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Sample records for blood pool contrast

  1. Magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool contrast agents: future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Univ. Hospitals, Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Goyen, M. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Lotz, J. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Blood pool agents remain in the intravascular space for a longer time period. Therefore the optimal imaging window for vascular structures is widened to about 30 minutes. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first blood-pool contrast agent approved in Europe for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of vessels in the abdomen, pelvis and lower extremity in adults. Other possible applications of blood-pool agents are now being considered, such as assessment of venous thromboembolism, coronary artery disease or sinus venous thrombosis. Perfusion MR imaging holds promise for detecting lung perfusion defects with higher spatial resolution and reduced scan time compared with radionuclide scintigraphy. In coronary artery disease, blood-pool agents enable a substantial increase in the quality of coronary artery imaging. Quantitative myocardial perfusion and myocardial viability seem to be possible, although modifications in protocols and sequence design are necessary for optimal results. Other novel applications of blood-pool agents include monitoring of inflammatory changes in systemic lupus erythematosus and evaluation of tumour invasion into lymph nodes and more reliable assessment of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis. (orig.)

  2. Relaxivity of blood pool contrast agent depends on the host tissue as suggested by semianalytical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgitte Fuglsang; Østergaard, Leif; Kiselev, Valerij G

    Concentration of MRI contrast agents (CA) is commonly determined indirectly using their relaxation effect. In quantitative perfusion studies, the change in the relaxation following a bolus passage is converted into concentrations assuming identical relaxivities for tissue and blood. Simulations...... presented in this study demonstrate that the relaxivity of blood pool CA depends significantly on both the host tissue and the pulse sequence, in agreement with previous experiments. In particular, the relaxation effect of Gd-based CA in brain tissues is several-fold larger than in bulk blood. The results...... can be applied to quantitation of perfusion, functional MRI and vessel size imaging...

  3. Prolonged in vivo circulation time by zwitterionic modification of magnetite nanoparticles for blood pool contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wangchuan; Lin, Jiang; Li, Mingli; Ma, Yongjie; Chen, Yuxin; Zhang, Chunfu; Li, Dan; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-01-01

    Long circulation time is critical for blood pool contrast agents used in high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. For iron oxide particle contrast agents, size and surface properties significantly influence their in vivo performance. We developed a novel long-circulating blood pool contrast agent by introducing zwitterionic structure onto the particle surface. Zwitterionic structure was fabricated by 3-(diethylamino)propylamine (DEAPA) grafted onto the surface of ployacrylic acid coated magnetite nanoparticles via EDC/NHS [N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbo-diimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide] coupling chemistry. Zwitterionic particles demonstrated five times lower macrophage cell uptake than the original particles and low cell toxicity. Magnetic resonance angiography indicated that zwitterionic nanoparticles had much longer in vivo circulation time than the original particles and were an ideal candidate for blood pool contrast agent. We suppose that zwitterionic modification by DEAPA and EDC/NHS can be used generally for coating nanoparticles with carboxyl surface and to prolong their circulating time. PMID:22539402

  4. Combined respiratory and cardiac triggering improves blood pool contrast-enhanced pediatric cardiovascular MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRA suffers from cardiac motion artifacts and often requires a breath-hold. This work develops and evaluates a blood pool contrast-enhanced combined respiratory- and ECG-triggered MRA method. An SPGR sequence was modified to enable combined cardiac and respiratory triggering on a 1.5-T scanner. Twenty-three consecutive children referred for pediatric heart disease receiving gadofosveset were recruited in HIPAA-compliant fashion with IRB approval and informed consent. Children underwent standard non-triggered contrast-enhanced MRA with or without suspended respiration. Additionally, a free-breathing-triggered MRA was acquired. Triggered and non-triggered studies were presented in blinded random order independently to two radiologists twice. Anatomical structure delineation was graded for each triggered and non-triggered acquisition and the visual quality on triggered MRA was compared directly to that on non-triggered MRA. Triggered images received higher scores from each radiologist for all anatomical structures on each of the two reading sessions (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P < 0.05). In direct comparison, triggered images were preferred over non-triggered images for delineating cardiac structures, with most comparisons reaching statistical significance (binomial test, P < 0.05). Combined cardiac and respiratory triggering, enabled by a blood pool contrast agent, improves delineation of most anatomical structures in pediatric cardiovascular MRA. (orig.)

  5. Combined respiratory and cardiac triggering improves blood pool contrast-enhanced pediatric cardiovascular MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasanawala, Shreyas S.; Newman, Beverley [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Chan, Frandics P. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Alley, Marcus T. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucas MRS Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRA suffers from cardiac motion artifacts and often requires a breath-hold. This work develops and evaluates a blood pool contrast-enhanced combined respiratory- and ECG-triggered MRA method. An SPGR sequence was modified to enable combined cardiac and respiratory triggering on a 1.5-T scanner. Twenty-three consecutive children referred for pediatric heart disease receiving gadofosveset were recruited in HIPAA-compliant fashion with IRB approval and informed consent. Children underwent standard non-triggered contrast-enhanced MRA with or without suspended respiration. Additionally, a free-breathing-triggered MRA was acquired. Triggered and non-triggered studies were presented in blinded random order independently to two radiologists twice. Anatomical structure delineation was graded for each triggered and non-triggered acquisition and the visual quality on triggered MRA was compared directly to that on non-triggered MRA. Triggered images received higher scores from each radiologist for all anatomical structures on each of the two reading sessions (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P < 0.05). In direct comparison, triggered images were preferred over non-triggered images for delineating cardiac structures, with most comparisons reaching statistical significance (binomial test, P < 0.05). Combined cardiac and respiratory triggering, enabled by a blood pool contrast agent, improves delineation of most anatomical structures in pediatric cardiovascular MRA. (orig.)

  6. Advantages of blood pool contrast agents in MR angiography: a pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadofosveset trisodium (Ablavar®, formerly Vasovist®) is the first intravascular contrast agent approved for clinical use in peripheral vascular disease. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the clinical uses of gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in patients referred for assessment of arteriovenous disease. Superior T1 shortening enables first pass renal and peripheral arteriography of quality comparable with larger doses of extracellular agents. In applications such as thoracic outlet syndrome, there may be other advantages such as superior venous imaging and need for only one injection. Steady-state delayed imaging provides high resolution mapping of both arterial and venous systems and imaging of multiple territories. A combination of dynamic and delayed steady-state imaging can provide detailed anatomy and flow characteristics of vascular malformations and mapping for percutaneous sclerotherapy at one investigation. The ability to image in the steady state can provide minimally invasive imaging of thrombo-occlusive disease of central veins.

  7. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hindel

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles

  8. A blood pool contrast aided T1 functional MRI in patients with brain tumors - a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study was to determine the possibility of using a new functional technique: a T1-dependent sequence with administration of blood pool contrast agent (BPCA), in patients with brain tumors before and after surgical treatment. We also aimed to compare our results with those obtained using the fMRI technique, based on Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) contrast. For each of our 14 oncologic patients (four before and ten after neurosurgical intervention), we obtained: a T1-3D GRE sequence (TR = 2.6 ms/TE = 1.1 ms/FA = 10 ) after intravenous administration of BPCA (0.03 mmol/kg), as well as a T2*EPI sequence (TR = 3 s/TE = 50 ms/FA = 90 ). Movement and/or tactile block type paradigms were carried out during both functional runs. SPM5 software was used for analysis. For both functional techniques, maximum activations were localized in the same areas. There were no significant differences observed in the t values calculated for activations located in the primary motor cortex between groups of pre- and post-intervention patients (in the same functional technique). The mean values for T2* EPI examinations were 10.84 and 9.36, respectively. The mean t values for the T1 technique were lower, especially for the post-intervention patients (5.83 and 3.9, respectively). The T1 technique can be used to detect functional areas in patients with brain tumors, pre-, and post-surgical intervention. This technique enables the evaluation of cortical centers that suffer from susceptibility artifacts when using the T2* BOLD technique. Activations found using both techniques have the same localization, with lower values for the T1 technique. (orig.)

  9. Blood Pool Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Correlation to Digital Subtraction Angiography: A Pictorial Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha-Grace Knuttinen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA provides noninvasive visualization of the vascular supply of soft tissue masses and vascular pathology, without harmful radiation. This is important for planning an endovascular intervention, and helps to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the treatment. MRA with conventional extracellular contrast agents relies on accurate contrast bolus timing, limiting the imaging window to first-pass arterial phase. The recently introduced blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium, reversibly binds to human serum albumin, resulting in increased T1 relaxivity and prolonged intravascular retention time, permitting both first-pass and steady-state phase high-resolution imaging. In our practice, high-quality MRA serves as a detailed "roadmap" for the needed endovascular intervention. Cases of aortoiliac occlusive disease, inferior vena cava thrombus, pelvic congestion syndrome, and lower extremity arteriovenous malformation are discussed in this article. MRA was acquired at 1.5 T with an 8-channel phased array coil after intravenous administration of gadofosveset (0.03 mmol/kg body weight, at the first-pass phase. In the steady-state, serial T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient echo images were obtained with high resolution. All patients underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA and endovascular treatment. MRA and DSA findings of vascular anatomy and pathology are discussed and correlated. BPCA-enhanced MRA provides high-quality first-pass and steady-state vascular imaging. This could increase the diagnostic accuracy and create a detailed map for pre-intervention planning. Understanding the pharmacokinetics of BPCA and being familiar with the indications and technique of MRA are important for diagnosis and endovascular intervention.

  10. Functional Flow Patterns and Static Blood Pooling in Tumors Revealed by Combined Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Yin, Melissa; Adam, Dan; Foster, F Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in tumor perfusion and microenvironment have been shown to be associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes, raising the need for noninvasive methods of tracking these changes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging serve as promising candidates-one has the ability to measure tissue perfusion, whereas the other can be used to monitor tissue oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the different functional parameters measured with DCEUS and PA imaging, using two morphologically different hind-limb tumor models and drug-induced alterations in an orthotopic breast tumor model. Imaging results showed some correlation between perfusion and oxygen saturation maps and the ability to sensitively monitor antivascular treatment. In addition, DCEUS measurements revealed different vascular densities in the core of specific tumors compared with their rims. Noncorrelated perfusion and hemoglobin concentration measurements facilitated discrimination between blood lakes and necrotic areas. Taken together, our results illustrate the utility of a combined contrast-enhanced ultrasound method with photoacoustic imaging to visualize blood flow patterns in tumors. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4320-31. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325651

  11. Synthesis, relaxation properties and in vivo assessment of a carborane-GdDOTA-monoamide conjugate as an MRI blood pool contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Lalit N; Cai, Quanyu; Ma, Lixin; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis, relaxivity measurements and in vivo assessment of a carborane-GdDOTA-monoamide (CB-GdDOTA-MA) amphiphilic conjugate as a blood pool contrast agent (BPCA) is reported. This BPCA exhibited excellent binding (87.4%) with human serum albumin (HSA) and showed a higher relaxivity value (r1 = 6.8 mM(-1) s(-1), 7 T) as compared to the clinically used BPCA, MS-325 (r1 = 5.1 mM(-1) s(-1), 9.4 T) in PBS. The blood pool contrast enhancement (CE) capability of CB-GdDOTA-MA was evaluated by performing MR angiography (MRA) in CF1 mice (n = 4) at a Gd dose of 0.1 mmol per kg body weight. The significant CE of blood vessels persisted for about 3-4 min post-injection (p.i.) and quickly diminishes over time. The significant CE of the bladder for up to 3 h p.i. indicated that the renal system is the primary clearance pathway for CB-GdDOTA-MA. However, the CE of liver tissues and intestine (up to 24 h p.i.) is suggestive of a significant hepatic uptake of the CB-GdDOTA-MA. PMID:26204958

  12. Quantitative evaluation of MR perfusion imaging using blood pool contrast agent in subjects without pulmonary diseases and in patients with pulmonary embolism

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    Hansch, Andreas; Hinneburg, Uta [University Hospital Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology II, Jena (Germany); University Hospital Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology II, Gera (Germany); Kohlmann, Peter; Laue, Hendrik [Fraunhofer MEVIS - Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Boettcher, Joachim [SRH Klinikum Gera, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Gera (Germany); Malich, Ansgar [Suedharzkrankenhaus Nordhausen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nordhausen (Germany); Wolf, Gunter [University Hospital Jena, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena (Germany); Pfeil, Alexander [University Hospital Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology II, Jena (Germany); University Hospital Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology II, Gera (Germany); University Hospital Jena, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    To assess the feasibility of time-resolved parallel three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantitative analysis of pulmonary perfusion using a blood pool contrast agent. Quantitative perfusion analysis was performed using novel software to assess pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in a quantitative manner. The evaluation of lung perfusion in the normal subjects showed an increase of PBF, PBV ventrally to dorsally (gravitational direction), and the highest values at the upper lobe, with a decrease to the middle and lower lobe (isogravitational direction). MTT showed no relevant changes in either the gravitational or isogravitational directions. In comparison with normally perfused lung areas (in diseased patients), the pulmonary embolism (PE) regions showed a significantly lower mean PBF (20 {+-} 0.6 ml/100 ml/min, normal region 94 {+-} 1 ml/100 ml/min; P < 0.001), mean PBV (2 {+-} 0.1 ml/100 ml, normal region 9.8 {+-} 0.1 ml/100 ml; P < 0.001) and mean MTT (3.8 {+-} 0.1 s; normal region 6.3 {+-} 0.1; P < 0.001). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using time-resolved dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to determine normal range and regional variation of pulmonary perfusion and perfusion deficits in patients with PE. (orig.)

  13. Quantitative evaluation of MR perfusion imaging using blood pool contrast agent in subjects without pulmonary diseases and in patients with pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the feasibility of time-resolved parallel three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantitative analysis of pulmonary perfusion using a blood pool contrast agent. Quantitative perfusion analysis was performed using novel software to assess pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in a quantitative manner. The evaluation of lung perfusion in the normal subjects showed an increase of PBF, PBV ventrally to dorsally (gravitational direction), and the highest values at the upper lobe, with a decrease to the middle and lower lobe (isogravitational direction). MTT showed no relevant changes in either the gravitational or isogravitational directions. In comparison with normally perfused lung areas (in diseased patients), the pulmonary embolism (PE) regions showed a significantly lower mean PBF (20 ± 0.6 ml/100 ml/min, normal region 94 ± 1 ml/100 ml/min; P < 0.001), mean PBV (2 ± 0.1 ml/100 ml, normal region 9.8 ± 0.1 ml/100 ml; P < 0.001) and mean MTT (3.8 ± 0.1 s; normal region 6.3 ± 0.1; P < 0.001). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using time-resolved dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to determine normal range and regional variation of pulmonary perfusion and perfusion deficits in patients with PE. (orig.)

  14. Cardiac magnetic resonance angiography using blood-pool contrast agents. Comparison of citrate-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles with gadofosveset trisodium in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare citrate-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) with gadofosveset trisodium as blood pool contrast agents for cardiac magnetic resonance angiography (CMRA) in pigs. Materials and Methods: Animal experiments were approved by the responsible authority. 10 CMRA-like examinations were performed at 1.5 T after administration of VSOP (0.06 mmol Fe/kg; 5 examinations) and gadofosveset trisodium (0.03 mmol Gd/kg; 5 examinations). The CMRA protocol included ECG-gated inversion-recovery-prepared T1-weighted gradient echo imaging (IR-GRE; one slice) and ECG-gated inversion recovery prepared steady state free precession imaging (IR SSFP; one slice) before and 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min after injection. At each time point, three different inversion times (TI; 200 msec, 300 msec, and 400 msec) were applied. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between blood and myocardium were calculated and compared using mixed linear models. Results: No significant differences of CNR were found between IR-GRE and IR SSFP. At 3 and 5 min after contrast agent administration, VSOP showed a significantly higher CNR than gadofosveset trisodium when TI of 200 msec and 300 msec were applied (TI of 200 msec at 3 min: 8.2 ± 0.7 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7; TI of 200 msec at 5 min: 7.9 ± 0.7 vs. 3.5 ± 0.8; TI of 300 msec at 3 min: 11.7 ± 0.7 vs. 8.8 ± 0.8; TI of 300 msec at 5 min: 11.4 ± 0.7 vs. 8.0 ± 0.8; p < 0.05). Moreover, significant differences in favor of VSOP were found for all time points from 10 to 40 min irrespective of TI (p < 0.05). Conclusion: VSOP has superior blood-pool properties compared to gadofosveset trisodium resulting in prolonged improvement of CNR on CMRA. (orig.)

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance angiography using blood-pool contrast agents. Comparison of citrate-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles with gadofosveset trisodium in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnorr, J.; Taupitz, M.; Schellenberger, E.A.; Warmuth, C.; Wagner, S.; Kaufels, N.; Wagner, M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Fahlenkamp, U.L. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Bonn (Germany). Radiologische Klinik

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To compare citrate-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) with gadofosveset trisodium as blood pool contrast agents for cardiac magnetic resonance angiography (CMRA) in pigs. Materials and Methods: Animal experiments were approved by the responsible authority. 10 CMRA-like examinations were performed at 1.5 T after administration of VSOP (0.06 mmol Fe/kg; 5 examinations) and gadofosveset trisodium (0.03 mmol Gd/kg; 5 examinations). The CMRA protocol included ECG-gated inversion-recovery-prepared T1-weighted gradient echo imaging (IR-GRE; one slice) and ECG-gated inversion recovery prepared steady state free precession imaging (IR SSFP; one slice) before and 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min after injection. At each time point, three different inversion times (TI; 200 msec, 300 msec, and 400 msec) were applied. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between blood and myocardium were calculated and compared using mixed linear models. Results: No significant differences of CNR were found between IR-GRE and IR SSFP. At 3 and 5 min after contrast agent administration, VSOP showed a significantly higher CNR than gadofosveset trisodium when TI of 200 msec and 300 msec were applied (TI of 200 msec at 3 min: 8.2 {+-} 0.7 vs. 5.4 {+-} 0.7; TI of 200 msec at 5 min: 7.9 {+-} 0.7 vs. 3.5 {+-} 0.8; TI of 300 msec at 3 min: 11.7 {+-} 0.7 vs. 8.8 {+-} 0.8; TI of 300 msec at 5 min: 11.4 {+-} 0.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 0.8; p < 0.05). Moreover, significant differences in favor of VSOP were found for all time points from 10 to 40 min irrespective of TI (p < 0.05). Conclusion: VSOP has superior blood-pool properties compared to gadofosveset trisodium resulting in prolonged improvement of CNR on CMRA. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance characterization of tumor microvessels in experimental breast tumors using a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent (carboxymethyldextran-A2-Gd-DOTA) with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preda, Anda [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, Center for Pharmaceutical and Molecular Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Novikov, Viktor; Moeglich, Martina; Turetschek, Karl; Shames, David M.; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Brasch, Robert C. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, Center for Pharmaceutical and Molecular Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O. [Pfizer Central Research, Groton, CT (United States); Corot, Claire [Guerbet Laboratories, Aulnay sous Bois (France)

    2005-11-01

    Carboxymethyldextran (CMD)-A2-Gd-DOTA, a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent with a molecular weight of 52.1 kDa, designed to have intravascular residence for more than 1 h, was evaluated for its potential to characterize and differentiate the microvessels of malignant and benign breast tumors. Precontrast single-slice inversion-recovery snapshot FLASH and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using an axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled sequence was performed in 30 Sprague-Dawley rats with chemically induced breast tumors. Endothelial transfer coefficient and fractional plasma volume of the breast tumors were estimated from MRI data acquired with CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA enhancement injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight using a two-compartment bidirectional model of the tumor tissue. The correlation between MRI microvessel characteristics and histopathological tumor grade was determined using the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson method. Using CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA, no significant correlations were found between the MR-estimated endothelial transfer coefficient or plasma volumes with histological tumor grade. Analysis of CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA-enhanced MR kinetic data failed to demonstrate feasibility for the differentiation of benign from malignant tumors or for image-based tumor grading. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance characterization of tumor microvessels in experimental breast tumors using a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent (carboxymethyldextran-A2-Gd-DOTA) with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboxymethyldextran (CMD)-A2-Gd-DOTA, a slow clearance blood pool contrast agent with a molecular weight of 52.1 kDa, designed to have intravascular residence for more than 1 h, was evaluated for its potential to characterize and differentiate the microvessels of malignant and benign breast tumors. Precontrast single-slice inversion-recovery snapshot FLASH and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using an axial T1-weighted three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled sequence was performed in 30 Sprague-Dawley rats with chemically induced breast tumors. Endothelial transfer coefficient and fractional plasma volume of the breast tumors were estimated from MRI data acquired with CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA enhancement injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg body weight using a two-compartment bidirectional model of the tumor tissue. The correlation between MRI microvessel characteristics and histopathological tumor grade was determined using the Scarff-Bloom-Richardson method. Using CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA, no significant correlations were found between the MR-estimated endothelial transfer coefficient or plasma volumes with histological tumor grade. Analysis of CMD-A2-Gd-DOTA-enhanced MR kinetic data failed to demonstrate feasibility for the differentiation of benign from malignant tumors or for image-based tumor grading. (orig.)

  18. High-resolution blood-pool-contrast-enhanced MR angiography in glioblastoma: tumor-associated neovascularization as a biomarker for patient survival. A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Josep; Blasco, Gerard; Remollo, Sebastian; Hernandez, David; Pedraza, Salvador [Hospital Universitari Dr Josep Trueta, Research Unit of Diagnostic Imaging Institute (IDI), Department of Radiology [Girona Biomedical Research Institute] IDIBGI, Girona (Spain); Daunis-i-Estadella, Josep; Mateu, Gloria [University of Girona, Department of Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Girona (Spain); Alberich-Bayarri, Angel [La Fe Polytechnics and University Hospital, Biomedical Imaging Research Group (GIBI230), La Fe Health Research Institute, Valencia (Spain); Essig, Marco [University of Manitoba, Department of Radiology, Winnipeg (Canada); Jain, Rajan [NYU School of Medicine, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Puigdemont, Montserrat [Hospital Universitari Dr Josep Trueta, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Hospital Cancer Registry, Girona (Spain); Sanchez-Gonzalez, Javier [Philips Healthcare Iberica, Madrid (Spain); Wintermark, Max [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Division, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The objective of the study was to determine whether tumor-associated neovascularization on high-resolution gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a useful biomarker for predicting survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastomas. Before treatment, 35 patients (25 men; mean age, 64 ± 14 years) with glioblastoma underwent MRI including first-pass dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion and post-contrast T1WI sequences with gadobutrol (0.1 mmol/kg) and, 48 h later, high-resolution MRA with gadofosveset (0.03 mmol/kg). Volumes of interest for contrast-enhancing lesion (CEL), non-CEL, and contralateral normal-appearing white matter were obtained, and DSC perfusion and DWI parameters were evaluated. Prognostic factors were assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards model. Eighteen (51.42 %) glioblastomas were hypervascular on high-resolution MRA. Hypervascular glioblastomas were associated with higher CEL volume and lower Karnofsky score. Median survival rates for patients with hypovascular and hypervascular glioblastomas treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy were 15 and 9.75 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Tumor-associated neovascularization was the best predictor of survival at 5.25 months (AUC = 0.794, 81.2 % sensitivity, 77.8 % specificity, 76.5 % positive predictive value, 82.4 % negative predictive value) and yielded the highest hazard ratio (P < 0.001). Tumor-associated neovascularization detected on high-resolution blood-pool-contrast-enhanced MRA of newly diagnosed glioblastoma seems to be a useful biomarker that correlates with worse survival. (orig.)

  19. High-resolution blood-pool-contrast-enhanced MR angiography in glioblastoma: tumor-associated neovascularization as a biomarker for patient survival. A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to determine whether tumor-associated neovascularization on high-resolution gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a useful biomarker for predicting survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastomas. Before treatment, 35 patients (25 men; mean age, 64 ± 14 years) with glioblastoma underwent MRI including first-pass dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion and post-contrast T1WI sequences with gadobutrol (0.1 mmol/kg) and, 48 h later, high-resolution MRA with gadofosveset (0.03 mmol/kg). Volumes of interest for contrast-enhancing lesion (CEL), non-CEL, and contralateral normal-appearing white matter were obtained, and DSC perfusion and DWI parameters were evaluated. Prognostic factors were assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards model. Eighteen (51.42 %) glioblastomas were hypervascular on high-resolution MRA. Hypervascular glioblastomas were associated with higher CEL volume and lower Karnofsky score. Median survival rates for patients with hypovascular and hypervascular glioblastomas treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy were 15 and 9.75 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Tumor-associated neovascularization was the best predictor of survival at 5.25 months (AUC = 0.794, 81.2 % sensitivity, 77.8 % specificity, 76.5 % positive predictive value, 82.4 % negative predictive value) and yielded the highest hazard ratio (P < 0.001). Tumor-associated neovascularization detected on high-resolution blood-pool-contrast-enhanced MRA of newly diagnosed glioblastoma seems to be a useful biomarker that correlates with worse survival. (orig.)

  20. Sonographic shift of hypervascular liver tumor on blood pool harmonic images with definity: Time-related changes of contrast-enhanced appearance in rabbit VX2 tumor under extra-low acoustic power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We elucidated the features of the time-related contrast-enhanced ultrasound appearance of hypervascular liver tumor using Definity, which has no accumulation activity in the liver. Ten rabbits with VX2 tumors broadcast into the liver were used. Changes in contrast-enhanced sonograms were evaluated by real-time observation (FR 15 Hz) of harmonic imaging under extra-low MI (MI 0.065) with Definity, and their intensity changes were analyzed. Hepatic angiography (4/10) and histopathological examination (10/10) were performed to investigate the tumor vascularity. VX2 tumors were hypervascular on angiogram (4/10) and histology (10/10). They showed time-related sonographic appearance changes from hyperechoic to hypoechoic, which were confirmed by quantitative intensity analysis. Hypervascular VX2 tumors showed characteristic time-related shift on contrast-enhanced sonograms in real-time and extra-low MI harmonic images with Definity. These findings may be useful for the ultrasound diagnosis of human hypervascular liver tumor like hepatocellular carcinoma with blood-pool contrast agent

  1. Combined magnetic resonance imaging of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary arteries after a single injection of a blood pool contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansch, Andreas; Neumann, Steffi; Baltzer, Pascal; Waginger, Matthias; Kaiser, Werner A.; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Betge, Stefan; Poehlmann, Gunther [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine I, Jena (Germany); Pfeil, Alexander; Wolf, Gunter [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena (Germany); Boettcher, Joachim [SRH Klinikum Gera, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Gera (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Agreement rate between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler ultrasound (DUS) for the detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremities was attempted by using the intravascular MRI contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium. The potential of this method to detect pulmonary embolism (PE) was also evaluated. Forty-three consecutive inpatients with ultrasound-confirmed DVT but no clinical signs of PE were prospectively enrolled in this feasibility study. MRI was performed after a single injection of gadofosveset trisodium. The pulmonary arteries were imaged using a 3D Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) gradient recalled echo sequence. Additionally, pulmonary arteries, abdominal veins, pelvic and leg veins were imaged using a fat-suppressed 3D gradient echo Volume Interpolated Breath-hold Examination (VIBE FS). Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced MRI detected more thrombi in the pelvic region, upper leg and lower leg than the initial DUS. In addition, PE was detected in 16 of the 43 DVT patients (37%). This study shows the feasibility of a combined protocol for the MRI diagnosis of DVT and PE using gadofosveset trisodium. This procedure is not only more sensitive in detecting DVT compared to standard DUS, but is also able to detect PE in asymptomatic patients. (orig.)

  2. Gated cardiac blood pool studies in arrhythmias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biventricular phase analysis a gated blood pool studies may help to solve two fundamental questions raised by patients suffering from arrhythmias: localization of an electrical cardiac activation abnormality by means of contraction mapping and assesment of an underlying organic disease using the phase histograms and their standard deviations. Three groups of patients have been evaluated to demonstrate the usefulness of radioisotopic techniques in arrhythmias: 36 patients with a Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrom, 27 patients studied during a ventricular tachycardia attack and 32 patients suspected of arrhythmogenic ventricular dysplasia. Correlations with invasive electrophysiologic studies are presented and the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these results are discussed

  3. Gated cardiac blood pool studies in arrhythmias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itti, R.; Casset, D.; Philippe, L.; Cosnay, P.; Fauchier, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Biventricular phase analysis a gated blood pool studies may help to solve two fundamental questions raised by patients suffering from arrhythmias: localization of an electrical cardiac activation abnormality by means of contraction mapping and assesment of an underlying organic disease using the phase histograms and their standard deviations. Three groups of patients have been evaluated to demonstrate the usefulness of radioisotopic techniques in arrhythmias: 36 patients with a Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrom, 27 patients studied during a ventricular tachycardia attack and 32 patients suspected of arrhythmogenic ventricular dysplasia. Correlations with invasive electrophysiologic studies are presented and the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these results are discussed.

  4. Nanoparticle encapsulation in red blood cells enables blood-pool magnetic particle imaging hours after injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging approach that is based on the nonlinear magnetization response of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) injected into the blood stream. To date, real-time MPI of the bolus passage of an approved MRI SPIO contrast agent injected into the tail vein of living mice has been demonstrated. However, nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood stream by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Therefore, imaging applications for long-term monitoring require the repeated administration of bolus injections, which complicates quantitative comparisons due to the temporal variations in concentration. Encapsulation of SPIOs into red blood cells (RBCs) has been suggested to increase the blood circulation time of nanoparticles. This work presents first evidence that SPIO-loaded RBCs can be imaged in the blood pool of mice several hours after injection using MPI. This finding is supported by magnetic particle spectroscopy performed to quantify the iron concentration in blood samples extracted from the mice 3 and 24 h after injection of SPIO-loaded RBCs. Based on these results, new MPI applications can be envisioned, such as permanent 3D real-time visualization of the vessel tree during interventional procedures, bleeding monitoring after stroke, or long-term monitoring and treatment control of cardiovascular diseases. (paper)

  5. Dark Blood Magnetic Resonance Lymphangiography Using Dual-Agent Relaxivity Contrast (DARC-MRL): A Novel Method Combining Gadolinium and Iron Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Jeffrey H; Neligan, Peter C; Briller, Noah; Mitsumori, Lee M; Wilson, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate a technique to eliminate venous enhancement in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography through shortening T2(⁎) in the blood pool, thus allowing for a lymphatic-only map. Administration of the blood-pool iron agent ferumoxtyol in addition to intracutaneous gadolinium during contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography allows for suppression of vascular structures to achieve venous-free lymphatic mapping. PMID:26460054

  6. Giant coronary artery aneurysm seen on blood-pool study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Alexander; Soontrapa, Suthipong; Singh, Preeti; Sehli, Sharmila; Harris, Jennifer; Suarez, Jose A; Arvandi, Aliakbar; Paone, Ralph F; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2013-01-01

    An 81-year-old man was incidentally found to have a large pericardial cyst on a chest computed tomography. Before surgical removal, an echocardiogram demonstrated that the cyst was more likely a large (7.5 cm) right coronary arterial aneurysm. A cardiac blood-pool study demonstrated a blood-filled structure adjacent to the heart, roughly the same size as the combined size of both the right and left ventricles. Coronary angiography confirmed the presence of a large right coronary artery aneurysm. A coronary aneurysm should be considered when a blood-filled structure is seen adjacent to the heart on a multigated acquisition scan. PMID:23242065

  7. Technical requirements, biophysical considerations and protocol optimization with magnetic resonance angiography using blood-pool agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to maximize the potential benefits of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, careful attention must be paid to the choice of hardware, data acquisition and processing, and to the choice of contrast agent. Typically, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography uses parallel-imaging techniques, which shorten the acquisition time, enhance spatial resolution and reduce artefacts. The timing of data acquisition is crucial for maximal enhancement of the arteries: for optimal arterial depiction, the centre of k-space should be acquired at the time of peak concentration of contrast agent in the arterial bed being investigated, and a number of k-space acquisition techniques are available to achieve this. SENSE or GRAPPA techniques can be used to facilitate parallel-imaging reconstruction of either the image data or k-space data, respectively. Gadolinium contrast agents shorten the proton relaxation times (most importantly T1) of blood, thereby increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and enhancing differentiation between blood vessels and other tissues. The blood-pool (intravascular) contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is reversibly protein-bound in human plasma. This results in a marked increase in relaxivity, and hence a strong T1 shortening effect compared with other gadolinium-based contrast agents. Furthermore, the blood retention time of gadofosveset trisodium is substantially prolonged compared with conventional contrast agents. As a result, gadofosveset trisodium permits both first-pass and steady-state imaging. (orig.)

  8. The diagnostic value of cardiac blood pool imaging in cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-two normal controls and thirty-three patients with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were examined by multigated cardiac imaging and phase analysis. The imaging traits of hypertrophic ones displayed thicken septal wall. The differences of synchronization of ventricular systolic function between hypertrophic ones and normal were statistically significant (P < 0.01). The imaging features of dilated cardiomyopathy showed that ventricular wall motion was seriously hypokinitic or akinitic and left ventricule enlarged abnormally. The function and synchronization of ventricular systole in dilated ones were worse than these in the hypertrophic (P < 0.01). These data suggest that the cardiac blood pool images can diagnose and differentiate the hypertrophic from dilated cardiomyopathy

  9. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity

  10. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W. (AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  11. Modern Perforator Flap Imaging with High-Resolution Blood Pool MR Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagen, Alexander C; Hossain, Rydhwana; Dayan, Erez; Maddula, Soumya; Samson, William; Dayan, Joseph; Smith, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Advances in microsurgical techniques have improved autologous reconstructions by providing new donor site options while decreasing donor site morbidity. Various preoperative imaging modalities have been studied to assess the relevant vascular anatomic structures, with magnetic resonance (MR) angiography traditionally lagging behind computed tomography (CT) with respect to spatial resolution. Blood pool MR angiography with gadofosveset trisodium, a gadolinium-based contrast agent with extended intravascular retention, has allowed longer multiplanar acquisitions with resultant voxel sizes similar to or smaller than those of CT and with improved signal-to-noise ratio and soft-tissue contrast while maintaining the ability to depict flow with time-resolved imaging. The resultant vascular detail enables precise evaluation of the relevant vascular anatomic structures, including the vessel course, size, and branching pattern, as well as the venous arborization pattern. In addition, any architectural distortion, vessel alteration, or injury from prior surgery can be depicted. The reporting radiologist should be aware of pertinent and incidental findings relevant to the planned surgery and the patient's disease so that he or she can assist the microsurgeon in flap design as a member of the multidisciplinary team. Given the lack of ionizing radiation exposure in patients who often have an elevated body mass index, high-spatial-resolution blood pool MR angiography has become the imaging reference standard for the preoperative assessment of perforator flap vascular and soft-tissue morphology in our practice. PMID:25884098

  12. Gated blood pool studies with a single probe - clinical validity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global volume alterations of the heart can be estimated non-invasively by means of the radiocardiographic function analysis developed by Hoffmann and Kleine. Since the failing heart with its functional disturbances demonstrates a pathological volume behaviour under physical exercise, it is possible to use these characteristics to differentiate between the intact heart and the failing heart by registration of the global volume alterations. The gated blood pool technique combined with the registration of the intraventricular pressure pulse by means of a Swan-Ganz flow-directed catheter enables demonstration of ventricular stroke work as a pressure-volume loop (work diagram). Its shape indicates whether the ventricle has to perform mainly pressure work or volume work. Myocardial failure is altering the basic conditions of the heart. The work diagram of the failing heart is significantly different from that of the intact human heart. It is shifted in its pressure-volume coordinates according to an increase of EDV and ESV and the rise of the filling pressure. Case demonstrations reveal the global volume behaviour of the heart under varying conditions: resting and physical exercise, drug influence on the intact and failing heart. (orig.)

  13. Spatially pooled contrast responses predict neural and perceptual similarity of naturalistic image categories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris I A Groen

    Full Text Available The visual world is complex and continuously changing. Yet, our brain transforms patterns of light falling on our retina into a coherent percept within a few hundred milliseconds. Possibly, low-level neural responses already carry substantial information to facilitate rapid characterization of the visual input. Here, we computationally estimated low-level contrast responses to computer-generated naturalistic images, and tested whether spatial pooling of these responses could predict image similarity at the neural and behavioral level. Using EEG, we show that statistics derived from pooled responses explain a large amount of variance between single-image evoked potentials (ERPs in individual subjects. Dissimilarity analysis on multi-electrode ERPs demonstrated that large differences between images in pooled response statistics are predictive of more dissimilar patterns of evoked activity, whereas images with little difference in statistics give rise to highly similar evoked activity patterns. In a separate behavioral experiment, images with large differences in statistics were judged as different categories, whereas images with little differences were confused. These findings suggest that statistics derived from low-level contrast responses can be extracted in early visual processing and can be relevant for rapid judgment of visual similarity. We compared our results with two other, well- known contrast statistics: Fourier power spectra and higher-order properties of contrast distributions (skewness and kurtosis. Interestingly, whereas these statistics allow for accurate image categorization, they do not predict ERP response patterns or behavioral categorization confusions. These converging computational, neural and behavioral results suggest that statistics of pooled contrast responses contain information that corresponds with perceived visual similarity in a rapid, low-level categorization task.

  14. A method for measuring mean circumferential fiber shortening rate from gated blood pool scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejection fraction and ejection rate are easily obtained from gated cardiac images, but no method is available for calculating mean circumferential fiber shortening rate. We assumed that the cube root of left ventricular end-diastolic volume or counts is proportional to the minor axis of the left ventricle at end-diastole or end-systole. Mean circumferential fiber shortening rate is then equal to the [cube root of the end-diastolic volume (count) minus cube root of end-systolic volume (count)] divided by [cube root of end-diastolic volume (count) multiplied by the ejection time]. In 250 contrast ventriculograms, the standard mean circumferential fiber shortening rate (MCFSR) and that derived by the cube root method correlated well (r = 0.94). The mean value of MCFSR (0.85 +- 0.35) was greater than the cube root value (0.75 +- 0.35) (P < 0.001). The regression equation was y = 0.86x + 0.02. Similar correlations were obtained from gated radionuclide images using a semiautomated program (r = 0.93) in 24 subjects or completely automated program (r = 0.85) in 28 patients. The regression equation between MCFSR and that derived from the cube root of counts for the semiautomated program was y = 0.82x + 0.04 and for the automated program was y = 0.84x + 0.004. Similar correlations, slopes, and intercepts were seen using circumferential fractional shortening for angiographic data when correlated with both the semiautomated and automated gated blood pool scan programs. These data indicate that MCFSR and circumferential fractional shortening may be obtained from gated blood pool images using cube root estimates of end-diastolic and end-systolic radii with a high degree of correlation with the standard contrast ventriculographic technique. (orig.)

  15. MRI macromolecular contrast agents as indicators of changed tumor blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. A rapid mapping technique derived from dynamic contrast enhanced MRI data was used to identify and characterize reduction of blood flow in fibrosarcoma SA-1 tumors treated either by application of electric pulses or vinblastine. Materials and methods. Tissue permeability surface area product (PS) and fractional blood volume (BV) were calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis using dynamic MRI intensity data after administration of gadomer- 17 or polylysine-Gd-DTPA; prototypic macromolecular contrast agents designed for blood pool enhancement. PS and BV values of untreated tumors were compared to those of tumors treated by local application of 8 electric pulses (amplitude/distance ratio, 1300 V/cm; duration, 100 μs, frequency, 1 Hz) percutaneously to the tumor or by systemic administration of vinblastine (2.5 mg/kg). Results. Both treatments transiently, but significantly reduced tumor blood flow, application of electric pulses to the tumors being by 40% more effective in reducing tumor blood flow than systemic administration of vinblastine. PS and BV values derived with polylysine-Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI were lower compared to those with gadomer-17, due to larger molecular size. Interestingly, Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI did not show any significant changes of PS and BV between untreated and treated tumors. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that dynamic contrast enhanced MRI can be effectively used to qualitatively monitor tumor blood flow, and quantitatively by means of BV and PS. (author)

  16. Calculation of net renal uptake curves without use of a blood pool agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual method of generating net Hippuran renal uptake curves involves the administration of a blood pool agent. Two techniques are presented which permit the determination of net renal uptake curves from data intrinsic to the Hippuran study. This reduced the complexity of the procedure, as well as reducing its cost and decreasing the radiation exposure. The new procedures were tested in 9 patients and showed excellent correlation with the blood pool agent technique. (orig.)

  17. Comprehensive kinetics of triiodothyronine production, distribution, and metabolism in blood and tissue pools of the rat using optimized blood-sampling protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStefano, J J; Jang, M; Malone, T K; Broutman, M

    1982-01-01

    We have determined estimates for 24 physiological parameters of production, interpool transport, distribution, and metabolism of T3 in the major T3 pools of the unanesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rat, from blood-borne data and a comprehensive model and analysis of this system. Most of these indices have previously been unavailable. Whereas only 3% (2 ng/100 g BW) of the total body T3 pool (74 ng/100 g BW) is in plasma, the composite of slowly equilibrating (slow) tissue pools (e.g. muscle, skin, and brain) appears to contain most of the T3, 76% (57 ng/100 g BW) of the total. The composite of rapidly equilibrating (fast) tissue pools (e.g. liver and kidney) contains the remaining 19% (16 ng/100 g BW). The total body T3 production rate is 0.12 ng/100 g BW . min, and we estimate that about half of this emanates directly from T4 in the slow pools, whereas the remainder is derived from both thyroidal secretion and T4 to T3 conversion in the fast pools. Our results also indicate that T3 molecules spend an average of only 0.5 min in transit each time through plasma, whereas the single pass mean transit times in fast and slow tissue pools (the times available for hormone action) are 10 times and 200 times greater. In contrast, the mean residence time for T3 in the entire system is greater than 12 h despite the extremely rapid early disappearance of injected T3 from plasma. To obtain the required accuracy, we used a novel optimization approach for choosing blood-sampling schedules (1, 4, 44, 202, and 600 min), a remarkably small number of sample times, and each was adjustable by about +/- 20% without effect on optimized parameter accuracies. PMID:7053984

  18. Nephron blood flow dynamics measured by laser speckle contrast imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Pavlov, Alexey N;

    2011-01-01

    simultaneously. The interacting nephron fields are likely to be more extensive. We have turned to laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the blood flow dynamics of 50-100 nephrons simultaneously on the renal surface of anesthetized rats. We report the application of this method and describe analytic...

  19. Diagnostic value of blood pool imaging for limbs viability after electrical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical usefulness of 99mTc labelled red blood cell imaging in the detection of limbs viability after electrical injury. 8 patients were studied. There are two steps in the imaging process: artery perfusion and blood pool imaging. In the case of severe injury, in which muscles were necrotic and vessels are obstructed, no radioactivities appeared in those areas. The imaging results were proved by plastic surgery. This study shows that 99mTc-RBC blood pool imaging is a reliable method for the detection of limbs' viability after electrical injury

  20. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although often asymptomatic, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with significant morbidity in a large proportion of patients. Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology in many instances, involving the whole arterial tree. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) permits rapid, non-invasive and accurate evaluation of the entire vascular system and can be used for both diagnostic purposes and monitoring of vascular involvement in diseases such as diabetes, Marfan's syndrome and Takayasu arteritis. MRA has been used successfully in the identification of high-grade stenosis in PAD, abnormalities of the ileocaval veins and carotid plaque imaging. Carotid disease is significantly correlated with severe coronary artery disease and renal artery atherosclerosis. Symptomatic lesions in one vascular bed are often related to additional asymptomatic atherosclerotic lesions in other vascular regions. MRA may be advantageous over computed tomographic angiography because it can be performed with contrast media virtually devoid of serious toxicity and without utilization of ionizing radiation. Display of the entire arterial vasculature can be achieved in < 90 s, with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Recent technological advances, such as parallel imaging and the implementation of dedicated matrix coils, have further increased image quality, and in combination with the blood-pool contrast agents, such as gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany), extended imaging time, higher spatial resolution and larger anatomical coverage can be achieved. (orig.)

  1. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, H. [Inst. for Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital Munich, Munich (Germany); Morana, G. [Radiological Dept., Hospital Ca' Foncello, Treviso (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    Although often asymptomatic, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with significant morbidity in a large proportion of patients. Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology in many instances, involving the whole arterial tree. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) permits rapid, non-invasive and accurate evaluation of the entire vascular system and can be used for both diagnostic purposes and monitoring of vascular involvement in diseases such as diabetes, Marfan's syndrome and Takayasu arteritis. MRA has been used successfully in the identification of high-grade stenosis in PAD, abnormalities of the ileocaval veins and carotid plaque imaging. Carotid disease is significantly correlated with severe coronary artery disease and renal artery atherosclerosis. Symptomatic lesions in one vascular bed are often related to additional asymptomatic atherosclerotic lesions in other vascular regions. MRA may be advantageous over computed tomographic angiography because it can be performed with contrast media virtually devoid of serious toxicity and without utilization of ionizing radiation. Display of the entire arterial vasculature can be achieved in < 90 s, with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Recent technological advances, such as parallel imaging and the implementation of dedicated matrix coils, have further increased image quality, and in combination with the blood-pool contrast agents, such as gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany), extended imaging time, higher spatial resolution and larger anatomical coverage can be achieved. (orig.)

  2. Effects of iodinated contrast media on blood and endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspelin, Peter [Karolinska Institute/Huddinge University Hospital, Division of Radiology, Centre for Surgical Sciences, Stockholm (Sweden); Stacul, Fulvio [Institute of Radiology, Trieste (Italy); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Diagnostic Radiology 54E2, Herlev (Denmark); Morcos, Sameh K. [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Molen, Aart J. van der [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the effects of iodinated contrast media on blood components and endothelium based on experimental and clinical studies and to produce clinically relevant guidelines for reducing thrombotic and hematologic complications following the intravascular use of contrast media. A report was drafted after review of the literature and discussions among the members of the Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology. The final report was produced following discussion at the 12th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Ljubljana, Slovenia (2005). Experimental data indicate that all iodinated contrast media produce an anticoagulant effect and that this effect is greater with ionic contrast media. Several of the in vitro and experimental in vivo studies on haematological effects of contrast media have not been confirmed by clinical studies. Low- or iso-osmolar contrast media should be used for diagnostic and interventional angiographic procedures, including phlebography. Meticulous angiographic technique is the most important factor for reducing the thrombotic complications associated with angiographic procedures. Drugs and interventional devices that decrease the risk of thromboembolic complications during interventional procedures minimize the importance of the effects of contrast media. (orig.)

  3. Blood Contrast Agents Enhance Intrinsic Signals in the Retina: Evidence for an Underlying Blood Volume Component

    OpenAIRE

    Schallek, Jesse; Ts'o, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Systemic injections of blood contrast agents nigrosin and indocyanine green increased stimulus-evoked reflectance signals in the retina. The enhancement of signal strength is consistent with neurovascular coupling in response to visual stimulation.

  4. Evaluation of copper-labeled bifunctional chelate-albumin conjugates for blood pool imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.J.; Rocque, P.A.; Welch, M.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology); Weinheimer, C.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). School of Medicine)

    1993-05-01

    [sup 62]Cu is a generator-produced positron-emitting radionuclide with a half-life amenable to blood-pool imaging with PET. Three bifunctional chelates [cyclic anhydride of diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (cDTPAA), 6-bromoacetamidobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'', N''' tetraacetic acid (BAT), and p-carboxyethylphenylglyoxal-bis-([sup 4])N-methyl-thiosemicarbazone (CE-DTS)] were conjugated to HSA and labeled with [sup 67]Cu. Blood clearance and biodistribution of these three [sup 67]Cu-labeled conjugates were determined in rats. Of the three [sup 67]Cu-labeled bifunctional chelate-HSA conjugates, [sup 67]Cu-benzyl-TETA-HSA remained in the blood pool the longest, achieving stable blood levels at times longer than 24 h post-injection. The [sup 67]Cu radioactivity cleared the blood within 60 min post-injection of [sup 67]Cu-DTS-HSA, and within 10 min after administration of [sup 67]Cu-DTPA-HSA, indicating the dissociation of Cu[sup 2+] from these conjugates. Copper-labeled DTS-HSA achieved stable blood concentrations for at least 30 min post-injection and was therefore evaluated as a vascular imaging agent. DTS-HSA and benzy-TETA-HSA were labeled with [sup 62]Cu and administered to a dog for blood-pool imaging using PET. Because of the high labeling efficiency, DTS-HSA can be labeled with [sup 62]Cu without purification, making it more practical than [sup 62]Cu-benzyl-TETA-HSA as a blood-pool imaging agent. Generator-produced [sup 62]Cu-DTS-HSA should be a viable alternative blood pool agent to cyclotron-produced C[sup 15]O for PET facilities without cyclotrons. (author).

  5. First clinical experiences with parametric SPECT of the gated cardiac blood pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPECT of the gated cardiac blood pool as well as conventional 300LAO equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography was performed in a total of 12 patients (4 healthy subjects and 8 patients with CAD or cardiomyopathy). Seven out of 8 patients with myocardial pathology showed abnormalities of the anterior wall motion. In all of the respective cases SPECT and laevocardiography yielded concordant results while conventional radionuclide ventriculography was limited to the detection of septal and posterior wall motion abnormalities. Thus, SPECT of the cardiac blood pool is an anternative to ''first pass'' techniques which are limited to only few heart beats. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation by ECG gated blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assumption necessary to perform ECG gated blood pool scintigraphy (EGBPS) are seemingly not valid for patients with atrial fibrillation (af), since they have wide variability in cardiac cycle length. The data were acquired in frame mode within the limits of mean heart rate of fix the first diastolic volume, and were calculated by frame count normalization (FCN) method to correct total counts in each frame. EGBPS were performed twelve patients with af, who were operated against valvular disease. The data acquired within mean heart rate ±10 % in frame mode were divided to 32 frames, and calculated total frame counts. With FCN method total frame counts from at 22nd to 32nd frame were multiplied to be equal to the average of total frame counts. FCN method could correct total frame counts at the latter frames. And there was good correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction calculated from scintigraphy and that from contrast cineangiography. Thus EGBPS with FCN method may be allow estimation of cardiac function even in subjects with af. (author)

  7. Human cerebral blood volume measurements using dynamic contrast enhancement in comparison to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is an important parameter for the assessment of brain tumors, usually obtained using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI. However, this method often suffers from low spatial resolution and high sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and usually does not take into account the effect of tissue permeability. The plasma volume (vp) can also be extracted from dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DCE can be used for the measurement of cerebral blood volume in place of DSC for the assessment of patients with brain tumors. Twenty-eight subjects (17 healthy subjects and 11 patients with glioblastoma) were scanned using DCE and DSC. vp and CBV values were measured and compared in different brain components in healthy subjects and in the tumor area in patients. Significant high correlations were detected between vp and CBV in healthy subjects in the different brain components; white matter, gray matter, and arteries, correlating with the known increased tissue vascularity, and within the tumor area in patients. This work proposes the use of DCE as an alternative method to DSC for the assessment of blood volume, given the advantages of its higher spatial resolution, its lower sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, and its ability to provide additional information regarding tissue permeability. (orig.)

  8. Human cerebral blood volume measurements using dynamic contrast enhancement in comparison to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Liberman, Gilad; Vitinshtein, Faina; Aizenstein, Orna [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Nadav, Guy [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-07-15

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is an important parameter for the assessment of brain tumors, usually obtained using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI. However, this method often suffers from low spatial resolution and high sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts and usually does not take into account the effect of tissue permeability. The plasma volume (v{sub p}) can also be extracted from dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DCE can be used for the measurement of cerebral blood volume in place of DSC for the assessment of patients with brain tumors. Twenty-eight subjects (17 healthy subjects and 11 patients with glioblastoma) were scanned using DCE and DSC. v{sub p} and CBV values were measured and compared in different brain components in healthy subjects and in the tumor area in patients. Significant high correlations were detected between v{sub p} and CBV in healthy subjects in the different brain components; white matter, gray matter, and arteries, correlating with the known increased tissue vascularity, and within the tumor area in patients. This work proposes the use of DCE as an alternative method to DSC for the assessment of blood volume, given the advantages of its higher spatial resolution, its lower sensitivity to susceptibility artifacts, and its ability to provide additional information regarding tissue permeability. (orig.)

  9. Ultrastable polyethyleneimine-stabilized gold nanoparticles modified with polyethylene glycol for blood pool, lymph node and tumor CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongxing; Wen, Shihui; Zhao, Lingzhou; Li, Du; Liu, Changcun; Jiang, Wenbin; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Wentao; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2016-03-01

    Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG monomethyl ether via PEI amine-enabled conjugation chemistry, followed by acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines. The formed PEGylated Au PSNPs were characterized via different methods. We show that the PEGylated Au PSNPs with an Au core size of 5.1 nm have a relatively long half-decay time (7.8 h), and display a better X-ray attenuation property than conventionally used iodine-based CT contrast agents (e.g., Omnipaque), and are hemocompatible and cytocompatible in a given concentration range. These properties of the Au PSNPs afford their uses as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of the blood pool and major organs of rats, lymph node of rabbits, and the xenografted tumor model of mice. Importantly, the PEGylated Au PSNPs could be excreted out of the body with time and also showed excellent in vivo stability. These findings suggest that the formed PEGylated Au PSNPs may be used as a promising contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems.Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG

  10. Effects of intravascular contrast media on blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects upon the rabbit blood-brain barrier after intracarotid injection of two non-ionic contrast media, iopentol (a monomer) and iodixanol (a dimer) were compared. Iothalamate and iohexol were used as reference substances. 99Tcm-DTPA, 125I-HSA and Trypsin blue were used as tracers in order to demonstrate various degrees of damage to the barrier. Injection of iothalamate led to large extravasation of 99Tcm-DTPA, 125I-HSA and Trypan blue which means severe damage of the blood-brain barrier. Injection of iopentol and iohexol resulted in some extravasation of all three tracers used, whereas injection of iodixanol only led to extravasation of the small molecule tracer 99Tcm-DTPA demonstrating minor changes of the barrier. At computed tomography of the brain with intravascular contrast medium enhancement it is safer to use iodixanol than iothalamate. Iodixanol is expected to cause even less adverse effects to the brain after intraarterial injection than iopentol and iohexol. (orig.)

  11. Preparation and biodistribution of 99TcmN-DCHDTC as a new blood pool imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99TcmN-DCHDTC (DCHDTC: dicyclohexyl dithiocarbamate) is prepared through a two-step ligand-exchange reaction by using SnCl2·2H2O as reduction agent and SDH (succinic dihydrazide) as a donor of nitride nitrogen atom (N3-). The radiochemical purity of the product is over 95% by TLC. 99TcmN-DCHDTC is stable over 6 h at room temperature. The IgP is 1.19. The electrophoresis results show the complex is neutral. The biodistribution results in mice indicate the complex has high blood uptake. The uptake ratios of blood/heart, blood/lung and blood/liver are 5.27, 1.31 and 1.07 at 30 min post-injection respectively. The results for the complex suggest that it will be potentially useful as a blood pool imaging agent

  12. Ventricular function during the acute rejection of heterotopic transplanted heart: Gated blood pool studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty patients who had undergone a heterotopic heart transplant were studied prospectively to determine the relationship between rejection and ventricular dysfunction assessed from gated blood pool studies. A fully automated method for detecting ventricular edges was implemented; its success rate for the grafted left and right ventricles was 94% and 77%, respectively. The parameters, peak ejection and filling rates, were calculated pixel per pixel using a two-harmonic Fourier algorithm and then averaged over the ventricular region of interest. Peak filling and ejection rates were closely related with the severity of the rejection, while the left ventricular ejection fraction was not. Peak filling rates of both ventricles were the indices closely related to the presence of moderate rejection. Despite the low number of patients, these data suggested that gated blood pool derived indices of ventricular function are associated with ventricular dysfunction resulting from myocarditis rejection. Radionuclide ventriculography provides parametric data which are accurate and reliable for the diagnosis of rejection. (orig.)

  13. Influence of ectopic heart beats in gated ventricular blood-pool studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct data collection from ventricular blood-pool studies were stored in frame mode in a computer and by means of a modified tape recorder, the blood-pool image and ECG were recorded on tape. At the end of the study the tape data were replayed into the computer. The ECG signal was passed through a trigger circuit that detected the R wave which was sampled by the computer once every msec. Contractions outside of the desired range could be rejected along with the subsequent contraction. Of seven patients whose calculated ejection fractions were changed by more than 0.03, all had frequent (one in 20) ectopic contractions. The distorted ventricular volume curves were effectively restructured by the constraining procedure, changing the end-systolic volume and EF. Computer modeling showed a linear relationship between the percent of ectopic contractions and the underestimate of ejection fraction. One ectopic beat in ten led to a 5% underestimate of EF

  14. Uptitrating amlodipine significantly reduces blood pressure in diabetic patients with hypertension: a retrospective, pooled analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffers BW; Bhambri R; Robbins J

    2014-01-01

    Barrett W Jeffers, Rahul Bhambri, Jeffery Robbins Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA Abstract: Diabetic patients with hypertension are approximately twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease as non-diabetic patients with hypertension. Given that hypertension affects ~60% of patients with diabetes, effective blood pressure (BP) management is important in this high-risk population. This post-hoc analysis pooled data from six clinical studies to quantify additional BP efficacy achieved when...

  15. Alterations of the blood pool in the femoral head before and after renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ION) is thought to be an ischemic event. The purpose of this study is to investigate alterations of the blood pool in the femoral head before and after renal transplantation. After renal transplantation, all patients received the same immunosuppressive therapy: corticosteroids, cyclosporin-A, and azathioprine. We performed 3-phase bone scintigraphy on 16 renal allograft recipients within 1 week before renal transplantation, and between week 4 and 9 after renal transplantation. Regions of interest (ROI) were assigned bilaterally in the femoral head, diaphysis, and soft tissue. The head-to-diaphysis ratios (HD ratios) were then calculated. Idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 2 femoral heads of 1 patient. The HD ratio before renal transplantation (mean HD±SD, 1.52±0.30) and the HD ratio after renal transplantation (1.28±0.30) were significantly different (P=0.000024). The HD ratios before and after renal transplantation were significantly different, indicating that the administration of steroids diminished the blood pool in the femoral head. A low HD ratio before renal transplantation revealed a poor blood pool in the femoral head, which may be a risk factor for ION. (author)

  16. 99mTc-MDP combined blood pool and bone phase radionuclide imaging in papain-injected carpal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigraphic changes, i.e., increased activity, were induced by 1% papain, dissolved in phosphate-buffered physiologic saline (pH 7.4), injected into one antebrachiocarpal joint in each of eight dogs. Scintigraphic evaluation was by the use of combined blood pool and bone phase scintigraphy of affected and normal carpi over a 28-day period. The qualitative and quantitative scintigraphic appearance in injected carpal joints were very similar in both blood pool and bone phases. The clinical use of combined blood pool and bone phase scintigraphy to diagnose early inflammatory joint changes appears limited

  17. Cardiac cine MRI: Comparison of 1.5 T, non-enhanced 3.0 T and blood pool enhanced 3.0 T imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerretsen, S.C.; Versluis, B.; Bekkers, S.C.A.M. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Leiner, T. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: leiner@rad.unimaas.nl

    2008-01-15

    Introduction: Cardiac cine imaging using balanced steady state free precession sequences (bSSFP) suffers from artefacts at 3.0 T. We compared bSSFP cardiac cine imaging at 1.5 T with gradient echo imaging at 3.0 T with and without a blood pool contrast agent. Materials and methods: Eleven patients referred for cardiac cine imaging underwent imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. At 3.0 T images were acquired before and after administration of 0.03 mmol/kg gadofosveset. Blood pool signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), temporal variations in SNR, ejection fraction and myocardial mass were compared. Subjective image quality was scored on a four-point scale. Results: Blood pool SNR increased with more than 75% at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T (p < 0.001); after contrast administration at 3.0 T SNR increased with 139% (p < 0.001). However, variations in blood pool SNR at 3.0 T were nearly three times as high versus those at 1.5 T in the absence of contrast medium (p < 0.001); after contrast administration this was reduced to approximately a factor 1.4 (p = 0.21). Saturation artefacts led to significant overestimation of ejection fraction in the absence of contrast administration (1.5 T: 44.7 {+-} 3.1 vs. 3.0 T: 50.7 {+-} 4.2 [p = 0.04] vs. 3.0 T post contrast: 43.4 {+-} 2.9 [p = 0.55]). Subjective image quality was highest for 1.5 T (2.8 {+-} 0.3), and lowest for non-enhanced 3.0 T (1.7 {+-} 0.6; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GRE cardiac cine imaging at 3.0 T after injection of the blood pool agent gadofosveset leads to improved objective and subjective cardiac cine image quality at 3.0 T and to the same conclusions regarding cardiac ejection fraction compared to bSSFP imaging at 1.5 T.

  18. Cardiac cine MRI: Comparison of 1.5 T, non-enhanced 3.0 T and blood pool enhanced 3.0 T imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Cardiac cine imaging using balanced steady state free precession sequences (bSSFP) suffers from artefacts at 3.0 T. We compared bSSFP cardiac cine imaging at 1.5 T with gradient echo imaging at 3.0 T with and without a blood pool contrast agent. Materials and methods: Eleven patients referred for cardiac cine imaging underwent imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. At 3.0 T images were acquired before and after administration of 0.03 mmol/kg gadofosveset. Blood pool signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), temporal variations in SNR, ejection fraction and myocardial mass were compared. Subjective image quality was scored on a four-point scale. Results: Blood pool SNR increased with more than 75% at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T (p < 0.001); after contrast administration at 3.0 T SNR increased with 139% (p < 0.001). However, variations in blood pool SNR at 3.0 T were nearly three times as high versus those at 1.5 T in the absence of contrast medium (p < 0.001); after contrast administration this was reduced to approximately a factor 1.4 (p = 0.21). Saturation artefacts led to significant overestimation of ejection fraction in the absence of contrast administration (1.5 T: 44.7 ± 3.1 vs. 3.0 T: 50.7 ± 4.2 [p = 0.04] vs. 3.0 T post contrast: 43.4 ± 2.9 [p = 0.55]). Subjective image quality was highest for 1.5 T (2.8 ± 0.3), and lowest for non-enhanced 3.0 T (1.7 ± 0.6; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GRE cardiac cine imaging at 3.0 T after injection of the blood pool agent gadofosveset leads to improved objective and subjective cardiac cine image quality at 3.0 T and to the same conclusions regarding cardiac ejection fraction compared to bSSFP imaging at 1.5 T

  19. Gallium-68-DOTA-albumin as a PET blood-pool marker: experimental evaluation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations into tumor angiogenesis and antiangiogenic treatment have renewed interest in tumor perfusion. To image tumor blood-pool by PET, suitable tracers are not generally available. In this experimental study, we characterized a 68Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugate of rat serum albumin (68Ga-DOTA-RSA) in vivo using a generator-produced isotope. Biodistribution was determined in ACI rats after intravenous administration of 3-6 MBq of 68Ga-DOTA-RSA. Three ACI rats were imaged over 1 h by dynamic PET after intravenous administration of 15-25 MBq of 68Ga-DOTA-RSA while the blood-pool activity was recorded simultaneously in a closed extracorporeal loop (ECL) between the carotid artery and the jugular vein. Time-activity curves (TACs) were obtained from volume of interest (VOI) analysis and from the ECL data. Stability and metabolites in plasma and urine were analyzed by size exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) 1 h after intravenous injection of 67Ga-DOTA-RSA. Blood radioactivity decreased by 10% and 18% from 10 to 60 min p.i. by biodistribution and PET or ECL, respectively. Tissue sampling between 10 and 60 min p.i. showed slight increases in the uptake of spleen, myocardium, kidney and skeletal muscle while hepatic accretion remained unchanged. Total urinary excretion after 60 min amounted to 9% of the injected dose. HPLC demonstrated a single urinary metabolite corresponding in size to gallium-labeled DOTA. 68Ga-DOTA-RSA is a blood-pool tracer whose physical and biological half-life is well suited for PET. Our findings support clinical imaging using 68Ga-DOTA-labeled human serum albumin (HSA). The generator-produced label makes 68Ga-DOTA-labeled albumin continuously available even to centers lacking an in-house cyclotron

  20. Antibody-mediated red blood cell agglutination resulting in spontaneous echocardiographic contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M R; Thompson, W R; Casella, J F; Spevak, P J

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous echocardiographic contrast is well reported in states of low flow and low shear stress, and the primary blood component involved has been reported as red blood cells via rouleaux formation. This report describes the occurrence of spontaneous echocardiographic contrast from a unique mechanism of IgM-mediated red blood cell agglutination and describes the clinical sequelae. PMID:10368455

  1. Identification of cytoskeletal elements enclosing the ATP pools that fuel human red blood cell membrane cation pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Haiyan; Puchulu-Campanella, Estela; Galan, Jacob A.; Tao, W. Andy; Low, Philip S.; Hoffman, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    The type of metabolic compartmentalization that occurs in red blood cells differs from the types that exist in most eukaryotic cells, such as intracellular organelles. In red blood cells (ghosts), ATP is sequestered within the cytoskeletal–membrane complex. These pools of ATP are known to directly fuel both the Na+/K+ and Ca2+ pumps. ATP can be entrapped within these pools either by incubation with bulk ATP or by operation of the phosphoglycerate kinase and pyruvate kinase reactions to enzyma...

  2. Pulmonary Hemorrhage: Imaging with a New Magnetic Resonance Blood Pool Agent in Conjunction with Breathheld Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA) imaging appearance of the pulmonary arteries following administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent to human volunteers, and to demonstrate in an animal model (pigs) how this technique can be used to detect pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage. Methods: Two volunteers were examined following the intravenous administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent (NC100150 Injection, Nycomed Amersham Imaging, Wayne, PA, USA). T1-weighted 3D gradient recalled echo (GRE) image sets (TR/TE 5.1/1.4 msec, flip angle 30 deg.) were acquired breathheld over 24 sec. To assess the detectability of pulmonary bleeding with intravascular MR contrast, pulmonary parenchymal injuries were created in two animals under general anesthesia, and fast T1-weighted 3D GRE image sets collected before and after the injury. Results: Administration of the intravascular contrast in the two volunteers resulted in selective enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature permitting complete visualization and excellent delineation of central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Following iatrogenic injury in the two animals, pulmonary hemorrhage was readily detected on the 3D image sets. Conclusion: The data presented illustrate that ultrafast 3D GRE MR imaging in conjunction with an intravenously administered intravascular blood pool agent can be used to perform high-quality pulmonary MRA as well as to detect pulmonary hemorrhage

  3. Preliminary estimation of bryophyte biomass and carbon pool from three contrasting different vegetation types

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Singh, M.K.; Juhász, A.; Csintalan, Z.; Kaligaric, M.; Marek, Michal V.; Urban, Otmar; Tuba, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2005), s. 267-270. ISSN 0133-3720 Grant ostatní: EU(CZ) HPRI-CT-2002-00197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : bryophyte * carbon pool * rain forest Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.320, year: 2005

  4. Gated cardiac blood pool studies in atrial fibrillation: Role of cycle length windowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cycle length windowing is gaining increasing acceptance in gated blood pool imaging of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The goals of this study were: to assess differences of ejection fraction (EF) in AF with and without windowing and to determine how EF varied with cycle length in patients with AF. Twenty patients with AF were prospectively studied by gated blood pool imaging, with simultaneous collection in each patient of 5-7 studies with cycle length windows spanning the cycle length histogram. Each window accepted beats of only a narrow range of cycle lengths. EF was determined for each of the narrow cycle length windows as well as for the entire gated blood pool study without cycle length windowing. For every patient an average of the windowed EFs was compared with the non-windowed EF. EF values were similar (mean windowed: 46.6; non-windowed: 45.5; P=0.16), and there was a good correlation between the two techniques (r=0.97). The data were then examined for a relationship of EF with cycle length. The difference from average windowed EF (ΔEF) was calculated for each window and plotted vs. the cycle length of the center of each window. No predictable linear or nonlinear relationship of ΔEF with window position was observed. Lack of predictable variation of EF with cycle length is likely due to lack of a predictable amount of ventricular filling for a given cycle length, as the amount of diastolic filling in AF depends on the random cycle length of the preceding beat. In summary, windowing in AF does not provide a clinically significant difference in EF determination. If cycle length windowing is used, the exact location of the window is not critical. (orig.)

  5. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis in children by combined blood pool and bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiation of osteomyelitis from cellulitis or septic arthritis can be difficult. The radiological examination often does not have the characteristic features. Seventy of 71 children with osteomyelitis had focal areas of increased radioactivity demonstrated by /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scans at the site of the infection. The addition of blood pool images aids in the interpretation of the study as they permit evaluation of the effect of hyperemia. The 13 children with cellulitis had diffuse increase in radioactivity involving both the bones and soft tissues. Bone imaging as the initial screening procedure for osteomyelitis is recommended. (auth)

  6. Fourier analysis of a gated blood-pool study during atrial flutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First-harmonic Fourier analysis of a gated blood-pool study is based on the assumption that the cardiac chambers contract once per cardiac cycle. In atrial arrhythmias this condition may not exist for the atria. We recently studied a patient with atrial flutter and 2:1 artioventricular conduction. There were predictable alterations in the first-harmonic Fourier phase and amplitude images. The observed changes from first-harmonic Fourier analysis were: (a) very low atrial amplitude values, and (b) absence of identifiable atrial regions on the phase image

  7. Dynamic circular buffering: a technique for equilibrium gated blood pool imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, J J; Rahms, H; Green, M V; Del Pozo, F

    1996-03-01

    We have devised a software technique called "dynamic circular buffering" (DCB) with which we create a gated blood pool image sequence of the heart in real time using the best features of LIST and FRAME mode methods of acquisition/processing. The routine is based on the concept of independent "agents" acting on the timing and position data continuously written into the DCB. This approach allows efficient asynchronous operation on PC-type machines and enhanced capability on systems capable of true multiprocessing and multithreading. PMID:8904285

  8. Comparison of blood pool and extracellular gadolinium chelate for functional MR evaluation of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ruth P., E-mail: ruthplim74@gmail.com [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Austin Health, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084 (Australia); The University of Melbourne, School of Medicine, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bruno, Mary, E-mail: mary.bruno@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Rosenkrantz, Andrew B., E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Kim, Danny C., E-mail: danny.kim@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Mulholland, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.mulholland@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Kwon, Jane, E-mail: jane.kwon@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, 660 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Palfrey, Amy P., E-mail: amy.pastva10@stjohns.edu [St John' s University, Department of Psychology, 8000 Utopia Parkway, Jamaica-Queens, NY 11439 (United States); Ogedegbe, Olugbenga, E-mail: Olugbenga.Ogedegbe@nyumc.org [New York University School of Medicine, Clinical and Translational Science Institute, 227 E30th St, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To compare performance of single-injection blood pool agent (gadofosveset trisodium, BPA) against dual-injection extracellular contrast (gadopentetate dimeglumine, ECA) for MRA/MRV in assessment of suspected vascular TOS. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients referred for vascular TOS evaluation were assessed with BPA (n = 18) or ECA (n = 13) MRA/MRV in arm abduction and adduction. Images were retrospectively assessed for: image quality (1 = non-diagnostic, 5 = excellent), vessel contrast (1 = same signal as muscle, 4 = much brighter than muscle) and vascular pathology by two independent readers, with a separate experienced reader providing reference assessment of vascular pathology. Results: Median image quality was diagnostic or better (score ≥3) for ECA and BPA at all time points, with BPA image quality superior at abduction late (BPA 4.5, ECA 4, p = 0.042) and ECA image quality superior at adduction-early (BPA 4.5; ECA 4.0, p = 0.018). High qualitative vessel contrast (mean score ≥3) was observed at all time points with both BPA and ECA, with superior BPA vessel contrast at abduction-late (BPA 3.97 ± 0.12; ECA 3.73 ± 0.26, p = 0.007) and ECA at adduction-early (BPA 3.42 ± 0.52; ECA 3.96 ± 0.14, p < 0.001). Readers readily identified arterial and venous pathology with BPA, similar to ECA examinations. Conclusion: Single-injection BPA MRA/MRV for TOS evaluation demonstrated diagnostic image quality and high vessel contrast, similar to dual-injection ECA imaging, enabling identification of fixed and functional arterial and venous pathology.

  9. Comparison of blood pool and extracellular gadolinium chelate for functional MR evaluation of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare performance of single-injection blood pool agent (gadofosveset trisodium, BPA) against dual-injection extracellular contrast (gadopentetate dimeglumine, ECA) for MRA/MRV in assessment of suspected vascular TOS. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients referred for vascular TOS evaluation were assessed with BPA (n = 18) or ECA (n = 13) MRA/MRV in arm abduction and adduction. Images were retrospectively assessed for: image quality (1 = non-diagnostic, 5 = excellent), vessel contrast (1 = same signal as muscle, 4 = much brighter than muscle) and vascular pathology by two independent readers, with a separate experienced reader providing reference assessment of vascular pathology. Results: Median image quality was diagnostic or better (score ≥3) for ECA and BPA at all time points, with BPA image quality superior at abduction late (BPA 4.5, ECA 4, p = 0.042) and ECA image quality superior at adduction-early (BPA 4.5; ECA 4.0, p = 0.018). High qualitative vessel contrast (mean score ≥3) was observed at all time points with both BPA and ECA, with superior BPA vessel contrast at abduction-late (BPA 3.97 ± 0.12; ECA 3.73 ± 0.26, p = 0.007) and ECA at adduction-early (BPA 3.42 ± 0.52; ECA 3.96 ± 0.14, p < 0.001). Readers readily identified arterial and venous pathology with BPA, similar to ECA examinations. Conclusion: Single-injection BPA MRA/MRV for TOS evaluation demonstrated diagnostic image quality and high vessel contrast, similar to dual-injection ECA imaging, enabling identification of fixed and functional arterial and venous pathology

  10. Influence of circulating antigen on blood pool activity of a radioiodinated monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athymic mice with and without circulating CA 125 antigen were injected with 0.1-100 μg of 131I-labeled OC 125 F(ab')2 antibody fragment. Both the blood clearance of 131I activity and the change in serum CA 125 were monitored over 24 h. Influence of CA 125 on blood pool activity could be avoided only at the 100 μg dose. In patient studies, circulating CA 125 levels decreased for the first 2 h after injection of OC 125 F(ab')2 but generally returned to preinjection levels shortly thereafter. In vitro binding studies using the sera from patients injected with 131I-labeled OC 125 F(ab')2 suggest that circulating CA 125 could interfere with the tumor uptake of the labeled antibody. (author)

  11. Evaluation of factor analysis and other functional images in exercise gated blood-pool study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factor analysis, a new method of functional imaging, has been applied to cardiovascular nuclear medicine. Because of the difficulty of its interpretation, it has not been popular as a method for detecting abnormal wall motion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of factor analysis in exercise gated blood-pool study in patients with ischemic heart disease. In our factor analysis, left ventricular region of interest (LVROI) was extracted to exclude the surrounding radioactivities. The new method was compared with the conventional factor analysis using whole region (whole ROI method), and the other functional images, i.e. stroke volume, ejection fraction and phase images. At first we tried 3-factor analysis of the LVROI method, which resulted in many uninterpretable factors. Whereas in 2-factor analysis no uninterpretable factors were extracted. In comparison with cine-mode display, the LVROI method with 2-factor analysis showed the best sensitivity (85%) and specificity (100%). In exercise gated blood-pool study, it became easier to detect abnormal wall motion by comparing the factor image at exercise with resting image. In conclusion, the 2-factor analysis using the LVROI method greatly improved the limitation of conventional factor analysis, and will be useful in detecting wall motion abnormality in patients with ischemic heart disase. (author)

  12. Synthesis of fluorine-18 radio-labeled serum albumins for PET blood pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We sought to develop a practical, reproducible and clinically translatable method of radiolabeling serum albumins with fluorine-18 for use as a PET blood pool imaging agent in animals and man. Fluorine-18 radiolabeled fluoronicotinic acid-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester, [18F]F-Py-TFP was prepared first by the reaction of its quaternary ammonium triflate precursor with [18F]tetrabutylammonium fluoride ([18F]TBAF) according to a previously published method for peptides, with minor modifications. The incubation of [18F]F-Py-TFP with rat serum albumin (RSA) in phosphate buffer (pH 9) for 15 min at 37–40 °C produced fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA and the product was purified using a mini-PD MiniTrap G-25 column. The overall radiochemical yield of the reaction was 18–35% (n = 30, uncorrected) in a 90-min synthesis. This procedure, repeated with human serum albumin (HSA), yielded similar results. Fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA demonstrated prolonged blood retention (biological half-life of 4.8 hours) in healthy awake rats. The distribution of major organ radioactivity remained relatively unchanged during the 4 hour observation periods either by direct tissue counting or by dynamic PET whole-body imaging except for a gradual accumulation of labeled metabolic products in the bladder. This manual method for synthesizing radiolabeled serum albumins uses fluorine-18, a widely available PET radionuclide, and natural protein available in both pure and recombinant forms which could be scaled up for widespread clinical applications. These preclinical biodistribution and PET imaging results indicate that [18F]RSA is an effective blood pool imaging agent in rats and might, as [18F]HSA, prove similarly useful as a clinical imaging agent

  13. Blood Pool Segmentation Results in Superior Virtual Cardiac Models than Myocardial Segmentation for 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Lengua, Carlos Gonzalez; Weinberg, Alan D; Nielsen, James C; Sanz, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The method of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) three-dimensional (3D) image acquisition and post-processing which should be used to create optimal virtual models for 3D printing has not been studied systematically. Patients (n = 19) who had undergone CMR including both 3D balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were retrospectively identified. Post-processing for the creation of virtual 3D models involved using both myocardial (MS) and blood pool (BP) segmentation, resulting in four groups: Group 1-bSSFP/MS, Group 2-bSSFP/BP, Group 3-MRA/MS and Group 4-MRA/BP. The models created were assessed by two raters for overall quality (1-poor; 2-good; 3-excellent) and ability to identify predefined vessels (1-5: superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, main pulmonary artery, ascending aorta and at least one pulmonary vein). A total of 76 virtual models were created from 19 patient CMR datasets. The mean overall quality scores for Raters 1/2 were 1.63 ± 0.50/1.26 ± 0.45 for Group 1, 2.12 ± 0.50/2.26 ± 0.73 for Group 2, 1.74 ± 0.56/1.53 ± 0.61 for Group 3 and 2.26 ± 0.65/2.68 ± 0.48 for Group 4. The numbers of identified vessels for Raters 1/2 were 4.11 ± 1.32/4.05 ± 1.31 for Group 1, 4.90 ± 0.46/4.95 ± 0.23 for Group 2, 4.32 ± 1.00/4.47 ± 0.84 for Group 3 and 4.74 ± 0.56/4.63 ± 0.49 for Group 4. Models created using BP segmentation (Groups 2 and 4) received significantly higher ratings than those created using MS for both overall quality and number of vessels visualized (p < 0.05), regardless of the acquisition technique. There were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 3. The ratings for Raters 1 and 2 had good correlation for overall quality (ICC = 0.63) and excellent correlation for the total number of vessels visualized (ICC = 0.77). The intra-rater reliability was good for Rater A (ICC = 0.65). Three models were successfully printed

  14. Factor analysis of multigated cardiac blood pool scintigram for the measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) was measured by factor analysis (FA) of multigated cardiac blood pool scintigram in 38 consecutive patients, and compared with that measured by the variable ROI method (EFVROI) with automated left ventricular contour detection. FA was automatically performed without operator intervention with a success rate of 100%. The correlation of EF with EFVROI was significant in the group of 22 patients with normal wall motion (r=0.65, p<0.001), and the entire group of patients (r=0.70, p<0.001), but not significant (p=0.19) in the group of 16 patients with abnormal wall motion. In conclusion, left ventricular ejection fraction can be estimated by factor analysis of MUGA in patients with normal wall motion. (author)

  15. The preparation and identification of 99mTc-DTPA-HSA instant kit for blood-pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedures for the preparation of animal experiment and preliminary clinical application of 99mTc-DTPA-HSA instant kit are described. The data showed that the radiochemical purity of this preparation was 97%, and also was stable more than 3 hours in room temperature. A comparison of 99mTc-DePA-HSA and 99mTc-HSA was carried in rats. The disappearance of radioactivity from the blood solwer for 99mTc-DTPA-HSA (T1/2 269.7 min, 88.8% of injected dose remaining in the blood at 1 hour) that for 99mTc-HSA (T1/2 = 139.6 min, 78.5% of injected dose remaining in the blood at 1 hour). In rabbits the blood pool images of 99mTc-DTPA-HSA was much more clear than with 99mTc-HSA. Identification of radioactive metabolites excreted in rabbit's urine 1 hour after injection of 99mTc-DTPA-HSA or indicated that no decomposition of 99mTc-DTPA-HSA was found, while in of 99mTc-HSA degradation was obvious. The liver blood pool imaging and the gated cardiac blood pool imaging were performed using 99mTc-DTPA-HSA demonstrating satisfactory results in 10 cases and also no toxic effects were observed

  16. Assessment of left ventricular function by gated cardiac blood-pool emission computed tomography using a rotating gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the usefulness of gated cardiac blood-pool single photon emission CT (SPECT) with Tc-99m for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) global and regional functions, 18 patients with coronary artery disease were studied. Thirty-two gated projection images were obtained over 360-degree at 16 frames per cardiac cycle. As LV volume was calculated by integrating the numbers of voxels which constituted LV and multiplying by the volume of a single voxel (0.1143 ml), we performed phantom studies to determine the appropriate cut-off level to detect LV outline. These cut-off levels were affected by the background activity and organ volume itself. So we constructed Volume-Cut-Level-Curve at each background activity. In clinical studies, short axis images which constituted LV were selected and provisional LV volumes were calculated at the cut-off levels of 45, 50 and 55%. These volumes were plotted on the Volume-Cut-Level-Curve and the true cut-off levels were obtained to calculate LV end-diastolic or end-systolic volume (EDV, ESV). The cut-off levels were different at every patient and ED or ES. EDV, ESV and LV ejection fraction obtained by SPECT were correlatd well with those obtained by contrast ventriculography (LVG) (r=0.89, 0.94, 0.94 each, p<0.01). For the LV wall motion analysis, LVGs obtained at two projections were compared with SPECT or gated cardiac blood-pool planar imaging (Planar) in 5 segments. In addition to visual comparison, wall motion scores (WMS) based on the degree of wall motion abnormality were calculated in each segment. Correlation of WMS between LVG and SPECT (r=0.84) was significantly (p<0.01) superior to that between LVG and Planar (r=0.62). Especially in SPECT, wall motion analyses at septal and infero-posterior segments were superior to those in Planar. Although gated SPECT requires relatively long time to perform, it is a useful method to detect LV global and regional functions. (author)

  17. Laser speckle contrast imaging for monitoring changes in microvascular blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrus, Rikard; Strandby, Rune B.; Svendsen, Lars Bo;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Microvascular blood flow is essential for healing and predicts surgical outcome. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relation between fluxes measured with the laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique and changes in absolute blood flow. In addition, we studied...

  18. Effect of x-ray contrast media on spontaneous red blood cell aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the method of registration of dynamics of red blood cell aggregation by light scattering and light microscopy it has been observed that hight osmolality of X-ray contrast media, their lipotropy and some peculiarities of the molecular structure determined red blood cell structure-functional changes

  19. Evaluation of myocardiotoxicity with SPECT cardiac blood pool imaging for patients treated with adriamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of myocardiotoxicity on adriamycin (ADM) with SPECT cardiac blood pool imaging was presented. SPECT was done to monitor left ventricular function in 49 patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and small cell carcinoma, they were treated with ADM of which the accumulation dose were over 300 mg/m2. The results showed that parameters of EF, PER and PFR before and after treatment with ADM were 57 +- 6%, 3.08 +- 0.63 EDV·s-1, 2.99 +- 0.23 EDV·s-1 and 50 +- 11%, 2.25 +- 0.66 EDV·s-1, 2.53 +- 0.35 EDV·s-1 respectively. The difference of these data are significant (P<0.05). The larger the accumulative dose of ADM, the more the parameters decrease, among them PFR is the most sensitive one. It was concluded that SPECT measurement of left ventricular function is a sensitive and useful method in monitoring ADM myocardiotoxicity

  20. Evaluation of left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation by ECG gated blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ECG gated blood pool scintigraphy (EGBP) is not always valid for the patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), since they have wide variability in cardiac cycle length (CL). To evaluate the left ventricular (LV) function during AF by EGBP, we devised a new processing algorithm to construct multiple gated images discriminated by preceding R-R interval (PRR) from the data acquired in list mode. 18 patients with AF were studied as to; 1) How affect the PRR on cardiac indices such as EF, TES, PER or TPER, 2) Comparison with conventional method getting all CL data, 3) LV filling curves derived by plotting EDV against PRR, 4) The slope and position of LV function curves (LVFC) derived by plotting SV against EDV. In most cases, EF, PER and TES were increased with longer PRR, and those by conventional method nearly corresponded to the average values obtained by our new method. Impairment of ventricular filling was demonstrated in the cases of mitral stenosis and constrictive pericarditis. LVFC of CHF group was situated at right and downward to controls, and left and upward shift was observed after treatment. The slope of LVFC was reduced in relation to the progression of NYHA's functional class. In conclusion, this new algorithm processing irregular CL enables LV filling and function curves to draw, which are useful in the evaluation of cardiac performance in the subjects with AF. (author)

  1. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, as inferred from lung areas in gated blood-pool scintigrams: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether the apex-to-base distribution of pulmonary blood volume, as obtained from gated cardiac blood-pool scans, could be used as a noninvasive method to estimate mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), gated blood-pool scans were analyzed in 77 patients who also had PCWP measurements at cardiac catheterization. Ten of these patients had gated cardiac blood-pool scans and PCWP measurements both at rest and during exercise. The apex-to-base distribution of pulmonary blood volume was determined from the end-systolic frame of the left anterior oblique view by placing equal-sized regions of interest over the apex and base of the right lung. The ratio of apex counts over base counts (A/B ratio) was considered abnormal if greater than unity. The mean A/B ratio was 1.15 +/- 0.27 (1 s.d.) for the 32 studies associated with an abnormal mean PCWP (greater than 12 mm Hg). The mean A/B ratio was 0.85 +/- 0.23 for the 55 studies associated with a normal mean PCWP (p less than 0.01 comparing normal group with abnormal). The sensitivity of the A/B ratio for a mean PCWP greater than 12 mm Hg was 81%R (26/32). The specificity of the A/B ratio for a mean PCWP greater than or equal to 12 mm Hg was 89% (49/55). Thus, noninvasive determination of the pulmonary apex-to-base ratio from gated cardiac blood-pool scans appears to differentiate subjects with normal and abnormal mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressures

  2. Microwave-assisted synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles for MR blood pool contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave-assisted polyol process was developed for the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles with precisely controlled size, high crystallinity and high water solubility. The process is simple, time-saving and low energy-consuming due to the advantages of polyols and microwave irradiation combined. The crystal phases of the nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectrum. The coating materials of the nanoparticles were analyzed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. Precise size tuning enables an easier way to adjust the relaxation properties of the magnetite nanoparticles. The colloid nanoparticles with high longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and low ratio of transverse relaxivity (r2) to r1 have a potential application in magnetic resonance angiography. - Highlights: → Microwave-assisted process was developed for the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. → Process is simple, time-saving and low energy-consuming. → Colloid nanoparticles have a potential application in magnetic resonance angiography. → Carbonate surface of nanoparticles facilitates for further modification.

  3. Relaxivity of blood pool contrast agent depends on the host tissue as suggested by semianalytical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølby, Birgitte Fuglsang; Østergaard, Leif; Kiselev, Valerij

    simulations and analytical theory to describe this effect and created a program for fast, realistic simulation of transverse relaxation in perfused tissues. We performed simulations for gray matter and white matter. The predicted values of the relaxivity are in agreement with the relaxivity found in animal...

  4. Effects of Contrast Media on Blood Rheology: Comparison in Humans, Pigs, and Sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare whole blood viscosity and erythrocyte aggregation in humans, pigs, and sheep, before and after adding water-soluble iodinated contrast medium (CM). Methods: Two CMs were studied: iopromide (nonionic) and ioxaglate (ionic). The blood-CM viscosity was measured with a Couette viscometer. Erythrocyte aggregation was measured with an erythroaggregometer. Results: The blood-CM viscosity was increased up to +20% (relative to pure blood) with a CM concentration of 0%-10%. At CM concentrations from 10% to 50%, the viscosity decreased. The disaggregation shear stress was increased (relative to pure blood) at low CM concentration (0%-10%). When the CM concentration increased from 10% to 20%, the disaggregation shear stress was decreased, except with the pig blood-ioxaglate mixture. Conclusion: At low CM concentration the blood viscosity was increased in pig, sheep, and humans and the disaggregation shear stress was increased in pig and humans. The aggregation of sheep blood was too low to be detected by the erythroaggregometer. This rise can be explained by the formation of poorly deformable echinocytes. At higher CM concentration, the viscosity and the disaggregation shear stress decreased in relation to the blood dilution. We conclude that pig blood and sheep blood can both be used to study the effect of CM injection on blood viscosity. Nevertheless, the rheologic behavior of pig blood in terms of erythrocyte aggregation is closer to that of human blood than is sheep blood when mixed with CM. Pigs could thus be more suitable than sheep for in vivo studies of CM miscibility with blood during selective cannulation procedures

  5. Myocardial ischemia detected by isoproterenol stress cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that left ventricular regional contraction abnormality (hypokinesis: hypo) occurs during myocardial ischemia. However, it is uncertain whether left ventricular asynchronous contraction (asynchrony) is an index of myocardial ischemia. To validate asynchrony as an index of myocardial ischemia, isoproterenol infusion stress (ISP) cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy (RI angiography) was performed in patients with ischemic heart disease. The subjects were classified into 2 groups: (1) 15 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and (2) 8 patients with 'normal' coronary arteries (NC). None had any electrical ventricular conduction disturbance. ISP was administered with increasing doses of 0.02, 0.04, 0.08 μg/kg/min at 3-min intervals, and it was terminated in the event of angina, significant ST changes or target heart rate. Symptom-limited ergometer exercise testing (EX) was also administered in 14 patients. Regional decrease in amplitude and phase delay identified by phase analysis was diagnosed as hypo and asynchrony, respectively. ISP myocardial scintigraphy was also performed in 15 patients. ISP and EX induced asynchrony in 14 (93%) and 13 patients (93%), respectively, while did hypo in 4 (27%) and 9 (64%), respectively. Ten (67%) of 15 patients had asynchrony without hypo in ISP; whereas only 4 (28%) of 14 patients did in EX. ISP-induced asynchrony occurred in one of 8 patients with NC. The locations of ISP-induced asynchrony and those of EX-induced asynchrony were concordant in 11 (79%) of 14 patients. Asynchrony on the ISP RI angiogram was observed at the same sites of redistribution on the ISP myocardial scintigram. We concluded that asynchrony itself is a sensitive and specific index of myocardial ischemia. (author)

  6. Fast and reliable automated ventriculography for gated blood-pool studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of algorithms, requiring only one single operator-interaction and minimal running time, has been generated to analyze left-ventricular function from cardiac gated Tc-99m Blood-pool Nuclear Medicine scintigrams (CBPS). The process depends mainly on an optimal edge enhancement filter derived in the frequency domain and applied to the study via FFT. The bandpass filter is based on Prolate Spheroidal wave functions and was described by Shanmugam et al in 1979. It maximizes output in the vicinity of edges, and is adapted here to enhance the ventricular region of interest (ROI) yielding images with sharp edges and good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This procedure does not require previous background subtraction from initial images in order to adequately define left-ventricular contours. A filter format has been chosen which will allow successful performance of the technique over a wide range of CBPS. The filtered image is then scanned and, on the original frame edges around ROI are marked and counts within ROI are defined. It will automatically run for any allowed number or size of frames. Processing time averages less than one minute when employing an Array Processor for a set of 32 64x64 pixel frames. Nuclear Medicine image processing applications of such filter have not been reported to date. This process has been tested on variable rate, variable ejection fraction, known volume Vanderbilt cardiac phantom; with maximum deviation of 3.5% and estimated standard deviation (SD) of 1.7%. When compared to other processes currently available, this technique is clearly more reliable due to its accuracy, speed and simplicity. It has also been used to determine ventricular volumes from gated SPECT images, with a respectable SD of 2.8%

  7. Gated blood pool imaging in the diagnosis and management of arrhythmia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of multigated cardiac blood pool imaging in evaluating left ventricular function and ventricular activation was studied in patients with cardiac arrhythmias. Subjects consisted of 12 patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome; 20 with ventricular premature contractions (VPC); 21 with various modes of artificial pacemakers; and two normal controls. 1. Phase analysis was useful in localizing the bypass tract in patients with the WPW syndrome. In four patients with the WPW syndrome and five with VVI pacing, the phase difference between the posterolateral wall of the left ventricle (LV) and the right ventricular apex correlated significantly with the activation time difference between these two regions as assessed by endocardial electrograms (r = 0.94, p < 0.001). 2. Images of VPC were obtained using the bad beat rejection program in an ADAC computer system. The origin of VPCs evaluated by phase image coincided with results of standard 12-lead electrograms. 3. The LV ejection fraction (LVEF) decreased significantly (p < 0.001) after the injection of lidocaine (-3.7 %) or disopyramide (-6.2 %). The percent reduction in LVEF was significantly greater with disopyramide than with lidocaine (-15.1 vs -11.2 %). There was a significant correlation between the percent reduction in LVEF and the disopyramide plasma concentrations (r = -0.62, p < 0.001). 4. The influence of the pacing mode and exercise on LV function was studied in 21 patients with artificial pacemakers. In the VDD and DDD modes, end-diastolic volume (EDV) and cardiac output (CO) decreased after converting to VVI mode. CO increased markedly to approximately 250 % of the control value in the VDD and DDD, and moderately in the VVI and AAI modes during ergometer exercise. (J.P.N.)

  8. Determination of regurgitation fraction by EEG-triggered gated blood pool scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, P.; Geffers, H.; Stauch, M.; Nechwatal, W.; Sigel, H.; Bitter, F.; Adam, W.E.

    1981-02-04

    The determination of regurgitation fraction by EEG-triggered gated blood pool scintigraphy is based on the different stroke volumes of left and right ventricles in patients with aortic and/or mitral valve incompetence. The count rate difference between enddiastole and endsystole over each ventricle (..delta..C) is equivalent to the stroke volume. After calculating the ratio of the count rate differences between the left and right ventricles (A = ..delta..Csub(l)/..delta..Csub(r)), regurgitation fraction is expressed in the formula 1-1/A. In a group of 66 patients without valvular regurgitation or shunt, we found (A) to be between 0.89 and 1.97 (mean value 1.43 with a standard deviation of +- 0.27). The deviation of the mean value of (A) from 1 may be due to significant overlapping of right ventricle and right atrium in the left anterior oblique (LAO) 30/sup 0/ position, leading to an underestimation of right ventricular enddiastolic-endsystolic count rate difference. In 23 our of 24 patients with aortic or mitral valve incompetence (A) exceeded the upper limit. In 13 cases with aortic/and/or mitral valve regurgitation (A) was compared with the ratio of the stroke volume of left and right ventricles with the stroke volume of the left ventricle determined angiographically and the stroke volume of the right ventricle determined by thermodilution. The specifity of the described method for detecting valvular regurgitation is high, while the sensitivity is relatively low. The principal advantages of this method are non-invasiveness, good practicability, and the fact that important additional information about the functional state of the heart is gained.

  9. A Case of Hepatic Hemangioma Detected by Blood Pool with {sup 99m}Tc Human Serum Albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hwi Joong; Moon, Hee Bum; Kwon, In Soon; Choi, Kang Won; Kim, Chung Yong; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    A case of hepatic hemangioma is presented in which blood pool imaging by {sup 99m}Tc-HSA provided a definite diagnostic clue. Cavernous hemangiomas are the most common benign tumor of the liver. But the majority of them are asymptomatic and are found incidentally at laparotomy or autopsy. Selective hepatic arteriography has been the most helpful technique for the preoperative diagnosis. Recently radioisotope scan and ultrasonogram proved to be a new, definite and non- invasive diagnostic procedure.

  10. A case of hepatic hamangioma detected by blood pool scan with sup(99m)Tc human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of hepatic hemangioma is presented in which blood pool imaging by sup(99m)Tc-HSA provided a definite diagnostic clue. Cavernous hemangiomas are the most common benign tumor of the liver. But the majority of them are asymptomatic and are found incidentally at laparotomy or autopsy. Selective hepatic arteriography has been the most helpful technique for the preoperative diagnosis. Recently radioisotope scan and ultrasonogram proved to be a new, definite and non-invasive diagnostic procedure. (author)

  11. A Case of Hepatic Hemangioma Detected by Blood Pool with 99mTc Human Serum Albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of hepatic hemangioma is presented in which blood pool imaging by 99mTc-HSA provided a definite diagnostic clue. Cavernous hemangiomas are the most common benign tumor of the liver. But the majority of them are asymptomatic and are found incidentally at laparotomy or autopsy. Selective hepatic arteriography has been the most helpful technique for the preoperative diagnosis. Recently radioisotope scan and ultrasonogram proved to be a new, definite and non- invasive diagnostic procedure.

  12. Microvascular blood flow monitoring with laser speckle contrast imaging using the generalized differences algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Mahé, Guillaume; Abraham, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a full-field optical technique to monitor microvascular blood flow with high spatial and temporal resolutions. It is used in many medical fields such as dermatology, vascular medicine, or neurosciences. However, LSCI leads to a large amount of data: image sampling frequency is often of several Hz and recordings usually last several minutes. Therefore, clinicians often perform regions of interest in which a spatial averaging of blood flow is performed a...

  13. Uptitrating amlodipine significantly reduces blood pressure in diabetic patients with hypertension: a retrospective, pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffers BW

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Barrett W Jeffers, Rahul Bhambri, Jeffery Robbins Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA Abstract: Diabetic patients with hypertension are approximately twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease as non-diabetic patients with hypertension. Given that hypertension affects ~60% of patients with diabetes, effective blood pressure (BP management is important in this high-risk population. This post-hoc analysis pooled data from six clinical studies to quantify additional BP efficacy achieved when titrating hypertensive diabetic patients from amlodipine 5 mg to 10 mg. Approximately half of the diabetic patients were male (44/98; 44.9% with a mean (standard deviation [SD] age of 60.6 (9.6 years and a baseline mean (standard error [SE] systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP of 150.8 (1.30/87.5 (0.94 mmHg while on amlodipine 5 mg (159.1 [1.40]/92.6 [0.94] mmHg prior to treatment. In comparison, 350/610 (57.4% non-diabetic patients were male with a mean (SD age of 58.7 (11.1 years and baseline mean (SE SBP/DBP of 150.3 (0.62/90.9 (0.41 mmHg while on amlodipine 5 mg (160.0 [0.67]/96.2 [0.45] mmHg prior to treatment. Increasing amlodipine from 5 mg to 10 mg lowered sitting SBP by -12.5 mmHg (95% confidence interval (CI: -15.5, -9.5; P<0.0001 and DBP by -6.0 mmHg (-7.4, -4.6; P<0.0001 in diabetic patients; and SBP by -12.4 mmHg (-13.5, -11.3; P<0.0001 and DBP by -7.3 mmHg (-8.0, -6.7; P<0.0001 in non-diabetic patients. In total, 12.0% (95% CI: 6.4, 20.0 of diabetic patients achieved their BP goal versus 46.4% (42.4, 50.4 of non-diabetic patients after titration to amlodipine 10 mg. Overall, 22.0% of diabetic patients experienced 31 adverse events (AEs and 28.9% of non-diabetic patients experienced 282 AEs. Serious AEs were reported by one (1.0% diabetic and five (0.8% non-diabetic patients. In this analysis, increasing amlodipine from 5 mg to 10 mg produced a clinically significant reduction in the BP of diabetic hypertensive patients

  14. Low-cost laser speckle contrast imaging of blood flow using a webcam

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Lisa M.; Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Davis, Janel L.; Olin, Katherine E.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging has become a widely used tool for dynamic imaging of blood flow, both in animal models and in the clinic. Typically, laser speckle contrast imaging is performed using scientific-grade instrumentation. However, due to recent advances in camera technology, these expensive components may not be necessary to produce accurate images. In this paper, we demonstrate that a consumer-grade webcam can be used to visualize changes in flow, both in a microfluidic flow phanto...

  15. Analysis of Left Ventricular Functional Parameters in Normal Korean Subjects by ECG Gated Blood Pool Scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for refinement in noninvasive and quantitative assessment of left ventricular (LU) function is increasing. To assess normal values of left ventricular functional parameters during both systole and diastole by scintigraphic method using computerized triple-head gamma camera and to evaluate correlations between these parameters. ECG gated blood pool scan with 99mTc-Human serum albumin was performed in 94 normal Korean subjects. Ejection fraction (EF), systolic parameters [peak emptying rate (PER), average emptying rate (AER), time to peak emptying rate (TPER)], and diastolic parameters [peak filling rate (PFR), average filling rate (AFR), time to peak filling rate (TPFR)] were obtained by analysis of LV time-activity curve, the correlation of these parameters to the age and sex, and the correlation between these parameters were evaluated. 1) Mean value of ejection fraction in study subjects was 59.6 ± 5.25% and showed no significant correlation to age (r=0.08) and sex but showed most pronounced correlation to PFR (r=0.46, p<0.001), PER (r=0.41, p<0.001), AFR (r=0.34, p<0.001) and AER (r=0.28, p<0.01). 2) Mean values of systolic parameters were as follows: PER=3.22 + 0.50 end-diastolic volume/sec, AER =2.22 + 0.45 end-diastolic volume/sec, TPER=103.5 + 29.30 msec. They showed no significant correlation to age and sex. 3) Mean values of diastolic parameters were as follows: PFR=2.71+0.51 end-diastolic volume/sec, AFR=1.830.44 end-diastolic volume/sec, TPFR=132.1 + 33.45 msec. They showed strong correlation to age (r=-0/70, -0.64, 0.37, p<0.001). Left ventricular functional parameters in normal Korean subjects were obtained reliably by computerized scintigraphic method and may be applied to the evaluation of cardiac function in diseased patients.

  16. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B; Garde, K; Ring, P B; Henriksen, O

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...

  17. CONTRAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Krogsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon.......Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon....

  18. Cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy in rats and hamsters: comparison of five radiopharmaceuticals and three pinhole collimator apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preclinical evaluation of cardiac drugs may require evaluation of cardiac function in intact animals. To optimize the quality of radionuclide measurements of ventricular function in small animals, a comparison was made of gated blood-pool scans recorded with five blood-pool radiopharmaceuticals (99mTc-labeled human polyclonal IgG, 99mTc-human serum albumin labeled by two methods, and red blood cells radiolabeled with 99mTc via in vivo and in vitro methods) in rats and three pinhole apertures in hamsters. The quality of the radiopharmaceuticals was evaluated by comparing count density ratios (LV/BACKGROUND and LV/LIVER) and ejection fractions recorded with each agent. The edge definition of the left ventricle and count rate performance of the 1-, 2-, and 3-mm apertures was evaluated in hamsters. In general, the images obtained with the radiolabeled cells were superior to those obtained with the labeled proteins and no significant differences between the protein preparations were detected. Left ventricular ejection fractions calculated with all five radiopharmaceuticals were not significantly different. The best quality images were obtained with the 1-mm pinhole collimator. Ejection fraction and acquisition time were inversely related to aperture size. A good compromise between resolution and sensitivity was obtained with the 2-mm pinhole collimator

  19. Multimodality evaluation of ventricular function: comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and planar and SPECT blood pool imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen M.; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2001-05-01

    Fifteen patients underwent resting echocardiography (EC), ECG gated cardiac MR ventriculography (MRV) and blood pool planar and SPECT ventriculography (SPV) sequentially on the same day. In addition, 36 patients had sequential ECG gated blood pool and SPV and 20 normal volunteers, age > 18 years, had sequential ECG gated cardiac MRI performed on both Siemens closed, 1.5T, and open, 0.2T, magnets. Echocardiography was performed using a HP 5500 system equipped with an S4 transducer in 2D mode. MRV at 0.2T and 1.5T used a circular polarized body coil. Nuclear Medicine studies used 25 mCi Tc- 99m labeled red blood cells. Gated planar and SPV were acquired on a dual head Siemens E-Cam system. We have found that MRV affords the most accurate measurement of ventricular function. SPV and MRV provide similar estimations of left ventricular function (LVEF). Further, SPV consistently provides higher LVEF, as compared to the planar data simultaneously acquired. Observed significant differences in intermodality measurements indicate that follow up studies in patients, especially in patients whose management is critically dependent on functional measurement changes, should be monitored by one modality only.

  20. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  1. Half a decade of mini-pool nucleic acid testing: Cost-effective way for improving blood safety in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaram Chandrashekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: It is well established that Nucleic acid testing (NAT reduces window phase of transfusion transmissible infections (TTI and helps improve blood safety. NAT testing can be done individually or in pools. The objectives of this study were to determine the utility, feasibility and cost effectiveness of an in-house minipool-NAT(MP-NAT. Materials and Methods: Blood donors were screened by history, tested by ELISA and sero-negative samples were subjected to an in-house NAT by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Testing was done in mini-pools of size eight (8. Positive pools were repeated with individual samples. Results: During the study period of Oct 2005-Sept 2010 (5 years all blood donors (n=53729 were screened by ELISA. Of which 469 (0.87% were positive for HIV-1, HBV or HCV. Sero-negative samples (n=53260 were screened by in-house MP-NAT. HIV-NAT yield was 1/53260 (n=1 and HBV NAT yield (n=2 was 1/26630. Conclusion: NAT yield was lower than other India studies possibly due to the lower sero-reactivity amongst our donors. Nevertheless it intercepted 9 lives including the components prepared. The in-house assay met our objective of improving blood safety at nominal cost and showed that it is feasible to set up small molecular biology units in medium-large sized blood banks and deliver blood within 24-48 hours. The utility of NAT (NAT yield will vary based on the donor population, the type of serological test used, the nature of kit employed and the sensitivity of NAT test used. The limitations of our in-house MP-NAT consisted of stringent sample preparation requirements, with labor and time involved. The benefits of our MP-NAT were that it acted as a second level of check for ELISA tests, was relatively inexpensive compared to ID-NAT and did not need sophisticated equipment.

  2. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  3. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K [University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  4. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  5. Noninvasive diagnosis of a false left ventricular aneurysm with radioisotope gated cardiac blood pool imaging. Differentiation from true aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlike the true left ventricular aneurysm, false aneurysms have recently been shown to be subject to late rupture. Rarely diagnosed before surgery or autopsy, the false aneurysm has never been identified by noninvasive techniques. We report the first such noninvasive diagnosis employing radioisotope gated cardiac blood pool imaging. Due to the unique and possibly life-threatening clinical course and potential for surgical cure of false left ventricular aneurysm, early noninvasive diagnosis by imaging techniques may be critical. The methods shown here are generally applicable, becoming widely available and may help in evaluation of false left ventricular aneurysm as a cause of sudden death

  6. Leptomeningeal contrast enhancement and blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in aseptic meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Angelika; Eisele, Philipp; Ebert, Anne D.; Griebe, Martin; Engelhardt, Britta; Szabo, Kristina; Hennerici, Michael G.; Gass, Achim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB) dysfunction in aseptic meningitis. METHODS In our case series of 14 patients with acute aseptic meningitis, we compared MRI characteristics with CSF findings. RESULTS Contrast enhancement in the sulcal space in a leptomeningeal pattern was visualized in 7 patients with BCSFB dysfunction categorized as moderate to severe as evidenced by the CSF/serum albumin ratio (Qalb) but was not present in those with mild or no barr...

  7. Use of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) angiography (PC-MRA) to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery. PC-MRA was performed in 16 volunteers with no ophthalmic abnormalities and measurement of blood flow based on the results was attempted. It was possible to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery using PC-MRA in all 16 volunteers. The mean (±1 standard deviation) velocity was 9.17±2.28 cm/second, peak systolic velocity was 16.69±3.33 cm/second, and end diastolic velocity was 3.69±2.44 cm/second. The resistivity index was 0.79±0.12, the pulsatility index was 1.49±0.41, and flow was 6.25±2.33 ml/minute. It was possible to identify the ophthalmic artery and a portion of the artery in which blood flow could be measured using MR imaging, a preliminary step to blood flow measurement using MR angiography. In addition to the velocity of blood flow in the ophthalmic artery, measurement of the amount of flow was possible with PC-MRA, which is one advantage of this method. (author)

  8. Bidirectional Contrast agent leakage correction of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI improves cerebral blood volume estimation and survival prediction in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab.

    OpenAIRE

    Ab, KL; Boxerman, JL; Lai, A.; Nghiemphu, PL; Pope, WB; Cloughesy, TF; Ellingson, BM

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate a leakage correction algorithm for T1 and T2* artifacts arising from contrast agent extravasation in dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) that accounts for bidirectional contrast agent flux and compare relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) estimates and overall survival (OS) stratification from this model to those made with the unidirectional and uncorrected models in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM).We determined median rCBV within contras...

  9. Clinical evaluation of cardiac function in patients with acute left heart failure using multigated blood-pool method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inotropic and left ventricular volume indices were determined using multigated blood pool imaging to assess cardiac function in 15 patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Twelve patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI) and 12 normal subjects (N) served as controls. In the OMI group without CHF, abnormal values in ejection fraction (EF) and peak ejection rate (PER) were observed in each four patients. End-systolic volume index (ESVI) and end-diastolic volume index (EDVI) were abnormally high in 3 patients and one patient, respectively. Inotropic indices may be more sensitive than volume indices in detecting OMI with no associated CHF. In detecting acute CHF, ESVI had the highest sensitivity (80%, 12/15), followed by EDVI (67%, 10/15). In both the CHF group and the OMI group, sensitivities of ESVI, EDVI, PER, and EF were 56%, 41%, 29%, and 26%, respectively. In assessing the clinical course of CHF, ESVI was a more sensitive index than EDVI and EF. It can be concluded that multigated blood-pool imaging is useful for assessing cardiac function in acute left heart failure. (Namekawa, K)

  10. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA and lung cancer: a pooled analysis of three prospective cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Wei Jie; Cawthon, Richard M; Purdue, Mark P; Hu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Huang, Wen-Yi; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Ji, Bu-Tian; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hosgood, H Dean; Bassig, Bryan A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Min, Shen; Chow, Wong-Ho; Berndt, Sonja I; Kim, Christopher; Lim, Unhee; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E; Chanock, Stephen; Zheng, Wei; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the relationship between telomere length and lung cancer in a pooled analysis from three prospective cohort studies: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, conducted among men and women in the United States, and previously published data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial conducted among male smokers in Finland, and the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), which is comprised primarily of never-smokers. The pooled population included 847 cases and 847 controls matched by study, age, and sex. Leukocyte telomere length was measured by a monochrome multiplex qPCR assay. We used conditional logistic regression models to calculate ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between telomere length and lung cancer risk, adjusted for age and pack-years of smoking. Longer telomere length was associated with increased lung cancer risk in the pooled analysis [OR (95% CI) by quartile: 1.00; 1.24 (0.90-1.71); 1.27 (0.91-1.78); and 1.86 (1.33-2.62); P trend = 0.000022]. Findings were consistent across the three cohorts and strongest for subjects with very long telomere length, i.e., lung cancer risks for telomere length [OR (95% CI)] in the upper half of the fourth quartile were 2.41 (1.28-4.52), 2.16 (1.11-4.23), and 3.02(1.39-6.58) for the PLCO trial, the ATBC trial, and the SWHS, respectively. In addition, the association persisted among cases diagnosed more than 6 years after blood collection and was particularly evident for female adenocarcinoma cases. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA may be a biomarker of future increased risk of lung cancer in diverse populations. PMID:24853549

  11. Cytogenetic investigation of contrast media effects in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of present investigation is to detect the cytogenetic effect in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients subjected to radiodiagnostic examination with contrast media. Material and method: The investigation was performed on 17 patients subjected to radio diagnostic examinations with different kinds of contrast media.The skin dose obtained by diagnostic x-ray exposure is measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. Cytogenetic analyses are performed before, as well as immediately after the examination. Chromosomal aberrations are used as a bio marker for cytogenetic effects analysis. Results show an increase of mean level of chromosomal damage after the radio diagnostic examination in comparison to the mean level before exposure. This increase is statistically significant. Further work on the investigation of cytogenetic effects of diagnostic dose x-rays and contrast media used in invasive radiological examinations is in progress. (authors)

  12. Simultaneous blood flow and blood oxygenation measurements using a combination of diffuse speckle contrast analysis and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Myeongsu; Phillips, Zephaniah; Mai, Phuong Minh; Yeo, Chaebeom; Song, Cheol; Lee, Kijoon; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-02-01

    A combined diffuse speckle contrast analysis (DSCA)-near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system is proposed to simultaneously measure qualitative blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in human tissue. The system employs an optical switch to alternate two laser sources at two different wavelengths and a CCD camera to capture the speckle image. Therefore, an optical density can be measured from two wavelengths for NIRS measurements and a speckle contrast can be calculated for DSCA measurements. In order to validate the system, a flow phantom test and an arm occlusion protocol for arterial and venous occlusion were performed. Shorter exposure times (<1 ms) show a higher drop (between 50% and 66%) and recovery of 1/KS2 values after occlusion (approximately 150%), but longer exposure time (3 ms) shows more consistent hemodynamic changes. For four subjects, the 1/KS2 values dropped to an average of 82.1±4.0% during the occlusion period and the average recovery of 1/KS2 values after occlusion was 109.1±0.8%. There was also an approximately equivalent amplitude change in oxyhemoglobin (OHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (RHb) during arterial occlusion (max RHb=0.0085±0.0024 mM/DPF, min OHb=-0.0057±0.0044 mM/DPF). The sensitivity of the system makes it a suitable modality to observe qualitative hemodynamic trends during induced physiological changes.

  13. Opening of the blood-brain barrier by intravenous contrast media in euvolemic and dehydrated rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that intravenous injections of hypertonic contrast media when used in computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography might raise plasma osmolality sufficiently to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The current investigation establishes the threshold of plasma osmolality that causes the opening of the BBB in euvolemic and dehydrated rabbits. Euvolemic rabbits were allowed food and water ad libitum. Dehydrated rabbits received 4.0 mg/kg of furosemide intramuscularly and were deprived of water for 72 hours. Meglumine/sodium diatrizoate 76% (n=28) or mannitol 20% (n=12) was administrated intravenously, at a rate of 25 mmol/kg body weihgt/hour for 2, 3 or 4 hours. Plasma osmolality, blood iodine concentration, blood pressure, heart rate and hematocrit were assessed at regular intervals. Evans blue and 99Tcm-DTPA were used simultaneously as tracers for BBB opening. Rating of BBB opening with 99Tcm-DTPA correlated well with Evans blue staining (r=0.863, p<0.001; n=42). BBB opening was related to plasma osmolality and was similar for both contrast media and mannitol. Widespread BBB opening occurred above 400 mmol/kg while focal BBB opening occurred above 370 mmol/kg. Dehydration per se increased plasma osmolality but did not reduce the threshold for BBB opening. (orig.)

  14. Laser speckle contrast imaging of cerebral blood flow in humans during neurosurgery: a pilot clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Weber, Erica L.; Richards, Lisa M.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2010-11-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) during neurosurgery can provide important physiological information for a variety of surgical procedures. CBF measurements are important for assessing whether blood flow has returned to presurgical baseline levels and for assessing postsurgical tissue viability. Existing techniques for intraoperative monitoring of CBF based on magnetic resonance imaging are expensive and often impractical, while techniques such as indocyanine green angiography cannot produce quantitative measures of blood flow. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical technique that has been widely used to quantitatively image relative CBF in animal models in vivo. In a pilot clinical study, we adapted an existing neurosurgical operating microscope to obtain LSCI images in humans in real time during neurosurgery under baseline conditions and after bipolar cautery. Simultaneously recorded ECG waveforms from the patient were used to develop a filter that helped reduce measurement variabilities due to motion artifacts. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using LSCI to obtain blood flow images during neurosurgeries and its capability to produce full field CBF image maps with excellent spatial resolution in real-time with minimal disruption to the surgical procedure.

  15. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B;

    1996-01-01

    to be in accordance with results obtained by other methods. Noncontrast functional MR (fMR) imaging showed signal increases in gray matter, but also inconsistent changes in some white matter regions. CONCLUSION: In this experiment, contrast-enhanced imaging seemed to show a somewhat higher sensitivity towards changes......PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... by fitting a gamma-variate function to the data. The tissue concentration vs time curves were deconvoluted using an input function obtained by arterial sampling. RESULTS: The ratio of gray to white matter CBV (1.9-2.5) as well as the fractional increase in rCBV during hypercapnia (about 30%) was found...

  16. Radionuclide left ventricular absolute volume determination by ejection fraction measurement data and a left posterior oblique blood pool image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Shinichiro (Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan))

    1989-09-01

    A new method for the calculation of left ventricular volumes called the 'semi-geometric' method, was reported by Nichols et al in 1984. This method, however, still had certain limitations for practical use. This paper describes a modified semi-geometric method in which the left ventricular volume was obtained from conventional left ventricular ejection fraction measurement data collected from the modified left anterior oblique position with a caudal tilt of 10 degrees or more and a left posterior oblique blood pool image. The left ventricular end-diastolic volumes obtained by this method were compared with those calculated by combining the thermodilution cardiac output and the left ventricular ejection fraction. The correlation coefficient was r=0.93 (n=20). In the phantom experiment, the true volumes and those obtained by this method showed an excellent correlation (r=0.99). This method is considered accurate and practical. (author).

  17. Factor analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data in patients with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to examine the usefulness of factor analysis in multi-gated cardiac blood-pool scintigraphic studies of 83 patients with various congenital heart diseases. In ventricular and atrial septal defects, two factors, including the first factor for ventricular components and the second factor for atrial and great vessel components, were extracted when Qp/Qs was comparatively small, being similar to normal subjects. In ventricular septal defect associated with higher Qp/Qs, however, the left and right ventricles were extracted as separate factors, thus providing three factors, including atrial and great vessel components. There was a significant positive correlation between Qp/Qs values and delayed ejection phase in both the left and right ventricular factors. In atrial septal defect associated with higher Qp/Qs, the right ventricle was divided into septal and free wall components, and the left ventricle was extracted as the same components as right ventricular septal component. In comparing two dynamic pattern curves of ventricular factors, there was no significant difference between delayed ejection phase and Qp/Qs values, although ejection phase tended to be prolonged in right ventricular free wall factors than both right ventricular septal and left ventricular factors. All patients with Ebstein's malformation had atrial factors in the inflow portion of the right ventricle, allowing clear distinction between the atrialized right ventricle and functional right ventricle. These results suggest that factor analysis may have a potential in analyzing multi-gated blood pool scintigraphic data in various congenital heart diseases. (N.K.)

  18. A Giant Hepatic Hemangioma Complicated by Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome: Findings of Tc-99m RBC Scintigraphy and SPECT Including a Total Body Blood Pool Imaging Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasabach-Merritt syndrome (KMS) consists of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and localized consumption coagulopathy that develops within vascular hemangioma. This syndrome may also be associated with occult hemangiomas located at various sites. Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy and SPECT have proven to be reliable for confirming or excluding hemangioma. Total body blood pool imaging study during the scintigraphy also provides a means of screening for occult lesions. The authors report the case of a 29-year-old man who presented with a giant hepatic hemangioma complicated by KMS, and underwent Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy and SPECT including a total body blood pool imaging study

  19. A Giant Hepatic Hemangioma Complicated by Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome: Findings of Tc-99m RBC Scintigraphy and SPECT Including a Total Body Blood Pool Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Myung Hee; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Dong Wook; Yim, Chang Yeol [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Kasabach-Merritt syndrome (KMS) consists of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and localized consumption coagulopathy that develops within vascular hemangioma. This syndrome may also be associated with occult hemangiomas located at various sites. Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy and SPECT have proven to be reliable for confirming or excluding hemangioma. Total body blood pool imaging study during the scintigraphy also provides a means of screening for occult lesions. The authors report the case of a 29-year-old man who presented with a giant hepatic hemangioma complicated by KMS, and underwent Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy and SPECT including a total body blood pool imaging study.

  20. Blood-ocular barrier damage: use of contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blood-ocular barrier (BOB) shares similar neuroepithelial origin, microanatomy and functions with the blood-brain barrier. There are many natural (e. g. diabetes, hypertension) or iatrogenic (chemotherapy, retinal photocoagulation) conditions which can cause a BOB breakdown, resulting in visual acuity impairment or loss. The authors examined 42 patients affected by BOB damage in different pathological conditions. All patients previously underwent a conventional fluoroangiographic (FA) study. Nine patients with normal FA exam were evaluated also. Despite normal MRI findings immediately after Gd-DTPA injection, contrast leakage into the vitreous body or into the aqueous fluid was demonstrated in delayed scans (40-50 min after contrast administration), proving the existence of a BOB damage (sensitively 94 %). Although FA exam remains the choice modality in BOB breakdown demonstration, we propose MRI as a useful diagnostic tool when optic media opacity (cataract, haemovitreous, intraocular silicon oil) occurs, preventing direct retinal fundus imaging and/or an early screening tool. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. Microvascular blood flow monitoring with laser speckle contrast imaging using the generalized differences algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Mahé, Guillaume; Abraham, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a full-field optical technique to monitor microvascular blood flow with high spatial and temporal resolutions. It is used in many medical fields such as dermatology, vascular medicine, or neurosciences. However, LSCI leads to a large amount of data: image sampling frequency is often of several Hz and recordings usually last several minutes. Therefore, clinicians often perform regions of interest in which a spatial averaging of blood flow is performed and the result is followed with time. Unfortunately, this leads to a poor spatial resolution for the analyzed data. At the same time, a higher spatial resolution for the perfusion maps is wanted. To get over this dilemma we propose a new post-acquisition visual representation for LSCI perfusion data using the so-called generalized differences (GD) algorithm. From a stack of perfusion images, the procedure leads to a new single image with the same spatial resolution as the original images and this new image reflects perfusion changes. The algorithm is herein applied on simulated stacks of images and on experimental LSCI perfusion data acquired in three different situations with a commercialized laser speckle contrast imager. The results show that the GD algorithm provides a new way of visualizing LSCI perfusion data. PMID:25576743

  2. Low-cost laser speckle contrast imaging of blood flow using a webcam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lisa M; Kazmi, S M Shams; Davis, Janel L; Olin, Katherine E; Dunn, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging has become a widely used tool for dynamic imaging of blood flow, both in animal models and in the clinic. Typically, laser speckle contrast imaging is performed using scientific-grade instrumentation. However, due to recent advances in camera technology, these expensive components may not be necessary to produce accurate images. In this paper, we demonstrate that a consumer-grade webcam can be used to visualize changes in flow, both in a microfluidic flow phantom and in vivo in a mouse model. A two-camera setup was used to simultaneously image with a high performance monochrome CCD camera and the webcam for direct comparison. The webcam was also tested with inexpensive aspheric lenses and a laser pointer for a complete low-cost, compact setup ($90, 5.6 cm length, 25 g). The CCD and webcam showed excellent agreement with the two-camera setup, and the inexpensive setup was used to image dynamic blood flow changes before and after a targeted cerebral occlusion. PMID:24156082

  3. Jugular venous pooling during lowering of the head affects blood pressure of the anesthetized giraffe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum, E.; Hasenkam, John Michael; Secher, Niels H.; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Grøndahl, C.; Petersen, K.K.; Buhl, Rikke; Aalkjaer, C.; Baandrup, U.; Nygaard, H.; Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Stegmann, F.; Sloth, E.; Østergaard, K.H.; Nissen, P.; Runge, M.; Pitsillides, K.; Wang, T.

    2009-01-01

    How blood flow and pressure to the giraffe's brain are regulated when drinking remains debated. We measured simultaneous blood flow, pressure, and cross-sectional area in the carotid artery and jugular vein of five anesthetized and spontaneously breathing giraffes. The giraffes were suspended in...... the upright position so that we could lower the head. In the upright position, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 193 +/- 11 mmHg (mean +/- SE), carotid flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and carotid cross-sectional area was 0.85 +/- 0.04 cm(2). Central venous pressure (CVP) was 4 +/- 2 mmHg, jugular flow was...... 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and jugular cross-sectional area was 0.14 +/- 0.04 cm(2) (n = 4). Carotid arterial and jugular venous pressures at head level were 118 +/- 9 and -7 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively. When the head was lowered, MAP decreased to 131 +/- 13 mmHg, while carotid cross-sectional area and flow...

  4. Clinical application of respiratory navigator echo triggered black blood contrast cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the application of respiratory navigator echo triggered black blood contrast FSE in cardiac MRI. Methods: The respiratory navigator echo trigger technique combining with black blood FSE (NAV-FSE) was tested on 11 volunteers and 5 patients in free breathing, using breath-hold FSE (BH-FSE) with the same imaging protocals as control. The imaging efficiency and the image sharpness were compared between NAV-FSE and BH-FSE and t-test was used for the statistics. Results: All NAV-FSE acquisitions were completed in sixteen subjects while 4 BH-FSE acquisitions failed because of poor breath holding. The efficiencies of NAV-FSE were (42.95 ± 11.50)%, (56.14 ± 11.40)% and (55.25 ± 14.70)% when echo train length (ETL) were 24, 16 and 8, respectively. When ETL were 16 and 24, the sharpness of NAV-FSE (0.43 ± 0.02 vs 0.36 ± 0.02) and BH-FSE (0.36 ± 0.03 vs 0.35 ± 0.02) were statistically different (t =4.26, 5.53, respectively; P <0.05). NAV-FSE could have a shorter ETL setting without consideration of breath holding. Conclusion: The navigator echo trigger technique could be compatible with black blood contrast FSE to image the heart without the restriction of breath holding and it allows to optimize the parameters to improve the image quality. (authors)

  5. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique

  6. Fourier analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data in patients with congenital heart diseases, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical usefulness of Fourier analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data was evaluated in 18 subjects with normal cardiac functions and 14 patients with complex cardiac anomalies (ten with tetralogy of Fallot, two with tricuspid atresia (TA), one with double-outlet right ventricle (DORV), and one with Ebstein's anomaly (EA)). Using global ventricular time-activity curves, the phase and amplitude at fundamental frequency were calculated, and emptying patterns of the left and right ventricles (LV, RV) were evaluated by phase difference [D(phase)=RV phase minus LV phase] and amplitude ratio of RV to LV [R(amp)]. In patients with TOF, mean values of D (phase) and R(amp) were 25.3+-10.5 degrees and 13.5+-0.49 respectively and significantly larger than those of normal subjects (p<0.001). D (phase) became larger in inverse proportion to the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow and there was an inverse linear correlation between these two variables (r=-0.830, p<0.01). On visual interpretation of functional images, the dynamic property of hypoplastic ventricles could be easily estimated in patients with TA or DORV. In a case with EA, the atrialized RV was shown clearly as a hypokinetic, atrial phase area. This method is valuable for pathophysiologic investigation of diseases with complex cardiac anomalies. (author)

  7. Evaluation of Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Patients with Hypertension Who Received Tapentadol Extended Release for Chronic Pain: A Post Hoc, Pooled Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Biondi, David M.; Xiang, Jim; Etropolski, Mila; Moskovitz, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hypertension is one of the most common co-existing conditions in patients with chronic pain, and the potential effects of an analgesic on heart rate and blood pressure are of particular concern for patients with hypertension. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate changes in blood pressure and heart rate with tapentadol extended release (ER) treatment in patients with hypertension. Methods We performed a post hoc analysis of data pooled from three randomized, p...

  8. Contrast between the Climatic States of the Warm Pool in the Indian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiangfeng; WU Dexing

    2002-01-01

    Based on the analysis of Levitus data, the climatic states of the warm pool in the Indian Ocean (WPIO) and in the Pacific Ocean (WPPO) are studied. It is found that WPIO has a relatively smaller area, a shallower bottom and a slightly lower seawater temperature than those of WPPO. The horizontal area at different depths, volumes, central positions, and bottom depths of both WPIO and WPPO show quite apparent signals of seasonal variation. The maximum amplitude of WPIO surface area's seasonal variation is 58% larger over the annual mean value. WPIO's maximum volume variation amplitude is 66% larger ovcr the annual mean value. The maximum variation amplitudes of the surface area and volume of WPPO are 20.9% and 20.6% larger over the annual mean value respectively. WPIO and WPPO show different temporal and spatial characteristics mainly due to the different wind fields and restriction of ocean basin geometry. For instance, seasonal northern displacement of WPIO is, to some extent, constrained by the basin of the Indian Ocean, while WPPO moves relatively freely in the longitudinal direction. The influence of WPIO and WPPO over the atmospheric motion must be quite different.

  9. Non-invasive estimation of blood pressure using ultrasound contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    Local blood pressure measurements provide important information on the state of health of organs in the body and can be used to diagnose diseases in the heart, lungs, and kidneys. This paper presents an experimental setup for investigating the ambient pressure sensitivity of a contrast agent using...... diagnostic ultrasound. The setup resembles a realistic clinical setup utilizing a single array transducer for transmit and receive. The ambient pressure sensitivity of SonoVue (Bracco, Milano, Italy) was measured twice using two different acoustic driving pressures, which were selected based on a preliminary...... component to occur at acoustic driving pressures between 300 and 500 kPa. Based on this, the pressure sensitivity was investigated using a driving pressure of 485 and 500 kPa. At 485 kPa, a linear pressure sensitivity of 0.42 dB/kPa was found having a linear correlation coefficient of 0.94. The second...

  10. Vascular centerline extraction in 3D MR angiograms for phase contrast MRI blood flow measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Hoyos, M. [CREATIS, CNRS 5515 et INSERM U630 Research Unit, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Universidad de los Andes, Bogota (Colombia). Grupo Imagine, Grupo de Ingenieria Biomedica; Orlowski, P.; Piatkowska-Janko, E.; Bogorodzki, P. [Warsaw Univ. of Tech. (Poland). ZEJM-BINSK, Inst. of Radioelectronics; Orkisz, M. [CREATIS, CNRS 5515 et INSERM U630 Research Unit, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-03-15

    The accuracy of 2D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) depends on the alignment between the vessels and the imaging plane. PC MRA imaging of blood flow is challenging when the flow in several vessels is to be evaluated with one acquisition. For this purpose, semi-automatic determination of the plane most perpendicular to several vessels is proposed based on centerlines extracted from 3D MRA. Arterial centerlines are extracted from 3D MRA based on iterative estimation-prediction, multi-scale analysis of image moments, and a second-order shape model. The optimal plane is determined by minimizing misalignment between its normal vector and the centerlines' tangent vectors. The method was evaluated on a phantom and on 35 patients, by seeking the optimal plane for cerebral blood flow quantification simultaneously in internal carotids and vertebral arteries. In the phantom, difference of orientation and of height between known and calculated planes was 1.2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. In the patients, all but one centerline were correctly extracted and the misalignment of the plane was within 12 per artery. Semi-automatic centerline extraction simplifies and automates determination of the plane orthogonal to one vessel, thereby permitting automatic simultaneous minimization of the misalignment with several vessels in PC MRA. (orig.)

  11. Vascular centerline extraction in 3D MR angiograms for phase contrast MRI blood flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of 2D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) depends on the alignment between the vessels and the imaging plane. PC MRA imaging of blood flow is challenging when the flow in several vessels is to be evaluated with one acquisition. For this purpose, semi-automatic determination of the plane most perpendicular to several vessels is proposed based on centerlines extracted from 3D MRA. Arterial centerlines are extracted from 3D MRA based on iterative estimation-prediction, multi-scale analysis of image moments, and a second-order shape model. The optimal plane is determined by minimizing misalignment between its normal vector and the centerlines' tangent vectors. The method was evaluated on a phantom and on 35 patients, by seeking the optimal plane for cerebral blood flow quantification simultaneously in internal carotids and vertebral arteries. In the phantom, difference of orientation and of height between known and calculated planes was 1.2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. In the patients, all but one centerline were correctly extracted and the misalignment of the plane was within 12 per artery. Semi-automatic centerline extraction simplifies and automates determination of the plane orthogonal to one vessel, thereby permitting automatic simultaneous minimization of the misalignment with several vessels in PC MRA. (orig.)

  12. Predictive value of T2-weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced MR imaging in assessing myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer: a pooled analysis of prospective studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lian-Ming [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China); Wayne State University, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Xu, Jian-Rong; Gu, Hai-Yan; Hua, Jia [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China); Haacke, E.M.; Hu, Jiani [Wayne State University, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2013-02-15

    To obtain diagnostic performance values of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) in the prediction of myometrial invasion in patients with endometrial cancer. Databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant original articles published from January1995 to March 2012. Pooled estimation data were obtained by statistical analysis. Eleven articles (548 patients) were included. For assessing any myometrial involvement, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for CE-MRI were 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72, 0.88), 0.72 (95% CI, 0.64, 0.79), 0.65 (95% CI, 0.56, 0.73) and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78, 0.91); for T2WI, they were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.78, 0.94), 0.58 (95% CI, 0.47, 0.69), 0.64 (95% CI, 0.54, 0.73), 0.84 (95% CI, 0.73, 0.92) respectively. The pooled specificity of CE-MRI (0.72) was significantly higher than T2WI (0.58) (P < 0.05). For assessing deep myometrial involvement, there was no statistically significant difference between CE-MRI and T2WI, (P > 0.05). CE-MRI has a good diagnostic performance in the prediction of any myometrial invasion and is superior to T2WI. But its PPV is somewhat suboptimal. For assessing deep myometrial involvement, its NPV appears relative high and negative findings strongly suggest an absence of deep myometrial involvement, which can guide therapeutic decision-making. (orig.)

  13. Ventricular emptying performance in patients with tetralogy of Fallot; Assessment with Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kan; Maeda, Hisato; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Tsunao; Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Matsuda, Akira (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    Comparison of emptying patterns between left and right ventricles (LV, RV) was performed with Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool data in patients with tetralogy of Fallot (TF). Using global time-activity curves, the phase and amplitude at the first-harmonic component of Fourier series were calculated and emptying patterns of both ventricles were evaluated by phase difference {l brace}D(phase)=RV phase minus LV phase{r brace} and RV/LV amplitude ratio {l brace}R(amp){r brace}. In 20 patients with normal cardiac function, D(phase) was minimal (mean 2.0{plus minus}6.6 degrees) and R(amp) was less than 1.0 (mean 0.60{plus minus}0.19). In 11 patients with TF, D(phase) was significantly larger than normal, with a mean value of 24.3{plus minus}10.0 degrees (p<0.01) and became greater in a reversed proportion to the ratio of the pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow (p<0.01). In all but one cases with TF, R(amp) was greater than 1.0 with a mean value of 1.4{plus minus}0.4, significantly larger than normal (p<0.001). Furthermore, using time-activity curves approximated by terms up to the 3rd-harmonic component, the temporal difference in emptying patterns between both ventricles was investigated. In TF cases, the time from end-diastole to minimum count (T2) was significantly larger in RV than in LV (p<0.001). The elongated T2 interval of RV seemed to play an important role in producing RV phase lag. Thus, this non-invasive method is valuable for pathophysiologic investigation of patients with TF and can be of help in estimating the severity of their disease. (author).

  14. Evaluation of left ventricular function in patients with ischemic heart disease by isoproterenol infusion stress blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findings of isoproterenol infusion stress blood pool scintigraphy with Tc-99m-O4 (ISP-SG) were compared with those of exercise stress scintigraphy (EX-SG) in 10 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), 9 with vasospastic angina (VA), and 7 normal controls (NC). EX-SG showed an increased left ventricular enddiastolic volume (EDV) and an unchanged left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) in CAD and VA patients. By contraries, EDV was unchanged and EF was increased in NC. ISP-SG showed the same results as those by EX-SG in CAD patients; it showed an unchanged EDV, a decreased left ventricular endsystolic volume, and an increased EF in both VA patients and NC. Both types of SG showed regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA) in CAD patients; however, ISP-SG showed normal wall motion in all VA patients, although RWMA was seen on EX-SG in some of them. The results indicate that ISP-SG may be helpful in the evaluation of left ventricular function when the execution of EX-SG is impossible, and in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease complicated by coronary spasm. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. The clinical value of early 99Tcm-RBC blood pool imaging in patients with replanted fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the clinical value of early (99Tcm-RBC blood pool imaging (BPI) in patients with replanted fingers (RF). Methods: Five times of BPI were performed on each of the 30 patients with RF, at 4-8, 8-12, 24, 36 and 48 h after the replantation surgery, and that was one time before and 4 times after the hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment on the patients. The radioactivity uptake of replanted finger/normal finger ratio (T/NT) was analyzed using region of interest analysis. The vascular crisis and prognosis were predicted. 0, I and II groups were classified according to their radionuclide distribution. The change of T/NT was comparatively studied. The vascular crisis and prognosis were predicted. Results: The replanted finger T/NT (0.624 +- 0.310) after 4 times of HBO treatment was significantly higher than before the treatment (0.413 +- 0.274, t = 2.79, P 2 = 28.8, 20.0, P 2 = 11.7, 18.0, P < 0.01), respectively. Conclusions: BPI could play an important role on dynamic evaluating the early therapeutic surveillance, predicting the vascular crisis and prognosis, and selecting the next treatment programme in the patients with RF

  16. Evaluation of absolute left ventricular volume by gated equilibrium blood pool scintigraphy using count-based method. Clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anno, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Akira; Ejiri, Kazutaka

    1987-12-01

    In order to estimate the absolute left ventricular volume (LVV) and the cradiac output (CO), gated equilibrium blood pool scintigraphy was performed. CO by radionuclide (RN) method was compared with CO simultaneously measured by thermodilution method (TDM) using Swan-Ganz catheter in 22 patients with cardiac diseases. To improve these determinations by RN, LVV using the count-based method was corrected by each of four transmission factors (TF1 = 1, TF2 (water) = e/sup -0.15d/, TF3 = e/sup -0.13d/ and TF4 = 1 - (1 - e/sup -0.125d/)/sup 1.26/ d: depth). We compared CO by RN with by TDM. CO by RN was significantly correlated with TDM: TF1 (CO (RN) = 0.23 x CO (TDM) + 0.08, r = 0.628, p < 0.002), TF (CO (RN) = 1.10 x CO (TDM) - 0.47, r = 0.914, p < 0.001), TF3 (CO (RN) = 0.89 x CO (TDM) - 0.30, r = 0.912, p < 0.001), and TF4 (CO (RN) = 0.71 x CO (TDM) - 0.23, r = 0.911, p < 0.001), respectively. These results indicate that the linear sttenuation correction is necessary and sufficient for accurate measurement of LVV and CO by RN using count-based method in clinical use.

  17. Right ventricular emptying perfomance in congenital heart disease assessed by temporal Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The right ventricular (RV) emptying performance in patients with congenital heart diseases was investigated by temporal Fourier analysis of multigated cardiac blood-pool studies on a pixel-by-pixel basis. In 15 normal subjects, no significant differences were detected between the mean values of phase of left ventricle (LV) and RV. In patients with ventricular septal defect (VSD), cases with minimal interventricular left-to-right (L-to-R) shunt without pulmonary hypertension (PH) showed normal phase and amplitude images, and cases with moderate or large L-to-R shunt with hyperkinetic PH showed delay of RV phase compared to LV, however, in a case of Eisenmenger type VSD, as well as in patients with primary PH, RV phase lag was not detected. In patients with mild pulmonary stenosis with intact ventricular septum, phase and amplitude images were normal. A case with moderate pulmonary artery stenosis showed mild delay of RV phase. Distinct phase lag of RV was shown in patients with tetralogy of Fallot. Evaluation of RV emptying performance by temporal Fourier analysis is highly valuable for pathophysiologic investigation of congenital heart disease

  18. Are there two functionally distinguished Neu5Gc pools with respect to rouleau formation on the bovine red blood cell?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musielak, Malgorzata

    2004-01-01

    Bovine red blood cells (RBCs) do not exhibit any aggregation tendency in autologous plasma and, therefore, all bovine rouleaux obtained in vitro are regarded as artificial. The present study reports the bovine RBC rouleau formation by either bovine or human fibrinogen and Ca2+ ions. The phenomenon was induced through two-step cell incubation: in 0.9% NaCl and 1% bovine albumin at 37 degrees C for 30 min followed by 20 hrs incubation at 30 degrees C in the fresh solution supplemented with 10 mM glucose. Its mechanism is unknown. During the incubation the number of N-glycolylneuraminic acid molecules per cell decreased from 48.1 to 44.9 amoles, which accounted for 7%. The treatment of RBCs with V. cholerae sialidase under the same conditions resulted in a 94% drop in the Neu5Gc quantity and did not induce the rouleau formation in the same fibrinogen preparation. The preliminary results rise a question whether the bulk of sialic acid is required in the aggregation of bovine erythrocytes under static conditions. Only a minor pool of Neu5Gc seems to be responsible for suppression of the phenomenon. PMID:15258381

  19. Optimal velocity encoding during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of velocity encoding on measurement of brain blood flow and blood volume of inflow and outflow using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. A single two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography slice was applied perpendicular to the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery at C2 level. For each subject, the velocity encoding was set from 30 to 90 cm/s with an interval of 10 cm/s for a total of seven settings. Various velocity encodings greatly affected blood flow volume, maximal blood flow velocity and mean blood flow velocity in the internal carotid artery, but did not significantly affect vertebral arteries and jugular veins. When velocity encoding was 60-80 cm/s, the inflow blood volume was 655 ± 118 mL/min, and the outflow volume was 506 ± 186 mL/min. The ratio of outflow/inflow was steady at 0.78-0.83, and there was no aliasing in any of the images. These findings suggest that velocity encodings of 60-80 cm/s should be selected during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography.

  20. Contrast enhancement in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There appears little question that cerebral contrast enhancement by iodinated material is to a great extent a reflection of a loss of integrity of the blood-brain barrier, expect in those instances where large vascular channels contain a sufficiently large pool of iodinated material of sufficient density and size to be visualized directly. (orig./VJ)

  1. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Assessment of Hyperemic Fractional Microvascular Blood Plasma Volume in Peripheral Arterial Disease: Initial Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Bas Versluis; Marjolein H G Dremmen; Nelemans, Patty J; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Geert-Willem Schurink; Tim Leiner; Walter H Backes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METH...

  2. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery. PMID:26025507

  3. Comparative value of ECG-gated blood pool SPET and ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPET in the assessment of global systolic left ventricular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both electrocardiographically (ECG) gated blood pool SPET (GBPS) and ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPET (GSPET) are currently used for the measurement of global systolic left ventricular (LV) function. In this study, we aimed to compare the value of GSPET and GBPS for this purpose. The population included 65 patients who underwent rest thallium-201 GSPET imaging at 15 min after 201Tl injection followed by planar (planarRNA) and GBPS equilibrium radionuclide angiography immediately after 4-h redistribution myocardial perfusion SPET imaging. Thirty-five patients also underwent LV conventional contrast angiography (X-rays). LV ejection fraction (EF) and LV volume [end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes] were calculated with GBPS and GSPET and compared with the gold standard methods (planarRNA LVEF and X-ray based calculation of LV volume). For both LVEF and LV volume, the inter-observer variability was lower with GBPS than with GSPET. GBPS LVEF was higher than planarRNA (PRNA LVEF showed a slightly better correlation with GBPS LVEF than with GSPET LVEF: r=0.87 and r=0.83 respectively. GSPET LV volume was lower than that obtained using X-rays and GBPS (PRNA LVEF, signal to noise ratio, LV volume calculated using X-rays, summed rest score and acquisition scan distance (i.e. the radius of rotation). The accuracy of GBPS for the measurement of LVEF and LV volume was correlated only with the signal level, the signal to noise ratio and the acquisition scan distance. Both GSPET and GBPS provide reliable estimation of global systolic LV function. The better reliability of GBPS and in particular its lower sensitivity to different variables as compared with GSPET favours its use when precise assessment of global systolic LV function is clinically indicated. (orig.)

  4. The comparison of ordered subset expectation maximization and filtered back projection technique for RBC blood pool SPECT in detection of liver hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Tae Joo; Kim, Hee Joung; Bong, Jung Kyun; Lee, Jong Doo [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    Odered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is a new iterative reconstruction technique for tomographic images that can reduce the reconstruction time comparing with conventional iteration method. We adopted this method of RBC blood pool SPECT and tried to validate the usefulness of OSEM in detection of liver hemangioma comparing with filtered back projection (FBP). A 64 projection SPECT study was acquired over 360 .deg. C by dual-head cameras after the injection of 750MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-RBC. OSEM was performed with various condition of subset (1,2,4,8,16 and 32) and iteration number (1,2,4,8 and 16) to obtain the best set for lesion detection. OSEM underwent in 17 lesions of 15 patients with liver hemangioma and compared with FBP images. Two nuclear medicine physicians reviewed these results independently. Best set for images was 4 iteration and 16 subset. In general, OSEM revealed more homogeneous images than FBP. Eighty-eight percent (15/17) of OSEM images were superior or equal to FBP for anatomic resolution. According to the blind review of images 70.5% (12/17) of OSEM was better in contrast (4/17), anatomic detail (4/17) and both (2/17). Two small lesions were detected by OSEM only and another 2 small lesions were failed to depict in both methods. Remaining 3 lesions revealed no difference in image quality. OSEM can provide better image quality as well as better results in detection of liver hemangioma than conventional FBP technique.

  5. Usefulness of PFR/TPFR score to discriminate hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertensive heart disease-using cardiac blood-pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to see whether it is possible to discriminate hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) with cardiac blood-pool imaging. Subjects were 20 normals, 21 HHD patients and 19 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) ones. Cardiac blood-pool imaging was carried out with 99mTc-labeled erythrocyte method to obtain ventricular volume curve and its differential curve for calculation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), 1/3LVEF, peak filling rate (PFR), time to peak filling rate (TPFR) and PFR/TPFR. LVEF and 1/3LVEF were found insignificant between the three groups. PFR was significantly lower in HCN group, TPFR was significantly prolonged in HCM and PFR/TPFR was significantly higher in HHD. PFR/TPFR was thus useful for discrimination. (K.H.)

  6. Quantitative measurement of total cerebral blood flow using 2D phase-contrast MRI and doppler ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare of quantitative measurement of the total cerebral blood flow using two-dimensional phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound. In 16 volunteers (mean age, 26 years; mean body weight, 66 kg) without abnormal medical histories, two-dimensional phase-contrast MR imaging was performed at the level of the C2-3 inter vertebral disc for flow measurement of the internal carotid arteries and the vertebral arteries. Volume flow measurements using Doppler ultrasound were also performed at the internal carotid arteries 2cm above the carotid bifurcation, and at the vertebral arteries at the level of the upper pole of the thyroid gland. Flows in the four vessels measured by the two methods were compared using Wilcoxon's correlation analysis and the median score. Total cerebral blood flows were calculated by summing these four vessel flows, and mean values for the 16 volunteers were calculated. Cerebral blood flows measured by 2-D phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasounds were 233 and 239 ml/min in the right internal carotid artery, 250 and 248 ml/min in the left internal carotid artery, 62 and 56 ml/min in the right vertebral artery, and 83 and 68 ml/min in the left vertebral artery. Correlation coefficients of the blood flows determined by the two methods were 0.48, 0.54, 0.49, and 0.62 in each vessel, while total cerebral blood flows were 628±68 (range, 517 to 779) ml/min and 612±79 (range, 482 to 804)ml/min, respectively. Total cerebral blood flow was easily measured using 2-D phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound, and the two noninvasive methods can therefore be used clinically for the measurement of total cerebral blood flow

  7. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes Salamon; Martin Hofmann; Caroline Jung; Michael Gerhard Kaul; Franziska Werner; Kolja Them; Rudolph Reimer; Peter Nielsen; Annika Vom Scheidt; Gerhard Adam; Tobias Knopp; Harald Ittrich

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. Materials and Methods A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superp...

  8. Influence of a hyperlipidic diet on the composition of the non-membrane lipid pool of red blood cells of male and female rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Remesar, Xavier; Antelo, Arantxa; Llivina, Clàudia; Albà, Emma; Berdié, Lourdes; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives. Red blood cells (RBC) are continuously exposed to oxidative agents, affecting their membrane lipid function. However, the amount of lipid in RBCs is higher than the lipids of the cell membrane, and includes triacylglycerols, which are no membrane components. We assumed that the extra lipids originated from lipoproteins attached to the cell surface, and we intended to analyse whether the size and composition of this lipid pool were affected by sex or diet. Experiment...

  9. Monitoring and evaluation of lymphatic filariasis interventions: an improved PCR-based pool screening method for high throughput Wuchereria bancrofti detection using dried blood spots

    OpenAIRE

    Plichart, Catherine; Lemoine, Aurore

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective diagnostic tools are necessary to monitor and evaluate interruption of Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) transmission. Accurate detection of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb) microfilaria (mf) is essential to measure the impact of community treatment programmes. PCR-based assays are specific, highly sensitive tools allowing the detection of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in human blood samples. However, current protocols describing the pool screening approach, use samples of less than 60 μl of...

  10. Study on improvement of detectability of abnormal wall motion of the left ventricle by factor analysis of the gated blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author developed a new zooming method for rectangular left ventricular region of interest (LVROI) in which the left ventricle (LV) was selected and set at the left edge of the rectangular ROI, allowing image magnification in factor analysis of gated blood pool study. When factor analysis of gated blood pool study was performed using the rectangular LVROI method in 10 normal subjects, three factors were extracted, such as an atrial factor, LV factor, and factor with slight hypokinetic time activity curve at the base of LV. In 18 patients with angina pectoris, the detectability of left ventricular wall motion abnormality (LVWMA) was 83 % with the rectangular LVROI method as compared with 50 % with the whole heart LVROI method and 64 % with regional ejection fraction imaging. For 14 patients with angiographically proven significant stenosis, the detectability of LVWMA was significantly higher with the rectangular LVROI (86 %) than two other methods (40 % and 64 %). Factor analysis was of limited value in detecting LVWMA in cases of diffuse hypokinesis demonstrated by echocardiography and regional ejection fraction imaging. In the factor analysis of gated blood pool study, the rectangular IVROI was found useful for the detection of LVWMA in ischemic heart disease. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Assessment of myocardial perfusion abnormality and hibernating myocardium by gated blood pool and exercise-stress thallium tomographies after successful coronary angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion were assessed by exercise-stress thallium SPECT and resting gated blood pool SPECT techniques before and after 47 successful coronary angioplasties. Thallium perfusion was analyzed visually and quantitatively in stress and resting studies. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and peak filling rate (PFR) were calculated and regional wall motion was scored by amplitude and phase images in radionuclide planar and tomographic imagings. The thallium redistribution in delayed or resting SPECTs was more sensitive (87%) for detecting myocardial ischemia compared to symptoms (36%) and ECG changes (60%). An exercise capacity, LVEF, PFR, and the scores of perfusion and regional wall motion were improved significantly after coronary angioplasty. Stress thallium and gated blood pool SPECTs showed the improvements of myocardial perfusion in 159 (79%) of 201 segments and regional wall motion in 47 (51%) of 92 segments, respectively. These results suggest that the combined use of stress thallium SPECT, gated blood pool planar and SPECT techniques can contribute not only to the assessment of the efficacy of coronary angioplasty but also to detecting the mismatching of myocardial perfusion and contraction ('myocardial hibernation') in infarct-related myocardial lesions. (author)

  12. Renal blood perfusion in GK rats using targeted contrast enhanced ultrasonography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo; Liu; Liang; Feng; Li-Ping; Gu; Chao-Qing; Wang; Xing-Hua; Li; Yi-Min; Jiang; Wei-Mei; Li; Qing-Zhi; Guo; Fang; Ma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore application of targeted contrast enhanced ultrasonography in diagnosis of early stage vascular endothelial injury and diabetic nephropathy. Methods: Targeted Sono VueTM microbubble was prepared by attaching anti-TM monoclonal antibody to the surface of ordinary micro-bubble Sono Vue by biotin-avidin bridge method and ultrasonic instrument was used to evaluate the developing situation of targeted microbubble in vitro. Twenty 12-week-old male GK rats and 20 Wistar rats were enrolled in this study, and were randomly divided into targeted angiography group and ordinary angiography group. Targeted microbubbles Sono VueTM or general microbubble Sono Vue were rapidly injected to the rats via tail vein; the developing situation of the two contrast agents in rats kidneys was dynamically observed. Time intensity curve was used to analyse rat kidney perfusion characteristics in different groups. Results: Targeted ultrasound microbubble Sono Vue-TM was successfully constructed, and it could be used to develop an external image. Targeted microbubbles Sono Vue-TM enabled clear development of experimental rat kidney. Time intensity curve shapes of rat kidney of the two groups showed as single apex with steep ascending and slowly descending branch. Compared with the control group, the rising slope of the GK rat renal cortex, medulla in targeted angiography group increased(P<0.05); the peak intensity of medulla increased(P<0.05), and the total area under the curve of medulla increased(P<0.05). Compared with control group, the ascending branch of the GK rat in renal cortex, medulla in ordinary angiography group increased(P<0.05). The peak intensity of the curve increased(P<0.05), and the total area under the curve increased(P<0.05). Compared with the ordinary angiography group, the peak of GK rat medullacurve in targeted angiography group intensity increased(P<0.05), and the total area under the curve increased(P<0.05). Conclusions: Targeted microbubbles Sono

  13. Effect of ionic and non-ionic contrast media on aggregation of red blood cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresh human blood without additives, and contrast medium were mixed and examined immediately by light microscopy in a non-flowing state. Sodium meglumine diatrizoate, meglumine diatrizoate, meglumine iodamide, sodium meglumine ioxaglate, iopromide, iopamidol, iohexol, and metrizamide were tested in concentrations of 300 mgI/ml. Physiologic saline and 5% glucose were used as controls. All media were tested in a randomized order with blood samples from 23 volunteers. No aggregation was detected in physiologic saline, and few rouleaux were found in ionic contrast media. Irregular red cell aggregates were found in all low-osmolal contrast media: in 17% of the specimens in ioxaglate, in 52% in metrizamide, and in 78 to 100% in other non-ionic media. Irregular aggregates were seen in all specimens with glucose. It remains to be domonstrated whether or not the irregular aggregation of human red cells in non-ionic contrast media has clinical significance. Iohexol was also tested with blood samples from several laboratory animals, but in nearly every case no aggregates were found. Results of animal experiments or tests with animal blood seem to be poorly applicable to man. (orig.)

  14. Effect of ionic and non-ionic contrast media on aggregation of red blood cells in vitro. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raininko, R.; Ylinen, S.L.

    Fresh human blood without additives, and contrast medium were mixed and examined immediately by light microscopy in a non-flowing state. Sodium meglumine diatrizoate, meglumine diatrizoate, meglumine iodamide, sodium meglumine ioxaglate, iopromide, iopamidol, iohexol, and metrizamide were tested in concentrations of 300 mgI/ml. Physiologic saline and 5% glucose were used as controls. All media were tested in a randomized order with blood samples from 23 volunteers. No aggregation was detected in physiologic saline, and few rouleaux were found in ionic contrast media. Irregular red cell aggregates were found in all low-osmolal contrast media: in 17% of the specimens in ioxaglate, in 52% in metrizamide, and in 78 to 100% in other non-ionic media. Irregular aggregates were seen in all specimens with glucose. It remains to be domonstrated whether or not the irregular aggregation of human red cells in non-ionic contrast media has clinical significance. Iohexol was also tested with blood samples from several laboratory animals, but in nearly every case no aggregates were found. Results of animal experiments or tests with animal blood seem to be poorly applicable to man.

  15. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) protocols are based on standard sequence protocols like time of flight MRA, which evaluates inflowing spins. This technique is limited by a variety of artifacts like the saturation artifact via turbulent blood flow. Contrast media diminish these artifacts like extracellular agents and blood-pool contrast media. The clinical value of the contrast-enhanced MRA for cerebral pathologies is based on the use of the paramagnetic contrast agent Gd-DTPA. For extracerebral diseases this technique is restricted because of the simultaneous visualization of both arterial and venous vascular territorities. Occult venous sinus thrombosis or AV malformations are clinical essential indications for the use of C-MRA. Experimental data prove the excellent contrast abilities of blood-pool agents like Gd-DTPA-polylysin or Gd-DTPA-albumin, which demonstrate long intravascular persistence and retarded excretion. (orig.)

  16. Non-invasive estimation of blood pressure using ultrasound contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Local blood pressure measurements provide important information on the state of health of organs in the body and can be used to diagnose diseases in the heart, lungs, and kidneys. This paper presents an experimental setup for investigating the ambient pressure sensitivity of a contrast agent using diagnostic ultrasound. The setup resembles a realistic clinical setup utilizing a single array transducer for transmit and receive. The ambient pressure sensitivity of SonoVue (Bracco, Milano, Italy) was measured twice using two different acoustic driving pressures, which were selected based on a preliminary experiment. To compensate for variations in bubble response and to make the estimates more robust, the relation between the energy of the subharmonic and the fundamental component was chosen as a measure over the subharmonic peak amplitude. The preliminary study revealed the growth stage of the subharmonic component to occur at acoustic driving pressures between 300 and 500 kPa. Based on this, the pressure sensitivity was investigated using a driving pressure of 485 and 500 kPa. At 485 kPa, a linear pressure sensitivity of 0.42 dB/kPa was found having a linear correlation coefficient of 0.94. The second measurement series at 485 kPa showed a sensitivity of 0.41 dB/kPa with a correlation coefficient of 0.89. Based on the measurements at 500 kPa, this acoustic driving pressure was concluded to be too high causing the bubbles to be destroyed. The pressure sensitivity for these two measurement series were 0.42 and 0.25 dB/kPa with linear correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.93, respectively.

  17. Assessment of left ventricular function by gated myocardial perfusion and gated blood-pool SPECT. Can we use the same reference database?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare left ventricular (LV) volume and ejection fraction (LVEF) measurements obtained with electrocardiographic gated single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (GS-MPI) with those obtained with gated SPECT cardiac blood-pool imaging (GS-pool). Fifteen patients underwent GS-MPI with technetium-99m tetrofosmin and GS-pool with technetium-99m-erythrocyte, within a mean interval of 8±3 days. Eight patients had suspected dilated cardiomyopathy and seven patients had angiographically significant coronary artery disease. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and LVEF measurements were estimated from GS-MPI images by means of Cedars-Sinai automatic quantitative program and from GS-pool images by the threshold technique. Mean differences between GS-MPI and GS-pool in EDV, ESV and LVEF measurements were -2.8±10.5 ml [95% confidence interval (CI): -8.6±3.0 ml], 2.6±7.3 ml (CI: -1.4-6.6 ml) and -2.3±5.1% (CI: -5.1-0.6%), respectively. No significant difference in the mean differences from 0 was found for EDV, ESV or LVEF measurements. Bland-Altman plots revealed no trend over the measured LV volumes and LVEF. For all parameters, regression lines approximated lines of identity. The excellent agreement between GS-MPI and GS-pool measurements suggests that, for estimation of LV volumes and LVEF, these two techniques may be used interchangeably and measurements by one method can serve as a reference for the other. (author)

  18. Proposta do uso de pool de sangue total como controle interno de qualidade em hematologia Proposal for the use of a pool of whole blood as internal quality control in hematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Daniele Schons

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A confiabilidade dos resultados do laboratório é garantida pela realização do controle de qualidade, que tem como funções básicas análise, pesquisa e prevenção da ocorrência de erros laboratoriais por meio de programas que abrangem tanto o controle interno quanto o externo. OBJETIVO: Propor a padronização de utilização de pool de sangue total como controle interno de qualidade no setor de hematologia. MÉTODO: Foram selecionadas amostras de sangue total, colhidas com ácido etilenodiaminotetracético (EDTA, de mesmos grupo sanguíneo e fator Rh, livres de interferentes, como hemólise, lipemia e icterícia. De um total de 30 ml de sangue total, obtiveram-se três alíquotas de 10 ml cada, às quais foram adicionados, respectivamente, 0 ml (sem adição, 1 ml e 5 ml de glicerol (conservante. As amostras foram avaliadas em contador automático ADVIA® 60. Após determinação dos valores de média e DP, todas as amostras foram avaliadas por um período de 45 dias úteis para confecção do gráfico de Levey-Jennings e verificação da estabilidade da amostra. RESULTADO E CONCLUSÃO: Podemos verificar que o pool de sangue total, preparado de acordo com a metodologia proposta, não apresenta estabilidade necessária para sua utilização, como controle interno alternativo no setor de hematologia.INTRODUCTION: The reliability of laboratory results is ensured by the implementation of quality control, which has basic functions, such as analysis, research and prevention of laboratory errors through programs that encompass both internal and external control. OBJECTIVE: To propose a standard method to use pooled whole blood as internal quality control in the Hematology division. METHOD: The selected whole blood samples were collected with EDTA, belonged to the same blood group and Rh factor and did not present interfering factors, such as hemolysis, lipemia and icterus. From a total of 30 ml of whole blood it was obtained 3

  19. Assessment of fluctuating velocities in disturbed cardiovascular blood flow : in vivo feasibility of generalized phase-contrast MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Engvall, Jan; Bolger, Ann F.; Ebbers, Tino

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of generalized phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) for the noninvasive assessment of fluctuating velocities in cardiovascular blood flow. Materials and Methods Multidimensional PC-MRI was used in a generalized manner to map mean flow velocities and intravoxel velocity standard deviation (IVSD) values in one healthy aorta and in three patients with different cardiovascular diseases. The acquired data were used to assess the kinetic energy of b...

  20. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer.A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4 was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography.Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide.4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  1. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. Materials and Methods A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Results Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. Conclusions 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions. PMID:27249022

  2. Differential uptake of MRI contrast agents indicates charge-selective blood-brain interface in the crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otopalik, Adriane G; Shin, Jane; Beltz, Barbara S; Sandeman, David C; Kolodny, Nancy H

    2012-08-01

    This study provides a new perspective on the long-standing problem of the nature of the decapod crustacean blood-brain interface. Previous studies of crustacean blood-brain interface permeability have relied on invasive histological, immunohistochemical and electrophysiological techniques, indicating a leaky non-selective blood-brain barrier. The present investigation involves the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a method for non-invasive longitudinal tracking of tracers in real-time. Differential uptake rates of two molecularly distinct MRI contrast agents, namely manganese (Mn(II)) and Magnevist® (Gd-DTPA), were observed and quantified in the crayfish, Cherax destructor. Contrast agents were injected into the pericardium and uptake was observed with longitudinal MRI for approximately 14.5 h. Mn(II) was taken up quickly into neural tissue (within 6.5 min), whereas Gd-DTPA was not taken up into neural tissue and was instead restricted to the intracerebral vasculature or excreted into nearby sinuses. Our results provide evidence for a charge-selective intracerebral blood-brain interface in the crustacean nervous system, a structural characteristic once considered too complex for a lower-order arthropod. PMID:22526631

  3. Correction of counting rate drop at the end of blood pool ROI curves on the bases of the total visual field curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A correction method based on the constant total counting rate in the final diastolic phase is described. The method should be applied in cases without time standardisation. If Fourier techniques are used for curve smoothing and for the calculation of phase and amplitude images, also users who do not have list mode, hybrid mode or frame mode with direct correction will be able to apply the method of gated blood pool scanning. In fact, time correction at a later stage may even have some advantages. (orig.)

  4. Visualization of hypertrophied papillary muscle mimicking left ventricular mass on gated blood pool and T1-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sixty-year old man with acute myocardial infarction was incidentally found to have a hypertrophied anterolateral papillary muscle (ALPPM) of the left ventricle on gated blood pool (GBP) and T1-201 myocardial perfusion images. Hypertrophy of the ALPPM was visualized as a movable defect in the lateral basal area on GBP imaging throughout the cardiac cycle and on the TI-201 study as a radionuclide accumulating structure, consistent with the defect in the GBP. A combination of these findings may suggest the presence of a hypertrophied papillary muscle of the left ventricle

  5. Activation of blood clotting and fibrinolysis in angiocardiography with ionic and non-ionic contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the effects of a ionic (amidotrizoate) and a nonionic X-ray contrast medium (iopromid) during routine levocardiography and coronary angiography, we employed assays that detect reaction products of thrombin and plasmin to assess the activation of the haemostatic system. Methods: Subsequent to informed consent, 20 patients were randomly assigned to receive either amidotrizoate or iopromid during standard levocardiography and coronary angiography in a double-blind comparative study. Groups were comparable in respect of age, weight, sex and severity of the disease. No anticoagulation was provided. Coronary angiography was performed according to a standardised protocol. Consumption of contrast media and duration of the examination were comparable in both groups. Results: Thrombin generation (F.1+2) and thrombin activity (TAT) were higher with the ionic contrast medium but did not attain statistical significance. Fibrin generation and degradation as expressed by D-dimer fibrin split products was significantly increased in patients who had been receiving amidotrizoate (p<0,05, U-Test). Conclusion: The non-ionic X-ray contrast medium induced significantly less haemostatic activation in vivo than did the ionic medium amidotrizoate. These data suggest that earlier in vitro observations of more pronounced anticoagulant effects of ionic X-ray contrast media are of limited significance for the evaluation of in vivo effects of X-ray contrast media on haemostatic function. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of right and left ventricular function by quantitative blood-pool SPECT (QBS): comparison with conventional methods and quantitative gated SPECT (QGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagiri, Keiichi; Wakabayashi, Yasushi; Tawarahara, Kei; Kurata, Chinori; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2006-10-01

    Though quantitative ECG-gated blood-pool SPECT (QBS) has become a popular tool in research settings, more verification is necessary for its utilization in clinical medicine. To evaluate the reliability of the measurements of left and right ventricular functions with QBS, we performed QBS, as well as first-pass pool (FPP) and ECG-gated blood-pool (GBP) studies on planar images in 41 patients and 8 healthy volunteers. Quantitative ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (QGS) was also performed in 30 of 49 subjects. First, we assessed the reproducibility of the measurements of left and right ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, RVEF) and left and right ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV, RVEDV) with QBS. Second, LVEF and RVEF obtained from QBS were compared with those from FPP and GBP, respectively. Third, LVEF and LVEDV obtained from QBS were compared with those from QGS, respectively. The intra- and inter-observer reproducibilities were excellent for LVEF, LVEDV, RVEF and RVEDV measured with QBS (r = 0.88 to 0.96, p < 0.01), while the biases in the measurements of RVEF and RVEDV were relatively large. LVEF obtained from QBS correlated significantly with those from FPP and GBP, while RVEF from QBS did not. LVEF and LVEDV obtained from QBS were significantly correlated with those from QGS, but the regression lines were not close to the lines of identity. In conclusion, the measurements of LVEF and LVEDV with QBS have good reproducibility and are useful clinically, while those of RVEF and RVEDV are less useful compared with LVEF and LVEDV. The algorithm of QBS for the measurements of RVEF and RVEDV remains to be improved. PMID:17134018

  7. Influence of a hyperlipidic diet on the composition of the non-membrane lipid pool of red blood cells of male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remesar, Xavier; Antelo, Arantxa; Llivina, Clàudia; Albà, Emma; Berdié, Lourdes; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives. Red blood cells (RBC) are continuously exposed to oxidative agents, affecting their membrane lipid function. However, the amount of lipid in RBCs is higher than the lipids of the cell membrane, and includes triacylglycerols, which are no membrane components. We assumed that the extra lipids originated from lipoproteins attached to the cell surface, and we intended to analyse whether the size and composition of this lipid pool were affected by sex or diet. Experimental design. Adult male and female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria diets. Packed blood cells and plasma lipids were extracted and analysed for fatty acids by methylation and GC-MS, taking care of not extracting membrane lipids. Results. The absence of ω3-PUFA in RBC extracts (but not in plasma) suggest that the lipids extracted were essentially those in the postulated lipid surface pool and not those in cell membrane. In cells' extracts, there was a marked depletion of PUFA (and, in general, of insaturation). Fatty acid patterns were similar for all groups studied, with limited effects of sex and no effects of diet in RBC (but not in plasma) fatty acids. Presence of trans fatty acids was small but higher in RBC lipids, and could not be justified by dietary sources. Conclusions. The presence of a small layer of lipid on the RBC surface may limit oxidative damage to the cell outer structures, and help explain its role in the transport of lipophilic compounds. However, there may be other, so far uncovered, additional functions for this lipid pool. PMID:26213652

  8. Evaluation of right and left ventricular function by quantitative blood-pool SPECT (QBS). Comparison with conventional methods and quantitative gated SPECT (QGS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though quantitative ECG-gated blood-pool SPECT (QBS) has become a popular tool in research settings, more verification is necessary for its utilization in clinical medicine. To evaluate the reliability of the measurements of left and right ventricular functions with QBS, we performed QBS, as well as first-pass pool (FPP) and ECG-gated blood-pool (GBP) studies on planar images in 41 patients and 8 healthy volunteers. Quantitative ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (QGS) was also performed in 30 of 49 subjects. First, we assessed the reproducibility of the measurements of left and right ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, RVEF) and left and right ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV, RVEDV) with QBS. Second, LVEF and RVEF obtained from QBS were compared with those from FPP and GBP, respectively. Third, LVEF and LVEDV obtained from QBS were compared with those from QGS, respectively. The intra- and inter-observer reproducibilities were excellent for LVEF, LVEDV, RVEF and RVEDV measured with QBS (r=0.88 to 0.96, p<0.01), while the biases in the measurements of RVEF and RVEDV were relatively large. LVEF obtained from QBS correlated significantly with those from FPP and GBP, while RVEF from QBS did not. LVEF and LVEDV obtained from QBS were significantly correlated with those from QGS, but the regression lines were not close to the lines of identity. In conclusion, the measurements of LVEF and LVEDV with QBS have good reproducibility and are useful clinically, while those of RVEF and RVEDV are less useful compared with LVEF and LVEDV. The algorithm of QBS for the measurements of RVEF and RVEDV remains to be improved. (author)

  9. Perfusion MRI (dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging) with different measurement approaches for the evaluation of blood flow and blood volume in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Steffensen, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Background: Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in the evaluation of brain tumors. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is usually obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using normal appearing white matter as reference region. The emerging perfusion...... glioblastomas. Results: rCBF and rCBV measurements obtained with the maximum perfusion method were correlated when normalized to white matter (r ¼ 0.60) and to the cerebellum (r ¼ 0.49). Histogram analyses of rCBF and rCBV showed that mean and median values as well as skewness and peak position were correlated...

  10. Changes of renal blood flow after ESWL: Assessment by ASL MR imaging, contrast enhanced MR imaging, and renal resistive index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd Ellah, Mohamed, E-mail: dr_m_hamdy2006@hotmail.co [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kremser, Christian, E-mail: christian.kremser@i-med.ac.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pallwein, Leo, E-mail: leo.pallwein-prettner@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Aigner, Friedrich, E-mail: friedrich.Aigner@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schocke, Michael, E-mail: michael.schocke@i-med.ac.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Peschel, Reinhard, E-mail: reinhard.peschel@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Urology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pedross, Florian, E-mail: florian.pedross@i-med.ac.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Medical Statistics Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pinggera, Germar-Michael, E-mail: germar.pinggera@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Urology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Wolf, Christian, E-mail: christian.wolf@bkh-reutte.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Alsharkawy, Mostafa A.M., E-mail: drmostafamri@yahoo.co [Assiut University, Radiology Dept., Assiut (Egypt); Jaschke, Werner, E-mail: werner.jaschke@i-med.ac.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Frauscher, Ferdinand, E-mail: ferdinand.frauscher@uki.a [Innsbruck Medical University, Radiology Dept., Anich St. 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-10-15

    The annual incidence of stone formation is increased in the industrialised world. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a non-invasive effective treatment of upper urinary tract stones. This study is aimed to evaluate changes of renal blood flow in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and renal resistive index (RI). Thirteen patients with nephrolithiasis were examined using MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound 12 h before and 12 h after ESWL. ASL sequence was done for both kidneys and followed by contrast enhanced MR imaging. In addition RI Doppler ultrasound measurements were performed. A significant increase in RI (p < 0.001) was found in both treated and untreated kidneys. ASL MR imaging also showed significant changes in both kidneys (p < 0.001). Contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging did not show significant changes in the kidneys. ESWL causes changes in RI and ASL MR imaging, which seem to reflect changes in renal blood flow.

  11. Changes of renal blood flow after ESWL: Assessment by ASL MR imaging, contrast enhanced MR imaging, and renal resistive index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual incidence of stone formation is increased in the industrialised world. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is a non-invasive effective treatment of upper urinary tract stones. This study is aimed to evaluate changes of renal blood flow in patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) by arterial spin labeling (ASL) MR imaging, contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and renal resistive index (RI). Thirteen patients with nephrolithiasis were examined using MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound 12 h before and 12 h after ESWL. ASL sequence was done for both kidneys and followed by contrast enhanced MR imaging. In addition RI Doppler ultrasound measurements were performed. A significant increase in RI (p < 0.001) was found in both treated and untreated kidneys. ASL MR imaging also showed significant changes in both kidneys (p < 0.001). Contrast enhanced dynamic MR imaging did not show significant changes in the kidneys. ESWL causes changes in RI and ASL MR imaging, which seem to reflect changes in renal blood flow.

  12. Effect of intracoronary injection of conventional ionic and modern nonionic contrast media on hemodynamics and blood constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim was to compare hemodynamic effects of intracoronary contrast media with comparable iodine contents in anesthetized dogs: ionic, high-osmolar diatrizoate, non-ionic monomeric iopromide, and nonionic dimeric iotrolane. Diatrizoate (compared with iopromide and iotrolane) increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure by 27% (3%, 4%) and decreased maximal rate of left ventricular pressure rise by 22% (11%, 6%). Osmolality increased by 20% (+8%, +4%) and cation concentrations decreased with an altered Na+/CA++ ratio (+10%, -1%, +2%) compatible with left ventricular dysfunction after diatrizoate. The authors conclude that the low-osmolar agents produced significantly less hemodynamic side effects and only minor changes in blood parameters

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume in peripheral arterial disease: initial findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten PAD patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. Patients underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the peripheral arteries, followed by one DCE MRI examination of the musculature of the calf. Healthy control subjects were examined twice on different days to determine normative values and the interreader and interscan reproducibility of the technique. The MRI protocol comprised dynamic imaging of contrast agent wash-in under reactive hyperemia conditions of the calf musculature. Using pharmacokinetic modeling the hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume (V(p, unit: % of the anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was calculated. RESULTS: V(p was significantly lower for all muscle groups in PAD patients (4.3±1.6%, 5.0±3.3% and 6.1±3.6% for anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, respectively compared to healthy control subjects (9.1±2.0%, 8.9±1.9% and 9.3±2.1%. Differences in V(p between muscle groups were not significant. The coefficient of variation of V(p varied from 10-14% and 11-16% at interscan and interreader level, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Using DCE MRI after contrast-enhanced MR angiography with gadofosveset enables reproducible assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. V(p was lower in PAD patients than in healthy controls, which reflects a promising functional (hemodynamic biomarker for the

  14. Quantification of hepatic parenchymal blood flow by contrast ultrasonography with flash-replenishment imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metoki, Ryo; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Iijima, Hiroko; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Aoki, Takaya; Miyata, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kei; Kudo, Kosei; Shimizu, Masafumi; Yamada, Masahiko

    2006-10-01

    Flash-replenishment (FR) utilizes destruction of microbubbles in the scan volume by high-power ultrasound and enables to observe reperfusion at a low acoustic power. In this paper, we introduced theoretic equation between probability density function (PDF) of the transit time in the scan volume and time intensity curve (TIC) measured by FR method. From the equations, it was explained that the mean transit time (MTT) through the scan volume was calculated from the plateau level and tangent of the initial slope. Animal experiments were also performed to measure TIC in the parenchymal region of the liver using FR method. From the result of the TIC, the variant of the PDF for the transit time was found to be small and the average MTT was 11.1 s. Hepatic blood flow by an ultrasonic transit time flowmeter was also measured in the same experiment, and adequate correlation was obtained from between the two methods. The results suggested that the FR method, which is a noninvasive measurement, can predict the blood flow of the liver. PMID:17045864

  15. Suitable image parameters and analytical method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow volume with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine suitable image parameters and an analytical method for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow volume. This was done by constructing an experimental model and applying the results to a clinical application. The experimental model was constructed from the aorta of a bull and circulating isotonic saline. The image parameters of PC-MRI (repetition time, flip angle, matrix, velocity rate encoding, and the use of square pixels) were studied with percent flow volume (the ratio of actual flow volume to measured flow volume). The most suitable image parameters for accurate blood flow measurement were as follows: repetition time, 50 msec; flip angle, 20 degrees; and a 512 x 256 matrix without square pixels. Furthermore, velocity rate encoding should be set ranging from the maximum flow velocity in the vessel to five times this value. The correction in measuring blood flow was done with the intensity of the region of interest established in the background. With these parameters for PC-MRI, percent flow volume was greater than 90%. Using the image parameters for PC-MRI and the analytical method described above, we evaluated cerebral blood flow volume in 12 patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. The results were compared with conventional xenon computed tomography. The values found with both methods showed good correlation. Thus, we concluded that PC-MRI was a noninvasive method for evaluating cerebral blood flow in patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. (author)

  16. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid...... approach in regularizing 3D flow fields is evaluated. METHODS: The proposed algorithm incorporates both a Newtonian fluid physics model and a linear PC-MRI signal model. The model equations are solved numerically using a modified CFD algorithm. The numerical solution corresponds to the optimal solution of...... dynamics (CFD) calculations. CFD provides arbitrarily high resolution, but its accuracy hinges on model assumptions, while velocity fields measured with PC-MRI generally do not satisfy the equations of fluid dynamics, provide limited resolution, and suffer from partial volume effects. The purpose of this...

  17. Intraoperative laser speckle contrast imaging for monitoring cerebral blood flow: results from a 10-patient pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lisa M.; Weber, Erica L.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Kappeler, Kaelyn L.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2012-02-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) during neurosurgery can provide important physiological information for a variety of surgical procedures. Although multiple intraoperative vascular monitoring technologies are currently available, a quantitative method that allows for continuous monitoring is still needed. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical imaging method with high spatial and temporal resolution that has been widely used to image CBF in animal models in vivo. In this pilot clinical study, we adapted a Zeiss OPMI Pentero neurosurgical microscope to obtain LSCI images by attaching a camera and a laser diode. This LSCI adapted instrument has been used to acquire full field flow images from 10 patients during tumor resection procedures. The patient's ECG was recorded during acquisition and image registration was performed in post-processing to account for pulsatile motion artifacts. Digital photographs confirmed alignment of vasculature and flow images in four cases, and a relative change in blood flow was observed in two patients after bipolar cautery. The LSCI adapted instrument has the capability to produce real-time, full field CBF image maps with excellent spatial resolution and minimal intervention to the surgical procedure. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using LSCI to monitor blood flow during neurosurgery.

  18. Cation exchange separation of 61Cu2+ from natCo targets and preparation of 61Cu-DOTA-HSA as a blood pool agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method for isolation of 61Cu2+ from a natCo target using cation exchange was developed. 61Cu2+ was eluted from a cation exchange resin column by 0.2 M HCl with 90% acetone, while Co2+ remained on the column. The whole separation process was completed within 50 min at more than 72% yield. The Co2+ impurity level in 61Cu2+ solution was reduced to less than 0.1 ppm. Highly pure 61Cu2+ solution was then applied to prepare 61Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-human serum albumin (HSA) which showed good blood pool imaging properties

  19. Critical appraisal and pooled analysis of telmisartan alone or in combination with hydrochlorothiazide for achieving blood pressure goals

    OpenAIRE

    Morimoto,

    2010-01-01

    Satoshi Morimoto, Nobuyuki Takahashi, Tatsuyori Morita, Kazunori Someya, Nagaoki Toyoda, Toshiji IwasakaSecond Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University 2-3-1, Shinmachi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1191, JapanAbstract: Rigid control of blood pressure (BP) is essential to prevent cardiovascular disease. However, only about 40% of hypertensive patients undergoing pharmacological intervention with a single agent achieve their BP goals in contemporary clinical practice. Combined therapy...

  20. The Agreement Between Blood Pool - Delayed Bone Scintigraphy and Tc-99m Human Immunoglobulin G (HIG Scintigraphy in the Determination of the Presence and Severity of Inflammatory Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulizar Kacar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, it was aimed to investigate the agreement between early phase of bone scintigraphy – human immunoglobulin scintigraphy (EPBS-HIG and late phase bone scintigraphy – HIG (LPBS-HIG in the determination of the presence and also the severity of inflammatory arthritis. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients (23 female, 5 male; between 19 to 80 years of age with inflammatory arthritis were included in the study. Tc-99m HIG and blood pool/late phase bone scintigraphies were performed in all patients. In scintigraphic examinations, the joints were scored with the degree of accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical by the semiquantitative analysis (0=Background activity, 1=Faint uptake, 2=Moderate uptake, 3=Marked uptake which is called as visually active joint score as severity index of the disease. To estimate the agreement between EPBS – HIG and LPBS - HIG in the determination of the presence and severity of inflammatory arthritis, 2x2 kappa coefficients were calculated. Results: Our results showed good agreement between EPBS - HIG for the presence of inflammation (kappa: 0.72 but not for the severity of the disease (kappa: 0.29, poor agreement between LPBS - HIG for both the presence (kappa: 0.51 and severity (kappa: 0.01 of inflammatory arthritis. Conclusion: The blood pool scintigraphy could be used in the investigation of the presence of inflammatory arthritis because the good agreement with HIG and the lower cost but not for the severity of the disease. (MIRT 2011;20:45-51

  1. Radionuclide plethysmography and Tc-99m red blood cell venography in venous thrombosis: comparison with contrast venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide plethysmography (RPG) is a new technique that uses Tc-99m labelled red blood cells to ascertain changes in venous volumes by detecting the change in counts in response to the inflation and deflation of proximal thigh cuffs. Diagnosis of ileofemoral venous occlusion is possible using this technique, which also provides kinetic data of venous outflow. Twenty-one patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis were studied prospectively using RPG, radionuclide venography (RV), and contrast venography (CV) to establish the usefulness of RPG alone and in combination wth RV in the diagnosis of ileofemoral venous thrombosis (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 100%). RV was less sensitive (73%) and less specific (93%) in diagnosing that condition

  2. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Marlies, E-mail: marlies.wagner@kgu.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis, E-mail: yiannis.kyriakou@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Health Care Sector (Germany); Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du, E-mail: mesnil@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Singer, Oliver C., E-mail: o.singer@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Department of Neurology (Germany); Berkefeld, Joachim, E-mail: berkefeld@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  3. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy

  4. Cerebral misery perfusion diagnosed using hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Olympio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cerebral misery perfusion represents a failure of cerebral autoregulation. It is an important differential diagnosis in post-stroke patients presenting with collapses in the presence of haemodynamically significant cerebrovascular stenosis. This is particularly the case when cortical or internal watershed infarcts are present. When this condition occurs, further investigation should be done immediately. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian man presented with a stroke secondary to complete occlusion of his left internal carotid artery. He went on to suffer recurrent seizures. Neuroimaging demonstrated numerous new watershed-territory cerebral infarcts. No source of arterial thromboembolism was demonstrable. Hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure his cerebrovascular reserve capacity. The findings were suggestive of cerebral misery perfusion. Conclusions Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging allows the inference of cerebral misery perfusion. This procedure is cheaper and more readily available than positron emission tomography imaging, which is the current gold standard diagnostic test. The most evaluated treatment for cerebral misery perfusion is extracranial-intracranial bypass. Although previous trials of this have been unfavourable, the results of new studies involving extracranial-intracranial bypass in high-risk patients identified during cerebral perfusion imaging are awaited. Cerebral misery perfusion is an important and under-recognized condition in which emerging imaging and treatment modalities present the possibility of practical and evidence-based management in the near future. Physicians should thus be aware of this disorder and of recent developments in diagnostic tests that allow its detection.

  5. Contrasted study on the opening degree of blood-brain barriier after radiation therapy with SPECT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blood-brain barrier(BBB) is the largest barrier responsible for preventing direct contact between chemotherapeutic drugs in blood and tumors in brain, the permeability of BBB incease at different degree after brain irradiation in clinical brain tumors radiotherapy. Methods: In our study, 26 patients with metastatic brain tumors(21 cases in pr/mary lung carcinoma, 5 cases in breast carcinoma) were accepted the full brain irradiation. The detructive effects of radiation on the BBB were determined by the 99mTc-DTPA SPECT and the concentration ratio of methotrexate(MTX) in cerebrospinal fluid(CSF) and blood, the brain MRI before and after radiotherapy were retrospective contrasted study with SPECT. Results: the degree of destructive effect on the BBB was directly proportional to radiation doses. After a dose of 20Gy radiation to brain, the permeability of BBB inceased markedly(P<0.01). But in cases the dexamethasone(DXM) was administrated to decease the brain edema during radiotherapy, the permeability inceased less than that in patients without DXM(P<0.05). Conclutions: After 20Gy irradiation, the BBB would gradually open. At this time, chemotherapy is the best choice to improving the therapeutic effect. Dexamethasone was found to cause the decease in BBB permeability but no significant remission of brain edema. So, if the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in treatment of metastatic brain tumors will be plan, the dexamethasone may be not used in expecting to deceasing the side effect and that no affecting the therapeutic effect. (authors)

  6. Assessment of left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation by left ventricular filling and function curves determined by ECG gated blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate cardiac function in patients with atrial fibrillation (Af) is difficult to assess, since a wide fluctuation of cardiac cycle makes the ventricular hemodynamics variable. Although ECG gated blood pool scintigraphy (EGBPS) is useful to evaluate left ventricular (LV) function, a conventional EGBPS might have a problem in applying to Af. Therefore, a new processing algorithm was devised to make multiple gated images discriminated by preceding R-R intervals (PRR), and LV filling and function curves were obtained in 62 patients with Af to evaluate LV function. LV filling curve, obtained by plotting end-diastolic volume (EDV) againt PRR, demonstrated that the blood filling was impaired in mitral stenosis and constrictive pericarditis, but recovered after mitral commissurotomy. LV function curve, by plotting stroke volume (SV) againt EDV, was quantitatively analysed by the indices such as Slope and Position. Both indices reduced significantly in heart failure. When compared among underlying diseases individually, the indices decreased in the following order; lone Af, hyperthyroidism, senile Af, hypertension, mitral valve disease, ischemic heart disease, dilated cardiomyopathy and aortic regurgitation. After the treatment with digitalis and/or diuretics, left and upward shift of function curve was observed. The rise in heart rate by atropine infusion made Slope and Position unchanged, and which implied that function curve was little influenced by heart rate per se. The rise in systolic blood pressure by angiotensin-II infusion caused shifts in function curve to rightward and downward. Downward shift, mostly seen in patients with gentler slope in control state, may imply afterload mismatch due to a decrease in preload reserve. (J.P.N.)

  7. Risk of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy in high-risk patients undergoing MDCT - A pooled analysis of two randomized trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, Henrik S. [University of Copenhagen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, and Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Herlev (Denmark); Morcos, Sameh K. [University of Sheffield, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    The incidence of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) following intravenous (IV) CM administration of contrast media to renally impaired patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is not well characterized. Our objective was to investigate the incidence of CIN in patients with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 ml/min undergoing contrast-enhanced MDCT examinations and to compare the rates of CIN following the IV administration of low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM, iopamidol and iomeprol) and an iso-osmolar contrast medium (IOCM, iodixanol). A total of 301 adult patients with moderate-to-severe renal failure received a similar IV contrast dose (40 gI). Serum creatinine (SCr) was measured at screening, baseline and 48-72 {+-} 6 h after the MDCT examination. Primary CIN outcome was an increase in SCr {>=}0.5 mg/dl ({>=}44.2 {mu}mol/l) from baseline. The CIN rates were 2.3% in the total population, 0.6% when GFR >40 ml/min, 4.6% when GFR <40 ml/min and 7.8% in patients with GFR <30 ml/min. The incidence of CIN was significantly higher after iodixanol than after LOCM (seven patients, 4.7% following IOCM, no CIN cases following the LOCM; p = 0.007). Significant differences in favor of the LOCM were also observed in patients with GFR <40 ml/min and GFR <30 ml/min. Following the IV administration of nonionic contrast agents in patients with moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency, the risk of significant CIN seems to be low. The IOCM iodixanol caused a higher rate of CIN than the LOCM iopamidol and iomeprol, especially in high-risk patients. Differences in osmolality between these LOCM and iodixanol do not play a role in the genesis of CIN. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of the coronary venous system in heart failure patients by blood pool agent enhanced whole-heart MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the feasibility of MRI for non-invasive assessment of the coronary sinus (CS) and the number and course of its major tributaries in heart failure patients. Fourteen non-ischaemic heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) underwent additional whole-heart coronary venography. MRI was performed 1 day before device implantation. The visibility, location and dimensions of the CS and its major tributaries were assessed and the number of potential implantation sites identified. The MRI results were validated by X-ray venography conventionally acquired during the device implantation procedure. The right atrium (RA), CS and mid-cardiac vein (MCV) could be visualised in all patients. 36% of the identified candidate branches were located posterolaterally, 48% laterally and 16% anterolaterally. The average diameter of the CS was quantified as 9.8 mm, the posterior interventricular vein (PIV) 4.6 mm, posterolateral segments 3.3 mm, lateral 2.9 mm and anterolateral 2.9 mm. Concordance with X-ray in terms of number and location of candidate branches was given in most cases. Contrast-enhanced MRI venography appears feasible for non-invasive pre-interventional assessment of the course of the CS and its major tributaries. (orig.)

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced x-ray CT measurement of cerebral blood volume in a rabbit tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenic, Aleksa; Lee, Ting-Yim; Craen, Rosemary A.; Gelb, Adrian W.

    1998-07-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is a major determinant of intracranial pressure (ICP). Hyperventilation is commonly employed to reduce raised ICP (e.g. in brain tumour patients) presumably through its effect on CBV. With the advent of slip- ring CT scanners, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging allows for the measurement of CBV with high spatial resolution. Using a two-compartment model to characterize the distribution of X- ray contrast agent in the brain, we have developed a non- equilibrium CT method to measure CBV in normal and pathological regions. We used our method to investigate the effect of hyperventilation on CBV during propofol anaesthesia in rabbits with implanted brain tumours. Eight New Zealand White rabbits with implanted VX2 carcinoma brain tumours were studied. For each rabbit, regional CBV measurements were initially made at normocapnia (PaCO2 40 mmHg) and then at hyperventilation (PaCO2 25 mmHg) during propofol anaesthesia. The head was positioned such that a coronal image through the brain incorporated a significant cross-section of the brain tumour as well as a radial artery in a forelimb. Images at the rate of 1 per second were acquired for 2 minutes as Omnipaque 300 (1.5 ml/kg rabbit weight) was injected via a peripheral vein. In these CT images, regions of interest in the brain tissue (e.g. tumour, contra-lateral normal, and peri-tumoural) and the radial artery were drawn. For each region, the mean CT number in pre-contrast images was subtracted from the mean CT number in post-contrast images to produce either the tissue contrast concentration curve, or the arterial contrast concentration curve. Using our non- equilibrium analysis method based on a two-compartment model, regional CBV values were determined from the measured contrast concentration curves. From our study, the mean CBV values [+/- SD] in the tumour, peri-tumoural, and contra-lateral normal regions during normocapnia were: 5.47 plus or minus 1.97, 3.28 plus or minus 1.01, and 1

  10. Laser speckle contrast imaging of blood flow from anesthetized mice: correcting drifts in measurements due to breathing movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Ribeiro, Márcio A. C.; Campos, Juliane C.; Ferreira, Julio C. B.

    2015-06-01

    Background: Laser speckle contrast imaging allows non-invasive assessment of cutaneous blood flow. Although the technique is attractive to measure a quantity related to the skin blood flow (SBF) in anesthetized animal models, movements from breathing can mask the SBF signal. As a consequence, the measurement is overestimated because a variable amount of a DC component due to the breathing movements is added to the SBF signal. Objective: To evaluate a method for estimating the background level of the SBF signal, rejecting artefacts from breathing. Methods: A baseline correction method used for accurate DNA sequencing was evaluated, based on estimating the background level of a signal in small temporal sliding-windows. The method was applied to evaluate a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. SBF signals from hindlimbs of anesthetized C57BL/6 mice (n=13) were registered. The mean SBF (Fi and Fc from ischemic and control hindlimbs) were computed from the registers and from the corresponding estimated background levels (Fib and Fcb from ischemic and control hindlimbs). Results: The mean values of the percentages (a measure of ischemia) MI = (Fi/Fc).100 and MIb = (Fib/Fcb).100 were computed to be 30+/-4% and 23+/-3% respectively (mean +/- SE). Evidences of statistical differences between both, ischemic and control hindlimbs, were obtained (p<0.05, paired student-t). The mean error [(MI-MIb)/MIb].100 obtained was 45+/-14% (mean+/-SE). Conclusion: The recovery of a corrupted SBF signal by breathing artefacts is feasible, allowing more accurate measurements.

  11. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound determination of microvascular blood volume in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in man. Evidence for adipose tissue capillary recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobin, L; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2010-01-01

    The adipose tissue metabolism is dependent on its blood perfusion. During lipid mobilization e.g. during exercise and during lipid deposition e.g. postprandial, adipose tissue blood flow is increased. This increase in blood flow may involve capillary recruitment in the tissue. We investigated the...... basic and postprandial microvascular volume in adipose tissue using real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) imaging in healthy normal weight subjects. In nine subjects, CEU was performed in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and in the underlying skeletal muscle after a bolus injection of...... ultrasound contrast agent to establish the reproducibility of the technique. In nine subjects, the effect of an oral glucose load on blood flow and microvascular volume was measured in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and forearm skeletal muscle. ¹³³Xe washout and venous occlusion strain...

  12. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast......-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged...... agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic...

  13. ECG-gated thallium-201 myocardial SPECT in patients with old myocardial infarction compared with ECG-gated blood pool SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated one of the merits of ECG-gated thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (g-Tl SPECT), i.e., the ability to appreciate left ventricular (LV) wall motion. LV wall motion assessed by g-Tl SPECT and by ECG-gated Blood Pool SPECT (g-BP SPECT) was classified into three grades and compared segment by segment. Tl-201 uptake by g-Tl SPECT was also classified into three grades and compared with those of wall motion in g-BP SPECT. Fifty patients with prior myocardial infarction were injected intravenously at rest with 111 to 185 MBq (3 to 5 mCi) of Tl-201. The left ventricular regions were divided into anterior, septal, inferior and lateral segments (50 patients x 4 segments = 200 segments in total). The grades of wall motion and Tl-201 uptake detected by g-Tl SPECT correlated well with those of wall motion in g-BP SPECT (94.5% and 85%, respectively). With g-Tl SPECT it was possible to evaluate left ventricular wall motion, providing clear perfusion images. (author)

  14. Error analysis of tumor blood flow measurement using dynamic contrast-enhanced data and model-independent deconvolution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed error analysis of tumor blood flow (TBF) measurement using dynamic contrast-enhanced data and model-independent deconvolution analysis, based on computer simulations. For analysis, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) consisting of gamma-variate functions using an adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model under various plasma flow (Fp), mean capillary transit time (Tc), permeability-surface area product (PS) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values. Deconvolution analyses based on truncated singular value decomposition with a fixed threshold value (TSVD-F), with an adaptive threshold value (TSVD-A) and with the threshold value determined by generalized cross validation (TSVD-G) were used to estimate Fp values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIF. First, we investigated the relationship between the optimal threshold value and SNR in TSVD-F, and then derived the equation describing the relationship between the threshold value and SNR for TSVD-A. Second, we investigated the dependences of the estimated Fp values on Tc, PS, the total duration for data acquisition and the shape of AIF. Although TSVD-F with a threshold value of 0.025, TSVD-A with the threshold value determined by the equation derived in this study and TSVD-G could estimate the Fp values in a similar manner, the standard deviation of the estimates was the smallest and largest for TSVD-A and TSVD-G, respectively. PS did not largely affect the estimates, while Tc did in all methods. Increasing the total duration significantly improved the variations in the estimates in all methods. TSVD-G was most sensitive to the shape of AIF, especially when the total duration was short. In conclusion, this study will be useful for understanding the reliability and limitation of model-independent deconvolution analysis when applied to TBF measurement using an extravascular

  15. Intra-arterial digital subtraction portography with a blood-isotonic, non-ionic, dimeric contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-arterial digital subtraction portography (IA-DSP) with a blood-isotonic, non-ionic, dimeric contrast medium was carried out in 27 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. It was possible to obtain images of excellent or good quality of the portal vein and its bilateral main branches in all patients. The third-order branches of the portal vein in the right lobe could be identified in all patients, and images of excellent or good quality were obtained in a mean of 80.2% of patients. Images of third-order branches in the left lobe were of lower quality than those of third-order branches in the right lobe; in particular, images obtained were of poor quality for 27.3% of the medial branches of the left lobe. It was impossible to identify the caudal branches in almost all patients. The side effects of IA-DSP, pain and sensations of heat were very mild; only one patient complained of mild pain, while 18 patients (69.2%) complained of no sensations of heat whatsoever. (author)

  16. Radionuclide plethysmography and Tc-99m red blood cell venography in venous thrombosis: comparison with contrast venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide plethysmography (RPG) is a new technique that uses Tc-99m labelled red blood cells to ascertain changes in venous volumes by detecting the change in counts in response to the inflation and deflation of proximal thigh cuffs. Diagnosis of ileofemoral venous occlusion is possible using this technique, which also provides kinetic data of venous outflow. A range of normal values was defined in 19 subjects for per cent change in venous capacitance and venous outflow. Twenty-one patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis were studied prospectively using RPG, radionuclide venography (RV), and contrast venography (CV) to establish the usefulness of RPG alone and in combination with RV in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. RPG proved to be a reliable technique for the diagnosis of ileofemoral venous thrombosis (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 100%). RV was less sensitive (73%) and less specific (93%) in diagnosing that condition. When RPG is used as the criterion for the detection of ileofemoral vein thrombosis and RV is used as the criterion for the detection of calf vein thrombosis, the combined techniques show improved sensitivity (92%) and specificity (93%) for the detection of all deep venous thromboses

  17. Whole-body MR angiography with body coil acquisition at 3 T in patients with peripheral arterial disease using the contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Eiberg, Jonas P; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Hansen, Marc A; Schroeder, Torben V; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2009-01-01

    Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) at 3 T with body coil acquisition has not previously been investigated. In this study, WB-MRA was performed in this manner using the blood pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium.......Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) at 3 T with body coil acquisition has not previously been investigated. In this study, WB-MRA was performed in this manner using the blood pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium....

  18. Vernal Pools

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This is a polygon layer representing existing vernal pool complexes in California's Central Valley, as identified and mapped by Dr. Robert F. Holland. The purpose...

  19. Routine measurements of left and right ventricular output by gated blood pool emission tomography in comparison with thermodilution measurements: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariano-Goulart, D.; Boudousq, V.; Comte, F.; Eberle, M.C.; Zanca, M.; Kotzki, P.O.; Rossi, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Montpellier University Hospital (France); Piot, C.; Raczka, F.; Davy, J.M. [Dept. of Cardiology B, Montpellier University Hospital (France)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the accuracy of left and right ventricular output computed from a semi-automatic processing of tomographic radionuclide ventriculography data (TRVG) in comparison with the conventional thermodilution method. Twenty patients with various heart diseases were prospectively included in the study. Thermodilution and TRVG acquisitions were carried out on the same day for all patients. Analysis of gated blood pool slices was performed using a watershed-based segmentation algorithm. Right and left ventricular output measured by TRVG correlated well with the measurements obtained with thermodilution (r=0.94 and 0.91 with SEE=0.38 and 0.46 l/min, respectively, P<0.001). The limits of agreement for TRVG and thermodilution measurements were -0.78-1.20 l/min for the left ventricle and -0.34-1.16 l/min for the right ventricle. No significant difference was found between the results of TRVG and thermodilution with respect to left ventricular output (P=0.09). A small but significant difference was found between right ventricular output measured by TRVG and both left ventricular output measured by TRVG (mean difference=0.17 l/min, P=0.04) and thermodilution-derived cardiac output (mean difference=0.41 l/min, P=0.0001). It is concluded that the watershed-based semi-automatic segmentation of TRVG slices provides non-invasive measurements of right and left ventricular output and stroke volumes at equilibrium, in routine clinical settings. Further studies are necessary to check whether the accuracy of these measurements is good enough to permit correct assessment of intracardiac shunts. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of brain perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability, using dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted MRI at 3 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Courivaud, Frédéric; Rostrup, Egill;

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of vascular properties is essential to diagnosis and follow-up and basic understanding of pathogenesis in brain tumors. In this study, a procedure is presented that allows concurrent estimation of cerebral perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain permeability from dynamic T(1)-weighted...

  1. Hard X-ray in-line outline imaging for blood vessels: first generation synchrotron radiation without contrast agents in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Phase-contrast X-ray imaging which reduces radiation exposure, is a promising technique for observing the inner structures of biological soft tissues without the aid of contrast agents.The present study intends to depict blood vessels of rabbits and human livers with hard X-ray in-line out line imaging without contrast agents using synchrotron radiation. Methods: All samples were fixed with formalin and sliced into 6 mm sections. The imaging experiments were performed with Fuji-IX80 films on the 4W1A light beam of the first generation synchrotron radiation in Beijing, China. The device of the ex periment, which supplies a maximum light spot size of 20× 10 mm was similar to that of in-line holography. The photon energy was set at 8 KeV and high quality imagines were obtained by altering the distance between the sample and the film. Results: The trees of rabbit-liver blood vessels and the curved vessels of the cirrhotic human liver were revealed on the images, where vessels < 20 μm in diameter were differentiated. Conclusion: These results show that the blood vessels of liver samples can be revealed by using hard X-ray in-line outline imaging with the first generation synchrotron radiation without contrast agents.

  2. Quantification of hepatic blood flow using a high-resolution phase-contrast MRI sequence with compressed sensing acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Besa, Cecilia; Cooper, Nancy; Garcia-Flores, Julio; Schiano, Thomas D; Markl, Michael; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to evaluate the performance of a high-spatial-resolution 2D phase-contrast (PC) MRI technique accelerated with compressed sensing for portal vein (PV) and hepatic artery (HA) flow quantification in comparison with a standard PC MRI sequence. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. In this prospective study, two PC MRI sequences were compared, one with parallel imaging acceleration and low spatial resolution (generalized autocalibrating partial parallel acquisition [GRAPPA]) and one with compressed sensing acceleration and high spatial resolution (sparse). Seventy-six patients were assessed, including 37 patients with cirrhosis. Two observers evaluated PC image quality. Quantitative analyses yielded a mean velocity, flow, and vessel area for the PV and HA and an arterial fraction. The PC techniques were compared using the paired Wilcoxon test and Bland-Altman statistics. The sensitivity of the flow parameters to the severity of cirrhosis was also assessed. RESULTS. Vessel delineation was significantly improved using the PC sparse sequence (p < 0.034). For both in vitro and in vivo measurements, PC sparse yielded lower estimates for vessel area and flow, and larger differences between PC GRAPPA and PC sparse were observed in the HA. PV velocity and flow were significantly lower in patients with cirrhosis on both PC sparse (p < 0.001 and p = 0.042, respectively) and PC GRAPPA (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). PV velocity correlated negatively with Child-Pugh class (r = -0.50, p < 0.001), whereas the arterial fraction measured with PC sparse was higher in patients with Child-Pugh class B or C disease than in those with Child-Pugh class A disease, with a trend toward significance (p = 0.055). CONCLUSION. A high-spatial-resolution highly accelerated compressed sensing technique (PC sparse) allows total hepatic blood flow measurements obtained in 1 breath-hold, provides improved delineation of the hepatic vessels compared with a standard PC

  3. Cerebral blood volume calculated by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging: preliminary correlation study with glioblastoma genetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inseon Ryoo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC enhanced perfusion MR imaging in predicting major genetic alterations in glioblastomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five patients (M:F = 13∶12, mean age: 52.1±15.2 years with pathologically proven glioblastoma who underwent DSC MR imaging before surgery were included. On DSC MR imaging, the normalized relative tumor blood volume (nTBV of the enhancing solid portion of each tumor was calculated by using dedicated software (Nordic TumorEX, NordicNeuroLab, Bergen, Norway that enabled semi-automatic segmentation for each tumor. Five major glioblastoma genetic alterations (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN, Ki-67, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and p53 were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and analyzed for correlation with the nTBV of each tumor. Statistical analysis was performed using the unpaired Student t test, ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Pearson correlation analysis. RESULTS: The nTBVs of the MGMT methylation-negative group (mean 9.5±7.5 were significantly higher than those of the MGMT methylation-positive group (mean 5.4±1.8 (p = .046. In the analysis of EGFR expression-positive group, the nTBVs of the subgroup with loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 10.3±8.1 were also significantly higher than those of the subgroup without loss of PTEN gene expression (mean: 5.6±2.3 (p = .046. Ki-67 labeling index indicated significant positive correlation with the nTBV of the tumor (p = .01. CONCLUSION: We found that glioblastomas with aggressive genetic alterations tended to have a high nTBV in the present study. Thus, we believe that DSC-enhanced perfusion MR imaging could be helpful in predicting genetic alterations that are crucial in predicting the prognosis of and selecting tailored treatment for glioblastoma patients.

  4. Cine phase-contrast MR to assess portal blood flow in a 10-year-old girl with abdominal aortic coarctation: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the case of a 10-year-old girl with repaired abdominal aortic coarctation in whom chronic mesenteric ischemia was clinically suspected. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) was used to determine the difference between fasting and postprandial portal blood flow. Fasting flow rates in the portal vein were normal. After a meal, blood flow in the portal vein increased 226 % over the fasting state, showing normal augmentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of this technique to a pediatric setting. (orig.)

  5. Pooling Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING WENLEI

    2010-01-01

    @@ While the 1997 Asian financial crisis gave birth to the Chiang Mai Initiative,a foreign currency reserve pool to address short-term liquidity difficulties in the region,the 2008global financial crisis promoted Asian political leaders,bankers and scholars to seek closer regional financial cooperation based on the initiative's framework.

  6. Comparison of gated blood pool SPECT and spiral multidetector computed tomography in the assessment of right ventricular functional parameters. Validation with first-pass radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to compare gated blood pool single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (GBPS) and multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) for the determination of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and right ventricular volumes (RVV) and to compare first-pass radionuclide angiography (FP-RNA) as the gold standard. Twenty consecutive patients (11 men, 9 women) referred for MDCT for the evaluation of the presence of coronary artery disease underwent FP-RNA and GBPS. The mean right ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) calculated with GBPS revealed a statistically significant lower value than that of MDCT. The mean right ventricular end-systolic volume (ESV) calculated with GBPS was also lower than that of MDCT. A comparison of right ventricular EDV from GBPS and MDCT yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.5972. Right ventricular ESV between GBPS and MDCT showed a correlation coefficient of 0.5650. The mean RVEFs calculated with FP-RNA (39.8%±4.0%), GBPS (43.7%±6.9%), and MDCT (40.4%±7.7%) showed no statistical differences (Kruskal-Wallis statistics 4.538, P=0.1034). A comparison of RVEFs from FP-RNA and GBPS yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.7251; RVEFs between FP-RNA and MDCT showed a correlation coefficient of 0.6166 and between GBPS and MDCT showed a correlation coefficient of 0.6367. The RVEF, EDV, and ESV calculated by GBPS had good correlation with those obtained with MDCT. In addition, there were no statistical differences of RVEF calculated from FP-RNA, GBPS, and MDCT. However, with regard to RVV, EDV and ESV from GBPS revealed statistically significantly lower values than those of MDCT. Although reasonable correlations among these modalities were obtained, the agreement among these three modalities was not good enough for interchangeable use in the clinical setting. Also, these results should be confirmed in patients with cardiac diseases in future larger population-based studies. (author)

  7. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  8. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbour, Maya [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jarvis, Kelly [Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  9. Monitoring Hypoxia Induced Changes in Cochlear Blood Flow and Hemoglobin Concentration Using a Combined Dual-Wavelength Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging and Doppler Optical Microangiography System

    OpenAIRE

    Reif, Roberto; Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Zhi, Zhongwei; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2012-01-01

    A synchronized dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (DWLSCI) system and a Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) system was developed to determine several ischemic parameters in the cochlea due to a systemic hypoxic challenge. DWLSCI can obtain two-dimensional data, and was used to determine the relative changes in cochlear blood flow, and change in the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) in mice. DOMAG can obtain three-dimensiona...

  10. Pool scrubbing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Source Term Project in the Third Frame Work Programme of the European Union Was conducted under and important joined effort on pool scrubbing research. CIEMAT was the Task Manager of the project and several other organizations participated in it: JRC-Ispra, NNC Limited, RUB-NES and UPM. The project was divided into several tasks. A peer review of the models in the pool scrubbing codes SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 was made, considering the different aspects in the hydrodynamic phenomenology, particle retention and fission product vapor abortions. Several dominant risk accident sequences were analyzed with MAAP, SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and the predictions were compared. A churn-turbulent model was developed for the hydrodynamic behaviour of the pool. Finally, an experimental programme in the PECA facility of CIEMAT was conducted in order to study the decontamination factor under jet injection regime, and the experimental observations were compared with the SPARC and BUSCA codes. (Author)

  11. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christine L; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T; Hopkins, Susan R; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological changes depends on the stability of n in response to different stimuli. The effect of visual stimulus contrast on this coupling ratio was tested in 9 healthy human subjects, measuring CBF and BOLD responses to a flickering checkerboard at four visual contrast levels. The theory of the BOLD effect makes a robust prediction-independent of details of the model-that if the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling ratio n remains constant, then the response ratio between the lowest and highest contrast levels should be higher for the BOLD response than the CBF response because of the ceiling effect on the BOLD response. Instead, this response ratio was significantly lower for the BOLD response (BOLD response: 0.23 ± 0.13, mean ± SD; CBF response: 0.42 ± 0.18; p=0.0054). This data is consistent with a reduced dynamic range (strongest/weakest response ratio) of the CMRO(2) response (~1.7-fold) compared to that of the CBF response (~2.4-fold) as luminance contrast increases, corresponding to an increase of n from 1.7 at the lowest contrast level to 2.3 at the highest contrast level. The implication of these results for fMRI studies is that the magnitude of the BOLD response does not accurately reflect the magnitude of underlying physiological processes. PMID:22963855

  12. Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Determination of Fractional Tumor Blood Volume: A Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Response to the Vascular Disrupting Agent ZD6126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess tumor fractional blood volume (ξ), determined in vivo by susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a noninvasive imaging biomarker of tumor response to the vascular disrupting agent ZD6126. Methods and Materials: The transverse MRI relaxation rate R2* of rat GH3 prolactinomas was quantified prior to and following injection of 2.5 mgFe/kg feruglose, an ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide intravascular contrast agent, and ξ (%) was determined from the change in R2*. The rats were then treated with either saline or 50 mg/kg ZD6126, and ξ measured again 24 hours later. Following posttreatment MRI, Hoechst 33342 (15 mg/kg) was administered to the rats and histological correlates from composite images of tumor perfusion and necrosis sought. Results: Irrespective of treatment, tumor volume significantly increased over 24 hours. Saline-treated tumors showed no statistically significant change in ξ, whereas a significant (p = 0.002) 70% reduction in ξ of the ZD6126-treated cohort was determined. Hoechst 33342 uptake was associated with viable tumor tissue and was significantly (p = 0.004) reduced and restricted to the rim of the ZD6126-treated tumors. A significant positive correlation between posttreatment ξ and Hoechst 33342 uptake was obtained (r = 0.83, p = 0.002), providing validation of the MRI-derived measurements of fractional tumor blood volume. Conclusions: These data clearly highlight the potential of susceptibility contrast MRI with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents to provide quantitative imaging biomarkers of fractional tumor blood volume at high spatial resolution to assess tumor vascular status and response to vascular disrupting agents

  13. The Steroid Effect on the Blood-Ocular Barrier Change Induced by Triolein Emulsion as seen on Contrast-Enhanced MR Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Yuk; Eun, Choong Ki [Graduate School of Inje University, College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Woo [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Kim, Hak Jin; Jung, Yeon Joo [Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jae, Seung Youn; Cho, Byung Mann; Choi, Seon Hee [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone on the damaged blood-ocular barrier caused by triolein emulsion, using contrast-enhanced MR imaging. An emulsion of 0.1-mL triolein in 20 mL of saline was infused into the carotid arteries of 32 cats, 12 cats were placed in the treatment group and 18 cats were placed in the Control group. Thirty minutes after the infusion of triolein emulsion, a set of orbital pre- and post-contrast T1-weighted MR images (T1WIs) were obtained. Infusion of 10 mg/kg dexamethasone into the ipsilateral carotid artery of each of the cats in the treatment group cats and 20 mL saline in each of the cats in the control group was given. A second set of pre- and post-contrast orbital T1WIs were obtained three hours following triolein emulsion infusion. Qualitative analysis was performed for the the anterior chamber (AC), the posterior chamber (PC), and in the vitreous humor of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyes. The signal intensity ratios of the ipsilateral eye over the contralateral eye were quantitatively evaluated in the three ocular chambers on the first and second set of T1WIs, and were then statistically compared. Qualitatively, the AC, the PC or the vitreous did not show immediate contrast enhancement on the first and the second set of post-contrast T1WIs. However, the AC and the PC showed delayed contrast enhancement for both groups of cats on the second pre-contrast T1WIs. No enhancement or minimally delayed enhancement was seen for the vitreous humor. Quantitatively, the signal intensity ratios in the PC of the treatment group of cats were statistically lower than the ratios of the control group of cats for the second set of T1WIs (p = 0.037). The AC and vitreous showed no statistically significant difference between the feline treatment group and control group (p > 0.05). Contrast-enhanced MR images revealed increased vascular permeability in the PC of the eye after infusion of triolein emulsion

  14. Functional imaging using the retinal function imager: direct imaging of blood velocity, achieving fluorescein angiography-like images without any contrast agent, qualitative oximetry, and functional metabolic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhaky, David; Nelson, Darin A; Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia; Grinvald, Amiram

    2009-07-01

    The Retinal Function Imager (RFI; Optical Imaging, Rehovot, Israel) is a unique, noninvasive multiparameter functional imaging instrument that directly measures hemodynamic parameters such as retinal blood-flow velocity, oximetric state, and metabolic responses to photic activation. In addition, it allows capillary perfusion mapping without any contrast agent. These parameters of retinal function are degraded by retinal abnormalities. This review delineates the development of these parameters and demonstrates their clinical applicability for noninvasive detection of retinal function in several modalities. The results suggest multiple clinical applications for early diagnosis of retinal diseases and possible critical guidance of their treatment. PMID:19763751

  15. High radiosensitivity of induction in contrast to radioresistance of expression of cells mediating delayed-type hypersensitivity during response to sheep red blood cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction observed in mice primed i.v. with low doses of sheep red blood cells was greatly decreased when mice were irradiated with 300 rad before priming. An estimation of the radiosensitivity of DTH-mediating cells (DTH-C) was performed using a titration assay after local adoptive transfer of these cells mixed with antigen into the footpad of unprimed mice. A high radiosensitivity of the induction of DTH-C was observed with a D37 of approximately 50 rad. In contrast, the expression of DTH-C appeared radioresistant, as the D37 was approximately 2000 rad. (author)

  16. RT-PCR em pools de soros sangüíneos para o diagnóstico da infecção aguda e de animais persistentemente infectados pelo vírus da diarréia viral bovina RT-PCR in pools of bovine blood serum to detect acute infection and persistently infected animals with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pilz

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Utilizou-se a técnica da RT-PCR para a detecção da região 5' UTR do genoma do vírus da diarréia viral bovina (BVDV em pools de soros sangüíneos provenientes de um rebanho, constituído por 226 animais, que apresentava distúrbios da reprodução. A partir das amostras individuais de soro e de acordo com a categoria dos animais e o número de animais por categoria foram formados 10 pools (A a J de soros. A primeira avaliação revelou a amplificação de um produto com 290pb nas reações referentes aos grupos D (35 vacas e H (25 bezerros lactentes que, após o desmembramento em amostras individuais, resultou na identificação de 11 vacas lactantes e 12 bezerros em amamentação positivos. Para a identificação de animais persistentemente infectados (PI entre os 23 positivos na primeira avaliação, realizou-se a segunda colheita de soros sangüíneos, três meses após. A RT-PCR das amostras individuais de soro revelou resultado positivo em cinco bezerros. Em dois, foi possível isolar o BVDV em cultivo de células MDBK. A especificidade das reações da RT-PCR foi confirmada pelo seqüenciamento dos produtos amplificados a partir do soro de uma vaca com infecção aguda, de um bezerro PI e das duas amostras do BVDV isoladas em cultivo celular. A utilização da RT-PCR em pools de soros sangüíneos demonstrou ser uma estratégia rápida de diagnóstico etiológico e de baixo custo tanto para a detecção de infecção aguda quanto de animais PI.The 5' untranslated region of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV genome was detected by RT-PCR assay in pools of blood sera samples collected from a cattle herd (n=226 animals with reproductive failures. Based on the classes of animal and the number of animals per class, the individual blood serum samples were distributed in 10 sera pools (A to J. During the first evaluation a 290bp amplicon was amplified in reactions from groups D (35 cows and H (25 sucking calves. The individual analysis

  17. Contrast enhancement of intracranial lesions at 1.5 T: comparison among 2D spin echo, black-blood (BB) Cube, and BB Cube-FLAIR sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, SungWoon; Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Yagyu, Yukinobu; Hyodo, Tomoko; Imaoka, Izumi; Kumano, Seishi; Ishii, Kazunari; Murakami, Takamichi [Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka (Japan); Wakayama, Tetsuya; Miyoshi, Mitsuharu [GE Healthcare Japan, MR Applications and Workflow, Asia Pacific, Hino, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of T1W black-blood Cube (BB Cube) and T1W BB Cube fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (BB Cube-FLAIR) sequences for contrast-enhanced brain imaging, by evaluating flow-related artefacts, detectability, and contrast ratio (CR) of intracranial lesions among these sequences and T1W-SE. Phantom studies were performed to determine the optimal parameters of BB Cube and BB Cube-FLAIR. A clinical study in 23 patients with intracranial lesions was performed to evaluate the usefulness of these two sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial lesions compared with the conventional 2D T1W-SE sequence. The phantom study revealed that the optimal parameters for contrast-enhanced T1W imaging were TR/TE = 500 ms/minimum in BB Cube and TR/TE/TI = 600 ms/minimum/300 ms in BB Cube-FLAIR imaging. In the clinical study, the degree of flow-related artefacts was significantly lower in BB Cube and BB Cube-FLAIR than in T1W-SE. Regarding tumour detection, BB Cube showed the best detectability; however, there were no significant differences in CR among the sequences. At 1.5 T, contrast-enhanced BB Cube was a better imaging sequence for detecting brain lesions than T1W-SE or BB Cube-FLAIR. (orig.)

  18. Contrast enhancement of intracranial lesions at 1.5 T: comparison among 2D spin echo, black-blood (BB) Cube, and BB Cube-FLAIR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of T1W black-blood Cube (BB Cube) and T1W BB Cube fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (BB Cube-FLAIR) sequences for contrast-enhanced brain imaging, by evaluating flow-related artefacts, detectability, and contrast ratio (CR) of intracranial lesions among these sequences and T1W-SE. Phantom studies were performed to determine the optimal parameters of BB Cube and BB Cube-FLAIR. A clinical study in 23 patients with intracranial lesions was performed to evaluate the usefulness of these two sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial lesions compared with the conventional 2D T1W-SE sequence. The phantom study revealed that the optimal parameters for contrast-enhanced T1W imaging were TR/TE = 500 ms/minimum in BB Cube and TR/TE/TI = 600 ms/minimum/300 ms in BB Cube-FLAIR imaging. In the clinical study, the degree of flow-related artefacts was significantly lower in BB Cube and BB Cube-FLAIR than in T1W-SE. Regarding tumour detection, BB Cube showed the best detectability; however, there were no significant differences in CR among the sequences. At 1.5 T, contrast-enhanced BB Cube was a better imaging sequence for detecting brain lesions than T1W-SE or BB Cube-FLAIR. (orig.)

  19. Demonstration of the blood-ocular barrier integrity by contrast-enhanced MR imaging: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In five Rhesus monkeys we assessed the potential for monitoring the blood-ocular barrier (BOB) with Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging. Unilateral opening of the BOB was achieved by infusion of mannitol into the internal carotid artery. This was followed immediately by Gd-DTPA, 0.2 mmol/kg, given intravenously. T-l weighted MR images (Picken unit, 0.5 T, SE 500/40, 5-mm thickness, 15cm FOV) obtained before and within one-half hour after injection of Gd-DTPA demonstrated marked enhancement (2-to 17-fold) of the anterior and posterior chambers of the challenged eye, representing leakage of Gd-DTPA into those chambers. Animals remained free of ocular side effects

  20. Autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model applied to quantification of cerebral blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model for quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in comparison with deconvolution analysis based on singular value decomposition (DA-SVD). Using computer simulations, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function under various CBFs, cerebral blood volumes and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for three different types of residue function (exponential, triangular, and box-shaped). We also considered the effects of delay and dispersion in AIF. The ARMA model and DA-SVD were used to estimate CBF values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIFs, and the estimated values were compared with the assumed values. We found that the CBF value estimated by the ARMA model was more sensitive to the SNR and the delay in AIF than that obtained by DA-SVD. Although the ARMA model considerably overestimated CBF at low SNRs, it estimated the CBF more accurately than did DA-SVD at high SNRs for the exponential or triangular residue function. We believe this study will contribute to an understanding of the usefulness and limitations of the ARMA model when applied to quantification of CBF with DSC-MRI. (author)

  1. Blood flow measurement of portal vein with fast cine phase contrast MR imaging under breath-holding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow measurements of the right portal vein were performed in seven healthy volunteers with the segmented k-space fast gradient-echo phase-contrast (fcard-PC) sequence under breath-holding. The mean velocity and the flow rate of the right portal vein at maximal expiration, 14.3±4.4 cm/sec and 457±218 ml/min, were significantly greater (p<0.01) than those at maximal inspiration: 11.8±3.8 cm/sec (mean±SD) and 364±191 ml/min, respectively. Fcard-PC enabled flow measurements to be obtained under breath-holding. Using this technique, we demonstrated portal venous flow changes according to respiratory phase. (author)

  2. Blood flow measurement of portal vein with fast cine phase contrast MR imaging under breath-holding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, Fumitaka; Murakami, Takamichi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Tsuda, Kyo; Kim, Tonsoku; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kashiwagi, Nobuo; Nakamura, Hironobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Harada, Koshi

    1996-03-01

    Flow measurements of the right portal vein were performed in seven healthy volunteers with the segmented k-space fast gradient-echo phase-contrast (fcard-PC) sequence under breath-holding. The mean velocity and the flow rate of the right portal vein at maximal expiration, 14.3{+-}4.4 cm/sec and 457{+-}218 ml/min, were significantly greater (p<0.01) than those at maximal inspiration: 11.8{+-}3.8 cm/sec (mean{+-}SD) and 364{+-}191 ml/min, respectively. Fcard-PC enabled flow measurements to be obtained under breath-holding. Using this technique, we demonstrated portal venous flow changes according to respiratory phase. (author).

  3. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA. Technique and contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Yousef W. [Dept. of Radiology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Bispebjerg, Bispebjerg (Denmark)], e-mail: ywnielsen@gmail.com; Thomsen, Henrik S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Herlev, Herlev (Denmark)

    2012-09-15

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency. Using optimized technique and a stable MRI contrast agent, peripheral CE-MRA is a safe procedure with diagnostic accuracy close to that of conventional catheter X

  4. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA. Technique and contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency. Using optimized technique and a stable MRI contrast agent, peripheral CE-MRA is a safe procedure with diagnostic accuracy close to that of conventional catheter X

  5. Monitoring hypoxia induced changes in cochlear blood flow and hemoglobin concentration using a combined dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging and Doppler optical microangiography system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Reif

    Full Text Available A synchronized dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (DWLSCI system and a Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG system was developed to determine several ischemic parameters in the cochlea due to a systemic hypoxic challenge. DWLSCI can obtain two-dimensional data, and was used to determine the relative changes in cochlear blood flow, and change in the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin (HbO, deoxyhemoglobin (Hb and total hemoglobin (HbT in mice. DOMAG can obtain three-dimensional data, and was used to determine the changes in cochlear blood flow with single vessel resolution. It was demonstrated that during a hypoxic challenge there was an increase in the concentrations of Hb, a decrease in the concentrations of HbO and cochlear blood flow, and a slight decrease in the concentration of HbT. Also, the rate of change in the concentrations of Hb and HbO was quantified during and after the hypoxic challenge. The ability to simultaneously measure these ischemic parameters with high spatio-temporal resolution will allow the detailed quantitative analysis of several hearing disorders, and will be useful for diagnosing and developing treatments.

  6. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spithoven, E.M.; Meijer, E.; Boertien, W.E.; Gaillard, C.A.J.M.; Jong, P.E. de; Gansevoort, R.T. [University of Groningen, Department of Nephrology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30.001, RB Groningen (Netherlands); Borns, C.; Kappert, P.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Jagt, E. van der [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Vart, P. [University of Groningen, Department of Health Sciences, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBF{sub MRI}) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBF{sub MRI} measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBF{sub MRI}. After validation, we measured RBF{sub MRI} in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBF{sub MRI} and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBF{sub MRI} measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBF{sub MRI} compared to RBF{sub Hip,} whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBF{sub MRI}. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. (orig.)

  7. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBFMRI) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBFMRI measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBFMRI. After validation, we measured RBFMRI in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBFMRI and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBFMRI measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBFMRI compared to RBFHip, whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBFMRI. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. (orig.)

  8. Use of Caval Subtraction 2D Phase-Contrast MR Imaging to Measure Total Liver and Hepatic Arterial Blood Flow: Preclinical Validation and Initial Clinical Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Manil D; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Bainbridge, Alan; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Davies, Nathan; Halligan, Steve; Lythgoe, Mark F; Taylor, Stuart A

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To validate caval subtraction two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements of total liver blood flow (TLBF) and hepatic arterial fraction in an animal model and evaluate consistency and reproducibility in humans. Materials and Methods Approval from the institutional ethical committee for animal care and research ethics was obtained. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2D phase-contrast MR imaging of the portal vein (PV) and infrahepatic and suprahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC). TLBF and hepatic arterial flow were estimated by subtracting infrahepatic from suprahepatic IVC flow and PV flow from estimated TLBF, respectively. Direct PV transit-time ultrasonography (US) and fluorescent microsphere measurements of hepatic arterial fraction were the standards of reference. Thereafter, consistency of caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging-derived TLBF and hepatic arterial flow was assessed in 13 volunteers (mean age, 28.3 years ± 1.4) against directly measured phase-contrast MR imaging PV and proper hepatic arterial inflow; reproducibility was measured after 7 days. Bland-Altman analysis of agreement and coefficient of variation comparisons were undertaken. Results There was good agreement between PV flow measured with phase-contrast MR imaging and that measured with transit-time US (mean difference, -3.5 mL/min/100 g; 95% limits of agreement [LOA], ±61.3 mL/min/100 g). Hepatic arterial fraction obtained with caval subtraction agreed well with those with fluorescent microspheres (mean difference, 4.2%; 95% LOA, ±20.5%). Good consistency was demonstrated between TLBF in humans measured with caval subtraction and direct inflow phase-contrast MR imaging (mean difference, -1.3 mL/min/100 g; 95% LOA, ±23.1 mL/min/100 g). TLBF reproducibility at 7 days was similar between the two methods (95% LOA, ±31.6 mL/min/100 g vs ±29.6 mL/min/100 g). Conclusion Caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging is a simple and clinically

  9. Ultrasound Imaging Beyond the Vasculature with New Generation Contrast Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, Reshani H.; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 μm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signa...

  10. A semi-automated method for measuring the evolution of both lumen area and blood flow in carotid from Phase Contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasquel, Jean-Baptiste; Lécluse, Aldéric; Cavaro-Ménard, Christine; Willoteaux, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Phase-Contrast (PC) velocimetry Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a useful modality to explore cardiovascular pathologies, but requires the automatic segmentation of vessels and the measurement of both lumen area and blood flow evolutions. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated method for extracting lumen boundaries of the carotid artery and compute both lumen area and blood flow evolutions over the cardiac cycle. This method uses narrow band region-based active contours in order to correctly capture the lumen boundary without being corrupted by surrounding structures. This approach is compared to traditional edge-based active contours, considered in related works, which significantly underestimate lumen area and blood flow. Experiments are performed using both a sequence of a homemade phantom and sequences of 20 real carotids, including a comparison with manual segmentation performed by a radiologist expert. Results obtained on the phantom sequence show that the edge-based approach leads to an underestimate of carotid lumen area and related flows of respectively 18.68% and 4.95%. This appears significantly larger than weak errors obtained using the region-based approach (respectively 2.73% and 1.23%). Benefits appear even better on the real sequences. The edge-based approach leads to underestimates of 40.88% for areas and 13.39% for blood flows, compared to limited errors of 7.41% and 4.6% with our method. Experiments also illustrate the high variability and therefore the lack of reliability of manual segmentation. PMID:26453757

  11. Pre-treatment whole blood gene expression is associated with 14-week response assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in infliximab-treated rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenzie D MacIsaac

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of rheumatoid arthritis patients achieve inadequate response to anti-TNF biologics. Attempts to identify molecular biomarkers predicting response have met with mixed success. This may be attributable, in part, to the variable and subjective disease assessment endpoints with large placebo effects typically used to classify patient response. Sixty-one patients with active RA despite methotrexate treatment, and with MRI-documented synovitis, were randomized to receive infliximab or placebo. Blood was collected at baseline and genome-wide transcription in whole blood was measured using microarrays. The primary endpoint in this study was determined by measuring the transfer rate constant (Ktrans of a gadolinium-based contrast agent from plasma to synovium using MRI. Secondary endpoints included repeated clinical assessments with DAS28(CRP, and assessments of osteitis and synovitis by the RAMRIS method. Infliximab showed greater decrease from baseline in DCE-MRI Ktrans of wrist and MCP at all visits compared with placebo (P<0.001. Statistical analysis was performed to identify genes associated with treatment-specific 14-week change in Ktrans. The 256 genes identified were used to derive a gene signature score by averaging their log expression within each patient. The resulting score correlated with improvement of Ktrans in infliximab-treated patients and with deterioration of Ktrans in placebo-treated subjects. Poor responders showed high expression of activated B-cell genes whereas good responders exhibited a gene expression pattern consistent with mobilization of neutrophils and monocytes and high levels of reticulated platelets. This gene signature was significantly associated with clinical response in two previously published whole blood gene expression studies using anti-TNF therapies. These data provide support for the hypothesis that anti-TNF inadequate responders comprise a distinct molecular subtype of RA characterized by

  12. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  13. SU-D-18C-04: The Feasibility of Quantifying MRI Contrast Agent in Pulsatile Flowing Blood Using DCE-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N, Gwilliam M; J, Collins D; O, Leach M; R, Orton M [Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of accurately quantifying the concentration of MRI contrast agent (CA) in pulsatile flowing blood by measuring its T{sub 1}, as is common for the purposes of obtaining a patientspecific arterial input function (AIF). Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) - MRI and pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling is widely used to produce measures of vascular function but accurate measurement of the AIF undermines their accuracy. A proposed solution is to measure the T{sub 1} of blood in a large vessel using the Fram double flip angle method during the passage of a bolus of CA. This work expands on previous work by assessing pulsatile flow and the changes in T{sub 1} seen with a CA bolus. Methods: A phantom was developed which used a physiological pump to pass fluid of a known T{sub 1} (812ms) through the centre of a head coil of a clinical 1.5T MRI scanner. Measurements were made using high temporal resolution sequences suitable for DCE-MRI and were used to validate a virtual phantom that simulated the expected errors due to pulsatile flow and bolus of CA concentration changes typically found in patients. Results: : Measured and virtual results showed similar trends, although there were differences that may be attributed to the virtual phantom not accurately simulating the spin history of the fluid before entering the imaging volume. The relationship between T{sub 1} measurement and flow speed was non-linear. T{sub 1} measurement is compromised by new spins flowing into the imaging volume, not being subject to enough excitations to have reached steady-state. The virtual phantom demonstrated a range of recorded T{sub 1} for various simulated T{sub 1} / flow rates. Conclusion: T{sub 1} measurement of flowing blood using standard DCE-MRI sequences is very challenging. Measurement error is non-linear with relation to instantaneous flow speed. Optimising sequence parameters and lowering baseline T{sub 1} of blood should be considered.

  14. Experimental characterization, comparison and image quality assessment of two ultrasound contrast agents: Optison and Definity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy C.; Day, Steven W.; Linte, Cristian A.; Schwarz, Karl Q.

    2016-04-01

    Microbubble-based contrast agents are commonly used in ultrasound imaging to help differentiate the blood pool from the endocardial wall. It is essential to use an agent which produces high image intensity relative to the surrounding tissue, commonly referred to contrast effect. When exposed to ultrasound waves, microbubbles produce an intense backscatter signal in addition to the contrast produced by the fluctuating size of the microbubbles. However, over time, the microbubble concentration depletes, leading to reduced visual enhancement. The retention time associated with contrast effect varies according to the frequency and power level of the ultrasound wave, as well as the contrast agent used. The primary objective of this study was to investigate and identify the most appropriate image acquisition parameters that render optimal contrast effect for two intravenous contrast agents, Optison™ and Definity™. Several controlled in vitro experiments were conducted using an experimental apparatus that featured a perfused tissue-emulating phantom. A continuous flow of contrast agent was imaged using ultrasound at different frequencies and power levels, while a pulse wave Doppler device was used to monitor the concentration of the contrast agent solution. The contrast effect was determined based on the image intensity inside the flow pipe mimicking the blood-pool relative to the intensity of the surrounding phantom material mimicking cardiac tissue. To identify the combination of parameters that yielded optimal visualization for each contrast agent tested, the contrast effect was assessed at different microbubble concentrations and different ultrasound imaging frequencies and transmission power levels.

  15. Cerebral blood flow volume measurements of the carotid artery and ipsilateral branches using two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    The optimal velocity encoding of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) in measuring cerebral blood flow volume (BFV) ranges from 60 to 80 cm/s. To verify the accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) PC MRA, the present study localized the region of interest at blood vessels of the neck using PC MRA based on three-dimensional time-of-flight sequences, and the velocity encodingwas set to 80 cm/s. Results of the measurements showed that the error rate was 7.0 ± 6.0%in the estimation of BFV in the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery and the ipsilateralcommon carotid artery. There was no significant difference, and a significant correlation in BFV between internal carotid artery + external carotid artery and ipsilateral common carotid artery. Inaddition, the BFV of the common carotid artery was correlated with that of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. The main error was attributed to the external carotid artery and its branches. Therefore,after selecting the appropriate scanning parameters and protocols, 2D PC MRA is more accuratein the determination of BFV in the carotid arteries.

  16. [An Examination of Variable Image Positions in the Aortic Valve Blood Flow Using Phase Contrast MRI: Effect of Breath-holding Methods in Healthy Volunteers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kenichi; Morimoto, Noriyoshi; Fukushima, Sachi

    2015-12-01

    Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) is a useful tool for evaluating valvular pathology. In addition, PC-MRI can provide a noninvasive assessment of blood flow in an arbitrary cross section. However, the blood flow measurement with breath-hold or free breath PC-MRI may be different from each other because of intrathoracic pressure changing and variable image position. The aim of this study was to find both the optimal breath-hold technique and the image position. Quantitative flow images were acquired in four planes (ascending aorta: Ao, sino-tubular junction: STJ, valsalva sinus: valsalva, left ventricular outflow tract: LVOT), in healthy subjects (n=10). The study protocol was divided into two parts: (1) stroke volume (SV) measured in each slice positions by using inspiration, expiration, and navigation method during normal breathing and (2) SV measured at each breath-hold techniques in the Ao, STJ, valsalva, and LVOT. As a result, (1) SV of the respective measurement positions were not significant by using inspiration, expiration, and navigation method and (2) LVOT SV was significantly lower than Ao, STJ, and valsalva. PMID:26685835

  17. Comparison of blood velocity measurements between ultrasound Doppler and accelerated phase-contrast MR angiography in small arteries with disturbed flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Jingfeng; Johnson, Kevin; Wieben, Oliver; Zagzebski, James [Medical Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States); Strother, Charles; Consigny, Dan [Radiology Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States); Baker, Sara, E-mail: jjiang2@wisc.edu [School of Ultrasound, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States)

    2011-03-21

    Ultrasound Doppler (UD) velocity measurements are commonly used to quantify blood flow velocities in vivo. The aim of our work was to investigate the accuracy of in vivo spectral Doppler measurements of velocity waveforms. Waveforms were derived from spectral Doppler signals and corrected for intrinsic spectral broadening errors by applying a previously published algorithm. The method was tested in a canine aneurysm model by determining velocities in small arteries (3-4 mm diameter) near the aneurysm where there was moderately disturbed flow. Doppler results were compared to velocity measurements in the same arteries acquired with a rapid volumetric phase contrast MR angiography technique named phase contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction magnetic resonance angiography (PC-VIPR MRA). After correcting for intrinsic spectral broadening, there was a high degree of correlation between velocities obtained by the real-time UD and the accelerated PC-MRA technique. The peak systolic velocity yielded a linear correlation coefficient of r = 0.83, end diastolic velocity resulted in r = 0.81, and temporally averaged mean velocity resulted in r = 0.76. The overall velocity waveforms obtained by the two techniques were also highly correlated (r = 0.89 {+-} 0.06). There were, however, only weak correlations for the pulsatility index (PI: 0.25) and resistive index (RI: 0.14) derived from the two techniques. Results demonstrate that to avoid overestimations of peak systolic velocities, the results for UD must be carefully corrected to compensate for errors caused by intrinsic spectral broadening.

  18. Selenoprotein P and apolipoprotein E receptor-2 interact at the blood-brain barrier and also within the brain to maintain an essential selenium pool that protects against neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Raymond F.; Hill, Kristina E.; Motley, Amy K.; Winfrey, Virginia P.; Kurokawa, Suguru; Mitchell, Stuart L.; Zhang, Wanqi

    2014-01-01

    Selenoprotein P (Sepp1) and its receptor, apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2), account for brain retaining selenium better than other tissues. The primary sources of Sepp1 in plasma and brain are hepatocytes and astrocytes, respectively. ApoER2 is expressed in varying amounts by tissues; within the brain it is expressed primarily by neurons. Knockout of Sepp1 or apoER2 lowers brain selenium from ∼120 to ∼50 ng/g and leads to severe neurodegeneration and death in mild selenium deficiency. Interactions of Sepp1 and apoER2 that protect against this injury have not been characterized. We studied Sepp1, apoER2, and brain selenium in knockout mice. Immunocytochemistry showed that apoER2 mediates Sepp1 uptake at the blood-brain barrier. When Sepp1−/− or apoER2−/− mice developed severe neurodegeneration caused by mild selenium deficiency, brain selenium was ∼35 ng/g. In extreme selenium deficiency, however, brain selenium of ∼12 ng/g was tolerated when both Sepp1 and apoER2 were intact in the brain. These findings indicate that tandem Sepp1-apoER2 interactions supply selenium for maintenance of brain neurons. One interaction is at the blood-brain barrier, and the other is within the brain. We postulate that Sepp1 inside the blood-brain barrier is taken up by neurons via apoER2, concentrating brain selenium in them.—Burk, R. F., Hill, K. E., Motley, A. K., Winfrey, V. P., Kurokawa, S., Mitchell, S. L., Zhang, W. Selenoprotein P and apolipoprotein E receptor-2 interact at the blood-brain barrier and also within the brain to maintain an essential selenium pool that protects against neurodegeneration. PMID:24760755

  19. The Productive Ligurian Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Casella, E; Couvelard, X; Caldeira, R M A

    2011-01-01

    In contrast with the behavior of the eddies in the open-ocean, the sub-mesoscale eddies generated in the constricted Ligurian Basin (NW Mediterranean), are unproductive but their combined effect, arranged in a rim-like fashion, contributes to the containment of a Productive Ligurian Pool (PLP). Data de- rived from MODIS satellite sensor showed persistent higher chlorophyll con- centrations in the centre of the basin, concurrent with high EKE values in its surroundings, derived from AVISO altimetry merged products. This sug- gested that this 'productive pool' is maintained by the intense (sub)mesoscale eddy activity in the rim. Numerical realistic experiments, using a Regional Ocean Model System, forced by MERCATOR and by a high-resolution COSMO- l7 atmospheric model, also showed that most of the sub-mesoscale eddies, during 2009 and 2010, are concentrated in the rim surrounding the basin, contributing to the formation of a basin-scale cyclonic gyre. We hypothesized that the interaction between eddies in the r...

  20. Fourier analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data in patients with congenital heart diseases, (2). Assessment of diseases with complex cardiac anomalies, especially tetralogy of Fallot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kan; Maeda, Hisato; Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Matsumura, Kaname; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Aoki, Kenzo

    1985-04-01

    The clinical usefulness of Fourier analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data was evaluated in 18 subjects with normal cardiac functions and 14 patients with complex cardiac anomalies (ten with tetralogy of Fallot, two with tricuspid atresia (TA), one with double-outlet right ventricle (DORV), and one with Ebstein's anomaly (EA)). Using global ventricular time-activity curves, the phase and amplitude at fundamental frequency were calculated, and emptying patterns of the left and right ventricles (LV, RV) were evaluated by phase difference (D(phase)=RV phase minus LV phase) and amplitude ratio of RV to LV (R(amp)). In patients with TOF, mean values of D (phase) and R(amp) were 25.3 +- 10.5 degrees and 13.5 +- 0.49 respectively and significantly larger than those of normal subjects. D (phase) became larger in inverse proportion to the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow and there was an inverse linear correlation between these two variables. On visual interpretation of functional images, the dynamic property of hypoplastic ventricles could be easily estimated in patients with TA or DORV. In a case with EA, the atrialized RV was shown clearly as a hypokinetic, atrial phase area. This method is valuable for pathophysiologic investigation of diseases with complex cardiac anomalies. (author).

  1. Right ventricular volume determination by continuous [sup 81m]Kr infusion and [sup 99m]Tc blood pool imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Saburo; Suzuki, Tetsuo; Muramatsu, Toshihiro; Ide, Masao; Suzuki, Shigeo; Dohi, Yutaka; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Miyamae, Tatsuya (Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan))

    1992-10-01

    Our newly developed radionuclide method for the calculation of right ventricular (RV) volume was examined. Using a semi-geometric count-based method, volume can be measured by the following equation: Cv=Cm/(L/d). V=(Ct/Cv)xd[sup 3]=(Ct/Cm)xLxd[sup 2]. (V=volume, Cv=voxel count, Cm=the maximum count of a container, Ct=the total count of the container, L=maximum length of the image of the container, L=maximum length of the image of the container obtained from a direction perpendicular to the direction where the count data were collected, and d=pixel size). A phantom study was performed by setting a cylindrical container in a system which circulated 5 liters of water per minute. [sup 81m]Kr solution was infused continuously into the container, and images of the container were collected for one minute. Cm and Ct were obtained, and because the container was cylindrical, the maximum width of the image of the container was measured as L. The volume of the container was calculated using the above equation. This theorem was applied to RV images obtained in the 30 degree right anterior oblique position by continuous infusion of the [sup 81m]Kr solution. Multiple gated acquisition was performed and RV end-diastolic maximum counts and total counts were obtained. The RV maximum width was measured as L on the end-diastolic cardiac pool image with [sup 99m]Tc-D-HSA collected in the 40 degree left anterior oblique position. The values obtained from these two images were substituted in the above equation and the RV end-diastolic volume (RV-EDV) was calculated. The RV ejection fraction (RV-EF) was obtained from the [sup 81m]Kr image. The RV stroke volume (SV) was calculated from multiplying the RV-EDV by the RV-EF. This value was compared to the SV with thermodilution. The correlation of these two values was r=0.90. This new method for calculating RV volume was thus considered useful. (author).

  2. Contrasting effects of age on the plasma/whole blood lead ratio in men and women with a history of lead exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the effect of age and sex on the relationship between the concentrations of Pb in blood (Pb-B) and in plasma (Pb-P) in an adult population with a history of lead exposure. Pb-P was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Pb-B by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). We studied 154 adults (56 men and 98 women) from 18 to 60-year old. Pb-B levels varied from 10.0 to 428.0 μg/L, with a mean of 76 μg/L. Blood lead levels varied from 10.0 to 428.0 μg/L in men (mean, 98.3 μg/L) and from 10.0 to 263.0 μg/L (mean, 62.8 μg/L) in women. Corresponding Pb-Ps were 0.02-2.9 μg/L (mean, 0.66 μg/L) and 0.02-1.5 μg/L (mean, 0.42 μg/L) in men and women, respectively. The relationship between Pb-B and Pb-P was found to be curvilinear (r=0.757, P1492 (y=Pb-P, and x=Pb-B). The %Pb-P/Pb-B ratio ranged from 0.03% to 1.85%. A positive association was found between %Pb-P/Pb-B ratio and Pb-B levels. When data were separated by sex, this association was also relevant for men (y=0.0184x 0.702) and women (y=0.0534x 0.5209) (y=%Pb-P/Pb-B and x=Pb-B). Moreover, we found an interesting positive correlation between Log (Pb-P/Pb-B) and age for women (r=0.31, P<0.0001) and a negative correlation for men (r=-0.164, P=0.07). Taken together, these results suggest contrasting effects of age on the plasma/whole blood lead ratio in men and women with a history of lead exposure. Moreover, sex might play an important role in the metabolism of lead, implying further consideration on the kinetic models constructed of lead toxicity

  3. Blood pressure and fasting lipid changes after 24 weeks’ treatment with vildagliptin: a pooled analysis in >2,000 previously drug-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marc; Schweizer, Anja; Foley, James E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We have previously shown modest weight loss with vildagliptin treatment. Since body weight balance is associated with changes in blood pressure (BP) and fasting lipids, we have assessed these parameters following vildagliptin treatment. Methods Data were pooled from all double-blind, randomized, controlled, vildagliptin mono-therapy trials on previously drug-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who received vildagliptin 50 mg once daily (qd) or twice daily (bid; n=2,108) and wherein BP and fasting lipid data were obtained. Results Data from patients receiving vildagliptin 50 mg qd or bid showed reductions from baseline to week 24 in systolic BP (from 132.5±0.32 to 129.8±0.34 mmHg; P<0.0001), diastolic BP (from 81.2±0.18 to 79.6±0.19 mmHg; P<0.0001), fasting triglycerides (from 2.00±0.02 to 1.80±0.02 mmol/L; P<0.0001), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (from 0.90±0.01 to 0.83±0.01 mmol/L; P<0.0001), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (from 3.17±0.02 to 3.04±0.02 mmol/L; P<0.0001), whereas high density lipoprotein cholesterol increased (from 1.19±0.01 to 1.22±0.01 mmol/L; P<0.001). Weight decreased by 0.48±0.08 kg (P<0.001). Conclusion This large pooled analysis demonstrated that vildagliptin shows a significant reduction in BP and a favorable fasting lipid profile that are associated with modest weight loss. PMID:27574437

  4. Measurements of diagnostic examination performance and correlation analysis using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in glial tumor grading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood flow (CBF) values derived from dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MR imaging) for grading of cerebral glial tumors, and to estimate the correlation between vascular permeability/perfusion parameters and tumor grades. A prospective study of 79 patients with cerebral glial tumors underwent DSC-MR imaging. Normalized relative CBV (rCBV) and relative CBF (rCBF) from tumoral (rCBVt and rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe and rCBFe), and the value in the tumor divided by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e and rCBFt/e), as well as MVL, expressed as the leakage coefficient K2 were calculated. Hemodynamic variables and tumor grades were analyzed statistically and with Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were also performed for each of the variables. The differences in rCBVt and the maximum MVL (MVLmax) values were statistically significant among all tumor grades. Correlation analysis using Pearson was as follows: rCBVt and tumor grade, r = 0.774; rCBFt and tumor grade, r = 0.417; MVLmax and tumor grade, r = 0.559; MVLmax and rCBVt, r = 0.440; MVLmax and rCBFt, r = 0.192; and rCBVt and rCBFt, r = 0.605. According to ROC analyses for distinguishing tumor grade, rCBVt showed the largest areas under ROC curve (AUC), except for grade III from IV. Both rCBVt and MVLmax showed good discriminative power in distinguishing all tumor grades. rCBVt correlated strongly with tumor grade; the correlation between MVLmax and tumor grade was moderate. (orig.)

  5. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  6. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin infection. It is caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium marinum . ... A swimming pool granuloma occurs when water containing Mycobacterium marinum bacteria enters a break in the skin. Signs of ...

  7. Effect of prone versus supine positioning on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and heart rate using ECG gated Tl-201 myocardial perfusion scans and gated cardiac blood pool scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is limited data on the effect of posture on LVEF. The study aim was to determine any difference in LVEF using gated cardiac blood pool scanning (GCBPS) and Tl-201 gated myocardial perfusion scanning (MPS) in prone or supine positions. In 50 patients undergoing evaluation for varying heart conditions, automated LVEF, end diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV) measurements were obtained at rest during gated MPS on Discovery NM 530c (GE Healthcare). In another 50 patients, semi-automated LVEF measurements were obtained using GCBPS on dual-headed gamma cameras. Average heart rate (HR) was recorded. Differences between prone and supine LVEF, HR, EDV and ESV were compared using paired two-tailed t-tests (P < 0.05 considered significant). Pearson's correlation, difference plots, mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence interval of the differences were also derived to analyse LVEF results. Using GCPBS or MPS, no significant difference in LVEF or LV volumes (from gated MPS) was demonstrated between postures. Increased HR was noted in prone positioning. Posture did not affect measured LVEF or LV volumes. However HR was higher on prone imaging.

  8. The science of pooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.

    1995-10-01

    The pooling of data from radon studies is described. Pooling refers to the analysis of original data from several studies, not meta-analysis in which summary measures from published data are analyzed. A main objective for pooling is to reduce uncertainty and to obtain more precise estimates of risk than would be available from any single study.

  9. High-resolution phase-contrast MRI of aortic and pulmonary blood flow during rest and physical exercise using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To establish high-resolution phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer to quantify aortic and pulmonary blood flow during resting conditions and exercise. Materials and methods: In 20 healthy volunteers (mean age, 26.8 ± 5.0 years) high-resolution PC-MRI (mean temporal resolution, 7.4 ± 3.2 ms) was performed in the ascending aorta (AA) and main pulmonary artery (PA) during physical rest and three exercise stages: stage 1, no-load operation; stage 2, heart rate increase 40% compared to rest; stage 3, heart rate increase 80% compared to rest. Flow quantification in AA and PA included flow volume (FV), average velocity (AV), peak velocity (PV) and time to PV (TP). Results: In stage 1 only TP demonstrated a significant change. With progression to stage 2, all parameters altered significantly. Flow measurements during stage 3 evidenced further alterations only of AV and TP regarding both AA and PA. The deviation of the heart rate from the desired target value was significantly higher for stage 3 compared to stage 2, and 15% of the subjects did not reach the desired target heart rate of stage 3 at all. Conclusion: Flow quantification by high-resolution PC-MRI during exercise using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer is feasible. Medium exercise stages are necessary and sufficient to demonstrate flow alterations in healthy volunteers. PC-MRI ergometry may give insights into aberrant hemodynamic conditions in patients with cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.

  10. High-resolution phase-contrast MRI of aortic and pulmonary blood flow during rest and physical exercise using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Tim Frederik, E-mail: tim.weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von, E-mail: hendrik.tengg-kobligk@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, Annette, E-mail: kopp@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia, E-mail: julia.ley-zaporozhan@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 430, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.ley@med.uni.heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Pediatric Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 430, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To establish high-resolution phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer to quantify aortic and pulmonary blood flow during resting conditions and exercise. Materials and methods: In 20 healthy volunteers (mean age, 26.8 {+-} 5.0 years) high-resolution PC-MRI (mean temporal resolution, 7.4 {+-} 3.2 ms) was performed in the ascending aorta (AA) and main pulmonary artery (PA) during physical rest and three exercise stages: stage 1, no-load operation; stage 2, heart rate increase 40% compared to rest; stage 3, heart rate increase 80% compared to rest. Flow quantification in AA and PA included flow volume (FV), average velocity (AV), peak velocity (PV) and time to PV (TP). Results: In stage 1 only TP demonstrated a significant change. With progression to stage 2, all parameters altered significantly. Flow measurements during stage 3 evidenced further alterations only of AV and TP regarding both AA and PA. The deviation of the heart rate from the desired target value was significantly higher for stage 3 compared to stage 2, and 15% of the subjects did not reach the desired target heart rate of stage 3 at all. Conclusion: Flow quantification by high-resolution PC-MRI during exercise using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer is feasible. Medium exercise stages are necessary and sufficient to demonstrate flow alterations in healthy volunteers. PC-MRI ergometry may give insights into aberrant hemodynamic conditions in patients with cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.

  11. Noninvasive Monitoring of Microvascular Changes With Partial Irradiation Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yu-Chun [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jiun-Jie [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ji-Hong [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Wai, Yau-Yau; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wu, Yi-Ming [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Chieh, E-mail: jjwang@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: The microvasculature of a tumor plays an important role in its response to radiation therapy. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI are both sensitive to vascular characteristics. The present study proposed a partial irradiation approach to a xenograft tumor to investigate the intratumoral response to radiation therapy using DCE and BOLD MRI. Methods and Materials: TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in C57BL/6J mice. Partial irradiation was performed on the distal half of the tumor with a single dose of 15 Gy. DCE MRI was performed to derive the endothelium transfer constant, K{sup trans}, using pharmacokinetic analysis. BOLD MRI was performed using quantitative R2* measurements with carbogen breathing. The histology of the tumor was analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin staining and CD31 staining to detect endothelial cells. The differences between the irradiated and nonirradiated regions of the tumor were assessed using K{sup trans} values, ΔR2* values in response to carbogen and microvascular density (MVD) measurements. Results: A significantly increased K{sup trans} and reduced BOLD response to carbogen were found in the irradiated region of the tumor compared with the nonirradiated region (P<.05). Histologic analysis showed a significant aggregation of giant cells and a reduced MVD in the irradiated region of the tumor. The radiation-induced difference in the BOLD response was associated with differences in MVD and K{sup trans}. Conclusions: We demonstrated that DCE MRI and carbogen-challenge BOLD MRI can detect differential responses within a tumor that may potentially serve as noninvasive imaging biomarkers to detect microvascular changes in response to radiation therapy.

  12. Blood pressure and fasting lipid changes after 24 weeks’ treatment with vildagliptin: a pooled analysis in >2,000 previously drug-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marc Evans,1 Anja Schweizer,2 James E Foley3 1Diabetes Resource Centre, Llandough Hospital, Cardiff, UK; 2Medical Affairs Cardio Metabolic, Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 3Medical Affairs Cardio-Metabolic, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA Introduction: We have previously shown modest weight loss with vildagliptin treatment. Since body weight balance is associated with changes in blood pressure (BP and fasting lipids, we have assessed these parameters following vildagliptin treatment. Methods: Data were pooled from all double-blind, randomized, controlled, vildagliptin monotherapy trials on previously drug-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who received vildagliptin 50 mg once daily (qd or twice daily (bid; n=2,108 and wherein BP and fasting lipid data were obtained. Results: Data from patients receiving vildagliptin 50 mg qd or bid showed reductions from baseline to week 24 in systolic BP (from 132.5±0.32 to 129.8±0.34 mmHg; P<0.0001, diastolic BP (from 81.2±0.18 to 79.6±0.19 mmHg; P<0.0001, fasting triglycerides (from 2.00±0.02 to 1.80±0.02 mmol/L; P<0.0001, very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (from 0.90±0.01 to 0.83±0.01 mmol/L; P<0.0001, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (from 3.17±0.02 to 3.04±0.02 mmol/L; P<0.0001, whereas high density lipoprotein cholesterol increased (from 1.19±0.01 to 1.22±0.01 mmol/L; P<0.001. Weight decreased by 0.48±0.08 kg (P<0.001. Conclusion: This large pooled analysis demonstrated that vildagliptin shows a significant reduction in BP and a favorable fasting lipid profile that are associated with modest weight loss. Keywords: TG, HDL, LDL, body weight DPP-4 inhibitor, GLP-1 

  13. Human brain tumor imaging with a protein-binding MR contrast agent: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Marco; Giesel, Frederik; Weber, Marc-Andre; Gerigk, Lars [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Rohrer, Martin [University of Applied Science Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Tuettenberg, Jochen [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Mannheim (Germany); Michaely, Hendrik; Voth, Matthias [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Klinikum Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Gadofosveset is a Gd-based protein-binding blood pool agent with increased relaxivities and blood half-life compared with conventional Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). No experience exists about the use of gadofosveset as an extracellular agent. In this report we present the first clinical experience with gadofosveset in enhancing intracranial tumors. Ten patients with different intracranial tumors were examined with a standard dose (0.03 mmol/kg) of gadofosveset compared with a standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of conventional GBCA. As a result of its significantly higher relaxivity, gadofosveset could, despite its low dose, achieve a sufficient contrast enhancement. The visual rating of the intensity of enhancement and the contrast to noise ratios were comparable to conventional agents. The detection and delineation of more complex lesions was rated equal. In one nonenhancing low grade astrocytoma an enhancing nodule became visible only 5 h after gadofosvesest injection. As shown in this initial report, contrast-enhanced intracranial tumor imaging is possible with the protein-binding blood pool agent gadofosveset. The agent gives a significant tumor contrast in early postcontrast imaging comparable with conventional agents. As a result of its unique longer lasting contrast, the use of gadofosveset might enable a new approach to imaging mild or nonenhancing tumors. (orig.)

  14. Oncogenic osteomalacia diagnosed by blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare metabolic bone disease characterized by phosphaturia and hypophosphatemia. Certain tumors secrete a phosphaturic factor, which results in this metabolic abnormality; this factor called as phosphatonin, is in fact a fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) involved closely in phosphate homeostasis and skeletogenesis. Complete excision of these tumors facilitates reversal of the problem. We have reported here the case of a patient who was crippled with this disease and on thorough investigation revealed an oncogenic osteomalacia with tumor focus in the right tibia. The tumor was identified as a mesenchymal tumor, i.e., hemangiopericytoma. Tumor excision alleviated patient symptoms with rapid symptomatic and biochemical improvement

  15. Fingertip Blood Capillary Whole Blood Glucose and Venous Plasma Glucose test Results Contrast Analysis%指尖毛细血管全血糖与静脉血浆血糖检测结果对比分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢美荣

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the blood glucose and blood glucose in the blood glucose and blood glucose of the finger tip blood glucose and to explore the accuracy of blood glucose detection in the blood glucose of finger tip capillary. Meth-ods From January 2014 to October 2015, 200 cases of blood glucose detection in the center of the disease control depart-ment of our CDC were studied. According to their blood glucose levels, the patients were divided into low blood sugar group, normal group, abnormal glucose tolerance group and diabetic group. Blood glucose was detected by using the automatic bio-chemical analyzer to measure blood glucose of blood and blood glucose in the blood and blood of the finger tip, which were collected from 200 cases of the patients. Results There were no significant differences in blood glucose levels between the blood glucose test results of the blood glucose test of the blood glucose and the blood glucose in the blood glucose of the patients with low blood glucose, glucose tolerance and glucose tolerance test in the patients with low blood glucose and glu-cose tolerance. Conclusion The method of blood glucose detection in blood glucose of finger tip has a high accuracy, and it is close to that of venous blood glucose detection. It can effectively reflect the blood glucose level of the subjects, and can be used as an effective method for the monitoring and management of the community and family.%目的:对比分析指尖毛细血管全血血糖与静脉血浆血糖的检测结果,以探讨指尖毛细血管全血糖检测血糖的准确性。方法于2014年1月-2015年10月,选取在该疾控中心体检科进行血糖检测的200例受检者进行研究,按照其血糖情况进行分组,分为低血糖组、血糖正常组、糖耐量异常组、糖尿病组。分别于空腹状态时和餐后2 h,采集这200例受检者的指尖毛细血管全血和外周静脉血液,使用全自动生化分析仪进行血糖测定,对比指尖毛细血

  16. New Dual Mode Gadolinium Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Ravoori, Murali; Sabapathy, Divya; Bankson, James; Kundra, Vikas; ANNAPRAGADA, ANANTH

    2009-01-01

    Background Liposomal-based gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles have elicited significant interest for use as blood pool and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Previous generations of liposomal MR agents contained gadolinium-chelates either within the interior of liposomes (core-encapsulated gadolinium liposomes) or presented on the surface of liposomes (surface-conjugated gadolinium liposomes). We hypothesized that a liposomal agent that contained both core-encapsulated gad...

  17. The resource pooling principle

    OpenAIRE

    Wischik, Damon; Handley, Mark; Bagnulo, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Since the ARPAnet, network designers have built localized mechanisms for statistical multiplexing, load balancing, and failure resilience, often without understanding the broader implications. These mechanisms are all types of resource pooling, whichmeans making a collection of resources behave like a single pooled resource. We believe that the natural evolution of the Internet is that it should achieve resource pooling by harnessing the responsiveness of multipath-capable end systems. We arg...

  18. Cold pool dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  19. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Christine L.; Ances, Beau M.; Perthen, Joanna E.; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T.; Hopkins, Susan R.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO2 coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological c...

  20. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich E-mail: kauczor@radiologie.klinik.uni-mainz.de; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich

    2000-06-01

    The lung has long been neglected by MR imaging. This is due to unique intrinsic difficulties: (1) signal loss due to cardiac pulsation and respiration; (2) susceptibility artifacts caused by multiple air-tissue interfaces; (3) low proton density. There are many MR strategies to overcome these problems. They consist of breath-hold imaging, respiratory and cardiac gating procedures, use of short repetition and echo times, increase of the relaxivity of existing spins by administration of intravenous contrast agents, and enrichment of spin density by hyperpolarized noble gases or oxygen. Improvements in scanner performance and frequent use of contrast media have increased the interest in MR imaging and MR angiography of the lung. They can be used on a routine basis for the following indications: characterization of pulmonary nodules, staging of bronchogenic carcinoma, in particular assessment of chest wall invasion; evaluation of inflammatory activity in interstitial lung disease; acute pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, vascular involvement in malignant disease; vascular abnormalities. Future perspectives include perfusion imaging using extracellular or intravascular (blood pool) contrast agents and ventilation imaging using inhalation of hyperpolarized noble gases, of paramagnetic oxygen or of aerosolized contrast agents. These techniques represent new approaches to functional lung imaging. The combination of visualization of morphology and functional assessment of ventilation and perfusion is unequalled by any other technique.

  1. Tissue-specific MR contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to outline recent trends in contrast agent development for magnetic resonance imaging. Up to now, small molecular weight gadolinium chelates are the workhorse in contrast enhanced MRI. These first generation MR contrast agents distribute into the intravascular and interstitial space, thus allowing the evaluation of physiological parameters, such as the status or existence of the blood-brain-barrier or the renal function. Shortly after the first clinical use of paramagnetic metallochelates in 1983, compounds were suggested for liver imaging and enhancing a cardiac infarct. Meanwhile, liver specific contrast agents based on gadolinium, manganese or iron become reality. Dedicated blood pool agents will be available within the next years. These gadolinium or iron agents will be beneficial for longer lasting MRA procedures, such as cardiac imaging. Contrast enhanced lymphography after interstitial or intravenous injection will be another major step forward in diagnostic imaging. Metastatic involvement will be seen either after the injection of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides or dedicated gadolinium chelates. The accumulation of both compound classes is triggered by an uptake into macrophages. It is likely that similar agents will augment MRI of atheriosclerotic plaques, a systemic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Thrombus-specific agents based on small gadolinium labeled peptides are on the horizon. It is very obvious that the future of cardiovascular MRI will benefit from the development of new paramagnetic and superparamagnetic substances. The expectations for new tumor-, pathology- or receptor-specific agents are high. However, is not likely that such a compound will be available for daily routine MRI within the next decade

  2. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  3. The influence of x-ray contrast agents in computed tomography on the induction of dicentrics and γ-H2AX foci in lymphocytes of human blood samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, G.; Golfier, S.; Pietsch, H.; Lengsfeld, P.; Voth, M.; Schmid, T. E.; Eckardt-Schupp, F.; Schmid, E.

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify two biomarkers for radiation exposure (dicentrics and γ-H2AX foci) in human lymphocytes after CT scans in the presence of an iodinated contrast agent. Blood samples from a healthy donor were exposed to CT scans in the absence or presence of iotrolan 300 at iodine concentrations of 5 or 50 mg ml-1 blood. The samples were exposed to 0.025, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 Gy in a tissue equivalent body phantom. Chromosome aberration scoring and automated microscopic analysis of γ-H2AX foci were performed in parts of the same samples. The theoretical physical dose enhancement factor (DEF) was calculated on the basis of the mass energy-absorption coefficients of iodine and blood and the photon energy spectrum of the CT tube. No significant differences in the yields of dicentrics and γ-H2AX foci were observed in the absence or presence of 5 mg iodine ml-1 blood up to 0.1 Gy, whereas at 1 Gy the yields were elevated for both biomarkers. At an iodine concentration of 50 mg ml-1 serving as a positive control, a biological DEF of 9.5 ± 1.4 and 2.3 ± 0.5 was determined for dicentrics and γ-H2AX foci, respectively. A physical DEF of 1.56 and 6.30 was calculated for 5 and 50 mg iodine ml-1, respectively. Thus, it can be concluded that in the diagnostic dose range (radiation and contrast dose), no relevant biological dose-enhancing effect could be detected, whereas a clear biological dose-enhancing effect could be found for a contrast dose well outside the diagnostic CT range for the complete radiation dose range with both methods.

  4. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adverse reaction, you should tell your doctor about: allergies to contrast materials, food, drugs, dyes, preservatives, or animals medications ... These include: previous adverse reactions to iodine-based contrast materials history of ... disease dehydration sickle cell anemia , polycythemia and ...

  5. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  6. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  7. Pools for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Three institutions in Ohio now stress hydrotherapy and water recreation as important parts of individual educational programs for the handicapped. Specially designed and adapted pools provide freedom of movement and ego building as well as physical education and recreation. (Author)

  8. [Uroangiographic contrast media, today. Elements of interest for the urologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, C

    1997-03-01

    Uroangiographic contrast media, as well as magnetic resonance or ultrasound contrast agents, are substances which are able to artificially enhance the contrast between different tissues, or between normal tissue and pathological areas. The design of ionic and nonionic, monomeric or dimeric, iodobenzene derivatives is outlined with attention given to historical developments and breakthroughs. Relationships between physicochemical properties (osmolality, viscosity, molecular structure, etc.) and pharmacological profile are described. Nonionic compounds display favourable physicochemical characteristics: high water solubility, low osmolality and viscosity and good systemic tolerability. Recent surveys on adverse reactions to uroangiographic iodinated contrast media have shown that the risk of severe reactions is about six times lower with nonionic than ionic X-ray contrast agents. The pathogenetic mechanisms of adverse reactions, generally classified as either anaphylactoid or osmotoxic and chemotoxic, are still not well understood. It has been proposed that leukotrienes, prostaglandins, kinins, etc., may be involved. Nitric oxide appears to play a crucial role in the final common pathway by which anaphylaxis-like reactions occur in response to contrast agent administration. The margin of safety (median lethal dose/diagnostic dose) for nonionic compounds is two- to three-fold greater than for ionic compounds. As a look at the future, an approach to molecules potentially useful as "blood pool X-ray contrast agents" is based on iodinated dendrimeric macromolecules, in which the core is triazacyclononane and branches are represented by trioodobenzene derivatives. PMID:9198904

  9. Paramagnetic Gd(3+) labeled red blood cells for magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Santosh; Stigliano, Cinzia; Key, Jaehong; Ramirez, Maricela; Anderson, Jeff; Karmonik, Christof; Fung, Steve; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Despite significant advances in contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, the lack of truly blood-pool agents with long circulating property is limiting the clinical impact of this imaging technique. The terminal half-life for blood elimination of most small molecular weight gadolinium (Gd) based extracellular fluid agents is about 1.5 h when administered intravenously to subjects with normal renal function. The small size of these extracellular fluid agents does not prevent them from extravasating, especially from damaged vessels which are generally hyperpermeable. Therefore, the development of novel, clinically relevant blood pool contrast agents is critically needed to improve outcomes in the prevention, detection, and treatment of vascular diseases. We have demonstrated the fusion strategies in which the Gd-liposome without any stealth property radically fuses with red blood cells (RBCs) forming MR glowing Gd-RBC with the order of magnitude enhancements in circulation half-life (t1/2 = 50 h) and r1 relaxivity (r1 = 19.0 mM(-1) s(-1)) of Gd. The in vivo contrast enhancement of Gd-RBC was studied by using 3T clinical MR scanner for extended period of time, which clearly visualized the abdominal aorta. In summary, the vascular delivery of blood pool agents may benefit from carriage by RBCs because it naturally stays within the vascular lumen. PMID:27192419

  10. Activation of blood clotting and fibrinolysis in angiocardiography with ionic and non-ionic contrast medium; Aktivierung von Blutgerinnung und Fibrinolyse nach Angiokardiographie mit ionischem und nichtionischem Kontrastmittel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, U.H. [Gerinnungsphysiologisches Lab., Zentrum fuer Frauenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany); Park, J.W. [Herz-Zentrum Kaiser-Wilhelm-Krankenhaus, Duisburg (Germany); Weber, S. [Schering AG, Geschaeftsbereich Deutschland, Berlin (Germany); Kothe, A. [Gerinnungsphysiologisches Lab., Zentrum fuer Frauenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany); Schnitker, J. [Inst. fuer Angewandte Statistik GmbH, Bielefeld (Germany); Behrends-Steins, B. [Schering AG, Geschaeftsbereich Deutschland, Berlin (Germany); Albring, M. [Schering AG, Geschaeftsbereich Deutschland, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-06-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of a ionic (amidotrizoate) and a nonionic X-ray contrast medium (iopromid) during routine levocardiography and coronary angiography, we employed assays that detect reaction products of thrombin and plasmin to assess the activation of the haemostatic system. Methods: Subsequent to informed consent, 20 patients were randomly assigned to receive either amidotrizoate or iopromid during standard levocardiography and coronary angiography in a double-blind comparative study. Groups were comparable in respect of age, weight, sex and severity of the disease. No anticoagulation was provided. Coronary angiography was performed according to a standardised protocol. Consumption of contrast media and duration of the examination were comparable in both groups. Results: Thrombin generation (F.1+2) and thrombin activity (TAT) were higher with the ionic contrast medium but did not attain statistical significance. Fibrin generation and degradation as expressed by D-dimer fibrin split products was significantly increased in patients who had been receiving amidotrizoate (p<0,05, U-Test). Conclusion: The non-ionic X-ray contrast medium induced significantly less haemostatic activation in vivo than did the ionic medium amidotrizoate. These data suggest that earlier in vitro observations of more pronounced anticoagulant effects of ionic X-ray contrast media are of limited significance for the evaluation of in vivo effects of X-ray contrast media on haemostatic function. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Bestimmung der Aktivitaet des haemostatischen Systems in vivo nach Gabe von ionischem und nichtionischem Roentgenkontrastmittel in der Angiokardiographie. Material und Methoden: In eine randomisierte doppelblinde Vergleichsstudie mit den Kontrastmitteln Amidotrizoat und Iopromid wurden 20 Patienten (10 pro Gruppe) einbezogen. Bei der aus medizinischen Gruenden indizierten Angiokardiographie wurden 5 repraesentative Reaktionsprodukte der thrombin- und plasmininduzierten

  11. Zooplankton at deep Red Sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Kaartvedt, Stein

    2016-03-02

    The deep-sea anoxic brines of the Red Sea comprise unique, complex and extreme habitats. These environments are too harsh for metazoans, while the brine–seawater interface harbors dense microbial populations. We investigated the adjacent pelagic fauna at two brine pools using net tows, video records from a remotely operated vehicle and submerged echosounders. Waters just above the brine pool of Atlantis II Deep (2000 m depth) appeared depleted of macrofauna. In contrast, the fauna appeared to be enriched at the Kebrit Deep brine–seawater interface (1466 m).

  12. Abnormal enhancement after contrast injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two factors are involved in the enhancement of pathological processes at CT: the vascular pool and extra-vascular diffusion ot the contrast agent. Enhancement is of considerable use in visualising and delineating these pathologies but is of only limited interest as regards their characterisation. (orig./VJ)

  13. Alteration of Blood Flow in a Venular Network by Infusion of Dextran 500: Evaluation with a Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging System

    OpenAIRE

    Namgung, Bumseok; Ng, Yan Cheng; Nam, Jeonghun; Leo, Hwa Liang; Kim, Sangho

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of dextran-induced RBC aggregation on the venular flow in microvasculature. We utilized the laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) as a wide-field imaging technique to visualize the flow distribution in venules influenced by abnormally elevated levels of RBC aggregation at a network-scale level, which was unprecedented in previous studies. RBC aggregation in rats was induced by infusing Dextran 500. To elucidate the impact of RBC aggregation on microvascular perf...

  14. Use of three-dimensional time-resolved phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging with vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction to assess renal blood flow in a renal cell carcinoma patient treated with sunitinib: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Tatsuya; Takehara, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Masataka; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Ishii, Yasuo; Johnson, Kevin E; Wieben, Oliver; Wakayama, Tetsuya; Sakahara, Harumi; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background New imaging modalities to assess the efficacy of drugs that have molecular targets remain under development. Here, we describe for the first time the use of time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to monitor changes in blood supply to a tumor during sunitinib treatment in a patient with localized renal cell carcinoma. Case presentation A 43-year-old Japanese woman with a tumor-bearing but functional single kidney presented at our hospital in July 2...

  15. Dialysis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  16. Dialysis and contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcos, Sameh K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology 54E2, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Herlev Ringvej 75, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Webb, Judith A.W. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    2002-12-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  17. Impact of adding nitrate or increasing the lipid content of two contrasting diets on blood methaemoglobin and performance of two breeds of finishing beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, C-A; Rooke, J A; Troy, S; Hyslop, J J; Ross, D W; Waterhouse, A; Roehe, R

    2016-05-01

    Adding nitrate to the diet or increasing the concentration of dietary lipid are effective strategies for reducing enteric methane emissions. This study investigated their effect on health and performance of finishing beef cattle. The experiment was a two×two×three factorial design comprising two breeds (CHX, crossbred Charolais; LU, Luing); two basal diets consisting of (g/kg dry matter (DM), forage to concentrate ratios) 520 : 480 (Mixed) or 84 : 916 (Concentrate); and three treatments: (i) control with rapeseed meal as the main protein source replaced with either (ii) calcium nitrate (18 g nitrate/kg diet DM) or (iii) rapeseed cake (RSC, increasing acid hydrolysed ether extract from 25 to 48 g/kg diet DM). Steers (n=84) were allocated to each of the six basal diet×treatments in equal numbers of each breed with feed offered ad libitum. Blood methaemoglobin (MetHb) concentrations (marker for nitrate poisoning) were monitored throughout the study in steers receiving nitrate. After dietary adaptation over 28 days, individual animal intake, performance and feed efficiency were recorded for a test period of 56 days. Blood MetHb concentrations were low and similar up to 14 g nitrate/kg diet DM but increased when nitrate increased to 18 g nitrate/kg diet DM (P0.05). Neither basal diet nor treatment affected carcass quality (P>0.05), but CHX steers achieved a greater killing out proportion (Pbeef steers when used within the diets studied. PMID:26627142

  18. Mapping of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen using dynamic susceptibility contrast and blood oxygen level dependent MR imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO2) has been suggested to be analogous to PET-derived CMRO2 and therefore may be used for detection of viable tissue at risk for infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR-derived CMRO2 mapping in acute ischemic stroke in relation to established diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging. In 23 patients (mean age 63 ± 18.7 years, 11 women) with imaging findings for acute ischemic stroke, relative oxygen extraction fraction was calculated from quantitative transverse relaxation times (T2, T2*) and relative cerebral blood volume using a quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) approach in order to detect a local increase of deoxyhemoglobin. Relative CMRO2 (rCMRO2) maps were calculated by multiplying relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) by cerebral blood flow, derived from PWI. After co-registration, rCMRO2 maps were evaluated in comparison with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps. Mean rCMRO2 values in areas with diffusion-restriction or TTP/ADC mismatch were compared with rCMRO2 values in the contralateral tissue. In tissue with diffusion restriction, mean rCMRO2 values were significantly decreased compared to perfusion-impaired (17.9 [95 % confidence interval 10.3, 25.0] vs. 58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3]; P < 0.001) and tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (68.2 [95 % confidence interval 61.4, 75.0]; P < 0.001). rCMRO2 in perfusion-impaired tissue showed no significant change compared to tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3] vs. 66.7 [95 % confidence interval 53.4, 73.4]; P = 0.34). MR-derived CMRO2 was decreased within diffusion-restricted tissue and stable within perfusion-impaired tissue, suggesting that this technique may be adequate to reveal different pathophysiological stages in acute stroke. (orig.)

  19. Mapping of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen using dynamic susceptibility contrast and blood oxygen level dependent MR imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersing, Alexandra S.; Schwaiger, Benedikt J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ankenbrank, Monika; Toth, Vivien; Bauer, Jan S.; Zimmer, Claus [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Insa [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Kooijman, Hendrik [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Wunderlich, Silke [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Preibisch, Christine [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    MR-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO{sub 2}) has been suggested to be analogous to PET-derived CMRO{sub 2} and therefore may be used for detection of viable tissue at risk for infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} mapping in acute ischemic stroke in relation to established diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging. In 23 patients (mean age 63 ± 18.7 years, 11 women) with imaging findings for acute ischemic stroke, relative oxygen extraction fraction was calculated from quantitative transverse relaxation times (T2, T2*) and relative cerebral blood volume using a quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) approach in order to detect a local increase of deoxyhemoglobin. Relative CMRO{sub 2} (rCMRO{sub 2}) maps were calculated by multiplying relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) by cerebral blood flow, derived from PWI. After co-registration, rCMRO{sub 2} maps were evaluated in comparison with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps. Mean rCMRO{sub 2} values in areas with diffusion-restriction or TTP/ADC mismatch were compared with rCMRO{sub 2} values in the contralateral tissue. In tissue with diffusion restriction, mean rCMRO{sub 2} values were significantly decreased compared to perfusion-impaired (17.9 [95 % confidence interval 10.3, 25.0] vs. 58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3]; P < 0.001) and tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (68.2 [95 % confidence interval 61.4, 75.0]; P < 0.001). rCMRO{sub 2} in perfusion-impaired tissue showed no significant change compared to tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3] vs. 66.7 [95 % confidence interval 53.4, 73.4]; P = 0.34). MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} was decreased within diffusion-restricted tissue and stable within perfusion-impaired tissue, suggesting that this technique may be adequate to reveal different pathophysiological stages in acute stroke. (orig.)

  20. Absolute quantification of cerebral blood flow in neurologically normal volunteers: dynamic-susceptibility contrast MRI-perfusion compared with computed tomography (CT)-perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelitz, Doerthe; Starck, Göran; Mikkelsen, Irene K; Tullberg, Mats; Edsbagge, Mikael; Wikkelsö, Carsten; Forssell-Aronson, Eva; Holtås, Stig; Knutsson, Linda

    2009-07-01

    To improve the reproducibility of arterial input function (AIF) registration and absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in dynamic-susceptibility MRI-perfusion (MRP) at 1.5T, we rescaled the AIF by use of a venous output function (VOF). We compared CBF estimates of 20 healthy, elderly volunteers, obtained by computed tomography (CT)-perfusion (CTP) and MRP on two consecutive days. MRP, calculated without the AIF correction, did not result in any significant correlation with CTP. The rescaled MRP showed fair to moderate correlation with CTP for the central gray matter (GM) and the whole brain. Our results indicate that the method used for correction of partial volume effects (PVEs) improves MRP experiments by reducing AIF-introduced variance at 1.5T. PMID:19253361

  1. Experimental study of renal damage assessment after injection of iodine contrast medium: the role of blood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI with a 3.0 T system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI on assessing renal damage after injection of iodine contrast medium with a 3.0 T system. Methods: Routine MRI examination, including T1WI and T2WI, and BOLD MRI were performed in 29 SD rats with a 3.0 T system before the injection of iodine contrast agent and 20 min, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h after the injection, respectively. T2 * and R2 * (=1/T2 *) measurements were obtained in the cortex, inner and outer medulla of kidney, respectively. The results obtained before contrast agent administration were considered as the self-controls. AVONA test were used for the comparison of R2 * values in different parts of both kidneys before contrast agent administration. Two-sample t test was used to compare R2 * values before and at each time point after contrast agent administration, and R2 * values in different parts of the kidneys. Results: Before contrast agent administration, R2 * values in outer medulla in both sides of kidney [R2 * leftOM =(31.76±2.73)/s , R2 * rightOM = (32.77±3.07)/s] were higher than those in cortex [R2 * leftC = (30.20±3.48)/s, R2 * rightC =(28.84±3.11)/s] and in inner medulla [R2 * leftIM =(29.54±2.42)/s, R2 * rightIM = (28.37±2.80)/s] (F=3.357 and 14.961, P2 * values in the three parts between left and right kidney, including cortex, outer and inner medulla (P>0.05). After contrast agent administration, R2 * values in outer medulla changed obviously, which reached to the peak values at 20 minutes after contrast agent administration [R2 * leftOM =(43.57±3.84)/s, R2 * rightOM =(44.58±3.13)/s] and dropped from 24 hours [R2 * leftOM =(42.07±4.82)/s, R2 * rightOM =(42.89±3.40)/s]. R2 * values in inner medulla and cortex only presented slight changes. Conclusion: R2 * values reflected the changes of oxygen content in renal cortex and medulla quantitatively, which helped for detecting medullar ischemia and hypoxia. BOLD MR imaging could offer a feasible method for evaluating oxygen

  2. The Future of Pooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Peter C.; Fone, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses seven propositions underlying the strategies that insurance pools can, will, and must pursue: (1) risk management versus risk financing; (2) elimination of windfall advantages; (3) the maintenance of market-dominant status; (4) cost leadership; (5) client focus; (6) innovation and diversification; and (7) leadership challenges. A sidebar…

  3. Liquid sodium pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental sodium pool combustion results have led to a definition of the combustion kinetics, and have revealed the hazards of sodium-concrete contact reactions and the possible ignition of organic matter (paint) by hydration of sodium peroxide aerosols. Analysis of these test results shows that the controlling mechanism is sodium evaporation diffusion. (author)

  4. Blood flow-metabolic relationships are dependent on tumour size in non-small cell lung cancer: a study using quantitative contrast-enhanced computer tomography and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to undertake dual assessment of tumour blood flow and glucose metabolism in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in order to assess how the relationships between these parameters vary with tumour size and stage. Tumour blood flow and glucose metabolism were assessed in 18 NSCLCs using quantitative CE-CT and FDG-PET respectively. Contrast enhancement and FDG uptake were both normalised to injected dose and patient weight to yield correspondingly the standardised perfusion value (SPV) and standardised uptake value (SUV). Tumour area was measured from conventional CT images. The ratio of SUV to SVP and the metabolic-flow difference (SUV-SVP) correlated with tumour size (r=0.56, p=0.015 and r=0.60 and p=0.008 respectively). A metabolic-flow difference of greater than 4 was more common amongst tumours of stages III and IV (odds ratio 10.5; 95% confidence limits 0.24-32.1). A significant correlation between SUV and SPV was found only for tumours smaller than 4.5 cm2 (r=0.85, p=0.03). Blood flow-metabolic relationships are not consistent in NSCLC but depend upon tumour size and stage. Quantitative CE-CT as an adjunct to an FDG study undertaken using integrated PET-CT offers an efficient way to augment the assessment of tumour biology with possible future application as part of clinical care. (orig.)

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid pulsation amplitude and its quantitative relationship to cerebral blood flow pulsations: a phase-contrast MR flow imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose in this investigation was to explain the heterogeneity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow pulsation amplitudes. To this end, we determined the contributions of the cerebral arterial and jugular venous flow pulsations to the amplitude of the CSF pulsation. We examined 21 healthy subjects by cine phase-contrast MRI at the C2-3 disc level to demonstrate the CSF and vascular flows as waveforms. Multiple regression analysis was performed to calculate the contributions of (a) the arterial and venous waveform amplitudes and (b) the delay between the maximum systolic slopes of the arterial and venous waveforms (AV delay), in order to predict the amplitude of the CSF waveform. The contribution of the arterial waveform amplitude was positive (r = 0.61; p 0.003) to the CSF waveform amplitude and that of the venous waveform amplitude was negative (r = -0.50; p = 0.006). Both in combination accounted for 56 % of the variance in predicting the CSF waveform amplitude (p < 0.0006). The contribution of AV delay was not significant. The results show that the variance in the CSF flow pulsation amplitudes can be explained by concurrent evaluation of the CSF and vascular flows. Improvement in the techniques, and controlled experiments, may allow use of CSF flow pulsation amplitudes for clinical applications in the non-invasive assessment of intracranial dynamics by MRI. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Efficacy Analysis of a Script-based Guide for EVAR Execution: is it Possible to Reduce Patient Exposure to Contrast, Operative Time and Blood Loss even when Advanced Technologies are not Available?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani José Dal Poggetto Molinari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Despite the patient and medical staff exposure to radiation in endovascular aneurysm repair, the benefits of this abdominal aortic aneurysm type of surgical management are justfied by minor recovery time and hospitalization, as well as an option for patients not elected to conventional open repair. In this minimally invasive surgical aproach, time of procedure and radiation doses can be substantial - and the increasing frequency of these procedures and it's complexity have impelled vascular surgeons to face additional and successive risk to occupational radiation exposure. Meticulous study of the computed tomography angiography during the endovascular aneurysm repair preparation allows reduction of unnecessary radiation exposure, as also reduces consecutive image acquisition and contrast use (that may be related to renal overload in susceptible patients. Some studies have proposed strategies to optimize endovascular intervention to reduce contrast use and X-ray exposure. Although they might prove to be effective, they rely on use of additional specific and advanced equipment, available only in major centers. As an alternative to this expensive and restrict technology, it is presented a simpler technique through image manipulation on software OsiriX, aiming to reduce both exposures. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the efficacy of the adoption of a study protocol and a script-based guide in preparation for endovascular aneurysm repair through verifying it's impact over the surgical procedure - as referred to intravascular contrast infuse, effects over renal function, blood loss and operatory time. METHODS: A longitudinal prospective study from March 2014 through March 2015, where 30 performed endovascular aneurysm repair were compared to a historic control group. The planning for endovascular aneurysm repair through the patient's tomographic image manipulation in the prospective group was performed with OsiriX MD software. A script

  7. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  8. CERN Electronics Pool presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Electronics Pool has organised a series of presentations in collaboration with oscilloscope manufacturers. The last one will take place according to the schedule below.   Time will be available at the end of the presentation to discuss your personal needs. The Agilent presentation had to be postponed and will be organised later. -     Lecroy: Thursday, 24 November 2011, in 530-R-030, 14:00 to 16:30.

  9. Pioglitazone modulates vascular inflammation in atherosclerotic rabbits monitored non-invasively with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and black blood dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Esad; Dickson, Stephen D.; Calcagno, Claudia; Rudd, James H.F.; Moshier, Erin; Hayashi, Katsumi; Mounessa, Jessica S.; Roytman, Michelle; Moon, Matthew J.; Lin, James; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Fisher, Edward A.; Nicolay, Klaas; Fuster, Valentin; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine the anti-atherosclerotic properties of pioglitazone using multi-modality non-invasive imaging techniques. Background Inflammation is an essential component of vulnerable or high risk atheromas. Pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ)agonist possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. We aimed to non-invasively to quantify the anti-inflammatory effects of pioglitazone on atheroma using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET/CT and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods Atherosclerotic plaques were induced in the aorta of fifteen New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits by a combination of hyperlipidemic diet and two balloon endothelial denudations. Nine rabbits continued the same diet whereas six received pioglitazone (10mg/kg orally) in addition to the diet. Twelve animals underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and fifteen animals underwent DCE-MRI at baseline, one and three months after treatment initiation. Concomitantly, serum metabolic parameters were monitored. After imaging was completed aortic histological analysis and correlation analysis was performed. Results 18F-FDG-PET/CT detected an increase in average standardized uptake value (SUV) in the control group (p<0.01), indicating progressive inflammation, while stable SUV values were observed in the treatment group, indicating no progression. DCE-MRI detected a significant decrease in area under the curve (AUC) for the pioglitazone group (p<0.01). Immunohistology of the aortas demonstrated a significant decrease in macrophage and oxidized phospholipid immunoreactivity in the pioglitazone group (p=0.04 and p=0.01, respectively) with respect to control animals, underlining the imaging results. Serum metabolic parameters showed no difference between groups. A strong positive correlation between SUV and macrophage density and AUC and neovessels was detected ( r2=0.86, p<0.0001 and r2=0.66, p=0.004, respectively). Conclusions 18F-FDG-PET/CT and DCE

  10. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  11. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers' Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  12. Large molten pool heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop on large molten pool heat transfer is composed of 5 sessions which titles are: feasibility of in-vessel core debris cooling; experiments on molten pool heat transfer; calculational efforts on molten pool convection; heat transfer to the surrounding water, experimental techniques; future experiments and ex-vessel studies (RASPLAV, TOLBIAC, BALI, SULTAN, CORVIS, VULCANO, CORINE programs)

  13. Contrast lipocryolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part o...

  14. Comparison of contrast-enhanced modified T1-weighted 3D TSE black-blood and 3D MP-RAGE sequences for the detection of cerebral metastases and brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammer, N.N.; Coppenrath, E.; Treitl, K.M.; Saam, T. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kooijman, H. [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Dietrich, O. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To compare a modified T1-weighted 3D TSE black-blood sequence with sub-millimetre resolution (T1-mVISTA) with a magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE) sequence for the diagnosis of cerebral malignomas. Forty-six patients with known or suspected intracranial tumours and 15 control patients were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent T1-mVISTA (0.75-mm isotropic resolution, 4:43 min) and MP-RAGE (0.8-mm isotropic resolution, 4:46 minutes) at 3-Tesla in random order after application of contrast agent. Two experienced radiologists determined the number of lesions. Maximum diameter, diagnostic confidence (DC), visual assessment of contrast enhancement (VCE) and CNR{sub lesion/parenchyma} were assessed for each lesion. Significantly more lesions were detected with T1-mVISTA compared to the MP-RAGE (61 vs. 36; p < 0.05). Further, DC and VCE was rated significantly higher in the T1-mVISTA (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). Mean CNR{sub lesion/parenchyma} was twofold higher for T1-mVISTA (24.2 ± 17.5 vs. 12.7 ± 11.5, p < 0.001). The 25 lesions detected only in T1-mVISTA were significantly smaller than those detected in both sequences (4.3 ± 3.7 mm vs. 11.3 ± 10.7 mm; p < 0.01). T1-mVISTA increases the contrast of lesions significantly compared to MP-RAGE and might therefore improve detection rates of small lesions in early stages of disease. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of contrast-enhanced modified T1-weighted 3D TSE black-blood and 3D MP-RAGE sequences for the detection of cerebral metastases and brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare a modified T1-weighted 3D TSE black-blood sequence with sub-millimetre resolution (T1-mVISTA) with a magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE) sequence for the diagnosis of cerebral malignomas. Forty-six patients with known or suspected intracranial tumours and 15 control patients were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent T1-mVISTA (0.75-mm isotropic resolution, 4:43 min) and MP-RAGE (0.8-mm isotropic resolution, 4:46 minutes) at 3-Tesla in random order after application of contrast agent. Two experienced radiologists determined the number of lesions. Maximum diameter, diagnostic confidence (DC), visual assessment of contrast enhancement (VCE) and CNRlesion/parenchyma were assessed for each lesion. Significantly more lesions were detected with T1-mVISTA compared to the MP-RAGE (61 vs. 36; p < 0.05). Further, DC and VCE was rated significantly higher in the T1-mVISTA (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001). Mean CNRlesion/parenchyma was twofold higher for T1-mVISTA (24.2 ± 17.5 vs. 12.7 ± 11.5, p < 0.001). The 25 lesions detected only in T1-mVISTA were significantly smaller than those detected in both sequences (4.3 ± 3.7 mm vs. 11.3 ± 10.7 mm; p < 0.01). T1-mVISTA increases the contrast of lesions significantly compared to MP-RAGE and might therefore improve detection rates of small lesions in early stages of disease. (orig.)

  16. The new pooled cohort equations risk calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preiss, David; Kristensen, Søren L

    2015-01-01

    total cardiovascular risk score. During development of joint guidelines released in 2013 by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA), the decision was taken to develop a new risk score. This resulted in the ACC/AHA Pooled Cohort Equations Risk Calculator. This risk...... calculator, based on major National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded cohort studies, is designed to predict 10-year risk of 'hard' atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events, namely, nonfatal myocardial infarction, fatal coronary heart disease, nonfatal, or fatal stroke. Considerable...... disease and any measure of social deprivation. An early criticism of the Pooled Cohort Equations Risk Calculator has been its alleged overestimation of ASCVD risk which, if confirmed in the general population, is likely to result in statin therapy being prescribed to many individuals at lower risk than...

  17. Synthesis and characterization of new low-molecular-weight lysine-conjugated Gd-DTPA contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Sophie; Burtea, Carmen; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2011-01-01

    Various blood pool contrast agents (CAs), characterized by intravascular distribution, have been developed to assist contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Among these CAs, the DTPA derivatives conjugated to synthetic polypeptides, such as polylysine, represent attractive candidates for blood pool imaging. However, due to the presence of charged residues located on their backbone, these agents are retained in the kidneys and this compromises their long blood half-life. In order to overcome this major drawback of the polylysine compounds, two new low-molecular-weight CAs were synthesized in the present work by conjugating four or six 1-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-DTPA moieties to tri- or penta-Lys peptides [(Gd-DTPA)(4) Lys(3) and (Gd-DTPA)(6) Lys(5)], respectively. All the -NH(2) groups of Lys were thus blocked by covalent conjugation to DTPA. The stability and relaxometric properties of these compounds, as well as their pharmacokinetic and biodistribution characteristics, were then evaluated. The half-life in blood of these new polylysine derivatives, as determined in rats, is twofold longer than that of Gd-DTPA. The compounds could thus be optimal blood pool markers for MRA, which typically uses fast acquisition times. The absence of positive molecular charge did not limit their retention in kidneys 2 h after administration. On the other hand, (Gd-DTPA)(4) Lys(3) is retained in kidneys to a lesser extent than (Gd-DTPA)(6) Lys(5) . Their moderate retention in blood and their higher stability and relaxivity in comparison with Gd-DTPA highlight these polylysine derivatives as optimal compared with previously developed polylysine compounds. PMID:21861283

  18. COLPEX - Cold Pool Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, H.; Price, J.; Horlacher, V.; Sheridan, P. F.; Vosper, S. B.; Brown, A. R.; Mobbs, S. D.; Ross, A. N.

    2009-04-01

    Planning has started towards designing a new field campaign aimed at studying the behaviour of the boundary layer over complex terrain. Of specific interest is the formation of cold-pools in valleys during stable night-time conditions. The field campaign will run continuously until the end of the winter in 2009/10. The experiment will make use of a wide variety of ground-based sensors including turbulence towers, automatic weather stations, Doppler lidar, radiation sensors and soil temperature probes. We also hope to deploy an instrumented car and a tethered balloon facility for limited periods. Data from the field campaign will be used for a number of purposes. Firstly, to increase our understanding of how the valley cold pools form and why, for instance, some valleys offer a more favourable environment for their formation than others. Secondly, to investigate the formation and dissipation of fog in complex terrain. Thirdly, the data set will also be used to help validate and develop the Met Office Unified Model at high resolution. An area for the experiment has been identified in the Shropshire/Powis area of the UK where a network of valleys and low hills exist with a typical valley width of ~1.5km and hill top to valley floor heights of 75-200m. 0m.

  19. Corium quench in deep pool mixing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of two recent corium-water thermal interaction (CWTI) tests are described in which a stream of molten corium was poured into a deep pool of water in order to determine the mixing behavior, the corium-to-water heat transfer rates, and the characteristic sizes of the quenched debris. The corium composition was 60% UO2, 16% ZrO2, and 24% stainless steel by weight; its initial temperature was 3080 K, approx.160 K above the oxide phase liquidus temperature. The corium pour stream was a single-phase 2.2 cm dia liquid column which entered the water pool in film boiling at approx.4 m/s. The water subcooling was 6 and 75C in the two tests. Test results showed that with low subcooling, rapid steam generation caused the pool to boil up into a high void fraction regime. In contrast, with large subcooling no net steam generation occurred, and the pool remained relatively quiescent. Breakup of the jet appeared to occur by surface stripping. In neither test was the breakup complete during transit through the 32 cm deep water pool, and molten corium channeled to the base where it formed a melt layer. The characteristic heat transfer rates measured 3.5 MJ/s and 2.7 MJ/s during the fall stage for small and large subcooling, respectively; during the initial stage of bed quench, the surface heat fluxes measured 2.4 MW/m2 and 3.7 MW/m2, respectively. A small mass of particles was formed in each test, measuring typically 0.1 to 1 mm and 1 to 5 mm dia for the large and small subcooling conditions, respectively. 9 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  20. Dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome and associated changes in the blood-brain barrier following Pc 4-PDT of glioma in an athymic nude rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Vaijayantee; Anka, Ali; Cross, Nathan; Thompson, Paul; Mott, Eric; Sharma, Rahul; Gray, Kayla; Zhang, Ruozhen; Xu, Yueshuo; Sun, Jiayang; Flask, Chris A.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) appears to provide an unambiguous means of tracking the outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of brain tumors with the photosensitizer Pc 4. The increase in Gd enhancement observed after Pc 4-PDT may be due to a temporary opening of the blood-brain-barrier which, as noted by others, may offer a therapeutic window. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells into the brains of 9 athymic nude rats. After 8-9 days peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7.0 T microMRI scanner before and after the administration of 150 μL Gd. DCE-MRI scans were repeated three times following Pc 4-PDT. Results: The average, normalized peak enhancement in the tumor region, approximately 30-90 seconds after Gd administration, was 1.31 times greater than baseline (0.03 Standard Error [SE]) prior to PDT and was 1.44 (0.02 SE) times baseline in the first Post-PDT scans (Day 11), a statistically significant (p ~ 0.014, N=8) increase over the Pre- PDT scans, and was 1.38 (0.02 SE) times baseline in the second scans (Day 12), also a statistically significant (p ~ 0.008, N=7) increase. Observations were mixed in the third Post-PDT scans (Day 13), averaging 1.29 (0.03 SE) times baseline (p ~ 0.66, N=7). Overall a downward trend in enhancement was observed from the first to the third Post-PDT scans. Discussion: DCE-MRI may provide an unambiguous indication of brain tumor PDT outcome. The initial increase in DCE-MRI signal may correlate with a temporary, PDT-induced opening of the blood-brain-barrier, creating a potential therapeutic window.

  1. The boom in power pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the liberalization of the power market there is euphoria in all parts of the world concerning the establishment of power pools. Power pools are to afford the transparency necessary when competition is fiercer, and have benefits for both buyers and vendors. But the technical community expects only a few to have great chances of survival. In Europe, for instance, only one leading power pool is expected to survive in the long term. It will set the power rate index for all players in the market. The other pools might establish themselves in regional niche markets. (orig.)

  2. Strategic inputs into patent pools

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Justus; Delcamp, Henry

    2010-01-01

    This article explores what factors determine the decision of a patent pool to accept new inputs. We propose a dynamic analysis of 1337 U.S. patent inputs into 7 important pools. This analysis highlights a trade-off between firm and patent characteristics as the determinants of inclusion of patents into pools. For instance we prove that firms already member of the pool or holding large patent portfolios are able to include lower quality patents. These findings can be explained both by bargaini...

  3. Crimson carrier, a long-acting contrast agent for in vivo near-infrared imaging of injured and diseased muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Suresh I; Martinez, Carlo O; Abraham, Jinu; McCleish, Amanda T; Michalek, Joel E; McManus, Linda M; Rubin, Brian P; Shireman, Paula K; Keller, Charles

    2010-08-01

    The near-infrared wavelengths (700-900 nm) are the most suitable optical window for light penetration and deep tissue imaging in small animals. Herein we report a near-infrared fluorescent contrast agent, crimson carrier, which acts as a blood pool contrast agent to detect and quantify injury and disease in live animals. After determining the excitation-emission spectra and pharmacokinetics, crimson carrier was injected into myoinjured mice to monitor their recovery. Crimson carrier was also used to image transgenic mice with spontaneous tumors. Crimson carrier has maximal excitation and emission wavelengths of 745 nm and 820 nm, respectively. Elimination occurs predominantly via urinary excretion. We demonstrate the utility of this contrast agent for serial imaging of traumatized muscle as well as muscle tumors. The unique long-acting pharmacokinetics and urinary excretion route characteristics make crimson carrier a contrast agent of choice for the visualization of tumors and injured muscle or other tissues in live animal studies. PMID:20544935

  4. Model 1: Blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because most radiopharmaceuticals are introduced into the body via the vascular system and may remain in the circulation for prolonged periods of time, it is useful to have a model of the blood as an aid in the estimation of radiation dose. It is extremely difficult to devise a precise blood model; the geometry is complex and distribution of blood may vary with position, physiological state and disease process. Estimates of blood volume distribution vary among investigators. Furthermore, the regional hematocrit varies throughout the body, thus affecting distribution of the labeled material according to whether it is attached to cellular elements or in the plasma. The size of the blood pool volumes range from the heart to the capillaries. Variable amounts of non-penetrating radiation contributions to organs depend on the volume of blood in the various sized vessels and the energy of the electrons which may penetrate into tissue from the blood vessel. The present model represents an advance in that it takes into account to some extent the distribution of significant blood pools in the body. Further refinement of the macro-geometry is possible with data which can now be obtained from modern radionuclide imaging equipment. A more difficult problem is definging the micro-geometry relative to the distribution of blood in capillaries and sinusoids, and their relationship to one another

  5. Continuous intravenous infusion of ATP in humans yields large expansions of erythrocyte ATP pools but extracellular ATP pools are elevated only at the start followed by rapid declines

    OpenAIRE

    Rapaport, Eliezer; Salikhova, Anna; Abraham, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) was investigated in a clinical trial that included 15 patients with advanced malignancies (solid tumors). ATP was administered by continuous intravenous infusions of 8 h once weekly for 8 weeks. Three values of blood ATP levels were determined. These were total blood (erythrocyte) and blood plasma (extracellular) ATP pools along with the initial rate of release of ATP into the blood plasma. We found that values related to erythrocyte ATP...

  6. Model of large pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two zone entrainment model of pool fires is proposed to depict the fluid flow and flame properties of the fire. Consisting of combustion and plume zones, it provides a consistent scheme for developing non-dimensional scaling parameters for correlating and extrapolating pool fire visible flame length, flame tilt, surface emissive power, and fuel evaporation rate. The model is extended to include grey gas thermal radiation from soot particles in the flame zone, accounting for emission and absorption in both optically thin and thick regions. A model of convective heat transfer from the combustion zone to the liquid fuel pool, and from a water substrate to cryogenic fuel pools spreading on water, provides evaporation rates for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic fires. The model is tested against field measurements of large scale pool fires, principally of LNG, and is generally in agreement with experimental values of all variables

  7. Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Index A-Z Blood Clots Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood that can be stationary (thrombosis) ... treated? What are blood clots? Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood. Normally, blood flows freely through ...

  8. Effects of computed tomography contrast medium factors on contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various nonionic iodinated contrast media used in contrast computed tomography (CT) studies differ in terms of their composition, characteristics, and iodine concentration (mgI/ml), as well as the volume injected (ml). Compared with ionic iodinated contrast media, nonionic iodinated contrast media are low-osmolar agents, with different agents having different osmotic pressures. Using a custom-made phantom incorporating a semipermeable membrane, the osmotic flow rate (hounsfield unit (HU)/s) could easily be measured based on the observed increase in CT numbers, and the relationship between the osmotic pressure and the osmotic flow rate could be obtained (r2=0.84). In addition, taking the effects of patient size into consideration, the levels of contrast enhancement in the abdominal aorta (AA) and inferior vena cava (IVC) were compared among four types of CT contrast medium. The results showed differences in contrast enhancement in the IVC during the equilibrium phase depending on the type of contrast medium used. It was found that the factors responsible for the differences observed in enhancement in the IVC were the osmotic flow rate and the volume of the blood flow pathways in the circulatory system. It is therefore considered that the reproducibility of contrast enhancement is likely to be reduced in the examination of parenchymal organs, in which scanning must be performed during the equilibrium phase, even if the amount of iodine injected per unit body weight (mgI/kg) is maintained at a specified level. (author)

  9. Measurement of blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus in healthy volunteers, and in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension with phase-contrast cine MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Gjerris, F;

    1996-01-01

    intracranial hypertension (IIH). RESULTS: Mean blood flow was 443 ml/min in healthy volunteers with a tendency towards reduced blood flow with increasing age. In NPH patients significantly lower superior sagittal sinus blood flow values were found, but this difference was no longer significant when patients...

  10. Pooling techniques for bioassay screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooling techniques commonly are used to increase the throughput of samples used for screening purposes. While advantages of such techniques are increased analytical efficiency and cost savings, the sensitivity of measurements decreases because it is inversely proportional to the number of samples m the pools. Consequently, uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk which are based on the results of pooled samples increase as the number of samples in the pools increases m all applications. However, sensitivities may not be seriously degraded, for example, in urinanalysis, if the samples in the pools are of known time duration, or if the fraction of some attribute of the grab urine samples to that m a 24-hour composite is known (e.g., mass, specific gravity, creatinine, or volume, per 24-h interval). This paper presents square and cube pooling schemes that greatly increase throughput and can considerably reduce analytical costs (on a sample basis). The benefit-cost ratios for 5x5 square and 5x5x5 cube pooling schemes are 2.5 and 8.3, respectively. Three-dimensional and higher arrayed pooling schemes would result in even greater economies; however, significant improvements in analytical sensitivity are required to achieve these advantages. These are various other considerations for designing a pooling scheme, where the number of dimensions and of samples in the optimum array are influenced by: 1) the minimal detectable amount (MDA) of the analytical processes, 2) the screening dose-rate requirements, 3) the maximum masses or volumes of the composite samples that can be analyzed, 4) the information already available from results of composite analysis, and 5) the ability of an analytical system to guard against both false negative and false positive results. Many of these are beyond the scope of this paper but are being evaluated. (author)

  11. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  12. ENERGY STAR Certified Pool Pumps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Pool Pumps that are effective as of February...

  13. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  14. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  15. NEW VISUAL PERCEPTUAL POOLING STRATEGY FOR IMAGE QUALITY ASSESSMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Wujie; Jiang Gangyi; Yu Mei

    2012-01-01

    Most of Image Quality Assessment (IQA) metrics consist of two processes.In the first process,quality map of image is measured locally.In the second process,the last quality score is converted from the quality map by using the pooling strategy.The first process had been made effective and significant progresses,while the second process was always done in simple ways.In the second process of the pooling strategy,the optimal perceptual pooling weights should be determined and computed according to Human Visual System (HVS).Thus,a reliable spatial pooling mathematical model based on HVS is an important issue worthy of study.In this paper,a new Visual Perceptual Pooling Strategy (VPPS) for IQA is presented based on contrast sensitivity and luminance sensitivity of HVS.Experimental results with the LIVE database show that the visual perceptual weights,obtained by the proposed pooling strategy,can effectively and significantly improve the performances of the IQA metrics with Mean Structural SIMilarity (MSSIM) or Phase Quantization Code (PQC).It is confirmed that the proposed VPPS demonstrates promising results for improving the performances of existing IQA metrics.

  16. Establishment of a Swine Model for Validation of Perfusion Measurement by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Sauerbrey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to develop a suitable animal model for validating dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging perfusion measurements. A total of 8 pigs were investigated by DCE-MRI. Perfusion was determined on the hind leg musculature. An ultrasound flow probe placed around the femoral artery provided flow measurements independent of MRI and served as the standard of reference. Images were acquired on a 1.5 T MRI scanner using a 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence. An arterial catheter for local injection was implanted in the femoral artery. Continuous injection of adenosine for vasodilation resulted in steady blood flow levels up to four times the baseline level. In this way, three different stable perfusion levels were induced and measured. A central venous catheter was used for injection of two different types of contrast media. A low-molecular weight contrast medium and a blood pool contrast medium were used. A total of 6 perfusion measurements were performed with a time interval of about 20–25 min without significant differences in the arterial input functions. In conclusion the accuracy of DCE-MRI-based perfusion measurement can be validated by comparison of the integrated perfusion signal of the hind leg musculature with the blood flow values measured with the ultrasound flow probe around the femoral artery.

  17. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M091)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The Leg Volume Measuring System is used to measure leg calf girth changes that occur during exposure to lower body negative pressure as a result of pooling of blood and other fluids in the lower extremities.

  18. HYDROLOGY AND LANDSCAPE CONNECTIVITY OF VERNAL POOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernal pools are shaped by hydrologic processes which influence many aspects of pool function. The hydrologic budget of a pool can be summarized by a water balance equation that relates changes in the amount of water in the pool to precipitation, ground- and surface-water flows, ...

  19. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall...

  20. Blood peptidome-degradome profile of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer invasion and metastasis are closely associated with activities within the degradome; however, little is known about whether these activities can be detected in the blood of cancer patients. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The peptidome-degradome profiles of pooled blood plasma sampled from 15 breast cancer patients (BCP and age, race, and menopausal status matched control healthy persons (HP were globally characterized using advanced comprehensive separations combined with tandem Fourier transform mass spectrometry and new data analysis approaches that facilitated top-down peptidomic analysis. The BCP pool displayed 71 degradome protein substrates that encompassed 839 distinct peptidome peptides. In contrast, the HP 50 degradome substrates found encompassed 425 peptides. We find that the ratios of the peptidome peptide relative abundances can vary as much as >4000 fold between BCP and HP. The experimental results also show differential degradation of substrates in the BCP sample in their functional domains, including the proteolytic and inhibitory sites of the plasmin-antiplasmin and thrombin-antithrombin systems, the main chains of the extracellular matrix protection proteins, the excessive degradation of innate immune system key convertases and membrane attack complex components, as well as several other cancer suppressor proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Degradomics-peptidomics profiling of blood plasma is highly sensitive to changes not evidenced by conventional bottom-up proteomics and potentially provides unique signatures of possible diagnostic utility.

  1. Monitoring pool-tail fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, K.; Potyondy, J. P.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fine sediment deposited in pool-tail areas of mountain streams is often measured to monitor changes in the supply of fines (e.g., by dam removal, bank erosion, or watershed effects including fires and road building) or to assess the status and trend of aquatic ecosystems. Grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric bedmaterial samples are typically used to quantify pool-tail fines. Grid-count results exhibit a high degree of variability not only among streams and among operators, but also among crews performing a nearly identical procedure (Roper et al. 2010). Variability is even larger when diverse methods are employed, each of which quantifies fines in a different way: grid counts visually count surface fines on small patches within the pool-tail area, pebble counts pick up and tally surface particles along (riffle) transects, and volumetric samples sieve out fines from small-scale bulk samples; and even when delimited to pool-tail areas, individual methods focus on different sampling locales. Two main questions were analyzed: 1) Do pool-tail fines exhibit patterns of spatial variability and are some grid count schemes more likely to provide accurate results than others. 2) How and why does the percentage of fines vary among grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric samples. In a field study, grids were placed at 7 locales in two rows across the wetted width of 10 pool tails in a 14-m wide 3rd order coarse gravel-bed mountain stream with banks, sometimes interrupted by a secondary peak of fines within the central half of the wetted width. Among the five sampling schemes tested, grid counts covering the wetted width with 7 locales produced the highest accuracy and the least variability among the pools of the reach. Pebble counts between the two waterlines indicated 2-3 times more fines than grid counts, likely because grid counts did not extend exactly up to the waterline. However, when confined to the central 50% of the wetted width, grid counts indicated 1.2 and

  2. Patent Pools: Intellectual Property Rights and Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Patent pools do not correct all problems associated with patent thickets. In this respect, patent pools might not stop the outsider problem from striking pools. Moreover, patent pools can be expensive to negotiate, can exclude patent holders with smaller numbers of patents or enable a group of major players to form a cartel that excludes new competitors. For all the above reasons, patent pools are subject to regulatory clearance because they could result in a monopoly. The aim of this article...

  3. The nucleate pool boiling dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the scatter of experimental data is due to the history and machining finish of the heated surface. All experimental pool boiling data published to date, which does not specify precisely the characteristics of the heated surface cannot be expected to provide reliable design information. (U.K.)

  4. EP BICYCLE POOL - VIGNETTES 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    EP-SMI Help Desk

    2002-01-01

    The vignettes (insurance certificates) for 2002 become obligatory from 1 June. If you have a bicycle from the EP Pool, please bring it to the EP-SMI Help Desk (Building 124) on any working day up to 31 May between 8h.30 - 12h.00 or 13h.30 - 17h.30. EP-SMI Help Desk

  5. Comparison of different protocols for the bovine viral diarrhea virus detection by RT-PCR in pools of whole blood and blood serum artificially contaminated/ Comparação de diferentes protocolos para a detecção do vírus da diarréia viral bovina por RT-PCR em grupos de sangue total e de soro sangüíneo, artificialmente contaminados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri A. Alfieri

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The RT-PCR technique was optimized and evaluated to detect the 5’ untranslated region of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV from clinical samples that consisted of blood serum and whole blood artificially contaminated with the NADL strain of BVDV. To optimization of technique, the following conditions were evaluated: i two pairs of primers, 103 / 372 (WEINSTOCK et al., 2001 and 324 / 326 (VILCEK et al., 1994, ii four methods of nucleic acid extraction (phenol/chloroform/isoamyl alcohol; silica/guanidine isothiocyanate; a combination of the two previous methods; and TRIzol™ and iii different concentrations and compositions of reagents and time/temperature of the reactions. Between the alternatives tested that resulted in the amplification of the 290 bp product that was easily visualized in ethidium bromide stained 2% agarose gel was that presented the following conditions: i primers 103 and 372; ii initial volume and clinical sample: 50 mL of blood serum; iii extraction of nucleic acid: silica/guanidine isothiocyanate method; iv reverse transcription: 9 mL extracted nucleic acid, 1xPCR buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl pH 8.4 and 50 mM KCl, 1.5 mM MgCl2; 60 units of reverse transcriptase enzyme M-MLV, RNA denaturation at 97°C / 4 min, and reverse transcription at 42°C / 30 min; v PCR: primers 103 / 372 with anneling temperature at 59°C. The utilization of RT-PCR within these optimized conditions allowed the amplification of the BVDV NADL strain (103,56 TCID50 from pools of artificially contaminated blood serum until the dilution 1:160.A técnica da RT-PCR foi otimizada e avaliada para a detecção da região 5’ terminal não-traduzida do genoma do vírus da diarréia viral bovina (BVDV em amostras clínicas de bovinos, constituídas por soro sangüíneo e sangue total, artificialmente contaminadas com a estirpe NADL do BVDV. Para a otimização da técnica foram avaliados: i dois pares de primers, 103 / 372 (WEINSTOCK et al., 2001 e 324 / 326

  6. Corrective Contrast in Russian, in Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Jasinskaja

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In many languages markers of contrast, such as the English 'but', are also used to express correction: John didn't go to Paris, but to Berlin. The present paper tries to explain this cross-linguistic pattern and represents correction as a special case of contrast. It focuses on the Russian contrastive conjunction 'a' and argues that its corrective uses in combination with negation 'ne ... a' / 'a ne', which are traditionally viewed as a fixed collocation, are in fact co-occurrences of a general contrastive 'a' with constituent negation.

  7. A Consensual Linear Opinion Pool

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    We propose a pooling method to aggregate expert opinions. Intuitively, it works as if the experts were continuously updating their opinions in order to accommodate the expertise of others. Each updated opinion takes the form of a linear opinion pool, where the weight that an expert assigns to a peer's opinion is inversely related to the distance between their opinions. In other words, experts are assumed to prefer opinions that are close to their own opinions. We prove that such an updating process leads to consensus, i.e., the experts all converge towards the same opinion. Further, we show that if experts are rewarded using the quadratic scoring rule, then the above mentioned assumption follows naturally. We empirically demonstrate the efficacy of our method using real-world data.

  8. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart contracts, which ... as it relaxes, which is called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure ...

  9. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this ... several sources of blood which are described below. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  10. Blood Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Group Links Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Basics Blood is a specialized body fluid. It ... about 9 pints. Jump To: The Components of Blood and Their Importance Many people have undergone blood ...

  11. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  12. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  13. Essential vernal pool habitat action plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Vernal pool ecosystem conservation and recovery requires the recovery team to develop methods to determine the distribution of vernal pool types throughout the...

  14. Validation of the pooled cohort risk score in an Asian population – a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Chia, Yook Chin; Lim, Hooi Min; Ching, Siew Mooi

    2014-01-01

    Background The Pooled Cohort Risk Equation was introduced by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) 2013 in their Blood Cholesterol Guideline to estimate the 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. However, absence of Asian ethnicity in the contemporary cohorts and limited studies to examine the use of the risk score limit the applicability of the equation in an Asian population. This study examines the validity of the pooled cohort ...

  15. 7 CFR 1033.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... its route distribution in this marketing area for 3 consecutive months or if the plant is required to... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1033.7 Section 1033.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1033.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants...

  16. 7 CFR 1030.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... its route distribution in this marketing area for 3 consecutive months or if the plant is required to... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1030.7 Section 1030.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1030.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants...

  17. 7 CFR 1131.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... its route distribution in this marketing area for 3 consecutive months or if the plant is required to... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1131.7 Section 1131.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1131.7 Pool plant. Pool Plant means a plant or unit of plants specified...

  18. 7 CFR 1032.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a majority of its route distribution in this marketing area for 3 consecutive months or if the plant... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1032.7 Section 1032.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1032.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants...

  19. Detection of brain tumors using fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and nanoparticles as contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Genevois, Coralie; Koenig, Anne; Heinrich, Emilie; Texier, Isabelle; Couillaud, Franck

    2012-12-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is used to localize tumors in mice using fluorescent nanoparticles as a blood pool contrast agent. The infrared dye DiR is loaded in the lipid core of nontargeted nanoparticles (DiR-lipidots) and injected systemically via the tail vein in mice bearing U87 tumors. Distribution and time-course of DiR-lipidots are followed using in vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and reveal enhanced fluorescent signal within the subcutaneous tumors up to seven days due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Tumor growth into the brain is followed using bioluminescent imaging, and tumor localization is further determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The fDOT provides three-dimensional fluorescent maps that allow for consistent localization for both subcutaneous and brain tumors.

  20. POOL development status and production experience

    CERN Document Server

    Chytracek, R; Frank, M; Girone, M; Govi, G; Moscicki, J T; Papadopoulos, I; Schmücker, H; Karr, K; Malon, D; Vaniachine, A; Tanenbaum, W; Xie, Z; Barrass, T; Cioffi, C; IT

    2005-01-01

    The pool of persistent objects for LHC (POOL) project, part of the large Hadron collider (LHC) computing grid (LCG), is now entering its third year of active development. POOL provides the baseline persistency framework for three LHC experiments. It is based on a strict component model, insulating experiment software from a variety of storage technologies. This paper gives a brief overview of the POOL architecture, its main design principles and the experience gained with integration into LHC experiment frameworks. It also presents recent developments in the POOL works areas of relational database abstraction and object storage into relational database management systems (RDBMS) systems.

  1. Potential for Differentiation of Pseudoprogression From True Tumor Progression With Dynamic Susceptibility-Weighted Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Ferumoxytol vs. Gadoteridol: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We evaluated dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) using gadoteridol in comparison to the iron oxide nanoparticle blood pool agent, ferumoxytol, in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who received standard radiochemotherapy (RCT). Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with GBM received standard RCT and underwent 19 MRI sessions that included DSC-MRI acquisitions with gadoteridol on Day 1 and ferumoxytol on Day 2. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were calculated from DSC data obtained from each contrast agent. T1-weighted acquisition post-gadoteridol administration was used to identify enhancing regions. Results: In seven MRI sessions of clinically presumptive active tumor, gadoteridol-DSC showed low rCBV in three and high rCBV in four, whereas ferumoxytol-DSC showed high rCBV in all seven sessions (p = 0.002). After RCT, seven MRI sessions showed increased gadoteridol contrast enhancement on T1-weighted scans coupled with low rCBV without significant differences between contrast agents (p = 0.9). Based on post-gadoteridol T1-weighted scans, DSC-MRI, and clinical presentation, four patterns of response to RCT were observed: regression, pseudoprogression, true progression, and mixed response. Conclusion: We conclude that DSC-MRI with a blood pool agent such as ferumoxytol may provide a better monitor of tumor rCBV than DSC-MRI with gadoteridol. Lesions demonstrating increased enhancement on T1-weighted MRI coupled with low ferumoxytol rCBV are likely exhibiting pseudoprogression, whereas high rCBV with ferumoxytol is a better marker than gadoteridol for determining active tumor. These interesting pilot observations suggest that ferumoxytol may differentiate tumor progression from pseudoprogression and warrant further investigation.

  2. Radiocalcium Measurement of Bone Turnover in Disorders of Calcium Metabolism Using a Model Based on an Expanding Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine bone mineralization rate the patient eats a constant daily diet for the duration of the study. 10 μCi of 47CaCl2 are injected intravenously on day one of the investigation. Blood samples are taken at 5, 10, 20, 40 and 90 minutes, 3, 5, 9 and 22 hours and 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 days. 47Ca radioactivity is measured in all the plasma and daily faecal and urine samples. Bone mineralization is determined using a model based on the concept that the exchangeable calcium pool is continuously expanding according to a power function and that activity is lost from the pool into faeces, urine and bone (by mineralization) in direct proportion to the specific activity of the plasma (S*). The power function can be determined graphically from a log/log plot of the S* data over the first 15 hours. Extrapolation of this line to day 7 permits calculation of the pool size at that time (reciprocal of the calculated Sp*7) and the product of the calculated pool and actual S7* yields the amount of activity in the pool at day 7. This is deducted from the activity retained at day 7 to give the activity attributable to bone mineralization which is then divided by the integrated S* over the 7 days to yield the bone mineralization rate. Usually the whole calculation is performed by curve fitting the data points with the aid of a computer. In contrast to previously published methods for the determination of the bone mineralization rates the results presented are independent of the portion of the S* curve that is analysed and thus bone mineralization can be determined in 7 days, previous methods requiring 14 days or more. The normal mineralization rate is 4-6 mg Ca/kg per day. High values of bone mineralization are found in groups of patients with Paget' s disease, osteomalacia, hyperthyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy. Low values for bone mineralization have been found in some patients with crush fracture osteoporosis and in hypoparathyroidism. Changes in bone

  3. Leidenfrost drops on a heated liquid pool

    CERN Document Server

    Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Brandenbourger, Martin; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We show that a volatile liquid drop placed at the surface of a non-volatile liquid pool warmer than the boiling point of the drop can experience a Leidenfrost effect even for vanishingly small superheats. Such an observation points to the importance of the substrate roughness, negligible in the case considered here, in determining the threshold Leidenfrost temperature. A theoretical model based on the one proposed by Sobac et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053011 (2014)] is developed in order to rationalize the experimental data. The shapes of the drop and of the substrate are analyzed. The model notably provides scalings for the vapor film thickness. For small drops, these scalings appear to be identical to the case of a Leidenfrost drop on a solid substrate. For large drops, in contrast, they are different and no evidence of chimney formation has been observed either experimentally or theoretically in the range of drop sizes considered in this study. Concerning the evaporation dynamics, the radius is shown to decrea...

  4. Application of Drag-Reducing Polymer Solutions as Test Fluids for In Vitro Evaluation of Potential Blood Damage in Blood Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Amanda R.; Sobajima, Hideo; Olia, Salim E.; Takatani, Setsuo; Kameneva, Marina V.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of the potential of a circulatory-assist device to damage blood cells has generally been performed using blood from various species. Problems with this approach include the variability of blood sensitivity to mechanical stress in different species, preparation of blood including the adjustment of hematocrit to a standard value, changes in the mechanical properties of blood that occur during storage, and necessity to pool blood samples to obtain an adequate amount of blood ...

  5. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Types KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Types Print A A ... or straight hair instead of curly. ...Make Eight Blood Types The different markers that can be found in ...

  6. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confidence to respond in emergency situations with the skills that can help to save a life. Learn more » Red Cross Information Donating Blood Learn About Blood Hosting a Blood Drive For Hospitals Engage with Us About Us Media ...

  7. Intraperitoneal Injection of Multiplacentas Pooled Cells Treatment on a Mouse Model with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Chen, Hong; Lv, Yan-Bo; Wang, Qiang; Xie, Zheng-Jun; Ma, Li-Hua; He, Jie; Xue, Wei; Yu, Shan; Guo, Jun; Wang, Ting-Hua; Wu, Tian-Xi; Pan, Xing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Coinfusion of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells is more effective than hematopoietic stem cell transplantation alone. It is necessary to explore a safe and routine mixed stem cell intraperitoneal transplantation method. Multiplacentas pooled cells were intraperitoneally injected into a radiation- and immunity-induced mouse aplastic anemia model with single time. Then, mouse survival time, peripheral blood hemoglobin count, bone marrow architecture, and donor cell engraftment were assessed. The recipient mouse exhibited donor cell engraftment in both bone marrow and peripheral blood. Survival time and peripheral blood hemoglobin count increased in placenta pooled cells treated mice, compared with model-only controls (P = 0.048 and P = 0.000, resp.). However, placentas pooled cells failed to cause a significant decrease in bone marrow pimelosis area (P = 0.357). Intraperitoneally transplanted multiplacentas pooled cells can survive and engraft into a host body through blood circulation, which can increase the life span of an aplastic anemia model mice, and delay but not abrogate the development of aplastic anemia. Furthermore, they appear to play a role in increasing peripheral blood hemoglobin level response for increasing the life span of aplastic anemia model mice. PMID:26997957

  8. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelrich J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan Estelrich,1,2 María Jesús Sánchez-Martín,1 Maria Antònia Busquets1,2 1Departament de Fisicoquímica, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Nanociència I Nanotecnologia (IN2UB, Barcelona, Catalonia, SpainAbstract: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions, providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of

  9. [Contrast sensitivity in glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, D

    1989-05-01

    Author reports on results of the contrast sensitivity examinations using the Cambridge low-contrast lattice test supplied by Clement Clarke International LTD, in patients with open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. In glaucoma patients there was observed statistically significant decrease of the contrast sensitivity. In patients with ocular hypertension decrease of the contrast sensitivity was in patients affected by corresponding changes of the visual field and of the optical disc. The main advantages of the Cambridge low-contrast lattice test were simplicity, rapidity and precision of its performance. PMID:2743444

  10. Immunoelectrophoresis - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    IEP - serum; Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - blood; Gamma globulin electrophoresis; Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis ... A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

  11. Livermore pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) has served a dual purpose since 1958--as an instrument for fundamental research and as a tool for measurement and calibration. Our early efforts centered on neutron-diffraction, fission, and capture gamma-ray studies. During the 1960's it was used for extensive calibration work associated with radiochemical and physical measurements on nuclear-explosive tests. Since 1970 the principal applications have been for trace-element measurements and radiation-damage studies. Today's research program is dominated by radiochemical studies of the shorter-lived fission products and by research on the mechanisms of radiation damage. Trace-element measurement for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is the major measurement application today

  12. A simplified analytical model for pool swell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapour suppression pool is being used in the containment of PHWR's to limit the pressure and temperature build-up in the containment following a LOCA. The discharge of high pressure water due to LOCA flashes into steam in the drywell, causes a rapid pressure build-up and forces an air-steam mixture into the suppression pool via the vent system. The containment and the pool internal structures need to withstand the hydrodynamic loading due to jet impingement and general motion of the pool water during the water clearing phase from the vents, the loads associated with pool swell in the subsequent air-clearing phase and those due to chugging - the oscillatory condensation of steam - apart from the general thermodynamic loading due to the mass and energy releases from the LOCA. This paper presents a simplified analytical model for pool swell assuming that the bubble is spherical in shape and it migrates vertically. (orig./HP)

  13. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic...... measures used to reduce the incidence of CIN, and the management of patients receiving metformin. Key Points • Definition, risk factors and prevention of contrast medium induced nephropathy are reviewed. • CIN risk is lower with intravenous than intra-arterial iodinated contrast medium. • eGFR of 45 ml....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  14. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic...... measures used to reduce the incidence of CIN, and the management of patients receiving metformin. Key Points • Definition, risk factors and prevention of contrast medium induced nephropathy are reviewed. • CIN risk is lower with intravenous than intra-arterial iodinated contrast medium. • eGFR of 45 ml....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  15. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammack, R. W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States). Geosciences Div.

    2006-12-28

    Decades of underground coal mining has left about 5,000 square miles of abandoned mine workings that are rapidly filling with water. The water quality of mine pools is often poor; environmental regulatory agencies are concerned because water from mine pools could contaminate diminishing surface and groundwater supplies. Mine pools are also a threat to the safety of current mining operations. Conversely, mine pools are a large, untapped water resource that, with treatment, could be used for a variety of industrial purposes. Others have proposed using mine pools in conjunction with heat pumps as a source of heating and cooling for large industrial facilities. The management or use of mine pool water requires accurate maps of mine pools. West Virginia University has predicted the likely location and volume of mine pools in the Pittsburgh Coalbed using existing mine maps, structure contour maps, and measured mine pool elevations. Unfortunately, mine maps only reflect conditions at the time of mining, are not available for all mines, and do not always denote the maximum extent of mining. Since 1999, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been evaluating helicopter-borne, electromagnetic sensing technologies for the detection and mapping of mine pools. Frequency domain electromagnetic sensors are able to detect shallow mine pools (depth < 50 m) if there is sufficient contrast between the conductance of the mine pool and the conductance of the overburden. The mine pools (conductors) most confidently detected by this technology are overlain by thick, resistive sandstone layers. In 2003, a helicopter time domain electromagnetic sensor was applied to mined areas in southwestern Virginia in an attempt to increase the depth of mine pool detection. This study failed because the mine pool targets were thin and not very conductive. Also, large areas of the surveys were degraded or made unusable by excessive amounts of cultural electromagnetic noise that obscured the

  16. Employee reactions to talent pool membership

    OpenAIRE

    Swailes, Stephen; Blackburn, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite a large literature on talent management there is very little research on the comparative attitudes of employees in talent pools with those not in talent pools. This is an important omission as employee reactions should influence how effective talent programmes are and how they can be designed and evaluated. Consequently, this paper explores the work-related attitudes of employees who are members and non-members of talent pools. Design: Matched samples of employees worki...

  17. Multi-bank loan pool contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Gintschel, Andreas; Hackethal, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We show that multi-bank loan pools improve the risk-return profile of banks? loan business. Banks write simple contracts on the proceeds from pooled loan portfolios, taking into account the free-rider problems in joint loan production. Thus, banks benefit greatly from diversifying credit risk while limiting the efficiency loss due to adverse incentives. We present calibration results that the formation of loan pools reduce the volatility in default rates, proxying for credit risk, of particip...

  18. Current operating practices of nuclear insurance pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the nuclear pooling system and co-operation between the pools, present practice and capacity, with a breakdown of the limits for third party liability and material damage. The author also describes the relationship between the pools and the nuclear operators (the policyholders), and concludes that the nuclear pools have been successful in serving the interests of their member companies, their policyholders and the governments as they have provided a stable insurance market by making available capacity in amounts that had never before been assembled and placed at risk in a single location. 2 tabs

  19. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  20. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. PMID:26778104

  1. A blood circulation model for reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Williams, L.R. [Indiana Univ., South Bend, IN (United States). Div. of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic blood circulation model that predicts the movement and gradual dispersal of a bolus of material in the circulation after its intravascular injection into an adult human. The main purpose of the model is to improve the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides that decay in the circulation to a significant extent. The total blood volume is partitioned into the blood contents of 24 separate organs or tissues, right heart chambers, left heart chambers, pulmonary circulation, arterial outflow to the systemic tissues (aorta and large arteries), and venous return from the systemic tissues (large veins). As a compromise between physical reality and computational simplicity, the circulation of blood is viewed as a system of first-order transfers between blood pools, with the delay time depending on the mean transit time across the pool. The model allows consideration of incomplete, tissue-dependent extraction of material during passage through the circulation and return of material from tissues to plasma.

  2. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  3. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Filipe

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-R...

  4. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase funct...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  5. Sufficient blood, safe blood: can we have both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bönig Halvard

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The decision in September 2011 in the UK to accept blood donations from non-practicing men who have sex with men (MSM has received significant public attention. Will this rule change substantially boost the number of blood donations or will it make our blood less safe? Clearly, most European countries have a blood procurement problem. Fewer young people are donating, while the population is aging and more invasive therapies are requiring more blood. Yet if that was the reason for allowing non-practicing MSM to donate, clearly re-admission of some other, much larger populations that are currently deferred from donation should likewise be considered. As far as risks for blood safety are concerned, evidence has been provided that the current quality of infectious disease marker testing significantly mitigates against, although does not completely eradicate, risks associated with admission of donors with a high risk of carrying certain blood-transmissible agents. However, it could be argued that more effective recruitment of the non-donor pool, which is substantially larger than the group of currently ineligible donors, would be a better strategy. Recruitment of this group will benefit the availability of blood without jeopardizing the current excellent safety profile of blood.

  6. Sulfur cycling in two Dutch moorland pools.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marnette, E.C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Due to atmospheric acid deposition, the chemistry of many moorland pools has changed, resulting in changes in their fauna and flora. Most moorland pools are sensitive to acid loading because underlying and surrounding soils are low in chemical buffering capacity. Biological processes in the sediment

  7. Free-Form Region Description with Second-Order Pooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, João; Caseiro, Rui; Batista, Jorge; Sminchisescu, Cristian

    2015-06-01

    Semantic segmentation and object detection are nowadays dominated by methods operating on regions obtained as a result of a bottom-up grouping process (segmentation) but use feature extractors developed for recognition on fixed-form (e.g. rectangular) patches, with full images as a special case. This is most likely suboptimal. In this paper we focus on feature extraction and description over free-form regions and study the relationship with their fixed-form counterparts. Our main contributions are novel pooling techniques that capture the second-order statistics of local descriptors inside such free-form regions. We introduce second-order generalizations of average and max-pooling that together with appropriate non-linearities, derived from the mathematical structure of their embedding space, lead to state-of-the-art recognition performance in semantic segmentation experiments without any type of local feature coding. In contrast, we show that codebook-based local feature coding is more important when feature extraction is constrained to operate over regions that include both foreground and large portions of the background, as typical in image classification settings, whereas for high-accuracy localization setups, second-order pooling over free-form regions produces results superior to those of the winning systems in the contemporary semantic segmentation challenges, with models that are much faster in both training and testing. PMID:26357341

  8. Ripples in a superconducting tidal pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of electrons in a metal is often compared to that of water in a pool. An empty pool is like a material that has all of its electrons removed. As electrons are 'poured' into the metal, they first occupy the lowest energies available - the bottom of the pool - and eventually fill up to the Fermi energy, the top of the pool. At this point we no longer discuss electrons but quasiparticles. These are electrons that have modified properties due to their interactions within the material. Waves in a pool can be excited, and their properties will depend on the depth of the water. Similarly in a metal, quasiparticles behave like waves that have a material-dependent dispersion relation between their energy and their wavevector, which specifies their direction and wavelength. This simple analogy also hints at an indirect method of measuring the dispersion relation of a metal, and hence the myriad of properties that depend on it. (U.K.)

  9. Report on fuel pool water loss tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalenski, R.F. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    To resolve potential concerns on the integrity of the fuel storage pool at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a highly accurate testing technique was developed to quantify water losses from the pool. The fuel pool is an unlined, single wall, reinforced concrete structure containing approximately 818,000 gallons of water. Since an initial test indicated that water losses could possibly be attributed solely to evaporation, a cover was suspended and sealed over the pool to block evaporation losses. High accuracy water level and temperature instrumentation was procured and installed. The conclusions of this report indicate that unaccounted-for water losses from the pool are insignificant and there is no detectable leakage within the range of test accuracy.

  10. Toward Critical Contrastive Rhetoric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Ryuko; Lehner, Al

    2004-01-01

    A traditional approach to contrastive rhetoric has emphasized cultural difference in rhetorical patterns among various languages. Despite its laudable pedagogical intentions to raise teachers' and students' cultural and rhetorical awareness in second language writing, traditional contrastive rhetoric has perpetuated static binaries between English…

  11. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  12. Motivating Factors and Potential Deterrents to Blood Donation in High School Aged Blood Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Finck; Alyssa Ziman; Matthew Hoffman; Michelle Phan-Tang; Shan Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background. To ensure an adequate supply of blood, collection centers must design campaigns that successfully recruit and maintain an active donor pool. Understanding factors that motivate and deter individuals from donating may help centers develop targeted recruitment campaigns. These factors among high school aged blood donors have not yet been fully investigated. Study Design and Methods. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to student donors at high school mobile blood drives. ...

  13. Pool scrubbing models for iodine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K. [Battelle Ingenieurtechnik GmbH, Eschborn (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    Pool scrubbing is an important mechanism to retain radioactive fission products from being carried into the containment atmosphere or into the secondary piping system. A number of models and computer codes has been developed to predict the retention of aerosols and fission product vapours that are released from the core and injected into water pools of BWR and PWR type reactors during severe accidents. Important codes in this field are BUSCA, SPARC and SUPRA. The present paper summarizes the models for scrubbing of gaseous Iodine components in these codes, discusses the experimental validation, and gives an assessment of the state of knowledge reached and the open questions which persist. The retention of gaseous Iodine components is modelled by the various codes in a very heterogeneous manner. Differences show up in the chemical species considered, the treatment of mass transfer boundary layers on the gaseous and liquid sides, the gas-liquid interface geometry, calculation of equilibrium concentrations and numerical procedures. Especially important is the determination of the pool water pH value. This value is affected by basic aerosols deposited in the water, e.g. Cesium and Rubidium compounds. A consistent model requires a mass balance of these compounds in the pool, thus effectively coupling the pool scrubbing phenomena of aerosols and gaseous Iodine species. Since the water pool conditions are also affected by drainage flow of condensate water from different regions in the containment, and desorption of dissolved gases on the pool surface is determined by the gas concentrations above the pool, some basic limitations of specialized pool scrubbing codes are given. The paper draws conclusions about the necessity of coupling between containment thermal-hydraulics and pool scrubbing models, and proposes ways of further simulation model development in order to improve source term predictions. (author) 2 tabs., refs.

  14. Pool scrubbing models for iodine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool scrubbing is an important mechanism to retain radioactive fission products from being carried into the containment atmosphere or into the secondary piping system. A number of models and computer codes has been developed to predict the retention of aerosols and fission product vapours that are released from the core and injected into water pools of BWR and PWR type reactors during severe accidents. Important codes in this field are BUSCA, SPARC and SUPRA. The present paper summarizes the models for scrubbing of gaseous Iodine components in these codes, discusses the experimental validation, and gives an assessment of the state of knowledge reached and the open questions which persist. The retention of gaseous Iodine components is modelled by the various codes in a very heterogeneous manner. Differences show up in the chemical species considered, the treatment of mass transfer boundary layers on the gaseous and liquid sides, the gas-liquid interface geometry, calculation of equilibrium concentrations and numerical procedures. Especially important is the determination of the pool water pH value. This value is affected by basic aerosols deposited in the water, e.g. Cesium and Rubidium compounds. A consistent model requires a mass balance of these compounds in the pool, thus effectively coupling the pool scrubbing phenomena of aerosols and gaseous Iodine species. Since the water pool conditions are also affected by drainage flow of condensate water from different regions in the containment, and desorption of dissolved gases on the pool surface is determined by the gas concentrations above the pool, some basic limitations of specialized pool scrubbing codes are given. The paper draws conclusions about the necessity of coupling between containment thermal-hydraulics and pool scrubbing models, and proposes ways of further simulation model development in order to improve source term predictions. (author) 2 tabs., refs

  15. Histamine release and endothelial leakage from an intravascular contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raininko, R.

    1981-04-01

    The endothelial injury produced by meglumine iodamide was studied in the rat aorta. A mixture of blood and contrast medium was more toxic to the endothelium than the pure contrast agent. This difference disappeared after premedication with antihistamine, which did not affect the injury produced by the pure contrast agent. Meglumine iodamide appears to cause a release of histamine from blood but not from the aortic endothelium nor from surrounding tissues in amounts demonstrable by this method. Leucocytes are a source of histamine after intravascular contrast medium administration.

  16. Coagulation, red cell aggregation, and the nonionic contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in the interactions between iodinated contrast agents and blood has been renewed recently following reports by Robertson in the United States of clots forming in blood-contaminated nonionic contrast agents in syringes, and by Raininko and Ylinen in Sweden of disordered red cell aggregation seemingly stimulated by nonionic contrast agents. These phenomena have been described and explained, and their significance for clinical angiography have been discussed. It has been suggested by a number of commentators that some contrast agents may be actively prothrombotic

  17. Operation and maintenance techniques of pool and pool water purification system in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IMEF pool is used pass way between pool and hot cell in order to inlet and outlet of fuel pin in cask. All operation is performed conforming with naked eyes. Therefore floating matter is filtered so as to easy under water handling. Also radioactivity in pool water is controlled according to the nuclear law, radioactivity ration maintained less than 15mR/hr on pool side. Perfect operation and maintenance can be achieved well trained operator. Result obtained from the perfection can give more influence over restrain, spreading contamination of radioactivity materials. This report describes operation and maintenance technique of pool water purification system in IMEF. (Author). 7 refs., 13 figs

  18. Dynamic contrast enhancement of paragangliomas of the head and neck: evaluation with time-resolved 2D MR projection angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to evaluate tumor hemodynamics of paragangliomas of the head and neck. A 2D magnetic resonance projection angiography (MRPA) protocol was developed. Six patients with histologically proven paragangliomas were included in the study. The sequence protocol and data post-processing procedure were optimized in view of a high temporal resolution and maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. Image-time series of two freely orientated slabs could be obtained. Correlation analysis was performed to generate selective arterial and venous weighted angiographic images. Glomus tumors showed a rapid and intense homogeneous enhancement following the intravenous administration of contrast material. The smallest tumors investigated measured 10 mm and could be visualized clearly. Time-resolved analysis of the tumor enhancement revealed an early bolus arrival within the vascular bed of the tumor and prolonged incomplete washout indicating blood pooling. The dynamic contrast enhancement of glomus tumors can be evaluated non-invasively with MRPA providing a high temporal resolution and high image quality. The characteristic contrast enhancement of glomus tumors can be helpful in the diagnostic workup of lesions that may mimic glomus tumors. (orig.)

  19. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the......Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...

  20. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  1. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osmotic fragility ) Deficiency of an enzyme called lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase Abnormalities of hemoglobin , the protein in ... sickle and Pappenheimer Red blood cells, target cells Formed elements of blood References Bain BJ. The peripheral ...

  2. Experimental investigation of passive pool mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the initial blow-down phase of a hypothetical design basis accident or severe accident in the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), heat is added to the suppression pool by gas-vapor flow through the isolation condenser (IC) and passive containment cooler (PCC) vent lines. The exit of the vent lines is fairly shallow (on the order of 0.75 meters) in order to enhance IC/PCC operation. The surface temperature of a pool increases when heat is injected. The magnitude of increase depends on the amount of the pool involved in heat absorption and thermal gradients in the absorbing region. Thermal stratification occurs because a rising plume carries the energy of the vented gas-vapor to the pool surface and, as a result, only the region of the pool above the injection point is involved in heat absorption. This experimental investigation demonstrated the feasibility of using the IC/PCC vent flow to drive pool mixing. A passive mixer was designed and constructed on the basis of buoyancy and momentum utilization. The mixer was sized to represent one in a system of several mixers which could be implemented in the SBWR. The experimental results show that the potential exists to involve a significant amount of the suppression pool in heat absorption using a passive mixer

  3. SAFETY AND MANAGEMENT OF SWIMING POOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal GÜNDOĞDU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study,it was investigated the situation related to the safety and management of swimming pools belongs to municipality This study was planned to determine the present situation related to the safety and management of open,half-olympic and closed swimming pools which are especially used for sports activities,to find out the deficiencies in practise and to overcome these.Our study included totally 80 open,closed,olympic, half-olympic public swimming pools(the pools that belongs to municipality,private administration and university,the colleges connected to the ministry of education, Military schools and police college.In our research,search,natural observation and meeting methods were used.In accordance with this aim the checklist questions,which were prepared for health and safety controls in swimming pools, were tested on the people by face-to-face meeting method. While the statistical evaluation of the available results were being done,frequency and percentage dispersion obtained from checklist was found.It was found that the 52 % of the training and lifeguard choise of the pools in Turkey,64 % of the emergency action equipment,71 % of the signs and signboards for the safety of the pool,75 % of the pool edge and its surroundings are not suitable for the standards and that these threaten the swimmers health importantly.Consequently,we are in the opinion that the pool staff should receive the periodical training about the first aid and using emergency situation equipment.And it is necessary that the Ministry Responsible for sports,Ministry of Interior,Ministry of Health,Ministry of Tourism be cooperate with water sports federations and the related civil society organizationsKey Words: .

  4. Does volumetric absorptive microsampling eliminate the hematocrit bias for caffeine and paraxanthine in dried blood samples? A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2015-06-30

    Volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS) is a novel sampling technique that allows the straightforward collection of an accurate volume of blood (approximately 10μL) from a drop or pool of blood by dipping an absorbent polymeric tip into it. The resulting blood microsample is dried and analyzed as a whole. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of VAMS to overcome the hematocrit bias, an important issue in the analysis of dried blood microsamples. An LC-MS/MS method for analysis of the model compounds caffeine and paraxanthine in VAMS samples was fully validated and fulfilled all pre-established criteria. In conjunction with previously validated procedures for dried blood spots (DBS) and blood, this allowed us to set up a meticulous comparative study in which both compounds were determined in over 80 corresponding VAMS, DBS and liquid whole blood samples. These originated from authentic human patient samples, covering a wide hematocrit range (0.21-0.50). By calculating the differences with reference whole blood concentrations, we found that analyte concentrations in VAMS samples were not affected by a bias that changed over the evaluated hematocrit range, in contrast to DBS results. However, VAMS concentrations tend to overestimate whole blood concentrations, as a consistent positive bias was observed. A different behavior of VAMS samples prepared from incurred and spiked blood, combined with a somewhat reduced recovery of caffeine and paraxanthine from VAMS tips at high hematocrit values, an effect that was not observed for DBS using a very similar extraction procedure, was found to be at the basis of the observed VAMS-whole blood deviations. Based on this study, being the first in which the validity and robustness of VAMS is evaluated by analyzing incurred human samples, it can be concluded that VAMS effectively assists in eliminating the effect of hematocrit. PMID:26041521

  5. Airways disorders and the swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Concerns have been expressed about the possible detrimental effects of chlorine derivatives in indoor swimming pool environments. Indeed, a controversy has arisen regarding the possibility that chlorine commonly used worldwide as a disinfectant favors the development of asthma and allergic diseases. The effects of swimming in indoor chlorinated pools on the airways in recreational and elite swimmers are presented. Recent studies on the influence of swimming on airway inflammation and remodeling in competitive swimmers, and the phenotypic characteristics of asthma in this population are reviewed. Preventative measures that could potentially reduce the untoward effects of pool environment on airways of swimmers are discussed. PMID:23830132

  6. The Role of Nuclear Insurance Pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since fifty years insurers respond to the need of both governments and the electricity industry to provide financial protection to cover the perils presented by the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. This paper aims at explaining what difficulties had to be solved in order to enable insurers to provide such protection, that as a solution to these difficulties Nuclear Insurance Pools were formed, how such pools operate and what security they provide. Thereby not only a number of universal principles underlying nuclear pool insurance will be explained, but also some differences in the characteristics of such insurance per group of countries. (author)

  7. LCG POOL development status and production experience

    CERN Document Server

    Chytracek, Radovan; Cioffi, Carmine; Düllmann, Dirk; Frank, Markus; Girone, Maria; Govi, Giacomo; Karr, Kristo; Malon, David; Moscicki, Jakub T; Papadopoulos, Ioannis M; Schmücker, H; Tanenbaum, William; Vaniachine, A; Xie Zhen

    2004-01-01

    The POOL project, as a part of the LHC Computing Grid (LCG), is now entering its third year of active development POOL provides the baseline persistency framework for three LHC experiment and is based on a strict component model, insulating experiment software from a variety of storage technology choices. This paper gives a brief overview of the POOL architecture, its main design principles and the experience gained with integration into LHC experiment frameworks. In also presents recent developments in the area of relational database abstraction and object storage into RDBMS systems.

  8. Weld pool visual sensing without external illumination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao; Fan, Zhun; Olsen, Soren Ingvor;

    2011-01-01

    Visual sensing in arc welding has become more and more important, but still remains challenging because of the harsh environment with extremely strong illumination from the arc. This paper presents a low-cost camera-based sensor system, without using external Illumination, but nevertheless able to...... sense and model the weld pool. Central is a carefully selected optical filtering as well as an active contour-based tracking of the weld pool boundary. The system is able to extract the 2D shape of the weld pool in real time. The reported experiments show the feasibility of this approach....

  9. Laser surveillance systems for fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Laser Surveillance System (LASSY) as a new safeguards device has been developed under the IAEA research contract No. 3458/RB at the Atominstitut Wien using earlier results by S. Fiarman. This system is designed to act as a sheet of light covering spent fuel assemblies in spent fuel storage pools. When movement of assemblies takes place, LASSY detects and locates the position of the movement in the pool and when interrogated, presents a list of pool positions and times of movement to the safeguards inspector. A complete prototype system was developed and built. Full scale tests showed the principal working capabilities of a LASSY underwater

  10. Generalized Phase Contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, ...

  11. Mental contrasting and transfer of energization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevincer, A Timur; Busatta, P Daniel; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2014-02-01

    Mental contrasting a desired future with present reality is a self-regulation strategy that fosters energization in line with a person's expectations of successfully attaining the desired future. We investigated whether physiological energization (measured by systolic blood pressure) elicited by mental contrasting a desired future of solving a given task transfers to effort in an unrelated task. As predicted, mental contrasting a desired future of excelling in an intelligence test (Study 1) and of writing an excellent essay (Study 2) triggered changes in energization that translated into physical effort in squeezing a handgrip (Study 1) and translated into mental effort in writing a get-well letter (Study 2). Results suggest that mental contrasting of solving one task triggers energization that may fuel effort for performing an unrelated task. Implications for intervention research are discussed. PMID:24145296

  12. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, F. R. N. C.; MacDowell, A.; Marchesini, S.; Padmore, H. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; PIEN., J.; Schirotzek, A.; Yang, C

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard...

  13. Effects of paradoxical suppression on contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with contrast medium is increasingly being used in examination of the abdomen, pelvis, and lower limbs. However, angiography at opposed phase causes paradoxical suppression (PS) due to the higher fat content of these areas. We evaluated the effect of PS on the ability to visualize blood vessels. The items evaluated included the effect of contrast medium concentration and TE (echo time) on PS as well as a comparison of fat suppression with the subtraction technique by referring to a mock blood vessel and pictures obtained by subjecting volunteers to MRA with contrast medium. Shorter TE and higher concentrations of contrast medium both reduced PS. The ability to visualize blood vessels was reduced by the subtraction technique, as compared with fat suppression. In clinical studies, fat suppression is essential. Hence, when MRA with contrast medium is performed with an apparatus or at a site where fat suppression is not feasible, PS must be taken into account to establish parameters. (author)

  14. Analysis of Bitcoin Pooled Mining Reward Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenfeld, Meni

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe the various scoring systems used to calculate rewards of participants in Bitcoin pooled mining, explain the problems each were designed to solve and analyze their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Nuclear insurance pools: history and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nuclear installations to produce electricity led to the establishment of Nuclear Insurance Pools and the introduction of international Conventions on third party liability. Nuclear Pools are market-wide, providing a facility for participation by insurers who could not otherwise write the insurance for this particularly sensitive risk. All acceptances are for the net retention of each member without recourse to individual reinsurance protection. Common account reinsurance is arranged with other Nuclear Pools all over the world. Thus, a transparency is created, which ensures the highest degree of reinsurance security and imposes a known finite limit to each participating insurer's commitment. Therefore Pool-members are prepared to make a greater commitment to nuclear risks than would be the case where they felt uncertain as regards their total exposure following a significant loss

  16. Tehas teisel pool Kuud / Gert Kiiler

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiiler, Gert

    2009-01-01

    Tartu Ülikooli Viljandi kultuuriakadeemia teatrikunsti tudengite seitsmendast lennust kõneleva saate "Tehas teisel pool Kuud" tegemisest. Saade Eesti Televisioonis 3. juunil. Produtsent Kadi Katarina Priske, režissöör Elo Selirand

  17. Nuclear Insurance Pools: Worldwide Practice and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nuclear installations to produce electricity led to the establishment of Nuclear Insurance Pools and the introduction of international Conventions on Third Party Liability. Nuclear Pools offer both Third Party Liability insurance, reflecting the Conventions' principles, and other insurance products. They are market-wide, providing a facility for participation by insurers who could not otherwise write the insurance for the particularly sensitive nuclear risk. All acceptances are for the net retention of each Member without recourse to individual reinsurance protection. Common account reinsurance is arranged with other Nuclear Pools all over the world. Thus, a transparency is created, which ensures the highest degree of reinsurance security and imposes a known finite limit to each participating insurer's commitment. Therefore, Pool-members are prepared to make a greater commitment to nuclear risks than would be case where they felt uncertain as regards their total exposure following a significant loss. (author)

  18. The Nuclear Insurance Pools: Operations and Covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear insurance pools have provided insurance for the nuclear industry for over fifty years and it is fair to say that the development of civil nuclear power would not have been possible without the support of the commercial insurance market. The unknown risks presented by the nascent nuclear power industry in the 1950s required a leap of faith by insurers who developed specialist pooled insurance capacity to ensure adequate capacity to back up the operators' compensation obligations. Since then, nuclear insurance pools have evolved to become comprehensive suppliers of most types of insurance for nuclear plant globally. This paper will outline the structure, development, products and current operations of nuclear insurance pools.(author)

  19. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    overview of the strategies which can be used to achieve microbiological safe water with low levels of DBPs to ensure healthy environment for bathers. There are different approaches to achieve healthy environment in public swimming pools which in this thesis are divided into three strategies: alternatives...... to chlorination, removal of precursors and DBPs, and inhibition of the DBP formation. None of the alternative disinfection agents which are used for private swimming pools are applicable for public swimming pools. Thus chlorine is the most likely future disinfectant in public swimming pools. The...... compound which is less reactive towards chlorine. Ozone is also able to remove combined chlorine and other DBPs but the reaction is slow. Activated carbon is able to adsorb precursors and DBPs except chloramines which are removed by catalytic reaction. Formation of DBPs is unavoidable. However, the...

  20. Performance Study of Swimming Pool Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a controlled laboratory study on the efficiency and emissions of swimming pool heaters based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected variations in operational parameters. Swimming pool heater sales trends have indicated a significant decline in the number of conventional natural gas-fired swimming pool heaters (NGPH). On Long Island the decline has been quite sharp, on the order of 50%, in new installations since 2001. The major portion of the decline has been offset by a significant increase in the sales of electric powered heat pump pool heaters (HPPH) that have been gaining market favor. National Grid contracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to measure performance factors in order to compare the relative energy, environmental and economic consequences of using one technology versus the other. A field study was deemed inappropriate because of the wide range of differences in actual load variations (pool size), geographic orientations, ground plantings and shading variations, number of hours of use, seasonal use variations, occupancy patterns, hour of the day use patterns, temperature selection, etc. A decision was made to perform a controlled laboratory study based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected operational variations in parameters. Critical to this are the frequency of use, temperature selection, and sizing of the heater to the associated pool heating loads. This would be accomplished by installing a limited amount of relatively simple compact field data acquisition units on selected pool installations. This data included gas usage when available and alternately heater power or gas consumption rates were inferred from the manufacturer's specifications when direct metering was not available in the field. Figure 1 illustrates a typical pool heater installation layout.

  1. The declining talent pool of government

    OpenAIRE

    Dewan, Torun; Myatt, David

    2008-01-01

    We consider a government for which success requires high performance by talented ministers. A leader provides incentives to her ministers by firing those who fail. However, the consequent turnover drains a finite talent pool of potential appointees. The severity of the optimal firing rule and ministerial performances decline over time: the lifetime of an effective government is limited. We relate this lifetime to various factors, including external shocks, the replenishment of the talent pool...

  2. Note on pool swell dynamics during depressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relationship between (1) formalism and kinematic wave analysis for the swelling of a saturated liquid pool during continuous pressure release, and (2) the extensive kinematic wave analysis of transient volumetric pool boiling is described. When the primary contribution to vapor generation, the liquid enthalpy, is the only contribution considered, and when the pressure release rate is essentially uniform, approximate results for depressurization are found to be obtained directly from existing volumetric boiling presentations. (Auth.)

  3. The challenge of common-pool resources

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrom, Elinor

    2008-01-01

    Metadata only record As population increases, there is an increased pressure on our environment and ecosystems to provide livable situations and ample resources. Though there have been substantial net gains in economic development and human well-being, this comes at a price to our environment and common-pool resources such as forests and fisheries. Because of the lack of property rights and open-accessibility of common-pool resources, they are frequently over-harvested and mismanaged. This...

  4. Profit pools: a fresh look at strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiesh, O; Gilbert, J L

    1998-01-01

    In charting strategy, many managers focus on revenue growth, assuming that profits will follow. But that approach is dangerous: today's deep revenue pool may become tomorrow's dry hole. To create strategies that result in profitable growth, managers need to look beyond revenues to see the shape of their industry's profit pool. The authors define an industry's profit pool as the total profits earned at all points along the industry's value chain. Although the concept is simple, the structure of a profit pool is usually quite complex. The pool will be deeper in some segments of the value chain than in others, and depths will vary within an individual segment as well. Segment profitability may, for example, vary widely by customer group, product category, geographic market, and distribution channel. Moreover, the pattern of profit concentration in an industry will often be very different from the pattern of revenue concentration. The authors describe how successful companies have gained competitive advantage by developing sophisticated profit-pool strategies. They explain how U-Haul identified new sources of profit in the consumer-truck-rental industry; how Merck reached beyond its traditional value-chain role to protect its profits in the pharmaceuticals industry; how Dell rebounded from a misguided channel decision by refocusing on its traditional source of profit; and how Anheuser-Busch made a series of astute product, pricing, and operating decisions to dominate the beer industry's profit pool. The companies with the best understanding of their industry's profit pool, the authors argue, will be in the best position to thrive over the long term. PMID:10179649

  5. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  6. Pooling strategies for St Petersburg gamblers

    OpenAIRE

    Csörgö, Sandor; Simons, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Peter offers to play exactly one St Petersburg game with each of [math] players, Paul [math] , [math] , Paul [math] , whose conceivable pooling strategies are described by all possible probability distributions [math] . Comparing infinite expectations, we characterize among all [math] those admissible strategies for which the pooled winnings, each distributed as [math] , yield a finite added value for each and every one of Paul [math] , [math] , Paul [math] in comparison with their individual...

  7. TRR-1/M1 reactor pool refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pool refurbishment of the TRR-1/M1 is intended to maintain the pool and irradiation facilities in the operable condition prior to the next decade before making decision whether the reactor will be shutdown and decommissioning or used for other purposes. What ever reason the TRR-1/M1 will serve as a training tool for scientists or engineers, and isotopes production or other analytical works for a period of time until the new research reactor will be established. (orig.)

  8. How to map your industry's profit pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiesh, O; Gilbert, J L

    1998-01-01

    Many managers chart strategy without a full understanding of the sources and distribution of profits in their industry. Sometimes they focus their sights on revenues instead of profits, mistakenly assuming that revenue growth will eventually translate into profit growth. In other cases, they simply lack the data or the analytical tools required to isolate and measure variations in profitability. In this Manager's Tool Kit, the authors present a way to think clearly about where the money's being made in any industry. They describe a framework for analyzing how profits are distributed among the activities that form an industry's value chain. Such an analysis can provide a company's managers with a rich understanding of their industry's profit structure--what the authors call its profit pool--enabling them to identify which activities are generating disproportionately large or small shares of profits. Even more important, a profit-pool map opens a window onto the underlying structure of the industry, helping managers see the various forces that are determining the distribution of profits. As such, a profit-pool map provides a solid basis for strategic thinking. Mapping a profit pool involves four steps: defining the boundaries of the pool, estimating the pool's overall size, estimating the size of each value-chain activity in the pool, and checking and reconciling the calculations. The authors briefly describe each step and then apply the process by providing a detailed example of a hypothetical retail bank. They conclude by looking at ways of organizing the data in chart form as a first step toward plotting a profit-pool strategy. PMID:10179650

  9. X-ray computed tomography contrast agents prepared by seeded growth of gold nanoparticles in PEGylated dendrimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Chie [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research Center, Research Organization for the 21st Century, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Umeda, Yasuhito; Harada, Atsushi; Kono, Kenji [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Ogawa, Mikako; Magata, Yasuhiro, E-mail: c-kojima@21c.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-3192 (Japan)

    2010-06-18

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are a potential x-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agent. A biocompatible and bioinactive surface is necessary for application of gold nanoparticle to CT imaging. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-attached dendrimers have been used as a drug carrier with long blood circulation. In this study, the Au NPs were grown in the PEGylated dendrimer to produce a CT contrast agent. The Au NPs were grown by adding gold ions and ascorbic acid at various equivalents to the Au NP-encapsulated dendrimer solution. Both size and surface plasmon absorption of the grown Au NPs increased with adding a large number of gold ions. The x-ray attenuation of the Au NPs also increased after the seeded growth. The Au NPs grown in the PEG-attached dendrimer at the maximum under our conditions exhibited a similar CT value to a commercial iodine agent, iopamidol, in vitro. The Au NP-loaded PEGylated dendrimer and iopamidol were injected into mice and CT images were obtained at different times. The Au NP-loaded PEGylated dendrimer achieved a blood pool imaging, which was greater than a commercial iodine agent. Even though iopamidol was excreted rapidly, the PEGylated dendrimer loading the grown Au NP was accumulated in the liver.

  10. Thrombotic actions of nonionic intravascular contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies show that nonionic contrast media (NICM) produce markedly lower or no anticoagulant effects and, on extended contact, can produce procoagulant actions in native blood. Patients with hemostatic imbalance (such as a decrease of antithrombin III, protein C, thrombocytosis, hyperfibrinogenemia, rheologic disorders, hemoconcentration, and dehydration) are at high thrombotic risk during angiography. Exogenous compensation of the hemostatic deficit minimizes the thrombogenic actions of NICMs. Anticoagulants such as hirudin and low-molecular-weight heparin can antagonize the procoagulant actions of NICM. In a primate model (Macaca mulatta), thrombogenic properties of nonionic contrast media have been successfully antagonized with anticoagulant drugs

  11. Aging management of nuclear fuel pool structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term operations of a nuclear power plant (NPP) are currently impacted by the utility's capabilities with respect to spent fuel storage. Available options for the safe, long-term storage of spent fuel are quite limited; as such, maximized usage of existing on-site storage capacity (NPP) is quite important. The service life of existing fuel pool structures may be determined by a number of operations or age-related events. Management of these events is often critical to the structure's integrity and durability. From an operations vantage point, aging management relates to such characteristics as storage capacity, performance of pool water treatment systems, and physical liner damage. Primary issues related to structural integrity include materials degradation and environmental enclosure factors. The development of an effective aging management program should address both operational and structural issues. The goal of this paper is to provide recommendations for pool structure aging management, with benefits to both short and long-term, or extended life, operations. Because of their critical nature, the report will focus on spent fuel pools. Many of the concepts generated in this report may also be applied to other NPP pool structures (i.e., new fuel pools, reactor internals pits and transfer canals) because of similar physical/environmental effects

  12. Characterisation of the Permafrost Carbon Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhry, P.; Grosse, G.; Harden, J.W.; Hugelius, G.; Koven, C.D.; Ping, C.-L.; Schirrmeister, L.; Tarnocai, C.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimate of the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in the northern permafrost region of 1672 Petagrams (Pg) C is much larger than previously reported and needs to be incorporated in global soil carbon (C) inventories. The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD), extended to include the range 0–300 cm, is now available online for wider use by the scientific community. An important future aim is to provide quantitative uncertainty ranges for C pool estimates. Recent studies have greatly improved understanding of the regional patterns, landscape distribution and vertical (soil horizon) partitioning of the permafrost C pool in the upper 3 m of soils. However, the deeper C pools in unconsolidated Quaternary deposits need to be better constrained. A general lability classification of the permafrost C pool should be developed to address potential C release upon thaw. The permafrost C pool and its dynamics are beginning to be incorporated into Earth System models, although key periglacial processes such as thermokarst still need to be properly represented to obtain a better quantification of the full permafrost C feedback on global climate change.

  13. Recent advances in probabilistic species pool delineations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Nikolaus Karger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A species pool is the set of species that could potentially colonize and establish within a community. It has been a commonly used concept in biogeography since the early days of MacArthur and Wilson’s work on Island Biogeography. Despite their simple and appealing definition, an operational application of species pools is bundled with a multitude of problems, which have often resulted in arbitrary decisions and workarounds when defining species pools. Two recently published papers address the operational problems of species pool delineations, and show ways of delineating them in a probabilistic fashion. In both papers, species pools were delineated using a process-based, mechanistical approach, which opens the door for a multitude of new applications in biogeography. Such applications include detecting the hidden signature of biotic interactions, disentangling the geographical structure of community assembly processes, and incorporating a temporal extent into species pools. Although similar in their conclusions, both ‘probabilistic approaches’ differ in their implementation and definitions. Here I give a brief overview of the differences and similarities of both approaches, and identify the challenges and advantages in their application.

  14. Vernal Pool Distribution - Central Valley, 2005 [ds650

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — "Great Valley Vernal Pool Distribution", originally mapped by Bob Holland, 2005. This dataset contains vernal pool areas mapped over Califorina's Central Valley,...

  15. Natural remobilization of multicomponent DNAPL pools due to dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, J W; Smith, J E; Gillham, R W

    2002-12-01

    breakthrough into the adjacent porous medium. In contrast, there was no potential for natural remobilization of a PCE-DCM mixture, primarily because the densities of the components are not sufficiently different. Dissolution of a DCM-toluene mixture decreased the density, reducing the tendency for downward displacement. However, the ultimate transformation from a DNAPL to an LNAPL may induce upward displacement. These results suggest that at sites with DNAPL pools containing a mix of components of sufficiently different densities and relative solubilities, natural remobilization may be an active mechanism, with implications for site evaluation and remediation. PMID:12487412

  16. Iodinated contrast media alter immune responses in pro-inflammatory states.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2010-07-01

    Hypertonic saline causes a transient elevation of blood osmolality and has been shown to alter cellular inflammatory responses in pro-inflammatory states. Intravascular administration of iodine contrast media also causes a transient elevation of blood osmolarity.

  17. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, Daniel; Dziwis, Joachim [E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH Nukleartechnik, Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Kemp, Lutz-Hagen [KKW Stade GmbH und Co. oHG, Stade (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Within the scope of the 4{sup th} partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 {mu}Sv/h to less than 2 {mu}Sv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further

  18. Stade NPP. Dismantling of the reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of the 4th partial decommissioning permission of Stade NPP the activated and contaminated structures of the reactor pool had to be dismantled in order to gain a completely non-radioactive reactor pool area for the subsequent clearance measurement of the reactor building. In order to achieve the aim it was intended to remove the activated pool liner sheets, its activated framework and several contaminated ventilation channels made of stainless steel, the concrete walls of the reactor pool entirely or in parts depending on their activation level, as well as the remaining activated carbon steel structures of the reactor pool bottom. Embedded in the concrete walls there were several highly contaminated excore tubes and the contaminated pool top edge, which were intended to be removed to its full extent. The contract of the Stade NPP initiated reactor pool dismantling project had been awarded to E.ON Anlagenservice GmbH (EAS) and its subsupplier sat. Kerntechnik GmbH for the concrete dismantling works and was performed as follows. In order to minimize the radiation level in the main working area in accordance with the ALARA principle, the liner sheets and middle parts of its framework were removed by means of angle grinders first, as they were the most dose rate relevant parts. As a result the primary average radiation level in the reactor pool (measured in a distance of 500 mm from the walls) was lowered from 40 μSv/h to less than 2 μSv/h. After the minimization of the radiation level in the working area the main dismantling step started with the cutting of the reactor pool walls in blocks by means of diamond rope cutters. Once a concrete block was cut out, it was transported into the fuel pool by means of a crane and crane fork, examined radiologically, marked area by area and segmented to debris by means of an electrical excavator with a hydraulic chisel. Afterwards the debris and carbon steel parts were fractioned and packed for further treatment

  19. Phase Contrast Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation with a si......The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...

  20. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Padmore, H A; Parkinson, D Y; Pien, J; Schirotzek, A; Yang, C; 10.1117/12.861946

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  1. Neurotoxicity of iodinated radiological contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied during the last ten years the neurotoxicity of artificial iodinated contrast media, with prospective clinical and experimental protocols. The experimental investigation in animals aimed to understand the relationship between the intracarotid injection, the subarachnoid application and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier function. The electro physiologic disturbances and the morphologic observation of pial circulation support the evidence that iodinated artificial contrast media induces significant alterations in brain metabolism and in the autoregulation of the blood flow of the encephalon. Even if many of such phenomena may not be apparent at the clinical level, we supposed that they are always present and that their clinical exteriorization is prevented by the immediate and effective action of homeostatic mechanisms. (author)

  2. Contrast-enhanced angiographic cone-beam computed tomography without pre-diluted contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, K.I.; Kim, S.R.; Choi, J.H.; Kim, K.H.; Jeon, P. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been introduced and accepted as a useful technique to evaluate delicate vascular anatomy and neurovascular stents. Current protocol for CBCT requires quantitative dilution of contrast medium to obtain adequate quality images. Here, we introduce simple methods to obtain contrast-enhanced CBCT without quantitative contrast dilution. A simple experiment was performed to estimate the change in flow rate in the internal carotid artery during the procedure. Transcranial doppler (TCD) was used to evaluate the velocity change before and after catheterization and fluid infusion. In addition, 0.3 cm{sup 3}/s (n = 3) and 0.2 cm{sup 3}/s (n = 7) contrast infusions were injected and followed by saline flushes using a 300 mmHg pressure bag to evaluate neurovascular stent and host arteries. Flow velocities changed -15 ± 6.8 % and +17 ± 5.5 % from baseline during catheterization and guiding catheter flushing with a 300 mmHg pressure bag, respectively. Evaluation of the stents and vascular structure was feasible using this technique in all patients. Quality assessment showed that the 0.2 cm{sup 3}/s contrast infusion protocol was better for evaluating the stent and host artery. Contrast-enhanced CBCT can be performed without quantitative contrast dilution. Adequate contrast dilution can be achieved with a small saline flush and normal blood flow. (orig.)

  3. Blood / Money

    OpenAIRE

    Strong, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Marilyn Strathern has argued that "nature" in Euro-American culture has appeared as constraint; it has figured the givens of existence on which human artifice is seen to construct "society" or "culture."(5) Among those givens is the notion that human beings are naturally individuals. And blood, too, images individuality: "The very thought of blood, individual blood, touches the deepest feelings in man about life and death" ([RIchard Titmuss] 16.) Transfusion medicine, then, draws on a series ...

  4. Evaluation of contrast media for bronchography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Bronchography is occasionally needed for the evaluation and management of some congenital pulmonary anomalies as well as some acquired diseases, usually of the tracheo- bronchial tree. There is currently no effective, approved contrast agent for this imaging tech- nique. Objective. We evaluated five agents (barium sulfate, iohexol, propyliodone oily, propyliodone aqueous, and perflubron) in terms of image quality, histologic changes, and effects on hemodynamics, blood gases, and standard laboratory tests in New Zealand White rabbits. Materials and methods. Animals were anesthetized and intubated. Each contrast agent (0.25 ml/kg) was administered intratracheally. Three animals in each group had intravenous lines placed for blood sampling and blood pressure monitoring and were sacrificed at 1 h. An additional three animals for each agent were sacrificed at 24 h and 1 week after imaging. Blood samples were taken immediately before contrast instillation and at 1 h postbronchography. Fluoroscopic images were recorded on standard VHS video tape and evaluated in blind fashion. Segments of lung tissue and bronchi were obtained for histologic examination. Results. Necrosis and/or inflammatory infiltrates were noted in 78 % of the bronchograms performed with propyliodone aqueous, 67 % with propyliodone oily, 55 % with perflubron, and 33 % with iohexol 120, 240 and 350. No histologic damage was observed with barium. The propyliodones gave the best-quality imaging results and the most histologic changes. Iohexol, in any concentration, gave the least acceptable images and a moderate number of histologic changes. Barium sulfate demonstrated acceptable images with virtually no histologic changes. Conclusion. From the histologic and imaging results, barium is the best available contrast material for bronchography. (orig.). With 6 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Contrast media: future aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, H.J.; Platzek, J.; Schirmer, H.; Pietsch, H. [Research Labs., Schering AG, Berlin (Germany); Carretero, J.; Harto, J.; Medina, J.; Riefke, B.; Martin, J. [Justesa Imagen SA, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-11-15

    In spite of the dramatic development in CT, there was no major breakthrough in the iodinated contrast media development. New agents based on hybrid between MRI and CT compounds may be a new innovative alternative. This new approach may also open new indications such as radiotherapy. (orig.)

  6. Phonation in Tonal Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Jianjing

    2013-01-01

    Phonation is used in many tonal languages, but how it should be incorporated into tonal systems is not well understood. The purpose of this dissertation thus is to examine the role of phonation in tonal contrasts, and to investigate how phonation and pitch interact in the tonal space. This dissertation presents close studies of tonal contrasts…

  7. Contrast agents for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible. - Highlights: • This paper studies the contrast agents for MRI. • Fe―Co alloys and Mn-ferrites exhibit suitable contrast enhancement. • Nonhydrolytic thermal-decomposition synthetic method is suitable to produce MNPs. • This method allows controlling the size, magnetic dopants, magneto-crystalline anisotropy. • The increase in the superparamagnetic size leads to the contrast-enhancement

  8. Nonionic radiographic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention deals with nonionic radiographic contrast media. The new media, which are water soluble and have desirable low osmolality properties, are derivates of the 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodine-1,3-benzenecarboxylic acid-unity where the 5-aminonitrogen atom is a part of a 4-, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic ring

  9. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab and Imaging Tests Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts SHARE: Print Glossary Blood cell counts give ... your blood that's occupied by red cells. Normal Blood Counts Normal blood counts fall within a range ...

  10. Iodinated contrast media nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the late seventies, iodinated contrast agents (ICA) were considered to be a major cause of acute iatrogenic renal failure. Over the last decade new contrast agents have been synthesized, nonionic and less hyperosmolar. The incidence of acute renal failure due to ICAs, varies from 3.7 to 70% of cases according to the series, with an average figure of 10.2%. The pathophysiology of ICA nephrotoxicity was mainly studied in laboratory animal models. Three main factors are involved in an inducing ICA-mediated decrease in glomerular filtration rate: reduction of the renal plasma flow, a direct cytotoxic effect on renal tubular cells and erythrocyte alteration leading to intra-renal sludge. Excluding dysglobulinemias with urinary excretion of immunoglobulin light chains, which represent a special case of maximum nephrotoxicity, 4 main risk factors of renal toxicity have been identified in nondiabetic subjects: previous renal failure with serum creatinine levels greater than 140 μmol per liter, extracellular dehydration, age over 60 and use of high doses of ICA and/or repeated ICA injections before serum creatinine levels return to baseline. Preventive measures for avoiding ICA nephrotoxicity are threefold: maintain or restore adequate hydration with saline infusion, stop NSAID treatment several days before ICA administration, and allow a 5 day interval before repeating contrast media injections. New, nonionic and moderately hyperosmolar contrast agents appear to be much less nephrotoxic than conventional ICAs in laboratory animals and in high-risk patients. It is advisable to select such contrast media for investigating high-risk patients. This approach was recently substantiated in well designed, randomized clinical studies which included more than 2 000 patients. (author)

  11. Condensation in a two-phase pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the case of vapor condensation in a liquid pool, when the heat transfer is controlled by heat losses through the walls. The analysis is based on drift flux theory for phase separation in the pool, and determines the two-phase mixture height for the pool. To our knowledge this is the first analytical treatment of this classic problem that gives an explicit result, previous work having established the result for the evaporative case. From conservation of mass and energy in a one-dimensional steady flow, together with a void relation between the liquid and vapor fluxes, we determine the increase in the mixture level from the base level of the pool. It can be seen that the thermal and hydrodynamic influences are separable. Thus, the thermal influence of the wall heat transfer appears through its effect on the condensing length L*, so that at high condensation rates the pool is all liquid, and at low rates overflows (the level swell or foaming effect). Similarly, the phase separation effect hydrodynamically determines the height via the relative velocity of the mixture to the entering flux. We examine some practical applications of this result to level swell in condensing flows, and also examine some limits in ideal cases

  12. Pooled influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates for Australia, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, S G; Carville, K S; Chilver, M; Fielding, J E; Grant, K A; Kelly, H; Levy, A; Stocks, N P; Tempone, S S; Regan, A K

    2016-08-01

    Data were pooled from three Australian sentinel general practice influenza surveillance networks to estimate Australia-wide influenza vaccine coverage and effectiveness against community presentations for laboratory-confirmed influenza for the 2012, 2013 and 2014 seasons. Patients presenting with influenza-like illness at participating GP practices were swabbed and tested for influenza. The vaccination odds of patients testing positive were compared with patients testing negative to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) by logistic regression, adjusting for age group, week of presentation and network. Pooling of data across Australia increased the sample size for estimation from a minimum of 684 to 3,683 in 2012, from 314 to 2,042 in 2013 and from 497 to 3,074 in 2014. Overall VE was 38% [95% confidence interval (CI) 24-49] in 2012, 60% (95% CI 45-70) in 2013 and 44% (95% CI 31-55) in 2014. For A(H1N1)pdm09 VE was 54% (95% CI-28 to 83) in 2012, 59% (95% CI 33-74) in 2013 and 55% (95% CI 39-67) in 2014. For A(H3N2), VE was 30% (95% CI 14-44) in 2012, 67% (95% CI 39-82) in 2013 and 26% (95% CI 1-45) in 2014. For influenza B, VE was stable across years at 56% (95% CI 37-70) in 2012, 57% (95% CI 30-73) in 2013 and 54% (95% CI 21-73) in 2014. Overall VE against influenza was low in 2012 and 2014 when A(H3N2) was the dominant strain and the vaccine was poorly matched. In contrast, overall VE was higher in 2013 when A(H1N1)pdm09 dominated and the vaccine was a better match. Pooling data can increase the sample available and enable more precise subtype- and age group-specific estimates, but limitations remain. PMID:27125368

  13. Contrast normalization in colour vision: the effect of luminance contrast on colour contrast detection

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Kathy T.; Kim, Yeon Jin; Gheiratmand, Mina

    2014-01-01

    While contrast normalization is well known to occur in luminance vision between overlaid achromatic contrasts, and in colour vision between overlaid colour contrasts, it is unknown whether it transfers between colour and luminance contrast. Here we investigate whether contrast detection in colour vision can be normalized by achromatic contrast, or whether this is a selective process driven only by colour contrast. We use a method of cross-orientation masking, in which colour detection is mask...

  14. Blood donation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A blood donation is organised by the Cantonal Hospital of Geneva On Thursday 19 March 2009 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT 2 Number of donations during the last blood donations :135 donors in July 2008 122 donors in November 2008 Let’s do better in 2009 !!! Give 30 minutes of your time to save lives...

  15. BLOOD DONATION

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A blood donation, organized by EFS (Etablissement Français du Sang) of Annemasse will take place On Wednesday 12 November 2008, from 8:30 to 16:00, at CERN Restaurant 2 If possible, please, bring your blood group Card.

  16. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  17. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 370C in the presence of 14C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with 14C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine

  18. Tainted blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Ida; Sheikh, Zainab Afshan; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    study of the historical rise and current workings of safety practices in the Danish blood system. Here, we identify a strong focus on contamination in order to avoid 'tainted blood', at the expense of working with risks that could be avoided through enhanced blood monitoring practices. Of further...... significance to this focus are the social dynamics found at the heart of safety practices aimed at avoiding contamination. We argue that such dynamics need more attention, in order to achieve good health outcomes in transfusion medicine. Thus, we conclude that, to ensure continuously safe blood systems, we...... need to move beyond the bifurcation of the social and medical aspects of blood supply as two separate issues and approach social dynamics as key medical safety questions....

  19. A Strategy for Optimizing Item-Pool Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariel, Adelaide; Linden, van der Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Item-pool management requires a balancing act between the input of new items into the pool and the output of tests assembled from it. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management is presented that is based on the idea of a periodic update of an optimal blueprint for the item pool to tune item prod

  20. The significance of (radio-) labile cadmium pools in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radio-labile fraction of cadmium, in a wide range of contaminated soils, was studied in relation to fractions of cadmium defined by traditional extraction procedures. The proportion of labile Cd which was exchangeable was highly pH-dependent, but above pH 5 only about 5% of labile Cd was extractable with 1 M KNO3. By contrast, EDTA released more than the labile Cd pool into solution, suggesting that significant dissolution of metal absorbents may occur when chelating agents are utilised as trace metal extractants. The effect of time in immobilising Cd added to soil was also illustrated by following changes in the radio-labile concentration. In calcareous soils, an instantaneous fixation' reaction as well-as a time-dependent transfer to non-labile pools was identified. It is suggested that radio-labile Cd represents a relatively unambiguous assessment of the chemical and biological reactivity of Cd in soil compared with the fractions isolated by chemical extractions. (Author)

  1. Unitization of a common oil pool: Theory and evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When heterogeneous firms gain access to the same oil pool, they drill and drain the pool based on their own preferences. The anticipated result is over-capitalization and rent dissipation: the tragedy of the commons. Given the notion of rationality based upon self interest, the rational behavior of these firms might instead be to unitize, acting in a manner efficient to the group. Failure to do so can be attributed to prohibitive bargaining costs required to coordinate many firms; this is supported by studies of the oil industry in the 1930s. In contrast, if the oil industry in the 1950s to 1980s is studied, very different conclusions are reached. Today, joint operations on oil and gas are found in all phases of petroleum-production process. Why did there occur such a drastic change in the degree of success in unitization? In the early 1930s to the late 1940s, both the drilling cost of oil extraction and the price of oil were low, so the gains from unitization were not large enough to be profitable. However, by the late 1950s the real price of oil and the cost of drilling had doubled from what they were in the early 1930s. This made the loss from rent dissipation significant and forced the firms to reevaluate their noncooperative behavior

  2. Mechanisms for convection triggering by cold pools

    CERN Document Server

    Torri, Giuseppe; Tian, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are fundamental ingredients of deep convection. They contribute to organizing the sub-cloud layer and are considered key elements in triggering convective cells. It was long known that this could happen mechanically, through lifting by the cold pools' fronts. More recently, it has been suggested that convection could also be triggered thermodynamically, by accumulation of moisture around the edges of cold pools. A method based on Lagrangian tracking is here proposed to disentangle the signatures of both forcings and quantify their importance in a given environment. Results from a simulation of radiative-convective equilibrium over the ocean show that parcels reach their level of free convection through a combination of both forcings, each being dominant at different stages of the ascent. Mechanical forcing is an important player in lifting parcels from the surface, whereas thermodynamic forcing reduces the inhibition encountered by parcels before they reach their level of free convection.

  3. CONTRAST SENSITIVITY IN AMBLYOPIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity function(CSF) for sinusoid gratings of varying spatial frequencies was determined for each eye of 21 cases with unilateral amblyopia. The CSF of all amblyopic eyes, except one, showed reduced sensitivity when compared with the non-amblyopic eye of the same person. The curve showed reduction more significantly at middle and high spatial frequencies. The cut-off frequency was shifted toward lower spatial frequencies. The relationship between CSF and various degree of amblyopia was als...

  4. Autotrophic microbe metagenomes and metabolic pathways differentiate adjacent red sea brine pools

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2013-04-29

    In the Red Sea, two neighboring deep-sea brine pools, Atlantis II and Discovery, have been studied extensively, and the results have shown that the temperature and concentrations of metal and methane in Atlantis II have increased over the past decades. Therefore, we investigated changes in the microbial community and metabolic pathways. Here, we compared the metagenomes of the two pools to each other and to those of deep-sea water samples. Archaea were generally absent in the Atlantis II metagenome; Bacteria in the metagenome were typically heterotrophic and depended on aromatic compounds and other extracellular organic carbon compounds as indicated by enrichment of the related metabolic pathways. In contrast, autotrophic Archaea capable of CO2 fixation and methane oxidation were identified in Discovery but not in Atlantis II. Our results suggest that hydrothermal conditions and metal precipitation in the Atlantis II pool have resulted in elimination of the autotrophic community and methanogens.

  5. Low osmolality contrast media in peripheral arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three new intravascular contrast media of low osmolality (ioxaglate, iopamidol and iohexol) were compared with a conventional one of high osmolality (diatrizoate) in clinical practice. A total number of 232 injections were performed in 87 cases, and subjective reactions, angiographic opacification and hemodynamic alterations were analysed. The intensity of local pain and heat sensation induced by the low osmolality contrast media were significantly milder than that caused by diatrizoate. Ioxaglate and iohexol were approximately identical in the degree of side reactions, but they were significantly less than iopamidol. Diatrizoate was almost identical to that of iopamidol in the opacification quality, while ioxaglate and iohexol were statistically superior to diatrizoate. The continuous monitorings of femoral blood pressure and electrocardiogram during 146 angiographic examinations revealed that three new low osmolality contrast agents induced significantly less effects on a decrease of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and increase of heart rate, as compared with diatrizoate. No statistical difference was observed among ioxaglate, iopamidol and iohexol. Finger plethysmographies were continuously recorded in total of 20 crossover studies in low osmolality compounds and conventional one. Three low osmolality agents induced less effects on a diminution of pulse wave height after the contrast injection. Slight fluctuations of the cardiac output, stroke volume and peripheral vascular resistance were induced following contrast injection in selective peripheral arteriographies, while aortofemoral arteriography using diatrizoate produced dominant changes. It is concluded that the new low osmolality contrast media are well suited for selective peripheral arteriography as they cause significantly less pain, good opacification quality and induce less hemodynamic effects than diatrizoate. (author)

  6. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A., E-mail: king@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette 91192 (France); Reischig, P. [Xnovo Technology ApS, 4600 Køge (Denmark); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands); Adrien, J. [MATEIS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Peetermans, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ludwig, W. [MATEIS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble 38043 (France)

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  7. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented

  8. Contrastive topics decomposed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wagner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of contrastive topics introduced in Büring 1997b and further developed in Büring 2003 relies on distinguishing two types of constituents that introduce alternatives: the sentence focus, which is marked by a FOC feature, and the contrastive topic, which is marked by a CT feature. A non-compositional rule of interpretation that refers to these features is used to derive a topic semantic value, a nested set of sets of propositions. This paper presents evidence for a correlation between the restrictive syntax of nested focus operators and the syntax of contrastive topics, a correlation which is unexpected under this analysis. A compositional analysis is proposed that only makes use of the flatter focus semantic values introduced by focus operators. The analysis aims at integrating insights from the original analysis while at the same time capturing the observed syntactic restrictions. http://dx.doi.org/10.3765/sp.5.8 BibTeX info

  9. Numerical modeling of sodium fire – Part II: Pool combustion and combined spray and pool combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A CFD based method is proposed for the simulation of sodium pool combustion. • A sodium evaporation based model is proposed to model sodium pool evaporation. • The proposed method is validated against sodium pool experiments of Newman and Payne. • The results obtained using the proposed method are in good agreement with the experiments. - Abstract: The risk of sodium-air reaction has received considerable attention after the sodium-fire accident in Monju reactor. The fires resulting from the sodium-air reaction can be detrimental to the safety of a sodium fast reactor. Therefore, predicting the consequences of a sodium fire is important from a safety point of view. A computational method based on CFD is proposed here to simulate sodium pool fire and understand its characteristics. The method solves the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equation and uses a non-premixed mixture fraction based combustion model. The mass transfer of sodium vapor from the pool surface to the flame is obtained using a sodium evaporation model. The proposed method is then validated against well-known sodium pool experiments of Newman and Payne. The flame temperature and location predicted by the model are in good agreement with experiments. Furthermore, the trends of the mean burning rate with initial pool temperature and oxygen concentration are captured well. Additionally, parametric studies have been performed to understand the effects of pool diameter and initial air temperature on the mean burning rate. Furthermore, the sodium spray and sodium pool combustion models are combined to simulate simultaneous spray and pool combustion. Simulations were performed to demonstrate that the combined code could be applied to simulate this. Once sufficiently validated, the present code can be used for safety evaluation of a sodium fast reactor

  10. The protein binding substance Ibuprofen does not affect the T1 time or partition coefficient in contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawel Nadine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR with T1 mapping enables quantification of diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Various factors, however, can interfere with T1 measurements. The purpose of the current study was to assess the effect of co-medication with a typical protein binding drug (Ibuprofen on T1 values in vitro and in vivo. Methods 50 vials were prepared with different concentrations of gadobenate dimeglumine, Ibuprofen and human serum albumin in physiologic NaCl solution and imaged at 1.5T with a spin echo sequence at multiple TRs to measure T1 values and calculate relaxivities. 10 volunteers (5 men; 31±6.3 years were imaged at 1.5T. T1 values for myocardium and blood pool were determined for various time points after administration of 0.15mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine using a modified look-locker inversion-recovery sequence before and after administration of Ibuprofen over 24 hours. The partition coefficient was calculated as ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood, where R1=1/T1. Results In vitro no significant correlation was found between relaxivity and Ibuprofen concentration, neither in absence (r=−0.15, p=0.40 nor in presence of albumin (r=−0.32, p=0.30. In vivo there was no significant difference in post contrast T1 times of myocardium and blood, respectively and also in the partition coefficient between exam 1 and 2 (p>0.05. There was good agreement of the T1 times of myocardium and blood and the partition coefficient, respectively between exam 1 and 2. Conclusions Contrast enhanced T1 mapping is unaffected by co-medication with the protein binding substance Ibuprofen and has an excellent reproducibility.

  11. Suppression pool swell analysis using CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional axi-symmetric model of suppression pool of Containment Studies Facility (CSF) along with single vent pipe was modeled to estimate the jet and hydrodynamic loads due to flow of steam air mixture during simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The analysis was carried out using CFD ACE+ software with Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach. The flow velocity variation through vent pipe was estimated using in-house containment thermal hydraulic code CONTRAN, was given as input at inlet boundary condition. The transient calculations were performed for 20 seconds and suppression pool level variation, pressure loads over the floor, walls and vent pipes etc were evaluated. (author)

  12. Censored Exploration and the Dark Pool Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ganchev, Kuzman; Nevmyvaka, Yuriy; Vaughan, Jennifer Wortman

    2012-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a natural algorithm for multi-venue exploration from censored data, which is motivated by the Dark Pool Problem of modern quantitative finance. We prove that our algorithm converges in polynomial time to a near-optimal allocation policy; prior results for similar problems in stochastic inventory control guaranteed only asymptotic convergence and examined variants in which each venue could be treated independently. Our analysis bears a strong resemblance to that of efficient exploration/ exploitation schemes in the reinforcement learning literature. We describe an extensive experimental evaluation of our algorithm on the Dark Pool Problem using real trading data.

  13. Detection of African horse sickness virus in Culicoides imicola pools using RT-qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Tania; Liebenberg, Danica; Venter, Gert J; Mienie, Charlotte Ms; van Hamburg, Huib

    2016-06-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is an infectious, non-contagious arthropod-borne disease of equids, caused by the African horse sickness virus (AHSV), an orbivirus of the Reoviridae family. It is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and thought to be the most lethal viral disease of horses. This study focused on detection of AHSV in Culicoides imicola (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) pools by the application of a RT-qPCR. Midges were fed on AHSV-infected blood. A single blood-engorged female was allocated to pools of unfed nulliparous female midges. Pool sizes varied from 1 to 200. RNA was extracted and prepared for RT-qPCR. The virus was successfully detected and the optimal pool size for the limit of detection of the virus was determined at a range between 1 to 25. Results from this investigation highlight the need for a standardized protocol for AHSV investigation in Culicoides midges especially for comparison among different studies and for the determination of infection rate. PMID:27232141

  14. Essential patents in pools: Is value intrinsinc or induced ?

    OpenAIRE

    Delcamp, Henry

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes empirically the value - as measured by patent citations - of a set of 1363 essential patents belonging to 9 different patent pools. We find that pooled patents receive more cites than control patents having the same characteristics but not included in a pool. This difference stems only partly from the pools' ability to select the most cited patents. Indeed we show that being included in a pool also tends to increase the value of patents. This induced effect reflects the in...

  15. Vision-based detection of MAG weld pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jinqiang; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Min; Zhao Yanhua

    2007-01-01

    Weld pool contains significant information about the welding process. The weld pool images of MAG welding are detected by LaserStrobe system. An algorithm for extracting weld pool edge is proposed according to the characteristics of MAG weld pool images. The maximum weld pool length and width are calculated. The measurement data can be used to verify the results of welding process simulation and to provide a good foundation for automatic control of MAG welding process.

  16. An international pooled analysis for obtaining a benchmark dose for environmental lead exposure in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Bellinger, David; Lanphear, Bruce; Grandjean, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Lead is a recognized neurotoxicant, but estimating effects at the lowest measurable levels is difficult. An international pooled analysis of data from seven cohort studies reported an inverse and supra-linear relationship between blood lead concentrations and IQ scores in children. The lack of a...... clear threshold presents a challenge to the identification of an acceptable level of exposure. The benchmark dose (BMD) is defined as the dose that leads to a specific known loss. As an alternative to elusive thresholds, the BMD is being used increasingly by regulatory authorities. Using the pooled data...... fitting models yielding lower confidence limits (BMDLs) of about 0.1-1.0 μ g/dL for the dose leading to a loss of one IQ point. We conclude that current allowable blood lead concentrations need to be lowered and further prevention efforts are needed to protect children from lead toxicity....

  17. Intraperitoneal Injection of Multiplacentas Pooled Cells Treatment on a Mouse Model with Aplastic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Li; Hong Chen; Yan-Bo Lv; Qiang Wang; Zheng-Jun Xie; Li-Hua Ma; Jie He; Wei Xue; Shan Yu; Jun Guo; Ting-Hua Wang; Tian-Xi Wu; Xing-Hua Pan

    2016-01-01

    Coinfusion of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells is more effective than hematopoietic stem cell transplantation alone. It is necessary to explore a safe and routine mixed stem cell intraperitoneal transplantation method. Multiplacentas pooled cells were intraperitoneally injected into a radiation- and immunity-induced mouse aplastic anemia model with single time. Then, mouse survival time, peripheral blood hemoglobin count, bone marrow architecture, and donor cell engraftment were asses...

  18. Double-contrast enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid state digital system (FCR 101) was employed in our comparative evaluation of the image quality of conventional versus digital techniques in the study of colon by means of double-contrast enema. Sixty patients were examined with a single AP view, using digital radiography with 100% radiation dose and progressive 50% and 75% reductions; the radiographs thus obtained were then compared with the corresponding conventional ones. The examined parameters were organ profile and mucosal pattern. Each digital and conventional radiographs was evaluated by 2 independent radiologists and a value is given to each parameter i.e., 1=good, 2=sufficient, 3=insufficient. Upon comparison of the average values obtained for digital and conventional radiographs in optimal conditions and with a dose reduced by 50%, the digital technique was seen to give a more detailed and accurate representation of both low-contrast mucosal pattern and of organ profile. With the dose reduced by 75%, a slight increase was observed in background noise which caused a slight loss in image definition, but this did not reduce image readability with respect to conventional radiographs. To conclude, the digital method with a 50% exposure reduction is to be preferred in the examination of the colon, especially in pediatric radiology; furthermore, since this technique allows better detailing at lower contrast, it is ot be preferred in the study of the pathologic conditions affecting mainly/only the mucosal pattern-e.g., cancer, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and so on. An exposure dose reduced by 75% may be used for following lesions previously diagnosed and when a less detailed depiction of the mucosal pattern is enough

  19. Contrast media in intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric radiologists in 40 children's hospitals in North America were interviewed to determine their choice of contrast media in the diagnosis and treatment of intussusception. The respondents indicated that barium was utilized in the vast majority of instances. Almost all indicated that they would proceed with barium enema even if there is unequivocal evidence of small bowel obstruction on the plain film examination. In over 14,000 cases of intussusception, there were 55 perforations, an incidence of approximately 1 in 250. The perforations in general were well tolerated, although there was one death. (orig.)

  20. Contrastive discourse studies

    OpenAIRE

    Clyne, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Le discours est un aspect essentiel du langage. Mais cet aspect est lié plus étroitement aux valeurs culturelles. Cet article présente les études contrastives du discours, comment elles ont été menées et les difficultés possibles dans les techniques de collection de données. Une typologie comparative des discours peut se développer au-delà de la typologie grammaticale. Parmi les applications du discours contrastif sont la formation interculturelle et l’enseignement des langues étrangères. ...

  1. Donating Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... And be sure to drink plenty of water, milk, or other liquids. Before donating, you'll need to answer some questions about your medical history, and have your temperature, pulse, blood pressure, and ...

  2. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of RBCs due to body destroying them ( immune hemolytic anemia ) Low number of RBCs due to some red ... of Heinz bodies may indicate: Alpha thalassemia Congenital hemolytic anemia Disorder in which red blood cells break down ...

  3. Amylase - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylase is an enzyme that helps digest carbohydrates. It is made in the pancreas and the glands ... saliva. When the pancreas is diseased or inflamed, amylase releases into the blood. A test can be ...

  4. Pooling operations: how nuclear insurance works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domestic nuclear legislation in the state where a nuclear installation is situated governs the liability of the operator to provide compensation for damage caused by a release of ionizing radiation. Many countries have ratified one of the two International Conventions on Civil Liability (Vienna and Paris) the requirements of which are mirrored in their domestic legislation. Both Conventions call for liability to be placed on the nuclear installation operator irrespective of actual negligence. National insurance market pools have been formed to underwrite operators' risks which are potentially so high that individual underwriters would be discouraged from providing insurance on their own. Pools have arranged collective or common-account reinsurance protection for themselves with other net-line pools in order to harness the total capacity available from the world insurance markets. This protection enables pools to enhance the cover they provide against nuclear risk. Details of compensation limits are given. These vary from country to country despite a recommendation by the Paris Convention of SDR 150 million (SDR -Special Drawing Right). (UK)

  5. Transferring Goods or Splitting a Resource Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Jacob; Van Assen, Marcel A. L. M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the consequences for exchange outcomes of the violation of an assumption underlying most social psychological research on exchange. This assumption is that the negotiated direct exchange of commodities between two actors (pure exchange) can be validly represented as two actors splitting a fixed pool of resources (split pool…

  6. Pricing Electricity in Pools With Wind Producers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales González, Juan Miguel; Conejo, A. J.; Kai Liu;

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers an electricity pool that includes a significant number of wind producers and is cleared through a network-constrained auction, one day in advance and on an hourly basis. The hourly auction is formulated as a two-stage stochastic programming problem, where the first stage...

  7. The warm pool in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; Shetye, S.R.

    surface temperature at locations coverEd. by the pool during at least a part of the year show the following modes: (1) a cycle with no significant variation (observed in the western equatorial Pacific and central and eastern equatorial Indian Ocean), (ii...

  8. Pool swell in a nuclear containment wetwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description is presented of scale model tests conducted to study LOCA induced wetwell pool swelling in the BWR Mk 1 containment pressure suppression system. The Mk 1 containment configuration is described together with the scale model design, the conduct of the tests, and the experimental results

  9. An analysis of pressure suppression pool swell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the pressure suppression pool swell phenomenon has been carried out for a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) of Indian design. In the event of a Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA), the upper chamber of the containment, i.e., Drywell, would experience higher pressure because of mass and energy release from the reactor coolant system into the drywell. To alleviate the problem of drywell overpressurization, there is a large volume of water or suppression pool at the bottom of the containment where steam from the drywell could flow and condense. The present analysis models the transient air-steam mixture flow from drywell through the vent shafts, distribution headers and downcomers into the pool. After the initial vent-clearing stage, bubble growth at the exit of individual downcomers is modeled. Finally, the coalesced bubble growth and rise are modeled for groups of downcomers. For all these stages, the pool-swell and wetwell air-space pressure are also calculated. A four-equation model consisting of conservation of mixture mass, momentum, energy and noncondensible (air) mass has been used

  10. "Teisele poole" Agambeniga ja Agambenita / Ragne Nukk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nukk, Ragne, 1984-

    2012-01-01

    Tallinna Fotokuu rahvusvahelise fotonäituse "Teisele poole" ideeliste lähtekohtade tõlgendamisest. Autor kõrvutab Adam Budaki kuraatornäituse aluseks olnud Giorgio Agambeni esseed „Viimne kohtupäev“ näitusel eksponeeritud piltidega

  11. Stein's neuronal model with pooled renewal input

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rajdl, K.; Lánský, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 3 (2015), s. 389-399. ISSN 0340-1200 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Stein’s model * Poisson process * pooled renewal processes * first-passage time Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.713, year: 2014

  12. Radionuclide scrubbing in water pools: Bubble hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In assessing the severity of degraded core accidents in light water reactors, limited credit is taken currently for scrubbing of fission products, either vapors or aerosols, in water pools. The development and use of more realistic scrubbing decontamination factors (DF's) could have a significant effect on the perceived safety of nuclear power plants. In order to provide a technique for calculating more realistic scrubbing DF's, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is sponsoring a program which includes development of an analytical model for scrubbing of fission product aerosols from steam/noncondensible gas mixtures injected into subcooled or saturated water pools under appropriate accident conditions. Battelle-Columbus is carrying out experiments designed to provide data for development and validation of the predictive model. Key hydrodynamic features in characterizing the transfer of aerosol from the incoming gas phase to the liquid pool include the interphase contact time and the interfacial area available for transfer. Hydrodynamic parameters which affect these key features were varied over ranges defined by analyses of several degraded core accidents carried out with the MARCH computer code. This paper presents the results of the first phase of the experimental program, a study of hydrodynamics of steam/noncondensible gas mixtures injected into a water pool through a single orifice

  13. Moving blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelis, K

    1997-01-01

    Our internationally acclaimed journalist Sanguinia has returned safely from her historic assignment. Travelling from Homeric Greece to British Romanticism, she was witness to blood drinking, letting, bathing, and transfusion. In this report, she explores connections between the symbolic and the sadistic; the mythic and the medical--all in an effort to appreciate the layered meanings our culture has given to the movement of blood between our bodies. PMID:9407636

  14. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ... Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood Clots ...

  15. Biology of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mail Facebook TwitterTitle Google+ LinkedIn Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Medical Dictionary Also ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  16. Blood (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Print A A A ... about the mysterious, life-sustaining fluid called blood. Blood Basics Two types of blood vessels carry blood ...

  17. Blood Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Blood > Blood Facts and Statistics Printable Version Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts ... about American Red Cross Blood Services Facts about blood needs Every two seconds someone in the U.S. ...

  18. Catecholamine blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norepinephrine -- blood; Epinephrine -- blood; Adrenalin -- blood; Dopamine -- blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... the test. This is especially true if both blood and urine catecholamines are to be measured. You ...

  19. High-resolution three-dimensional scanning optical image system for intrinsic and extrinsic contrast agents in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yueqing; Qian, Zhiyu; Chen, Jinxian; Blessington, Dana; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Chance, Britton

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the theory and development of a three-dimensional (3D) imaging instrument capable of determining the biochemical properties of tissue by measuring the absorption or fluorescence of different intrinsic and extrinsic agents simultaneously. A bifurcated optical fiber bundle, serving to deliver the excitation light and collect the emission or reflection light, scans over the flat tissue surface retrieving optical signals in each pixel. Two-dimensional (2D) images of a series of subsequent sections are obtained after signal conversion and processing to yield a 3D image. Manipulation of the scanning step and diameter size of the fibers within the bundle, the spatial resolution of the instrument attains a maximum of 40 × 40 × 10 μm3. The wavelength range is extended from ultraviolet to the near infrared (NIR) through specialized optical design, typically employed for the NIR extrinsic contrast agents study. The instrument is most applicable in situations involving the measurement of fluorescence or absorption at any specific wavelength within the spectrum range. Flavoprotein and nicotinamide adeine dinucleotide are the two typical intrinsic agents indicating the oxidization and reduction status of the tissue sample, with their fluorescence detected at wavelengths of 540 and 440 nm, respectively. Oxy and deoxy hemoglobin are two other significant intrinsic agents for evaluating the blood oxygenation saturation by recording their absorptions at two different wavelengths of 577 and 546 nm. These intrinsic agents were measured in this study for comparison of biochemical properties of rat liver in different gas inhalation treatments. Indocyanine green, a NIR extrinsic contrast agent measured at wavelengths of 780 nm/830 nm as excitation/emission can indicate blood pooling by displaying the distribution of blood vessels within a 9 L tumor. The advantage of high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and broad applied potentiality were demonstrated by the

  20. Intestinal contrasting in abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 56 patients undergoing abdominal CT the gastro-intestinal tract was defined by negative contrast instead of the conventional positive contrast from an iodine containing contrast medium. The contrast material was a 2 1/2% mannitol solution and was used for filling the rectum. Filling of the gastro-intestinal tract was of similar quality to that obtained with positve contrast media. The number of artifacts due to high contrast boundaries was slightly greater with the negative contrast than if would have been with positive contrast. Differentiation of the gastro-intestinal tract from other abdominal organs was equally good for both methods. The negative contrast method was poor in diagnosing cystic tumours but proved much better than positive contrast for evaluating the wall of the gastro-intestinal tract. (orig.)

  1. Principles and procedures of considering item sequence effects in the development of calibrated item pools: Conceptual analysis and empirical illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safir Yousfi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Item responses can be context-sensitive. Consequently, composing test forms flexibly from a calibrated item pool requires considering potential context effects. This paper focuses on context effects that are related to the item sequence. It is argued that sequence effects are not necessarily a violation of item response theory but that item response theory offers a powerful tool to analyze them. If sequence effects are substantial, test forms cannot be composed flexibly on the basis of a calibrated item pool, which precludes applications like computerized adaptive testing. In contrast, minor sequence effects do not thwart applications of calibrated item pools. Strategies to minimize the detrimental impact of sequence effects on item parameters are discussed and integrated into a nomenclature that addresses the major features of item calibration designs. An example of an item calibration design demonstrates how this nomenclature can guide the process of developing a calibrated item pool.

  2. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of reracked spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simple model of the spent fuel pool for computer code GOTHIC, which enables calculation of thermal-hydraulic parameters of the reracked spent fuel pool of NPP Krsko, has been developed. This model encompasses all basic characteristics of spent fuel pool, which are necessary to simulate a global behavior of spent fuel pool cooling. Within this model, the temperatures of the spent fuel pool for steady state, as well as temperature increases after loss of cooling were calculated for NPP Krsko reracked spent fuel pool. (author)

  3. Single breath-hold assessment of cardiac function using an accelerated 3D single breath-hold acquisition technique - comparison of an intravascular and extravascular contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makowski Marcus R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is the current gold standard for the assessment of left ventricular (LV function. Repeated breath-holds are needed for standard multi-slice 2D cine steady-state free precession sequences (M2D-SSFP. Accelerated single breath-hold techniques suffer from low contrast between blood pool and myocardium. In this study an intravascular contrast agent was prospectively compared to an extravascular contrast agent for the assessment of LV function using a single-breath-hold 3D-whole-heart cine SSFP sequence (3D-SSFP. Methods LV function was assessed in fourteen patients on a 1.5 T MR-scanner (Philips Healthcare using 32-channel coil technology. Patients were investigated twice using a 3D-SSFP sequence (acquisition time 18–25 s after Gadopentetate dimeglumine (GdD, day 1 and Gadofosveset trisodium (GdT, day 2 administration. Image acquisition was accelerated using sensitivity encoding in both phase encoding directions (4xSENSE. CNR and BMC were both measured between blood and myocardium. The CNR incorporated noise measurements, while the BMC represented the coeffiancy between the signal from blood and myocardium [1]. Contrast to noise ratio (CNR, blood to myocardium contrast (BMC, image quality, LV functional parameters and intra-/interobserver variability were compared. A M2D-SSFP sequence was used as a reference standard on both days. Results All 3D-SSFP sequences were successfully acquired within one breath-hold after GdD and GdT administration. CNR and BMC were significantly (p vs. 23.7 and regression analysis showed a stronger correlation to the reference standard (R2 = 0.92 vs. R2 = 0.71, compared to 3D-SSFP with GdD. Conclusions A single-breath-hold 3D-whole-heart cine SSFP sequence in combination with 32-channel technology and an intravascular contrast agent allows for the accurate and fast assessment of LV function. Trial registration The study was approved by the local

  4. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous

  5. Soluble vascular endothelial growth factor in various blood transfusion components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T;

    1999-01-01

    sVEGF was determined in nonfiltered and prestorage white cell-reduced whole blood (WB), buffy coat-depleted saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol (SAGM) blood, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and buffy coat-derived platelet (BCP) pools obtained from volunteer, healthy blood donors. As a control, total content...... of platelet-derived soluble plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (sPAI-1) was determined by an EIA in the same samples. Finally, the extracellular accumulation of sVEGF was determined in nonfiltered WB and SAGM blood during storage for 35 days and in BCP pools during storage for 7 days. RESULTS: In......BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion may reduce survival after curative surgery for solid tumors. This may be related to extracellular content of cancer growth factors present in transfusion components. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent stimulator of angiogenesis in solid tumors. The...

  6. Microflora of nuclear research reactor pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The circulation of pool water through the nuclear reactor core produces a bactericidal effect on the microflora due to the influence of various kinds of radiation. The microbe contents return to their initial level in 2 to 4 months after the circulation has stopped. The microflora comprises mainly cocci in large numbers, G-positive rods and fungi, and lower amounts of G-negative rods as compared with the water with which the reactor pool was initially filled. Increased amounts are present of radiation-resistant forms exhibiting intense production of catalase and nuclease. Supposedly, the presence of these enzymes is in some way beneficial to the microbes in their survival in the high-radiation zones. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 12 refs

  7. Economic efficiency of pool coordinated electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents economic efficiency evaluation of pool coordinated electricity markets. The evaluation accounts for the overall cost of power generation, network losses and costs, and various operational constraints. We assume a non-collusive oligopolistic competition. An iterative supply function model is used to characterize the competitive behavior of suppliers. A social welfare function is defined for PoolCo market that operates over multiple hours time span. This leads to a mixed-integer non-linear programming problem. An Augmented Lagrangian approach is used to solve iteratively for global optimal operation schedules (i.e. power generation, load, and price for each bus node) while considering constraints of different sorts. An IEEE 24-bus, eight-supplier, 17-customer test system is used for illustration. The results show deflection of electricity prices from the marginal costs of power generation. The results of 2-year (730 round) market simulations show a range of deadweight efficiency loss between 0.5. (author)

  8. Pooling the oil and gas lease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the legislation and regulations in Alberta regarding the density of drilling patterns for both drilling and production purposes was presented. The legislation provides for expansion or contraction of the normal spacing unit in response to particular reservoir conditions. Before an operator can obtain a drilling license, he must prove that he has the appropriate rights with respect to the entire spacing unit. Most petroleum and natural gas leases cover 160 acres. This is normally sufficient for oil drilling purposes, but not for natural gas drilling purposes. However, the pooling clause allows the lessee to combine lands with adjoining lands, and makes necessary adjustments to royalty regimes. Various court cases are cited by way of illustrating the application and interpretation of the pooling clause

  9. Suppression pool swell analysis. Special report. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambre, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamic response of a Mark I pressure suppression system during the early air discharge phase of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is studied mathematically. The mathematical analysis of the surface swell caused by the initial discharge, located a finite depth below the free surface, is described in detail with the surface elevation shape as a function of time being one of the results. The initial approach considers the case of an infinite pool with the approach progressing to vertical boundary walls and finally to the semicircular pool cross section of the Mark I pressure suppression system. This analysis is valid for the time interval before the free surface impacts any structure.

  10. Suppression pool swell analysis. Special report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic response of a Mark I pressure suppression system during the early air discharge phase of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is studied mathematically. The mathematical analysis of the surface swell caused by the initial discharge, located a finite depth below the free surface, is described in detail with the surface elevation shape as a function of time being one of the results. The initial approach considers the case of an infinite pool with the approach progressing to vertical boundary walls and finally to the semicircular pool cross section of the Mark I pressure suppression system. This analysis is valid for the time interval before the free surface impacts any structure

  11. Review and assessment of pool scrubbing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of fission products bearing bubbles as they through aqueous pools becomes a crucial phenomenon for source term evaluation of hypothetical risk dominant sequences of Light Water Reactors. In the present report a peer review and assessment of models encapsulated in SPARC andBUSCA codes is presented. Several aspects of pool scrubbing have been addressed: particle removal, fission product vapour retention and bubble hydrodynamics. Particular emphasis has been given to the close link between retention and hydrodynamics, from both modelling and experimental point of view. In addition, RHR and SGTR sequences were simulated with SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and their results were compared with those obtained with MAAP 3.0B.As a result of this work, model capabilities and shortcomings have beenassessed and some areas susceptible of further research have been identified.(Author) 73 refs

  12. Review and assessment of pool scrubbing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of fission products bearing bubbles as they pass through aqueous pools becomes a crucial phenomenon for source term evaluation of hypothetical risk dominant sequences of Light Water Reactors. In the present report a peer review and assessment of models encapsulated in SPARC and BUSCA codes is presented. Several aspects of pool scrubbing have been addressed: particle removal, fission product vapour retention and bubble hydrodynamics. Particular emphasis has been given to the close link between retention and hydrodynamics, from both modelling and experimental point of view. In addition, RHR and SGTR sequences were simulated with SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and their results were compared with those obtained with MAAP 3.0B. As a result of this work, model capabilities and shortcomings have been assessed and some areas susceptible of further research have been identified. (Author) 73 refs

  13. The Hardest Straight-in Pool Shot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Rick

    2010-01-01

    When playing pool or billiards, a player often has the opportunity to make a "straight-in" shot, that is, one in which the cue ball, the object ball, and the target (e.g., a pocket) are collinear. With the distance from the cue ball to the target assumed fixed, the relative difficulty is here explored of shots taken at varying positions of the…

  14. Investigation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool Coolability

    OpenAIRE

    Nimander, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    The natural catastrophe at Fukushima Dai-ichi 2011 enlightened the nuclear community. This master thesis reveals the non-negligible risks regarding the short term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The thesis has also investigated the possibility of using natural circulation of air in a passive safety system to cool the spent nuclear fuel pools. The results where conclusive: The temperature difference between the heated air and ambient air is far too low for natural circulation of air to remove a...

  15. Health risks of early swimming pool attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoefer, Yvonne; Zutavern, Anne; Brockow, Inken; Schäfer, Torsten; Krämer, Ursula; Schaaf, Beate; Herbarth, Olf; von Berg, Andrea; Wichmann, H-Erich; Heinrich, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Swimming pool attendance and exposure to chlorination by-products showed adverse health effects on children. We assessed whether early swimming pool attendance, especially baby swimming, is related to higher rates of early infections and to the development of allergic diseases. In 2003-2005, 2192 children were analysed for the 6-year follow-up of a prospective birth cohort study. Data on early swimming pool attendance, other lifestyle factors and medical history were collected by parental-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate associations. Babies who did not participate in baby swimming had lower rates of infection in the 1st year of life (i) diarrhoea: OR 0.68 CI 95% 0.54-0.85; (ii) otitis media: OR 0.81 CI 95% 0.62-1.05; (iii) airway infections: OR 0.85 CI 95% 0.67-1.09. No clear association could be found between late or non-swimmers and atopic dermatitis or hay fever until the age of 6 years, while higher rates of asthma were found (OR 2.15 95% CI 1.16-3.99), however, potentially due to reverse causation. The study indicates that, in terms of infections, baby swimming might not be as harmless as commonly thought. Further evidence is needed to make conclusions if the current regulations on chlorine in Germany might not protect swimming pool attendees from an increased risk of gastrointestinal infections. In terms of developing atopic diseases there is no verifiable detrimental effect of early swimming. PMID:17869580

  16. Modeling of pool swell dynamics. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, W.G.; Huber, P.W.; Sonin, A.A.

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this research program is to develop and verify the scaling laws which apply to LOCA-induced pool swell in BWR pressure-suppression containment systems. The work has now progressed to a stage where several critical series of experiments have been completed. The experimental test program for checking the scaling laws is outlined. Some of the experimental results obtained to date and the conclusions one can draw from them are summarized.

  17. The Cinema of the Swimming Pool

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Christopher; Hirsch, Pam

    2014-01-01

    The swimming pool frequently appears in film not merely as a setting but as a dynamic site where social, political, cultural and aesthetic forces converge. What is it about this space that has so fascinated filmmakers and what kinds of cinematic investigations does it encourage? This collection features essays by an eclectic, international range of film researchers. Amongst the works analysed are classics such as The Cameraman (1928), The Philadelphia Story (1940) and La Piscine (1969); cult ...

  18. Studies on pressure suppression pool dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several newly identified pressure suppression pool hydrodynamic loads associated with a loss-of-coolant accident, or actuation of the safety/relief valves, are attracting attention because of their potential influence on integrity of the BWR pressure suppression containment. This report provides a survey of the research works and experiences on performance of the pressure suppression system during abnormal and normal reactor operating conditions. Specific areas for future studies are also indicated. (author)

  19. Blood mixtures: impact of puncture site on blood parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, X; El Hassani, M S; Lecq, S; Michel, C L; El Mouden, E H; Michaud, B; Slimani, T

    2016-08-01

    Various puncture routes, veins, arteries, heart, are used to take blood in animals. For anatomical reasons, differences in blood composition are expected among puncture sites. However, this issue has been rarely assessed and contrasted results have been reported: strong effects of puncture site versus a lack of effect. We captured free-ranging freshwater turtles from different locations to compare the mean concentrations of 12 blood parameters (metabolites, hormone, ions, and enzyme) among three puncture sites: (1) a lateral branch of the jugular vein, (2) a dorsal subcarapacial cervical plexus (sometimes incorrectly referred as the 'cervical sinus' in the literature), and (3) a caudal plexus site (sometimes incorrectly referred as the 'caudal sinus'). Because we used very small syringes (27-30G), we were able to separate lymph, blood, or blood-lymph mixtures. Our results show very strong effects of puncture site and of mixture level (mean maximal difference between sites was 250 %). We also found strong sex and geographical effects. Typically, there were differences in concentrations of blood solutes sampled from the lateral jugular vein and subcarapacial plexus, mainly due to sampling a mixture of blood and lymph from the 'blood' at the subcarapacial site and pure blood from the lateral jugular site, and likewise, samples from the caudal site were highly variable due to often sampling a mixture of blood and lymph. These results have technical and fundamental implications, especially when performing comparative analyses. Further, by selecting precise puncture sites, physiological differences between lymph and blood compartments could be investigated. PMID:27146147

  20. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Stevens

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP and a slowly releasable (SRP pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles.