, and Cosmic Ray Precursor Length at Supernova Remnant Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Laming, J Martin; Ghavamian, Parviz; Rakowski, Cara

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the observability, by direct and indirect means, of a shock precursor arising from magnetic field amplification by cosmic rays. We estimate the depth of such a precursor under conditions of nonresonant amplification, which can provide magnetic field strengths comparable to those inferred for supernova remnants. Magnetic field generation occurs as the streaming cosmic rays induce a plasma return current, and may be quenched either by nonresonant or resonant channels. In the case of nonresonant saturation, the cosmic rays become magnetized and amplification saturates at higher magnetic fields. The precursor can extend out to $10^{17} - 10^{18}$ cm and is potentially detectable. If resonant saturation occurs, the cosmic rays are scattered by turbulence and the precursor length will likely be much smaller. The dependence of precursor length on shock velocity has implications for electron heating. In the case of resonant saturation, this dependence is similar to that in the more familiar resonantly ...

  6. Effect of immobilized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hemopoietic precursors of various classes during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Andreeva, T V; Madonov, P G; Vereshagin, E I; Kinsht, D N; Pershina, O V; Khmelevskaya, E S

    2010-09-01

    Experiments were performed on the model of cytostatic myelosuppression induced by cyclophosphamide. We compared the effect of immobilized granulocyte CSF (the preparation was created in Russia) and reference standard preparation of granulocyte CSF on the development of neutrophilic leukopenia and hemopoietic precursors of various classes. It was found that preparations of granulocyte CSF decreased the duration and degree of peripheral blood neutropenia. The granulocytopoiesis-stimulating effect was related to stimulation of multipotent hemopoietic precursors, granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte precursors, and granulocyte precursors. Induction of division and maturation of multipotent hemopoietic precursors, granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte precursors, and granulocyte precursors and recovery of cellularity of the granulocytic hemopoietic stem after administration of immobilized granulocyte CSF were observed at later terms compared to treatment with the reference preparation of granulocyte CSF.

  7. Signalling pathways that inhibit the capacity of precursor cells for myelin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Jennifer K; Cate, Holly S

    2013-01-07

    In demyelinating disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS), targets of injury are myelin and oligodendrocytes, leading to severe neurological dysfunction. Regenerative therapies aimed at promoting oligodendrocyte maturation and remyelination are promising strategies for treatment in demyelinating disorders. Endogenous precursor cells or exogenous transplanted cells are potential sources for remyelinating oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Several signalling pathways have been implicated in regulating the capacity of these cell populations for myelin repair. Here, we review neural precursor cells and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells as potential sources for remyelinating oligodendrocytes and evidence for the functional role of key signalling pathways in inhibiting regeneration from these precursor cell populations.

  8. Signalling Pathways that Inhibit the Capacity of Precursor Cells for Myelin Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Sabo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In demyelinating disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS, targets of injury are myelin and oligodendrocytes, leading to severe neurological dysfunction. Regenerative therapies aimed at promoting oligodendrocyte maturation and remyelination are promising strategies for treatment in demyelinating disorders. Endogenous precursor cells or exogenous transplanted cells are potential sources for remyelinating oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS. Several signalling pathways have been implicated in regulating the capacity of these cell populations for myelin repair. Here, we review neural precursor cells and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells as potential sources for remyelinating oligodendrocytes and evidence for the functional role of key signalling pathways in inhibiting regeneration from these precursor cell populations.

  9. TNF-alpha is required for the attraction of mesenchymal precursors to white adipose tissue in Ob/ob mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz G Gálvez

    Full Text Available Most adult tissues harbour a stem cell subpopulation (Mesenchymal Precursors or MPs that represent a small proportion of the total cell number and have the potential to differentiate into several cell types within the mesenchymal lineage. In adipose tissue, adipocytes account for two-thirds of the total cell number. The remaining cells include blood and endothelial cells, along with adipocyte precursors (adipose MPs. Obesity is defined as an excess of body fat that frequently results in a significant impairment of health. The ob/ob mice bear a mutation in the ob gene that causes a deficiency in the hormone leptin and hence obesity. Here, we present evidence that ob/ob mice have a dramatic decrease in the resident MP pool of several tissues, including squeletal muscle, heart, lung and adipose tissue. Moreover, we show that that there is a migration of MP cells from distant organs, as well as homing of these cells to the adipose tissue mass of the ob/ob mice. We call this process adipotaxis. Once in the adipose tissue, migrant MPs undergoe adipose differentiation, giving rise to new differentiated adipocytes within the adipose mass. Finally, we provide evidence that adipotaxis is largely explained by the production of high levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha within the ob/ob adipose tissue. The therapeutic implications for human obesity as well as for regenerative medicine are further discussed in this paper.

  10. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Verweij, Niek; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Weihua; Kelly, Tanika N.; Saleheen, Danish; Lehne, Benjamin; Leach, Irene Mateo; Drong, Alexander W.; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R.; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L.; Esko, Tonu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E.; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Huaixing; Mok, Zuan Yu; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Alves, Alexessander Da Silva Couto; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W.; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N.; Pereira, Mark A.; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T.; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A.; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S.; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Ines; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R.; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B.; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L.; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E.; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L. N.; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M.; Katsuy, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R.; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C. M.; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T.; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J.; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Rozario, Michelle Ann; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparso, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M.; Stott, David J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Vaino; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D.; Young, Terri L.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W.; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D.; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jorgensen, Torben; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahonen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimaki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J.; Franco, Oscar H.; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T.; Holbrook, Joanna D.; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; Maerz, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L.; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. W.; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James; Teo, Yik-Ying; He, Jiang; Elliott, Paul; Tai, E. Shyong; van der Harst, Pim; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Chambers, John C.; Doevendans, PAFM

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 x 10(-11) to 5.0 x 10(-21

  11. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kato (Norihiro); M. Loh (Marie); F. Takeuchi (Fumihiko); N. Verweij (Niek); X. Wang (Xu); W. Zhang (Weihua); T. NKelly (Tanika); D. Saleheen; B. Lehne (Benjamin); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Abbott (James); S. Wahl (Simone); S.-T. Tan (Sian-Tsung); W.R. Scott (William R.); G. Campanella (Gianluca); M. Chadeau-Hyam (Marc); U. Afzal (Uzma); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); M.J. Bonder (Marc Jan); P. Chen (Ping); A. Dehghan (Abbas); T.L. Edwards (Todd L.); T. Esko (Tõnu); M.J. Go (Min Jin); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J. Hartiala (Jaana); S. Kasela (Silva); A. Kasturiratne (Anuradhani); C.C. Khor; M.E. Kleber (Marcus); H. Li (Huaixing); Z.Y. Mok (Zuan Yu); M. Nakatochi (Masahiro); N.S. Sapari (Nur Sabrina); R. Saxena (Richa); A.F. Stewart (Alexandre F.); L. Stolk (Lisette); Y. Tabara (Yasuharu); A.L. Teh (Ai Ling); Y. Wu (Ying); J.-Y. Wu (Jer-Yuarn); Y. Zhang (Yi); I. Aits (Imke); A. Da Silva Couto Alves (Alexessander); S. Das; R. Dorajoo (Rajkumar); J. CHopewell (Jemma); Y.K. Kim (Yun Kyoung); R. WKoivula (Robert); J. Luan (Jian'An); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); Q. NNguyen (Quang); M.A. Pereira (Mark A); D. Postmus (Douwe); O. TRaitakari (Olli); M. Scannell Bryan (Molly); R.A. Scott (Robert); R. Sorice; V. Tragante (Vinicius); M. Traglia (Michela); J. White (Jon); K. Yamamoto (Ken); Y. Zhang (Yonghong); L.S. Adair (Linda); A. Ahmed (Alauddin); K. Akiyama (Koichi); R. Asif (Rasheed); T. Aung (Tin); I. Barroso (Inês); A. Bjonnes (Andrew); T.R. Braun (Timothy R.); H. Cai (Hui); L.-C. Chang (Li-Ching); C.-H. Chen; C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); Y.-S. Chong (Yap-Seng); F.S. Collins (Francis); R. Courtney (Regina); G. Davies (Gail); G. Delgado; L.D. Do (Loi D.); P.A. Doevendans (Pieter); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); Y. Gao; T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); N. Grarup (Niels); J. Grewal (Jagvir); D. Gu (D.); G. SWander (Gurpreet); A.L. Hartikainen; S.L. Hazen (Stanley); J. He (Jing); C.K. Heng (Chew-Kiat); E.J.A. Hixso (E. James Ames); A. Hofman (Albert); C. Hsu (Chris); W. Huang (Wei); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); J.-Y. Hwang (Joo-Yeon); S. Ichihara (Sahoko); M. Igase (Michiya); M. Isono (Masato); J.M. Justesen (Johanne M.); T. Katsuya (Tomohiro); M. GKibriya (Muhammad); Y.J. Kim; M. Kishimoto (Miyako); W.-P. Koh (Woon-Puay); K. Kohara (Katsuhiko); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kwek (Kenneth); N.R. Lee (Nanette); J. Lee (Jeannette); J. Liao (Jie); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); D.C. Liewald (David C.); T. Matsubara (Tatsuaki); Y. Matsushita (Yumi); T. Meitinger (Thomas); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); R. Mills (Rebecca); K. Mononen (Kari); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); T. Nabika (Toru); E. Nakashima (Eitaro); H.K. Ng (Hong Kiat); K. Nikus (Kjell); T. Nutile; T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); K. Ohnaka (Keizo); S. Parish (Sarah); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); H. Peng (Hao); A. Peters (Annette); S. TPham (Son); M.J. Pinidiyapathirage (Mohitha J.); M. Rahman (Mahfuzar); H. Rakugi (Hiromi); O. Rolandsson (Olov); M.A. Rozario (Michelle Ann); D. Ruggiero; C. Sala (Cinzia); R. Sarju (Ralhan); K. Shimokawa (Kazuro); H. Snieder (Harold); T. Sparsø (Thomas); W. Spiering (Wilko); J.M. Starr (John); D.J. Stott (David J.); D. OStram (Daniel); T. Sugiyama (Takao); S. Szymczak (Silke); W.H.W. Tang (W.H. Wilson); L. Tong (Lin); S. Trompet (Stella); V. Turjanmaa (Väinö); H. Ueshima (Hirotsugu); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S. Umemura (Satoshi); M. Vaarasmaki (Marja); R.M. Dam (Rob Mvan); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); J. Viikari (Jorma); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); Y. Wang (Yiqin); A. Wang (Aili); R. Wilson (Rory); T.-Y. Wong (Tien-Yin); Y.-B. Xiang (Yong-Bing); S. Yamaguchi (Shuhei); X. Ye (Xingwang); R. Young (Robin); T.L. Young (Terri); J.-M. Yuan (Jian-Min); X. Zhou (Xueya); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Ciullo; R. Clarke (Robert); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Franke (Andre); W.F. Paul (W. Frank); S. Franks (Steve); Y. Friedlander (Yechiel); M.D. Gross (Myron D.); Z. Guo (Zhirong); T. Hansen (T.); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); T. Jørgensen (Torben); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M. Kähönen (Mika); H. Kajio (Hiroshi); M. Kivimaki (Mika); J.-Y. Lee (Jong-Young); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A. Linneberg (Allan); T. Miki (Tetsuro); O. Pedersen (Oluf); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); R. Takayanagi (Ryoichi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); H. Ahsan (Habibul); H. Allayee (Hooman); Y.-T. Chen (Yuan-Tsong); J. Danesh (John); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); O.H. Franco (Oscar); L. Franke (Lude); B. THeijman (Bastiaan); J.D. Holbrook (Joanna D.); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); B.-J. Kim (Bong-Jo); X. Lin (Xu); J. Liu (Jianjun); W. März (Winfried); A. Metspalu (Andres); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); K. Sangher; D. Harambir (Dharambir); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); A.R. Wickremasinghe (Ananda); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); B.H.W. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce H.W.); M. Yokota (Mitsuhiro); W. Zheng (Wei); D. Zhu (Dingliang); P. Vineis (Paolo); S.A. Kyrtopoulos (Soterios A.); J.C.S. Kleinjans (Jos C.S.); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); R. Soong (Richie); C. Gieger (Christian); J. Scott (James); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); J. He (Jiang); P. Elliott (Paul); E.S. Tai (Shyong); P. van der Harst (Pim); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); J.C. Chambers (John)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10 -11 to 5

  12. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kato (Norihiro); M. Loh (Marie); F. Takeuchi (Fumihiko); N. Verweij (Niek); X. Wang (Xu); W. Zhang (Weihua); T. NKelly (Tanika); D. Saleheen; B. Lehne (Benjamin); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Abbott (James); S. Wahl (Simone); S.-T. Tan (Sian-Tsung); W.R. Scott (William R.); G. Campanella (Gianluca); M. Chadeau-Hyam (Marc); U. Afzal (Uzma); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); M.J. Bonder (Marc); P. Chen (Ping); A. Dehghan (Abbas); T.L. Edwards (Todd L.); T. Esko (Tõnu); M.J. Go (Min Jin); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J. Hartiala (Jaana); S. Kasela (Silva); A. Kasturiratne (Anuradhani); C.C. Khor; M.E. Kleber (Marcus); H. Li (Huaixing); Z.Y. Mok (Zuan Yu); M. Nakatochi (Masahiro); N.S. Sapari (Nur Sabrina); R. Saxena (Richa); A.F. Stewart (Alexandre F.); L. Stolk (Lisette); Y. Tabara (Yasuharu); A.L. Teh (Ai Ling); Y. Wu (Ying); J.-Y. Wu (Jer-Yuarn); Y. Zhang (Yi); I. Aits (Imke); A. Da Silva Couto Alves (Alexessander); S. Das (Shikta); R. Dorajoo (Rajkumar); J. CHopewell (Jemma); Y.K. Kim (Yun Kyoung); R. WKoivula (Robert); J. Luan (Jian'An); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); Q. NNguyen (Quang); M.A. Pereira (Mark A); D. Postmus (Douwe); O. TRaitakari (Olli); M. Scannell Bryan (Molly); R.A. Scott (Robert); R. Sorice; V. Tragante (Vinicius); M. Traglia (Michela); J. White (Jon); K. Yamamoto (Ken); Y. Zhang (Yonghong); L.S. Adair (Linda); A. Ahmed (Alauddin); K. Akiyama (Koichi); R. Asif (Rasheed); T. Aung (Tin); I. Barroso (Inês); A. Bjonnes (Andrew); T.R. Braun (Timothy R.); H. Cai (Hui); L.-C. Chang (Li-Ching); C.-H. Chen; C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); Y.-S. Chong (Yap-Seng); F.S. Collins (Francis); R. Courtney (Regina); G. Davies (Gail); G. Delgado; L.D. Do (Loi D.); P.A. Doevendans (Pieter); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); Y. Gao; T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); N. Grarup (Niels); J. Grewal (Jagvir); D. Gu (D.); G. SWander (Gurpreet); A.L. Hartikainen; S.L. Hazen (Stanley); J. He (Jing); C.K. Heng (Chew-Kiat); E.J.A. Hixso (E. James Ames); A. Hofman (Albert); C. Hsu (Chris); W. Huang (Wei); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); J.-Y. Hwang (Joo-Yeon); S. Ichihara (Sahoko); M. Igase (Michiya); M. Isono (Masato); J.M. Justesen (Johanne M.); T. Katsuya (Tomohiro); M. GKibriya (Muhammad); Y.J. Kim; M. Kishimoto (Miyako); W.-P. Koh (Woon-Puay); K. Kohara (Katsuhiko); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kwek (Kenneth); N.R. Lee (Nanette); J. Lee (Jeannette); J. Liao (Jie); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); D.C. Liewald (David C.); T. Matsubara (Tatsuaki); Y. Matsushita (Yumi); T. Meitinger (Thomas); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); R. Mills (Rebecca); K. Mononen (Kari); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); T. Nabika (Toru); E. Nakashima (Eitaro); H.K. Ng (Hong Kiat); K. Nikus (Kjell); T. Nutile; T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); K. Ohnaka (Keizo); S. Parish (Sarah); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); H. Peng (Hao); A. Peters (Annette); S. TPham (Son); M.J. Pinidiyapathirage (Mohitha J.); M. Rahman (Mahfuzar); H. Rakugi (Hiromi); O. Rolandsson (Olov); M.A. Rozario (Michelle Ann); D. Ruggiero; C. Sala (Cinzia); R. Sarju (Ralhan); K. Shimokawa (Kazuro); H. Snieder (Harold); T. Sparsø (Thomas); W. Spiering (Wilko); J.M. Starr (John); D.J. Stott (David J.); D. OStram (Daniel); T. Sugiyama (Takao); S. Szymczak (Silke); W.H.W. Tang (W.H. Wilson); L. Tong (Lin); S. Trompet (Stella); V. Turjanmaa (Väinö); H. Ueshima (Hirotsugu); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S. Umemura (Satoshi); M. Vaarasmaki (Marja); R.M. Dam (Rob Mvan); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); J. Viikari (Jorma); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); Y. Wang (Yiqin); A. Wang (Aili); R. Wilson (Rory); T.-Y. Wong (Tien-Yin); Y.-B. Xiang (Yong-Bing); S. Yamaguchi (Shuhei); X. Ye (Xingwang); R. Young (Robin); T.L. Young (Terri); J.-M. Yuan (Jian-Min); X. Zhou (Xueya); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Ciullo; R. Clarke (Robert); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Franke (Andre); W.F. Paul (W. Frank); S. Franks (Steve); Y. Friedlander (Yechiel); M.D. Gross (Myron D.); Z. Guo (Zhirong); T. Hansen (T.); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); T. Jørgensen (Torben); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M. Kähönen (Mika); H. Kajio (Hiroshi); M. Kivimaki (Mika); J.-Y. Lee (Jong-Young); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A. Linneberg (Allan); T. Miki (Tetsuro); O. Pedersen (Oluf); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); R. Takayanagi (Ryoichi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); H. Ahsan (Habibul); H. Allayee (Hooman); Y.-T. Chen (Yuan-Tsong); J. Danesh (John); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); O.H. Franco (Oscar); L. Franke (Lude); B. THeijman (Bastiaan); J.D. Holbrook (Joanna D.); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10 -11 to

  13. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10(-11) to 5.0 × 10(...

  14. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood, safe blood transfusions depend on careful blood typing and cross-matching. The ABO Blood Group System ... that provided by the ABO positive/negative blood typing. For example, sometimes if the donor and recipient ...

  15. Mobilization of endothelial precursor cells: systemic vascular response to musculoskeletal trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, A J

    2012-02-03

    Postnatal vasculogenesis, the process by which vascular committed bone marrow stem cells or endothelial precursor cells (EPC) migrate, differentiate, and incorporate into the nacent endothelium contributing to physiological and pathological neovascularization, has stimulated much interest. Its contribution to tumor nonvascularization, wound healing, and revascularization associated with skeletal and cardiac muscles ischaemia is established. We evaluated the mobilization of EPCs in response to musculoskeletal trauma. Blood from patients (n = 15) following AO type 42a1 closed diaphyseal tibial fractures was analyzed for CD34 and AC133 cell surface marker expression. Immunomagnetically enriched CD34+ mononuclear cell (MNC(CD34+)) populations were cultured and examined for phenotypic and functional vascular endothelial differentiation. Circulating MNC(CD34+) levels increased sevenfold by day 3 postinjury. Circulating MNC(AC133+) increased 2.5-fold. Enriched MNC(CD34+) populations from day 3 samples in culture exhibited cell cluster formation with sprouting spindles. These cells bound UEA-1 and incorporated fluorescent DiI-Ac-LDL intracellularily. Our findings suggest a systemic provascular response is initiated in response to musculoskeletal trauma. Its therapeutic manipulation may have implications for the potential enhancement of fracture healing.

  16. Ex-vivo changes in amino acid concentrations from blood stored at room temperature or on ice: implications for arginine and taurine measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil Yvette R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of the plasma concentrations of arginine and other amino acids is important for understanding pathophysiology, immunopathology and nutritional supplementation in human disease. Delays in processing of blood samples cause a change in amino acid concentrations, but this has not been precisely quantified. We aimed to describe the concentration time profile of twenty-two amino acids in blood from healthy volunteers, stored at room temperature or on ice. Methods Venous blood was taken from six healthy volunteers and stored at room temperature or in an ice slurry. Plasma was separated at six time points over 24 hours and amino acid levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results Median plasma arginine concentrations decreased rapidly at room temperature, with a 6% decrease at 30 minutes, 25% decrease at 2 hours and 43% decrease at 24 hours. Plasma ornithine increased exponentially over the same period. Plasma arginine was stable in blood stored on ice, with a Conclusion Plasma arginine concentrations in stored blood fall rapidly at room temperature, but remain stable on ice for at least 24 hours. Blood samples taken for the determination of plasma amino acid concentrations either should be placed immediately on ice or processed within 30 minutes of collection.

  17. Blood lead levels and chronic blood loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manci, E.A.; Cabaniss, M.L.; Boerth, R.C.; Blackburn, W.R.

    1986-03-01

    Over 90% of lead in blood is bound to the erythrocytes. This high affinity of lead for red cells may mean that chronic blood loss is a significant means for excretion of lead. This study sought correlations between blood lead levels and clinical conditions involving chronic blood loss. During May, June and July, 146 patients with normal hematocrits and red cell indices were identified from the hospital and clinic populations. For each patient, age, race, sex and medical history were noted, and a whole blood sample was analyzed by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Age-and race-matched pairs showed a significant correlation of chronic blood loss with lead levels. Patients with the longest history of blood loss (menstruating women) had the lowest level (mean 6.13 ..mu..g/dl, range 3.6-10.3 ..mu..g/dl). Post-menopausal women had levels (7.29 ..mu..g/dl, 1.2-14 ..mu..g/dl) comparable to men with peptic ulcer disease, or colon carcinoma (7.31 ..mu..g/dl, 5.3-8.6 ..mu..g/dl). The highest levels were among men who had no history of bleeding problems (12.39 ..mu..g/dl, 2.08-39.35 ..mu..g/dl). Chronic blood loss may be a major factor responsible for sexual differences in blood lead levels. Since tissue deposition of environmental pollutants is implicated in diseases, menstruation may represent a survival advantage for women.

  18. Mesoionic oxides: facile access from triazolium salts or triazolylidene copper precursors, and catalytic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronilho, Ana; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-07-04

    Reaction of CsOH with triazolium salts affords mesoionic compounds containing an exocyclic oxygen; the same product is obtained by reaction of the corresponding Cu(I) triazolylidenes with CsOH and represents an unusual reactivity pattern of N-heterocyclic carbene precursors that has implications for carbene copper-catalyzed reactions.

  19. The Distribution of HIV DNA and RNA in Cell Subsets Differs in Gut and Blood of HIV-Positive Patients on ART: Implications for Viral Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukl, Steven A.; Shergill, Amandeep K.; Ho, Terence; Killian, Maudi; Girling, Valerie; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Wong, Lisa K.; Crouch, Pierre; Deeks, Steven G.; Havlir, Diane V.; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K.

    2013-01-01

    Even with optimal antiretroviral therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in plasma, blood cells, and tissues. To develop new therapies, it is essential to know what cell types harbor residual HIV. We measured levels of HIV DNA, RNA, and RNA/DNA ratios in sorted subsets of CD4+ T cells (CCR7+, transitional memory, and effector memory) and non-CD4+ T leukocytes from blood, ileum, and rectum of 8 ART-suppressed HIV-positive subjects. Levels of HIV DNA/million cells in CCR7+ and effector memory cells were higher in the ileum than blood. When normalized by cell frequencies, most HIV DNA and RNA in the blood were found in CCR7+ cells, whereas in both gut sites, most HIV DNA and RNA were found in effector memory cells. HIV DNA and RNA were observed in non-CD4+ T leukocytes at low levels, particularly in gut tissues. Compared to the blood, the ileum had higher levels of HIV DNA and RNA in both CD4+ T cells and non-CD4+ T leukocytes, whereas the rectum had higher HIV DNA levels in both cell types but lower RNA levels in CD4+ T cells. Future studies should determine whether different mechanisms allow HIV to persist in these distinct reservoirs, and the degree to which different therapies can affect each reservoir. PMID:23852128

  20. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in the upper arm tissues under an inflatable cuff:Implications for noninvasive blood pressure measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhipeng Deng; Fuyou Liang

    2016-01-01

    An inflatable cuff wrapped around the upper arm is widely used in noninvasive blood pressure measurement. However, the mechanical interaction between cuff and arm tissues, a factor that potentially affects the accuracy of noninvasive blood pressure measurement, remains rarely addressed. In the present study, finite element (FE) mod-els were constructed to quantify intra-arm stresses generated by cuff compression, aiming to provide some theoretical evi-dence for identifying factors of importance for blood pressure measurement or explaining clinical observations. Obtained results showed that the simulated tissue stresses were highly sensitive to the distribution of cuff pressure on the arm sur-face and the contact condition between muscle and bone. In contrast, the magnitude of cuff pressure and small variations in elastic properties of arm soft tissues had little influence on the efficiency of pressure transmission in arm tissues. In par-ticular, it was found that a thickened subcutaneous fat layer in obese subjects significantly reduced the effective pres-sure transmitted to the brachial artery, which may explain why blood pressure overestimation occurs more frequently in obese subjects in noninvasive blood pressure measurement.

  1. Rapid synthesis of macrocycles from diol precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Magnus; Madsen, Charlotte Marie; Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    A method for the formation of synthetic macrocycles with different ring sizes from diols is presented. Reacting a simple diol precursor with electrophilic reagents leads to a cyclic carbonate, sulfite or phosphate in a single step in 25-60% yield. Converting the cyclization precursor to a bis-ele...

  2. Implications of the Eighth Joint National Committee Guidelines for the Management of High Blood Pressure for Aging Adults: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, Michael D; Lopez, Faye L; Blaha, Michael J; Virani, Salim S; Coresh, Josef; Ballantyne, Christie M; Folsom, Aaron R

    2015-09-01

    The recent 2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults from the Eight Joint National Committee Panel may significantly affect the aging US population. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of black and white participants in Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities who participated in the fifth study visit (2011-2013). Sitting blood pressure was calculated from the average of 3 successive readings taken after a 5-minute rest. Currently, prescribed antihypertensive medications were recorded by reviewing medication containers brought to the visit. Blood pressure control was defined using both the Seventh and Eighth Joint National Committee thresholds. Of 6088 participants (mean age, 75.6 [range, 66-90] years, 58.4% women; 23.2% black), 54.9% had either diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. The prevalence of hypertension according to Seventh Joint National Committee thresholds was 81.9%, and 62.8% of the entire sample were at blood pressure goal. Using the Eighth Joint National Committee thresholds, 79.4% were at blood pressure goal (16.6% were reclassified as at-goal). Reclassification was higher for individuals with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (20.6%) when compared with individuals without either condition (11.6%). The use of antihypertensive medications in our cohort was high, with 75.0% prescribed at least 1 antihypertensive medication and 46.7% on ≥2 antihypertensive agents. In conclusion, in a US cohort of aging white and black individuals, ≈1 in 6 individuals were reclassified as having blood pressure at goal by Eighth Joint National Committee guidelines. Despite these less aggressive goals, >20% remain uncontrolled by the new criteria. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Adipokines in psoriatic arthritis patients: the correlations with osteoclast precursors and bone erosions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xue

    Full Text Available Significant bone remodeling with disordered osteoclastogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA. And there is a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS in PsA patients. Adipokines, especially leptin and adiponectin, have recently been reported to be involved in the development and regulation of some autoimmune diseases. In this study, we examined the alternation of circulating osteoclastogenesis related cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, osteoprotegerin (OPG and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL] and adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, resistin, chemerin, omentin in PsA patients, and analysed the correlations between these factors and osteoclast precursors numbers, radiographic damage scores, and disease activity index. 41 PsA patients, 20 psoriasis patients, and 24 healthy controls were recruited. Blood samples were obtained for detecting the levels of TNF-α, OPG, RANKL and the adipokines. The numbers of osteoclast precursors (OCs in peripheral blood were assessed. Radiographs of affected joints in PsA patients were scored for erosion, joint-space narrowing, osteolysis, and new bone formation. Compared with healthy controls, patients with PsA had higher TNF-α, RANKL, OCs, leptin and omentin but lower adiponectin and chemerin. Increased serum levels of TNF-α, RANKL, leptin, and omentin were positively correlated with OCs numbers. In contrast, serum adiponectin levels were decreased in PsA patients and negatively correlated with OCs numbers. TNF-α, RANKL and leptin were positively correlated with Psoriatic Arthritis Joint Activity Index (PsAJAI. Only TNF-α was positively correlated with radiographic damage scores. Our data demonstrated that systemic expression of soluble mediators of osteoclastogenesis and adipokines were disordered in PsA. Certain adipokines were elevated in the circulation of patients with PsA and might contribute to pathogenesis of arthritis. Prospective

  4. Establishing baseline levels of trace elements in blood and skin of bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida: Implications for non-invasive monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Colleen E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Hollings Marine Laboratory, 331 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, South Carolina 29412 (United States); College of Charleston, Grice Marine Laboratory, 205 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, South Carolina 29412 (United States)], E-mail: colleen.bryan@nist.gov; Christopher, Steven J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Hollings Marine Laboratory, 331 Fort Johnson Road, Charleston, South Carolina 29412 (United States); Balmer, Brian C.; Wells, Randall S. [Chicago Zoological Society c/o Mote Marine Laboratory, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, Florida 34236 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Several major unusual mortality events occurring in recent years have increased the level of concern for the health of bottlenose dolphin populations along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Trace element concentrations were examined in a population of free-ranging dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida, in order to develop a benchmark for future comparisons within and between populations. Whole blood (n = 51) and skin (n = 40) samples were collected through capture and release health assessment events during 2002-2004. Samples were analyzed for Al, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, and Pb by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and Hg via atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Trace element concentrations (wet mass) in skin were 2 to 45 times greater than blood, except Cu was approximately 1.5 times higher in blood. Statistically strong correlations (p < 0.05) were found for V, As, Se, Rb, Sr, and Hg between blood and skin demonstrating that these tissues can be used as effective non-lethal monitoring tools. The strongest correlation was established for Hg (r = 0.9689) and concentrations in both blood and skin were above the threshold at which detrimental effects are observed in other vertebrate species. Female dolphins had significantly greater Hg concentrations in blood and skin and Pb concentrations in skin, relative to males. Calves exhibited significantly lower V, As, and Hg concentrations in blood and V and Hg concentrations in skin, relative to other age classes. Rubidium and Cu concentrations in skin were greatest in subadults and calves, respectively. In blood, V, Zn, and As concentrations were significantly greater in winter, relative to summer, and the opposite trend was observed for Rb and Sr concentrations. In skin, Cu and Zn concentrations were significantly greater in winter, relative to summer, and the opposite trend was observed for Mn, Rb, Cd, and Pb concentrations. The baseline concentrations and trends

  5. Anti-hepatits B core antigen testing, viral markers, and occult hepatitis B virus infection in Pakistani blood donors: implications for transfusion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Farhat Abbas; Ullah, Zia; Salamat, Nuzhat; Ayub, Muhammad; Ghani, Ejaz

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBc) and the impact of its testing along with other markers of hepatitis B, hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, hepatitis C virus antibody (anti-HCV), and syphilis in Pakistani blood donors. The study design was cross-sectional. A total of 966 donors were selected randomly for testing of anti-HBc and HBV markers, including HBV DNA, of 94,177 blood donors who were routinely screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HCV, human immunodeficiency virus antibody (anti-HIV), Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA), and malarial parasites from 2003 to October 2005. The seroprevalence of various infectious markers was as follows: HBsAg, 2.16 percent; anti-HCV, 4.16 percent; anti-HIV, 0.004 percent; TPHA, 0.75 percent; and malaria, 0.002 percent. Anti-HBc prevalence in HBsAg-negative, HBV DNA-negative blood donors was 167 of 966 (17.28%), with 76 percent demonstrating anti-HBs positivity. Younger donors with mean age of 25 years were exposed to HBV to a lesser extent compared to those with a mean age of 29 years. Anti-HBc positivity was significantly higher in anti-HCV-reactive individuals. HBV DNA was detectable in 5 blood donors who were HBsAg-, anti-HBc-positive and were categorized as having occult HBV infection. The study shows that more than 17 percent of healthy, young blood donors in Pakistan are already exposed to HBV, with two-thirds showing anti-HBs levels of greater than 100 mIU per mL. One in 200 blood donors who are HBsAg-, anti-HBc-positive, however, have occult HBV infection, with likelihood of transmission of hepatitis B in recipients of blood components derived from them. HBsAg-negative individuals who are anti-HBc-negative and those who are anti-HBc-positive, anti-HBs-positive, and HBV DNA-negative should be selected as regular blood donors to minimize transmission due to occult hepatitis B infection.

  6. Human BCAS3 expression in embryonic stem cells and vascular precursors suggests a role in human embryogenesis and tumor angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Siva

    Full Text Available Cancer is often associated with multiple and progressive genetic alterations in genes that are important for normal development. BCAS3 (Breast Cancer Amplified Sequence 3 is a gene of unknown function on human chromosome 17q23, a region associated with breakpoints of several neoplasms. The normal expression pattern of BCAS3 has not been studied, though it is implicated in breast cancer progression. Rudhira, a murine WD40 domain protein that is 98% identical to BCAS3 is expressed in embryonic stem (ES cells, erythropoiesis and angiogenesis. This suggests that BCAS3 expression also may not be restricted to mammary tissue and may have important roles in other normal as well as malignant tissues. We show that BCAS3 is also expressed in human ES cells and during their differentiation into blood vascular precursors. We find that BCAS3 is aberrantly expressed in malignant human brain lesions. In glioblastoma, hemangiopericytoma and brain abscess we note high levels of BCAS3 expression in tumor cells and some blood vessels. BCAS3 may be associated with multiple cancerous and rapidly proliferating cells and hence the expression, function and regulation of this gene merits further investigation. We suggest that BCAS3 is mis-expressed in brain tumors and could serve as a human ES cell and tumor marker.

  7. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this ... several sources of blood which are described below. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  8. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some red blood cells shaped like spheres ( hereditary spherocytosis ) Increased breakdown of RBCs Presence of RBCs with ... normal Red blood cells, elliptocytosis Red blood cells, spherocytosis Acute lymphocytic leukemia - photomicrograph Red blood cells, multiple ...

  9. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  10. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  11. Blood typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    A blood sample is needed. The test to determine your blood group is called ABO typing. Your blood sample is mixed with antibodies against type A and B blood. Then, the sample is checked to see whether ...

  12. Monocyte chemiluminescence and macrophage precursors in the aged.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi,Isao

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Age-related alterations in the host defense system have been vigorously investigated because of increased susceptibility to infection and neoplasms in the aged. Although monocyte-macrophages form a major part of the cellular defense against microorganisms, the majority of investigations has been limited to neutrophils and lymphocytes. The present study, designed to determine the influence of age on mononuclear phagocytes, revealed no significant decrease in the absolute number of blood monocytes, but did reveal a tendency for the chemiluminescence of blood monocytes to decrease (p less than 0.10 and a significant decrease in the numbers of macrophage precursors (p less than 0.05 in the aged (over 70 year old, in comparison with controls (under 40 years old. On the basis of these findings, functional alterations of monocyte-macrophages seem to participate in the increased susceptibility to infection in the aged.

  13. Impaired interferon-alpha production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells after cord blood transplantation in children: implication for post-transplantation toll-like receptor ligand-based immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Emily; Cordeiro, Paulo; Brito, Rose-Marie; Harnois, Michaël; Mezziani, Samira; Herblot, Sabine; Le Deist, Françoise; Duval, Michel

    2014-10-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) initiate both innate and adaptive immune responses, making them attractive targets for post-transplantation immunotherapy, particularly after cord blood transplantation (CBT). Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are currently studied for pDC stimulation in various clinical settings. Their efficacy depends on pDC number and functionality, which are unknown after CBT. We performed a longitudinal study of pDC reconstitution in children who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and single-unit CBT. Both CBT and unrelated BMT patients received antithymocyte globulin as part of their graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimen. pDC blood counts were higher in CBT patients than in healthy volunteers from 2 to 9 months after transplantation, whereas they remained lower in BMT patients. We showed that cord blood progenitors gave rise in vitro to a 500-fold increase in functional pDCs over bone marrow counterparts. Upon stimulation with a TLR agonist, pDCs from both CBT and BMT recipients upregulated T cell costimulatory molecules, whereas interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production was impaired for 9 months after CBT. TLR agonist treatment is thus not expected to induce IFN-α production by pDCs after CBT, limiting its immunotherapeutic potential. Fortunately, in vitro production of large amounts of functional pDCs from cord blood progenitors paves the way for the post-transplantation adoptive transfer of pDCs. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preparation of precursor for stainless steel foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiang-yang; LI Shan-ni; LI Jie; LIU Ye-xiang

    2008-01-01

    The effects of polyurethane sponge pretreatment and slurry compositions on the slurry loading in precursor were discussed, and the,performances of stainless steel foams prepared from precursors with different slurry loadings and different particle sizes of the stainless steel powder were also investigated. The experimental results show that the pretreatment of sponge with alkaline solution is effective to reduce the jam of cells in precursor and ensure the slurry to uniformly distribute in sponge, and it is also an effective method for increasing the slurry loading in precursor; the mass fraction of additive A and solid content in slurry greatly affect the slurry loading in precursor, when they are kept in 9%-13% and 52%-75%, respectively, the stainless steel foam may hold excellent 3D open-cell network structure and uniform muscles; the particle size of the stainless steel powder and the slurry loading in precursor have great effects on the bending strength, apparent density and open porosity of stainless steel foam; when the stainless steel powder with particle size of 44 tan and slurry loading of 0.5 g/cm3 in precursor are used, a stainless steel foam can be obtained, which has open porosity of 81.2%, bending strength of about 51.76 MPa and apparent density of about 1.0 g/cm3.

  15. Synthesis and structures of metal chalcogenide precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj, Stan A.; Eckles, William E.; Andras, Maria T.

    1990-01-01

    The reactivity of early transition metal sandwich complexes with sulfur-rich molecules such as dithiocarboxylic acids was studied. Researchers recently initiated work on precursors to CuInSe2 and related chalcopyrite semiconductors. Th every high radiation tolerance and the high absorption coefficient of CuInSe2 makes this material extremely attractive for lightweight space solar cells. Their general approach in early transition metal chemistry, the reaction of low-valent metal complexes or metal powders with sulfur and selenium rich compounds, was extended to the synthesis of chalcopyrite precursors. Here, the researchers describe synthesis, structures, and and routes to single molecule precursors to metal chalcogenides.

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition from Dissolved Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanlin; Döhler, Dirk; Barr, Maïssa; Oks, Elina; Wolf, Marc; Santinacci, Lionel; Bachmann, Julien

    2015-10-14

    We establish a novel thin film deposition technique by transferring the principles of atomic layer deposition (ALD) known with gaseous precursors toward precursors dissolved in a liquid. An established ALD reaction behaves similarly when performed from solutions. "Solution ALD" (sALD) can coat deep pores in a conformal manner. sALD offers novel opportunities by overcoming the need for volatile and thermally robust precursors. We establish a MgO sALD procedure based on the hydrolysis of a Grignard reagent.

  17. Comparative Susceptibility of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti to Dengue Virus Infection After Feeding on Blood of Viremic Humans: Implications for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehorn, James; Kien, Duong Thi Hue; Nguyen, Nguyet Minh; Nguyen, Hoa L; Kyrylos, Peter P; Carrington, Lauren B; Tran, Chau Nguyen Bich; Quyen, Nguyen Thanh Ha; Thi, Long Vo; Le Thi, Dui; Truong, Nguyen Thanh; Luong, Tai Thi Hue; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Wills, Bridget; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron P

    2015-10-15

    Aedes albopictus is secondary to Aedes aegypti as a vector of dengue viruses (DENVs) in settings of endemicity, but it plays an important role in areas of dengue emergence. This study compared the susceptibility of these 2 species to DENV infection by performing 232 direct blood-feeding experiments on 118 viremic patients with dengue in Vietnam. Field-derived A. albopictus acquired DENV infections as readily as A. aegypti after blood feeding. Once infected, A. albopictus permitted higher concentrations of DENV RNA to accumulate in abdominal tissues, compared with A. aegypti. However, the odds of A. albopictus having infectious saliva were lower than the odds observed for A. aegypti (odds ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, .52-.93). These results quantitate the susceptibility of A. albopictus to DENV infection and will assist parameterization of models for predicting disease risk in settings where A. albopictus is present.

  18. The effect of NaCl on the level of reduced sulfur compounds in rat liver. Implications for blood pressure increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Iciek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is commonly known that excessive salt intake is a risk factor of hypertension. Currently, there is an increasing interest in reduced reactive sulfur species (RSS, mainly H2S and sulfane sulfur (SS as new gasotransmitters showing vasorelaxant properties. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of repeated administration of low sodium chloride dose included in physiological saline on blood pressure, on the level of RSS and activity of enzymes involved in their biosynthesis in the rat.Methods: Two separate experiments were carried out on male Wistar rats: one with intravenous injections of saline and the second one with intraperitoneal saline injections. Blood pressure was measured during the experiment. The level of RSS and other biochemical assays were conducted in the rat liver, because of an intense cysteine metabolism to RSS in this organ.Results: Intravenous administration of saline induced a significant increase in systolic blood pressure while intraperitoneal injections showed only a tendency towards increasing blood pressure. The RSS (H2S and SS level as well as the activity of the main enzyme responsible for their production in the liver of animals after iv saline injections were decreased. Animals injected with physiological saline by ip route did not reveal any statistically significant differences in SS, H2S, and activities of sulfurtransferases, although a tendency to decrease in the RSS was observed.Conclusions: The repeated iv saline injection induced a slight hypertension accompanied by disturbances in anaerobic cysteine metabolism in the rat liver.

  19. Nanobubbles Form at Active Hydrophobic Spots on the Luminal Aspect of Blood Vessels: Consequences for Decompression Illness in Diving and Possible Implications for Autoimmune Disease—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Arieli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Decompression illness (DCI occurs following a reduction in ambient pressure. Decompression bubbles can expand and develop only from pre-existing gas micronuclei. The different hypotheses hitherto proposed regarding the nucleation and stabilization of gas micronuclei have never been validated. It is known that nanobubbles form spontaneously when a smooth hydrophobic surface is submerged in water containing dissolved gas. These nanobubbles may be the long sought-after gas micronuclei underlying decompression bubbles and DCI. We exposed hydrophobic and hydrophilic silicon wafers under water to hyperbaric pressure. After decompression, bubbles appeared on the hydrophobic but not the hydrophilic wafers. In a further series of experiments, we placed large ovine blood vessels in a cooled high pressure chamber at 1,000 kPa for about 20 h. Bubbles evolved at definite spots in all the types of blood vessels. These bubble-producing spots stained positive for lipids, and were henceforth termed “active hydrophobic spots” (AHS. The lung surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, was found both in the plasma of the sheep and at the AHS. Bubbles detached from the blood vessel in pulsatile flow after reaching a mean diameter of ~1.0 mm. Bubble expansion was bi-phasic—a slow initiation phase which peaked 45 min after decompression, followed by fast diffusion-controlled growth. Many features of decompression from diving correlate with this finding of AHS on the blood vessels. (1 Variability between bubblers and non-bubblers. (2 An age-related effect and adaptation. (3 The increased risk of DCI on a second dive. (4 Symptoms of neurologic decompression sickness. (5 Preconditioning before a dive. (6 A bi-phasic mechanism of bubble expansion. (7 Increased bubble formation with depth. (8 Endothelial injury. (9 The presence of endothelial microparticles. Finally, constant contact between nanobubbles and plasma may result in distortion of proteins and their

  20. The use of meat juice or blood serum for the diagnosis of Salmonella infection in pigs and its possible implications on Salmonella control programs

    OpenAIRE

    Vico, Juan Pablo; Mainar Jaime, Raúl Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Serology is the method of choice for country-scale Salmonella control programs in pigs and can be carried out both on blood serum or meat juice. However, the diagnostic performance of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) on these sample matrices has not been sufficiently compared. The agreement between the serum ELISA and meat juice ELISA on samples taken from commercial farms was assessed in 2 pig populations (adult sows and finishers). Results of optical density percentag...

  1. Testing the predictors of boredom at school: development and validation of the precursors to boredom scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschmann, Elena C; Goetz, Thomas; Stupnisky, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND. Boredom has been found to be an important emotion for students' learning processes and achievement outcomes; however, the precursors of this emotion remain largely unexplored. AIM. In the current study, scales assessing the precursors to boredom in academic achievement settings were developed and tested. SAMPLE. Participants were 1,380 grade 5-10 students in mathematics classes. METHOD. The Precursors to Boredom Scales were tested for structural and convergent validity with multi-level confirmatory factor analyses (ML-CFA), and differences in the perception of the precursors of boredom due to gender were investigated. RESULTS. The first ML-CFA found support for the structural validity of the Precursors to Boredom Scales. In a second ML-CFA, the newly developed boredom scales showed good convergent validity with several key aspects of instructional quality. Finally, the results supported previous research that found no gender differences in academic self-concept and interest. CONCLUSION. The precursors contained in our scales are empirically separable. Implications of the current findings for research on boredom among students are discussed.

  2. Blood-type distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom Jun; Myeong Lee, Dong; Hun Lee, Sung; Gim, Wan-Suk

    2007-01-01

    We statistically verify the Hardy-Weinberg principle in genetics by investigating the independence of ABO-blood types of married couples. The allelic frequencies derived from the phenotypic frequencies in ethnic groups via the Hardy-Weinberg principle are used to define a genetic distance (called the blood distance in this work) between two groups. The blood distances are compared with the geographic distances, and then used to construct a network of ethnic groups. We also investigate the relationship between the ABO blood types and the human personalities, gauged by the Myers-Briggs-type indicator (MBTI) psychological test. The statistical χ2-test reveals the independence between the blood types and MBTI results with an exception of type B males. A psychological implication is discussed.

  3. Progress in molecular precursors for electronic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhro, W.E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular-precursor chemistry provides an essential underpinning to all electronic-materials technologies, including photovoltaics and related areas of direct interest to the DOE. Materials synthesis and processing is a rapidly developing field in which advances in molecular precursors are playing a major role. This article surveys selected recent research examples that define the exciting current directions in molecular-precursor science. These directions include growth of increasingly complex structures and stoichiometries, surface-selective growth, kinetic growth of metastable materials, growth of size-controlled quantum dots and quantum-dot arrays, and growth at progressively lower temperatures. Continued progress in molecular-precursor chemistry will afford precise control over the crystal structures, nanostructures, and microstructures of electronic materials.

  4. Satellite Observations of Ionospheric Earthquake Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimal'Skij, V. V.; Ivchenko, V. N.; Lizunov, G. V.

    The authors review satellite observations of seismogenic phenomena in the ionosphere. Based on literature data, hypothetical patterns of seismogenic phenomena were reconstructed. The authors discuss the reasons which allow the ionospheric "anomalies" to be correlated with eartquake precursors.

  5. Rational design of precursors for oxide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apblett, A.W.; Georgieva, G. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The use of molecular species as precursors for inorganic materials has received considerable attention in recent years. As a result, metal-organic precursors are becoming increasingly sophisticated as particular decomposition mechanisms and specific stoichiometry are integrated into their design. The authors have pursued both of these design aspects for the development of low-temperature precursors for mono- and bi-metallic oxide materials. Thus, a great variety of metal complexes with 2- and 3-oximinocarboxylic acids, acyloin oximes, 2,4-diols, and diacetone alcohol have been prepared and their thermal behavior investigated. The results of this investigation and their application to the preparation of a variety of metal, oxide ceramics, will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to precursors for alumina, titania, zirconia, perovskite-phase ferroelectric materials, and ferrites.

  6. Precursor Parameter Identification for IGBT Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precursor parameters have been identified to enable development of a prognostic approach for insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The IGBT were subjected to...

  7. Backbone resonance assignments of the micro-RNA precursor binding region of human TRBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Matthieu P M H; Plevin, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    TAR-RNA binding protein (TRBP) is a multidomain human protein involved in micro-RNA (miRNA) biogenesis. TRBP is a component of both the Dicer complex, which processes precursor miRNAs, and the RNA-induced silencing complex-loading complex. In addition, TRBP is implicated in the human immunodeficiency virus replication cycle and interferon-protein kinase R activity. TRBP contains 3 double-stranded RNA binding domains the first two of which have been shown to interact with miRNA precursors. Here we present the backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure of residues 19-228 of human TRBP2.

  8. Blood Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tests and Procedures Blood donation By Mayo Clinic Staff Blood donation is a voluntary procedure. You agree to have blood drawn so that it can ... have a disease that requires blood components. Blood donation makes all of this possible. There are several ...

  9. Minimal variation in anti-A and -B titers among healthy volunteers over time: Implications for the use of out-of-group blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprogøe, Ulrik; Yazer, Mark H; Rasmussen, Mads Hvidkjær; Antonsen, Berit; Bistrup, Claus; Assing, Kristian

    2017-06-01

    Using potentially out-of-group blood components, like low titer A plasma and O whole blood, in the resuscitation of trauma patients is becoming increasingly popular. However, very little is known whether the donors' anti-A and/or anti-B titers change over time and whether repeated titer measurements on the same donor are required to ensure that each donation produces a low titer product. The anti-A and/or anti-B titers were measured on 56 healthy adult volunteers (47 blood donors; nine blood center personnel) every 3 months for 12 consecutive months using an automated solid phase analyzer. The results were expressed as log2 titer steps (e.g., titer 32 = 5 titer steps). Minor variations in the average anti-A and/or anti-B titers were seen over time; the maximum individual SD in each group was 1.50 (IgG anti-A) or 1.00 (IgM anti-A, IgM, and IgG anti-B). When the SDs for the four titer measurements from all 56 volunteers were combined as appropriate, the highest overall combined SD was 0.47 titer steps for IgG anti-A. This value corresponds to a 95% confidence interval for intraindividual variation in this antibody's titer over 12 months of 0.96 titer steps. Thus, based on one measurement, an IgG anti-A with a titer step of, for example, 6 would be expected to be in the range of titer step 5 to titer step 7 over the course of 1 year with 95% probability. The titers of anti-A and/or anti-B among healthy adults are stable over at least 1 year. This suggests that repeated titer measurements within a year on the same donor are not necessary if donations are made at 3 months or longer intervals. Diagnostic study, level V.

  10. Endurance Exercise Mobilizes Developmentally Early Stem Cells into Peripheral Blood and Increases Their Number in Bone Marrow: Implications for Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Suszynska, Ewa; Malicka, Iwona; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise has been reported to increase the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) in peripheral blood (PB) as well as in bone marrow (BM). We therefore became interested in whether endurance exercise has the same effect on very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which have been described as a population of developmentally early stem cells residing in BM. Mice were run daily for 1 hour on a treadmill for periods of 5 days or 5 weeks. Human volunteers had trained in long-distance running for one year, six times per week. FACS-based analyses and RT-PCR of murine and human VSELs and HSPCs from collected bone marrow and peripheral blood were performed. We observed that endurance exercise increased the number of VSELs circulating in PB and residing in BM. In parallel, we observed an increase in the number of HSPCs. These observations were subsequently confirmed in young athletes, who showed an increase in circulating VSELs and HSPCs after intensive running exercise. We provide for the first time evidence that endurance exercise may have beneficial effects on the expansion of developmentally early stem cells. We hypothesize that these circulating stem cells are involved in repairing minor exercise-related tissue and organ injuries.

  11. Concentrations and congener profiles of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in blood plasma from Hong Kong: implications for sources and exposure route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Sheng; Jiang, Guan-Min; Chen, Zhuo-Jia; Du, Jun; Man, Yu-Bon; Giesy, John P; Wong, Chris K C; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2013-10-15

    There was limited information about bioaccumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in humans of the general population of Hong Kong. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine concentrations and congener profiles of PBDEs in blood plasma from Hong Kong, evaluate their sources and correlations with other organobrominated compounds, and investigate exposure routes from fish and dust. Concentrations of ∑PBDE22 ranged from 0.56 to 92 ng g(-1), lipid weight (lw), with a median of 5.4 ng g(-1). BDE-47 was the dominant congener, accounting for 26% of ∑PBDE22. Concentrations of PBDE congeners in market fish were significantly (r(2)=0.89, pPBDEs. Furthermore, our data revealed a spatial distribution and terrestrial source of BDE-28 for local people. Results of the present study, which was the first systematic study to investigate concentrations of PBDEs in blood of Hong Kong people, provides useful information to which future measurements can be compared.

  12. Regional differences in the coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism changes in response to activation: implications for BOLD-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ances, Beau M; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E; Liang, Christine; Lansing, Amy E; Buxton, Richard B

    2008-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, but quantitative interpretation of the BOLD response is problematic. The BOLD response is primarily driven by cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, but is moderated by M, a scaling parameter reflecting baseline deoxyhemoglobin, and n, the ratio of fractional changes in CBF to cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)). We compared M and n between cortical (visual cortex, VC) and subcortical (lentiform nuclei, LN) regions using a quantitative approach based on calibrating the BOLD response with a hypercapnia experiment. Although M was similar in both regions (~5.8%), differences in n (2.21+/-0.03 in VC and 1.58+/-0.03 in LN; Cohen d=1.71) produced substantially weaker (~3.7x) subcortical than cortical BOLD responses relative to CMRO(2) changes. Because of this strong sensitivity to n, BOLD response amplitudes cannot be interpreted as a quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes, particularly when comparing cortical and subcortical regions.

  13. Blood dendritic cell levels associated with impaired IL-12 production and T-cell deficiency in patients with kidney disease: implications for post-transplant viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Sun, Qianmei; Huang, Yanfei; Atta, Mohamed G; Turban, Sharon; Segev, Dorry L; Marr, Kieren A; Naqvi, Fizza F; Alachkar, Nada; Kraus, Edward S; Womer, Karl L

    2014-10-01

    Reduced pretransplant blood myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) levels are associated with post-transplant BK viremia and cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease after kidney transplantation. To elucidate potential mechanisms by which mDC levels might influence these outcomes, we studied the association of mDC levels with mDC IL-12 production and T-cell level/function. Peripheral blood (PB) was studied in three groups: (i) end stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis (HD; n = 81); (ii) chronic kidney disease stage IV-V patients presenting for kidney transplant evaluation or the day of transplantation (Eval/Tx; n = 323); and (iii) healthy controls (HC; n = 22). Along with a statistically significant reduction in mDC levels, reduced CD8(+) T-cell levels were also demonstrated in the kidney disease groups compared with HC. Reduced PB mDC and monocyte-derived DC (MoDC) IL-12 production was observed after in vitro LPS stimulation in the HD versus HC groups. Finally, ELISpot assays demonstrated less robust CD3(+) INF-γ responses by MoDCs pulsed with CMV pp65 peptide from HD patients compared with HC. PB mDC level deficiency in patients with kidney disease is associated with deficient IL-12 production and T-cell level/function, which may explain the known correlation of CD8(+) T-cell lymphopenia with deficient post-transplant antiviral responses. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  14. Donating Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can't get an infection or disease from giving blood. The needles and other equipment used are sterile ... part of blood (plasma) within 72 hours after giving blood. It generally takes about 4–8 weeks to ...

  15. Donating Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can Get Weight Loss Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Donating ... Red Cross, there's a 97% chance that someone you know will need a blood transfusion. Blood donors — especially donors with certain blood types — are always ...

  16. The use of meat juice or blood serum for the diagnosis of Salmonella infection in pigs and its possible implications on Salmonella control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico, Juan P; Mainar-Jaime, Raúl C

    2011-05-01

    Serology is the method of choice for country-scale Salmonella control programs in pigs and can be carried out both on blood serum or meat juice. However, the diagnostic performance of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) on these sample matrices has not been sufficiently compared. The agreement between the serum ELISA and meat juice ELISA on samples taken from commercial farms was assessed in 2 pig populations (adult sows and finishers). Results of optical density percentage (OD%) from the serum ELISA were consistently higher than those from the meat juice ELISA (38.5 vs. 27.9; Pmeat juice ELISA results was low (r=0.53). These results indicated an important disagreement between ELISA performed on serum and meat juice matrices and suggested that before implementing a control program to reduce the prevalence of Salmonella in swine the choice of matrix on which to perform the ELISA should be carefully considered.

  17. Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwait BHADBHADE

    2012-03-01

    s disease. Trends in Cell Biology 1998;8(11:447-453. Thinakaran G, Koo EH. Amyloid precursor protein trafficking, processing, and function. Journal of Biological Chemistry 2008;283(44:29615. Zhang YW, Thompson R, Zhang H, Xu H. APP processing in Alzheimer’s disease. Mol Brain 2011;4:3. doi: 1756- 6606-4-3 [pii] 10.1186/1756-6606-4-3. Nunan J, Small DH. Regulation of APP cleavage by α-,β- and γ-secretases. J Biolog Chem 2000:483(1:6-10. Pearson HA, Peers C. Physiological roles for amyloid peptides. J Physiology 2006;575(1:5-10. Wang Y, Ha Y. The X-ray structure of an antiparallel dimer of the human amyloid precursor protein E2 domain. Molecular Cell 2004;15(3:343-353. Quitschke WW, Goldgaber D. The amyloid b-protein precursor promoter. Journal Biolog Chem 1992;267(24:17362-17368. Vostrov AA, Taheny MJ, Izkhakov N, Quitschke WW. A nuclear factor-binding domain in the 5’-untranslated region of the amyloid precursor protein promoter: implications for the regulation of gene expression. BMC Research Notes 2010;3:4. Ghosala K,Vogta D, Lianga M, Shenb Y, Lamba BT, Sanjay W, Pimplikara SW. Alzheimer’s disease-like pathological features in transgenic mice expressing the APP intracellular domain. Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences 2009;106(43:18367-77.  

  18. Hepatitis B virus DNA splicing in Lebanese blood donors and genotype A to E strains: implications for hepatitis B virus DNA quantification and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Chaar, Mira; El Jisr, Tamima; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the major viruses transmissible by blood that causes chronic infection in immunocompromised individuals. The study of 61 HBV carrier blood donors from Lebanon revealed multiple patterns of spliced HBV DNA. HBV DNA splicing was examined and quantified in samples of five genotypes and in seroconversion panels. The Lebanese sample median viral load was 1.5 ×10(2) IU/ml. All strains were genotype D, serotype ayw; 35 clustered as subgenotype D1 and 7 clustered as subgenotype D2. Three splice variants (SP1, SP1A, and Pol/S) were observed in 12 high-viral-load samples. Twenty samples of each genotype, A to E, were tested for the presence of HBV spliced DNA and SP1-specific splice variant. An unspliced HBV genome was dominant, but 100% of strains with a viral load of ≥10(5) copies/ml contained various proportions of spliced DNA. SP1 was detected in 56/100 (56%) samples in levels that correlated with the overall viral load. HBV DNA quantification with S (unspliced) and X (total DNA) regions provided different levels of viral load, with the difference corresponding to spliced DNA. During the highly infectious window period, the SP1 variant became detectable shortly after the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), suggesting a correlation between the initiation of splicing and the production of detectable levels of HBsAg. The quantification of HBV DNA with primers located outside and inside the spliced region might provide different estimations of viral load and differentiate between infectious and defective viral genomes. The role of splicing neoproteins in HBV replication and interaction with the host remains to be determined.

  19. Assessing complexity of skin blood flow oscillations in response to locally applied heating and pressure in rats: Implications for pressure ulcer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fuyuan; O'Brien, William D.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of local heating on the complexity of skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) under prolonged surface pressure in rats. Eleven Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: 7 rats underwent surface pressure with local heating (△t=10 °C) and 4 rats underwent pressure without heating. A pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The loading period was divided into nonoverlapping 30 min epochs. For each epoch, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) was utilized to compute DFA coefficients and complexity of endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic frequencies of BFO. The results showed that under surface pressure, local heating led to a significant decrease in DFA coefficients of myogenic frequency during the initial epoch of loading period, a sustained decrease in complexity of myogenic frequency, and a significantly higher degree of complexity of metabolic frequency during the later phase of loading period. Surrogate tests showed that the reduction in complexity of myogenic frequency was associated with a loss of nonlinearity whereas increased complexity of metabolic frequency was associated with enhanced nonlinearity. Our results indicate that increased metabolic activity and decreased myogenic response due to local heating manifest themselves not only in magnitudes of metabolic and myogenic frequencies but also in their structural complexity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using complexity analysis of BFO to monitor the ischemic status of weight-bearing skin and risk of pressure ulcers.

  20. Occurrence of artificial sweeteners in human liver and paired blood and urine samples from adults in Tianjin, China and their implications for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Gan, Zhiwei; Gao, Chuanzi; Ma, Ling; Li, Yanxi; Li, Xiao; Sun, Hongwen

    2016-09-14

    In this study, acesulfame (ACE), saccharin (SAC) and cyclamate (CYC) were found in all paired urine and blood samples collected from healthy adults, with mean values of 4070, 918 and 628 ng mL(-1), respectively, in urine and 9.03, 20.4 and 0.72 ng mL(-1), respectively, in blood. SAC (mean: 84.4 ng g(-1)) and CYC (4.29 ng g(-1)) were detectable in all liver samples collected from liver cancer patients, while ACE was less frequently detected. Aspartame (ASP) was not found in any analyzed human sample, which can be explained by the fact that this chemical metabolized rapidly in the human body. Among all adults, significantly positive correlations between SAC and CYC levels were observed (p < 0.001), regardless of human matrices. Nevertheless, no significant correlations between concentrations of SAC (or CYC) and ACE were found in any of the human matrices. Our results suggest that human exposure to SAC and CYC is related, whereas ACE originates from a discrete source. Females (or young adults) were exposed to higher levels of SAC and CYC than males (or elderly). The mean renal clearance of SAC was 730 mL per day per kg in adults, which was significantly (p < 0.001) lower than those for CYC (10 800 mL per day per kg) and ACE (10 300 mL per day per kg). The average total daily intake of SAC and ACE was 9.27 and 33.8 μg per kg bw per day, respectively.

  1. Transcriptome of the NTS in exercise-trained spontaneously hypertensive rats: implications for NTS function and plasticity in regulating blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Hidefumi; Gouraud, Sabine S; Bhuiyan, Mohammad E R; Takagishi, Miwa; Yamazaki, Toshiya; Kohsaka, Akira; Maeda, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) controls the cardiovascular system during exercise, and alteration of its function may underlie exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation. To understand the molecular basis of the NTS's plasticity in regulating blood pressure (BP) and its potential contribution to the antihypertensive effects, we characterized the gene expression profiles at the level of the NTS after long-term daily wheel running in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed to screen for differentially expressed genes in the NTS between exercise-trained (12 wk) and control SHRs. Pathway analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database revealed that daily exercise altered the expression levels of NTS genes that are functionally associated with metabolic pathways (5 genes), neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions (4 genes), cell adhesion molecules (3 genes), and cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions (3 genes). One of the genes that belonged to the neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions category was histamine receptor H(1). Since we confirmed that the pressor response induced by activation of this receptor is increased after long-term daily exercise, it is suggested that functional plasticity in the histaminergic system may mediate the facilitation of blood pressure control in response to exercise but may not be involved in the lowered basal BP level found in exercise-trained SHRs. Since abnormal inflammatory states in the NTS are known to be prohypertensive in SHRs, altered gene expression of the inflammatory molecules identified in this study may be related to the antihypertensive effects in exercise-trained SHRs, although such speculation awaits functional validation.

  2. Early precursors and enabling skills of reading acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Ingvar

    2009-12-01

    Research on early linguistic precursors and enabling skills of reading acquisition among young children is reviewed. Language development starts early in infancy when the child learns to categorize the speech sounds according to the pattern typical of the mother tongue. Equipped with these sound categories the child is ready to learn to segment words from the sound stream and to understand and to use words. The precise phonological representation of words will facilitate the important development of phonological awareness, a basic prerequisite for reading acquisition. This paper reviews some of my longitudinal research and training studies indicating the causal direction of the relation between phonological awareness and reading and includes some ongoing studies, where gender differences, socio-economic factors, dose-response-effects and motivational factors are explored. Preventive and remedial implications of the findings are pointed out. Finally, the complexity of the causal relationships between different aspects of early language development, including genetic influences and later reading is pointed out.

  3. Amyloid precursor protein is trafficked and secreted via synaptic vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teja W Groemer

    Full Text Available A large body of evidence has implicated amyloid precursor protein (APP and its proteolytic derivatives as key players in the physiological context of neuronal synaptogenesis and synapse maintenance, as well as in the pathology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD. Although APP processing and release are known to occur in response to neuronal stimulation, the exact mechanism by which APP reaches the neuronal surface is unclear. We now demonstrate that a small but relevant number of synaptic vesicles contain APP, which can be released during neuronal activity, and most likely represent the major exocytic pathway of APP. This novel finding leads us to propose a revised model of presynaptic APP trafficking that reconciles existing knowledge on APP with our present understanding of vesicular release and recycling.

  4. Treatment of Lignin Precursors to Improve their Suitability for Carbon Fibers: A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Ryan [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Naskar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gallego, Nidia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Dai, Xuliang [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Hausner, Andrew [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.

    2015-04-17

    Lignin has been investigated as a carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although there have been a number of reports of successful lignin-based carbon fiber production at the lab scale, lignin-based carbon fibers are not currently commercially available. This review will highlight some of the known challenges, and also the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Lignin can come from different sources (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction methods (e.g. organosolv, kraft), meaning that lignin can be found with a diversity of purity and structure. The implication of these conditions on lignin as carbon fiber precursor is not comprehensively known, especially as the lignin landscape is evolving. The work presented in this review will help guide the direction of a project between GrafTech and ORNL to develop lignin carbon fiber technology, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  5. Deposition of calcium carbonate films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Laurie B.; Odom, Damian J.

    2000-03-01

    A polypeptide additive has been used to transform the solution crystallization of calcium carbonate to a solidification process of a liquid-phase mineral precursor. In situ observations reveal that polyaspartate induces liquid-liquid phase separation of droplets of a mineral precursor. The droplets deposit on the substrate and coalesce to form a coating, which then solidifies into calcitic tablets and films. Transition bars form during the amorphous to crystalline transition, leading to sectorization of calcite tablets, and the defect textures and crystal morphologies are atypical of solution grown crystals. The formation of nonequilibrium crystal morphologies using an acidic polypeptide may have implications in the field of biomineralization, and the environmentally friendly aspects of this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process may offer new techniques for aqueous-based processing of ceramic films, coatings, and particulates.

  6. Non-enzymatic modifications of prostaglandin H synthase 1 affect bifunctional enzyme activity - Implications for the sensitivity of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassassir, Hassan; Siewiera, Karolina; Talar, Marcin; Stec-Martyna, Emilia; Pawlowska, Zofia; Watala, Cezary

    2016-06-25

    Due to its ability to inhibit the blood platelet PGHS-1, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, Aspirin(®)) is widely used as a preventive agent in atherothrombotic diseases. However, its beneficial effects seem to be lower in diabetic patients, suggesting that protein glycation may impair effective ASA-mediated acetylation process. On the other hand, it is proposed that ASA can prevent some of the late complications of diabetes by lowering the extent of glycation at protein free amino groups. The aim of this work was to evaluate the extents of non-enzymatic N-glycosylation (glycation) and acetylation of blood platelet PGHS-1 (COX-1) and the competition between glycation and acetylation was investigated in order to demonstrate how these two reactions may compete against platelet PGHS-1. When PGHS-1 was incubated with glycating/acetylating agents (glucose, Glu; 1,6-bisphosphofructose, 1,6-BPF; methylglyoxal, MGO, acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), the enzyme was modified in 13.4 ± 1.6, 5.3 ± 0.5, 10.7 ± 1.2 and 6.4 ± 1.1 mol/mol protein, respectively, and its activity was significantly reduced. The prior glycation/carbonylation of PGHS-1 with Glu, 1,6-BPF or MGO decreased the extent of acetylation from 6.4 ± 1.1 down to 2.5 ± 0.2, 3.6 ± 0.3 and 5.2 ± 0.2 mol/mol protein, respectively, but the enzyme still remained susceptible to the subsequent inhibition of its activity with ASA. When PGHS-1 was first acetylated with ASA and then incubated with glycating/carbonylating agents, we observed the following reductions in the enzyme modifications: from 13.4 ± 1.6 to 8.7 ± 0.6 mol/mol protein for Glu, from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 3.9 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for 1,6-BPF and from 10.7 ± 1.2 to 7.5 ± 0.5 mol/mol protein for MGO, however subsequent glycation/carbonylation did not significantly affect PGHS-1 function. Overall, our outcomes allow to better understand the structural aspects of the chemical competition between glycation and acetylation of PGHS-1.

  7. On the discovery of precursor processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Donald F

    2011-01-01

    Studies of the biosynthesis of insulin in a human insulinoma beginning in 1965 provided the first evidence for a precursor of insulin, the first such prohormone to be identified. Further studies with isolated rat islets then confirmed that the precursor became labeled more rapidly than insulin and later was converted to insulin by a proteolytic processing system located mainly within the secretory granules of the beta cell and was then stored or secreted. The precursor was designated "proinsulin" in 1967 and was isolated and sequenced from beef and pork sources. These structural studies confirmed that the precursor was a single polypeptide chain which began with the B chain of insulin, continued through a connecting segment of 30-35 amino acids and terminated with the A chain. Paired basic residues were identified at the sites of excision of the C-peptide. Human proinsulin and C-peptide were then similarly obtained and sequenced. The human C-peptide assay was developed and provided a useful tool for measuring insulin levels indirectly in diabetics treated with insulin. The discovery of other precursor proteins for a variety of peptide hormones, neuropeptides, or plasma proteins then followed, with all having mainly dibasic cleavage sites for processing. The subsequent discovery of a similar biosynthetic pathway in yeast led to the identification of eukaryotic families of specialized processing subtilisin-like endopeptidases coupled with carboxypeptidase B-like exopeptidases. Most neuroendocrine peptides are processed by two specialized members of this family - PC2 and/or PC1/3 - followed by carboxypeptidase E (CPE). This brief report concentrates mainly on the role of insulin biosynthesis in providing a useful early paradigm of precursor processing in the secretory pathway.

  8. The ethical, legal and social implications of umbilical cord blood banking: learning important lessons from the protection of human genetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrot, David

    2012-03-01

    Internationally networked umbilical cord blood banks hold great promise for better clinical outcomes, but also raise a host of potential ethical and legal concerns. There is now significant accumulated experience in Australia and overseas with regard to the establishment of human genetic research databases and tissue collections, popularly known as "biobanks". For example, clear lessons emerge from the controversies that surrounded, stalled or derailed the establishment of some early biobanks, such as Iceland's deCODE, Autogen's Tonga database, a proposed biobank in Newfoundland, Canada, and the proposed Taiwan biobank. More recent efforts in the United Kingdom, Japan, Quebec and Tasmania have been relatively more successful in generating public support, recognising the critical need for openness and transparency, and ample public education and debate, in order to build community acceptance and legitimacy. Strong attention must be paid to ensuring that other concerns--about privacy, discrimination, informed consent, governance, security, commercial fairness and financial probity--are addressed in structural terms and monitored thereafter, in order to maintain public confidence and avoid a backlash that inevitably would imperil such research. Once lost, credibility is very difficult to restore.

  9. Sonic Hedgehod y comportamiento de precursores neuroepiteliales

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Gutiérrez, Álvaro; Recio Moreno, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    En los estadios tempranos del desarrollo embrionario, el cerebro tiene dos componentes fundamentales: fluido cerebroespinal embrionario (E-CSF) y precursores neuroepiteliales. En esta investigación nos centraremos en explicar la influencia de un factor de transcripción, sonic hedgehog (SHH), presente en el E-CSF, sobre el comportamiento de los precursores neuroepiteliares. Empleamos técnicas de Wester-Blot para demostrar la presencia de SHH en el E-CSF y técnicas de cultivo organotípico de...

  10. C-type natriuretic peptide and its precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej; Iversen, Peter; Brasso, Klaus;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Seminal plasma offer a more organ-specific matrix for markers in prostatic disease. We hypothesized that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) expression may constitute such a new target. METHODS: Patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, clinically localized and metastatic prostate cancer were...... examined for CNP and CNP precursor (proCNP) concentrations in blood and seminal plasma. Furthermore, CNP and the CNP receptor (NPR-B) mRNA contents in tissue from prostate and seminal vesicles were analyzed by qPCR. RESULTS: CNP and NPR-B concentrations decreased with increasing tumor burden (p = 0.......0027 and p = 0.0096, respectively). In contrast, seminal plasma CNP and proCNP concentrations were markedly increased with increased tumor burden (p prostate cancer....

  11. Carbon fibers: precursor systems, processing, structure, and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Erik; Steudle, Lisa M; Ingildeev, Denis; Spörl, Johanna M; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2014-05-19

    This Review gives an overview of precursor systems, their processing, and the final precursor-dependent structure of carbon fibers (CFs) including new developments in precursor systems for low-cost CFs. The following CF precursor systems are discussed: poly(acrylonitrile)-based copolymers, pitch, cellulose, lignin, poly(ethylene), and new synthetic polymeric precursors for high-end CFs. In addition, structure-property relationships and the different models for describing both the structure and morphology of CFs will be presented.

  12. [Thyroid hormones and their precursors I. Biochemical properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gergo; Noszál, Béla

    2013-01-01

    This paper and the following one (see the next issue of Acta Pharmaceutica Hungarica) survey the biological roles and the related site-specific physico-chemical parameters (basicity and lipophilicity) of the presently known thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine and reverse liothyronine) and their biological precursors (monoiodotyrosine and diiodotyrosine). Here the literature of the thyroid hormone biochemistry, biosynthesis, plasma- and membrane transport is summarized, focusing on the pH-dependent processes. Biosyntheses of the thyroid hormones take place by oxidative coupling of two iodotyrosine residues catalyzed by thyreoperoxidase in thyreoglobulin. The protonation state of the precursors, especially that of the phenolic OH is crucial for the biosynthesis, since anionic iodotyrosine residues can only be coupled in the thyroid hormone biosyntheses. In the blood more than 99% of the circulating thyroid hormone is bound to plasma proteins among which the thyroxine-binding globulin and transthyretin are crucial. The amphiphilic character of the hormones is assumed to be the reason why their membrane transport is an energy-dependent, transport-mediated process, in which the organic anion transporter family, mainly OATP1C1, and the amino acid transporters, such as MCT8 play important roles. Liothyronine is the biologically active hormone; it binds the thyroid hormone receptor, a type of nuclear receptor. There are two major thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, alfa (TRalpha) and beta (TRbeta). The activation of the TRalpha is associated with modifications in cardiac behavior, while activation of the TRbeta is associated with increasing metabolic rates, resulting in weight loss and reduction of blood plasma lipid levels. The affinity of the thyroid hormones for different proteins depends on the ionization state of the ligands. The site-specific physico-chemical characterization of the thyroid hormones is of fundamental importance to understand their (patho

  13. Opiates Upregulate Adhesion Molecule Expression in Brain MicroVascular Endothelial Cells (BMVEC: Implications for Altered Blood Brain Barrier (BBB Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavan P.N. Nair

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB is an intricate cellular system composed of vascular endothelial cells and perivascular astrocytes that restrict the passage of immunocompetent cells into the central nervous system (CNS. Expression of the adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC and their interaction with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 viral proteins may help enhance viral adhesion and virus-cell fusion resulting in increased infectivity. Additionally, transmigration through the BBB is facilitated by both endothelial and monocyte/macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO. Dysregulated production of NO by BMVEC due to opiates and HIV-1 viral protein interactions play a pivotal role in brain endothelial injury, resulting in the irreversible loss of BBB integrity, which may lead to enhanced infiltration of virus-carrying cells across the BBB. Opioids act as co-factors in the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 by facilitating BBB dysfunction however, no studies have been done to investigate the role of opiates alone or in combination with HIV-1 viral proteins on adhesion molecule expression in BMVEC. We hypothesize that opiates such as heroin and morphine in conjunction with the HIV-1 viral protein gp120 increase the expression of adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and these effects are mediated via the modulation of NO. Results show that opiates alone and in synergy with gp120 increase both the genotypic and phenotypic expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 by BMVEC, additionally, these opiate induced effects may be the result of increased NO production. These studies will provide a better understanding of how opiate abuse in conjunction with HIV-1 infection facilitates the breakdown of the BBB and exacerbates the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1. Elucidation of the mechanisms of BBB modulation will provide new therapeutic approaches to maintain BBB integrity

  14. Implication of NOD1 and NOD2 for the differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Sik Kim

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs and Nod-like receptors (NLRs are known to trigger an innate immune response against microbial infection. Although studies suggest that activation of TLRs modulate the function of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, little is known about the role of NLRs on the MSC function. In this study, we investigated whether NOD1 and NOD2 regulate the functions of human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs. The genes of TLR2, TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 were expressed in hUCB-MSCs. Stimulation with each agonist (Pam(3CSK(4 for TLR2, LPS for TLR4, Tri-DAP for NOD1, and MDP for NOD2 led to IL-8 production in hUCB-MSC, suggesting the expressed receptors are functional in hUCB-MSC. CCK-8 assay revealed that none of agonist influenced proliferation of hUCB-MSCs. We next examined whether TLR and NLR agonists affect osteogenic-, adipogenic-, and chondrogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs. Pam(3CSK(4 and Tri-DAP strongly enhanced osteogenic differentiation and ERK phosphorylation in hUCB-MSCs, and LPS and MDP also slightly did. Treatment of U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor restored osteogenic differentiation enhanced by Pam(3CSK(4. Tri-DAP and MDP inhibited adipogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs, but Pam(3CSK(4 and LPS did not. On chondrogenic differentiation, all TLR and NLR agonists could promote chondrogenesis of hUCB-MSCs with difference in the ability. Our findings suggest that NOD1 and NOD2 as well as TLRs are involved in regulating the differentiation of MSCs.

  15. Cell-Specific Variation in E-Selectin Ligand Expression among Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Immunosurveillance and Pathobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mariana; Fung, Ronald Kam Fai; Donnelly, Conor Brian; Videira, Paula Alexandra; Sackstein, Robert

    2017-03-22

    Both host defense and immunopathology are shaped by the ordered recruitment of circulating leukocytes to affected sites, a process initiated by binding of blood-borne cells to E-selectin displayed at target endothelial beds. Accordingly, knowledge of the expression and function of leukocyte E-selectin ligands is key to understanding the tempo and specificity of immunoreactivity. In this study, we performed E-selectin adherence assays under hemodynamic flow conditions coupled with flow cytometry and Western blot analysis to elucidate the function and structural biology of glycoprotein E-selectin ligands expressed on human PBMCs. Circulating monocytes uniformly express high levels of the canonical E-selectin binding determinant sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)) and display markedly greater adhesive interactions with E-selectin than do circulating lymphocytes, which exhibit variable E-selectin binding among CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells but no binding by B cells. Monocytes prominently present sLe(X) decorations on an array of protein scaffolds, including P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, CD43, and CD44 (rendering the E-selectin ligands cutaneous lymphocyte Ag, CD43E, and hematopoietic cell E-selectin/L-selectin ligand, respectively), and B cells altogether lack E-selectin ligands. Quantitative PCR gene expression studies of glycosyltransferases that regulate display of sLe(X) reveal high transcript levels among circulating monocytes and low levels among circulating B cells, and, commensurately, cell surface α(1,3)-fucosylation reveals that acceptor sialyllactosaminyl glycans convertible into sLe(X) are abundantly expressed on human monocytes yet are relatively deficient on B cells. Collectively, these findings unveil distinct cell-specific patterns of E-selectin ligand expression among human PBMCs, indicating that circulating monocytes are specialized to engage E-selectin and providing key insights into the molecular effectors mediating recruitment of these cells at inflammatory

  16. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram (Baylor); (LBNL)

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  18. Artificial blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Suman

    2008-07-01

    Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  19. Sol-gel precursors and products thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Scott C.; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Weisner, Ulrich B.

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a generalizable single-source sol-gel precursor capable of introducing a wide range of functionalities to metal oxides such as silica. The sol-gel precursor facilitates a one-molecule, one-step approach to the synthesis of metal-silica hybrids with combinations of biological, catalytic, magnetic, and optical functionalities. The single-source precursor also provides a flexible route for simultaneously incorporating functional species of many different types. The ligands employed for functionalizing the metal oxides are derived from a library of amino acids, hydroxy acids, or peptides and a silicon alkoxide, allowing many biological functionalities to be built into silica hybrids. The ligands can coordinate with a wide range of metals via a carboxylic acid, thereby allowing direct incorporation of inorganic functionalities from across the periodic table. Using the single-source precursor a wide range of functionalized nanostructures such as monolith structures, mesostructures, multiple metal gradient mesostructures and Stober-type nanoparticles can be synthesized. ##STR00001##

  20. Sol-gel precursors and products thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Scott C.; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Weisner, Ulrich B.

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a generalizable single-source sol-gel precursor capable of introducing a wide range of functionalities to metal oxides such as silica. The sol-gel precursor facilitates a one-molecule, one-step approach to the synthesis of metal-silica hybrids with combinations of biological, catalytic, magnetic, and optical functionalities. The single-source precursor also provides a flexible route for simultaneously incorporating functional species of many different types. The ligands employed for functionalizing the metal oxides are derived from a library of amino acids, hydroxy acids, or peptides and a silicon alkoxide, allowing many biological functionalities to be built into silica hybrids. The ligands can coordinate with a wide range of metals via a carboxylic acid, thereby allowing direct incorporation of inorganic functionalities from across the periodic table. Using the single-source precursor a wide range of functionalized nanostructures such as monolith structures, mesostructures, multiple metal gradient mesostructures and Stober-type nanoparticles can be synthesized. ##STR00001##

  1. Milk proteins as precursors of bioactive peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Dziuba

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Milk proteins, a source of bioactive peptides, are the subject of numerous research studies aiming to, among others, evaluate their properties as precursors of biologically active peptides. Physiologically active peptides released from their precursors may interact with selected receptors and affect the overall condition and health of humans. By relying on the BIOPEP database of proteins and bioactive peptides, developed by the Department of Food Biochemistry at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn (www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia, the profiles of potential activity of milk proteins were determined and the function of those proteins as bioactive peptide precursors was evaluated based on a quantitative criterion, i.e. the occurrence frequency of bioactive fragments (A. The study revealed that milk proteins are mainly a source of peptides with the following types of activity: antihypertensive (Amax = 0.225, immunomodulating (0.024, smooth muscle contracting (0.011, antioxidative (0.029, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors (0.148, opioid (0.073, opioid antagonistic (0.053, bonding and transporting metals and metal ions (0.024, antibacterial and antiviral (0.024, and antithrombotic (0.029. The enzymes capable of releasing bioactive peptides from precursor proteins were determined for every type of activity. The results of the experiment indicate that milk proteins such as lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin, β-casein and κ-casein hydrolysed by trypsin can be a relatively abundant source of biologically active peptides.

  2. Sedimentary porphyrins: Correlations with biological precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callot, H.J.; Ocampo, R.; Albrecht, P. (Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France))

    Over the past 6 years several sedimentary porphyrins (petroporphyrins, geoporphyrins) were correlated for the first time with biological precursors specific for classes of organisms (algae, photosynthetic bacteria (Chlorobiaceae)). This article discusses the various examples of correlations and the methods that led to these conclusions (isolation of pure porphyrins, structure determination using spectroscopic techniques, total synthesis, isotope measurements).

  3. School Violence: Prevalence, Precursors, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvonen, Jaanna

    2002-01-01

    Reviews types of school violence students confront, including a frequent precursor thereto: bullying. Discusses positive and negative aspects of current approach to school violence prevention such as surveillance, zero-tolerance policies, anti-bullying programs. Describes components of model school violence-prevention program. (Contains 38…

  4. Janus microgels produced from functional precursor polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Sebastian; Romanowsky, Mark B; Weitz, David A

    2010-09-21

    Micrometer-sized Janus particles of many kinds can be formed using droplet microfluidics, but in existing methods, the microfluidic templating is strongly coupled to the material synthesis, since droplet solidification occurs through rapid polymerization right after droplet formation. This circumstance limits independent control of the material properties and the morphology of the resultant particles. In this paper, we demonstrate a microfluidic technique to produce functional Janus microgels from prefabricated, cross-linkable precursor polymers. This approach separates the polymer synthesis from the particle gelation, thus allowing the microfluidic droplet templating and the functionalization of the matrix polymer to be performed and controlled in two independent steps. We use microfluidic devices to emulsify semidilute solutions of cross-linkable, chemically modified or unmodified poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) precursors and solidify the drops via polymer-analogous gelation. The resultant microgel particles exhibit two distinguishable halves which contain most of the modified precursors, and the unmodified matrix polymer separates these materials. The spatial distribution of the modified precursors across the particles can be controlled by the flow rates during the microfluidic experiments. We also form hollow microcapsules with two different sides (Janus shells) using double emulsion droplets as templates, and we produce Janus microgels that are loaded with a ferromagnetic additive which allows remote actuation of the microgels.

  5. Detection of Chemical Precursors of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Certain selected chemicals associated with terrorist activities are too unstable to be prepared in final form. These chemicals are often prepared as precursor components, to be combined at a time immediately preceding the detonation. One example is a liquid explosive, which usually requires an oxidizer, an energy source, and a chemical or physical mechanism to combine the other components. Detection of the oxidizer (e.g. H2O2) or the energy source (e.g., nitromethane) is often possible, but must be performed in a short time interval (e.g., 5 15 seconds) and in an environment with a very small concentration (e.g.,1 100 ppm), because the target chemical(s) is carried in a sealed container. These needs are met by this invention, which provides a system and associated method for detecting one or more chemical precursors (components) of a multi-component explosive compound. Different carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are loaded (by doping, impregnation, coating, or other functionalization process) for detecting of different chemical substances that are the chemical precursors, respectively, if these precursors are present in a gas to which the CNTs are exposed. After exposure to the gas, a measured electrical parameter (e.g. voltage or current that correlate to impedance, conductivity, capacitance, inductance, etc.) changes with time and concentration in a predictable manner if a selected chemical precursor is present, and will approach an asymptotic value promptly after exposure to the precursor. The measured voltage or current are compared with one or more sequences of their reference values for one or more known target precursor molecules, and a most probable concentration value is estimated for each one, two, or more target molecules. An error value is computed, based on differences of voltage or current for the measured and reference values, using the most probable concentration values. Where the error value is less than a threshold, the system concludes that the target

  6. Expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein during immortalization of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by HTLV-1: Implications for transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadella Kiran S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is initiated by infection with human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1; however, additional host factors are also required for T-cell transformation and development of ATLL. The HTLV-1 Tax protein plays an important role in the transformation of T-cells although the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP plays an important role in the pathogenesis of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM that occurs in the majority of ATLL patients. However, PTHrP is also up-regulated in HTLV-1-carriers and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP patients without hypercalcemia, indicating that PTHrP is expressed before transformation of T-cells. The expression of PTHrP and the PTH/PTHrP receptor during immortalization or transformation of lymphocytes by HTLV-1 has not been investigated. Results We report that PTHrP was up-regulated during immortalization of lymphocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by HTLV-1 infection in long-term co-culture assays. There was preferential utilization of the PTHrP-P2 promoter in the immortalized cells compared to the HTLV-1-transformed MT-2 cells. PTHrP expression did not correlate temporally with expression of HTLV-1 tax. HTLV-1 infection up-regulated the PTHrP receptor (PTH1R in lymphocytes indicating a potential autocrine role for PTHrP. Furthermore, co-transfection of HTLV-1 expression plasmids and PTHrP P2/P3-promoter luciferase reporter plasmids demonstrated that HTLV-1 up-regulated PTHrP expression only mildly, indicating that other cellular factors and/or events are required for the very high PTHrP expression observed in ATLL cells. We also report that macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α, a cellular gene known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of HHM in ATLL patients, was highly expressed during early HTLV-1 infection indicating that, unlike PTHrP, its expression was

  7. The Use of Platelet-Rich and Platelet-Poor Plasma to Enhance Differentiation of Skeletal Myoblasts: Implications for the Use of Autologous Blood Products for Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnychenko, Olga; Chang, Wen-Teh; Dragoo, Jason L

    2017-03-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used to augment tissue repair and regeneration after musculoskeletal injury. However, there is increasing clinical evidence that PRP does not show a consistent clinical effect. Purpose/Hypothesis: This study aimed to compare the effects of the following non-neutrophil-containing (leukocyte-poor) plasma fractions on human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) differentiation: (1) PRP, (2) modified PRP (Mod-PRP), in which transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and myostatin (MSTN) were depleted, and (3) platelet-poor plasma (PPP). The hypothesis was that leukocyte-poor PRP would lead to myoblast proliferation (not differentiation), whereas certain modifications of PRP preparations would increase myoblast differentiation, which is necessary for skeletal muscle regeneration. Controlled laboratory study. Blood from 7 human donors was individually processed to simultaneously create leukocyte-poor fractions: PRP, Mod-PRP, PPP, and secondarily spun PRP and Mod-PRP (PRPss and Mod-PRPss, respectively). Mod-PRP was produced by removing TGF-β1 and MSTN from PRP using antibodies attached to sterile beads, while a second-stage centrifugal spin of PRP was performed to remove platelets. The biologics were individually added to cell culture groups. Analysis for induction into myoblast differentiation pathways included Western blot analysis, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry, as well as confocal microscopy to assess polynucleated myotubule formation. HSMMs cultured with PRP showed an increase in proliferation but no evidence of differentiation. Western blot analysis confirmed that MSTN and TGF-β1 could be decreased in Mod-PRP using antibody-coated beads, but this modification mildly improved myoblast differentiation. However, cell culture with PPP, PRPss, and Mod-PRPss led to a decreased proliferation rate but a significant induction of myoblast differentiation verified by increased multinucleated myotubule

  8. Humoral activity of cord blood-derived stem/progenitor cells: implications for stem cell-based adjuvant therapy of neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Paczkowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stem/progenitor cells (SPCs demonstrate neuro-regenerative potential that is dependent upon their humoral activity by producing various trophic factors regulating cell migration, growth, and differentiation. Herein, we compared the expression of neurotrophins (NTs and their receptors in specific umbilical cord blood (UCB SPC populations, including lineage-negative, CD34(+, and CD133(+ cells, with that in unsorted, nucleated cells (NCs. METHODS AND RESULTS: The expression of NTs and their receptors was detected by QRT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescent staining in UCB-derived SPC populations (i.e., NCs vs. lineage-negative, CD34(+, and CD133(+ cells. To better characterize, global gene expression profiles of SPCs were determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Furthermore, the intracellular production of crucial neuro-regenerative NTs (i.e., BDNF and NT-3 was assessed in NCs and lineage-negative cells after incubation for 24, 48, and 72 h in both serum and serum-free conditions. We discovered significantly higher expression of NTs and NT receptors at both the mRNA and protein level in lineage-negative, CD34(+, and CD133(+ cells than in NCs. Global gene expression analysis revealed considerably higher expression of genes associated with the production and secretion of proteins, migration, proliferation, and differentiation in lineage-negative cells than in CD34(+ or CD133(+ cell populations. Notably, after short-term incubation under serum-free conditions, lineage-negative cells and NCs produced significantly higher amounts of BDNF and NT-3 than under steady-state conditions. Finally, conditioned medium (CM from lineage-negative SPCs exerted a beneficial impact on neural cell survival and proliferation. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our findings demonstrate that UCB-derived SPCs highly express NTs and their relevant receptors under steady-state conditions, NT expression is greater under stress-related conditions and

  9. Implications of cerebrovascular ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) and apolipoprotein M in cholesterol transport at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Alexandra Carmen; Manavalan, Anil Paul Chirackal; Tam-Amersdorfer, Carmen; Holmér, Andreas; Saeed, Ahmed; Fanaee-Danesh, Elham; Zandl, Martina; Albrecher, Nicole Maria; Björkhem, Ingemar; Kostner, Gerhard M; Dahlbäck, Björn; Panzenboeck, Ute

    2017-06-01

    Impaired cholesterol/lipoprotein metabolism is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebral cholesterol homeostasis is maintained by the highly efficient blood-brain barrier (BBB) and flux of the oxysterols 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, potent liver-X-receptor (LXR) activators. HDL and their apolipoproteins are crucial for cerebral lipid transfer, and loss of ATP binding cassette transporters (ABC)G1 and G4 results in toxic accumulation of oxysterols in the brain. The HDL-associated apolipoprotein (apo)M is positively correlated with pre-β HDL formation in plasma; its presence and function in the brain was thus far unknown. Using an in vitro model of the BBB, we examined expression, regulation, and functions of ABCG1, ABCG4, and apoM in primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (pBCEC). RT Q-PCR analyses and immunoblotting revealed that in addition to ABCA1 and scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI), pBCEC express high levels of ABCG1, which was up-regulated by LXR activation. Immunofluorescent staining, site-specific biotinylation and immunoprecipitation revealed that ABCG1 is localized both to early and late endosomes and on apical and basolateral plasma membranes. Using siRNA interference to silence ABCG1 (by 50%) reduced HDL-mediated [(3)H]-cholesterol efflux (by 50%) but did not reduce [(3)H]-24(S)-hydroxycholesterol efflux. In addition to apoA-I, pBCEC express and secrete apoM mainly to the basolateral (brain) compartment. HDL enhanced expression and secretion of apoM by pBCEC, apoM-enriched HDL promoted cellular cholesterol efflux more efficiently than apoM-free HDL, while apoM-silencing diminished cellular cholesterol release. We suggest that ABCG1 and apoM are centrally involved in regulation of cholesterol metabolism/turnover at the BBB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) and Its Relationship to Hopelessness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Caroline L.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Numerous existing measures assess attitudes toward suicide yet fail to account for contextual factors. The Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) is presented as an alternative, with implications for the development of prevention programs. Having previously reported exploratory analysis of the TIPS; confirmatory factor analysis and…

  11. Photoreactivity of the occipital cortex measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging-blood oxygenation level dependent in migraine patients and healthy volunteers: pathophysiological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Helena; Sánchez del Río, Margarita; de Silanes, Carlos López; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández, Juan Antonio; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-01-01

    The brain of migraineurs is hyperexcitable, particularly the occipital cortex, which is probably hypersensitive to light. Photophobia or hypersensitivity to light may be accounted for by an increased excitability of trigeminal, the visual pathways, and the occipital cortex. To study light sensitivity and photophobia by assessing the response to light stimuli with functional magnetic resonance imaging-blood oxygenation level dependent (fMRI-BOLD) of the occipital cortex in migraineurs and in controls. Also, to try to decipher the contribution of the occipital cortex to photophobia and whether the cortical reactivity of migraineurs may be part of a constitutional (defensive) mechanism or represents an acquired (sensitization) phenomenon. Nineteen patients with migraine (7 with aura and 12 without aura) and 19 controls were studied with fMRI-BOLD during 4 increasing light intensities. Eight axial image sections of 0.5 cm that covered the occipital cortex were acquired for each intensity. We measured the extension and the intensity of activation for every light stimuli. Photophobia was estimated according to a 0 to 3 semiquantitative scale of light discomfort. Migraineurs had a significantly higher number of fMRI-activated voxels at low (320.4 for migraineurs [SD = 253.9] and 164.3 for controls [SD = 102.7], P = .027) and medium-low luminance levels (501.2 for migraineurs [SD = 279.5] and 331.1 for controls [SD = 194.3], P = .034) but not at medium-high (579.5 for migraineurs [SD = 201.4] and 510.2 for controls [SD = 239.5], P = .410) and high light stimuli (496.2 for migraineurs [SD = 216.2] and 394.7 for controls [SD = 240], P = .210). No differences were found with respect to the voxel activation intensity (amplitude of the BOLD wave) between migraineurs and controls (8.98 [SD = 2.58] vs 7.99 [SD = 2.57], P = .25; 10.82 [SD = 3.27] vs 9.81 [SD = 3.19], P = .31; 11.90 [SD = 3.18] vs 11.06 [SD = 2.56], P = .62; 11.45 [SD = 2.65] vs 10.25 [SD = 2.22], P = .16). Light

  12. Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to their work or home. The availability of plastic bags that can have one or more satellite bags ... in preparing the donated blood. The use of plastic bags allows the blood center to make a variety ...

  13. Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk for blood clots? Do You Know About Thalassemia? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... become hard, sticky, and shaped like a C. Thalassemia Red blood cell disorder that affects hemoglobin. Von ...

  14. Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or prevent blood clots from dissolving properly. Risk factors for excessive blood clotting include Certain genetic disorders Atherosclerosis Diabetes Atrial fibrillation Overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome Some medicines Smoking deep vein ...

  15. Artifical Blood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goorha, Y K; Deb, Prabal; Chatterjee, T; Dhot, P S; Prasad, R S

    2003-01-01

    .... The problems and high cost factor involved in collecting and storing human blood and the pending world-wide shortages are the other driving forces contributing towards the development of blood substitutes...

  16. Artificial Blood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umit Yasar; Pinar Yilgor Huri; Nurten Dikmen

    2012-01-01

    The problems and additional cost factor involved in collecting and storing human blood, as well as the pending worldwide shortages are the main driving forces in the development of blood substitutes...

  17. Blood Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeremiah T; Ferraris, Victor A

    2015-01-01

    Patient blood management requires multi-modality and multidisciplinary collaboration to identify patients who are at increased risk of requiring blood transfusion and therefore decrease exposure to blood products. Transfusion is associated with poor postoperative outcomes, and guidelines exist to minimize transfusion requirements. This review highlights recent studies and efforts to apply patient blood management across disease processes and health care systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Blood Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts and Statistics Printable Version Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts about the blood ... to Top Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Components Whole Blood and Red Blood Cells ...

  19. [Presentation of the Lunar Precursor Robotics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Anthony R.

    2008-01-01

    The Lunar Precursor Robotics Program (LPRP) is the host program for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate's (ESMD) lunar robotic precursor missions to the Moon. The program includes two missions, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), and the Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS). Both missions will provide the required lunar information to support development and operations of those systems required for Human lunar return. LPRP is developing a lunar mapping plan, Called the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project, to create the capability to archive and present all data from LRO, LCROSS, historical lunar missions, and international lunar missions for future mission planning and operations. LPRP is also developing its educational and public outreach activities for the Vision for Space Exploration's first missions. LPRP is working closely with the Science Mission Directorate as their lunar activities come into focus.

  20. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics of edge localized mode precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Z. B., E-mail: guozhipku@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Gwahangno 113, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Lu [SEEE, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang, X. G. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2015-02-15

    A possible origin of edge-localized-mode (ELM) precursors based on nonlinear ideal peeling-ballooning mode is reported. Via nonlinear variational principle, a nonlinear evolution equation of the radial displacement is derived and solved, analytically. Besides an explosive growth in the initial nonlinear phase, it is found that the local displacement evolves into an oscillating state in the developed nonlinear phase. The nonlinear frequency of the ELM precursors scales as ω{sub pre}∼x{sup 1/3}ξ{sup ^}{sub ψ,in}{sup 2/3}n, with x position in radial direction, ξ{sup ^}{sub ψ,in} strength of initial perturbation, and n toroidal mode number.

  1. Functional Nanoporous Polymers from Block Copolymer Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao

    functionalities remains a great challenge due to the limitation of available polymer synthesis and the nanoscale confinement of the porous cavities. The main topic of this thesis is to develop methods for fabrication of functional nanoporous polymers from block copolymer precursors. A method has been developed...... functional nanoporous polymers based on nanoporous 1,2- polybuatdiene 1,2-PB, which is derived from a 1,2-PB-b-PDMS diblock copolymer precursor. As a result, nanoporous 1,2-PB with pores decorated of polyacrylates, sulfonated polymers and poly(ethylene glycol) are created. A method of vapor phase deposition...... has also been generated to obtain nanoporous polymers with functional coatings on pore walls. Vapor phase polymerization of pyrrole is performed to incorporate an ultra thin film of polypyrrole into nanoporous 1,2-PB. The preliminary test shows that nanoporous 1,2-PB gains conductivity. Generally...

  2. Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves.

  3. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  4. Calculations of precursor propagation in dispersive dielectrics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Larry Donald

    2003-08-01

    The present study is a numerical investigation of the propagation of electromagnetic transients in dispersive media. It considers propagation in water using Debye and composite Rocard-Powles-Lorentz models for the complex permittivity. The study addresses this question: For practical transmitted spectra, does precursor propagation provide any features that can be used to advantage over conventional signal propagation in models of dispersive media of interest? A companion experimental study is currently in progress that will attempt to measure the effects studied here.

  5. PRECURSORS OF EARTHQUAKES: VLF SIGNALSIONOSPHERE IONOSPHERE RELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa ULAS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available lot of people have died because of earthquakes every year. Therefore It is crucial to predict the time of the earthquakes reasonable time before it had happed. This paper presents recent information published in the literature about precursors of earthquakes. The relationships between earthquakes and ionosphere are targeted to guide new researches in order to study further to find novel prediction methods.

  6. Precursor lesions of invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreer, Ingrid [Breast Center, University Hospital Kiel, Kiel (Germany)]. E-mail: ischreer@email.uni-kiel.de; Luettges, Jutta [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The increasing application of mammography, mainly in screening programs for the early detection of breast cancer, and the high technical standard of imaging has resulted in the detection of clinically occult breast tumors. Considering that only diagnosis at an early stage will be able to change the prognosis of breast cancer, this diagnostic challenge appears to be the most exciting field in both breast imaging and breast pathology. Especially the precursor lesions need to be diagnosed and defined precisely to understand their prognostic significance. In imaging, the morphologic appearance of precursor lesions is usually neither typical nor pathognomonic. They have to be assessed histologically using percutaneous interventions. Recent molecular studies have demonstrated various genetic alterations in the ductal epithelium, with the earliest onset in atypical ductal hyperplasia. The recent WHO classification, which is based on molecular data and histopathological features, attempts to define in particular the precursor lesions and low grade intraductal carcinomas. The clinical importance of the various grades has to be assessed. Intimate cooperation between diagnostic radiologist and pathologist is essential.

  7. Precursor lesions of invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreer, Ingrid; Lüttges, Jutta

    2005-04-01

    The increasing application of mammography, mainly in screening programs for the early detection of breast cancer, and the high technical standard of imaging has resulted in the detection of clinically occult breast tumors. Considering that only diagnosis at an early stage will be able to change the prognosis of breast cancer, this diagnostic challenge appears to be the most exciting field in both breast imaging and breast pathology. Especially the precursor lesions need to be diagnosed and defined precisely to understand their prognostic significance. In imaging, the morphologic appearance of precursor lesions is usually neither typical nor pathognomonic. They have to be assessed histologically using percutaneous interventions. Recent molecular studies have demonstrated various genetic alterations in the ductal epithelium, with the earliest onset in atypical ductal hyperplasia. The recent WHO classification, which is based on molecular data and histopathological features, attempts to define in particular the precursor lesions and low grade intraductal carcinomas. The clinical importance of the various grades has to be assessed. Intimate cooperation between diagnostic radiologist and pathologist is essential.

  8. Ionospheric precursors for crustal earthquakes in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perrone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Crustal earthquakes with magnitude 6.0>M≥5.5 observed in Italy for the period 1979–2009 including the last one at L'Aquila on 6 April 2009 were considered to check if the earlier obtained relationships for ionospheric precursors for strong Japanese earthquakes are valid for the Italian moderate earthquakes. The ionospheric precursors are based on the observed variations of the sporadic E-layer parameters (h'Es, fbEs and foF2 at the ionospheric station Rome. Empirical dependencies for the seismo-ionospheric disturbances relating the earthquake magnitude and the epicenter distance are obtained and they have been shown to be similar to those obtained earlier for Japanese earthquakes. The dependences indicate the process of spreading the disturbance from the epicenter towards periphery during the earthquake preparation process. Large lead times for the precursor occurrence (up to 34 days for M=5.8–5.9 tells about a prolong preparation period. A possibility of using the obtained relationships for the earthquakes prediction is discussed.

  9. Disinfection byproduct formation from lignin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guanghui; Kim, Junsung; Reckhow, David A

    2014-10-15

    Lignin is the most abundant aromatic plant component in terrestrial ecosystems. This study was conducted to determine the contribution of lignin residues in natural water to the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water. We investigated the formation of different classes of DBPs from lignin model compounds, lignin polymers, and humic substances using two common disinfection techniques, chlorination and chloramination. The contributions of lignin to the overall formation of DBPs from these organic products were determined based on the observed abundances of individual lignin phenols and their DBP yields. Model lignin phenols generally produced higher trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) yields than chloroform and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) during chlorination. Lignin phenols generally produced higher DBP yields but lower percentages of unknown total organic halogen compared to bulk humic substances and lignin polymers. The relative significance of lignin phenols as chlorination DBP precursors generally follows the order of TCAA > DCAA&chloroform. The relative significance of lignin phenols to DBP formation by chloramination follows the order: TCAA > DCAA&DCAN > chloroform. Overall, lignin phenols are more important as TCAA precursors than as chloroform and DCAA precursors.

  10. NASA Accident Precursor Analysis Handbook, Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Frank; Everett, Chris; Hall, Anthony; Insley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    accident precursors by evaluating anomaly occurrences for their system safety implications and, through both analytical and deliberative methods used to project to other circumstances, identifying those that portend more serious consequences to come if effective corrective action is not taken. APA builds upon existing safety analysis processes currently in practice within NASA, leveraging their results to provide an improved understanding of overall system risk. As such, APA represents an important dimension of safety evaluation; as operational experience is acquired, precursor information is generated such that it can be fed back into system safety analyses to risk-inform safety improvements. Importantly, APA utilizes anomaly data to predict risk whereas standard reliability and PRA approaches utilize failure data which often is limited and rare.

  11. Immunoelectrophoresis - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    IEP - serum; Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - blood; Gamma globulin electrophoresis; Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis; Amyloidosis - electrophoresis serum; Multiple myeloma - serum electrophoresis; Waldenström - serum electrophoresis

  12. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  13. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab and Imaging Tests Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts SHARE: Print Glossary Blood cell counts give ... your blood that's occupied by red cells. Normal Blood Counts Normal blood counts fall within a range ...

  14. Blood donation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A blood donation is organised by the Cantonal Hospital of Geneva On Thursday 19 March 2009 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT 2 Number of donations during the last blood donations :135 donors in July 2008 122 donors in November 2008 Let’s do better in 2009 !!! Give 30 minutes of your time to save lives...

  15. Artificial Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Yasar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The problems and additional cost factor involved in collecting and storing human blood, as well as the pending worldwide shortages are the main driving forces in the development of blood substitutes. Studies on artificial blood basically aim to develop oxygen carrying compounds, produce stem cell-based erythrocyte cells in vitro and, implement the functions and movements of natural hemoglobin molecules found in erythrocyte cells through artificial erythrocyte cells. Consequently, major areas of research in artificial blood studies are haemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, perfluorochemicals, respirocytes and stem cells. Even though these artificial erythrocyte cells do not qualify as perfect red blood cell substitutes yet, they have many potential clinical and non clinical uses. Studies are being carried out on the elimination of side effects of blood substitutes and extensive clinical trials are being conducted to test their safety and efficacy. Artificial blood substitutes could only be used clinically for patient management following clinical trials and approvals, and will be the ultimate global solution to the problems associated with donor scarcity, blood collection and transfusion-mediated diseases. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(2.000: 95-108

  16. BLOOD DONATION

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A blood donation, organized by EFS (Etablissement Français du Sang) of Annemasse will take place On Wednesday 12 November 2008, from 8:30 to 16:00, at CERN Restaurant 2 If possible, please, bring your blood group Card.

  17. Blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the same time, the veins carry oxygen-poor blood (shown in blue) from the tissues back toward the heart. From there, it passes to the lungs to receive more oxygen. This cycle repeats itself when oxygen-rich blood returns to the heart from the lungs, which ...

  18. BLOOD DONATION

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A blood donation, organized by EFS (Etablissement Français du Sang) of Annemasse will take place On Wednesday 12 November 2008, from 8:30 to 16:00, at CERN Restaurant 2 If possible, please, bring your blood group Card.

  19. Artificial and Natural Sialic Acid Precursors Influence the Angiogenic Capacity of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian P. Galuska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac represents the most common terminal carbohydrate residue in many mammalian glycoconjugates and is directly involved in a number of different physiological as well as pathological cellular processes. Endogenous sialic acids derive from the biosynthetic precursor molecule N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc. Interestingly, N-acyl-analogues of D-mannosamine (ManN can also be incorporated and converted into corresponding artificial sialic acids by eukaryotic cells. Within this study, we optimized a protocol for the chemical synthesis of various peracetylated ManN derivatives resulting in yields of approximately 100%. Correct molecular structures of the obtained products ManNAc, N-propanoyl-ManN (ManNProp and N-butyl-ManN (ManNBut were verified by GC-, ESI-MS- and NMR-analyses. By applying these substances to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, we could show that each derivative was metabolized to the corresponding N-acylneuraminic acid variant and subsequently incorporated into nascent glycoproteins. To investigate whether natural and/or artificial sialic acid precursors are able to modulate the angiogenic capacity of HUVECs, a spheroid assay was performed. By this means, an increase in total capillary length has been observed when cells incorporated N-butylneuraminic acid (Neu5But into their glycoconjugates. In contrast, the natural precursor ManNAc inhibited the growth of capillaries. Thus, sialic acid precursors may represent useful agents to modulate blood vessel formation.

  20. Tainted blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Ida; Sheikh, Zainab Afshan; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    study of the historical rise and current workings of safety practices in the Danish blood system. Here, we identify a strong focus on contamination in order to avoid 'tainted blood', at the expense of working with risks that could be avoided through enhanced blood monitoring practices. Of further...... significance to this focus are the social dynamics found at the heart of safety practices aimed at avoiding contamination. We argue that such dynamics need more attention, in order to achieve good health outcomes in transfusion medicine. Thus, we conclude that, to ensure continuously safe blood systems, we...... need to move beyond the bifurcation of the social and medical aspects of blood supply as two separate issues and approach social dynamics as key medical safety questions....

  1. The non-Mendelian inheritance of Lewis-c blood group substance, as demonstrated in the case of a Bombay, Le(a-b-c-) saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvas, R S

    1975-01-01

    A Bombay, Le(a-b-) saliva was shown to lack Pneumococcus type XIV activity, an unusual situation, since this sample should be rich in this precursor to the ABO blood group substances. However, the sample was found to contain a new serological specificity, Le-c. It is argued that simple Mendelian inheritance does not occur with Le-c and single gene control cannot be demonstrated. Failure to repress a fetal gene at birth, as implicated by the similarity in structure between Le-c and carcinoembryonic antigen [SIMMONS and PERLMANN], has been excluded as the mechanism of inheritance of this blood group substance, due to the inability to detect carcinoembryonic antigen in the test saliva.

  2. Neutron-powered precursors of kilonovae

    CERN Document Server

    Metzger, Brian D; Goriely, Stephane; Kasen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The merger of binary neutron stars (NSs) ejects a small quantity of neutron rich matter, the radioactive decay of which powers a day to week long thermal transient known as a kilonova. Most of the ejecta remains sufficiently dense during its expansion that all neutrons are captured into nuclei during the r-process. However, recent general relativistic merger simulations by Bauswein and collaborators show that a small fraction of the ejected mass (a few per cent, or ~1e-4 Msun) expands sufficiently rapidly for most neutrons to avoid capture. This matter originates from the shocked-heated interface between the merging NSs. Here we show that the beta-decay of these free neutrons in the outermost ejecta powers a `precursor' to the main kilonova emission, which peaks on a timescale of a few hours following merger at U-band magnitude ~22 (for an assumed distance of 200 Mpc). The high luminosity and blue colors of the neutron precursor render it a potentially important counterpart to the gravitational wave source, t...

  3. Precursors of eruptions at Vesuvius (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandone, Roberto; Giacomelli, Lisetta

    2008-04-01

    The historical record of activity of Mount Vesuvius is uncommonly long and may serve as a guide to understand precursors before the outbreak of new activity. Reposes of different lengths have been observed in the past, with long ones preceding violent explosive eruptions. Eruptions occurring during periods of permanent activity have been preceded by possible deformation of the volcanic edifice and by short duration, earthquake swarms. Otherwise they have occurred without any reported precursors. The renewal of activity after long periods, like the current one, has been preceded by unrest lasting years to weeks, as a new eruption would require connection to the surface of a reservoir at depth ranging between 6 and 4 km. Since 1944, episodic seismic swarms, have occurred with a frequency similar to that of the violent strombolian eruptions during the last period of permanent activity; they are interpreted as intrusions and arrest of magma batches into a reservoir at the same depth of that feeding past sub-plinian eruptions.

  4. Human blood BDCA-1 dendritic cells differentiate into Langerhans-like cells with thymic stromal lymphopoietin and TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cingolani, Carolina; Grandclaudon, Maximilien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Jouve, Mabel; Zollinger, Raphaël; Soumelis, Vassili

    2014-10-09

    The ontogeny of human Langerhans cells (LCs) remains poorly characterized, in particular the nature of LC precursors and the factors that may drive LC differentiation. Here we report that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a keratinocyte-derived cytokine involved in epithelial inflammation, cooperates with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β for the generation of LCs. We show that primary human blood BDCA-1(+), but not BDCA-3(+), dendritic cells (DCs) stimulated with TSLP and TGF-β harbor a typical CD1a(+)Langerin(+) LC phenotype. Electron microscopy established the presence of Birbeck granules, an intracellular organelle specific to LCs. LC differentiation was not observed from tonsil BDCA-1(+) and BDCA-3(+) subsets. TSLP + TGF-β LCs had a mature phenotype with high surface levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40. They induced a potent CD4(+) T-helper (Th) cell expansion and differentiation into Th2 cells with increased production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 compared with CD34-derived LCs. Our findings establish a novel LC differentiation pathway from BDCA-1(+) blood DCs with potential implications in epithelial inflammation. Therapeutic targeting of TSLP may interfere with tissue LC repopulation from circulating precursors.

  5. What Happens to Donated Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... week. Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Components Whole Blood and Red Blood Cells Platelets Plasma ... About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Types Blood Components What Happens to Donated Blood Blood and Diversity ...

  6. Precursor Mediated Synthesis of Nanostructured Silicas: From Precursor-Surfactant Ion Pairs to Structured Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hesemann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanostructured anionic-surfactant-templated mesoporous silica (AMS recently appeared as a new strategy for the formation of nanostructured silica based materials. This method is based on the use of anionic surfactants together with a co-structure-directing agent (CSDA, mostly a silylated ammonium precursor. The presence of this CSDA is necessary in order to create ionic interactions between template and silica forming phases and to ensure sufficient affinity between the two phases. This synthetic strategy was for the first time applied in view of the synthesis of surface functionalized silica bearing ammonium groups and was then extended on the formation of materials functionalized with anionic carboxylate and bifunctional amine-carboxylate groups. In the field of silica hybrid materials, the “anionic templating” strategy has recently been applied for the synthesis of silica hybrid materials from cationic precursors. Starting from di- or oligosilylated imidazolium and ammonium precursors, only template directed hydrolysis-polycondensation reactions involving complementary anionic surfactants allowed accessing structured ionosilica hybrid materials. The mechanistic particularity of this approach resides in the formation of precursor-surfactant ion pairs in the hydrolysis-polycondensation mixture. This review gives a systematic overview over the various types of materials accessed from this cooperative ionic templating approach and highlights the high potential of this original strategy for the formation of nanostructured silica based materials which appears as a complementary strategy to conventional soft templating approaches.

  7. Identification of the Main Intermediate Precursor of l-Ergothioneine Biosynthesis in Human Biological Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Sotgia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A capillary electrophoresis coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (CE–MS/MS has been used to make a qualitative determination of hercynine—the main precursor of l-ergothioneine biosynthesis—in some key human biological specimens, such as urine, whole blood, plasma, and saliva. From semiquantitative analysis results, the highest concentrations of hercynine were detected in saliva and whole blood, whereas much lower concentrations were measured in urine and plasma. Whole blood was the biological matrix with the highest concentration of l-ergothioneine followed by plasma, saliva, and urine. The antioxidant effects attributed to l-ergothioneine, along with its peculiar antioxidant mechanism, offer a possible explanation for the presence of the hercynine, as well as its concentration, in the considered biological matrices.

  8. [Transient cerebral ischemia--precursors of stroke. Can warning signs be recognized?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberl, R L

    2003-02-13

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are neurological deficits of sudden onset and equally sudden reversal. They are considered to be precursors of stroke that (still) have a good prognosis. Since the symptoms have usually disappeared by the time of the first examination the physician must rely on the information provided by the patient or relatives for the medical history. Symptoms to look for include disordered speech, aphasia, vertigo, unilateral arm paralysis, crooked mouth. When a TIA is suspected, the following examinations are mandatory: neurological ultrasound, blood pressure, ECG, laboratory examinations (blood sugar, blood count, hematocrit), CT or MRI, Doppler-ultrasonography of the carotids and, where indicated, transcranial Doppler. Long-term prophylaxis with platelet antiaggregation agents or Marcumar (phenprocoumon) and appropriate changes in lifestyle are indicated for all TIA patients. When the indication is established, thrombarterectomy must be carried out within six months after the event.

  9. Rapid appearance of resolvin precursors in inflammatory exudates: novel mechanisms in resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Kie; Yang, Rong; Porter, Timothy F; Agrawal, Nitin; Petasis, Nicos A; Irimia, Daniel; Toner, Mehmet; Serhan, Charles N

    2008-12-15

    Resolution of inflammation is essential. Although supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids is widely used, their availability at sites of inflammation is not known. To this end, a multidisciplinary approach was taken to determine the relationship of circulating omega-3 to inflammatory exudates and the generation of resolution signals. In this study, we monitored resolvin precursors in evolving exudates, which initially paralleled increases in edema and infiltrating neutrophils. We also prepared novel microfluidic chambers to capture neutrophils from a drop of blood within minutes that permitted single-cell monitoring. In these, docosahexaenoic acid-derived resolvin D1 rapidly stopped neutrophil migration, whereas precursor docosahexaenoic acid did not. In second organ injury via ischemia-reperfusion, resolvin metabolically stable analogues were potent organ protectors reducing neutrophils. Together, these results indicate that circulating omega-3 fatty acids rapidly appear in inflammatory sites that require conversion to resolvins that control excessive neutrophil infiltration, protect organs, and foster resolution.

  10. Rapid Appearance of Resolvin Precursors in Inflammatory Exudates: Novel Mechanisms in Resolution*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Kie; Yang, Rong; Porter, Timothy F.; Agrawal, Nitin; Petasis, Nicos A.; Irimia, Daniel; Toner, Mehmet; Serhan, Charles N.

    2009-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is essential. While supplementation of ω-3 fatty acids is widely used, their availability at sites of inflammation is not known. To this end, a multidisciplinary approach was taken to determine the relationship of circulating ω-3 to inflammatory exudates and the generation of resolution signals. Here, we monitored resolvin precursors in evolving exudates, which initially paralleled increases in edema and infiltrating neutrophils. We also prepared novel microfluidic chambers to capture neutrophils from a drop of blood within minutes that permitted single cell monitoring. In these, DHA-derived Resolvin D1 rapidly stopped neutrophil migration while precursor DHA did not. In second organ injury via ischemia-reperfusion, resolvin metabolically stable analogs were potent organ protectors reducing neutrophils. Together, these results indicate that circulating ω-3 fatty acids rapidly appear in inflammatory sites that require conversion to resolvins that control excessive neutrophil infiltration, protect organs, and foster resolution. PMID:19050288

  11. Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with blood disorders. Magnitude of the Problem Complications from deep vein thrombosis (DVT) kill more people each year than breast cancer, motor vehicle accidents, and HIV combined. Sickle cell trait ...

  12. Blood Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anemia such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia Bleeding during or after surgery Injury or trauma Excessive blood loss Cancer and the effects of chemotherapy Bleeding disorders such as hemophilia Testing is ordered when ...

  13. What's Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rh" because scientists found it while studying Rhesus monkeys. If your blood is positive, you have this ... doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  14. Artificial blood.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    #Blood substitutes have been developed for almost a century. The various type of artificial blood was continuously available on the market. The theme of this report is to identify the best substitute in emergency situation for some patients and science students. The definition of best is given; thus, as the vital part of the report, the comparison between them is described and discussed. Modified hemoglobin, bovine-based hemoglobin and PFCs are three basic types. In terms of the perfor...

  15. Artifical Blood

    OpenAIRE

    GOORHA, YK; Deb, Prabal; Chatterjee, T; Dhot, PS; Prasad, RS

    2003-01-01

    Elimination of unwanted side-effects, especially transfusion-transmitted diseases (HIV and hepatitis) and leucocyte-mediated allosensitisation, is an important goal of modern transfusion medicine. The problems and high cost factor involved in collecting and storing human blood and the pending world-wide shortages are the other driving forces contributing towards the development of blood substitutes. Two major areas of research in this endeavour are haemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) an...

  16. Ancient engineers' inventions precursors of the present

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Cesare

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the inventions and designs of ancient engineers who are the precursors of the present. The period ranges mainly from 300 B.C. to 1600 A.D. with several exceptions. Many of the oldest inventions are documented by archaeological finds, often very little known, mainly from Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae and reveal a surprising modernity in their conception. Most of the inventions presented in the first four parts of the book were conceived up to the late Roman Empire and may be considered as milestones, each in their respective field. The fifth part concentrates on more recent centuries. The sixth part deals with some building construction techniques. Generally, for each of the presented inventions, three elements of research and reference are provided: written documents (the classics), iconic references (coins, bas-reliefs, etc.) and archaeological findings. The authors did not write this book for engineers only; hence they describe all the devices without assuming wide technical knowledge...

  17. Mars MetNet Precursor Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Guerrero, H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Vazquez, L.; Haukka, H.

    2013-09-01

    We are developing a new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor [1] mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide significant insights in to the Martian atmospheric behavior. The key technologies of the MetNet Lander have been qualified and the electrical qualification model (EQM) of the payload bay has been built and successfully tested.

  18. Naphthalene and its precursors in Iomex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, S.D.; Sharma, B.K. [Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India)

    1995-05-01

    Iomex, an aromatic rich concentrate from kerosene feedstock is a potential source for production of naphthalene which has a variety of industrial applications. Four analytical procedures were standardized for compositional study of iomex according to chemical class. Hydrocarbon group type separation (saturates, mono- and diaromatics) and quantitation was reported using column chromatography, gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Data generated by these techniques are in good agreement with each other. A diaromatic fraction containing naphthalene and its precursors was studied in detail by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Capillary GC could resolve each and every component of the diaromatic fraction, whereas quantitation and characterization of 27 components were obtained by mass spectrometry. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The intramolecular click reaction using 'carbocontiguous' precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pravin C; Luzzio, Frederick A

    2017-07-20

    The synthesis and utilization of all carbon-chain 'carbocontiguous' azidoalkynyl precursors for an intramolecular click reaction is described. The substrates contain both azidoalkyl and ethynylmethyl groups which are conjoined by a 2-(phenylsulfonylmethyl)-4,5-diphenyloxazole lynchpin and are suitably disposed for ring closure. On promotion by copper salts, a number of cyclic click products having the 1,4-disubstituted endo-fused triazole component and the 4,5-diphenyloxazole component are obtained. In one case, removal of the phenylsulfonylmethyl group from the substrate prior to cyclization gave the 1,5-disubstituted exo-fused triazole. The utilization of CuSO4/sodium ascorbate system appears to be the optimal conditions for closure/cyclization and afforded the cyclized products in yields of 84-95%.

  20. Nanomechanics controls neuronal precursors adhesion and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Elisa; Ban, Jelena; Grenci, Gianluca; Andolfi, Laura; Pozzato, Alessandro; Tormen, Massimo; Torre, Vincent; Lazzarino, Marco

    2013-08-01

    The ability to control the differentiation of stem cells into specific neuronal types has a tremendous potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In vitro neuronal differentiation can be guided by the interplay of biochemical and biophysical cues. Different strategies to increase the differentiation yield have been proposed, focusing everything on substrate topography, or, alternatively on substrate stiffness. Both strategies demonstrated an improvement of the cellular response. However it was often impossible to separate the topographical and the mechanical contributions. Here we investigate the role of the mechanical properties of nanostructured substrates, aiming at understanding the ultimate parameters which govern the stem cell differentiation. To this purpose a set of different substrates with controlled stiffness and with or without nanopatterning are used for stem cell differentiation. Our results show that the neuronal differentiation yield depends mainly on the substrate mechanical properties while the geometry plays a minor role. In particular nanostructured and flat polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with comparable stiffness show the same neuronal yield. The improvement in the differentiation yield obtained through surface nanopatterning in the submicrometer scale could be explained as a consequence of a substrate softening effect. Finally we investigate by single cell force spectroscopy the neuronal precursor adhesion on the substrate immediately after seeding, as a possible critical step governing the neuronal differentiation efficiency. We observed that neuronal precursor adhesion depends on substrate stiffness but not on surface structure, and in particular it is higher on softer substrates. Our results suggest that cell-substrate adhesion forces and mechanical response are the key parameters to be considered for substrate design in neuronal regenerative medicine.

  1. Sorting by the cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein binding receptor SorLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten S; Gustafsen, Camilla; Madsen, Peder

    2007-01-01

    -formation with the amyloid precursor protein it downregulates generation of Alzheimer's disease-associated Abeta-peptide. The receptor is mainly located in vesicles, suggesting a function in protein sorting and transport. Here we examined SorLA's trafficking using full-length and chimeric receptors and find that its...... established that the AP-1 adaptor complex is essential to SorLA's transport between Golgi membranes and endosomes. Our results further implicate the GGA proteins in SorLA trafficking and provide evidence that SNX1 and Vps35, as parts of the retromer complex or possibly in a separate context, are engaged...

  2. Production and Peripheral Roles of 5-HTP, a Precursor of Serotonin

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuhiro Nakamura; Hiroyuki Hasegawa

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological functions. Multiple steps of enzyme reactions enable biosynthesis of 5-HT. The first and rate-limiting step of the reaction is the synthesis of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) from L-tryptophan. This step is dictated by an enzyme, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). TPH requires 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) as a co-substrate of TPH. 5-HTP has been simply regarded as a precursor...

  3. The crustal micro-deformation anomaly and the credible precursor*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雁滨; 蒋骏; 钱家栋; 陈京; 和升棋; 张燕; 和平

    2002-01-01

    @@ What is a credible seismic precursor in observation of deformation A real seismic precursor ought to be resulted from the variations in the earth strain and stress. The deformation observation can provide the information during earthquake gestation and occurrence period for us. Usually the seismic precursors can be divided into field and epicentral region precursors. The precursor information is very useful for seismic prediction from epicentral region or near epicentral region. Micro-deformation observation mainly includes tilt, strain and gravity observation. Compared with GPS, geodesy and mobile deformation observation, micro-deformation (tilt, strain) shows the change of deformation which is continual in a limited volume with dominant observed range of 10(6~10(10 m. Because the variation of the crustal nature and cracking can be directly obtained by micro-deformation observation, it is an effective way to find middle-short term and short-term precursor.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of TaN ALD Precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Delong Zhang; Tracy Yund; Cynthia A.Hoover

    2004-01-01

    High purity organic-tantalum precursors for thin film ALD TaN were synthesized and characterized.Vapor pressure and thermal stability of these precursors were studied.From the vapor pressure analysis,it was found that TBTEMT has a higher vapor pressure than any other published liquid TaN precursor,including TBTDET,TAITMATA,and IPTDET.Thermal stability of the alkyl groups on the precursors was investigated using a 1H NMR technique.The results indicated that the tertbutylimino group is the most stable group on TBTDET and TBTEMT as compared to the dialkylamido groups.Thermal stability of TaN precursors decreased in the following order:TBTDET > PDMAT > TBTEMT.In conclusion,precursor vapor pressure and thermal stability were tuned by making slight variations in the ligand sphere around the metal center.

  5. Lessons learned on probabilistic methodology for precursor analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babst, Siegfried [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Berlin (Germany); Wielenberg, Andreas; Gaenssmantel, Gerhard [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Based on its experience in precursor assessment of operating experience from German NPP and related international activities in the field, GRS has identified areas for enhancing probabilistic methodology. These are related to improving the completeness of PSA models, to insufficiencies in probabilistic assessment approaches, and to enhancements of precursor assessment methods. Three examples from the recent practice in precursor assessments illustrating relevant methodological insights are provided and discussed in more detail. Our experience reinforces the importance of having full scope, current PSA models up to Level 2 PSA and including hazard scenarios for precursor analysis. Our lessons learned include that PSA models should be regularly updated regarding CCF data and inclusion of newly discovered CCF mechanisms or groups. Moreover, precursor classification schemes should be extended to degradations and unavailabilities of the containment function. Finally, PSA and precursor assessments should put more emphasis on the consideration of passive provisions for safety, e. g. by sensitivity cases.

  6. Blood Type Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood > Blood Donor Community > Games > Blood Type Game Blood Type Game This feature requires version 6 or later ... many points as possible by matching the appropriate blood type of a donor to the blood type of ...

  7. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ... Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood Clots ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ... Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood Clots ...

  9. Blood (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood A A A What's ... about the mysterious, life-sustaining fluid called blood. Blood Basics Two types of blood vessels carry blood ...

  10. Catecholamine blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norepinephrine -- blood; Epinephrine -- blood; Adrenalin -- blood; Dopamine -- blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... the test. This is especially true if both blood and urine catecholamines are to be measured. You ...

  11. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching ... one or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use. NIH: ...

  12. Biology of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here for the Professional Version Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Resources In This ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  13. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Clots and Travel Blood Clotting and ... Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood Clots ...

  14. DSC Study on the Polyacrylonitrile Precursors for Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wangxi ZHANG; Musen LI

    2005-01-01

    Different polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor fibers that displayed various thermal properties were studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results showed that some commercial PAN precursor fibers displayed double separated peaks and these fibers were of high quality because of their process stability during their conversion to carbon fibers of high performance. Some fabrication processes, such as spinning, drawing, could not apparently change the DSC features of a PAN precursor fiber. It was concluded that the thermal properties of a PAN precursor fiber was mainly determined from its comonomer content type and compositions.

  15. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manceur, Aziza P. [Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Tseng, Michael [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Pathophysiology, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Holowacz, Tamara [Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Witterick, Ian [Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Weksberg, Rosanna [Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Program in Genetics and Genomic Biology, Toronto, Ontario Canada (Canada); McCurdy, Richard D. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute, Program in Genetics and Genomic Biology, Toronto, Ontario Canada (Canada); Warsh, Jerry J. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Pathophysiology, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Audet, Julie, E-mail: julie.audet@utoronto.ca [Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. Managing your blood sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperglycemia - control; Hypoglycemia - control; Diabetes - blood sugar control; Blood glucose - managing ... Know how to: Recognize and treat low blood sugar ( hypoglycemia ) Recognize and treat high blood sugar ( hyperglycemia ) ...

  17. Development of an accident sequence precursor methodology and its application to significant accident precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seung Hyun; Park, Sung Hyun; Jae, Moo Sung [Dept. of of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The systematic management of plant risk is crucial for enhancing the safety of nuclear power plants and for designing new nuclear power plants. Accident sequence precursor (ASP) analysis may be able to provide risk significance of operational experience by using probabilistic risk assessment to evaluate an operational event quantitatively in terms of its impact on core damage. In this study, an ASP methodology for two operation mode, full power and low power/shutdown operation, has been developed and applied to significant accident precursors that may occur during the operation of nuclear power plants. Two operational events, loss of feedwater and steam generator tube rupture, are identified as ASPs. Therefore, the ASP methodology developed in this study may contribute to identifying plant risk significance as well as to enhancing the safety of nuclear power plants by applying this methodology systematically.

  18. Eruption precursors: Manifestations and strategies for detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael; Pritchard, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    The past several decades have seen a rapid increase in volcano monitoring and modeling capabilities. Diverse arrays of instrument networks can detect a variety of pre-, co-, and post-eruptive phenomena, and remote sensing observations are available across a range of spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions. A growing class of models, based on the physics of magmatic systems, are making use of these expanding datastreams, providing probabilistic assessments of such parameters as magma supply, volatile content, and eruption duration. To what extent, however, do these developments heighten our ability to identify eruption precursors? The advent of better data and new models provides an opportunity to reexamine our understanding of pre-eruption unrest, as well as our ability to detect and recognize it as such. An idealized model of the buildup to a volcanic eruption might include magma ascent from a deep source region and accumulation in the mid- to upper crust in the preceding months to years. The process might be manifested by surface inflation and deep long-period earthquakes, and accompanied by an increase in CO2 emissions. As magma continues to accumulate, distal volcano-tectonic earthquakes may result as stress builds on nearby faults, H2S emissions may increase as sulfur in a shallow reservoir is hydrolyzed by groundwater, and fumarole and spring temperatures may increase and show changes in chemistry. In the days to hours before an eruption, sudden changes in the rate and style of earthquakes (including repeating earthquakes and tremor) and deformation may occur as the magma reservoir ruptures and magma moves laterally or vertically. Phreatic eruptions might result as ascending magma comes into contact with groundwater, and SO2 emissions might increase as the path between the magma and surface dries out. How often does such a sequence actually occur? Relatively few volcanoes are comprehensively monitored prior to obvious expressions of unrest, so this is not

  19. TLR Stimulation of Bone Marrow Lymphoid Precursors from Childhood Acute Leukemia Modifies Their Differentiation Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Dorantes-Acosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are the most frequent childhood malignancies worldwide and remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of relapsed patients. While remarkable progress has been made in characterizing genetic aberrations that may control these hematological disorders, it has also become clear that abnormalities in the bone marrow microenvironment might hit precursor cells and contribute to disease. However, responses of leukemic precursor cells to inflammatory conditions or microbial components upon infection are yet unexplored. Our previous work and increasing evidence indicate that Toll-like receptors (TLRs in the earliest stages of lymphoid development in mice and humans provide an important mechanism for producing cells of the innate immune system. Using highly controlled co-culture systems, we now show that lymphoid precursors from leukemic bone marrow express TLRs and respond to their ligation by changing cell differentiation patterns. While no apparent contribution of TLR signals to tumor progression was recorded for any of the investigated diseases, the replenishment of innate cells was consistently promoted upon in vitro TLR exposure, suggesting that early recognition of pathogen-associated molecules might be implicated in the regulation of hematopoietic cell fate decisions in childhood acute leukemia.

  20. Blood Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of ASH ASH Meeting on Hematologic Malignancies Consultative Hematology Course ASH Meeting on Lymphoma Biology ASH Workshop on Genome Editing Publications Blood The Hematologist ASH Clinical News ASH Self-Assessment Program Hematology , ASH Education Program About Awards Membership ASH Foundation ...

  1. Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of ASH ASH Meeting on Hematologic Malignancies Consultative Hematology Course ASH Meeting on Lymphoma Biology ASH Workshop on Genome Editing Publications Blood The Hematologist ASH Clinical News ASH Self-Assessment Program Hematology , ASH Education Program About Awards Membership ASH Foundation ...

  2. Pair Fireball Precursors of Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Metzger, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    If at least one neutron star (NS) is magnetized in a binary NS merger, then the orbital motion of the conducting companion through its dipole field during the final inspiral induces a strong voltage and current along the magnetic field lines connecting the two objects. If a modest fraction eta of the electromagnetic power extracted during the inspiral is used to accelerate relativistic particles, the resulting gamma-ray emission in such a compact volume will result in the formation of a thermal electron-positron pair fireball. Applying the steady-state pair wind model of Paczynski (1986), we quantify the luminosities and temperatures of the precursor fireball and its detectability with gamma-ray satellites. Under the assumption that eta ~ 1, the gamma-ray detection horizon of Dmax ~ 20(Bd/1e14 G) is much closer than the Advanced LIGO/Virgo horizon of 200 Mpc, unless the surface magnetic field of the NS is very strong, Bd > 1e15 G. Given the quasi-isotropic nature of the emission, a sub-population of mergers w...

  3. Kaolin Geopolymer as Precursor to Ceramic Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Nur Ain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduced the potential application of kaolin geopolymer as ceramic precursor. This is one of the alternatives to produce high strength ceramic at a slightly lower temperature. Upon sintering the conversion of geopolymer to ceramic occur. The kaolin used were characterized using XRF and has plate-like structure upon investigating through microstructural analysis. Geopolymer mixture is produced using 12 M NaOH molarity with the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 0.24. The sintering temperature used were ranging from 900 °C to 1200 °C. The flexural strength showed the highest value of 88.47 MPa when sintered at 1200 °C. The combination of geopolymerization and sintering has attributed to the strength increment as temperature increased. The density is observed to increase with increasing sintering temperature due to the appearance of the close pores in the structure. Sintering of the geopolymer resulted in the formation of liquid phase, which enables the joining of particles to produce dense microstructure.

  4. Pair fireball precursors of neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Zivancev, Charles

    2016-10-01

    If at least one neutron star (NS) is magnetized in a binary NS merger, then the orbital motion of the conducting companion during the final inspiral induces a strong voltage and current along the magnetic field lines connecting the NSs. If a modest fraction η of the extracted electromagnetic power extracted accelerates relativistic particles, the resulting gamma-ray emission a compact volume will result in the formation of an electron-positron pair fireball. Applying a steady-state pair wind model, we quantify the detectability of the precursor fireball with gamma-ray satellites. For η ˜ 1 the gamma-ray detection horizon of Dmax ≈ 10(Bd/1014 G)3/4 Mpc is much closer than the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/Virgo horizon of 200 Mpc, unless the NS surface magnetic field strength is very large, B_d ≲ 10^{15} G. Given the quasi-isotropic nature of the emission, mergers with weaker NS fields could contribute a nearby population of short gamma-ray bursts. Power not dissipated close to the binary is carried to infinity along the open field lines by a large-scale Poynting flux. Reconnection within this outflow, well outside of the pair photosphere, provides a potential site for non-thermal emission, such as a coherent millisecond radio burst.

  5. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection.

  6. Formation of biomolecule precursors in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geppert, W D [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Vigren, E [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Hamberg, M [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Zhaunerchyk, V [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Thomas, R D [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Kaminska, M [Institute of Physics, Swieetokrzyska Academy, ul. Swieokrzyska 15, PL-25406, Kielce (Poland); Millar, T J [Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Semaniak, J [Institute of Physics, Swieetokrzyska Academy, ul. Swieokrzyska 15, PL-25406, Kielce (Poland); Roberts, H [Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hellberg, F [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Oesterdahl, F [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Ehlerding, A [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Larsson, M [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova, Roslagstullbacken 21, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-11-15

    Alcohols and nitriles not only play an important role as templates for synthesis of larger molecules in the interstellar medium and planetary atmospheres, but they can also be regarded as precursors for biomolecules. Alcohols can form carbohydrates through reaction with HCO and nitriles can be hydrolysed to amino acids in aqueous solutions, which is the final step of the well-known Strecker synthesis. Therefore the question of the pathways of formation of alcohols and nitriles and the efficiency and the product distribution of their subsequent degradation reactions in the above-mentioned astrophysical environments is of great interest. In both processes dissociative recombination reactions of protonated nitriles and alcohols may play a major role and are included in models of interstellar clouds and planetary atmospheres. However, the reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios for the majority of these processes are so far still unknown, which adversely affects the quality of predictions of model calculations. In this Contribution, we therefore present branching ratios and rate constants of the dissociative recombination of protonated methanol (CH{sub 3}OH{sub 2}), as well as protonated acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CNH{sup +}), acrylonitrile (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}CNH{sup +}) and cyanoacetylene (HC{sup 3}NH{sup +}). The impact of the obtained new data on model calculations of abundances of important interstellar molecules in dark clouds is discussed.

  7. Biodegradable mesoporous delivery system for biomineralization precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-ye; Niu, Li-na; Sun, Jin-long; Huang, Xue-qing; Pei, Dan-dan; Huang, Cui; Tay, Franklin R

    2017-01-01

    Scaffold supplements such as nanoparticles, components of the extracellular matrix, or growth factors have been incorporated in conventional scaffold materials to produce smart scaffolds for tissue engineering of damaged hard tissues. Due to increasing concerns on the clinical side effects of using large doses of recombinant bone-morphogenetic protein-2 in bone surgery, it is desirable to develop an alternative nanoscale scaffold supplement that is not only osteoinductive, but is also multifunctional in that it can perform other significant bone regenerative roles apart from stimulation of osteogenic differentiation. Because both amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and silica are osteoinductive, a biodegradable, nonfunctionalized, expanded-pore mesoporous silica nanoparticle carrier was developed for loading, storage, and sustained release of a novel, biosilicification-inspired, polyamine-stabilized liquid precursor phase of ACP for collagen biomineralization and for release of orthosilicic acid, both of which are conducive to bone growth. Positively charged poly(allylamine)-stabilized ACP (PAH-ACP) could be effectively loaded and released from nonfunctionalized expanded-pore mesoporous silica nanoparticles (pMSN). The PAH-ACP released from loaded pMSN still retained its ability to infiltrate and mineralize collagen fibrils. Complete degradation of pMSN occurred following unloading of their PAH-ACP cargo. Because PAH-ACP loaded pMSN possesses relatively low cytotoxicity to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, these nanoparticles may be blended with any osteoconductive scaffold with macro- and microporosities as a versatile scaffold supplement to enhance bone regeneration. PMID:28182119

  8. Bone formation on synthetic precursors of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, O; Nakamura, M; Miyasaka, Y; Kagayama, M; Sakurai, M

    1991-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reaction of skeletal tissue to various synthetic calcium phosphate (Ca-P) compounds in vivo. Five synthetic Ca-P compounds were implanted into the subperiosteal area of the calvaria of 7-week-old BALB/c mice for one to 15 weeks. Synthetic compounds were dicalcium phosphate (DCP), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatile (HA). Implanted DCP, OCP and ACP were found to be converted to apatitic phase by x-ray microdiffraction analysis using undecalcified specimens. Structure of bone was found out on all of Ca-P compounds eventually at late stage under the light microscope, but the rate of bone formation calculated from a number of experiments varied on respective synthetic Ca-P compound. It was high as 80% for DCP, OCP and ACP, but was low as 5.6% for Ca-deficient HA, and no reaction was found for HA at the stage of 3 weeks. Fine filaments and granular materials in the newly formed bone matrix were detected at 7 days around the remnants of OCP particles which already converted to apatitic phase by ultrastructural study of decalcified specimens. These structures were very similar to the components of bone nodules seen in intramembranous osteogenesis. It is postulated that the precursors of HA have an important role in intramembranous osteogenesis.

  9. Robotic Precursor Missions for Mars Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Pirjanian, Paolo; Schenker, Paul S.; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Das, Hari; Joshi, Sajay

    2000-07-01

    Infrastructure support for robotic colonies, manned Mars habitat, and/or robotic exploration of planetary surfaces will need to rely on the field deployment of multiple robust robots. This support includes such tasks as the deployment and servicing of power systems and ISRU generators, construction of beaconed roadways, and the site preparation and deployment of manned habitat modules. The current level of autonomy of planetary rovers such as Sojourner will need to be greatly enhanced for these types of operations. In addition, single robotic platforms will not be capable of complicated construction scenarios. Precursor robotic missions to Mars that involve teams of multiple cooperating robots to accomplish some of these tasks is a cost effective solution to the possible long timeline necessary for the deployment of a manned habitat. Ongoing work at JPL under the Mars Outpost Program in the area of robot colonies is investigating many of the technology developments necessary for such an ambitious undertaking. Some of the issues that are being addressed include behavior-based control systems for multiple cooperating robots (CAMPOUT), development of autonomous robotic systems for the rescue/repair of trapped or disabled robots, and the design and development of robotic platforms for construction tasks such as material transport and surface clearing.

  10. Formation of biomolecule precursors in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, W. D.; Vigren, E.; Hamberg, M.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Thomas, R. D.; Kamińska, M.; Millar, T. J.; Semaniak, J.; Roberts, H.; Hellberg, F.; Österdahl, F.; Ehlerding, A.; Larsson, M.

    2007-11-01

    Alcohols and nitriles not only play an important role as templates for synthesis of larger molecules in the interstellar medium and planetary atmospheres, but they can also be regarded as precursors for biomolecules. Alcohols can form carbohydrates through reaction with HCO and nitriles can be hydrolysed to amino acids in aqueous solutions, which is the final step of the well-known Strecker synthesis. Therefore the question of the pathways of formation of alcohols and nitriles and the efficiency and the product distribution of their subsequent degradation reactions in the above-mentioned astrophysical environments is of great interest. In both processes dissociative recombination reactions of protonated nitriles and alcohols may play a major role and are included in models of interstellar clouds and planetary atmospheres. However, the reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios for the majority of these processes are so far still unknown, which adversely affects the quality of predictions of model calculations. In this Contribution, we therefore present branching ratios and rate constants of the dissociative recombination of protonated methanol (CH3OH2), as well as protonated acetonitrile (CH3CNH+), acrylonitrile (C2H3CNH+) and cyanoacetylene (HC3NH+). The impact of the obtained new data on model calculations of abundances of important interstellar molecules in dark clouds is discussed.

  11. Precursors to suicidality and violence on antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bielefeldt, Andreas Ø; Danborg, Pia B; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the risk of suicidality and violence when selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are given to adult healthy volunteers with no signs of a mental disorder. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Harms related to suici......OBJECTIVE: To quantify the risk of suicidality and violence when selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are given to adult healthy volunteers with no signs of a mental disorder. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Harms related...... to suicidality, hostility, activation events, psychotic events and mood disturbances. SETTING: Published trials identified by searching PubMed and Embase and clinical study reports obtained from the European and UK drug regulators. PARTICIPANTS: Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in adult healthy volunteers...... that reported on suicidality or violence or precursor events to suicidality or violence. RESULTS: A total of 5787 publications were screened and 130 trials fulfilled our inclusion criteria. The trials were generally uninformative; 97 trials did not report the randomisation method, 75 trials did not report any...

  12. Bacterial Cellular Materials as Precursors of Chloroform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Ng, T.; Zhang, Q.; Chow, A. T.; Wong, P.

    2011-12-01

    The environmental sources of chloroform and other halocarbons have been intensively investigated because their effects of stratospheric ozone destruction and environmental toxicity. It has been demonstrated that microorganisms could facilitate the biotic generation of chloroform from natural organic matters in soil, but whether the cellular materials itself also serves as an important precursor due to photo-disinfection is poorly known. Herein, seven common pure bacterial cultures (Acinetobacter junii, Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus substilis, Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus sciuri) were chlorinated to evaluate the yields of chloroform, dibromochloromethane, dichlorobromomethane, and bromoform. The effects of bromide on these chemical productions and speciations were also investigated. Results showed that, on average, 5.64-36.42 μg-chloroform /mg-C were generated during the bacterial chlorination, in similar order of magnitude to that generated by humic acid (previously reported as 78 μg-chloroform/mg-C). However, unlike humic acid in water chlorination, chloroform concentration did not simply increase with the total organic carbon in water mixture. In the presence of bromide, the yield of brominated species responded linearly to the bromide concentration. This study provides useful information to understand the contributions of chloroform from photodisinfection processes in coastal environments.

  13. Comparison studies of ozone precursors in Phoenix, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Guyton, J.; Lee, C.P. [Arizona Dept. of Environmental Quality, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Parmar, S. [Atmospheric Analysis and Consulting Co., Ventura, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper will present the comparison of the ozone precursors monitoring program for Phoenix, Arizona during 1992 and 1993. Specific details and methodologies will be presented involving collection of air samples and analysis of speciated measurements for reactive VOC and carbonyl precursors responsible for ozone formation. Quality control and quality assurance techniques will also be discussed.

  14. The electromagnetic Brillouin precursor in one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitham, R.; Hoenders, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    We have calculated the electromagnetic Brillouin precursor that arises in a one-dimensional photonic crystal that consists of two homogeneous slabs which each have a single electron resonance. This forerunner is compared with the Brillouin precursor that arises in a homogeneous double-electron reson

  15. The electromagnetic Brillouin precursor in one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitham, R.; Hoenders, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    We have calculated the electromagnetic Brillouin precursor that arises in a one-dimensional photonic crystal that consists of two homogeneous slabs which each have a single electron resonance. This forerunner is compared with the Brillouin precursor that arises in a homogeneous double-electron

  16. Classifying the tropospheric precursor patterns of sudden stratospheric warmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ming; Tan, Xin; Hartmann, Dennis L.; Ceppi, Paulo

    2017-08-01

    Classifying the tropospheric precursor patterns of sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) may provide insight into the different physical mechanisms of SSWs. Based on 37 major SSWs during the 1958-2014 winters in the ERA reanalysis data sets, the self-organizing maps method is used to classify the tropospheric precursor patterns of SSWs. The cluster analysis indicates that one of the precursor patterns appears as a mixed pattern consisting of the negative-signed Western Hemisphere circulation pattern and the positive phase of the Pacific-North America pattern. The mixed pattern exhibits higher statistical significance as a precursor pattern of SSWs than other previously identified precursors such as the subpolar North Pacific low, Atlantic blocking, and the western Pacific pattern. Other clusters confirm northern European blocking and Gulf of Alaska blocking as precursors of SSWs. Linear interference with the climatological planetary waves provides a simple interpretation for the precursors. The relationship between the classified precursor patterns of SSWs and ENSO phases as well as the types of SSWs is discussed.

  17. Topographical and Functional Properties of Precursors to Severe Problem Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmie, Tara A.; Iwata, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    A literature search identified 17 articles reporting data on 34 subjects who engaged in precursors to severe problem behavior, which we examined to identify topographical and functional characteristics. Unintelligible vocalization was the most common precursor to aggression (27%) and property destruction (29%), whereas self- or nondirected…

  18. Precursors of Short GRBs Registered by SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaev, P.; Pozanenko, A.

    2016-10-01

    We have searched for precursors in light curves of short gamma-ray bursts registered by SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL in 2002-2014. The portion of short bursts with precursor activity will be less than 0.4% from all short bursts registered by SPI-ACS.

  19. Effects of rhythmic precursors on perception of stress/syllabicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilp, Christian E.; Kluender, Keith R.

    2005-09-01

    Rhythmic structure is a common property of many environmental sounds including speech. Here, perceptual effects of preceding rhythmic context are assessed in experiments employing edited words for which perceived stress/syllabicity are assessed. A series of edited naturally spoken words varying perceptually from ``polite'' to ``plight,'' was created by deleting initial-vowel glottal pulses from a recording of ``polite.'' Words were identified following nonspeech precursor sequences having either trochaic (strong-weak) or iambic (weak-strong) rhythmic patterns. Precursors consisted of a harmonic spectrum (-6-dB/octave slope) filtered by four sinusoidally modulated single-pole filters. Trochaic (strong-weak) and iambic (weak-strong) rhythmic patterns were created by varying amplitude, pitch, and duration in successive segments (akin to beats) of the precursors. Precursors were comprised of two to six repetitions of these patterns. Following trochaic precursors, listeners were more likely to report hearing ``polite'' (iambic). This pattern of results indicates that perception did not assimilate to precursor pattern, consistent with rhythmic expectancy. Instead, perception shifted in a way that contrasts with precursor temporal pattern. Additional results with precursors that are more and less like speech are being conducted to further understand how auditory perception adjusts for temporal and spectral regularities. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  20. Geometrizing configurations. Heinrich Hertz and his mathematical precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    A comparison between the methods used by Heinrich hertz and his mathematician precursors such as Liouville, Lipschitz and Darboux in order to apply differential geometry in mechanics......A comparison between the methods used by Heinrich hertz and his mathematician precursors such as Liouville, Lipschitz and Darboux in order to apply differential geometry in mechanics...

  1. Precursors to Aggression Are Evident by 6 Months of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Dale F.; Waters, Cerith S.; Perra, Oliver; Swift, Naomi; Kairis, Victoria; Phillips, Rebecca; Jones, Roland; Goodyer, Ian; Harold, Gordon; Thapar, Anita; van Goozen, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that developmental precursors to aggression are apparent in infancy. Up to three informants rated 301 firstborn infants for early signs of anger, hitting and biting; 279 (93%) were assessed again as toddlers. Informants' ratings were validated by direct observation at both ages. The precursor behaviours were…

  2. Glial and neuronal control of brain blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwell, David; Buchan, Alastair M; Charpak, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Blood flow in the brain is regulated by neurons and astrocytes. Knowledge of how these cells control blood flow is crucial for understanding how neural computation is powered, for interpreting functional imaging scans of brains, and for developing treatments for neurological disorders. It is now...... in our understanding of cerebral blood flow control have important implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches....

  3. Simple asymptotic forms for Sommerfeld and Brillouin precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Macke, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    We examine from a physical viewpoint the classical problem of the propagation of a causal optical field in a dense Lorentz-medium when the propagation distance is such that the medium is opaque in a broad spectral region including the frequency of the optical carrier. The transmitted signal is then reduced to the celebrated precursors of Sommerfeld and Brillouin, well separated in time. In these conditions, we obtain explicit analytical expressions of the first (Sommerfeld) precursor, which only depend on the nature and the importance of the initial discontinuity of the incident field, and we show that the second (Brillouin) precursor has a Gaussian or Gaussian-derivative shape, depending whether the time-integral (algebraic area) of the incident field differs or not from zero. We demonstrate that the Brillouin precursor that has been actually observed in a Debye medium at decimetric wavelengths is also Gaussian. We complete these results by establishing a more general expression of the Brillouin precursor in...

  4. Bone marrow B cell precursor number after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and GVHD development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoriw, Yuri; Samulski, T Danielle; Deal, Allison M; Dunphy, Cherie H; Sharf, Andrew; Shea, Thomas C; Serody, Jonathan S; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2012-06-01

    Patients without chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) have robust B cell reconstitution and are able to maintain B cell homeostasis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To determine whether B lymphopoiesis differs before cGVHD develops, we examined bone marrow (BM) biopsies for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and PAX5 immunostaining early post-HSCT at day 30 when all patients have been shown to have high B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels. We found significantly greater numbers of BM B cell precursors in patients who did not develop cGVHD compared with those who developed cGVHD (median = 44 vs 2 cells/high powered field [hpf]; respectively; P < .001). Importantly, a significant increase in precursor B cells was maintained when patients receiving high-dose steroid therapy were excluded (median = 49 vs 20 cells/hpf; P = .017). Thus, we demonstrate the association of BM B cell production capacity in human GVHD development. Increased BM precursor B cell number may serve to predict good clinical outcome after HSCT. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Blood Count Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your blood contains red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in your blood. This helps doctors check on your overall health. ...

  6. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Patients Blood Disorders Blood Clots Blood Clotting & Pregnancy If you are pregnant, or you have just ... The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is increased by the following: Previous blood clots ...

  7. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... improve the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). 2018 Highlights of ASH Attend a meeting ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ...

  9. A critical review of Electric Earthquake Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vallianatos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The generation of transient electric potential prior to rupture has been demonstrated in a number of laboratory experiments involving both dry and wet rock specimens. Several different electrification effects are responsible for these observations, but how these may scale up co-operatively in large heterogeneous rock volumes, to produce observable macroscopic signals, is still incompletely understood. Accordingly, the nature and properties of possible Electric Earthquake Precursors (EEP are still inadequately understood. For a long time observations have been fragmentary, narrow band and oligo-parametric (for instance, the magnetic field was not routinely measured. In general, the discrimination of purported EEP signals relied on "experience" and ad hoc empirical rules that could be shown unable to guarantee the validity of the data. In consequence, experimental studies have produced a prolific variety of signal shape, complexity and duration but no explanation for the apparently indefinite diversity. A set of inconsistent or conflicting ideas attempted to explain such observations, including different concepts about the EEP source region (near the observer or at the earthquake focus and propagation (frequently assumed to be guided by peculiar geoelectric structure. Statistics was also applied to establish the "beyond chance" association between presumed EEP signals and earthquakes. In the absence of well constrained data, this approach ended up with intense debate and controversy but no useful results. The response of the geophysical community was scepticism and by the mid-90's, the very existence of EEP was debated. At that time, a major re-thinking of EEP research began to take place, with reformulation of its queries and objectives and refocusing on the exploration of fundamental concepts, less on field experiments. The first encouraging results began to appear in the last two years of the 20th century. Observation technologies are mature

  10. The reliability of radon as seismic precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilian Toader, Victorin; Moldovan, Iren Adelina; Ionescu, Constantin; Marmureanu, Alexandru

    2016-04-01

    Our multidisciplinary network (AeroSolSys) located in Vrancea (Curvature Carpathian Mountains) includes radon concentration monitoring in five stations. We focus on lithosphere and near surface low atmosphere phenomena using real-time information about seismicity, + / - ions, clouds, solar radiation, temperature (air, ground), humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction, telluric currents, variations of the local magnetic field, infrasound, variations of the atmospheric electrostatic field, variations in the earth crust with inclinometers, electromagnetic activity, CO2 concentration, ULF radio wave propagation, seismo-acoustic emission, animal behavior. The main purpose is to inform the authorities about risk situation and update hazard scenarios. The radon concentration monitoring is continuously with 1 hour or 3 hours sample rate in locations near to faults in an active seismic zone characterized by intermediate depth earthquakes. Trigger algorithms include standard deviation, mean and derivative methods. We correlate radon concentration measurements with humidity, temperature and atmospheric pressure from the same equipment. In few stations we have meteorological information, too. Sometime the radon concentration has very high variations (maxim 4535 Bq/m3 from 106 Bq/m3) in short time (1 - 2 days) without being accompanied by an important earthquake. Generally the cause is the high humidity that could be generated by tectonic stress. Correlation with seismicity needs information from minimum 6 month in our case. For 10605 hours, 618 earthquakes with maxim magnitude 4.9 R, we have got radon average 38 Bq/m3 and exposure 408111 Bqh/m3 in one station. In two cases we have correlation between seismicity and radon concentration. In other one we recorded high variation because the location was in an area with multiple faults and a river. Radon can be a seismic precursor but only in a multidisciplinary network. The anomalies for short or long period of

  11. Precursor Science for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, P. R. (Editor); Unwin, S. C. (Editor); Beichman, C. A. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This document outlines a path for the development of the field of extrasolar planet research, with a particular emphasis on the goals of the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF). Over the past decade, a new field of research has developed, the study of extrasolar planetary systems, driven by the discovery of massive planets around nearby stars. The planet count now stands at over 130. Are there Earth-like planets around nearby stars? Might any of those planets be conducive to the formation and maintenance of life? These arc the questions that TPF seeks to answer. TPF will be implemented as a suite of two space observatories, a 6-m class optical coronagraph, to be launched around 20 14, and a formation flying mid-infrared interferometer, to be launched sometime prior to 2020. These facilities will survey up to 165 or more nearby stars and detect planets like Earth should they be present in the 'habitable zone' around each star. With observations over a broad wavelength range, TPF will provide a robust determination of the atmospheric composition of planets to assess habitability and the presence of life. At this early stage of TPF's development, precursor observational and theoretical programs are essential to help define the mission, to aid our understanding of the planets that TPF could discover, and to characterize the stars that TPF will eventually study. This document is necessarily broad in scope because the significance of individual discoveries is greatly enhanced when viewed in thc context of the field as a whole. This document has the ambitious goal of taking us from our limited knowledge today, in 2004, to the era of TPF observations in the middle of the next decade. We must use the intervening years wisely. This document will be reviewed annually and updated as needed. The most recent edition is available online at http://tpf.jpl.nasa.gov/ or by email request to lawson@hucy.jpl.nasa.gov

  12. PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-10-09

    In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

  13. Molecular precursor routes to transition metal sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnage, Christopher Walker

    This thesis is primarily concerned with the synthesis of homoleptic early transition meta thiolates and the subsequent preparation of bulk and thin-film metal disulfides from these compounds. Chapter 1 gives an introduction into the properties, preparation procedures and uses of bulk and thin-film transition metal disulfides as well as giving an overview of early transition metal thiolates synthesied so far in the literature (for titanium, zirconium, tantalum and niobium). Chapter 2 is concerned with the synthesis of a number of ionic and neutral transition metal thiolates. The main synthetic methodologies discussed in this chapter include substitution reactions of transition metal amides and alkyls with thiols, salt metathesis reactions of transition metal chlorides with alkali metal thiolates or with a base / thiol and the use of Grignard reagents. Chapter 3 discusses the preparation of bulk transition metal disulfides using the thiolates prepared in the previous chapter via a thio "sol-gel" route. The preparation of a range of bulk metal and mixed-metal disulfides using transition metal chlorides and hexamethyldisilathiane is also discussed in this chapter. Finally, chapter 4 is concerned with the attempted preparation of thin-films of some transition metal disulfides. Decomposition studies of some of the thiolates prepared in chapter 2 are discussed using thermal gravimetric analysis. Vapour-phase deposition studies are also explored in order to test the potential of the transition metal thiolates as precursors to the disulfides. Experiments using low-pressure chemical vapour deposition and aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition are also described.

  14. Multiwavelength Diagnostics of the Precursor and Main Phases of an M1.8 Flare on 2011 April 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, A. K.; Jain, R.; Gadhiya, P. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Chandra, R.; Gopalswamy, N.; Nitta, N. V.; Yashiro, S.; Manoharan, P. K.; Choudhary, D. P.; Joshi, N. C.; Dwivedi, V. C.; Mahalakshmi, K.

    2013-01-01

    We study the temporal, spatial and spectral evolution of the M1.8 flare, which occurred in the active region 11195 (S17E31) on 2011 April 22, and explore the underlying physical processes during the precursor phase and their relation to the main phase. The study of the source morphology using the composite images in 131Å wavelength observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and 6-14 kiloelectronvolts [from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)] revealed a multi-loop system that destabilized systematically during the precursor and main phases. In contrast, hard X-ray emission (20-50 kiloelectronvolts) was absent during the precursor phase, appearing only from the onset of the impulsive phase in the form of foot-points of emitting loops. This study also revealed the heated loop-top prior to the loop emission, although no accompanying foot-point sources were observed during the precursor phase. We estimate the flare plasma parameters, namely temperature (T), emission measure (EM), power-law index (gamma) and photon turn-over energy (to), and found them to be varying in the ranges 12.4-23.4 megakelvins, 0.0003-0.6 x 10 (sup 49) per cubic centimeter, 5-9 and 14-18 kiloelectronvolts, respectively, by forward fitting RHESSI spectral observations. The energy released in the precursor phase was thermal and constituted approximately 1 percent of the total energy released during the flare. The study of morphological evolution of the filament in conjunction with synthesized T and EM maps was carried out, which reveals (a) partial filament eruption prior to the onset of the precursor emission and (b) heated dense plasma over the polarity inversion line and in the vicinity of the slowly rising filament during the precursor phase. Based on the implications from multiwavelength observations, we propose a scheme to unify the energy release during the precursor and main phase emissions in which the precursor phase emission

  15. Artifical Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorha, Y K; Deb, Prabal; Chatterjee, T; Dhot, P S; Prasad, R S

    2003-01-01

    Elimination of unwanted side-effects, especially transfusion-transmitted diseases (HIV and hepatitis) and leucocyte-mediated allosensitisation, is an important goal of modern transfusion medicine. The problems and high cost factor involved in collecting and storing human blood and the pending world-wide shortages are the other driving forces contributing towards the development of blood substitutes. Two major areas of research in this endeavour are haemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorochemicals. Even though they do not qualify as perfect red blood cell substitutes, these 'oxygen carrying solutions' have many potential clinical and non clinical usages. These can reach tissues more easily than normal red cells and can deliver oxygen directly. These are not without adverse effects, and extensive clinical trials are being conducted to test their safety and efficacy. New understandings on the mode of action of these products will help to define their utility and application. Only after successful clinical trials can they be used for patient management, after approval by the FDA.

  16. Surface chemistry of group 11 atomic layer deposition precursors on silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, Peter J.; Barry, Seán T.

    2017-02-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as thin film deposition techniques has had a major impact on a number of fields. The deposition of pure, uniform, conformal thin films requires very specific vapour-solid reactivity that is largely unknown for the majority of ALD and CVD precursors. This work examines the initial chemisorption of several thin film vapour deposition precursors on high surface area silica (HSAS) using 13C, 31P, and quantitative 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two copper metal precursors, 1,3-diisopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper (I) hexamethyldisilazide (1) and 1,3-diethyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper(I) hexamethyldisilazide (2), and one gold metal precursor, trimethylphosphine gold(III) trimethyl (3), are examined. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to chemisorb at the hydroxyl surface-reactive sites to form a ||-O-Cu-NHC surface species and fully methylated silicon (||-SiMe3, due to reactivity of the hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) ligand on the precursor) at 150 °C and 250 °C. From quantitative 29Si solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) spectroscopy measurements, it was found that HMDS preferentially reacts at geminal disilanol surface sites while the copper surface species preferentially chemisorbed to lone silanol surface species. Additionally, the overall coverage was strongly dependent on temperature, with higher overall coverage of 1 at higher temperature but lower overall coverage of 2 at higher temperature. The chemisorption of 3 was found to produce a number of interesting surface species on HSAS. Gold(III) trimethylphosphine, reduced gold phosphine, methylated phosphoxides, and graphitic carbon were all observed as surface species. The overall coverage of 3 on HSAS was only about 10% at 100 °C and, like the copper compounds, had a preference for lone silanol surface reactive sites. The overall coverage and chemisorbed surface species have implications to the overall growth rate and purity of

  17. Photospheric radius expansion in superburst precursors from neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Keek, L

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear runaway burning of carbon is in rare cases observed from accreting neutron stars as day-long X-ray flares called superbursts. In the few cases where the onset is observed, superbursts exhibit a short precursor burst at the start. In each instance, however, the data was of insufficient quality for spectral analysis of the precursor. Using data from the propane anti-coincidence detector of the PCA instrument on RXTE, we perform the first detailed time resolved spectroscopy of precursors. For a superburst from 4U 1820-30 we demonstrate the presence of photospheric radius expansion. We find the precursor to be 1.4-2 times more energetic than other short bursts from this source, indicating that the burning of accreted helium is insufficient to explain the full precursor. Shock heating would be able to account for the lacking energy. We argue that this precursor is a strong indication that the superburst starts as a detonation, and that a shock induces the precursor. Furthermore, we employ our techniq...

  18. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype.

  19. Clustering chlorine reactivity of haloacetic acid precursors in inland lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Teng; Arnold, William A

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents the major pool of organic precursors for harmful disinfection byproducts, such as haloacetic acids (HAAs), formed during drinking water chlorination, but much of it remains molecularly uncharacterized. Knowledge of model precursors is thus a prerequisite for understanding the more complex whole water DOM. The utility of HAA formation potential data from model DOM precursors, however, is limited due to the lack of comparability to water samples. In this study, the formation kinetics of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), the two predominant HAA species, were delineated upon chlorination of seventeen model DOM precursors and sixty-eight inland lake water samples collected from the Upper Midwest region of the United States. Of particular interest was the finding that the DCAA and TCAA formation rate constants could be grouped into four statistically distinct clusters reflecting the core structural features of model DOM precursors (i.e., non-β-diketone aliphatics, β-diketone aliphatics, non-β-diketone phenolics, and β-diketone phenolics). A comparative approach built upon hierarchical cluster analysis was developed to gain further insight into the chlorine reactivity patterns of HAA precursors in inland lake waters as defined by the relative proximity to four model precursor clusters. This work highlights the potential for implementing an integrated kinetic-clustering approach to constrain the chlorine reactivity of DOM in source waters.

  20. Study on Nuclear Accident Precursors Using AHP and BBN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the nuclear accident reports used to indicate the implicit precursors which are not easily quantified as underlying factors. The current Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA is capable of quantifying the importance of accident causes in limited scope. It was, therefore, difficult to achieve quantifiable decision-making for resource allocation. In this study, the methodology which facilitates quantifying these precursors and a case study were presented. First, four implicit precursors have been obtained by evaluating the causality and hierarchy structure of various accident factors. Eventually, it turned out that they represent the lack of knowledge. After four precursors are selected, subprecursors were investigated and their cause-consequence relationship was implemented by Bayesian Belief Network (BBN. To prioritize the precursors, the prior probability is initially estimated by expert judgment and updated upon observations. The pair-wise importance between precursors is calculated by Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP and the results are converted into node probability tables of the BBN model. Using this method, the sensitivity and the posterior probability of each precursor can be analyzed so that it enables making prioritization for the factors. We tried to prioritize the lessons learned from Fukushima accident to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed methodology.

  1. Optimality properties of a proposed precursor to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2009-09-01

    We calculate the optimality score of a doublet precursor to the canonical genetic code with respect to mitigating the effects of point mutations and compare our results to corresponding ones for the canonical genetic code. We find that the proposed precursor is much less optimal than that of the canonical code. Our results render unlikely the notion that the doublet precursor was an intermediate state in the evolution of the canonical genetic code. These findings support the notion that code optimality reflects evolutionary dynamics, and that if such a doublet code originally had a biochemical significance, it arose before the emergence of translation.

  2. Methods for forming particles from single source precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Rodriguez, Rene G [Pocatello, ID; Pak, Joshua [Pocatello, ID

    2011-08-23

    Single source precursors are subjected to carbon dioxide to form particles of material. The carbon dioxide may be in a supercritical state. Single source precursors also may be subjected to supercritical fluids other than supercritical carbon dioxide to form particles of material. The methods may be used to form nanoparticles. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form chalcopyrite materials. Devices such as, for example, semiconductor devices may be fabricated that include such particles. Methods of forming semiconductor devices include subjecting single source precursors to carbon dioxide to form particles of semiconductor material, and establishing electrical contact between the particles and an electrode.

  3. MMPM - Mars MetNet Precursor Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Schmidt, W.; Pichkhadze, K.; Linkin, V.; Vazquez, L.; Uspensky, M.; Polkko, J.; Genzer, M.; Lipatov, A.; Guerrero, H.; Alexashkin, S.; Haukka, H.; Savijarvi, H.; Kauhanen, J.

    2008-09-01

    We are developing a new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars - MetNet in situ observation network based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called the Met-Net Lander (MNL). The eventual scope of the MetNet Mission is to deploy some 20 MNLs on the Martian surface using inflatable descent system structures, which will be supported by observations from the orbit around Mars. Currently we are working on the MetNet Mars Precursor Mission (MMPM) to deploy one MetNet Lander to Mars in the 2009/2011 launch window as a technology and science demonstration mission. The MNL will have a versatile science payload focused on the atmospheric science of Mars. Detailed characterization of the Martian atmospheric circulation patterns, boundary layer phenomena, and climatology cycles, require simultaneous in-situ measurements by a network of observation posts on the Martian surface. The scientific payload of the MetNet Mission encompasses separate instrument packages for the atmospheric entry and descent phase and for the surface operation phase. The MetNet mission concept and key probe technologies have been developed and the critical subsystems have been qualified to meet the Martian environmental and functional conditions. Prototyping of the payload instrumentation with final dimensions was carried out in 2003-2006.This huge development effort has been fulfilled in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), the Russian Lavoschkin Association (LA) and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI) since August 2001. Currently the INTA (Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) from Spain is also participating in the MetNet payload development. To understand the behavior and dynamics of the Martian atmosphere, a wealth of simultaneous in situ observations are needed on varying types of Martian orography, terrain and altitude spanning all latitudes and longitudes. This will be performed by the Mars MetNet Mission. In addition to the science aspects the

  4. Biodegradable mesoporous delivery system for biomineralization precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang HY

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hong-ye Yang,1 Li-na Niu,2 Jin-long Sun,2 Xue-qing Huang,3 Dan-dan Pei,4 Cui Huang,1 Franklin R Tay5 1The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology, Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Prosthodontics, Guanghua School and Hospital of Stomatology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Prosthodontics, College of Stomatology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Endodontics, College of Dental Medicine, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA Abstract: Scaffold supplements such as nanoparticles, components of the extracellular matrix, or growth factors have been incorporated in conventional scaffold materials to produce smart scaffolds for tissue engineering of damaged hard tissues. Due to increasing concerns on the clinical side effects of using large doses of recombinant bone-morphogenetic protein-2 in bone surgery, it is desirable to develop an alternative nanoscale scaffold supplement that is not only osteoinductive, but is also multifunctional in that it can perform other significant bone regenerative roles apart from stimulation of osteogenic differentiation. Because both amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP and silica are osteoinductive, a biodegradable, nonfunctionalized, expanded-pore mesoporous silica nanoparticle carrier was developed for loading, storage, and sustained release of a novel, biosilicification-inspired, polyamine-stabilized liquid precursor phase of ACP

  5. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood: How I Treat A compendium of Blood articles updated to reflect the most recent scientific research View all publications For Patients Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ...

  6. Precursors of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Linneberg, Allan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    by questionnaire. Digital grayscale fundus photographs were recorded in red-free illumination and graded for the presence of macular drusen >63µm in either eye and the presence of 20 or more small, hard macular drusen as a mean of both eyes. RESULTS: Macular drusen >63µm were associated with the level of physical...... macular drusen per eye. These findings support that a physically active, heart-healthy lifestyle prevents the earliest manifestation of AMD.......PURPOSE: To investigate associations of small, hard macular drusen and larger macular drusen with obesity-related risk factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 888 subjects aged 30-60 years characterized using anthropometric measurements and blood sample analyses. Physical activity was assessed...

  7. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low blood glucose or low blood sugar, occurs when ...

  8. Post-embryonic nerve-associated precursors to adult pigment cells: genetic requirements and dynamics of morphogenesis and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erine H Budi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The pigment cells of vertebrates serve a variety of functions and generate a stunning variety of patterns. These cells are also implicated in human pathologies including melanoma. Whereas the events of pigment cell development have been studied extensively in the embryo, much less is known about morphogenesis and differentiation of these cells during post-embryonic stages. Previous studies of zebrafish revealed genetically distinct populations of embryonic and adult melanophores, the ectotherm homologue of amniote melanocytes. Here, we use molecular markers, vital labeling, time-lapse imaging, mutational analyses, and transgenesis to identify peripheral nerves as a niche for precursors to adult melanophores that subsequently migrate to the skin to form the adult pigment pattern. We further identify genetic requirements for establishing, maintaining, and recruiting precursors to the adult melanophore lineage and demonstrate novel compensatory behaviors during pattern regulation in mutant backgrounds. Finally, we show that distinct populations of latent precursors having differential regenerative capabilities persist into the adult. These findings provide a foundation for future studies of post-embryonic pigment cell precursors in development, evolution, and neoplasia.

  9. Hair Growth Defects in Insig-Deficient Mice Caused by Cholesterol Precursor Accumulation and Reversed by Simvastatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Bret M.; Farooqi, Midhat S.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Liang, Guosheng

    2010-01-01

    Insig-1 and Insig-2, two closely related proteins, are essential for feedback inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we characterized a line of epidermal-specific, Insig-double knockout (Epi-Insig-DKO) mice lacking both Insigs in epidermis. At birth, Epi-Insig-DKO mice were indistinguishable from control littermates, but thereafter they failed to thrive and died before 6 weeks of age. By 14 days of age, 100% of Epi-Insig-DKO mice exhibited defects in hair growth along with other skin abnormalities, including hyperkeratosis. Hair follicles in Epi-Insig-DKO mice developed normally through postnatal day 7, but they failed to progress to later stages and thus exhibited defects in postnatal hair cycling. Insig deficiency caused a marked buildup of cholesterol precursors in skin associated with a marked increase in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase protein. Topical treatment of Epi-Insig-DKO mice with simvastatin, an inhibitor of reductase, reduced sterol precursors in skin and corrected the hair and skin defects. We conclude that Insig deficiency in skin causes accumulation of cholesterol precursors, and this impairs normal hair development. These findings have implications for several human genetic diseases in which mutations in cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes lead to accumulation of sterol precursors and multiple cutaneous abnormalities. PMID:20090767

  10. Mobilization of Neural Precursors in the Circulating Blood of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    progressive forms. Demyelinated lesions or “plaques” are found randomly distributed in the MS CNS (Frohman et al., 2006) and evidence of spontaneous...MH, Prineas JW (2004) Relapsing and remitting multiple sclerosis: pathology of the newly forming lesion . Ann Neurol 55:458-468. Brannvall K...progenitor subclasses with a mild phenotype in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. PLoS One 3:e2218. Martinez HR, Gonzalez-Garza MT, Moreno-Cuevas JE

  11. Stabilising cubosomes with Tween 80 as a step towards targeting lipid nanocarriers to the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhari, Hanisah; Strauss, Mike; Hook, Sarah; Boyd, Ben J; Rizwan, Shakila B

    2016-07-01

    Coating nanoparticles with the surfactant Tween 80 have been previously shown to enhance drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The aim of this study was to investigate whether Tween 80 could be used to stabilise phytantriol-based cubosomes thereby enabling potential application in delivering macromolecular therapeutics to the brain. Cubosome particles with their large internal and external surface area by virtue of their nanostructure are ideal for delivery of macromolecules. Phase behaviour studies were conducted using a combination of optical microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and the addition of Tween 80 to mixtures of phytantriol and water resulted in a rich array of lyotropic mesophases. In particular, a large cubic phase region and a two-phase region of readily dispersed cubosomes is observed. Cubosomes with different concentrations of Tween 80 and phytantriol as the liquid crystal forming lipid were prepared using the solvent precursor method and their physical properties were investigated. A combination of dynamic light scattering, cryogenic electron tomography and SAXS shows formation of well-defined cubosomes with a narrow size distribution and the Im3m cubic structure. Collectively, the results confirm that Tween 80 can effectively stabilize phytantriol cubosomes, opening the possibility for future application in drug delivery across the BBB. Moreover, well-defined, homogenous cubosome formulations prepared using the mild solvent precursor dilution method has significant implications for large-scale production of cubosomes, which currently is a major barrier to the application of cubosomes in the clinic.

  12. Precursor Parameter Identification for Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) Prognostics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precursor parameters have been identified to enable development of a prognostic approach for insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The IGBT were subjected to...

  13. Unconsumed precursors and couplers after formation of oxidative hair dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Søsted, Heidi; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    Contact allergy to hair dye ingredients, especially precursors and couplers, is a well-known entity among consumers having hair colouring done at home or at a hairdresser. The aim of the present investigation was to estimate consumer exposure to some selected precursors (p-phenylenediamine, toluene......-2,5-diamine) and couplers (3-aminophenol, 4-aminophenol, resorcinol) of oxidative hair dyes during and after hair dyeing. Concentrations of unconsumed precursors and couplers in 8 hair dye formulations for non-professional use were investigated, under the conditions reflecting hair dyeing. Oxidative...... hair dye formation in the absence of hair was investigated using 6 products, and 2 products were used for experimental hair dyeing. In both presence and absence of hair, significant amounts of unconsumed precursors and couplers remained in the hair dye formulations after final colour development. Thus...

  14. Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165985.html Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People ... 26, 2017 FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression appears to raise the risk of falls in ...

  15. Synthesis of beta alumina from aluminum hydroxide and oxyhydroxide precursors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, A

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Two aluminium oxyhydroxides, boehmite and pseudoboehmite, and two aluminium hydroxides, bayerite and gibbsite, have been investigated as precursors for the synthesis of the solid electrolyte, beta alumina. Reaction pathways and products have been...

  16. Liquid precursor for deposition of copper selenide and method of preparing the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Franciscus Antonius Maria Van Hest, Marinus; Ginley, David S.; Hersh, Peter A.; Eldada, Louay; Stanbery, Billy J.

    2015-09-08

    Liquid precursors containing copper and selenium suitable for deposition on a substrate to form thin films suitable for semiconductor applications are disclosed. Methods of preparing such liquid precursors and methods of depositing a precursor on a substrate are also disclosed.

  17. The NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside decreases exercise performance in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kourtzidis, Ioannis A.; Stoupas, Andreas T.; Gioris, Ioannis S.; Veskoukis, Aristidis S.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Tsantarliotou, Maria; Taitzoglou, Ioannis; Vrabas, Ioannis S.; Paschalis, Vassilis; Kyparos, Antonios; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and its phosphorylated form (NADP+) are key molecules in ubiquitous bioenergetic and cellular signaling pathways, regulating cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Thus, supplementation with NAD+ and NADP+ precursors emerged as a promising strategy to gain many and multifaceted health benefits. In this proof-of-concept study, we sought to investigate whether chronic nicotinamide riboside administration (an NAD+ precursor) affects exercise perf...

  18. Catalysts in syntheses of carbon and carbon precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Mochida, Isao; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Qiao, Wenming

    2006-01-01

    Carbon materials have been applied in different fields because of their unique performances. Naturally, the physical and chemical structures of carbon precursors and carbon materials decide their properties and applications. Catalysts play a very important role in the synthesis of carbon precursors and carbon materials by controlling the molecular and compositional chemistry at the transformation of organic substrates into carbon through carbonaceous intermediates. Carbon materials of high pe...

  19. Elements of the tsunami precursors' detection physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novik, Oleg; Ruzhin, Yuri; Ershov, Sergey; Volgin, Max; Smirnov, Fedor

    ionosphere from the buoy, balloon and satellite complexes. The balloon and buoy complexes will transmit data to a shore station over satellite link. The frequency ranges and sensitivity thresholds of all of the sensors of the LOAMS will be adapted to the characteristics of expected seismic signals according to the numerical research above. Computational methods and statistical analysis (e.g. seismic changes of coherence of spatially distributed sensors of different nature) of the recorded multidimensional time series will be used for prognostic interpretation. The multilevel recordings will provide a stable noise (e.g. ionosphere Pc pulsations, hard sea, industry) and seismic event detection. An intensive heat flow typical for tectonically active lithosphere zones may be considered as an energy source for advanced modifications of the LOAMS. The latter may be used as a warning system for continental and marine technologies, e.g. a sea bottom geothermal energy production. Indeed, seismic distraction of the nuclear power station Fukushima I demonstrates that similar technology hardly is able to solve the energy problems in seismically active regions. On the other hand, the LOAMS may be considered as a scientific observatory for development of the seaquake/tsunami precursor physics, i.e. seismo-hydro-electromagnetics.

  20. Detection of hydrogeochemical seismic precursors by a statistical learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Castellana

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The problem of detecting the occurrence of an earthquake precursor is faced in the general framework of the statistical learning theory. The aim of this work is both to build models able to detect seismic precursors from time series of different geochemical signals and to provide an estimate of number of false positives. The model we used is k-Nearest-Neighbor classifier for discriminating "no-disturbed signal", "seismic precursor" and "co-post seismic precursor" in time series relative to thirteen different hydrogeochemical parameters collected in water samples from a natural spring in Kamchachta (Russia peninsula. The measurements collected are ion content (Na, Cl, Ca, HCO3, H3BO3, parameters (pH, Q, T and gases (N2, CO2, CH4, O2, Ag. The classification error is measured by Leave-K-Out-Cross-Validation procedure. Our study shows that the most discriminative ions for detecting seismic precursors are Cl and Na having an error rates of 15%. Moreover, the most discriminative parameters and gases are Q and CH4 respectively, with error rate of 21%. The ions result the most informative hydrogeochemicals for detecting seismic precursors due to the peculiarities of the mechanisms involved in earthquake preparation. Finally we show that the information collected some month before the event under analysis are necessary to improve the classification accuracy.

  1. Risk Assessment of Infrastructure System of Systems with Precursor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenyu; Haimes, Yacov Y

    2016-08-01

    Physical infrastructure systems are commonly composed of interconnected and interdependent subsystems, which in their essence constitute system of systems (S-o-S). System owners and policy researchers need tools to foresee potential emergent forced changes and to understand their impact so that effective risk management strategies can be developed. We develop a systemic framework for precursor analysis to support the design of an effective and efficient precursor monitoring and decision support system with the ability to (i) identify and prioritize indicators of evolving risks of system failure; and (ii) evaluate uncertainties in precursor analysis to support informed and rational decision making. This integrated precursor analysis framework is comprised of three processes: precursor identification, prioritization, and evaluation. We use an example of a highway bridge S-o-S to demonstrate the theories and methodologies of the framework. Bridge maintenance processes involve many interconnected and interdependent functional subsystems and decision-making entities and bridge failure can have broad social and economic consequences. The precursor analysis framework, which constitutes an essential part of risk analysis, examines the impact of various bridge inspection and maintenance scenarios. It enables policy researchers and analysts who are seeking a risk perspective on bridge infrastructure in a policy setting to develop more risk informed policies and create guidelines to efficiently allocate limited risk management resources and mitigate severe consequences resulting from bridge failures.

  2. Role of neural precursor cells in promoting repair following stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pooya DIBAJNIA; Cindi M MORSHEAD

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of stroke have received considerable attention.Two broad approaches to stem cell-based therapies have been taken:the transplantation of exogenous stem cells,and the activation of endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells (together termed neural precursors).Studies examining the transplantation of exogenous cells have demonstrated that neural stem and progenitor cells lead to the most clinically promising results.Endogenous activation of neural precursors has also been explored based on the fact that resident precursor cells have the inherent capacity to proliferate,migrate and differentiate into mature neurons in the uninjured adult brain.Studies have revealed that these neural precursor cell behaviours can be activated following stroke,whereby neural precursors will expand in number,migrate to the infarct site and differentiate into neurons.However,this innate response is insufficient to lead to functional recovery,making it necessary to enhance the activation of endogenous precursors to promote tissue repair and functional recovery.Herein we will discuss the current state of the stem cell-based approaches with a focus on endogenous repair to treat the stroke injured brain.

  3. High dose ionizing irradiation induces an early and transient increase in peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells; L`exposition aigue aux radiations ionisantes induit un recrutement transitoire des progeniteurs hematopoietiques au niveau du sang peripherique: implications therapeutiques potentielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouet, M.; Mathieu, J.; Grenier, N.; Vetillard, J.; Chauvelot, F.; Thierry, D.; Mestries, J.C.; Herodin, F. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche, 38 - Grenoble (France)]|[Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees - Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1997-12-31

    Nonhuman primates exposed to ionizing radiation exhibit an early and transient increase in peripheral blood committed hematopoietic progenitor cells. The management of bone marrow aplasia secondary to accidental irradiation could be based in part on the re-infusion of those circulating autologous progenitors following a period of ex vivo expansion with cytokines. (authors)

  4. Oral bioavailability of the ether lipid plasmalogen precursor, PPI-1011, in the rabbit: a new therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Paul L

    2011-12-01

    phosphoethanolamine group and desaturation at sn-1 to generate the target plasmalogen. The second pool, like the PtdEtn, resulted from increased availability of DHA released during remodeling of sn-2. In the case of sn-1 18:0 and 18:1 plasmalogens with [13C3]DHA at sn-2, labeling was the result of increased availability of [13C3]DHA from lipid remodeling. Isotope and repeated dosing (2 weeks experiments also demonstrated that plasmalogens and/or plasmalogen precursors derived from PPI-1011 are able to cross both the blood-retinal and blood-brain barriers. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that PPI-1011, an ether lipid precursor of plasmalogens is orally bioavailable in the rabbit, augmenting the circulating levels of unesterified DHA and DHA-containing PlsEtn and PtdEtn. Other ethanolamine plasmalogens were generated from the precursor via lipid remodeling (de-acylation/re-acylation reactions at sn-2 and phosphatidylethanolamines were generated via de-alkylation/re-acylation reactions at sn-1. Repeated oral dosing for 2 weeks with PPI-1011 resulted in dose-dependent increases in circulating DHA and DHA-containing plasmalogens. These products and/or precursors were also able to cross the blood-retinal and blood-brain barriers.

  5. Low Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem. Sometimes blood pressure that is too low can also cause problems. Blood pressure is the ... reading is 90/60 or lower, you have low blood pressure. Some people have low blood pressure ...

  6. Cord-Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Cord-Blood Banking KidsHealth > For Parents > Cord-Blood Banking Print A ... for you and your family. About Cord-Blood Banking Cord-blood banking basically means collecting and storing ...

  7. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... may be used to puncture the skin. The blood collects in a small glass tube called a ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Initiative Research Programs and Awards View all Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer- ... Get email updates View all meetings Publications Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer- ...

  9. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection) back to top How are Blood Clots in Pregnant Women Treated? Typically, blood clots are treated ... history of blood clots or blood clotting disorders in your family. Remain active, with your doctor's approval. ...

  10. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Print ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  11. White Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Count; Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , ...

  12. High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Cholesterol What is High Blood Cholesterol? What is Cholesterol? Cholesterol is a ... heart disease. If Your Blood Cholesterol Is Too High Too much cholesterol in your blood is called ...

  13. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Transfusions A A ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. ...

  14. [Thyroid hormones and their precursors. II. Species-specific properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gergo; Noszál, Béla

    2014-01-01

    This paper surveys the species-specific physico-chemical parameters (basicity and lipophilicity) and related biological functions of thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine and reverse liothyronine) and their biological precursors (tyrosine, monoiodotyrosine and diiodotyrosine). The protonation macroconstants were determined by 1H NMR-pH titrations while the microconstants were determined by a multimodal spectroscopic-deductive methodology using auxiliary derivatives of reduced complexity. Our results show that the different number and/or position of iodine are the key factors to influence the phenolate basicity. The ionization state of the phenolate site is crucial in the biosynthesis and protein binding of thyroid hormones. The role of the protonation state in the receptor binding was investigated by an in silico docking method. Microspecies of thyroid hormones were docked to the thyroid hormone receptor isoforms. Our results quantitate at the molecular level how the ionization stage and the charge distribution influence the protein binding. The anionic form of the carboxyl group is essential for the protein binding, whereas the protonated form of the amino group loosens it. The protonation state of the phenolate plays a role of secondary importance in the receptor binding. The combined results of docking and microspeciation studies show that microspecies of the highest concentration at the pH of blood are not the strongest binding ones. The site-specific lipophilicity of our investigated molecules was determined with the measurement of distribution coefficients at different pH using carboxymethyl- and O-methyl-derivatives to mimic the partition of some of the individual microspecies. Correction factors were determined and introduced. Our data show that the iodinated aromatic ring system is the definitive structural element that fundamentally determines the lipophilicity of thyroid hormones, whereas the protonation state of the aliphatic part is essential in

  15. Concentrations of cadmium, Cobalt, Lead, Nickel, and Zinc in Blood and Fillets of Northern Hog Sucker (Hypentelium nigricans) from streams contaminated by lead-Zinc mining: Implications for monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, C.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; May, T.W.

    2009-01-01

    Lead (Pb) and other metals can accumulate in northern hog sucker (Hypentelium nigricans) and other suckers (Catostomidae), which are harvested in large numbers from Ozark streams by recreational fishers. Suckers are also important in the diets of piscivorous wildlife and fishes. Suckers from streams contaminated by historic Pb-zinc (Zn) mining in southeastern Missouri are presently identified in a consumption advisory because of Pb concentrations. We evaluated blood sampling as a potentially nonlethal alternative to fillet sampling for Pb and other metals in northern hog sucker. Scaled, skin-on, bone-in "fillet" and blood samples were obtained from northern hog suckers (n = 75) collected at nine sites representing a wide range of conditions relative to Pb-Zn mining in southeastern Missouri. All samples were analyzed for cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), Pb, nickel (Ni), and Zn. Fillets were also analyzed for calcium as an indicator of the amount of bone, skin, and mucus included in the samples. Pb, Cd, Co, and Ni concentrations were typically higher in blood than in fillets, but Zn concentrations were similar in both sample types. Concentrations of all metals except Zn were typically higher at sites located downstream from active and historic Pb-Zn mines and related facilities than at nonmining sites. Blood concentrations of Pb, Cd, and Co were highly correlated with corresponding fillet concentrations; log-log linear regressions between concentrations in the two sample types explained 94% of the variation for Pb, 73-83% of the variation for Co, and 61% of the variation for Cd. In contrast, relations for Ni and Zn explained <12% of the total variation. Fillet Pb and calcium concentrations were correlated (r = 0.83), but only in the 12 fish from the most contaminated site; concentrations were not significantly correlated across all sites. Conversely, fillet Cd and calcium were correlated across the range of sites (r = 0.78), and the inclusion of calcium in the fillet-to-blood

  16. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion

  17. First molecular identification of the vertebrate hosts of Culicoides imicola in Europe and a review of its blood-feeding patterns worldwide: implications for the transmission of bluetongue disease and African horse sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-DE LA Puente, J; Navarro, J; Ferraguti, M; Soriguer, R; Figuerola, J

    2017-07-27

    Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of pathogens that affect wildlife, livestock and, occasionally, humans. Culicoides imicola (Kieffer, 1913) is considered to be the main vector of the pathogens that cause bluetongue disease (BT) and African horse sickness (AHS) in southern Europe. The study of blood-feeding patterns in Culicoides is an essential step towards understanding the epidemiology of these pathogens. Molecular tools that increase the accuracy and sensitivity of traditional methods have been developed to identify the hosts of potential insect vectors. However, to the present group's knowledge, molecular studies that identify the hosts of C. imicola in Europe are lacking. The present study genetically characterizes the barcoding region of C. imicola trapped on farms in southern Spain and identifies its vertebrate hosts in the area. The report also reviews available information on the blood-feeding patterns of C. imicola worldwide. Culicoides imicola from Spain feed on blood of six mammals that include species known to be hosts of the BT and AHS viruses. This study provides evidence of the importance of livestock as sources of bloodmeals for C. imicola and the relevance of this species in the transmission of BT and AHS viruses in Europe. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  18. Human hepatitis B viral e antigen and its precursor P20 inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvina, Maija; Hoste, Astrid; Rossignol, Jean-Michel [Universite de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire, EA 4589, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Lagaudriere-Gesbert, Cecile, E-mail: cecile.lagaudriere-gesbert@u-psud.fr [Universite de Versailles-Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire, EA 4589, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer P20, precursor of the HBeAg, interacts with the cellular protein gC1qR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 bind to T cell surface and inhibit mitogen-induced T cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBeAg and P20 inhibition of T cell proliferation is gC1qR and IL-1RAcP-independent. -- Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) Precore protein is processed through the secretory pathway directly as HBeAg or with the generation of an intermediate (P20). Precore gene has been shown to be implicated in viral persistence, but the functions of HBeAg and its precursors have not been fully elucidated. We show that the secreted proteins HBeAg and P20 interact with T cell surface and alter Kit-225 and primary T cells proliferation, a process which may facilitate the establishment of HBV persistence. Our data indicate that the N-terminal end of Precore is important for these inhibitory effects and exclude that they are dependent on the association of HBeAg and P20 with two characterized cell surface ligands, the Interleukin-1 Receptor Accessory Protein and gC1qR (present study).

  19. Precursors of adolescent substance use from early childhood and early adolescence: testing a developmental cascade model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnick, Stephanie L; Shaw, Daniel S; Hyde, Luke W

    2014-02-01

    This study examined developmentally salient risk and protective factors of adolescent substance use assessed during early childhood and early adolescence using a sample of 310 low-income boys. Child problem behavior and proximal family risk and protective factors (i.e., parenting and maternal depression) during early childhood, as well as child and family factors and peer deviant behavior during adolescence, were explored as potential precursors to later substance use during adolescence using structural equation modeling. Results revealed that early childhood risk and protective factors (i.e., child externalizing problems, mothers' depressive symptomatology, and nurturant parenting) were indirectly related to substance use at the age of 17 via risk and protective factors during early and middle adolescence (i.e., parental knowledge and externalizing problems). The implications of these findings for early prevention and intervention are discussed.

  20. β-Amyloid precursor protein: function in stem cell development and Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David H; Hu, Yanling; Bolós, Marta; Dawkins, Edgar; Foa, Lisa; Young, Kaylene M

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy may be a suitable approach for the treatment of many neurodegenerative diseases. However, one major impediment to the development of successful cell-based therapies is our limited understanding of the mechanisms that instruct neural stem cell behaviour, such as proliferation and cell fate specification. The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may play an important role in neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Our recent work shows that in vitro, APP stimulates neural stem or progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. The effect on proliferation is mediated by an autocrine factor that we have identified as cystatin C. As cystatin C expression is also reported to inhibit the development of amyloid pathology in APP transgenic mice, our finding has implications for the possible use of cystatin C for the therapy of AD.

  1. Roles of amyloid precursor protein family members in neuroprotection, stress signaling and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögel, Donat; Deller, Thomas; Behl, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The roles of amyloid precursor protein (APP) family members in normal brain function are poorly understood. Under physiological conditions the majority of APP appears to be processed along the non-amyloidogenic pathway leading to the formation of the secreted N-terminal APP fragment sAPPα. This cleavage product of APP has been implicated in several physiological processes such as neuroprotection, synaptic plasticity, neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis. In this review we focus on the role of APP family members in neuroprotection and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms which are believed to mediate this effect. We propose that a reduction of APP processing along the non-amyloidogenic pathway during brain aging could result in an enhanced susceptibility of neurons to cellular stress and could contribute to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Subcellular Distribution of Glutathione Precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffler, Barbara Eva; Maier, Romana; Zechmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione is an important antioxidant and has many important functions in plant development, growth and defense. Glutathione synthesis and degradation is highly compartment-specific and relies on the subcellular availability of its precursors, cysteine, glutamate, glycine and γ-glutamylcysteine especially in plastids and the cytosol which are considered as the main centers for glutathione synthesis. The availability of glutathione precursors within these cell compartments is therefore of great importance for successful plant development and defense. The aim of this study was to investigate the compartment-specific importance of glutathione precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The subcellular distribution was compared between wild type plants (Col-0), plants with impaired glutathione synthesis (glutathione deficient pad2-1 mutant, wild type plants treated with buthionine sulfoximine), and one complemented line (OE3) with restored glutathione synthesis. Immunocytohistochemistry revealed that the inhibition of glutathione synthesis induced the accumulation of the glutathione precursors cysteine, glutamate and glycine in most cell compartments including plastids and the cytosol. A strong decrease could be observed in γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) contents in these cell compartments. These experiments demonstrated that the inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) – the first enzyme of glutathione synthesis – causes a reduction of γ-EC levels and an accumulation of all other glutathione precursors within the cells. PMID:22050910

  3. Brief Report: Efficient Generation of Hematopoietic Precursors and Progenitors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Parker, Aaron S.; Moraghebi, Roksana; Lutz, Margaret K.; Firth, Amy L.; Brennand, Kristen J.; Berggren, W. Travis; Raya, Angel; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Gage, Fred H.; Verma, Inder M.

    2012-01-01

    By mimicking embryonic development of the hematopoietic system, we have developed an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of hematopoietic lineages and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Factors such as cytokines, extra cellular matrix components, and small molecules as well as the temporal association and concentration of these factors were tested on seven different human ESC and iPSC lines. We report the differentiation of up to 84% human CD45+ cells (average 41% ± 16%, from seven pluripotent lines) from the differentiation culture, including significant numbers of primitive CD45+/CD341 and CD45+/CD341/CD38− hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, the numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells generated, as measured by colony forming unit assays, were comparable to numbers obtained from fresh umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell isolates on a per CD45+ cell basis. Our approach demonstrates highly efficient generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors with among the highest efficiencies reported to date (CD45+/CD341) using a single standardized differentiation protocol on several human ESC and iPSC lines. Our data add to the cumulating evidence for the existence of an in vitro derived precursor to the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) with limited engrafting ability in transplanted mice but with multipotent hematopoietic potential. Because this protocol efficiently expands the preblood precursors and hematopoietic progenitors, it is ideal for testing novel factors for the generation and expansion of definitive HSCs with long-term repopulating ability. PMID:21544903

  4. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês P Perpétuo

    Full Text Available Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC in AS patients.13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed.RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline.In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli.

  5. Brief report: efficient generation of hematopoietic precursors and progenitors from human pluripotent stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Parker, Aaron S; Moraghebi, Roksana; Lutz, Margaret K; Firth, Amy L; Brennand, Kristen J; Berggren, W Travis; Raya, Angel; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Gage, Fred H; Verma, Inder M

    2011-07-01

    By mimicking embryonic development of the hematopoietic system, we have developed an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of hematopoietic lineages and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Factors such as cytokines, extra cellular matrix components, and small molecules as well as the temporal association and concentration of these factors were tested on seven different human ESC and iPSC lines. We report the differentiation of up to 84% human CD45+ cells (average 41% ± 16%, from seven pluripotent lines) from the differentiation culture, including significant numbers of primitive CD45+/CD34+ and CD45+/CD34+/CD38- hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, the numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells generated, as measured by colony forming unit assays, were comparable to numbers obtained from fresh umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell isolates on a per CD45+ cell basis. Our approach demonstrates highly efficient generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors with among the highest efficiencies reported to date (CD45+/CD34+) using a single standardized differentiation protocol on several human ESC and iPSC lines. Our data add to the cumulating evidence for the existence of an in vitro derived precursor to the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) with limited engrafting ability in transplanted mice but with multipotent hematopoietic potential. Because this protocol efficiently expands the preblood precursors and hematopoietic progenitors, it is ideal for testing novel factors for the generation and expansion of definitive HSCs with long-term repopulating ability.

  6. Partitioning tungsten between matrix precursors and chondrule precursors through relative settling

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of chondrites have found a tungsten isotopic anomaly between chondrules and matrix. Given the refractory nature of tungsten, this implies that W was carried into the solar nebula by at least two distinct families of pre-solar grains. The observed chondrule/matrix split requires that the distinct families were kept separate during the dust coagulation process, and that the two families of grain interacted with the chondrule formation mechanism differently. We take the co-existence of different families of solids in the same general orbital region at the chondrule-precursor size as given, and explore the requirements for them to have interacted with the chondrule formation process at significantly different rates. We show that this sorting of families of solids into chondrule and matrix destined dust had to have been at least as powerful a sorting mechanism as the relative settling of aerodynamically distinct grains at at least two scale heights above the midplane. The requirement that the chondr...

  7. Implications of the formation of cloud condensation nuclei from gaseous precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.

    1990-01-01

    The question of the derivation of the characteristic shape of the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectrum from commonly used aerosol size distributions is examined. The shape of the CCN spectrum is important since it determines if the cloud droplets are controlled by the number of CCN or cloud dynamics. It is found that both a Junge and a Whitby size distribution of soluble particles over-predict the exponent of the CCN spectrum, and the situation is made worse by considering the fraction of soluble material to be particle size dependent. Approximate agreement is obtained from a model that assumes the number of CCN to be proportional to the surface area of the ambient aerosol as might be the case if the particle surface catalysts a chemical reaction to form the soluble material.

  8. Implications of the formation of cloud condensation nuclei from gaseous precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.

    1990-12-31

    The question of the derivation of the characteristic shape of the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectrum from commonly used aerosol size distributions is examined. The shape of the CCN spectrum is important since it determines if the cloud droplets are controlled by the number of CCN or cloud dynamics. It is found that both a Junge and a Whitby size distribution of soluble particles over-predict the exponent of the CCN spectrum, and the situation is made worse by considering the fraction of soluble material to be particle size dependent. Approximate agreement is obtained from a model that assumes the number of CCN to be proportional to the surface area of the ambient aerosol as might be the case if the particle surface catalysts a chemical reaction to form the soluble material.

  9. Metabolic precursors in astrophysical ice analogs: implications for meteorites and comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen E; Gerakines, Perry A; Callahan, Michael P

    2015-07-28

    We report the synthesis of complex organic compounds including nicotinic and quinolinic acid, two members involved in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthetic pathway, in irradiated astrophysical ice analogs. If delivered to Earth by meteorites and comets, these compounds may have contributed to the origin and early evolution of life.

  10. Crude glycerol as glycogenic precursor in feed; effects on milk coagulation properties and metabolic profiles of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzia, Hedi; Kilk, Kalle; Ariko, Tiia; Kass, Marko; Soomets, Ursel; Jõudu, Ivi; Kaart, Tanel; Arney, David; Kärt, Olav; Ots, Meelis

    2013-05-01

    As grain prices rise, the search for alternative glycogenic precursors in animal feed becomes increasingly important, and this study was conducted to determine if the replacement of starch with glycerol, as an alternative glycogenic precursor, affects the milk metabolic profile and milk coagulation ability, and therefore the quality of the milk. Eight primiparous mid-lactation Holstein cows were fed during a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square trial with four different isoenergetic rations: (1) control (T0) fed a total mixed ration (TMR) with barley meal; (2) group T1, decreased barley content, replaced isoenergetically with 1 kg crude glycerol; (3) group T2, the barley meal was replaced with 2 kg of crude glycerol; and (4) group T3 the barley meal was replaced with 3 kg of crude glycerol. Rumen, blood and milk samples were collected at the end of every 21-d treatment period. Rumen samples were analysed for proportion of total volatile fatty acid (VFA), blood samples for insulin and glucose, and milk for metabolites (e.g. citric-acid cycle compounds). The change in glycogenic precursors had a positive effect on rumen VFA proportions; the proportion of propionic acid increased (P < 0.001). Milk protein (P < 0.001) and curd firmness (P < 0.001) both increased. The increase in milk protein concentration may have been due to an increase in microbial protein. Regarding the milk metabolic profiles, different signals were positively associated with coagulation ability and change in the diet. Based on this study, changing the glycogenic precursor in animal diet in this way is possible, and may have no immediate deleterious consequences on milk quality or cow health. Indeed, there is evidence for benefits from this substitution.

  11. (Pro)renin and its receptors: Pathophysiological implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W. Batenburg (Wendy); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTissue angiotensin generation depends on the uptake of circulating (kidney-derived) renin and/or its precursor prorenin [together denoted as (pro)renin]. Since tissue renin levels are usually somewhat higher than expected based upon the amount of (renin-containing) blood in tissue, an

  12. In vitro transdifferentiation of human cultured CD34+ stem cells into oligodendrocyte precursors using thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Katari; Srikanth, Lokanathan; Vengamma, Bhuma; Chandrasekhar, Chodimella; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mouleshwara; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2015-02-19

    The extent of myelination on the axon promotes transmission of impulses in the neural network, any disturbances in this process results in the neurodegenerative condition. Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursors that supports in the regeneration of axons through myelination is an important step in the restoration of damaged neurons. Therefore, in the present study, the differentiation of human CD34+ stem cells into oligodendrocytes was carried out. The pure human CD34+ culture developed from the stem cells obtained from a peripheral blood of a donor were subjected to oligodendrocyte differentiation medium (ODM). The ODM at a concentration of 40ng/ml thyroxine, 40ng/ml 3,3',5-tri-iodo-thyronine showed distinct morphological changes from day 6 to 9 with cells exhibiting conspicuous stellate morphology and extensive foot processes. The real-time PCR analysis showed prominent expression of Olig2, CNPase, PDGFRα and PLP1/DM20 in the differentiated cells confirming the formed cells are oligodendrocyte precursors. The expression of these genes increased from days 6 to 9 corresponding to the morphological changes observed with almost no expression of GFAP+ cells. The distinct CNPase activity was observed in these differentiated cells compared to normal CD34+ stem cells correlating with results of real-time PCR conclusively explains the development of oligodendrocytes from human CD34+ stem cells.

  13. Precursor ion scan profiles of acylcarnitines by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, Giuseppe; D'Apolito, Oceania; Corso, Gaetano

    2008-12-01

    The fatty acyl esters of L-carnitine (acylcarnitines) are useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of some inborn errors of metabolism analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In this study the acylcarnitines were analyzed by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization using a commercial tandem mass spectrometer (APTDCI-MS/MS). The method is based on the precursor ion scan mode determination of underivatized acylcarnitines desorbed from samples by a hot desolvation gas flow and ionized by a corona pin discharge. During desorption/ionization step the temperature induces the degradation of acylcarnitines; nevertheless, the common fragment to all acylcarnitines [MH-59](+) is useful for analyzing their profile. APTDCI parameters, including angle of collection and incidence, gas flows and temperatures, were optimized for acylcarnitines. The experiments were performed drying 2 microL of an equimolar mixture of acylcarnitine standards on a glass slide. The specificity was evaluated by comparing product ion spectra and the precursor ion spectra of 85 m/z of acylcarnitines obtained by the APTDCI method and by electrospray ionization flow injection analysis (ESI-FIA). The method was also employed to analyze acylcarnitines extracted from a pathological dried blood spot and a control. The method enables analysis of biological samples and recognition of some acylcarnitines that are diagnostic markers of inherited metabolic diseases. The intrinsic high-throughput analysis of the ambient desorption ionization methods offers a new opportunity either for its potential application in clinical chemistry and for the expanded screening of some inborn errors of metabolism.

  14. Iron and the translation of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and ferritin mRNAs: riboregulation against neural oxidative damage in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jack T; Bush, Ashley I; Cho, Hyan-Hee; Smith, Deborah H; Thomson, Andrew M; Friedlich, Avi L; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Leedman, Peter J; Huang, Xudong; Cahill, Catherine M

    2008-12-01

    The essential metals iron, zinc and copper deposit near the Abeta (amyloid beta-peptide) plaques in the brain cortex of AD (Alzheimer's disease) patients. Plaque-associated iron and zinc are in neurotoxic excess at 1 mM concentrations. APP (amyloid precursor protein) is a single transmembrane metalloprotein cleaved to generate the 40-42-amino-acid Abetas, which exhibit metal-catalysed neurotoxicity. In health, ubiquitous APP is cleaved in a non-amyloidogenic pathway within its Abeta domain to release the neuroprotective APP ectodomain, APP(s). To adapt and counteract metal-catalysed oxidative stress, as during reperfusion from stroke, iron and cytokines induce the translation of both APP and ferritin (an iron storage protein) by similar mechanisms. We reported that APP was regulated at the translational level by active IL (interleukin)-1 (IL-1-responsive acute box) and IRE (iron-responsive element) RNA stem-loops in the 5' untranslated region of APP mRNA. The APP IRE is homologous with the canonical IRE RNA stem-loop that binds the iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) to control intracellular iron homoeostasis by modulating ferritin mRNA translation and transferrin receptor mRNA stability. The APP IRE interacts with IRP1 (cytoplasmic cis-aconitase), whereas the canonical H-ferritin IRE RNA stem-loop binds to IRP2 in neural cell lines, and in human brain cortex tissue and in human blood lysates. The same constellation of RNA-binding proteins [IRP1/IRP2/poly(C) binding protein] control ferritin and APP translation with implications for the biology of metals in AD.

  15. Novel, high-yield red blood cell production methods from CD34-positive cells derived from human embryonic stem, yolk sac, fetal liver, cord blood, and peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Emmanuel; Qiu, Caihong; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2012-08-01

    The current supply of red blood cells expressing rare blood groups is not sufficient to cover all the existing transfusion needs for chronically transfused patients, such as sickle cell disease homozygous carriers, because of alloimmunization. In vitro production of cultured red blood cells is slowly emerging as a possible complement to the existing collection-based red blood cell procurement system. The yield of cultured red blood cells can theoretically be maximized by amplifying the stem, progenitor, or precursor compartment. Here, we combined methods designed to expand these three compartments to optimize the yield of cultured red blood cells and found that exposing CD34(+) cells to a short pulse of cytokines favorable for erythroid differentiation prior to stem cell expansion followed by progenitor expansion produced the highest yield of erythroid cells. This novel serum-free red blood cell production protocol was efficient on CD34(+) cells derived from human embryonic stem cells, 6-8-week yolk sacs, 16-18-week fetal livers, cord blood, and peripheral blood. The yields of cells obtained with these new protocols were larger by an order of magnitude than the yields observed previously. Globin expression analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that these expansion protocols generally yielded red blood cells that expressed a globin profile similar to that expected for the developmental age of the CD34(+) cells.

  16. Observations on the Influence of Precursor Conformations on Macrocyclization Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøj, Peter; Beldring, Klavs; Nielsen, Anders R.;

    2016-01-01

    Macrocycles hold great promise in drug discovery as an underutilized class of lead compounds. The low abundance of these molecules can, in part, be explained by the inherent difficulties in the synthesis of macrocycles and the lack of general methods for their rapid assembly. We have undertaken...... a research program aimed at developing methods for facile synthesis of macrocycles from simple precursors. The synthesis of two new cyclization precursors is described and the results of their reaction with thionyl chloride are presented and discussed. Whereas one acyclic diol smoothly underwent...

  17. 3-D rheologic model of earthquake preparation (Ⅲ): Precursor field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the theory of viscoelastic displacement and strain field for the three-dimensional rheologic model of earthquake preparation, this paper mainly studies the theoretical solution of precursor field for the three-dimensional rheologic model of earthquake preparation. We derive the viscoelastic analytical expressions of the ground tilt, underground water level, earth resistivity at an arbitrary point (x, y, z) in the rheologic medium, and analyzed the earth resistivity preliminarily, providing a certain theoretical basis for the precursor analysis of seismogenic process.

  18. Synthesis of GAP and PAMMO Homopolymers from Mesylate Polymeric Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Claudio; Fruci, Stefania; Lamia, Pietro; Cappello, Miriam; Filippi, Sara; Polacco, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In azidic binders for solid propellants, the N3 functionality is introduced by substitution of a halogen or tosyl group, but recently the mesyl group has been suggested as an alternative. The mesylate group has two advantages, mainly related to its small dimensions and low cost. Poly(glycidyl azide) and poly 3-azidomethyl-3-methyl oxetane were prepared by using both tosylate and mesylate precursors. The azidation kinetics were studied at three different temperatures while keeping all other operating parameters the same. The results confirmed the good potential of the mesylate precursors for the production of azidic binders.

  19. Endosomes derived from clathrin-independent endocytosis serve as precursors for endothelial lumen formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Porat-Shliom

    Full Text Available Clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE is a form of bulk plasma membrane (PM endocytosis that allows cells to sample and evaluate PM composition. Once in endosomes, the internalized proteins and lipids can be recycled back to the PM or delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Endosomes arising from CIE contain lipid and signaling molecules suggesting that they might be involved in important biological processes. During vasculogenesis, new blood vessels are formed from precursor cells in a process involving internalization and accumulation of endocytic vesicles. Here, we found that CIE has a role in endothelial lumen formation. Specifically, we found that human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs utilize CIE for internalization of distinct cargo molecules and that in three-dimensional cultures CIE membranes are delivered to the newly formed lumen.

  20. The Presence of Modifiable Residues in the Core Peptide Part of Precursor Nisin Is Not Crucial for Precursor Nisin Interactions with NisB- and NisC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khusainov, Rustem; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2013-01-01

    Precursor nisin is a model posttranslationally modified precursor lantibiotic that can be structurally divided into a leader peptide sequence and a modifiable core peptide part. The nisin core peptide clearly plays an important role in the precursor nisin - nisin modification enzymes interactions, s

  1. Blood vessels, circulation and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series, describes the vessels of the body's blood and lymphatic circulatory systems. Blood pressure and its regulatory systems are examined. The causes and management of hypertension are also explored. It is important that nurses and other healthcare professionals understand the various mechanisms involved in the regulation of blood pressure to prevent high blood pressure or ameliorate its damaging consequences.

  2. Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as obstructive jaundice: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awasum Michael

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute leukemias very rarely present with jaundice. Herein we report a case of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that presented with jaundice in an adult. Case presentation A 44-year-old Hispanic man presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and jaundice. His initial blood work revealed pancytopenia and hyperbilirubinemia. Direct bilirubin was more than 50% of the total. His imaging studies were unremarkable except for hepatomegaly. All blood screening tests for various hepatocellular etiologies were normal. A diagnosis of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was made upon liver biopsy. It also showed lymphocytic infiltration of the hepatic parenchyma leading to bile stasis. The diagnosis was subsequently confirmed upon bone marrow biopsy. The patient was treated with a hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide/vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone regimen. Conclusion Acute lymphoblastic leukemia should be one of the differential diagnoses that should be considered when initial work-up for jaundice is inconclusive. Some cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been reported in both adults and children to have presented with the initial manifestation of jaundice, but only a few had no radiographic evidence of biliary obstruction. Such presentation can pose a serious diagnostic dilemma for clinicians. This manuscript attempts to highlight it. Moreover, we believe that if acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentations similar to this case continue to be reported in adults or children, a specific immunophenotypic expression and cytogenetic abnormality may be found to be associated with hepatic infiltration by leukemia. This may substantially contribute to the further understanding of the pathophysiology of this hematologic disease.

  3. Blood Pressure Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an online personal health record or blood pressure tracker, for example. This gives you the option of ... lower your blood pressure. Exercise regularly. Regular physical activity can help lower your blood pressure and keep ...

  4. Blood Type Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Presents a blood type puzzle that provides a visual, hands-on mechanism by which students can examine blood group reactions. Offers students an opportunity to construct their own knowledge about blood types. (JRH)

  5. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and rises sharply on waking. Blood pressure: How low can you go? What's considered low blood pressure ... even life-threatening disorders. Conditions that can cause low blood pressure Some medical conditions can cause low ...

  6. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  7. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of articles from the 2016 ASH Annual Meeting Education Program Blood: How I Treat A compendium of Blood articles updated to reflect the most recent scientific research View all publications For Patients Blood Basics ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a unique focus ... help: Results of Clinical Studies Published in Blood Search Blood , the official journal of ASH, for the ...

  9. Home blood sugar testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - home glucose testing; Diabetes - home blood sugar testing ... Usual times to test your blood sugar are before meals and at bedtime. Your provider may ask you to check your blood sugar 2 hours after a meal or ...

  10. What Is Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation for America's Blood Centers ADRP What is blood? PUBLICATIONS EDUCATION PRESS ROOM BLOG CAREERS CONTACT ABC ... for patients who need it. One unit of blood can be separated into the following components: Nearly ...

  11. Ketones blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight ... there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  12. Magnesium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  13. CEA blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinoembryonic antigen blood test ... A blood sample is needed . ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. ...

  14. Glucagon blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type I - glucagon test; Hypoglycemia - glucagon test; Low blood sugar - glucagon test ... A blood sample is needed . ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel ... Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This ...

  15. Special Blood Donation Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... takes about 10 minutes. Double red blood cell donation In the so-called double red blood cell ... can be cured with apheresis. Directed or designated donation Family members or friends can donate blood specifically ...

  16. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased by the following: Previous blood clots A genetic predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e. ... you are interested in learning more about blood diseases and disorders, here are a few other resources ...

  17. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  18. Blood Gases Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... known as: Arterial Blood Gases; ABGs Formal name: Arterial Blood Gas Analysis Related tests: Electrolytes , Bicarbonate , BUN , Creatinine , Emergency and ... lives higher than sea level. Results from an arterial blood gas analysis are not diagnostic; they should be used in ...

  19. Coughing up blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gastrointestinal tract. Blood that comes up with a cough often looks bubbly because it is mixed with ... conditions, diseases, and medical tests may make you cough up blood. These include: Blood clot in the ...

  20. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other resources that may be of some help: Results of Clinical Studies Published in Blood Search Blood , the official journal of ASH, for the results of the latest blood research. While recent articles ...

  1. Symptoms of Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leg (causing most often swelling, redness, and/or warmth of the leg or shortness of breath) Petechiae ( ... Disorders Symptoms of Blood Disorders Medical History and Physical Examination for Blood Disorders Laboratory Tests for Blood ...

  2. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Blood Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Culture Print A A ... adjust the treatment choice. Why Do a Blood Culture? During some illnesses, certain infection-causing bacteria and ...

  3. Blood and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patient diversity. For example, U-negative and Duffy-negative blood types are unique to the African-American community. ... most common blood type and because type O negative blood, in particular, is the universal type needed for ...

  4. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  5. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  6. Myoglobin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin blood test; Myositis - myoglobin blood test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin blood test ... too high, it can damage the kidneys. This test is ordered when your health care provider suspects ...

  7. High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cholesterol? To understand high blood cholesterol (ko-LES-ter- ... cholesterol from your body. What Is High Blood Cholesterol? High blood cholesterol is a condition in which ...

  8. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood clots A genetic predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) ... If you find that you are interested in learning more about blood diseases and disorders, here are ...

  9. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low blood pressure (hypotension) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Low blood pressure might seem desirable, and for some people, it causes no problems. However, for many people, abnormally low blood pressure (hypotension) can cause dizziness and fainting. In severe ...

  10. Red blood cell production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to one part of the body or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job ... is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of ...

  11. Strong Correlation Between Concentrations of Tenofovir (TFV) Emtricitabine (FTC) in Hair and TFV Diphosphate and FTC Triphosphate in Dried Blood Spots in the iPrEx Open Label Extension: Implications for Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Adherence Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Monica; Glidden, David V; Liu, Albert; Anderson, Peter L; Horng, Howard; Defechereux, Patricia; Guanira, Juan V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Grant, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Self-reported adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has limitations, raising interest in pharmacologic monitoring. Drug concentrations in hair and dried blood spots (DBS) are used to assess long-term-exposure; hair shipment/storage occurs at room temperature. The iPrEx Open Label Extension collected DBS routinely, with opt-in hair collection; concentrations were measured with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In 806 hair-DBS pairs, tenofovir (TFV) hair levels and TFV diphosphate (DP) in DBS were strongly correlated (Spearman coefficient r = 0.734; P hair TFV/DBS emtricitabine (FTC) triphosphate (TP) (r = 0.781; P hair FTC/DBS TFV-DP (r = 0.74; P hair FTC/DBS FTC-TP (r = 0.587; P Hair TFV/FTC concentrations correlate strongly with DBS levels, which are predictive of PrEP outcomes.

  12. Money for Blood and Markets for Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derpmann, Simon; Quante, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Ontario's Bill 178 proposing a Voluntary Blood Donations Act declares the offer or acceptance of payment for the donation of blood a legal offence and makes it subject to penalty. The bill reinvigorates a fundamental debate about the ethical problems associated with the payment of money for blood. Scarcity of blood donors is a recurring problem in most health systems, and monetary remuneration of the willingness to donate blood is regularly discussed--and sometimes practiced--as a means to overcome scarcity in blood. However, making blood an object of economic exchange has long aroused ethical concerns that often refer to the specific meaning of blood. From the perspective of a modern understanding of money as a metric of economic value, the exchange of money for blood--shed or given--is seen as ethically troubling, because it appears to imply a commensurability of the value of human life and economic wealth. In this paper, we begin with a general taxonomy of the types of arguments that speak in favour or against compensating donors for giving blood. We then describe the context in which the discussion about payment for blood arises, and of the specific aims and concerns that are brought forward in this context. This is used to reconstruct the normative background that supports the rejection of payment for blood as it is envisaged in Bill 178 and the aims of the proposal. We then argue that while a payment indeed changes the nature of a blood donation in an ethically considerable way, we do not believe that decisive arguments against the monetary remuneration of blood donations can be substantiated, at least not independently of assuming specific societal circumstances. Thus it may be possible to establish a stable and safe blood supply through just gratification while at the same time taking strong provisions against social disconnection, injustice, exploitation or heteronomy.

  13. Conformational analysis of thioglycoside derivatives of histo-blood group ABH antigens using an ab initio-derived reparameterization of MM4: implications for design of non-hydrolysable mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strino, Francesco; Lii, Jenn-Huei; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2009-12-01

    Histo-blood group ABH antigens serve as recognition sites for infectious microorganisms and tissue lectins in intercellular communication, e.g. in tumor progression. Thus, they are of interest as a starting point for drug design. In this respect, potent non-hydrolysable derivatives such as thioglycosides are of special interest. As prerequisite to enable estimations of ligand properties relative to their natural counterparts, conformational properties of the thioglycosidic derivatives of ABH trisaccharides and their disaccharide units were calculated using systematic and filtered systematic searches with the MM4 force field. Parameters for the glycosidic torsions of thioglycosides were independently derived from ab initio calculations. The resulting energy deviations required a reparameterization of MM4 to a new parameter set called MM4R. The data sets obtained using MM4R reveal that the thioglycosides have somewhat increased levels of flexibility about the major low-energy conformations shared with the corresponding O-glycosides. In the trisaccharides, the thiosubstitution of the Gal[NAc]α1-3Gal linkage leads to a preference for a conformation which is the secondary minimum of the natural counterparts. This conformation also generates contacts between the N-acetyl group and the fucose moiety in the blood group A derivative. Calculations further indicate that thiosubstitution of only the Fucα1-2Gal linkage does not affect the conformational preferences compared to the natural trisaccharide. Thiosubstitution of both linkages in the trisaccharide results in increased flexibility but the favored conformation of the natural trisaccharides is preferred. The study suggests that thioglycoside derivatives of ABH antigens could have pharmaceutical interest as ligands of lectins and other carbohydrate-binding proteins.

  14. Multiple Modes of Communication between Neurons and Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maldonado, Paloma P; Angulo, María Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The surprising discovery of bona fide synapses between neurons and oligodendrocytes precursor cells (OPCs) 15 years ago placed these progenitors as real partners of neurons in the CNS. The role of these synapses has not been established yet, but a main hypothesis is that neuron-OPC synaptic activity

  15. NASA's Accident Precursor Analysis Process and the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Frank; Lutomski, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the implementation of Accident Precursor Analysis (APA), as well as the evaluation of In-Flight Investigations (IFI) and Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA) data for the identification of unrecognized accident potentials on the International Space Station.

  16. The isoprenoid-precursor dependence of Plasmodium spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Hirsch, Anna K. H.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increase in resistance of Plasmodium spp. against available antimalarials, there is a need for new, effective and innovative drugs. The non-mevalonate pathway for the biosynthesis of the universal isoprenoid precursors, which is absent in humans, is suggested as an attractive source of

  17. Manganite perovskite ceramics, their precursors and methods for forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, David Alan; Clothier, Brent Allen

    2015-03-10

    Disclosed are a variety of ceramics having the formula Ln.sub.1-xM.sub.xMnO.sub.3, where 0.Itoreq.x.Itoreq.1 and where Ln is La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu or Y; M is Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, or Pb; manganite precursors for preparing the ceramics; a method for preparing the precursors; and a method for transforming the precursors into uniform, defect-free ceramics having magnetoresistance properties. The manganite precursors contain a sol and are derived from the metal alkoxides: Ln(OR).sub.3, M(OR).sub.2 and Mn(OR).sub.2, where R is C.sub.2 to C.sub.6 alkyl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 alkoxyalkyl, or C.sub.6 to C.sub.9 aryl. The preferred ceramics are films prepared by a spin coating method and are particularly suited for incorporation into a device such as an integrated circuit device.

  18. The telescience experiment progamme TELEX for the Columbus Precursor Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungius, C. B.; Limbourg, M. C.; Wittmann, K.; Bennett, E.

    1992-08-01

    The paper overviews the telescience experiment program TELEX developed by the Microgravity User Support Centre (MUSC) and the Belgium User Support and Operation Centre for missions such as Columbus Precursor Flights. TELEX will be used to develop, test, and demonstrate in a stepwise manner the Columbus laboratory operations concept. Special attention is given to the TELEX operations and implementation.

  19. Laser microdissection of sensory organ precursor cells of Drosophila microchaetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulalie Buffin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Drosophila, each external sensory organ originates from the division of a unique precursor cell (the sensory organ precursor cell or SOP. Each SOP is specified from a cluster of equivalent cells, called a proneural cluster, all of them competent to become SOP. Although, it is well known how SOP cells are selected from proneural clusters, little is known about the downstream genes that are regulated during SOP fate specification. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to better understand the mechanism involved in the specification of these precursor cells, we combined laser microdissection, toisolate SOP cells, with transcriptome analysis, to study their RNA profile. Using this procedure, we found that genes that exhibit a 2-fold or greater expression in SOPs versus epithelial cells were mainly associated with Gene Ontology (GO terms related with cell fate determination and sensory organ specification. Furthermore, we found that several genes such as pebbled/hindsight, scabrous, miranda, senseless, or cut, known to be expressed in SOP cells by independent procedures, are particularly detected in laser microdissected SOP cells rather than in epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results confirm the feasibility and the specificity of our laser microdissection based procedure. We anticipate that this analysis will give new insight into the selection and specification of neural precursor cells.

  20. College Student Stress: A Predictor of Eating Disorder Precursor Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Virginia L.; Valkyrie, Karena T.

    2010-01-01

    Eating disorders are compulsive behaviors that can consume a person's life to the point of becoming life threatening. Previous research found stress associated with eating disorders. College can be a stressful time. If stress predicted precursor behaviors to eating disorders, then counselors would have a better chance to help students sooner. This…

  1. Carbon molecular sieve membranes prepared from porous fiber precursor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsema, J.N.; van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Koops, G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are usually prepared from dense polymeric precursors that already show intrinsic gas separation properties. The rationale behind this approach is that the occurrence of any kind of initial porosity will deteriorate the final CMS performance. We will show that

  2. Developmental Dyslexia: Early Precursors, Neurobehavioral Markers, and Biological Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benasich, April A., Ed.; Fitch, R. Holly, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the precursors and early indicators of dyslexia is key to early identification and effective intervention. Now there's a single research volume that brings together the very latest knowledge on the earliest stages of dyslexia and the diverse genetic, neurobiological, and cognitive factors that may contribute to it. Based on findings…

  3. Precursors to numeracy in kindergartners with specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemans, M.A.J.; Segers, P.C.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated to what extent children with specific language impairment (SLI) differ in their early numeracy skills, when compared to normal language achieving (NLA) children. It was also explored which precursors were related to the early numeracy skills in both groups. Sixty-one

  4. Antibody-bound amyloid precursor protein upregulates ornithine decarboxylase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Tatjana; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Gabrielsson, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by extracellular accumulation of the Abeta peptide, derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The function of APP as a cell surface receptor was examined by ligand-mimicking using an antibody against the APP extracellular...

  5. Synthesis of new diverse macrocycles from diol precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Marie; Hansen, Martin; Thrane, Marie V.;

    2010-01-01

    The formation of a library of diverse macrocycles with different ring sizes from two easily accessible building blocks is presented. Reacting diol precursors with electrophilic reagents lead to 17-membered sulfites and 19-membered malonates in 34–79% yield. Double-reductive amination of dialdehyd...

  6. Carbon molecular sieve membranes prepared from porous fiber precursor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsema, Jonathan N.; Vegt, van der N.F.A.; Koops, G.H.; Wessling, M.

    2002-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are usually prepared from dense polymeric precursors that already show intrinsic gas separation properties. The rationale behind this approach is that the occurrence of any kind of initial porosity will deteriorate the final CMS performance. We will show that i

  7. Observations on the Influence of Precursor Conformations on Macrocyclization Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøj, Peter; Beldring, Klavs; Nielsen, Anders R.

    2016-01-01

    macrocyclization to afford a mixture of diastereomeric sulfites, subjection of the other precursor to identical reaction conditions resulted in the isolation of the linear dichloride. We hypothesize that there is a difference in the ability of the two molecules to adopt a conformation that is germane...... to macrocyclization, a proposition that is supported by conformational analyses using molecular mechanics....

  8. The isoprenoid-precursor dependence of Plasmodium spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Hirsch, Anna K. H.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the increase in resistance of Plasmodium spp. against available antimalarials, there is a need for new, effective and innovative drugs. The non-mevalonate pathway for the biosynthesis of the universal isoprenoid precursors, which is absent in humans, is suggested as an attractive source of ta

  9. Tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    carrier carbohydrate chains. Histo-blood group antigens are found in most epithelial tissues. Meanwhile, several factors influence the type, the amount, and the histological distribution of histoblood group antigens, i.e. the ABO, Lewis, and saliva-secretor type of the individual, and the cell- and tissue......The introduction of immunohistochemical techniques and monoclonal antibodies to specific carbohydrate epitopes has made it possible to study in detail the tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens and related carbohydrate structures. The present paper summarizes the available data...... concerning the histological distribution of histo-blood group antigens and their precursor structures in normal human tissues. Studies performed have concentrated on carbohydrate antigens related to the ABO, Lewis, and TTn blood group systems, i.e. histo-blood group antigens carried by type 1, 2, and 3 chain...

  10. "The Correlation between the Percent of CD3- CD56+ Cells and NK Precursor Function "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Gharehbaghian

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The number and function of human natural killer (NK cells are generally assessed to monitor the baseline of immune function, the effect of treatment, the progress of malignancy or metastases and diseases. NK cells recognise and kill target cells in the absence of prior sensitisation and are able to defend the host from infection or prevent the progression of a disease. Human NK cells express CD16 and CD56 which are (massively being used as a major hallmark for the NK cell. The purpose of this study was to identify the unique subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC (%CD3-CD56+ cells by flow cytometry and to determine whether there is any correlation with functionally mature progeny of (NKp precursor after five days of culture. The correlation was analysed using samples obtained from 120 Caucasian patients. 20-30ml of whole blood was collected in sterile tube containing preservative free sodium heparin and a similar sample was obtained after five days. Maturation of NKp required the continuous presence of recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2, or interleukin 15 (rIL-15 and functional maturity of NK cells was determined by their ability to lyse target cells from the K562 cell line. The NK precursor frequency was measured by limiting dilution analysis (LDA, which The NKpf assay was set up with a range of cell dilutions from 40,000 to 625 per 100l/well in 96 well culture plates. At the end of the culture period the K562 cell line labelled with Europium (Eu-K562 was added and Eu release measured in culture supernatants using time-resolved fluorometry. The PBMC were set up in parallel cultures under various conditions .On day five cells were collected from culture plates and adjusted to 1x10 cells/ml and then mixed. The mixture was incubated and anti CD3 and anti CD56 were added. NK cells were enumerated in 120 patients by double staining with a combination of anti-CD3- and anti-CD56+. The results of these Immunophenotyping studies by flow

  11. Different mechanisms must be considered to explain the increase in hippocampal neural precursor cell proliferation by physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert W Overall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus is strongly increased by physical activity. The mechanisms through which this behavioral stimulus induces cell proliferation, however, are not yet understood. In fact, even the mode of proliferation of the stem and progenitor cells is not exactly known. Evidence exists for several mechanisms including cell cycle shortening, reduced cell death and stem cell recruitment, but as yet no model can account for all observations. An appreciation of how the cells proliferate, however, is crucial to our ability to model the neurogenic process and predict its behavior in response to pro-neurogenic stimuli. In a recent study, we addressed modulation of the cell cycle length as one possible mode of regulation of precursor cell proliferation in running mice. Our results indicated that the observed increase in number of proliferating cells could not be explained through a shortening of the cell cycle. We must therefore consider other mechanisms by which physical activity leads to enhanced precursor cell proliferation. Here we review the evidence for and against several different hypotheses and discuss the implications for future research in the field.

  12. Ethics as a precursor to organization–public relationships: Building trust before and during the OPR model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon A. Bowen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study builds on the public relations theory of organization–public relationships (OPRs by exploring the role of ethics as a precursor to building OPRs. We qualitatively explore the existing relationship variables in the context of ethical behavior as a precursor to building authentic, long-term relationships with publics that will eventually benefit an organization’s effectiveness and reputation. These variables have not yet been explored in terms of ethics. We conducted elite interviews with public relations professionals of North America, Europe, and Asia who were either: (1 chief communications officers at the top of responsibility in the public relations function or (2 highly placed public relations professionals involved in the agency world who are in charge of regions or the heads of independent consultancies. Prior studies show that trust is a crucial variable of OPR and building on that foundation, we examine how ethics and trust are interrelated as part of complex relationships. Our research contributes to the foundation of ethics in building trust in both OPRs and the excellence theory within public relations. This study provides analysis and implications for the public relations industry in the use of ethics as a precursor to OPR, to build relationships between organizations and publics.

  13. [Blood rheologic disorders in patients with polycythemia vera and their correction by therapeutic erythrocytapheresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhovetskaia, Z M; Prigozhina, T A; Gorbunova, N A; Kalinin, N N; Petrov, M M

    1989-11-01

    The rheologic blood properties were studied in patients with polycythemia vera (PV) before and after erythrocytapheresis. The patients with PV showed a complex of hemorheologic disorders (high blood viscosity at different rates of deviation, intensified red blood cell aggregation, decreased deformability of these cells) found to be implicated in the disease pathogenesis. Erythrocytapheresis promoted the improvement of the rheologic characteristics such as dynamic blood viscosity and the red blood cell aggregation ratio.

  14. Autocatalytic growth of Co on pure Co surfaces using Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoba, R.; Sese, J.; Ibarra, M.R. [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); De Teresa, J.M., E-mail: deteresa@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the autocatalytic growth of Co using Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On Si wafers and Co grown by FEBID, no role is played by autocatalytic growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On Co films grown by sputtering, Co grows autocatalytically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implications of the results on Co by FEBID are discussed. - Abstract: The autocatalytic growth of Co on different surfaces using the Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} precursor is investigated. It is observed that Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} molecules dissociate spontaneously on pure Co surfaces grown by sputtering, forming a pure Co film. The microstructure of this film consists of Co nanocrystals with size below 100 nm. However, when the same type of experiment is done on a Co surface grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition there is no autocatalytic growth of Co. On other surfaces such as Si substrates and Al films grown by sputtering, the spontaneous dissociation of the Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} molecules does not occur. The origin and implications of these results are discussed.

  15. Impaired Picture Arrangement subscores (WAIS-III) associated with decreased place orientation and frontal/occipital blood flow in Alzheimer's disease: Implications for social judgment dysfunction. The Osaki-Tajiri Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuka; Meguro, Kenichi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2016-10-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients manifest not only memory impairment but also deficit of social judgment. However, contrary to frequently recognized deficit, only two neuropsychological tests have been established for assessing "judgment" : the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument domain Abstraction & judgment and the Picture Arrangement subscale of WAIS-III. For the former, we previously reported an association with decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the left parietal lobe. Herein, we analyzed the scores of the Picture Arrangement test. Forty-nine AD patients were classified into two groups, i.e., the high and low PA score groups. The (99m)Tc-ECD SPECT investigation was performed with the voxel-based analysis using SPM5. The Mini-Mental State Examination subscores of "place orientation" showed a correlation with the PA scores. The low PA score group exhibited significantly decreased rCBFs in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus (LIFG), Left Superior Frontal Gyrus (LSFG) and Right Occipital Lobe (ROL), compared with the high PA score group. The ability of PA may be associated with the place orientation, which may be necessary to re-arrange the pictures. The ROL was related to visual recognition. The LSFG may be involved in executive function or "frontal reasoning."

  16. Strong Correlation Between Concentrations of Tenofovir (TFV) Emtricitabine (FTC) in Hair and TFV Diphosphate and FTC Triphosphate in Dried Blood Spots in the iPrEx Open Label Extension: Implications for Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Adherence Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Monica; Glidden, David V.; Liu, Albert; Anderson, Peter L.; Horng, Howard; Defechereux, Patricia; Guanira, Juan V.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Grant, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Self-reported adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has limitations, raising interest in pharmacologic monitoring. Drug concentrations in hair and dried blood spots (DBS) are used to assess long-term-exposure; hair shipment/storage occurs at room temperature. The iPrEx Open Label Extension collected DBS routinely, with opt-in hair collection; concentrations were measured with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In 806 hair-DBS pairs, tenofovir (TFV) hair levels and TFV diphosphate (DP) in DBS were strongly correlated (Spearman coefficient r = 0.734; P < .001), as were hair TFV/DBS emtricitabine (FTC) triphosphate (TP) (r = 0.781; P < .001); hair FTC/DBS TFV-DP (r = 0.74; P < .001); hair FTC/DBS FTC-TP (r = 0.587; P < .001). Drug detectability was generally concordant by matrix. Hair TFV/FTC concentrations correlate strongly with DBS levels, which are predictive of PrEP outcomes. PMID:25895984

  17. Whole-cell fungal transformation of precursors into dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosz-Wilkołazka Anna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical methods of producing dyes involve extreme temperatures and unsafe toxic compounds. Application of oxidizing enzymes obtained from fungal species, for example laccase, is an alternative to chemical synthesis of dyes. Laccase can be replaced by fungal biomass acting as a whole-cell biocatalyst with properties comparable to the isolated form of the enzyme. The application of the whole-cell system simplifies the transformation process and reduces the time required for its completion. In the present work, four fungal strains with a well-known ability to produce laccase were tested for oxidation of 17 phenolic and non-phenolic precursors into stable and non-toxic dyes. Results An agar-plate screening test of the organic precursors was carried out using four fungal strains: Trametes versicolor, Fomes fomentarius, Abortiporus biennis, and Cerrena unicolor. Out of 17 precursors, nine were transformed into coloured substances in the presence of actively growing fungal mycelium. The immobilized fungal biomass catalyzed the transformation of 1 mM benzene and naphthalene derivatives in liquid cultures yielding stable and non-toxic products with good dyeing properties. The type of fungal strain had a large influence on the absorbance of the coloured products obtained after 48-hour transformation of the selected precursors, and the most effective was Fomes fomentarius (FF25. Whole-cell transformation of AHBS (3-amino-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid into a phenoxazinone dye was carried out in four different systems: in aqueous media comprising low amounts of carbon and nitrogen source, in buffer, and in distilled water. Conclusions This study demonstrated the ability of four fungal strains belonging to the ecological type of white rot fungi to transform precursors into dyes. This paper highlights the potential of fungal biomass for replacing isolated enzymes as a cheaper industrial-grade biocatalyst for the synthesis of dyes and other

  18. CARBONACEOUS MATTER PRECURSORS AND METAMORPHIC CONDITIONS IN THERMALLY PROCESSED CHONDRITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirico, E.; Montagnac, G.; Rouzaud, J.; Bonal, L.; Bourot-Denise, M.; Duber, S.; Reynard, B.

    2009-12-01

    Unravelling the origin of carbonaceous matter in pristine chondrites requires the understanding of the effect of post-accretion processes. In chondrites of petrologic type 3, thermal metamorphism modified to various extents the composition and structure of carbonaceous matter. Interestingly, this process controls the degree of structural order of carbonaceous matter, and clues on the thermal history of the parent body may be recovered from the physico-chemical study of carbonaceous matter. Following this framework, geothermometers based on Raman spectrometry of carbonaceous matter and covering a wide range of temperatures (100-650 °C) have been developed over recent years, both on terrestrial rocks and chondrites. While Raman data have been largely interpreted in terms of temperature, they are also the fingerprint of certain metamorphic conditions, especially in the low temperature range relevant to poorly ordered carbonaceous matter. This study investigates the Raman spectra of two series of chondritic carbonaceous matter and coal samples formed from different precursors and under different metamorphic conditions. The Raman spectra of Polyaromatic Carbonaceous Matter (PCM) from 42 chondrites and 27 coal samples, measured with visible (514 nm) and ultra-violet (244 nm) excitation wavelengths, are analyzed. The Raman spectra of low rank coals and chondrites of petrologic types 1 and 2, which contain the more disordered PCM, reflect the distinct carbon structures of their precursors. The 514 nm Raman spectra of high rank coals and chondrites of petrologic type 3 exhibit continuous and systematic spectral differences reflecting different carbon structures present during the metamorphism event. They result from differences in the chemical structures of the precursors concerning for instance the reticulation of polyaromatic units or an abundance of ether functional groups, or possibly from a lack of carbonization processes to efficiently expel oxygen heteroatoms, due

  19. Treating High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    About High Blood Pressure Many people in the United States die from high blood pressure. This condition usually does not cause symptoms. Most ... until it is too late. A person has high blood pressure when the blood pushes against Visit your doctor ...

  20. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  1. BUN - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood urea nitrogen ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health ... if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this ...

  2. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Hyperglycemia is the technical term for high blood glucose (blood sugar). High blood glucose happens when the body has too little insulin or when the body can't use insulin properly. What Causes Hyperglycemia? A number of things can cause hyperglycemia: ...

  3. Clinical relevance of intermittent tumour blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina [British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver (Canada)

    2001-12-01

    One of the goals of translational cancer research is to understand basic 'phenomena' so that tumour response to therapy can be improved. One such phenomenon is intermittent tumour blood flow. The impact of the transient hypoxia that results from decreased tumour blood flow is now beginning to be appreciated in preclinical systems, and also receiving some attention in clinical practise. Thus in this article we review the nature and frequency of microregional blood flow changes in preclinical and clinical tumours and examine the impact of those changes on response to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, the implications of non-constant blood flow for both the growth of the unperturbed tumour and the regrowth of surviving tumour clonogens during and after therapy are examined.

  4. Anti-hepatitis B core antigen testing with detection and characterization of occult hepatitis B virus by an in-house nucleic acid testing among blood donors in Behrampur, Ganjam, Orissa in southeastern India: implications for transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panigrahi Rajesh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection might transmit viremic units into the public blood supply if only hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg testing is used for donor screening. Our aim was to evaluate the prevalence of occult HBV infection among the HBsAg negative/antiHBc positive donations from a highly HIV prevalent region of India. Methods A total of 729 HBsAg negative donor units were included in this study. Surface gene and precore region were amplified by in house nucleic acid test (NAT for detection of occult HBV infection and surface gene was analyzed after direct sequencing. Results A total of 220 (30.1% HBsAg negative donors were antiHBc positive, of them 66 (30% were HBV DNA positive by NAT. HBV DNA positivity among 164 antiHBc only group, was 27.1% and among 40 antiHBs positive group was 30.0%. HBV/D (93.3% was predominant and prevalence of both HBV/C and HBV/A was 3.3%. Single or multiple amino acids substitutions were found in 95% samples. Conclusion Thus, a considerable number of HBV infected donors remain undiagnosed, if only HBsAg is used for screening. Addition of antiHBc testing for donor screening, although will lead to rejection of a large number of donor units, will definitely eliminate HBV infected donations and help in reducing HBV transmission with its potential consequences, especially among the immunocompromised population. The HBV genetic diversity found in this donor population are in accordance with other parts of India.

  5. Activation of Na+/H+ and K+/H+ exchange by calyculin A in Amphiuma tridactylum red blood cells: implications for the control of volume-induced ion flux activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Acevedo, Alejandro; Rigor, Robert R.; Maldonado, Hector M.; Cala, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Alteration in cell volume of vertebrates results in activation of volume-sensitive ion flux pathways. Fine control of the activity of these pathways enables cells to regulate volume following osmotic perturbation. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation have been reported to play a crucial role in the control of volume-sensitive ion flux pathways. Exposing Amphiuma tridactylu red blood cells (RBCs) to phorbol esters in isotonic medium results in a simultaneous, dose-dependent activation of both Na+/H+ and K+/H+ exchangers. We tested the hypothesis that in Amphiuma RBCs, both shrinkage-induced Na+/H+ exchange and swelling-induced K+/H+ exchange are activated by phosphorylation-dependent reactions. To this end, we assessed the effect of calyculin A, a phosphatase inhibitor, on the activity of the aforementioned exchangers. We found that exposure of Amphiuma RBCs to calyculin-A in isotonic media results in simultaneous, 1–2 orders of magnitude increase in the activity of both K+/H+ and Na+/H+ exchangers. We also demonstrate that, in isotonic media, calyculin A-dependent increases in net Na+ uptake and K+ loss are a direct result of phosphatase inhibition and are not dependent on changes in cell volume. Whereas calyculin A exposure in the absence of volume changes results in stimulation of both the Na+/H+ and K+/H+ exchangers, superimposing cell swelling or shrinkage and calyculin A treatment results in selective activation of K+/H+ or Na+/H+ exchange, respectively. We conclude that kinase-dependent reactions are responsible for Na+/H+ and K+/H+ exchange activity, whereas undefined volume-dependent reactions confer specificity and coordinated control. PMID:18799654

  6. Superior long-term repopulating capacity of G-CSF+plerixafor-mobilized blood: implications for stem cell gene therapy by studies in the Hbb(th-3) mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psatha, Nikoleta; Sgouramali, Eleni; Gkountis, Antonios; Siametis, Athanasios; Baliakas, Panayotis; Constantinou, Varnavas; Athanasiou, Evangelia; Arsenakis, Minas; Anagnostopoulos, Achilles; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2014-12-01

    High numbers of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) equipped with enhanced engrafting potential are required for successful stem cell gene therapy. By using thalassemia as a model, we investigated the functional properties of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from Hbb(th3)/45.2(+) mice after mobilization with G-CSF, plerixafor, or G-CSF+plerixafor and the engraftment kinetics of primed cells after competitive primary and noncompetitive secondary transplantation. G-CSF+plerixafor yielded the highest numbers of HSPCs, while G-CSF+plerixafor-mobilized Hbb(th3)/45.2(+) cells, either unmanipulated or transduced with a reporter vector, achieved faster hematologic reconstitution and higher levels of donor chimerism over all other types of mobilized cells, after competitive transplantation to B6.BoyJ/45.1(+) recipients. The engraftment benefit observed in the G-CSF+plerixafor group was attributed to the more primitive stem cell phenotype of G-CSF+plerixafor-LSK cells, characterized by higher CD150(+)/CD48 expression. Moreover, secondary G-CSF+plerixafor recipients displayed stable or even higher chimerism levels as compared with primary engrafted mice, thus maintaining or further improving engraftment levels over G-CSF- or plerixafor-secondary recipients. Plerixafor-primed cells displayed the lowest competiveness over all other mobilized cells after primary or secondary transplantation, probably because of the higher frequency of more actively proliferating LK cells. Overall, the higher HSC yields, the faster hematological recovery, and the superiority in long-term engraftment indicate G-CSF+plerixafor-mobilized blood as an optimal graft source, not only for thalassemia gene therapy, but also for stem cell gene therapy applications in general.

  7. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  8. Whistler damping at oblique propagation - Laminar shock precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. P.; Mellott, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the collisionless damping of whistlers observed as precursors standing upstream of oblique, low-Mach number terrestrial bow shocks. The linear theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma with Maxwellian distribution functions and a magnetic field is considered. Numerical solutions of the full dispersion equation are presented for whistlers propagating at an arbitrary angle with respect to the magnetic field. It is demonstrated that electron Landau damping attenuates oblique whistlers and that the parameter which determines this damping is beta-e. In a well-defined range of parameters, this theory provides damping lengths which are the same order of magnitude as those observed. Thus electron Landau damping is a plausible process in the dissipation of upstream whistlers. Nonlinear plasma processes which may contribute to precursor damping are also discussed, and criteria for distinguishing among these are described.

  9. Atomic scale simulation of carbon nanotube nucleation from hydrocarbon precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Umedjon; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C

    2015-12-22

    Atomic scale simulations of the nucleation and growth of carbon nanotubes is essential for understanding their growth mechanism. In spite of over twenty years of simulation efforts in this area, limited progress has so far been made on addressing the role of the hydrocarbon growth precursor. Here we report on atomic scale simulations of cap nucleation of single-walled carbon nanotubes from hydrocarbon precursors. The presented mechanism emphasizes the important role of hydrogen in the nucleation process, and is discussed in relation to previously presented mechanisms. In particular, the role of hydrogen in the appearance of unstable carbon structures during in situ experimental observations as well as the initial stage of multi-walled carbon nanotube growth is discussed. The results are in good agreement with available experimental and quantum-mechanical results, and provide a basic understanding of the incubation and nucleation stages of hydrocarbon-based CNT growth at the atomic level.

  10. Preparation of tantalum carbide from an organometallic precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, C.P. [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geoquimica. Lab. de Termodinamica e Reatores]. E-mail: carlson at ufrnet.ufrn.br; Favotto, C.; Satre, P.; L' Honore, A.; Roubin, M. [Universite du Toulon et de Var B.P. (France). Equipe der Materiaux a Finalite Specifique. Lab. de Physicochimie du Materiaux et du Milieu Marin]. E-mail: roubin at univ-tln.fr

    1999-03-01

    In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta{sub 2} O{sub 5} nH{sub 2}O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, Ta C, in the powder form at 1000 deg C. The natural sintering of Ta C powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400 deg C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to density the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value. (author)

  11. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor: Molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrouri, K.; Ezzine, M.; Ichcho, S.; Hannache, H.; Denoyel, R.; Pailler, R.; Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulfuric acid, followed by carbonization. The adsorption capacity, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined. The micropore volume was assessed by Dubinin- Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and show the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activation in steam yielded a carbon that contains both micropores and supermicropores. Analysis of the nitrogen isotherm by BET and DR methods established that most of obtained carbons are highly microporous, with high surface areas (≥ 1200 m2/g) and very low mesoporosity.

  12. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D. (Florida)

    2016-11-11

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein–protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(methylsilane) as Ceramic Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Lai; Zhang Feng-jun; Wu Shi; Sun Jin-liang; Ren Mu-su; Fan Xue-qi

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Polysilanes are novel polymers with Si-Si catenation chain. They can be used as precursors for SiC ceramic, have important applications in anti-oxidation of C/C composites[1]. Poly(methylsilane)(PMS), which is anideal precursor to stoichiometric SiC, is synthesized by the sodium polycondensation reaction of monomer CH3SiHCl2. During the reaction, there is an initiation period. In this period there is no obvious exothermic reaction after dropping of monomer, then suddenly eruptive reaction arise and temperature goes up quickly. After the eruption, the polymerization can proceed smoothly. This phenomenon is harmful to scale-up. To solve this problem, we did relevant research, but the additive, crown ether, is expensive[2]. This paper describes the influence of naphthalene(NAPH) and p-dibromobenzene(DBB) on the reaction. Good effect is attained for these additives.

  14. Antarctic new particle formation from continental biogenic precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrö, E.-M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Virkkula, A.; Dal Maso, M.; Parshintsev, J.; Ruíz-Jimenez, J.; Forsström, L.; Manninen, H. E.; Riekkola, M.-L.; Heinonen, P.; Kulmala, M.

    2013-04-01

    Over Antarctica, aerosol particles originate almost entirely from marine areas, with minor contribution from long-range transported dust or anthropogenic material. The Antarctic continent itself, unlike all other continental areas, has been thought to be practically free of aerosol sources. Here we present evidence of local aerosol production associated with melt-water ponds in continental Antarctica. We show that in air masses passing such ponds, new aerosol particles are efficiently formed and these particles grow up to sizes where they may act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The precursor vapours responsible for aerosol formation and growth originate very likely from highly abundant cyanobacteria Nostoc commune (Vaucher) communities of local ponds. This is the first time freshwater vegetation has been identified as an aerosol precursor source. The influence of the new source on clouds and climate may increase in future Antarctica, and possibly elsewhere undergoing accelerating summer melting of semi-permanent snow cover.

  15. Antarctic new particle formation from continental biogenic precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-M. Kyrö

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Over Antarctica, aerosol particles originate almost entirely from marine areas, with minor contribution from long-range transported dust or anthropogenic material. The Antarctic continent itself, unlike all other continental areas, has been thought to be practically free of aerosol sources. Here we present evidence of local aerosol production associated with melt-water ponds in continental Antarctica. We show that in air masses passing such ponds, new aerosol particles are efficiently formed and these particles grow up to sizes where they may act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The precursor vapours responsible for aerosol formation and growth originate very likely from highly abundant cyanobacteria Nostoc commune (Vaucher communities of local ponds. This is the first time freshwater vegetation has been identified as an aerosol precursor source. The influence of the new source on clouds and climate may increase in future Antarctica, and possibly elsewhere undergoing accelerating summer melting of semi-permanent snow cover.

  16. Study of the Optimal Precursors for Blocking Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhina; LUO Dehai

    2005-01-01

    The precursors of dipole blocking are obtained by a numerical approach based upon a quasi-geostrophic barotropic planetary- to synoptic-scale interaction model without topography and with a localized synopticscale wave-maker. The optimization problem related to the precursors of blocking is formulated and the nonlinear optimization method is used to examine the optimal synoptic-scale initial field successfully. The results show that the prominent characteristics of the optimal synoptic-scale initial field are that the synoptic-scale wave train structures exist upstream of the incipient blocking. In addition, the large-scale low/high eddy-forcing pattern upstream of the incipient blocking is an essential precondition for the onset of dipole blocking.

  17. Ceramic fibers from Si-B-C polymer precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Hsu, M. S.; Chen, T. S.

    1993-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC), silicon nitride (Si3N4), and silicon borides (SiB4, SiB6) have thermal stability, oxidation resistance, hardness, and varied electrical properties. All these materials can be prepared in a fiber form from a suitable polymer precursor. The above mentioned fibers, when tested over a temperature range from 25 to 1400 C, experience degradation at elevated temperatures. Past work in ceramic materials has shown that the strength of ceramics containing both carbides and borides is sustained at elevated temperatures, with minimum oxidation. The work presented here describes the formation of ceramic fibers containing both elements, boron and silicon, prepared via the polymer precursor route previously reported by the authors, and discusses the fiber mechanical properties that are retained over the temperature range studied.

  18. Characterization studies of purified HgI{sub 2} precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, M. E-mail: Schieber@vms.huji.ac.il; Zuck, A.; Sanguinetti, S.; Montalti, M.; Braiman, M.; Melekhov, L.; Nissenbaum, J.; Grilli, E.; Guzzi, M.; Turchetta, R.; Dulinski, W.; Husson, D.; Riester, J.L

    1999-06-01

    The ability of HgI{sub 2} powders, used as precursors in mercuric iodide crystal growth, to produce high-quality detectors may be predicted by non-destructive methods like photoluminescence. In fact, it is possible to correlate the presence and the intensity ratio of specific bands in the photoluminescence spectrum of a HgI{sub 2} crystal to its impurity content and stoichiometry. These quantities determine the detector grade that may be achieved using that starting material. Nine different HgI{sub 2} precursors, obtained by different purification methods, have been characterized. The lowest impurity content is achieved via poly-ethylene treatment, which gives also a powder of relatively good stoichiometric quality.

  19. Derivation of multipotent mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells provide access to the earliest stages of human development and may serve as a source of specialized cells for regenerative medicine. Thus, it becomes crucial to develop protocols for the directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells into tissue-restricted precursors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we present culture conditions for the derivation of unlimited numbers of pure mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells and demonstrate multilineage differentiation into fat, cartilage, bone, and skeletal muscle cells. CONCLUSION: Our findings will help to elucidate the mechanism of mesoderm specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation and provide a platform to efficiently generate specialized human mesenchymal cell types for future clinical applications.

  20. Turbulence-induced magnetic fields in shock precursors

    CERN Document Server

    del Valle, Maria Victoria; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo

    2016-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be mostly accelerated at supernova shocks. However, the interstellar magnetic field is too weak to efficiently accelerate galactic cosmic rays up to the highest energies, i.e. $10^{15}$ eV. A stronger magnetic field in the pre-shock region could provide the efficiency required. Bell's cosmic-ray nonresonant streaming instability has been claimed to be responsible for the amplification of precursor magnetic fields. However, an alternative mechanism has been proposed in which the cosmic-ray pressure gradient forms the shock precursor and drives turbulence, amplifying the magnetic field via the small-scale dynamo. A key ingredient for the mechanism to operate are the inhomogeneities present in the interstellar medium (ISM). These inhomogeneities are the consequence of turbulence. In this work we explore the magnetic field amplification in different ISM conditions through 3D MHD numerical simulations.

  1. Optical precursors from classical waves to single photons

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, JF; Loy, MMT; Du, Shengwang

    2013-01-01

    Ever since Einstein’s special relativity in 1905, the principle of invariant light speed in vacuum has been attracting attention from a wide range of disciplines. How to interpret the principle of light speed? Is light referred to continuous light, or light pulse with definite boundaries? Recent discovery of superluminal medium triggered vigorous discussion within the Physics community. Can communication via such “superluminal channel” break the speed limit and thus violate causality principle? Or, will a single photon, which is not governed by classical laws of Physics, tend to break the speed limit? To solve these problems, in this Brief we bring in optical precursor, the theoretical works for which started as early as 1914. This is a typical optical phenomenon combining wave propagation theory and light-wave interaction. Both theory and experimental works are covered in this Brief. The study of precursor verifies that the effective information carried by light pulses can never exceed the speed of lig...

  2. Higher vulnerability and stress sensitivity of neuronal precursor cells carrying an alpha-synuclein gene triplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Flierl

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a multi-factorial neurodegenerative disorder with loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and characteristic intracellular inclusions, called Lewy bodies. Genetic predisposition, such as point mutations and copy number variants of the SNCA gene locus can cause very similar PD-like neurodegeneration. The impact of altered α-synuclein protein expression on integrity and developmental potential of neuronal stem cells is largely unexplored, but may have wide ranging implications for PD manifestation and disease progression. Here, we investigated if induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal precursor cells (NPCs from a patient with Parkinson's disease carrying a genomic triplication of the SNCA gene (SNCA-Tri. Our goal was to determine if these cells these neuronal precursor cells already display pathological changes and impaired cellular function that would likely predispose them when differentiated to neurodegeneration. To achieve this aim, we assessed viability and cellular physiology in human SNCA-Tri NPCs both under normal and environmentally stressed conditions to model in vitro gene-environment interactions which may play a role in the initiation and progression of PD. Human SNCA-Tri NPCs displayed overall normal cellular and mitochondrial morphology, but showed substantial changes in growth, viability, cellular energy metabolism and stress resistance especially when challenged by starvation or toxicant challenge. Knockdown of α-synuclein in the SNCA-Tri NPCs by stably expressed short hairpin RNA (shRNA resulted in reversal of the observed phenotypic changes. These data show for the first time that genetic alterations such as the SNCA gene triplication set the stage for decreased developmental fitness, accelerated aging, and increased neuronal cell loss. The observation of this "stem cell pathology" could have a great impact on both quality and quantity of neuronal networks and could provide a

  3. A role for oxidized DNA precursors in Huntington's disease-like striatal neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele De Luca

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Several human neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxodG in the DNA of affected neurons. This can occur either through direct oxidation of DNA guanine or via incorporation of the oxidized nucleotide during replication. Hydrolases that degrade oxidized purine nucleoside triphosphates normally minimize this incorporation. hMTH1 is the major human hydrolase. It degrades both 8-oxodGTP and 8-oxoGTP to the corresponding monophosphates. To investigate whether the incorporation of oxidized nucleic acid precursors contributes to neurodegeneration, we constructed a transgenic mouse in which the human hMTH1 8-oxodGTPase is expressed. hMTH1 expression protected embryonic fibroblasts and mouse tissues against the effects of oxidants. Wild-type mice exposed to 3-nitropropionic acid develop neuropathological and behavioural symptoms that resemble those of Huntington's disease. hMTH1 transgene expression conferred a dramatic protection against these Huntington's disease-like symptoms, including weight loss, dystonia and gait abnormalities, striatal degeneration, and death. In a complementary approach, an in vitro genetic model for Huntington's disease was also used. hMTH1 expression protected progenitor striatal cells containing an expanded CAG repeat of the huntingtin gene from toxicity associated with expression of the mutant huntingtin. The findings implicate oxidized nucleic acid precursors in the neuropathological features of Huntington's disease and identify the utilization of oxidized nucleoside triphosphates by striatal cells as a significant contributor to the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  4. Surface reconstruction precursor to melting in Au309 clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Fuyi Chen; Li, Z. Y.; Roy L. Johnston

    2011-01-01

    The melting of gold cluster is one of essential properties of nanoparticles and revisited to clarify the role played by the surface facets in the melting transition by molecular dynamics simulations. The occurrence of elaborate surface reconstruction is observed using many-body Gupta potential as energetic model for 309-atom (2.6 nm) decahedral, cuboctahedral and icosahedral gold clusters. Our results reveal for the first time a surface reconstruction as precursor to the melting transitions. ...

  5. The miR-10 microRNA precursor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tehler, Disa; Høyland-Kroghsbo, Nina Molin; Lund, Anders H

    2011-01-01

    The miR-10 microRNA precursor family encodes a group of short non-coding RNAs involved in gene regulation. The miR-10 family is highly conserved and has sparked the interest of many research groups because of the genomic localization in the vicinity of, coexpression with and regulation of the Hox...... gene developmental regulators. Here, we review the current knowledge of the evolution, physiological function and involvement in cancer of this family of microRNAs....

  6. Lineage specification of neuronal precursors in the mouse spinal cord.

    OpenAIRE

    L.J. Richards; Murphy, M.; Dutton, R; Kilpatrick, T J; Puche, A. C.; Key, B; Tan, S S; Talman, P S; Bartlett, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the differentiation potential of precursor cells within the developing spinal cord of mice and have shown that spinal cord cells from embryonic day 10 specifically give rise to neurons when plated onto an astrocytic monolayer, Ast-1. These neurons had the morphology of motor neurons and > 83% expressed the motor neuron markers choline acetyltransferase, peripherin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and L-14. By comparison, < 10% of the neurons arising on monolayers of othe...

  7. Copper Promotes the Trafficking of the Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Karla M.; Hung, Ya Hui; Dalziel, Andrew H.; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina; Wikhe, Krutika; Rembach, Alan; Roberts, Blaine; Masters, Colin L.; Ashley I. Bush; Camakaris, James

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of the amyloid β peptide in the cortical and hippocampal regions of the brain is a major pathological feature of Alzheimer disease. Amyloid β peptide is generated from the sequential protease cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We reported previously that copper increases the level of APP at the cell surface. Here we report that copper, but not iron or zinc, promotes APP trafficking in cultured polarized epithelial cells and neuronal cells. In SH-SY5Y neuronal cells ...

  8. [Plant sterols, cholesterol precursors and oxysterols: small amounts, big effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkonen, Vesa M; Gylling, Helena; Ikonen, Elina

    2015-01-01

    Noncholesterol sterols are present in the body in very low concentrations compared with cholesterol. Minor structural changes in sterols give them completely individual biological activities. Steroid hormones are the best known example of this. The knowledge of other relatives of cholesterol, particularly plant sterols, cholesterol precursors and oxysterols, their properties, physiological effects, significance in disease processes and diagnostic applications has recently undergone a rapid increase.

  9. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  10. Effects of endotoxin on proliferation of human hematopoietic cell precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Rinehart, John J.; Keville, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    In examining the effects of corticosteroids on hematopoiesis in vitro, we observed that results were highly dependent on the lot of commercial fetal calf serum (FCS) utilized. We hypothesized that this variability correlated with the picogram (pg) level of endotoxin contaminating the FCS. Randomly obtained commercial lots of FCS contained 0.39 to 187 pg/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Standard FCS concentrations in hematopoietic precursor proliferation assays (granulocyte-marcrophage colony f...

  11. COS in the stratosphere. [sulfuric acid aerosol precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inn, E. C. Y.; Vedder, J. F.; Tyson, B. J.; Ohara, D.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been detected in the stratosphere, and mixing ratio measurements are reported for altitudes of 15.2 to 31.2 km. A large volume, cryogenic sampling system mounted on board a U-2 aircraft has been used for lower stratosphere measurements and a balloon platform for measurement at 31.2 km. These observations and measurements strongly support the concept that stratospheric COS is an important precursor in the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  12. Laser-induced metal reduction from liquid electrolyte precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsoo; Choi, Choljin

    2013-11-01

    A special sort of laser methods such as direct writing of metal and thin film deposition from liquid precursors was developed for the surface processing and the localized metallization of different kinds of materials. Laser radiation initiates the chemical reaction resulted in the reduction of the metal complexes to the metals in the liquid electrolyte, followed by the metal deposition on the substrate with a high degree of the adhesion. In this study, continuous wave of Ar+ laser generated in multiwave regime with laser power from 5 to 500 mW was chosen for the Copper reduction and deposition on SiO2 substrate. In order to investigate the effect of salt precursors on the properties of the deposited structures, two kinds of electrolyte solution were prepared on the base of CuSO4 and CuCl2. It was shown that metal deposition can be initiated at the laser power of 50 mW. The width of the deposits was found to be substantially dependent on the applied laser power. Deposits were revealed as conductive layers and the resistance of the layers depends strongly on the solution temperature and the salt precursor.

  13. Structural analysis of the precursor pseudogap in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sokichi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the precursor pseudogap (PP) state that emerges on the lower temperature side of the pseudogap phase in cuprate superconductors based on the characteristic layer structure. The coherence among layers in the electronic state may be broken by low energy thermal interactions, whereas the coherence within the layers remains in the phase above the superconducting (SC) phase on account of strongness of the bonding. In this state, the two-electron energy gain (TEG) is also larger than that of SC state and the one-electron energy gain (OEG) is smaller than that of the SC state. We call this incoherent ensemble of in-layer states the in-layer electronic state system (IESS). The PP state is a crossover state between IESS and the normal pseudogap (NP) state, which appears on the upper temperature side, because the d-wave pairing symmetry in cuprates inverts the sign of the difference of the total electronic energy gain between the IESS and the NP state around the nodal region, even though it is positive overall. We perform our analysis at the mean field level. We show that the relationships among the SC gap, the gap of in-layer state, and the transition temperatures in the relevant phases are compatible with existing experimental data. The proposed precursor state requires pairing models to make the SC interactions three-dimensional beyond a single layer, although the precursors have in-layer properties.

  14. Development of techniques for tagging precursor and essential chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swansiger, W.A.; Shepodd, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Phillips, M.L.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The ability to identify the manufacturers and distributors of chemicals seized in raids of illicit drug labs would be of great value in controlling the diversion of these chemicals. We developed a tagging scheme based on the addition of sub-ppM concentrations of various combinations of rare-earth elements to the target chemicals and evaluated a number of techniques for detecting the tags. We developed soluble tags for tagging liquids and selected Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the preferred detection technique. We developed insoluble tags for tagging solids and developed methods to analyze them and mix them into solid precursors. We have successfully demonstrated the tagging of several solvents and two of the precursor chemicals used in one of the most popular clandestine methamphetamine syntheses (ephedrine reacting with hydriodic acid/red phosphorus). The tagging scheme is capable of yielding tens of thousands of signatures (using holmium as an internal standard and up to 9 rare-earths at up to 3 concentrations yields 3{sup 9} {minus} 1 = 19,682 signatures) and is applicable to most of the chemicals on the precursor and essential chemicals list. In the concentrations employed, the tags are safe enough to be added to pharmaceuticals and cheap enough to tag tanker loads of chemicals.

  15. Reduction of precursor decay anomaly in single crystal lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yukio

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal that the precursor decay anomaly in single crystal lithium fluoride is reduced by Sano's decay curve [Y. Sano, J. Appl. Phys. 85, 7616 (1999)], which is much smaller in slope than Asay's decay curve [J. R. Asay, G. R. Fowles, G. E. Duvall, M. H. Miles, and R. F. Tinder, J. Appl. Phys. 43, 2132 (1972)]. To this end, strain, particle, velocity, and stress in a precursor and near the leading edge of the follower changing with time along Sano's decay curve are first analyzed quantitatively. The analysis verified the existence of degenerate contraction waves I and II and a subrarefaction wave R', and the decay process [Y. Sano, J. Appl. Phys. 77, 3746 (1995)] caused in sequence by evolving followers C, I, II, R', Rb. Next, inequalities relating decay rates qualitatively to plastic strain rates at the leading edge of the follower, which are derived using the properties of the followers, are incorporated into the analysis. Calculation results showed that the plastic strain rates were reduced by low decay rates. This indicates that the precursor decay anomaly might be greatly reduced by Sano's decay curve.

  16. Spectroscopy Study of Synthetic Forsterite Obtained from Zeolite Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subotić, B.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Important ceramics materials are prepared from aluminosilicate based precursors using novel methods, offering at the same time a better control over many important properties. Forsterite, due to its good refractoriness with melting point at 2163 K, excellent electrical insulation properties even at high temperatures, low dielectric permittivity, thermal expansion and chemical stability, is a material of interest to engineers and designers especially as an active medium for tuneable laser and is also a material of interest to SOFC (Solid oxide fuel cells manufacturers. The aim of this study is to investigate the synthesis of crystalline forsterite using different zeolite precursors previously activated by ball milling. Synthetic forsterite was synthesized from different zeolite precursors and MgO combining highenergy ball milling and thermal treatment of the mixture under determined conditions of time and temperature for each operation. In this research are studied the solid-state phase transformations taking place at temperatures below 1273 K. The obtained products were characterized using different spectroscopy techniques in comparison with surface analysis method and X-ray diffraction.

  17. Elastic Precursor Decay in S-200F Beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Chris; Anderson, William; Blumenthal, William; Gray, George (Rusty), III

    2013-06-01

    We have performed a number of plate impact experiments on vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) S-200F Be at shock stresses between 2.1 and 23 GPa to gain insight into the dynamic strength and damage behavior of this technologically important material. In this discussion we will focus on our observations of dynamic strength represented by the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) determined from the amplitude of the elastic precursor wave observed in VISAR wave profiles collected at the rear surface of the target for experiments conducted in transmission geometry. We observe monotonic decay in precursor amplitude with run distance for sample thicknesses between 4 and 8 mm. We will discuss the observed precursor decay with respect to the relative roles of twinning and dislocation mediated slip in the overall material mechanical response. We will make comparisons with similar data obtained from experiments conducted on roll-textured plate where the contribution of twinning to initial deformation is expected to be suppressed. C. D. Adams et al., ``Shock Compression of Condensed Matter - 2009,'' AIP Conference Proceedings 1195, 1, 509-512 (2009).

  18. Precursor lesions in pancreatic cancer: morphological and molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Christopher J; Salisbury, Elizabeth L; Biankin, Andrew V; Kench, James

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis and is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death in Western societies. In large part this is due to its typically late presentation, usually as locally advanced or metastatic disease. Identification of the non-invasive precursor lesions to pancreatic cancer raises the possibility of surgical treatment or chemoprevention at an early stage in the evolution of this disease, when more amenable to therapeutic interventions. Precursor lesions to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, in particular pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), have been recognised under a variety of synonyms for over 50 years. Over the past decade our understanding of the morphology, biological significance and molecular aberrations of these lesions has grown rapidly and there is now a widely accepted progression model integrating the accumulated morphological and molecular observations. Further progress is likely to be accelerated by improved mouse models of pancreatic cancer and by insight into the cancer genome gained by the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), in which an Australian consortium is leading the pancreatic cancer initiative. This review also outlines the morphological and molecular features of the other two precursors of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, i.e., intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms.

  19. Observations of Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Koval, A.; Szabo, Adam; Breneman, A.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Maruca, B. A.; Pulupa, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. They have rest frame frequencies f(sub ci) < f much < f(sub ce) and wave numbers 0.02 approx < k rho (sub ce) approx <. 5.0. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves. Al though the precursors can have delta B/B(sub o) as large as 2, fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar shock transitions in three of the four events.

  20. Prolactin stimulates precursor cells in the adult mouse hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L Walker

    Full Text Available In the search for ways to combat degenerative neurological disorders, neurogenesis-stimulating factors are proving to be a promising area of research. In this study, we show that the hormonal factor prolactin (PRL can activate a pool of latent precursor cells in the adult mouse hippocampus. Using an in vitro neurosphere assay, we found that the addition of exogenous PRL to primary adult hippocampal cells resulted in an approximate 50% increase in neurosphere number. In addition, direct infusion of PRL into the adult dentate gyrus also resulted in a significant increase in neurosphere number. Together these data indicate that exogenous PRL can increase hippocampal precursor numbers both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, PRL null mice showed a significant reduction (approximately 80% in the number of hippocampal-derived neurospheres. Interestingly, no deficit in precursor proliferation was observed in vivo, indicating that in this situation other niche factors can compensate for a loss in PRL. The PRL loss resulted in learning and memory deficits in the PRL null mice, as indicated by significant deficits in the standard behavioral tests requiring input from the hippocampus. This behavioral deficit was rescued by direct infusion of recombinant PRL into the hippocampus, indicating that a lack of PRL in the adult mouse hippocampus can be correlated with impaired learning and memory.