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Sample records for blood ph effects

  1. The effect of biofiltration on red blood cells 2.3-diphosphoglycerate and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umimoto, K; Hirai, Y; Hayashi, T; Tanaka, H

    2000-12-01

    To investigate the effect of biofiltration (BF) on the ability of blood to supply oxygen to the peripheral tissues, a 2 week crossover study was conducted with bicarbonate hemodialysis (BcHD) and BF using 5 male patients with diabetic renal failure as subjects. BcHD and BF were performed for 4 h and 3.5 h per session, respectively. Blood gases, the pH of red blood cells (RBC-pH), and 2. 3-diphosphoglycerate in RBC (RBC-2.3DPG) were measured during each treatment. After a 2 week BF treatment, the plasma HCO3- at the beginning of BF was significantly higher than that of BcHD (p level (p levels. The RBC-2.3DPG during BcHD remained unchanged, but during BF significantly increased (p level. The improved metabolic acidosis might occur as a result of the increase in RBC-2.3DPG during BF. This increase in RBC-2.3DPG has the effect of reducing the affinity of oxygen for hemoglobin and allows more oxygen to be delivered to the peripheral tissues although the increase in RBC-pH by dialysis restricts the dissociation of oxygen from hemoglobin.

  2. Effect of Sample Storage Temperature and Time Delay on Blood Gases, Bicarbonate and pH in Human Arterial Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadhoseini, Elham; Safavi, Enayat; Seifi, Sepideh; Seifirad, Soroush; Firoozbakhsh, Shahram; Peiman, Soheil

    2015-03-01

    Results of arterial blood gas analysis can be biased by pre-analytical factors, such as time interval before analysis, temperature during storage and syringe type. To investigate the effects of samples storage temperature and time delay on blood gases, bicarbonate and PH results in human arterial blood samples. 2.5 mL arterial blood samples were drawn from 45 patients via an indwelling Intraarterial catheter. Each sample was divided into five equal samples and stored in multipurpose tuberculin plastic syringes. Blood gas analysis was performed on one of five samples as soon as possible. Four other samples were divided into two groups stored at 22°C and 0°C. Blood gas analyses were repeated at 30 and 60 minutes after sampling. PaO2 of the samples stored at 0°C was increased significantly after 60 minutes (P = 0.007). The PaCO2 of the samples kept for 30 and 60 minutes at 22°C was significantly higher than primary result (P = 0.04, P samples stored at 22°C, pH decreased significantly after 30 and 60 minutes (P = 0.017, P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in other results of samples stored at 0°C or 22°C after 30 or 60 minutes. In samples stored in plastic syringes, overestimation of PaO2 levels should be noted if samples cooled before analysis. In samples stored in plastic syringes, it is not necessary to store samples in iced water when analysis delayed up to one hour.

  3. The evolution of Root effect hemoglobins in the absence of intracellular pH protection of the red blood cell: insights from primitive fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Matthew D; Brauner, Colin J

    2010-06-01

    The Root effect, a reduction in blood oxygen (O(2)) carrying capacity at low pH, is used by many fish species to maximize O(2) delivery to the eye and swimbladder. It is believed to have evolved in the basal actinopterygian lineage of fishes, species that lack the intracellular pH (pH(i)) protection mechanism of more derived species' red blood cells (i.e., adrenergically activated Na(+)/H(+) exchangers; betaNHE). These basal actinopterygians may consequently experience a reduction in blood O(2) carrying capacity, and thus O(2) uptake at the gills, during hypoxia- and exercise-induced generalized blood acidoses. We analyzed the hemoglobins (Hbs) of seven species within this group [American paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), bowfin (Amia calva), mooneye (Hiodon tergisus), and pirarucu (Arapaima gigas)] for their Root effect characteristics so as to test the hypothesis of the Root effect onset pH value being lower than those pH values expected during a generalized acidosis in vivo. Analysis of the haemolysates revealed that, although each of the seven species displayed Root effects (ranging from 7.3 to 40.5% desaturation of Hb with O(2), i.e., Hb O(2) desaturation), the Root effect onset pH values of all species are considerably lower (ranging from pH 5.94 to 7.04) than the maximum blood acidoses that would be expected following hypoxia or exercise (pH(i) 7.15-7.3). Thus, although these primitive fishes possess Hbs with large Root effects and lack any significant red blood cell betaNHE activity, it is unlikely that the possession of a Root effect would impair O(2) uptake at the gills following a generalized acidosis of the blood. As well, it was shown that both maximal Root effect and Root effect onset pH values increased significantly in bowfin over those of the more basal species, toward values of similar magnitude to those of most of the more derived

  4. The Effects of Sodium Bicarbonate and Sodium Citrate on Blood pH, HCO3-, Lactate Metabolism and Time to Exhaustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soetanto Hartono

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of sodium bicarbonate and sodium citrate in increasing lactate concentration, blood pH, HCO3-, and time to exhaustion. Increased time to exhaustion is an advantage since the athletes can do more anaerobic work. Exhaustion could be delayed by increasing HCO3- to catch H+ produced by lactate metabolism to form H2O and CO2. The design of this research was randomized pretest posttest control group design. Thirty badminton student players were randomly selected and randomly assigned to three groups. The first group (the control group was given placebo, NaCl .9 g/dl, the second group was given sodium bicarbonate 300 mg/kg in 500 ml aqua, and the third group was given sodium citrate 300 mg/kg in 500 ml aqua. Blood pH and bicarbonate ion (HCO3- were measured through Opti Medical Blood gas Analyzer. Lactate was measured by Cobas Roche lactate Analyzer. Data was analyzed using Manova with .05 significant level. Blood pH of the groups taking sodium bicarbonate and sodium citrate were higher significantly against control group (p.05. Sodium bicarbonate is better than sodium citrate, although both were better than control (p<.05. Sodium bicarbonate is better than sodium citrate in increasing blood pH and time to exhaustion. The disadvantage of using sodium bicarbonate is that it can cause gastrointestinal problem and headache, so it is not advisable to be used by athletes who have the symptoms.

  5. Effects of sodium bicarbonate on the end-tidal CO2, PaCO2, HCO3-, PH and cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatani, Akio; Akutsu, Tooru; Yoshida, Michihiko; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Seo, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    To estimate the quantitative reactivity of cerebral blood flow (CBF), the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the end-tidal CO 2 , arterial partial pressure of CO 2 (PaCO 2 ), HCO 3 - , pH and CBF were examined. The CBF was measured by 133 Xe inhalation method with ring type SPECT (HEADTOME). Activation study with sodium bicarbonate administration was performed after 30 minutes of resting study, and the reactivity of each parameters was investigated. The arterial HCO 3 - and pH increased with similar reactivity, but PaCO 2 , end-tidal CO 2 and CBF in the non-injured hemisphere changed with irregular reactivity. The excellent correlation between PaCO 2 and end-tidal CO 2 was vanished by the administration of sodium bicarbonate. The reactivity of CBF did not correlate with reactivity of PaCO 2 and end-tidal CO 2 , but correlated with arterial HCO 3 - and pH. Thus the measurement of arterial HCO 3 - and pH may be indispensable to estimate the CBF reactivity with the administration of sodium bicarbonate. (author)

  6. Effects of sodium bicarbonate on the end-tidal CO[sub 2], PaCO[sub 2], HCO[sub 3][sup -], PH and cerebral blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatani, Akio; Akutsu, Tooru; Yoshida, Michihiko; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Seo, Hiroshi (Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    To estimate the quantitative reactivity of cerebral blood flow (CBF), the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the end-tidal CO[sub 2], arterial partial pressure of CO[sub 2] (PaCO[sub 2]), HCO[sub 3][sup -], pH and CBF were examined. The CBF was measured by [sup 133]Xe inhalation method with ring type SPECT (HEADTOME). Activation study with sodium bicarbonate administration was performed after 30 minutes of resting study, and the reactivity of each parameters was investigated. The arterial HCO[sub 3][sup -] and pH increased with similar reactivity, but PaCO[sub 2], end-tidal CO[sub 2] and CBF in the non-injured hemisphere changed with irregular reactivity. The excellent correlation between PaCO[sub 2] and end-tidal CO[sub 2] was vanished by the administration of sodium bicarbonate. The reactivity of CBF did not correlate with reactivity of PaCO[sub 2] and end-tidal CO[sub 2], but correlated with arterial HCO[sub 3][sup -] and pH. Thus the measurement of arterial HCO[sub 3][sup -] and pH may be indispensable to estimate the CBF reactivity with the administration of sodium bicarbonate. (author).

  7. The effect of sugar beet pulp on caecal pH in Norwegian cold-blooded trotter horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøkner, Christine; Austbø, D.; Næsset, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    It was hypothesised that whole barley would lower caecal pH more thatn whole barley fed in combination with Betfor®. Four geldings were fed two concentrate diets: 2.06 kg whole barley + 300 g DM Befor® (BB) and 2.06 kg whole barley (B). Timothy hay was fed as roughages in both diets. A pH electrode...

  8. Effect of pectin, lecithin, and antacid feed supplements (Egusin®) on gastric ulcer scores, gastric fluid pH and blood gas values in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of two commercial feed supplements, Egusin 250® [E-250] and Egusin SLH® [E-SLH], on gastric ulcer scores, gastric fluid pH, and blood gas values in stall-confined horses undergoing feed-deprivation. Methods Nine Thoroughbred horses were used in a three-period crossover study. For the three treatment groups, sweet feed was mixed with E-250, E-SLH, or nothing (control group) and fed twice daily. Horses were treated for 21 days, then an additional 7 days while on an alternating feed-deprivation model to induce or worsen ulcers (period one). In periods two and three, horses (n=6) were treated for an additional 7 days after feed-deprivation. Gastroscopies were performed on day -1 (n=9), day 21 (n=9), day 28 (n=9) and day 35 (n=6). Gastric juice pH was measured and gastric ulcer scores were assigned. Venous blood gas values were also measured. Results Gastric ulcers in control horses significantly decreased after 21 days, but there was no difference in ulcer scores when compared to the Egusin® treated horses. NG gastric ulcer scores significantly increased in E-250 and control horses on day 28 compared to day 21 as a result of intermittent feed-deprivation, but no treatment effect was observed. NG ulcer scores remained high in the control group but significantly decreased in the E-SLH- and E-250-treated horses by day 35. Gastric juice pH values were low and variable and no treatment effect was observed. Mean blood pCO2 values were significantly increased two hours after feeding in treated horses compared to controls, whereas mean blood TCO2 values increased in the 24 hour sample, but did not exceed 38 mmol/l. Conclusions The feed-deprivation model increased NG gastric ulcer severity in the horses. However, by day 35, Egusin® treated horses had less severe NG gastric ulcers compared to untreated control horses. After 35 days, Egusin® products tested here ameliorate the severity of gastric ulcers in

  9. Secondary elements of blood pH variation can influence the effort effectiveness based on adaptive changes within a group of elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ştefan Adrian; Tomescu, Valeriu; Voidăzan, Septimiu

    2016-01-01

    pH is the direct indicator of the body reaction following the activities performed. Establishing precise correlations between pH and blood biochemical parameters might support the balancing of values during periods of marked physical activity. We conducted a case study in a group of elite rowers. Twelve athletes were included in the study. Monitoring was carried out by collecting biological samples several times a day: in the morning, 80 minutes pre-workout, 12 hours after the last physical effort performed, at two different times, 10 days apart. Determinations were aimed at adapting the reported biochemical parameters depending on the effort performed. The following parameters were monitored: pH, HCO3, pCO2, pO2, BE, SBE, SBC, Ca++, Mg++, LDH, GPT, T-Pro, and Alb. The mean value of pH found in athletes was 7.41±0.024. The value obtained was significantly correlated to biochemical parameters such as BE (2.32±1.79), SBC (1.67±1.45), SBE (2.70±1.75). However, bicarbonate (HCO3) was statistically significantly related with SBE, SBC, SBE, and pO2, but did not present a strong association with the pH value (p=0.094). However, values such as Alb, Ca++, LDH, BE, SBC are related to pH value as a result of variations in the data submitted. The processed data evidence the fact that blood pH, in this case, is significantly influenced by a number of indices that correlate energy system activity, individual adaptation to effort, and the recovery process. The parameters under investigation (SBE, SBC, SBE, CPK, LDH) are associated with pH changes that could confirm the recovery efficiency of the athlete, along with a possible metabolic acidosis/alkalosis.

  10. The effect of a pre-anesthetic infusion of amino acids on body temperature, venous blood pH, glucose, creatinine, and lactate of healthy dogs during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark-Price, Stuart C; Dossin, Olivier; Ngwenyama, Thandeka R; O'Brien, Mauria A; McMichael, Maureen; Schaeffer, David J

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of preanesthetic, intravenous (IV) amino acids on body temperature of anesthetized healthy dogs. Randomized, experimental, crossover study. Eight mixed-breed dogs approximately 2 years of age weighing 20.7 ± 2.1 kg. Dogs received 10% amino acid solution (AA) or 0.9% saline (SA) IV at 5 mL kg(-1) over 60 minutes. Body temperature (BT) was recorded at 5 minute intervals during infusions. Dogs were then anesthetized with sevoflurane for 90 minutes. BT was recorded at 5 minute intervals during anesthesia. Jugular blood samples were analyzed for pH, glucose, creatinine, and lactate concentrations at baseline, after infusion, after anesthesia and after 24 hours. BT at conclusion of infusion decreased -0.34 ± 0.42 °C in group AA and -0.40 ± 0.38 °C in group SA and was not different between groups (p = 0.072). BT decreased 2.72 ± 0.37 °C in group AA and 2.88 ± 0.26 °C in group SA after anesthesia and was different between groups (p dogs, preanesthetic IV infusion of amino acids attenuated heat loss compared to controls, however, the amount attenuated may not be clinically useful. Further studies are warranted to determine if nutrient-induced thermogenesis is beneficial to dogs undergoing anesthesia. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  11. Umbilical Cord Blood pH in Intrapartum Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perveen, Fouzia; Khan, Ayesha; Ali, Tahmina; Rabia, Syeda

    2015-09-01

    To determine the association of cord arterial blood pH with neonatal outcome in cases of intrapartum fetal hypoxia. Descriptive analytical study. Gynaecology Unit-II, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from September 2011 to November 2012. All singleton cephalic fetuses at term gestation were included in the study. Those with any anomaly, malpresentation, medical disorders, maternal age 7.25, neonatal outcome measures (healthy, NICU admission or neonatal death), color of liquor and mode of delivery recorded on predesigned proforma. Statistical analysis performed by SPSS 16 by using independent-t test or chi-square test and ANOVA test as needed. A total of 204 newborns were evaluated. The mean pH level was found to be significantly different (p=0.007) in two groups. The pH value 7.25 had significant association (p 7.25. Majority (63.6%) cases needed caesarean section as compared to 31.4% controls. There is a significant association of cord arterial blood pH at birth with neonatal outcome at pH 7.25; but below the level of pH 7.25 it is still inconclusive.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1120 - Blood gases (PCO2, PO2) and blood pH test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood gases (PCO2, PO2) and blood pH test system... Test Systems § 862.1120 Blood gases (PCO2, PO2) and blood pH test system. (a) Identification. A blood gases (PCO2, PO2) and blood pH test system is a device intended to measure certain gases in blood, serum...

  13. In vivo 31P and 1H NMR studies of rat brain tumor pH and blood flow during acute hyperglycemia: Differential effects between subcutaneous and intracerebral locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, B.D.; Mitchell, S.L.; Merkle, H.; Garwood, M.

    1989-01-01

    Surface coil NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor the hyperglycemia-induced alterations in pH and blood flow in vivo in C6 gliomas implanted both subcutaneously and intracerebrally in rats. Tumor pH was calculated from the chemical shift difference between PCr and Pi in the 31 P NMR spectra. Subcutaneous glioma pH decreased 0.8 units by 1 h after intraperitoneal administration of an aqueous 50% glucose solution (6 g glucose per kg body weight). In contrast, hyperglycemia failed to significantly alter the pH of intracerebral gliomas which were monitored for 90 min following administration of glucose. Tumor blood flow (TBF) was determined both pre- and post-glucose administration using deuterium NMR by monitoring the time course of D2O washout following intratumoral injection of saline D2O. Subcutaneous and intracerebral TBF were found to have an average change of -78.1% (range -47.4 to -93.3%, n = 5) and -21.1% (range +6.0 to -37.8%, n = 9), respectively. In addition, laser Doppler blood flow measurements of rat skin and subcutaneous glioma revealed a dramatic reduction in blood flow in both tissues following glucose administration. These results indicate that the effects of acute hyperglycemia are site dependent and that hyperglycemia alone is not beneficial for inducing intracellular acidosis in intracerebral tumors

  14. Collection and storage of red blood cells with anticoagulant and additive solution with a physiologic pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Patrick; Korsten, Herbert; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; de Korte, Dirk; van Bruggen, Robin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A donation of whole blood is most commonly collected in acidic citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) variants with pH 5.2 to 6.2 as anticoagulants. Previously, we have shown that the initial pH after red blood cell (RBC) preparation can have an effect on RBCs during storage. First, we

  15. Changes in interstitial K+ and pH during exercise: implications for blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    that blood flow is affected by changes in K+ as low as 0.1 mmol/L. The vasodilatory effect of K+ can be inhibited with simultaneous barium infusion, indicating that inward rectifier potassium (Kir)channels are involved. Acidosis has a direct effect on blood flow and an indirect effect, mediated by changes...... with the microdialysis technique. Interstitial K+ accumulation is dependent on the intensity and duration of muscle activity and may reach 10 mmol/L during intense exercise, and the concentration in T-tubules may be even higher. Thus, interstitial K+ can reach a level that affects fibre excitability and the development...... of fatigue. It has also been demonstrated with microdialysis that the interstitial decrease in pH during muscle activity is larger than the reduction in blood pH. Ion changes in the interstitium may affect blood flow directly or indirectly. Infusion of K+ into the femoral artery in humans has demonstrated...

  16. Effects of buffering mineral mixtures on milk yield, milk composition, rumen pH and some blood biochemical parameters in heat stressed dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamović Milan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work was to investigate the influence of partial substitution of magnesium oxide with natural bentonite in feed mixtures used in feeding of cows during their exposure to heat stress. The investigation lasted 30 days and was carried out during last ten days of may and first twenty days of June when average air temperature in stables was 36.6±2.5oC. In the experiment there were included 30 cows of Holstein breed in first phase of lactation, which were divided into two groups of 15 cows: control (C and experimental (E. Group C was fed with experimental mineral mixture that contained 60% of magnesium oxide during the whole investigation period. Group E was fed with experimental mineral mixture that contained 40% of magnesium oxide as well as 20% of natural bentonite. Remaining ingredients in both control and experimental mineral mixtures were the same and also contained 20% of sodium bicarbonate and 20% of zeolite in the same quantities. The control and experimental mineral mixtures were mixed into complete feed mixture (18% UP in the amount of 1%. At tne end of the investigation period, on the 30th day, there were taken samples of rumens contents for determining pH, and after that blood samples, in which, after the separation of blood serum, were determined glucose concentration, total proteins, albumin, globulin, urea, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total bilirubin, calcium and phosphorus, as well as the activity of ALT and AST. By computation there was calculated the ratio between albumin and globulin, ALT and AST, and the ratio between calcium and phosphorus. Daily allowance and milk chemical composition ( percentage of fat, proteins and dry substance were determined at the end of the investigation period, that is on the 30th day of lactation, for each cow individually. Partial substitution of magnesium oxide with bentonite influenced milk production increase, but it was statistically insignificant. Besides that, in E

  17. pCO2 And pH regulation of cerebral blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeongHun eYoon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2 Serves as one of the fundamental regulators of cerebral blood flow. It is widely considered that this regulation occurs through pCO2-driven changes in pH of the cerebral spinal fluid, with elevated and lowered pH causing direct relaxation and contraction of the smooth muscle, respectively. However, some findings also suggest that pCO2 acts independently of and/or in conjunction with altered pH. This action may be due to a direct effect of cerebral spinal fluid pCO2 on the smooth muscle as well as on the endothelium, nerves, and astrocytes. Findings may also point to an action of arterial pCO2 on the endothelium to regulate smooth muscle contractility. Thus, the effects of pH and pCO2 may be influenced by the absence/presence of different cell types in the various experimental preparations. Results may also be influenced by experimental parameters including myogenic tone as well as solutions containing significantly altered HCO3- concentrations, i.e., solutions routinely employed to differentiate the effects of pH from pCO2. In sum, it appears that pCO2, independently and in conjunction with pH, may regulate cerebral blood flow.

  18. The relationship between fetal biophysical profile and cord blood PH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valadan M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The Biophysical Profile (BPP is a noninvasive test that predicts the presence or absence of fetal asphyxia and, ultimately, the risk of fetal death in the antenatal period. Intervention on the basis of an abnormal biophysical profile result has been reported to yield a significant reduction in prenatal mortality, and an association exists between biophysical profile scoring and a decreased cerebral palsy rate in a given population. The BPP evaluates five characteristics: fetal movement, tone, breathing, heart reactivity, and amniotic fluid (AF volume estimation. The purpose of study was to determine whether there are different degree of acidosis at which the biophysical activity (acute marker are affected. "nMethods: In a prospective study of 140 patients undergoing cesarean section before onset of labor, the fetal biophysical profile was performed 24h before the time of cesarean and was matched with cord arterial PH that was obtained from a cord segment (10-20cm that was double clamped after delivery of newborn. (using cord arterial PH less than 7.20 for the diagnosis of acidosis. "nResults: The fetal biophysical profile was found to have a significant relationship with umbilical blood PH. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value of fetal biophysical profile score were: 88.9%, 88.6%, 50%, 98.1%. "nConclusion: The first manifestations of fetal acidosis are nonreactive nonstress testing and fetal breathing loss; in advanced acidemia fetal movements and fetal tone are compromised. A protocol of antepartum fetal evaluation is suggested based upon the individual biophysical components rather than the score alone.

  19. Tumor blood flow and pH changes after glucose administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thistlethwaite, A.J.; Tupchong, L.; Leeper, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used a laser doppler technique to correlate blood flow changes with pH changes in human tumors after glucose ingestion. Three PTs with large superficial tumors ingested 100 gm glucose. A 21g needle pH electrode (Micro-electrodes, Inc.) and a 21g ''Laserflo'' fiberoptic laser doppler blood flow probe (TSI, Minneapolis, MN) were used at the same location. Blood glucose was measured by finger stick every 7.5 min. One PT with a squamous cell CA with extensive necrosis had only a small increase in blood glucose and an increase in tumor pH. Blood flow readings were within 6.4-18.4ml/100g/min. Another PT with a squamous CA had a drop in tumor pH (7.46 to 7.05) as blood glucose increased from 85 to 137 mg/dl by 55 min. Blood flow remained in a range of 7.7-13.8 ml/100g/min with a mean of 11.4. The third PT with a sarcoma had tumor pH and blood glucose measurements on two occasions, with similar results. Blood glucose rose from approx. 100 to 150 mg/dl by 52.5 min with a drop in tumor pH from approx. 7.4 to 7.25. On the second trial, tumor blood flow was measured and, while erratic (6.4-24.9ml/100g/min), decreased by approx. 50%. These preliminary data show that the laser doppler blood flow technique is quite sensitive to movement artifact and interference by free hemoglobin. Currently, it is inconclusive whether blood flow is altered with blood glucose and tumor pH changes. Further studies may prove this to be a valuable tool in predicting tumor response to hyperthermia

  20. Continuous monitoring of arterial blood gases and pH during intraoperative rapid blood administration using a Paratrend sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vretzakis, G; Papaziogas, B; Matsaridou, E; Vasiliadou, G; Papadopoulos, G; Patsialas, C; Kostopoulou, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of rapid transfusion of packed red cells on the arterial blood gases and acid-base status of the recipient. We studied 16 patients (mean age 66.3+/-9.9 years) who received rapid transfusion of 632.8+/-287.2 g of packed red cells in CPDA-1, stored before use for a period of 15.2+/-4.4 days. During transfusion, monitoring of pH, PCO2 and PO2 was continuous using an intra-arterial multiparameter sensor (Paratrend 7, Biomedical Sensors, UK). The rate of the transfusion was 73.1+/-9.6 g/min and the duration of observation was 35.8+/-12.8 min. Arterial pH decreased from 7.446+/-0.023 to 7.385+/-0.034 (pDelta pH and delta PCO2 showed significant correlation to the weight and the age of the transfused blood (pPO2 were not specific and our clinical impression was that they were related to unmeasured parameters. Our findings suggest that the fall in pH and the elevation in PCO2 which occur during rapid transfusion of packed red cells may go undetected or be misinterpreted if the acid-base status of the recipient is not monitored continuously. These alterations are mainly of metabolic character and depend on the amount and age of the transfused component. Our data suggest that arterial sampling is essential during massive transfusions.

  1. Effect of two mouthwashes on salivary ph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, Paola A; Morelatto, Rosana A; Benavidez, Tomás E; Baruzzi, Ana M; López de Blanc, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of two mouthwashes on salivary pH and correlate it with age, buffer capacity and saliva flow rate in healthy volunteers, a crossover phase IV clinical study involving three age-based groups was designed. Two commercial mouthwashes (MW), Cool Mint ListerineR (MWa) and Periobacter R (MWb) were used. The unstimulated saliva of each individual was first characterized by measuring flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. Salivary pH was evaluated before rinsing with a given MW, immediately after rinsing, 5 minutes later, and then every 10 min (at 15, 25, 35 min) until the baseline pH was recovered. Paired t-test, ANOVA with a randomized block design, and Pearson correlation tests were used. Averages were 0.63 mL/min, 7.06, and 0.87 for flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity, respectively. An immediate significant increase in salivary pH was observed after rinsing, reaching average values of 7.24 (MWb) and 7.30 (MWa), which declined to an almost stable value 15 minutes. The great increase in salivary pH, after MW use shows that saliva is a dynamic system, and that the organism is capable of responding to a stimulus with changes in its composition. It is thus evident that pH of the external agent alone is not a good indicator for its erosive potential because biological systems tend to neutralize it. The results of this study enhance the importance of in vivo measurements and reinforce the concept of the protective action of saliva.

  2. In Vivo Model to Test Implanted Biosensors for Blood pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Somps, Chris J.; Madou, Marc; Hines, John; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Biosensors for monitoring physiologic data continuously through telemetry are available for heart rate, respiration, and temperature but not for blood pH or ions affected by hydrogen ion concentration. A telemetric biosensor for monitoring blood pH on-line could be used to identify and manage problems in fluid and electrolyte metabolism, cardiac and respiratory function during space flight and the acid-base status of patients without the need for venipuncture in patients on Earth. Critical to the development of biosensors is a method for evaluating their performance after implantation. Mature rats, prepared with jugular, cannulas for repeated blood samples, were exposed to a gas mixture containing high levels of carbon dioxide (7%) in a closed environment to induce mild respiratory acidosis. Serial blood gas and pH measurements in venous blood were compared with electrical responses from sensors implanted in the subcutaneous tissue. Animals became slightly tachypneic after exposure to excess CO2, but remained alert and active. After 5 minutes, basal blood pH decreased from 7.404 +/- 0.013 to 7.289 +/- 0.010 (p less than 0.001)and PC02 increased from 45 +/- 6 to 65 +/- 4 mm. Hg (p les than 0.001). Thereafter pH and blood gas parameters remained stable. Implanted sensors showed a decrease in millivolts (mV) which paralleled the change in pH and averaged 5-6 mV per 0.1 unit pH. Implanted sensors remained sensitive to modest changes in tissue pH for one week. A system for inducing acidosis in rats was developed to test the in vivo performance of pH biosensors. The system provides a method which is sensitive, rapid and reproducible in the same and different animals with full recovery, for testing the performance of sensors implanted in subcutaneous tissues.

  3. Blood ph and mortality of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) and sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonas, R E.E.; Sehdev, H S; Tomlinson, N

    1972-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) under light anaesthesia with MS 222 (Tricaine methanesulphonate) died when their blood pH was lowered into the range of 6.8 to 6.9 by injection of either lactic acid or hydrochloric acid. When injection of the same quantities of either acid did not lower the blood pH into this range, fatalities did not result (one exception in 56 fish injected). The injection of much larger quantities of lactate of chloride ions in the form of sodium salts did not cause fatalities. Very limited date for sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) suggest a similar association between blood pH and mortality for this species.

  4. Blood perfusion and pH monitoring in organs by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Stavridi, Marigo; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Thomas, Reem; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in detecting a change in tissue pH, and blood perfusion was determined. Rabbits were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The arterial and venous blood supplies of the kidney were isolated and ligated to alter the perfusion. The femoral artery was cannulated to extract samples for blood gas analysis. A 308-nm XeCl was used as an excitation source. A 600 micrometers core diameter fiber was used for fluorescence acquisition, and the spectra analyzed by an optical multichannel analyzer (EG & G, OMA III). the corresponding intensity ratio R equals INADH / ICOLL was used as an index for respiratory acidosis. Blood perfusion was assessed using the following algorithm: (IELAS minus ICOLL) divided by (INADH minus ICOLL). The intensity ratio linearly decreased with the reduction of blood perfusion. When we totally occluded the artery the ratio decreased tenfold when compared to the ratio of a fully perfused kidney. Results of monitoring blood acidosis by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy shows a significant trend between pH and intensity ratio. Since all the slopes were negative, there is an obvious significant correlation between the pH and NADH.COLLAGEN RATIO. Blue-light-induced fluorescence measurements and ratio fluorometry is a sensitive method for monitoring blood perfusion and acidity or alkalinity of an organ.

  5. An evaluation of the AVL 937C blood-gas and pH microanalyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutter, W P; Aitchison, T C; Thorburn, J; Sharp, F

    1976-12-01

    The AVL 937C blood-gas and pH microanalyser was evaluated with particular reference to its use in obsterics and in neonatal paediatrics in which its ability to analyse blood smaples as small as 40 micronlitre would be of particular value. Analysing samples of cord blood, maternal venous blood and foetal scalp blood, the reproducibility over the range of values measured was excellent with samples of 40-100 micronlitre. SD of the variation in values measured on samples collected in syringes were po2 0.11 kPa; Pco2 0.21 kPa; PH 0.005 unit. The same values for specimens collected in capillary tubes were: Po2 0.19 kPa;Pco 0.43 kPa; pH 0.013 unit. Analysis of tonometered blood samples showed a similar high standard of accuracy. The 91-98% confidence limits for the measurement of blood-gas values in samples collected in syringes were: Po2-0.22 to +0.49kPa; Pco2-0.53 to +0.42 kPa. The same values for samples collected in capillary tubes were: Po2 -0.38 to +0.70 kPa; Pco2 -0.97 to +0.86 kPa.

  6. In vivo measurement of intracellular pH in human brain during different tensions of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. A 31P-NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    The effect of changes in carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood upon intracellular pH in brain tissue was studied in seven healthy volunteers, aged 22-45 years. The pH changes were monitored by use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, performed on a whole-body 1.5 Tesla Siemens imaging...

  7. Cord lactate, pH, and blood gases from healthy neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, T; St Pierre, J; Winkelman, J

    1996-01-01

    Lactate, pH, pO2, and pCO2 were determined in arterial, venous, and free-flowing mixed umbilical cord blood obtained from deliveries of apparently healthy neonates. The goals of this study were to establish reference ranges for lactate and pH against which results in cases of high-risk labor and delivery could be compared, to see how the gases correlated with these values, and to determine whether easily accessible mixed umbilical cord blood can serve as the sample in lieu of cord arterial or cord venous blood. Arterial and venous cord lactates were 2.98 mmol/l (+/- 1.40) and 2.80 mmol/l (+/- 1.35), respectively, from 85 cords obtained from vaginal and cesarean deliveries. Mixed cord blood lactate, obtained on 48 cords, was 2.72 mmol/l (+/- 1.28) versus 3.14 and 2.97 mmol/l for the arterial and venous samples from those cords, respectively, and correlated quite well with lactate from the venous specimens (r = 0.97). Differences of > 0.5 mmol/l occurred between mixed and arterial cord bloods in 21 patients, and between mixed and venous cord bloods in 6 of the 48 patients, respectively. We conclude that (1) less than 2.5% of deliveries of apparently healthy neonates have arterial, venous, or mixed cord lactates > or = 7.0 mmol/l and pH pO2 nor pCO2 correlate well with cord venous lactate, and (3) readily available mixed cord blood is a satisfactory specimen for the measurement of venous cord latate.

  8. Muscle pH, rigor mortis and blood variables in Atlantic salmon transported in two types of well-boat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica, M C; Monti, G E; Knowles, T G; Gallo, C B

    2010-01-09

    Two systems for transporting live salmon (Salmo salar) were compared in terms of their effects on blood variables, muscle pH and rigor index: an 'open system' well-boat with recirculated sea water at 13.5 degrees C and a stocking density of 107 kg/m3 during an eight-hour journey, and a 'closed system' well-boat with water chilled from 16.7 to 2.1 degrees C and a stocking density of 243.7 kg/m3 during a seven-hour journey. Groups of 10 fish were sampled at each of four stages: in cages at the farm, in the well-boat after loading, in the well-boat after the journey and before unloading, and in the processing plant after they were pumped from the resting cages. At each sampling, the fish were stunned and bled by gill cutting. Blood samples were taken to measure lactate, osmolality, chloride, sodium, cortisol and glucose, and their muscle pH and rigor index were measured at death and three hours later. In the open system well-boat, the initial muscle pH of the fish decreased at each successive stage, and at the final stage they had a significantly lower initial muscle pH and more rapid onset of rigor than the fish transported on the closed system well-boat. At the final stage all the blood variables except glucose were significantly affected in the fish transported on both types of well-boat.

  9. [Relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetes patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafri, I H; Mashlah, A; Shaqifa, A

    2014-03-13

    This study was evaluated the relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetic patients. The sample comprised 210 participants (age ranged 40-60 years). Based on fasting blood glucose levels the participants were divided into 3 groups: controls with normal blood glucose levels; diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL; and diabetic patients with levels > 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH and buffering capacity were determined in a sample of resting (non-stimulated) saliva taken from each participant. Salivary pH levels in diabetic patients with blood glucose levels > 200 mg/dL were lower than in the controls and diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH levels were comparable in controls and diabetic patients with blood glucose levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary buffering capacity in the 3 groups was comparable.

  10. The effect of biogeochemical processes on pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Hofmann, A.F.; Middelburg, J.J.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Greenwood, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of biogeochemical and physical processes on aquatic chemistry is usually expressed in terms of alkalinity. Here we show how to directly calculate the effect of single processes on pH. Under the assumptions of equilibrium and electroneutrality, the rate of change of pH can be calculated as

  11. In vivo MR monitoring of pH and blood flow during hyperglycemia in a brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, S.L.; Ross, B.D.; Merkle, H.; Garwood, M.

    1988-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that tumors exhibit an acidotic pH shift following hyperglycemia, which may aid in hyperthermic treatments. P-31 and H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to monitor hyperglycemia-induced pH and blood flow changes, respectively, in subcutaneous and intracerebral C6 gliomas in rats. Subcutaneous tumors had a 78.2% +- 8.03% (standard error of the mean) decrease in blood flow and a concomitant pH decrease of 0.76 units +- 0.08. However, intracerebral tumors displayed an average blood flow reduction of only 20.9% +- 6.1%, with no significant pH change following hyperglycemia. These results indicate that the tissue harboring the tumor may have an important role in the overall tumor response to hyperglycemia

  12. Increased blood pH but not performance with sodium bicarbonate supplementation in elite rugby union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Sonya L; McLay-Cooke, Rebecca T; Brown, Rachel C; Gray, Andrew R; Fairbairn, Kirsty A

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of ingesting 0.3 g/kg body weight (BW) of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃) on physiological responses, gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability, and sprint performance in elite rugby union players. Twenty-five male rugby players, age 21.6 (2.6) yr, participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Sixty-five minutes after consuming 0.3 g/kg BW of either NaHCO₃ or placebo, participants completed a 25-min warm-up followed by 9 min of high-intensity rugby-specific training followed by a rugby-specific repeated-sprint test (RSRST). Whole-blood samples were collected to determine lactate and bicarbonate concentrations and pH at baseline, after supplement ingestion, and immediately after the RSRST. Acute GI discomfort was assessed by questionnaire throughout the trials, and chronic GI discomfort was assessed during the 24 hr postingestion. After supplement ingestion and immediately after the RSRST, blood HCO₃⁻ concentration and pH were higher for the NaHCO₃ condition than for the placebo condition (p < .001). After the RSRST, blood lactate concentrations were significantly higher for the NaHCO₃ than for the placebo condition (p < .001). There was no difference in performance on the RSRST between the 2 conditions. The incidence of belching, stomachache, diarrhea, stomach bloating, and nausea was higher after ingestion of NaHCO₃ than with placebo (all p < .050). The severity of stomach cramps, belching, stomachache, bowel urgency, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach bloating, and flatulence was rated worse after ingestion of NaHCO₃ than with placebo (p < .050). NaHCO₃ supplementation increased blood HCO₃⁻ concentration and attenuated the decline in blood pH compared with placebo during high-intensity exercise in well-trained rugby players but did not significantly improve exercise performance. The higher incidence and greater severity of GI symptoms after ingestion of NaHCO₃ may negatively affect

  13. A Comparison of Po2, Pco2, Ph and Bicarbonate in Blood from the Carotid and Coccygeal Arteries of Calves

    OpenAIRE

    Gustin, Pascal; de Groote, A.; Dhem, A. R.; Bakima, M.; Lomba; Lekeux, Pierre

    1988-01-01

    A technique is described for the subcutaneous deviation of the carotid artery into the jugular groove of calves weighing between 90 and 200 kg. This makes sampling arterial blood or chronic cannulation for further experimentation very easy. Values of oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension, pH and bicarbonate concentration in blood sampled from the ventral coccygeal artery were compared with the values obtained in blood from carotid artery puncture. The high correlations observed indicate that...

  14. THE EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND pH ON BACTERIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    The effect of temperature and pH on bacterial degradation of latex paint under humid condition by .... blade and plastic bags as described by Okpokwasili and. Ituen(1996) and .... provided different ecological niche for bacteria at favourable ...

  15. Polyhedral charge-packing model for blood pH changes in disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    packing pH zone' (From pH = 7.30, for tetrahedral, to pH = 7.65 for dodecahedral packing), which lies in the neighborhood of the well known physiological pH range. Literature is cited in support of pH 7.65 as the extreme upper limit of tolerable ...

  16. Proficiency testing materials for pH and blood gases. The California Thoracic Society experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, J L; Levy, S E; Mohler, J G; Van Kessel, A L

    1986-02-01

    The California Thoracic Society Blood Gas Proficiency Testing Program distributed ampules from three separate lots of quality control products every three months as unknowns to participating clinical (survey) laboratories and ten selected reference laboratories. For eight quarters, aqueous buffers were distributed. For each lot, PCO2 and pH measurements varied within narrow ranges between laboratories. Concurrently, the PO2 measurements varied widely between reference laboratories as well as survey laboratories, but varied minimally when repeatedly assessed on each reference laboratory machine. Change to a fluorocarbon-containing emulsion as a testing medium resulted in a significant reduction in within model and overall variability for PO2. We attribute this reduction in variability to the higher O2 content and decreased temperature sensitivity for PO2 of the fluorocarbon-containing emulsion. Because we have no evidence that the magnitude of the interinstrument differences in PO2 found with these materials would be found with fresh human blood we recommend that regulatory agencies use the results of proficiency testing for PO2 cautiously.

  17. Contribution of pH, diprotonated phosphate and potassium for the reflex increase in blood pressure during handgrip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Madsen, P; Nielsen, H B

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of pH, diprotonated phosphate (H2PO4-) and potassium (K+) for the reflex increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during exercise was evaluated in seven subjects during rhythmic handgrip at 15 and 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), followed by post-exercise muscle...... to the exercise levels. Analysis of each variable as a predictor of blood pressure indicated that only the intracellular pH and diprotonated phosphate were linked to the reflex elevation of blood pressure during handgrip....

  18. Fresh and preserved green fodder modify effects of urinary acidifiers on urine pH of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, G; Fritz, J; Dillitzer, N; Hipp, B; Kienzle, E

    2014-04-01

    Hay stabilises urine pH in horses. It is unknown whether this is an effect of structure or of chemical composition. In this study, four ponies (230-384 kg body weight [BW]) were fed six different diets with either a structure or a composition similar to hay with and without acidifiers in a cross-over experimental design in amounts to maintain body weight with the following main compounds: Fresh grass (GRASS), alfalfa hay (ALF), grass cobs (COBS), grass silage (SIL), straw (STR) or extruded straw (STRe) for 2 to 10 days. Urine pH was measured in all trials, blood pH, blood base excess and bicarbonate as well as mineral balance were determined in GRASS, ALF, STR and STRe. In the trials with straw and extruded straw, urine pH decreased significantly (STR control: 7.8 ± 0.23, acidifier: 5.2 ± 0.38) when acidifiers were added, whereas in all other diets that were based on fresh or preserved green fodder, pH did not decrease below 7. Blood pH was similarly affected by diet and acidifiers. Acidifiers had little effect on the pre-prandial blood pH, only in diet STR there was a significant reduction in relation to control. Post-prandial blood pH was significantly reduced by acidifiers in all diets. Blood bicarbonate and base excess showed corresponding effects. Faecal and renal mineral excretion and apparent mineral digestibility were not systematically affected by diet or acidifiers except for chloride. Chloride added as inorganic chloride salt had an even better apparent digestibility than chloride originating from feed. Because only green plant material stabilised acid base balance, chlorophyll and its metabolites are discussed as potential mediators of the effect of green fodder on acid base balance. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Lactate versus pH levels in fetal scalp blood during labor--using the Lactate Scout System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Ingeborg Christina Rørbye; Perslev, Anette; Nickelsen, Carsten Nahne Amtoft

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess if lactate measured with the Scout Lactate System is a reliable alternative to pH in intrapartum monitoring of the fetus. METHODS: A prospective study analyzing (1) the correlation between scalp lactate measured by the Scout Lactate System and the Automatic Blood Laboratory (...

  20. pH adjustment of human blood plasma prior to bioanalytical sample preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, G.; Uges, D. R. A.; Franke, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    pH adjustment in bioanalytical sample preparation concerning ionisable compounds is one of the most common sample treatments. This is often done by mixing an aliquot of the sample with a proper buffer adjusted to the proposed pH. The pH of the resulting mixture however, does not necessarily have to

  1. Effect of pH on radiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W. Song; Park, Heon J.; Lyons, John C.; Auger, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The effect of environmental pH on the radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cells in vitro was investigated. Materials and Methods: SCK mammary adenocarcinoma cells of A/J mice were irradiated with γ-rays using a 137 Cs irradiator and incubated in media of different pHs. After incubation at 37 degree sign C for 24-120 hrs., the extent of apoptosis was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA, in situ TUNEL staining, flow cytometry, and release of 3 H from 3 H-thymidine labeled cells. The membrane integrity, using the trypan blue exclusion method, and the clonogenicity of the cells were also determined. Results: Irradiation with 2-12 Gy of γ-rays induced apoptosis in pH 7.5 medium within 48 hrs. The radiation-induced apoptosis progressively declined as the medium pH was lowered so that little apoptosis occurred in 48 hrs. after irradiation with 12 Gy in pH 6.6 medium. However, when the cells were irradiated and incubated for 48 hrs. in pH 6.6 medium and then medium was replaced with pH 7.5 medium, apoptosis promptly occurred. Apoptosis also occurred even in pH 6.6 medium when the cells were irradiated and maintained in pH 7.5 medium for 8 hrs. or longer post-irradiation before incubation in pH 6.6 medium. Conclusion: An acidic environment markedly suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis probably by suppressing the expression of initial signals responsible for irradiation-induced apoptosis. Indications are that the signals persist in an acidic environment and trigger apoptosis when the environmental acidity is eased. Our results suggest that the acidic environment in human tumors may inhibit the apoptosis after irradiation. However, apoptosis may be triggered when reoxygenation occurs after irradiation, and thus, the intratumor environment becomes less acidic after irradiation. Not only the change in pO 2 but the change in pH during the course of fractionated radiotherapy may greatly influence the outcome of the treatment

  2. Comparison of Interstitial Fluid pH, PCO2, PO2 with Venous Blood Values During Repetitive Handgrip Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Ronald Donald; Soller, Babs R.; Shear, Michael; Walz, Matthias; Landry, Michelle; Heard, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the use of a small, fiber optic sensor to measure pH, PCO2 and PO2 from forearm muscle interstitial fluid (IF) during handgrip dynamometry. PURPOSE: Compare pH, PCO2 and PO2 values obtained from venous blood with those from the IF of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) during three levels of exercise intensity. METHODS: Six subjects (5M/1F), average age 29+/-5 yrs, participated in the study. A venous catheter was placed in the retrograde direction in the antecubital space and a fiber optic sensor (Paratrend, Diametrics Medical, Inc.) was placed through a 22 G catheter into the FDS muscle under ultrasound guidance. After a 45 min rest period, subjects performed three 5-min bouts of repetitive handgrip exercise (2s contraction/1 s relaxation) at attempted levels of 15%, 30% and 45% of maximal voluntary contraction. The order of the exercise bouts was random with the second and third bouts started after blood lactate had returned to baseline. Venous blood was sampled every minute during exercise and analyzed with an I-Stat CG-4+ cartridge, while IF fiber optic sensor measurements were obtained every 2 s. Change from pre-exercise baseline to end of exercise was computed for pH, PCO2 and PO2. Blood and IF values were compared with a paired t-test. RESULTS: Baseline values for pH, PCO2 and PO2 were 7.37+/-0.02, 46+/-4 mm Hg, and 36+/-6 mm Hg respectively in blood and 7.39+/-0.02, 44+/-6 mm Hg, and 35+/-14 mm Hg in IF. Average changes over all exercise levels are noted in the Table below. For each parameter the exercise-induced change was at least twice as great in IF as in blood. In blood and IF, pH and PCO2 increases were directly related to exercise intensity. Change in venous PO2 was unrelated to exercise intensity, while IF PO2 decreased with increases in exercise intensity. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of IF pH, PCO2 and PO2 is more sensitive to exercise intensity than measurement of the same parameters in venous blood and provides continuous

  3. Field-effect pH Control in Nanochannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, R.B.H.; van der Wouden, E.J.; van Nieuwkasteele, Jan William; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Kim, Tae Song; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Taek-Dong; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Suh, Kaph-Yang; Choo, Jaebum; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel capacitive method to change the pH in nanochannels. The device employs metal electrodes outside an insulating channel wall to change the electrical double layer potential by the field effect (‘voltage gating’). We demonstrate that this potential change is accompanied by a

  4. Graphene Channel Liquid Container Field Effect Transistor as ph Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Shi, J.; Pang, J.; Liu, W.; Wang, X.; Liu, H.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene channel liquid container field effect transistor ph sensor with interdigital micro trench for liquid ion testing is presented. Growth morphology and ph sensing property of continuous few-layer graphene (FLG) and quasi-continuous monolayer graphene (MG) channels are compared. The experiment results show that the source-to-drain current of the graphene channel FET has a significant and fast response after adsorption of the measured molecule and ion at the room temperature; at the same time, the FLG response time is less than 4 s. The resolution of MG (0.01) on ph value is one order of magnitude higher than that of FLG (0.1). The reason is that with fewer defects, the MG is more likely to adsorb measured molecule and ion, and the molecules and ions can make the transport property change. The output sensitivities of MG are from 34.5% to 57.4% when the ph value is between 7 and 8, while sensitivity of FLG is 4.75% when the Ph=6. The sensor fabrication combines traditional silicon technique and flexible electronic technology and provides an easy way to develop graphene-based electrolyte gas sensor or even biological sensors.

  5. Effect of pH on sludge composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Shoji; Watanabe, Hiromasa; Nishimura, Koichi; Kawakami, Waichiro

    1984-01-01

    The effect of pH on composting of irradiated sewage sludge was discussed. Inorganic materials, such as activated alumina, Kanuma-soil, and Akadama-soil, were used as bulking agents. Na 2 CO 3 was used as a pH adjuster. The fermentations were done isothermally at the optimum temperature, 50 0 C. The rate of CO 2 evolution increased initially with time, and then, decreased. The peak value of CO 2 evolution and the time to attain the peak varied by the addition of Na 2 CO 3 . When Kanuma-soil was used as the bulking agent, for example, the peak value became larger as the amount of Na 2 CO 3 was increased to 1.0 % and became smaller over this value. From pH measurements, it was found that the optimum pH for fermentation was ranged from 6 to 8 when activated alumina was used. When other bulking agents were used, the maximum value of CO 2 evolution rate was obtained at pH 7 to 8.5. The peak value and the peak time also varied by the addition of NH 3 in the aeration gas. (author)

  6. Effect of sodium bicarbonate on [HCO3-], pH, and gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Amelia J; Slater, Gary J; Gore, Christopher J; Dawson, Brian; Burke, Louise M

    2011-06-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃) is often ingested at a dose of 0.3 g/kg body mass (BM), but ingestion protocols are inconsistent in terms of using solution or capsules, ingestion period, combining NaHCO₃ with sodium citrate (Na₃C₆H₅O₇), and coingested food and fluid. To quantify the effect of ingesting 0.3 g/kg NaHCO₃ on blood pH, [HCO₃-], and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms over the subsequent 3 hr using a range of ingestion protocols and, thus, to determine an optimal protocol. In a crossover design, 13 physically active subjects undertook 8 NaHCO₃ experimental ingestion protocols and 1 placebo protocol. Capillary blood was taken every 30 min and analyzed for pH and [HCO₃-]. GI symptoms were quantified every 30 min via questionnaire. Statistics used were pairwise comparisons between protocols; differences were interpreted in relation to smallest worthwhile changes for each variable. A likelihood of >75% was a substantial change. [HCO₃-] and pH were substantially greater than in placebo for all other ingestion protocols at almost all time points. When NaHCO3 was coingested with food, the greatest [HCO₃-] (30.9 mmol/kg) and pH (7.49) and lowest incidence of GI symptoms were observed. The greatest incidence of GI side effects was observed 90 min after ingestion of 0.3 g/kg NaHCO₃ solution. The changes in pH and [HCO₃-] for the 8 NaHCO₃-ingestion protocols were similar, so an optimal protocol cannot be recommended. However, the results suggest that NaHCO₃ coingested with a high-carbohydrate meal should be taken 120-150 min before exercise to induce substantial blood alkalosis and reduce GI symptoms.

  7. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on intracellular pH using 31P-MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Ito, Haruhide; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Kitahara, Tetsuhiro; Nakayama, Naoto; Saito, Kennichi

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the intracellular pH of the brain and cerebral blood flow (CBF); five normal volunteers were studied. Intracellular pH and CBF were measured by phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) and stable xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT), respectively. Each individual received 7% sodium bicarbonate (3.5 ml/kg body weight), infused intravenously over a 15-min period. Intracellular pH, CBF, and physiological parameters were determined before and after the injection. Intracellular pH was significantly decreased and CBF was increased. Among the physiological parameters, the hematocrit was significantly decreased and arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ), increased. These results suggest that increasing CO 2 contributes to the decrease in intracellular pH. In conclusion, three factors increase CBF during the administration of sodium bicarbonate to humans: arterial dilatation in response to carbon dioxide; decrease of the hematocrit, and intracellular cerebral acidosis. (author)

  8. Respiratory properties of blood and arterial blood gases in the tegu lizard: effects of temperature and hypercapnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S C; Glass, M L; Andersen, N A; Heisler, N

    1987-01-01

    The effects of body temperature and hypercapnia (7% inspired CO2) on arterial blood gases, plasma pH, and the characteristics of the blood oxygen dissociation curve were determined in Tegu lizards (Tupinambis nigropunctatus). Arterial pH fell from 7.59 to 7.50 when body temperature was increased from 25 to 35 degrees C. The pH/temperature coefficient (delta pH/delta t = -0.009 U/degrees C) was half of that predicted on the basis of 'constant relative alkalinity' and the alphastat hypothesis. The fall in plasma pH resulted from a decrease in plasma [HCO3-], and a rise in plasma Pco2. The O2 affinity of Tegu blood, expressed by the partial pressure at half saturation (P50), decreased with temperature in vitro from 42.3 to 49.6 torr at pH 7.4. The apparent enthalpy (delta H = -3.1 kcal/mol) is about 1/4 of that of human blood. In vivo, the arterial blood oxygen saturation decreased from 89% at 25 degrees to 82% at 35 degrees C. Arterial Po2 increased from 61 to 71 torr as expected from the right-shift of the oxygen dissociation curve. During environmental hypercapnia (7% CO2, 21% O2, 72% N2 inspired concentrations), arterial pH decreased to 7.28. Arterial O2 saturation remained constant and arterial Po2 increased from 61 to 85 torr due to the right-shift of the oxygen dissociation curve. The comparatively small effect of changes in temperature on the oxygen affinity of Tegu blood (directly according to the delta H value, and indirectly via changes in blood pH) results in a relatively small right shift of the oxygen dissociation curve, and accordingly in relatively high arterial and tissue Po2 values also at higher temperatures.

  9. Effect of laser on human blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalsamad, Amuna Nagash Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the effect of He-Ne (632.8 nm), N2 (337.1 nm), LED (450 nm) on the human blood, and blood component was studied by using CBC machine ( complete blood count) and UV -visible spectroscopy. Blood samples platoon A+ were collected and irradiated for different periods of time (10 minute, 20 minute, and 30 minute), to varied types of light source ( He- Ne laser and LED). Blood parameters of samples were measured by using complete Blood Count Machine (CBC). The absorption spectrum of blood samples were examined by using UV-visible spectrometer. The obtained results have shown different values of Complete Blood Counts and absorption spectrum due to different laser types and periods of time. We conclude that the laser light has clear effect on blood samples. (Author)

  10. Effect of degumming ph value on electrospining of silk fibroin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Shen-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerated silk fibroin fibers show properties dependent on the molecular weight of fibroin. The cocoon-degumming approaches had great impact on the degradation of silk fibroin. The effect of degumming pH value to electrospining of fibroin was studied in this paper. The viscosity and molecular weight of regenerated silk fibroin were studied using rheometer and gel electrophoresis. The results showed that the weaker the alkalinity of degumming reagent, there was the milder the effect on silk fibroin molecular. The fibroin fibers can be prepared by electrospining with low concentration of regenerated silk fibroin solution.

  11. Polyhedral charge-packing model for blood pH changes in disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    May 2, 2007 ... The six negatively charged hydroxyl ions occupy the six vertices of the octahedron, while the lone proton,. H+, occupies the octahedral hole at the centroid. ... ge packing can account for the common pH of 7.4 of mammals, in spite of other differences that are well known (Jackson, 1997). In the original model ...

  12. Effect of orally administered sodium bicarbonate on caecal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E A; Beard, W L; Douthit, T; Pohlman, L

    2014-03-01

    Caecal acidosis is a central event in the metabolic cascade that occurs following grain overload. Buffering the caecal acidosis by enterally administered sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 ) may be beneficial to affected horses. To determine the effect and duration of enterally administered NaHCO3 on caecal pH in healthy horses. Experimental study using horses with caecal cannulas. Nine horses had been previously fitted with a caecal cannula. Six horses received 1.0 g/kg bwt NaHCO3 and 3 control horses were given 3 l of water via nasogastric tube. Clinical parameters, water consumption, venous blood gases, caecal pH, faecal pH and faecal water content were measured at 6 h intervals over a 36 h study period. Horses that received enterally administered NaHCO3 had significantly increased caecal pH that lasted the duration of the study. Treated horses increased their water intake, and developed metabolic alkalaemia, significantly increased plasma sodium concentrations and significantly decreased plasma potassium concentrations. Enterally administered NaHCO3 may be beneficial in buffering caecal acidosis. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  13. Effects of hormone therapy on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Zeinab; Seely, Ellen W; Rahme, Maya; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada

    2015-04-01

    Although hormone therapy remains the most efficacious option for the management of vasomotor symptoms of menopause, its effects on blood pressure remain unclear. This review scrutinizes evidence of the mechanisms of action of hormone therapy on signaling pathways affecting blood pressure and evidence from clinical studies. Comprehensive Ovid MEDLINE searches were conducted for the terms "hypertension" and either of the following "hormone therapy and menopause" or "selective estrogen receptor modulator" from year 2000 to November 2013. In vitro and physiologic studies did not reveal a clear deleterious effect of hormone therapy on blood pressure. The effect of oral therapy was essentially neutral in large trials conducted in normotensive women with blood pressure as primary outcome. Results from all other trials had several limitations. Oral therapy had a neutral effect on blood pressure in hypertensive women. Transdermal estrogen and micronized progesterone had a beneficial effect on blood pressure in normotensive women and, at most, a neutral effect on hypertensive women. In general, tibolone and raloxifene had a neutral effect on blood pressure in both hypertensive and normotensive women. Large randomized trials are needed to assess the effect of oral hormone therapy on blood pressure as a primary outcome in hypertensive women and the effect of transdermal preparations on both normotensive and hypertensive women. Transdermal preparations would be the preferred mode of therapy for hypertensive women, in view of their favorable physiologic and clinical profiles. The decision regarding the use of hormone therapy should be individualized, and blood pressure should be monitored during the course of treatment.

  14. Virtual Biochemistry – pH effect on enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Heidrich

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Protocols of laboratory experiments, followed by teacher's explanation, not always clearly translate to the student the dynamics to beadopted for the implementation of the proposed practice. One of these cases is related to the study of the effect of pH on enzyme activity. For better help the understanding of the technical procedure, a hypermedia was built based on a protocol adopted at the Department of Biochemistry, UFSC. The hypermedia shows how theeffect of variations in pH can be observed  in vitro. Taking as example salivary amylase and the consumption of starch (substrate by means of iodine staining, a set of pH buffers was tested to identify the best pH for this enzyme  activity. This hypermedia as introductory tool for such practice was tested on aNutrition course classroom. Students agree that the hypermedia provided a better understanding of the proposed activities. Teachers also notice a smallerreagents consumption and reduction of the time spent by the students in the achievement of the experiment.

  15. Effect of pH on tumor cell uptake of radiogallium in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallabhajosula, S.R.; Hartwig, J.F.; Wolf, W.

    1982-01-01

    When injected at tracer levels into the blood, radiogallium as 67 Ga-citrate binds to, and is transported to, the site of the tumor by transferrin. The process by which transferrin-bound Ga is converted to tumor-bound Ga is not fully unterstood, but may involve the differential physicology of neoplasmas compared with normal tissues. Based on the slight acidity known to be exhibited by the extracellular fluid of many animal and human tumors, we have studied the effect of pH on stability and dissociation of the Ga-transferrin complex and on the uptake of Ga by tumor cells in vitro and animal tumors in vivo. When plasma from rabbits injected with 67 Ga-citrate was dialyzed at pH 6.5-7.5, disociation of Ga from transferrin showed an inverse pH-dependence. A similar inverse dependence on pH was observed for the uptake of Ga by L1210 leukemia cells and Ehrlich ascites cells incubated with Ga-transferrin complex. Tumor uptake of Ga in rats bearing Walker-256 carcinosarcoma or Murphystum lymphosarcoma whose tumor pH had been further lowered by administration of glucose showed a statistically significant increase over control rats receiving no glucose. These results demonstrate that the stability of the Ga-transferrin complex is pH-dependent and suggest that dissociation of this complex due to decreased pH at the tumor site may be one factor involved in tumor localization and binding of Ga. (orig.)

  16. Gastric mucosal electrical potential difference, pH, blood flow, and morphology during hypoxia and selective gastric ischaemia with and without allopurinol pretreatment in anaesthetized dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bülow, J B; Madsen, J

    1990-01-01

    Ischaemia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal disorders. The aim of this investigation was to study the gastric mucosal electrical potential difference (PD), pH, blood flow and morphology during hypoxia, gastric ischaemia, and gastric ischaemia following inhibition of free...... radical formation with allopurinol. PD and pH were measured simultaneously with an intragastric microelectrode, and the PD values were corrected for the liquid junction potentials created by the intragastric pH variation. Blood flow was measured by the radiolabelled microsphere technique in 18...... anaesthetized dogs. Short general hypoxia and short ischaemia caused reversible declines in PD, increases in pH, and no morphological damage. Ischaemia for 1 h caused a significant decline in PD persistent after reperfusion, an increase in pH, and morphological PD, but after reperfusion PD was normalized. Gross...

  17. Side effects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.S. van der; Lenders, J.W.M.; Thien, Th.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the experiences and complaints of patients who underwent 24 h blood pressure monitoring. METHODS: Two groups of hypertensive patients of a tertiary outpatient clinic were asked to fill in a nine-item questionnaire about the side effects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

  18. On the effective refractive index of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmad-Rohen, Alexander; Contreras-Tello, Humberto; Morales-Luna, Gesuri; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index {n}{eff} of blood as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm; we employed van de Hulst’s theory, together with the anomalous diffraction approximation, for the calculation. We modelled blood as a mixture of plasma and erythrocytes. Our results indicate that erythrocyte orientation has a strong effect on {n}{eff}, making blood an optically anisotropic medium except when the erythrocytes are randomly oriented. In the case in which their symmetry axis is perpendicular to the wave vector, {n}{eff} equals the refractive index of plasma at certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the erythrocytes’ shape affects their contribution to {n}{eff} in an important way, implying that studies on the effective refractive index of blood should avoid approximating them as spheres or spheroids. Finally, the effective refractive index of blood predicted by van de Hulst’s theory is different from what would be obtained by averaging the refractive indices of its constituents weighted by volume; such a volume-weighted average is appropriate only for haemolysed blood. We then measured the real part of the refractive index of various blood solutions using two different experimental setups. One of the most important results of our expriment is that {n}{eff} is measurable to a good degree of precision even for undiluted blood, although not all measuring apparatuses are appropriate. The experimental data is self-consistent and in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations.

  19. Effects of 42 deg. C hyperthermia on intracellular pH in ovarian carcinoma cells during acute or chronic exposure to low extracellular pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, Miriam L.; Bobyock, Suzanne B.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Owen, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether intracellular pH (pH i ) is affected during hyperthermia in substrate-attached cells and whether acute extracellular acidification potentiates the cytotoxicity of hyperthermia via an effect on pH i . Methods and Materials: The pH i was determined in cells attached to extracellular matrix proteins loaded with the fluorescent indicator dye BCECF at 37 deg. C and during 42 deg. C hyperthermia at an extracellular pH (pH e ) of 6.7 or 7.3 in cells. Effects on pH i during hyperthermia are compared to effects on clonogenic survival after hyperthermia at pH e 7.3 and 6.7 of cells grown at pH e 7.3, or of cells grown and monitored at pH e 6.7. Results: The results show that pH i values are affected by substrate attachments. Cells attached to extracellular matrix proteins had better signal stability, low dye leakage and evidence of homeostatic regulation of pH i during heating. The net decrease in pH i in cells grown and assayed at pH e = 7.3 during 42 deg. C hyperthermia was 0.28 units and the decrease in low pH adapted cells heated at pH e = 6.7 was 0.14 units. Acute acidification from pH e = 7.3 to pH e = 6.7 at 37 deg. C caused an initial reduction of 0.5-0.8 unit in pH i , but a partial recovery followed during the next 60-90 min. Concurrent 42 deg. C hyperthermia caused the same initial reduction in pH i in acutely acidified cells, but inhibited the partial recovery that occurred during the next 60-90 min at 37 deg. C. After 4 h at 37 deg. C, the net change in pH i in acutely acidified cells was 0.30 pH unit, but at 42 deg. C is 0.63 pH units. The net change in pH i correlated inversely with clonogenic survival. Conclusions: Hyperthermia causes a pH i reduction in cells which was smaller in magnitude by 50% in low pH adapted cells. Hyperthermia inhibited the partial recovery from acute acidification that was observed at 37 deg. C in substrate attached cells, in parallel with a lower subsequent clonogenic survival

  20. [How aliphatic alcohols and ph affect reactional capability of the horse blood serum cholinesterase at its interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basova, N E; Kormilitsin, B N; Perchenok, A Iu; Rozengart, E V; Saakov, V S; Suvorov, A A

    2013-01-01

    There was studied action of aliphatic alcohols (ethanol, propanol, isopropanol, n-butanol, isobutanol, secbutanol, tretbetanol) and pH on various kinds of reactional capability the serum cholinesterase. At the alcohols-affected inhibition of the cholinesterase hydrolytic activity, the determining role was played not the total number carbon atoms in the alcohol molecule, but by the "effective length" of the carbohydrate chain. The fact that the presence of alcohols did not affect parameters of the reverse cholinesterase inhibition with onium ions tetramethylammonium and choline allows suggesting the absence of effect solvents on specific acetylcholine sorption in the enzyme active center. With aid of two rows of hydrophobic organophosphorus inhibitors (OPI), we have managed to estimate both the degree and the character itself of the modifying action of alcohols and pH on the process of irreversible inhibition of serum cholinesterase.

  1. Effect of pH on structure, function, and stability of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Danish; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide to produce proton and bicarbonate which is primarily expressed in the mitochondrial matrix of liver, and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis, and neuronal transmission. To understand the effect of pH on the structure, function, and stability of CAVA, we employed spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism, fluorescence, and absorbance measurements in wide range of pH (from pH 2.0 to pH 11.5). CAVA showed an aggregation at acidic pH range from pH 2.0 to pH 5.0. However, it remains stable and maintains its secondary structure in the pH range, pH 7.0-pH 11.5. Furthermore, this enzyme has an appreciable activity at more than pH 7.0 (7.0 < pH ≤ 11.5) with maximum activity at pH 9.0. The maximal values of k cat and k cat /K m at pH 9.0 are 3.7 × 10 6  s -1 and 5.5 × 10 7  M -1  s -1 , respectively. However, this enzyme loses its activity in the acidic pH range. We further performed 20-ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different pH values. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies. This study provides an insight into the activity of CAVA in the pH range of subcellular environment.

  2. The Effect of Arterial pH on Oxygenation Persists Even in Infants Treated with Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee M. Barton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To validate the empiric observation that pH has an important effect on oxygenation in infants receiving iNO. Study Design. Demographics, ventilator settings, arterial blood gases (ABG, and interventions for up to 96 hours of life were extracted from the charts of 51 infants receiving iNO. Need for ECMO and survival to discharge were noted. Mean blood pressure (MBP and mean airway pressure (MAP were recorded. The arterial/alveolar (a/A ratio was used as the primary outcome. Analysis was by simple linear regression and multiple linear regression analyses and Fisher's exact test. pH responsiveness was arbitrarily defined as a correlation coefficient (CC of >0.40 with 7.55. Of 11 patients requiring ECMO, only 3 exhibited responsiveness at any time in their course. Three responders required ECMO. Conclusion. This small study suggests that failure or inability to optimize pH may account for observed unresponsiveness to iNO. Maintaining a pH > 7.5 using hyperventilation is not recommended.

  3. Effect of cocoa on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, Karin; Fakler, Peter; Stocks, Nigel P

    2017-04-25

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, contributing to about 50% of cardiovascular events worldwide and 37% of cardiovascular-related deaths in Western populations. Epidemiological studies suggest that cocoa-rich products reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Flavanols found in cocoa have been shown to increase the formation of endothelial nitric oxide which promotes vasodilation and therefore blood pressure reduction. Here we update previous meta-analyses on the effect of cocoa on blood pressure. To assess the effects on blood pressure of chocolate or cocoa products versus low-flavanol products or placebo in adults with or without hypertension when consumed for two weeks or longer. This is an updated version of the review initially published in 2012. In this updated version, we searched the following electronic databases from inception to November 2016: Cochrane Hypertension Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase. We also searched international trial registries, and the reference lists of review articles and included trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of chocolate or cocoa products on systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adults for a minimum of two weeks duration. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risks of bias in each trial. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses on the included studies using Review Manager 5. We explored heterogeneity with subgroup analyses by baseline blood pressure, flavanol content of control group, blinding, age and duration. Sensitivity analyses explored the influence of unusual study design. Thirty-five trials (including 40 treatment comparisons) met the inclusion criteria. Of these, we added 17 trials (20 treatment comparisons) to the 18 trials (20 treatment comparisons) in the previous version of this updated review.Trials provided participants with 30 to 1218 mg of flavanols (mean = 670 mg) in 1.4 to 105

  4. Chronic effect of low pH on fathead minnow survival, growth, and reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, D I

    1973-01-01

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas rafinesque) were continuously exposed to reduced pH levels of 4.5, 5.2, 5.9, 6.6, and 7.5 (control) during a 13-month, one-generation test. Survival was not affected, even at the lowest pH tested. Fish behavior was abnormal, and fish were deformed at pH 4.5 and 5.2. Egg production and egg hatchability were reduced at pH 5.9 and lower, and all eggs were abnormal. A pH of 6.6 was marginal for vital life functions, but safe for continuous exposure. Free carbon dioxide, liberated by the addition of sulfuric acid to reduce the pH, may have had an unknown effect. The fish did not become acclimiated to low pH levels.

  5. Sensory meat quality, ultimate pH values, blood metabolites and carcass parametersin reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. fed various diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Wiklund

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was made to study and compare the effects of different diets on sensory meat quality and ultimate pH values in reindeer muscles and to relate stress-induced blood metabolites and carcass parameters to the meat quality traits measured. Altogether 23 female reindeer calves were included in the study. During an adaptation period, all reindeer were allowed free access to a mimicked natural diet containing 80% lichens (lichen diet. On January 28, 8 reindeer (group Cjan were slaughtered. Five reindeer (group C.Mar were allowed continuous free access to the lichen diet throughout the experiment. During 8 days, the other reindeer (groups PL and PS were given the lichen diet, half of the amount offered to the control group, and were then starved for one day. Thereafter, these reindeer were fed 80% commercial reindeer feed (pellets and either 20% lichens (group PL, or 20% silage (group PS for 5 weeks. After this, all animals were slaughtered. The average carcass weight and dressing percentage in the group fed commercial reindeer feed and lichens (PL were higher than in group CMar- Fat registrations were generally higher in groups PL and PS than in the groups Cj2n and CMar- Ultimate pH values in M. triceps brachii and M. longissimus were significantly lower in the group CMST than in PL. The levels of all blood metabolites (urea, ASAT and Cortisol were generally higher in groups PL and PS than in groups Cja„ and CMEF- NO significant differences were found in any of sensory attributes of the meat (monitored according to ISO standards. The present study shows that muscle and fat depots in reindeer can be improved by feeding a diet based on reindeer pellets but suggests that a feeding period of 35 days might be too short to affect the sensory properties of reindeer meat.

  6. pH and redox effects of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Sloot, H.A.; Van Zomeren, A.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; De Nie, D.S.

    2007-11-01

    The application of relatively fine grained industrial slags as fill material in industrial terrains and parking lots has led to unacceptably elevated pH values and imposed reducing conditions in ground- and surface water. Based on the Dutch Building Materials Decree the materials applied were classified as category 1 materials (free use). There are no limits set to pH and redox in this regulation. In itself a lower or higher pH and a low redox potential are not necessarily critical. Only when the buffer capacity of the surroundings is exceeded, undesirable situations may develop. In this work, the release of alkaline and reducing substances has been studied to assess if regulatory controls are needed and how such controls could be implemented practically. Both pH and redox potential are unsuitable properties for this purpose as it is the buffer capacity of the releasing material and the buffer capacity of the receiving soil and water bodies that determine whether unacceptable conditions develop. As pH and redox are also affected by gas reactions (O2 and CO2), the evaluation becomes relatively complex. Using the chemical speciation-transport model ORCHESTRA, a scenario description has been developed to assess the release of alkaline and reducing species from slag by infiltration under unsaturated conditions. Proper acid neutralization and redox buffering data for the materials were determined. Based on the sophisticated model results, a simplified model description was applied to link observations to impact. Decision schemes for applications above groundwater and in surface water have been developed based on the buffer capacity and particle size distribution of the material to be used, the infiltration rate, the degree of exposure to O2 and CO2 from the atmosphere or from soil air and the dimensions of the application. This has led to a preliminary guidance on implementing rules for acceptance of materials in specific applications. The modeled release predictions

  7. The effect of sodium bicarbonate on intracellular pH using {sup 31}P-MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Ito, Haruhide [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Kitahara, Tetsuhiro; Nakayama, Naoto; Saito, Kennichi

    1997-03-01

    This report deals with the effects of sodium bicarbonate on the intracellular pH of the brain and cerebral blood flow (CBF); five normal volunteers were studied. Intracellular pH and CBF were measured by phosphorus 31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRS) and stable xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT), respectively. Each individual received 7% sodium bicarbonate (3.5 ml/kg body weight), infused intravenously over a 15-min period. Intracellular pH, CBF, and physiological parameters were determined before and after the injection. Intracellular pH was significantly decreased and CBF was increased. Among the physiological parameters, the hematocrit was significantly decreased and arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO{sub 2}), increased. These results suggest that increasing CO{sub 2} contributes to the decrease in intracellular pH. In conclusion, three factors increase CBF during the administration of sodium bicarbonate to humans: arterial dilatation in response to carbon dioxide; decrease of the hematocrit, and intracellular cerebral acidosis. (author)

  8. Some effects of pH on iodine volatility in containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmore, C.B.; Gwyther, J.R.; Sims, H.E.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of iodine in containment in the event of an accident involving fission product release would be strongly dependent on pH. High pH leads to a lower rate of radiolytic oxidation and in alkaline conditions the thermally stable form is IO 3 - . Much of the work on effects of pH on radiolytic oxidation reported in the literature may be erroneous or misleading because of postirradiation reaction and in this report some new experiments are described which were designed to overcome these problems involving sparged irradiated solutions of CsI spiked with 131 I. The rate of radiolytic oxidation has been measured as a function of pH between pH 4.6 and pH 9 and iodide concentrations between 10 -4 and 10 -6 mol dm -3 . Also discussed in the paper are factors which can affect the pH of the sump water and the effects of high pH in sprays. It is concluded that high pH is beneficial and it is important not only to achieve high pH but to maintain it. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  9. Effect of habitual arecanut chewing on resting whole mouth salivary flow rate and pH

    OpenAIRE

    Rooban T; Mishra G; Elizabeth J; Ranganathan K; Saraswathi T

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resting whole mouth salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH play a significant role in pathogenesis of various oral diseases and conditions. AIM: To observe the effect of habitual use of arecanut and various arecanut containing products (AN) on SFR and pH. DESIGN: Cross sectional. SETTING: Outpatient Department of Dental College. PARTICIPANTS: AN chewers and non-chewers attending Dental college. MEASUREMENTS: SFR and pH. VARIABLES: Type, frequency, duration and exposure time of AN, Smokin...

  10. Effect of pH on Pulp Potential and Sulphide Mineral Flotation

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKTEPE, Ferihan

    2014-01-01

    Control of pH is one of the most widely applied methods for the modulation of mineral flotation. In this study the effect of pH on potential in solution and sulphur minerals flotation is discussed with various electrodes. The electrodes were platinum, gold, chalcopyrite, pyrite and galena. In solution, potentials were linearly dependent on pH with a different slope for each electrode. Chalcopyrite, pyrite, sphalerite and galena minerals flotation tests were performed in a microflot...

  11. Effect of pH on saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, D.L.; Roades, J.D.; Lavado, R.; Grieve, C.M.

    The adverse effects of exchangeable sodium on soil hydraulic conductivity (K) are well known, but at present only sodicity and total electrolyte concentration are used in evaluating irrigation water suitability. In arid areas, high sodicity is often associatd with high dissolved carbonate and thus high pH, but in humid areas high sodicity may be associated with low pH. To evaluate the effect of pH (as an independent variable) on K, solutions with the same SAR and electrolyte level were prepared at pH 6, 7, 8, and 9. Saturated K values were determined at constant flux in columns packed at a bulk density of 1.5 Mg m/sup -3/. At pH 9, saturated K values were lower than at pH 6 for a montmorillonitic and kaolinitic soil. For a vermiculitic soil with lower organic carbon and higher silt content, pH changes did not cause large K differences. Decreases in K were not reversible on application of waters with higher electrolyte levels. The results from the K experiments were generally consistent with optical transmission measurements of dispersion. Although anion adsorption was at or below detection limits and cation exchange capacity (CEC) was only slightly dependent on pH, differences in pH effects on K among soils are likely due to differences in quantities of variable-charge minerals and organic matter.

  12. Assessment of the Effect of Fruit (Apple and Plain Yoghurt Consumption on Plaque pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyvand Moeiny

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, thanks to improvements in fruit yoghurt tastes, more tendencies are seen in their consumption especially among children. Therefore, their cariogenicity evaluation as healthy snacks is important. The goal of this study was the assessment of the consumption effect of two kinds of Iranian fruit (apple and plain yoghurts on dental plaque PH. Methods: In this experimental study, 10 healthy dentistry students were selected upon inclusion criteria. Plaque pH in the certain areas of the mouth was measured by microelectrode and digital pH meter. PH was measured at the baseline and intervals of 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes after eating test products: fruit yoghurt (apple and plain Yoghurt. For positive control group, just the baseline PH and at intervals of 2 and 5 min after swishing with 10% sucrose solutions were recorded. The results were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Lowest pH was obtained after fruit yoghurt consumption followed by plain yoghurt and %10 sucrose solution and the plaque PH difference was significant (P=0.05. Furthermore, time duration which remained below the critical pH was longer after consuming fruit yoghurt. Conclusion: Both kinds of yoghurts were considered cariogenic since plaque pH drop below critical points. Average of plaque pH after consuming fruit yoghurt was significantly lower in almost all the time intervals

  13. Effect of initial ph on growth characteristics and fermentation properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingyan; Jia, Bo; Sun, Xiangyu; Ai, Jingya; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Cheng; Zhao, Fang; Zhan, Jicheng; Huang, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    As the core microorganism of wine making, Saccharomyces cerevisiae encounter low pH stress at the beginning of fermentation. Effect of initial pH (4.50, 3.00, 2.75, 2.50) on growth and fermentation performance of 3 S. cerevisiae strains Freddo, BH8, Nº.7303, different tolerance at low pH, chosen from 12 strains, was studied. The values of yeast growth (OD600 , colony forming units, cell dry weight), fermentation efficiency (accumulated mass loss, change of total sugar concentration), and fermentation products (ethanol, glycerol, acetic acid, and l-succinic acid) at different pH stress were measured. The results showed that the initial pH of must was a vital factor influencing yeast growth and alcoholic fermentation. Among the 3 strains, strain Freddo and BH8 were more tolerant than Nº.7303, so they were affected slighter than the latter. Among the 4 pH values, all the 3 strains showed adaptation even at pH 2.50; pH 2.75 and 2.50 had more vital effect on yeast growth and fermentation products in contrast with pH 4.50 and 3.00. In general, low initial pH showed the properties of prolonging yeast lag phase, affecting accumulated mass loss, changing the consumption rate of total sugar, increasing final content of acetic acid and glycerol, and decreasing final content of ethanol and l- succinic acid, except some special cases. Based on this study, the effect of low pH on wine products would be better understood and the tolerance mechanism of low pH of S. cerevisiae could be better explored in future. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Effects of pH on nitrogen transformations in media-based aquaponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yina; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Huijun; Guimbaud, Christophe; Fang, Yingke

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of pH on performance and nitrogen transformations in aquaponics, media-based aquaponics operated at pH 6.0, 7.5 and 9.0 were systematically examined and compared in this study. Results showed that nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) reached its maximum of 50.9% at pH 6.0, followed by 47.3% at pH 7.5 and 44.7% at pH 9.0. Concentrations of nitrogen compounds (i.e., TAN, NO2(-)-N and NO3(-)-N) in three pH systems were all under tolerable levels. pH had significant effect on N2O emission and N2O conversion ratio decreased from 2.0% to 0.6% when pH increased from 6.0 to 9.0, mainly because acid environment would inhibit denitrifiers and lead to higher N2O emission. 75.2-78.5% of N2O emission from aquaponics was attributed to denitrification. In general, aquaponics was suggested to maintain pH at 6.0 for high NUE, and further investigations on N2O mitigation strategy are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of cold stratification pretreatment and pH level on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies emphasise that low germination rate of its seed is primarily due to deep seed dormancy. Therefore, studies was done on C. tchihatcheffii seeds, to investigate the effects of cold stratification for different periods (90, 120 and 150 days) and different pH values (pH 6.5, 7.5 and 8.5) on seed germination.

  16. The effect of initial pH on the kinetics of ferrous-iron biooxidation at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The general understanding in bioleaching of sulphide minerals is to keep pH low. A number of published articles have reported the effect of pH on biooxidation rates of ferrous-iron and/or sulphur by bioleaching microbes, although most of these studies were conducted at optimum or near optimum temperature for microbial ...

  17. The effects of pH and temperature on phosphate and nitrate uptake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the effects of pH and temperature on nutrient uptake efficiency of 3 wastewater protozoan isolates (Aspidisca (A), Trachelophyllum (B) and Peranema (C)) that have previously been screened for nutrient uptake ability. The study was carried out in shake flask at pH 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 ...

  18. Effect of Qingnao tablet on blood viscosity of rat model of blood stasis induced by epinephrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoqi; Hao, Shaojun; Ma, Zhenzhen; Liu, Xiaobin; Li, Jun; Li, Wenjun; Zhang, Zhengchen

    2018-04-01

    To establish a rat model of blood stasis with adrenaline (Adr) subcutaneous injection and ice bath stimulation. The effects of different doses on the blood viscosity of blood stasis model rats were observed. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups: blank control group (no model), model group, positive control group, high, middle and low dose group. The whole blood viscosity and plasma viscosity were detected by blood viscosity instrument. Compared with the blank group, model group, high shear, low shear whole blood viscosity and plasma viscosity were significantly increased, TT PT significantly shortened, APTT was significantly prolonged, FIB increased significantly, indicating that the model was successful. Compared with the model group, can significantly reduce the Naoluotong group (cut, low cut). Qingnaopian high dose group (low cut), middle dose group (cut, low shear blood viscosity) (Pgroup, high dose group (Pgroup (Pblood rheology of blood stasis mice abnormal index, decrease the blood viscosity, blood stasis has certain hemostatic effect.

  19. Effect of rhizosphere pH condition on cadmium movement in a soybean plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, T.; Tanoi, K.; Iikura, H.; Rai, H.; Nakanishi, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect of rhizosphere pH condition on the cadmium uptake movement, 109 Cd, was applied as a radioisotope tracer to a soybean plant grown in a water culture at pH 4.5 or pH 6.5. The distribution of 109 Cd in the soybean plant was observed radiographically with an imaging plate (IP). The amount of Cd transported from the root to the upper part of the plant at pH 4.5 was approximately two times higher than that at pH 6.5. However, the movement of Cd in the upper part of the plant was similar under both pH conditions. The distribution of Cd inside the internodes at pH 4.5 also showed similar pattern to that at pH 6.5, suggesting that once Cd reached to the vessel of the root, the movement of Cd was not dependent on rhizosphere pH conditions. (author)

  20. Effect of pH on paste properties of irradiated corn starch by gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Aoki, Shohei; Kobayashi, Nobuo; Okuaki, Akira.

    1979-01-01

    The degradation of starch by γ-irradiation and the effect of pH on gelatinization of starch after irradiation were investigated. Paste viscosities were markedly affected by pH on gelatinization and a decrease in the viscosity of irradiated starch was stimulated by increasing pH. On the other hand, the solubility of irradiated starch increased significantly at the high pH. The granule structure of irradiated starch easily disintegrated at alkaline pH. Remarkable dissolution from the surface of the irradiated starch granules was observed after heating at high pH only a filamentous network frame remained, but the unirradiated one collapsed and folded. It was seen that alkali treatment after irradiation reduces the required dose to obtain low viscosity starch. The required dose to produce a low viscosity starch, for example Ajinomoto Essan Sizer 600 grade, was ca. 3 Mrad at pH 11.0 and ca. 5 Mrad at pH 7.0, whereas it was ca. 7 Mrad without pH adjustment. (author)

  1. Effect of lemon juice on blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    SARI, Aysel; SELİM, Nevzat; DİLEK, Melda; AYDOĞDU, Turkan; ADIBELLİ, Zelal; BÜYÜKKAYA, Piltan; AKPOLAT, Tekin

    2012-01-01

    Lemon juice has commonly been used by hypertensive patients in order to lower blood pressure (BP) acutely when BP is raised or as an alternative/complementary therapy for expectation of chronic improvement. Grapefruit, a citrus fruit like lemon, causes clinically significant interactions with a variety of drugs including calcium antagonists. The aims of this study were to investigate acute and chronic effects of lemon juice on BP among hypertensive patients. Ninty-eight patients were included...

  2. Dissolution study of tremolite and anthophyllite: pH effect on the reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozalen, M.; Ramos, M.E.; Gervilla, F.; Kerestedjian, T.; Fiore, S.; Huertas, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dissolution rates strongly depend on pH and it is different for each mineral. • Anthophyllite dissolves up to 8 times faster than tremolite in similar conditions. • SEM images show different particle breakage and carbonation effects at basic pHs. • Our results are a good background to develop remediation processes of contaminated sites. - Abstract: The effect of pH on the kinetics of tremolite and anthophyllite dissolution was investigated at 25 °C in batch reactors over the pH range of 1–13.5, in inorganic buffered solutions. Dissolution rates were obtained based on the release of Si and Mg. Results obtained in this study show different behaviors for both minerals. For tremolite, dissolution rates show a noticeable dependence on pH between 1 and 8, decreasing as pH increases and reaching a minimum around neutral conditions. At basic pH this dependence becomes even stronger, but dissolution takes place together with collateral effects of saturation and carbonation. A preferential release of Ca and Mg is observed in acid media, lowering the Mg/Si ratio to the extent that Mg solubility decreases with pH. For anthophyllite, dissolution rates also show a strong dependence on pH, between 1 and 9.5. At the same pH, anthophyllite dissolves up to 8 times faster than tremolite. For pH > 9.5 this dependence is smooth, and it is probably associated with effects of saturation and carbonation. Dissolution is also non-stoichiometric with a faster release of Mg with respect to Si in acid media. SEM observations show differences in the breakage mechanism of the fibers. The anthophyllite particle breakage during dissolution consists of the splitting of bundle fibers parallel to the fiber longitudinal direction. However, for tremolite, other than fiber splitting, particles shorten induced by coalescence of etch pits developed perpendicular to c axe

  3. Birth asphyxia measured by the pH value of the umbilical cord blood may predict an increased risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Susanne Hvolgaard; Olsen, Jørn; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Wu, Chunsen; Liew, Zeyan; Gissler, Mika; Obel, Carsten; Arah, Onyebuchi

    2017-06-01

    Although birth asphyxia is a major risk factor for neonatal and childhood morbidity and mortality, it has not been investigated much in relation to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We examined whether birth asphyxia measured by the pH of the blood in the umbilical artery cord was associated with childhood ADHD. A population-based cohort of 295 687 children born in Finland between 1991 and 2002 was followed until December 31, 2007. ADHD was identified by the International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, as a diagnosis of hyperkinetic disorder. We examined the risk of ADHD with varying pH values using Cox regression, taking time trends into consideration. When compared to the reference group, a pH value below 7.10 was significantly associated with an increased risk of ADHD. The strongest risks were observed among children with a pH value value did not contribute much to the risk among children with an Apgar score of 0-3. Birth asphyxia, defined by low pH value, may predict an increased risk of ADHD in childhood. The association between the pH value and ADHD was homogenous when stratified by gestational age and the Apgar score. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Long-term effect of tobacco on unstimulated salivary pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Neeraj; Sharma, Jyoti; Sengupta, Shamindra; Singh, Sanjeet; Singh, Nishant; Kaur, Harjeet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the effects of tobacco on salivary pH between tobacco chewers, smokers and controls. A total of 60 subjects (males and females) aged 25-40 years, were divided equally into three groups: Tobacco smokers (Group A), chewers (Group B) and controls (Group C). Saliva of each subject was collected under resting condition. Salivary pH was determined using the specific salivary pH meter. The mean (±standard deviation) pH for Group A was 6.75 (±0.11), Group B was 6.5 (±0.29) and Group C was 7.00 (±0.28) after comparison. The significant results showed lower salivary pH in Groups A and B as compared to controls. Salivary pH was lowest in Group B compared to Group A and Group C. This study indicates that a lower (acidic) salivary pH was observed in tobacco users as compared with control. These alterations in pH due to the long-term effect of tobacco use can render oral mucosa vulnerable to various oral and dental diseases.

  5. Comparative study on the effect of radiation on whole blood and isolate red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, N.S.

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of the dielectric properties of red blood cells requires several steps for preparation and isolation from whole blood. These steps may results in changes in the cells properties, and they are time consuming . The present study aims to compare the properties of both whole blood and isolated red blood cells and the effect of gamma radiation on these properties. Adult male rats were exposed to 1, 3.5 and 7 Gy as single dose, from Cs-137 source.The studies dielectric properties, in the frequency range 40 k Hz to 5 MHz, and light scattering studies for suspensions of whole blood and isolated red blood cells from the same groups were measured. The obtained results showed that whole blood and red blood cells suspensions followed the same trend in their response to radiation, which suggests the possibility of using whole blood suspension for the evaluation of the red blood cells properties

  6. Computer simulation of the effect of temperature on pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, J E; Schuck, D F

    1995-11-01

    The effect of temperature on solution pH was simulated by computer (program PHTEMP). We have determined that the change in pH due to shifts in acid-base equilibria [delta pH = pH(60 degrees C) - pH(25 degrees C)] can be substantial for compounds such as aliphatic amines that have high enthalpies for acid dissociation. This is of particular significance during elevated temperature experiments in which changes in the pKa values of formulation components, and hence the solution pH, can accelerate decomposition as compared to those formulations where sensitive functionality is absent. PHTEMP afforded the following results at initial pH = 7 (25 degrees C): (a) 0.1 M triethylamine (delta H zero = 10.4 kcal/mol) delta pH approximately -0.8; (b) 0.1 M acetic acid (delta H zero = -0.1 kcal/mol) delta pH approximately 0; (c) 0.1 M sulfuric acid (delta H zero 1 = -12 kcal/mol; delta H zero 2 = -5.4 kcal/mol) delta pH approximately -0.4. Solutions of general pharmaceutical interest were also studied and included a 12-component amino acid mixture, 0.1 M glycine, and 0.1 M triethylamine in either 0.02 M citric acid or 0.05 M TRIS buffer. In each case the pH change with temperature was dependent on the concentrations of components, the enthalpies for each acid dissociation, and the starting pH. At lower pH ( 9). These results are interpreted as the effect of a relative change in hydronium ion activity, delta H+/H+(initial), due to temperature-induced shifts in equilibria (acid dissociation, water autoprotolysis). This relative change must become larger as H+ decreases (pH increases). The output of PHTEMP was experimentally verified with 0.1 M glycine and with a multiple component amino acid solution. In both cases, agreement with prediction was excellent. The results of this investigation underscore the need to critically review formulation choices for both thermodynamic and traditional kinetic effects on the resulting product stability.

  7. Effect of pH and phosphate on calcium carbonate polymorphs precipitated at near-freezing temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yu-Bin; Wolthers, Mariëtte; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Nehrke, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pH and phosphate on the precipitation of calcium carbonate polymorphs from aqueous solution were investigated. Experiments were carried out at near-freezing temperature and two different pH conditions (pH 13.4 and 9.0). At each pH condition, solutions having different concentrations

  8. The effect of pH on phosphorus availability and speciation in an aquaponics nutrient solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerozi, Brunno da Silva; Fitzsimmons, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between the main ions in aquaponics nutrient solutions affects chemical composition and availability of nutrients, and nutrient uptake by plant roots. This study determined the effect of pH on phosphorus (P) speciation and availability in an aquaponics nutrient solution and used Visual MINTEQ to simulate P species and P activity. In both experimental and simulated results, P availability decreased with increase in pH of aquaponics nutrient solutions. According to simulations, P binds to several cations leaving less free phosphate ions available in solution. High pH values resulted in the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate species. The study also demonstrated the importance of organic matter and alkalinity in keeping free phosphate ions in solution at high pH ranges. It is recommended though that pH in aquaponics systems is maintained at a 5.5-7.2 range for optimal availability and uptake by plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of ioxaglate to blood rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid-Schoenbein, H.; Teitel, P.; Tietz, G.; Oezlen, A.

    1984-01-01

    Almen and Aspelin have shown that the use of non-ionic radio contrast media allows to increase the iodine concentration (which is desirable because of its effect on radio opacity) without a very large increase in osmolarity (which is undesirable because it impaires the fluidity of erythrocytes). This latter effect can also be diminished by reducing the osmolarity of a dimeric contrast medium as it has been achieved by incorporating more iodine atoms into the molecule in the case of Ioxaglate (Hexabrix). In various microrheological test systems, the fluidity of packed red cell suspension, the corrected filtration rate though 5 μm pores and the relative apparent viscosity of blood - contrast media mixtures (1 to 50% concentration) were determined in experiments comparing this compound with Urografin 76 of the same iodine content. In all systems, the former showed lesser rheological effects. In whole blood viscometry, this can be detected only after appropriate corrections for the effects of the two contrast media on hematocrit and plasma viscosity. Owing to a more pronounced water shift from the cells to the plasma, Urografin tends to reduce the viscosity of the plasma-contrast media mixture. The concomitant reduction in MCV and hematocrit level tends to screen the macrorheological effect of the dehydrated cells becomes immediately obvious when the viscometric data are corrected for hematocrit value and plasma viscosity effects. (orig.)

  10. The effect of different pH modifier on formation of CdS nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoxiao, Ren [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhao Gaoling [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: glzhao@zju.edu.cn; Hong, Li; Wei, Wu; Gaorong, Han [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-10-06

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method. The effects of pH modifier on the properties of CdS particles were studied. NaOH and NH{sub 4}OH were chosen as the pH modifier. The morphology and optical properties of CdS particles were characterized by transmitted electron microscope (TEM) and optical absorption spectra analysis, respectively. The particle size of the samples whose pH modifier is NaOH was smaller than that of the CdS samples with NH{sub 4}OH at the same pH value. Optical absorption edge of CdS shifted to longer wavelength with increasing pH value. Optical absorption edge of the samples with NH{sub 4}OH as pH modifier shifted to the longer wavelength more significantly than that of those samples with NaOH as pH modifier. When CdS particles were adsorbed to the TiO{sub 2} electrodes, the photoelectrochemical property of CdS-sensitized TiO{sub 2} electrode showed that the samples with NH{sub 4}OH as pH modifier had higher photocurrent than those samples with NaOH.

  11. The effect of different pH modifier on formation of CdS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiaoxiao; Zhao Gaoling; Li Hong; Wu Wei; Han Gaorong

    2008-01-01

    CdS nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method. The effects of pH modifier on the properties of CdS particles were studied. NaOH and NH 4 OH were chosen as the pH modifier. The morphology and optical properties of CdS particles were characterized by transmitted electron microscope (TEM) and optical absorption spectra analysis, respectively. The particle size of the samples whose pH modifier is NaOH was smaller than that of the CdS samples with NH 4 OH at the same pH value. Optical absorption edge of CdS shifted to longer wavelength with increasing pH value. Optical absorption edge of the samples with NH 4 OH as pH modifier shifted to the longer wavelength more significantly than that of those samples with NaOH as pH modifier. When CdS particles were adsorbed to the TiO 2 electrodes, the photoelectrochemical property of CdS-sensitized TiO 2 electrode showed that the samples with NH 4 OH as pH modifier had higher photocurrent than those samples with NaOH

  12. Effect of systemic pH on pHi and lactic acid generation in exhaustive forearm exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, V.L.; Schubert, C.; Keller, U.; Mueller, S.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate whether changes in systemic pH affect intracellular pH (pH i ), energy-rich phosphates, and lactic acid generation in muscle, eight normal volunteers performed exhaustive forearm exercise with arterial blood flow occluded for 2 min on three occasions. Subjects ingested 4 mmol/kg NH 4 Cl (acidosis; A) or NaHCO 3 (alkalosis; B) or nothing (control; C) 3 h before the exercise. Muscle pH i and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured with 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P-NMR) spectroscopy during exercise and recovery. Lactate output during 0.5-7 min of recovery was calculated as deep venous-arterial concentration differences times forearm blood flow. Before exercise, blood pH and bicarbonate were lower in acidosis than alkalosis and intermediate in control. Lactic acid output during recovery was less with A than B and intermediate in C. PCr utilization and resynthesis were not affected by extracellular pH changes. pH i did not differ before exercise or at its end. Hence systemic acidosis inhibited and alkalosis stimulated lactic acid output. These findings suggest that systemic pH regulates cellular acid production, protecting muscle pH, at the expense of energy availability

  13. The role of pH in lethal effect of glucose load malignant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmakova, N.L.; Yarmonenko, S.P.; Laser, K.; Fomenkova, T.E.; Kozubek, S.; Korogodin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    The lethal effect of variuos pH values on Erlich ascites tumour (EAT) calls has been investigated. Different pH values were obtained by means of both glucose load and phosphate buffers. The effect has been investigated by observing cell death in vitro, determining cancerogenity of EAT cells and determining their radiosensitivity. The results of all methods enabled us to conclude that the same values of pH lead to the same effect on EAT cells independently of the way by which the given pH value was reached. The lethal effect markedly increased when the value of pH was lower than 5.6. It is concluded that the basis of the mechanism of glucose load lethal effect is their ''self-acidisation''. The measurement of pH in tumours is proposed as a basic test for determining the suitability of the use of hyperglycemia in clinics and for comparison of the efficiency of various modes of treatment

  14. Effect of pH grade on polymer-gel dosimeter and its brachytherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spevacek, V.; Hrbacek, J.; Dvorak, P.; Cechak, T.; Novotny, J.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate impact of pH grade on characteristics of polymer-gel dosimeter and its application in dose distribution verification in brachytherapy. A polymer-gel dosimeter based on radiation induced polymerization and crosslinking of acrylic monomers (acrylic acid, N,N' methylen-bis-acrylamide) was investigated with respect to its pH grade. pH grade of a dosimeter was varied by concentration of natrium hydroxide. Afterwards, dosimeter was split into several samples which were uniformly irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays. The range of doses applied was usually from 0 to 50 Gy with the main interest in region up to 20 Gy. Evaluation of dosimeter dose response was performed using MRI (T2). Dose response curves obtained were evaluated with respect to pH grade as a parameter. In parallel, there was studied temperature resistance (melting temperature) of gels with various pH grade. pH grade modified polymer-gel dosimeter was then used to compare dose distribution calculated with brachytherapy treatment planning system for simple irradiation geometry with Ir-192 HDR source. Additionaly, Monte Carlo calculated data were also included in the brachytherapy study. There was observed effect of pH grade on dose-response curve parameters (slope of linear fit, background response, linear range and maximum measurable dose). In general, the lower pH grade the higher sensitivity. Another positive effect of decreased pH grade is significantly higher maximum measurable dose. Maximum melting temperature of a gel was observed with pH grade between 3.5 and 4. For both higher and lower pH grades the melting temperature was lower. Using pH modified polymer-gel dosimeter simple brachytherapy dose distribution was measured and compared with calculated and Monte Carlo simulated data. There was observed strong dependence of dose-response relationship on pH grade of polymer-gel dosimeter resulting in significant improvement of dosimeter characteristics, namely sensitivity, applicable range of

  15. Long-term effect of tobacco on unstimulated salivary pH

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj Grover; Jyoti Sharma; Shamindra Sengupta; Sanjeet Singh; Nishant Singh; Harjeet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the effects of tobacco on salivary pH between tobacco chewers, smokers and controls. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 subjects (males and females) aged 25-40 years, were divided equally into three groups: Tobacco smokers (Group A), chewers (Group B) and controls (Group C). Saliva of each subject was collected under resting condition. Salivary pH was determined using the specific salivary pH meter. Results: The mean (±st...

  16. The effect of pH on chronic aquatic nickel toxicity is dependent on the pH itself: Extending the chronic nickel bioavailability models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nys, Charlotte; Janssen, Colin R; Van Sprang, Patrick; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2016-05-01

    The environmental quality standard for Ni in the European Commission's Water Framework Directive is bioavailability based. Although some of the available chronic Ni bioavailability models are validated only for pH ≤ 8.2, a considerable fraction of European surface waters has a pH > 8.2. Therefore, the authors investigated the effect of a change in pH from 8.2 to 8.7 on chronic Ni toxicity in 3 invertebrate (Daphnia magna, Lymnaea stagnalis, and Brachionus calyciflorus) and 2 plant species (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Lemna minor). Nickel toxicity was almost always significantly higher at pH 8.7 than at pH 8.2. To test whether the existing chronic Ni bioavailability models developed for pH ≤ 8.2 can be used at higher pH levels, Ni toxicity at pH 8.7 was predicted based on Ni toxicity observed at pH 8.2. This resulted in a consistent underestimation of toxicity. The results suggest that the effect of pH on Ni(2+) toxicity is dependent on the pH itself: the slope of the pH effect is steeper above than below pH 8.2 for species for which a species-specific bioavailability model exists. Therefore, the existing chronic Ni bioavailability models were modified to allow predictions of chronic Ni toxicity to invertebrates and plants in the pH range of 8.2 to 8.7 by applying a pH slope (SpH ) dependent on the pH of the target water. These modified Ni bioavailability models resulted in more accurate predictions of Ni toxicity to all 5 species (within 2-fold error), without the bias observed using the bioavailability models developed for pH ≤ 8.2. The results of the present study can decrease the uncertainty in implementing the bioavailability-based environmental quality standard under the Water Framework Directive for high-pH regions in Europe. © 2015 SETAC.

  17. The effect of sodium bicarbonate oral rinse on salivary pH and oral microflora: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandel, Siddhartha; Khan, Mohsin Ali; Singh, Nishi; Agrawal, Amiya; Khare, Vinita

    2017-01-01

    Present study is designed to explore the effect of sodium bicarbonate oral rinse on salivary pH and oral micro flora. Twenty five healthy subjects were recruited for the study in department of dentistry in Era Medical College. Subjects were abstained from tooth brushing overnight pre rinse (control) samples were collected after one hour of dinner and were asked to rinse with pre calibrated freshly prepared sodium bicarbonate solution. The salivary samples were then collected the following morning using sterile gauze in marked bottles. Aerobic bacterial culture was done by plating the sample directly from the swab on the surface of Blood agar and Mac Conkeys media respectively. The colony forming units and ph were calculated for the pre rinse and post rinse saliva sample. Results shows that salivary pH increased significantly after sodium Bicarbonate oral rinse. There was a marginal decrease in number of CFU/ml for bacteria especially Viridans Streptococci, Moraxella species. Sodium Bicarbonate oral rinse may be considered as a cheap and effective alternative for chlorhexidine and alcohol based mouth wash, especially where long duration usage is required.

  18. Effect of nitrogen form and pH of nutrient solution on the changes in pH and EC of spinach rhizosphere in hydroponic culture

    OpenAIRE

    M. Parsazadeh; N. Najafi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effect of nitrate to ammonium ratio and pH of nutrient solution on the changes in pH and EC of rhizosphere during spinach growth period in perlite culture, under greenhouse conditions, was investigated. A split factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with four replications was conducted with three factors including nutrient solution’s pH in three levels (4.5, 6.5 and 8), nitrate to ammonium ratio of nutrient solution in five levels (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75...

  19. The effects of lead, water hardness and pH on oxygen consumption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Closed system respirometry was performed on captive juvenile Tilapia sparrmanii exposed for 96 hours to a range of Pb-acetate concentrations in hard and soft water to determine the effect of Pb in relation to water hardness and pH. For hard and soft water with a pH above 7.51 no change in the resting specific oxygen ...

  20. Effect of long-term smoking on salivary flow rate and salivary pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Saliva is a complex and important body fluid which is very essential for oral health and it is the first biological fluid that is exposed to cigarette smoke, which contains numerous toxic compositions responsible for structural and functional changes in saliva. Aim: To evaluate the long-term effect of smoking on salivary flow rate (SFR and salivary pH. Materials and Methods: The subjects of the study were divided into smokers and nonsmokers. Each group comprised of 35 male adults. The saliva of each subject was collected under resting conditions. They were asked to spit in a graduated container at an interval of 60 s for 5 min. Salivary pH was measured immediately after measuring SFR using the (Indikrom Paper pH indicator and calibrated cylinder. Based on the color change of the indicator paper strip, the pH was assessed in comparison with a color chart. Data were analyzed by Student′s t-test using SPSS 15. Results: The mean (±standard deviation SFR and pH were 0.20 (±0.05 ml/min and 6.30 (±0.36 respectively in smokers while the mean SFR and pH were 0.36 (±0.06 ml/min and 7.10 (±0.24 in nonsmokers. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.00. Conclusion: Long-term smoking significantly reduces the SFR and salivary pH.

  1. Effect of pH and sulfate concentration on hydrogen production using anaerobic mixed microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jeong-A.; Bhatnagar, Amit; Kumar, Eva; Jeon, Byong-Hun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do, 220-710 (Korea); Abou-Shanab, R.A.I. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do, 220-710 (Korea); Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Mubarak City for Scientific Research, Alexandria (Egypt); Min, Booki [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea); Song, Hocheol; Kim, Yong Je [Geologic Environment Division, KIGAM, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea); Choi, Jaeyoung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea); Lee, Eung Seok [Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701-2979 (United States); Um, Sukkee [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-Dong, Seongdong-Gu, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea); Lee, Dae Sung [Petroleum and Marine Research Department, KIGAM, Daejeon (Korea)

    2009-12-15

    The effects of varying sulfate concentrations with pH on continuous fermentative hydrogen production were studied using anaerobic mixed cultures growing on a glucose substrate in a chemostat reactor. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 2.8 L/day at pH 5.5 and sulfate concentration of 3000 mg/L. Hydrogen production and residual sulfate level decreased with increasing the pH from 5.5 to 6.2. The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and ethanol fractions in the effluent were in the order of butyric acid (HBu) > acetic acid (HAc) > ethanol > propionic acid (HPr). Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed the presence of hydrogen producing bacteria (HPB) under all pH ranges while sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) were present at pH 5.8 and 6.2. The inhibition in hydrogen production by SRB at pH 6.2 diminished entirely by lowering to pH 5.5, at which activity of SRB is substantially suppressed. (author)

  2. Effect of single oral dose of tramadol on gastric secretions pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Mueen Ullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tramadol is an atypical analgesic agent. It has been shown that intramuscular or intravenous injection tramadol is able to inhibit M3 muscarinic receptors. Tramadol is able to mediate smooth muscles contraction and glandular secretions. We have evaluated the effects of single oral dose of tramadol given preoperatively on gastric juices pH in patients electively scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult, American Society of Anesthesiologist I and II patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n = 30 or oral tramadol 50 mg (n = 30. General anesthesia was induced using propofol, fentanyl and cisatracurium. After induction of anesthesia 5 ml of gastric fluid was aspirated through orogastric tube. The gastric fluid pH was measured using pH meter. Result: There was no significant difference in the pH between the groups. Gastric pH of the placebo and tramadol groups was 1.97 versus 1.98 (P = 0.092 respectively. Conclusion: Preoperatively single oral dose of tramadol was unable to elevate the desired level of gastric acid secretions pH (>2.5. This may be due to pharmacokinetic disparity between the analgesic and pH elevating properties of tramadol.

  3. Modeling of pH Dependent Electrochemical Noise in Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors ISFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Das

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available pH ISFETs are very important sensor for in vivo continuous monitoring application of physiological and environmental system. The accuracy of Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET output measurement is greatly affected by the presences of noise, drift and slow response of the device. Although the noise analysis of ISFET so far performed in different literature relates only to sources originated from Field Effect Transistor (FET structure which are almost constant for a particular device, the pH dependent electrochemical noise has not been substantially explored and analyzed. In this paper we have investigated the low frequency pH dependent electrochemical noise that originates from the ionic conductance of the electrode-electrolyte-Field Effect Transistor structure of the device and that the noise depends on the concentration of the electrolyte and 1/f in nature. The statistical and frequency analysis of this electrochemical noise of a commercial ISFET sensor, under room temperature has been performed for six different pH values ranging from pH2 to pH9.2. We have also proposed a concentration dependent a/f & b/f2 model of the noise with different values of the coefficients a, b.

  4. Effects of anatomy and diet on gastrointestinal pH in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Kevin D; Stengel, Ashley; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Dearing, M Denise

    2013-04-01

    The pH of the gastrointestinal tract can have profound influences on digestive processes. Rodents exhibit wide variation in both stomach morphology and dietary strategies, both of which may influence gut pH. Various rodent species have evolved bilocular (or semi-segmented) stomachs that may allow for more microbial growth compared to unilocular (single-chambered) stomachs. Additionally, herbivory has evolved multiple times in rodents. The high dietary fiber typical of an herbivorous diet is known to induce secretion of bicarbonate in the gut. We predicted that stomach segmentation might facilitate the separation of contents in the proximal chamber from that of the gastric stomach, facilitating a chemical environment suitable to microbial growth. To investigate the effect of stomach anatomy and diet on gut pH, several species of rodent with varying stomach morphology were fed either a high or low-fiber diet for 7 days, and pH of the proximal stomach, gastric stomach, small intestine, and cecum were measured. We discovered that rodents with bilocular stomach anatomy maintained a larger pH gradient between the proximal and gastric stomach compartments, and were able to achieve a lower absolute gastric pH compared to those with unilocular stomachs. Dietary fiber increased the pH of the small intestine, but not in any other gut regions. The stomach pH data supports the century old hypothesis that bilocular stomach anatomy creates an environment in the proximal stomach that is suitable for microbial growth. Additionally, the alkaline small intestinal pH on a high fiber diet may enhance digestion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of pH and Water Structure on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction on platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briega-Martos, Valentín; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at different pH values has been studied at platinum single crystal electrodes using the hanging meniscus rotating disk electrode (HMRDE) configuration. The use of NaF/HClO 4 mixtures allows investigating the reaction up to pH = 6 in solutions with enough buffering capacity and in the absence of anion specific adsorption. The analysis of the currents shows that the kinetic current density measured at 0.85 V for the Pt(111) electrode follows a volcano curve with the maximum located around pH = 9. This maximum activity for pH = 9 can be related to the effects of the electrode charge and/or water structure in the ORR. On the other hand, the catalytic activity for the other basal planes shows a monotonic behavior with a small dependence of the activity with pH. For stepped surfaces with (111) terraces, the behavior with pH changes gets closer to that of the Pt(111) surface as the terrace length increases. Additionally, the ORR curves show a dependence of the limiting diffusion current with pH. It is observed that the limiting current density diminishes as the pH increases in a potential region where hydrogen peroxide is readily reduced. These results suggest the existence of a bifurcation point in the mechanism previous to peroxide formation, in which OOH • is proposed as the bifurcation intermediate. The reduction of OOH • requires proton addition and would be more difficult at neutral pH values, justifying the diminution of the limiting currents.

  6. ESTIMATION OF pH, TOTAL ACID AND ETHANOL CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE ALCOHOL-CONTAINING MOUTHWASHES AND ITS EFFECT ON SALIVARY pH

    OpenAIRE

    Rafi Shaik; Sharath Pocha Reddy; Sameeulla Shaik; Sarah Emerald Sheela Nemalladinne; Dandu Sivasai Prasad Reddy; Kotu Nagavenkata Sai Praveen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Use of mouthwash has become widespread as a part of routine oral hygiene. Mouthwashes may have deleterious effects on oral tissues because of its low pH, high acid content and use of ethanol as an antiseptic agent. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional experimental study was conducted among 48 undergraduate dental students. Eight commercially available alcohol-containing mouthwashes, which are available in Indian market were selected for which the pH, total acid an...

  7. Synergic effect of salivary pH baselines and low pH intakes on the force relaxation of orthodontic latex elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Shabnam; Farjood, Amin; Zare, Mahbubeh

    2017-01-01

    Latex elastics are still in common use due to their low cost and high flexibility to improve sagittal discrepancies or interdigitation of teeth. Mechanical properties of elastics are influenced by several environmental factors such as pH changes. This study evaluated similar latex elastics to define the influence of synergic effect of intermittent low pH and various baselines pH of saliva. Four groups of latex elastics (3-M Unitek, 3/16 inch) were tested ( n = 15 in each group). Two groups of elastics were immersed in two tanks of artificial saliva with different pH levels of 7 and 5, and two groups were immersed in two tanks of artificial saliva with intermittent drop of pH to 4. The force was measured when the elastics were stretched to 25 mm. These measurements were taken in 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h for each group. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's test were used to assess the findings. The level of significance was 0.05%. The interaction between pH and time analyzed with RMANOVA showed no significant differences ( P > 0.05) except in 36 h ( P = 0.014). The Tukey's analysis showed that each comparison between any two groups did not indicate significant differences ( P > 0.05) except between Groups 1 and 3 and between Groups 2 and 3 ( P pH and force degradation in latex elastic band except in 36 h.

  8. ZnO-Based Microfluidic pH Sensor: A Versatile Approach for Quick Recognition of Circulating Tumor Cells in Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ganesh Kumar; Morohoshi, Madoka; Yasoda, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Sho; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi

    2017-02-15

    The present study is concerned about the development of highly sensitive and stable microfluidic pH sensor for possible identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood. The precise pH measurements between silver-silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) reference electrode and zinc oxide (ZnO) working electrode have been investigated in the microfluidic device. Since there is a direct link between pH and cancer cells, the developed device is one of the valuable tools to examine circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood. The ZnO-based working electrode was deposited by radio frequency (rf) sputtering technique. The potential voltage difference between the working and reference electrodes (Ag/AgCl) is evaluated on the microfluidic device. The ideal Nernstian response of -43.71165 mV/pH was achieved along with high stability and quick response time. Finally, to evaluate the real time capability of the developed microfluidic device, in vitro testing was done with A549, A7r5, and MDCK cells.

  9. Effects of plastic composite support and pH profiles on pullulan production in a biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Demirci, Ali; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2010-04-01

    Pullulan is a linear homopolysaccharide which is composed of glucose units and often described as alpha-1, 6-linked maltotriose. The applications of pullulan range from usage as blood plasma substitutes to environmental pollution control agents. In this study, a biofilm reactor with plastic composite support (PCS) was evaluated for pullulan production using Aureobasidium pullulans. In test tube fermentations, PCS with soybean hulls, defatted soy bean flour, yeast extract, dried bovine red blood cells, and mineral salts was selected for biofilm reactor fermentation (due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and high biomass attachment). Three pH profiles were later applied to evaluate their effects on pullulan production in a PCS biofilm reactor. The results demonstrated that when a constant pH at 5.0 was applied, the time course of pullulan production was advanced and the concentration of pullulan reached 32.9 g/L after 7-day cultivation, which is 1.8-fold higher than its respective suspension culture. The quality analysis demonstrated that the purity of produced pullulan was 95.8% and its viscosity was 2.4 centipoise. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra also supported the supposition that the produced exopolysaccharide was mostly pullulan. Overall, this study demonstrated that a biofilm reactor can be successfully implemented to enhance pullulan production and maintain its high purity.

  10. Effect of a feed/fast protocol on pH in the proximal equine stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, L; Sanchez, L C; Baptiste, K E; Olsen, S N

    2009-09-01

    Risk factors for the development of gastric squamous ulcers include various management procedures, such as intermittent feed deprivation that can occur during weight management regimens or stall and dry lot confinement. To investigate the effect of intermittent feed deprivation relative to continuous feed intake on proximal intragastric pH, specifically in the region of the squamous mucosa of the lesser curvature. In 6 horses, pH electrodes were placed just inside of the oesophageal sphincter in the stomach for each of two 72 h protocols (A and B) in a randomised, cross-over design. Protocol A consisted of 12 h fed, 12 h fasted, 24 h fed and 24 h fasted, in sequence. Protocol B consisted of 72 h fed. During the fed periods of each protocol, horses had ad libitum access to coastal Bermuda hay and were fed sweet feed (1 kg, b.i.d.). Horses had ad libitum access to water at all times. Proximal intragastric pH was significantly lower during protocol A, than during protocol B. However, hourly mean pH was significantly different only during the day and evening hours between protocols. During protocol B, mean proximal pH decreased significantly from 03.00 to 09.00 compared to 19.00 to 23.00 h. A moderate positive correlation of hay intake vs. proximal gastric pH could be established. Intermittent feed deprivation decreased proximal gastric pH in horses relative to those horses for which feed was not restricted. However, the effect was only significant when fasting occurred during the day and evening hours, as a nocturnal decrease in pH occurred simultaneously in the fed horses. Episodes of daytime feed deprivation should be avoided if possible, as proximal gastric acid exposure rapidly increases during such events.

  11. The Radiation Effect on Peripheral Blood Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae June; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Im, Sun Kyun; Choi, Ki Chul

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate radiation effect on the hematopoietic system, we analyzed 44 patients who were treated with conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) at Chonbuk National University Hospital. According to the treatment sites, we classified them into three groups: group I as head and neck, group II as thorax, and group III as pelvis. White blood cell, lymphocyte, platelet and hemoglobin were checked before and during RT The results were as follow; 1. White blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte count were declined from the first week of RT to the third week, and then slightly recovered after the third or fourth week. There was prominent decrease in lymphocyte counts than WBC. 2. Platelet counts were declined until the second week of the RT, showed slight recovery at fourth week in all groups. Hemoglobin values were slightly decreased in the first week and then recovered the level of pretreatment value, gradually. 3. Lymphocyte count were declined significantly on group III(p<0.01), WBC and platelet counts were decreased on group II but statistically not significant

  12. Effects of vegetarian diets on blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yoko Yokoyama,1,2 Kazuo Tsubota,2,3 Mitsuhiro Watanabe1,2,4,5 1Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, 2Health Science Laboratory, 3Department of Ophthalmology, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 5Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for coronary artery diseases, and the prevalence of hypertension is continuously increasing. Diet is an important factor that can be modified to prevent hypertension. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, dietary patterns are defined as the quantities, proportions, and variety or combinations of different foods and beverages in diets and the frequency with which they are habitually consumed. In this review, the vegetarian dietary pattern is introduced with a focus on the effect on blood pressure (BP. Although the available evidence is limited, according to a previous meta-analysis of controlled trials, vegetarian dietary patterns significantly reduced systolic and diastolic BPs. One of the common features of a vegetarian diet is weight loss, which might, at least partially, explain the effect on BP. Other possible factors such as sodium, potassium, protein, amino acids, vitamin B-12, antioxidants, fiber, and the microbiome are introduced as possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed with non-Western populations to determine the most effective vegetarian dietary pattern and to explore the exact mechanisms by which these dietary patterns affect BP. Keywords: vegetarian diet, plant-based diet, blood pressure, hypertension, meta-analysis

  13. Electron microscopy of rhamnolipid (biosurfactant) morphology: Effects of pH, cadmium, and octadecane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, J.T.; Gilkey, J.C.; Lamparski, H.; Retterer, J.; Miller, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    A rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 is reported to increase the aqueous dispersion and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons and to complex heavy metals. These reports indicate the potential for application of rhamnolipids in remediation of contaminated sites. Effective use of rhamnolipids will require understanding of rhamnolipid morphology and the effects of pH and organic and inorganic contaminants on that morphology. The authors used cryo-transmission electron microscopy to investigate the morphology of vitrified, frozen hydrated suspensions of rhamnolipid over a pH range of 5.5 to 8.0, and to determine the effect of a model alkane, octadecane, and a model heavy metal, cadmium, on rhamnolipid morphology. Micrographs clearly showed that rhamnolipid morphology was a function of pH, changing from lamellar, to vesicular, to micellar as pH increased. The effect of cadmium and octadecane on rhamnolipid morphology was determined at pH 6.8 and 7.0, where maximum cadmium complexation and maximum octadecane dispersion occurs. Cadmium seemed to stabilize rhamnolipid vesicle structures as shown by an increase in vesicle number and a decrease in vesicle diameter. In contrast, octadecane favored the micellar structure as shown by the complete absence of vesicles

  14. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami Nogourani, Maryam; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Kowsari Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2012-01-01

    Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women) healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6 min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for 6 consecutive days. After unstimulated saliva was collected, stimulated saliva was collected at interval of 0-1, 1-3, and 3-6 minutes after the start of different flavored chewing gums. The SFR and salivary pH were measured. The SFR increased in all five flavored gums at 1, 3, and 6 minutes after start of chewing gums (P salivary pH. Gum flavored can affect the SFR and pH and special flavors can be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions.

  15. pH and effects on Streptococcus mutans growth of denture adhesives: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengying; Mao, Tiantian; Cheng, Xiangrong

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the pH and effects on Streptococcus mutans growth of denture adhesives. There is little information regarding the pH of contemporary adhesives and their influences on S. mutans growth. The adhesives tested were Polident® cream, Protefix® cream and Protefix® powder. Samples of each adhesive were added to deionized water to produce solutions of 10.0, 5.0, 2.5 and 1.0% w/v (cream formulations) or 5.0, 2.5,1.0 and 0.5% (powder formulation). The pH values were measured immediately after preparation and at 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-h intervals using a digital pH meter. Streptococcus mutans UA159 was inoculated in the Brain Heart Infusion medium with or without the adhesive extracts (control). Bacterial growth was observed by measuring absorption at 600 nm every 1 h for 12 h using a spectrophotometer. The tested adhesives generally remained relatively pH-stable over 24 h, ranging from 5.5 to 7.0. There were no statistically significant differences in S. mutans growth rates between the extract-treated and control cultures (p>0.5). Some adhesives produce a pH below the critical pH of hydroxyapatite and may not be suitable for patients with natural teeth. None of the tested adhesives significantly affect S. mutans growth. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Effect of pH on the toxicity and bioconcentration of sulfadiazine on Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anskjær, Gitte Gotholdt; Rendal, Cecilie; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial sulfonamide sulfadiazine has in the last decades been detected in environmental water bodies, both surface and ground water. Since pH in the environment may vary considerably, this study examined the toxicity of the amphoter sulfadiazine towards Daphnia magna at pH levels of 6.......0, 7.5 and 8.5, thus taking the impact of speciation into consideration, contrary to earlier eco-toxicity studies conducted at standard conditions. Toxicity tests were performed using the standard ISO 6341 test procedure modified to accommodate the three pH levels and the toxicity was expressed as EC50....... After 48h the EC50 was determined to be 27.2, 188 and 310mgL−1 at pH 6.0, 7.5 and 8.5, respectively, thus demonstrating a significant effect of pH on the toxicity of sulfadiazine. Furthermore, the bioconcentration factor (dry weight) was determined to be 50 and 36 at pH 6.0 and 8.5, respectively...

  17. Effects of pH on embryo tolerance and adult behavior in the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, H H; Howard, R D; Whitten, K A [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1995-08-01

    Adult discrimination ability and embryo performance was examined under different pH conditions in the eastern tiger salamander. Individuals from three populations were collected in habitats that differed naturally in pH. Two pH treatments were used to determine adult pH discrimination ability, and eight pH treatments to evaluate embryo performance. Results suggested that the pH of the source-population habitat could influence breeding-habitat discrimination by adults. Decreasing pH produced similar patterns of lethal and sublethal effects on embryos from the three populations, with reduced performance at low pH. The pH at which 50% mortality occurs was estimated at 4.2, suggesting that tiger salamanders were relatively acid tolerant. The study suggested that adult behavior patterns could influence the success of population reintroductions to previously acidified areas. 78 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  18. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  19. Disentangling the effects of low pH and metal mixture toxicity on macroinvertebrate diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaroli, Riccardo; Ippolito, Alessio; Tolkkinen, Mari J.; Mykrä, Heikki; Muotka, Timo; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Schmidt, Travis S.

    2018-01-01

    One of the primary goals of biological assessment of streams is to identify which of a suite of chemical stressors is limiting their ecological potential. Elevated metal concentrations in streams are often associated with low pH, yet the effects of these two potentially limiting factors of freshwater biodiversity are rarely considered to interact beyond the effects of pH on metal speciation. Using a dataset from two continents, a biogeochemical model of the toxicity of metal mixtures (Al, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) and quantile regression, we addressed the relative importance of both pH and metals as limiting factors for macroinvertebrate communities. Current environmental quality standards for metals proved to be protective of stream macroinvertebrate communities and were used as a starting point to assess metal mixture toxicity. A model of metal mixture toxicity accounting for metal interactions was a better predictor of macroinvertebrate responses than a model considering individual metal toxicity. We showed that the direct limiting effect of pH on richness was of the same magnitude as that of chronic metal toxicity, independent of its influence on the availability and toxicity of metals. By accounting for the direct effect of pH on macroinvertebrate communities, we were able to determine that acidic streams supported less diverse communities than neutral streams even when metals were below no-effect thresholds. Through a multivariate quantile model, we untangled the limiting effect of both pH and metals and predicted the maximum diversity that could be expected at other sites as a function of these variables. This model can be used to identify which of the two stressors is more limiting to the ecological potential of running waters.

  20. Disentangling the effects of low pH and metal mixture toxicity on macroinvertebrate diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaroli, Riccardo; Ippolito, Alessio; Tolkkinen, Mari J; Mykrä, Heikki; Muotka, Timo; Balistrieri, Laurie S; Schmidt, Travis S

    2018-04-01

    One of the primary goals of biological assessment of streams is to identify which of a suite of chemical stressors is limiting their ecological potential. Elevated metal concentrations in streams are often associated with low pH, yet the effects of these two potentially limiting factors of freshwater biodiversity are rarely considered to interact beyond the effects of pH on metal speciation. Using a dataset from two continents, a biogeochemical model of the toxicity of metal mixtures (Al, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) and quantile regression, we addressed the relative importance of both pH and metals as limiting factors for macroinvertebrate communities. Current environmental quality standards for metals proved to be protective of stream macroinvertebrate communities and were used as a starting point to assess metal mixture toxicity. A model of metal mixture toxicity accounting for metal interactions was a better predictor of macroinvertebrate responses than a model considering individual metal toxicity. We showed that the direct limiting effect of pH on richness was of the same magnitude as that of chronic metal toxicity, independent of its influence on the availability and toxicity of metals. By accounting for the direct effect of pH on macroinvertebrate communities, we were able to determine that acidic streams supported less diverse communities than neutral streams even when metals were below no-effect thresholds. Through a multivariate quantile model, we untangled the limiting effect of both pH and metals and predicted the maximum diversity that could be expected at other sites as a function of these variables. This model can be used to identify which of the two stressors is more limiting to the ecological potential of running waters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Birth asphyxia measured by the pH value of the umbilical cord blood may predict an increased risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Susanne Hvolgaard; Olsen, Jørn; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Although birth asphyxia is a major risk factor for neonatal and childhood morbidity and mortality, it has not been investigated much in relation to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We examined whether birth asphyxia measured by the pH of the blood in the umbilical artery cord...... was associated with childhood ADHD. METHOD: A population-based cohort of 295 687 children born in Finland between 1991 and 2002 was followed until December 31, 2007. ADHD was identified by the International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, as a diagnosis of hyperkinetic disorder. We examined the risk...

  2. Effect of a Modest Weight Loss in Normalizing Blood Pressure in Obese Subjects on Antihypertensive Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Gilardini, Luisa; Redaelli, Gabriella; Croci, Marina; Conti, Antonio; Pasqualinotto, Lucia; Invitti, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of a lifestyle intervention in lowering/normalizing blood pressure (BP) levels in hypertensive (controlled or not) obese patients. Methods In this prospective observational study, 490 obese hypertensive patients, 389 controlled (BP < 140/90 mm Hg; CH) and 101 uncontrolled (BP ≥ 140/90 mm Hg; UH) attended a 3-month lifestyle intervention. Before and after the intervention we assessed weight, waist circumference, fat mass, BP, metabolic and renal variables, and ph...

  3. Detrimental effects of perioperative blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Evidence suggests that perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion increases the risk of infectious complications after major surgery and of cancer recurrence after curative operation. This has been attributed to immunosuppression. Several authors have suggested that filtered whole blood and/or red...... cell concentrate, or leucocyte- and buffy coat-reduced red cells in artificial medium or their own plasma, may reduce postoperative immunosuppression. It was also anticipated that the use of autologous blood might minimize the risk of perioperative transfusion, but studies have unexpectedly shown...... similar postoperative infectious complications and cancer recurrence and/or survival rates in patients receiving autologous blood donated before operation and those receiving allogeneic blood. Future studies should identify common risk factors associated with blood storage....

  4. Radiation-induced apoptosis of stem/progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood is associated with alterations in reactive oxygen and intracellular pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Tomonori [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan)]. E-mail: tomo@rerf.or.jp; Hayashi, Ikue [Central Research Laboratory, Hiroshima University Faculty of Dentistry, Hiroshima (Japan); Shinohara, Tomoko [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Morishita, Yukari [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagamura, Hiroko [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusunoki, Yoichiro [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Kyoizumi, Seishi [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Seyama, Toshio [Yasuda Women' s University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakachi, Kei [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2004-11-22

    To investigate the sensitivity of human hematopoietic stem cell populations to radiation and its relevance to intracellular events, specifically alteration in cellular energy production systems, we examined the frequency of apoptotic cells, generation of superoxide anions (O2-), and changes in cytosol pH in umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -}, CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup +} and CD34{sup -}/CD38{sup +} cells before and after 5Gy of X-irradiation. Human UCB mononucleated cells were used in this study. After X-irradiation and staining subgroups of the cells with fluorescence (FITC, PE, or CY)-labeled anti-CD34 and anti-CD38 antibodies, analyses were performed by FACScan using as stains 7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) for the detection of apoptosis, and hydroethidine (HE) for the measurement of O2- generation in the cells. For intracellular pH, image analysis was conducted using confocal laser microscopy after irradiation and staining with carboxy-SNAFR-1. The frequency of apoptotic cells, as determined by cell staining with 7-AAD, was highest in the irradiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} cell population, where the level of O2- detected by the oxidation of HE was also most highly elevated. Intracellular pH measured with carboxy-SNARF-1-AM by image cytometer appeared to be lowest in the same irradiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} cell population, and this intracellular pH decreased as early as 4h post-irradiation, virtually simultaneous with the significant elevation of O2- generation. These results suggest that the CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} stem cell population is sensitive to radiation-induced apoptosis as well as production of intracellular O2-, compare to more differentiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup +} and CD34{sup -}/CD38{sup +} cells and that its intracellular pH declines at an early phase in the apoptosis process.

  5. Radiation-induced apoptosis of stem/progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood is associated with alterations in reactive oxygen and intracellular pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tomonori; Hayashi, Ikue; Shinohara, Tomoko; Morishita, Yukari; Nagamura, Hiroko; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Seyama, Toshio; Nakachi, Kei

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of human hematopoietic stem cell populations to radiation and its relevance to intracellular events, specifically alteration in cellular energy production systems, we examined the frequency of apoptotic cells, generation of superoxide anions (O2-), and changes in cytosol pH in umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD34 + /CD38 - , CD34 + /CD38 + and CD34 - /CD38 + cells before and after 5Gy of X-irradiation. Human UCB mononucleated cells were used in this study. After X-irradiation and staining subgroups of the cells with fluorescence (FITC, PE, or CY)-labeled anti-CD34 and anti-CD38 antibodies, analyses were performed by FACScan using as stains 7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) for the detection of apoptosis, and hydroethidine (HE) for the measurement of O2- generation in the cells. For intracellular pH, image analysis was conducted using confocal laser microscopy after irradiation and staining with carboxy-SNAFR-1. The frequency of apoptotic cells, as determined by cell staining with 7-AAD, was highest in the irradiated CD34 + /CD38 - cell population, where the level of O2- detected by the oxidation of HE was also most highly elevated. Intracellular pH measured with carboxy-SNARF-1-AM by image cytometer appeared to be lowest in the same irradiated CD34 + /CD38 - cell population, and this intracellular pH decreased as early as 4h post-irradiation, virtually simultaneous with the significant elevation of O2- generation. These results suggest that the CD34 + /CD38 - stem cell population is sensitive to radiation-induced apoptosis as well as production of intracellular O2-, compare to more differentiated CD34 + /CD38 + and CD34 - /CD38 + cells and that its intracellular pH declines at an early phase in the apoptosis process

  6. Immunomodulating effect of blood transfusion: is storage time important?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Dybkjoer, E; Kronborg, Gitte

    1998-01-01

    in stimulating TNF-alpha and IL-2 release in an ex vivo assay. METHODS: Supernatants of 10 units of whole blood and 10 units of SAGM blood were collected after 1, 21 and 35 days of standard blood bank storage. Heparinized blood from 20 healthy volunteers (as 'recipients'), corresponding in ABO and Rh type......OBJECTIVES: TNF-alpha and IL-2 are important cytokines in macrophage and T-lymphocyte activity against infection and dissemination of malignant cells. We studied the influence of supernatants from stored whole blood and buffy-coat-depleted SAGM (saline, adenine, glucose and mannitol) blood...... to the stored blood, were used in a culture system with LPS and PHA as stimulators of TNF-alpha and IL-2 release. The effect of added supernatants, from either stored whole blood or SAGM blood, on cytokine release was evaluated compared to saline as control. TNF-alpha concentration was analyzed by ELISA after...

  7. Virtual Lab Experiment: Physics Educational Technology (PhETPhoto Electric Effect for Senior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supurwoko Supurwoko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduced these Physics Educational Technology (PhET Simulation and demonstrated their utility for Senior High School Students. The PhET simulations are very involved, interactive animated environments that create a unique opportunity for students. In each case, we demonstrate that discussion simulations are more productive, for developing student conceptual understanding  for photo electric effect than traditional discussion without simulations. During the discussion with PhET simulation, students can construct their  understanding about concepts photo electric effect within this framework. Students learn by building on their prior understanding through a series of constrained and supportives exploration. The simulations support an interactive approach and constrain students productively.

  8. Effect of pH on the production of alkaline proteinase by alkalophilic Bacillus sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Makio; Horikoshi, Koki

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the pH of the medium on the microbial growth and alkaline proteinase production, and on the uptake of various substances by alkalophilic Bacillus sp. No.8-1 were studied to investigate the physiological properties of alkalophilic bacteria. Both the microbial growth and alkaline proteinase production by replacement culture were maximum between pH 9 and 10. The alkaline proteinase production sources were also effective for the production. The uptake of various substances such as glucose, acetate, amino acids, and uracil, necessary for proteinase production by this strain, was maximum between pH 9 and 10. The uptake of α-aminoisobutyric acid, a nonmetabolizable amino acid analogue, was also maximum at pH 10. The pH-dependence of these substance was not due to their ionic forms being affected by extracellular pH. It was concluded from above results that good production of alkaline proteinase in alkaline media was due to the active uptake of various nutrients in this culture condition. (auth.)

  9. Finding stable cellulase and xylanase: evaluation of the synergistic effect of pH and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinas, Cristiane S; Loyo, Marcel Moitas; Baraldo, Anderson; Tardioli, Paulo W; Neto, Victor Bertucci; Couri, Sonia

    2010-12-31

    Ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass has been recognized as one of the most promising alternatives for the production of renewable and sustainable energy. However, one of the major bottlenecks holding back its commercialization is the high costs of the enzymes needed for biomass conversion. In this work, we studied the enzymes produced from a selected strain of Aspergillus niger under solid state fermentation. The cellulase and xylanase enzymatic cocktail was characterized in terms of pH and temperature by using response surface methodology. Thermostability and kinetic parameters were also determined. The statistical analysis of pH and temperature effects on enzymatic activity showed a synergistic interaction of these two variables, thus enabling to find a pH and temperature range in which the enzymes have a higher activity. The results obtained allowed the construction of mathematical models used to predict endoglucanase, β-glucosidase and xylanase activities under different pH and temperature conditions. Optimum temperature values for all three enzymes were found to be in the range between 35°C and 60°C, and the optimum pH range was found between 4 and 5.5. The methodology employed here was very effective in estimating enzyme behavior under different process conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunomodulatory effects of temperature and pH of water in an Indian freshwater sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Bhunia, Anindya Sundar; Bhunia, Niladri Sekhar; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-07-01

    Eunapius carteri, a freshwater sponge of India, inhabits the ponds and lakes and experiences variations of temperature and pH of water throughout the year. Sponges bear evolutionary and ecological importance with limited information on their immunological attribute and adaptational resilience in a changing environment. This paper reports temperature and pH specific responses of immune related parameters in sponge maintained in the experimental conditions of laboratory. Innate immunological parameters like phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase activity were estimated in E. carteri at different environmentally realistic water temperatures (10, 20, 30 and 40°C) and pH (6.4, 7.4 and 8.4). Phagocytosis and cytotoxicity are established as important immune parameters of invertebrates. Calalase, an antioxidant enzyme and phosphatases are involved in pathogen destruction and are considered as components of innate immunity. Activities of catalase, acid and alkaline phosphatases were estimated in E. carteri at different thermal regimes and pH. Modulation of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses and the activities of catalase and phosphatases at different water temperatures and pH indicated temperature and pH specific immunological status of E. carteri. Present investigation deals with the effects of selected hydrological parameters on the fundamental immune related parameters in sponge indicating its adaptational plasticity. Immunological resilience of this species in the face of variation of water temperature and pH is thought to be a special adaptive feature of sponge, a reported "living fossil". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of intravenous solutions on acid-base equilibrium: from crystalloids to colloids and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thomas; Ferrari, Michele; Zazzeron, Luca; Gattinoni, Luciano; Caironi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous fluid administration is a medical intervention performed worldwide on a daily basis. Nevertheless, only a few physicians are aware of the characteristics of intravenous fluids and their possible effects on plasma acid-base equilibrium. According to Stewart's theory, pH is independently regulated by three variables: partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strong ion difference (SID), and total amount of weak acids (ATOT). When fluids are infused, plasma SID and ATOT tend toward the SID and ATOT of the administered fluid. Depending on their composition, fluids can therefore lower, increase, or leave pH unchanged. As a general rule, crystalloids having a SID greater than plasma bicarbonate concentration (HCO₃-) cause an increase in plasma pH (alkalosis), those having a SID lower than HCO₃- cause a decrease in plasma pH (acidosis), while crystalloids with a SID equal to HCO₃- leave pH unchanged, regardless of the extent of the dilution. Colloids and blood components are composed of a crystalloid solution as solvent, and the abovementioned rules partially hold true also for these fluids. The scenario is however complicated by the possible presence of weak anions (albumin, phosphates and gelatins) and their effect on plasma pH. The present manuscript summarises the characteristics of crystalloids, colloids, buffer solutions and blood components and reviews their effect on acid-base equilibrium. Understanding the composition of intravenous fluids, along with the application of simple physicochemical rules best described by Stewart's approach, are pivotal steps to fully elucidate and predict alterations of plasma acid-base equilibrium induced by fluid therapy.

  12. Effects of pH, Chloride, and Bicarbonate on Cu(I) Oxidation Kinetics at Circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X.; Pham, A.; Waite, T.; Xing, G.; Rose, A.

    2012-12-01

    The redox chemistry of copper species in the upper water column plays a significant role in its speciation, transport and bioavailability. Most previous studies have focused primarily on Cu(II), principally because Cu(I) is easily oxidized to Cu(II) by oxygen or other oxidants. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that a number of potentially important reactions may lead to Cu(I) formation and result in a significant steady-state concentration of Cu(I) in natural waters. Redox reactions of Cu(I) could result in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydroxyl radical, that may subsequently induce a cascade of radical-promoted reactions with other constituents in natural waters. As such, a better understanding of copper-catalysed processes that produce and consume O2- is important in furthering our insight into factors contributing to global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, the oxidation kinetics of nanomolar concentrations of Cu(I) in NaCl solutions have been investigated over the pH range 6.5-8.0.The overall apparent oxidation rate constant was strongly affected by chloride, moderately by bicarbonate and, and to a lesser extent, by pH. In the absence of bicarbonate, an equilibrium-based speciation model indicated that Cu+ and CuClOH- were the most kinetically reactive species, while the contribution of other Cu(I) species to the overall oxidation rate was minor. A kinetic model based on recognized key redox reactions for these two species further indicated that oxidation of Cu(I) by oxygen and superoxide were important reactions at all pH values and [Cl-] considered, but back reduction of Cu(II) by superoxide only became important at relatively low chloride concentrations. Bicarbonate concentrations from 2-5 mM substantially accelerated Cu(I) oxidation. Kinetic analysis over a range of bicarbonate concentrations revealed that this was due to the formation of CuCO3-, which reacts relatively rapidly with oxygen, and not

  13. Effects of Flaxseed and pH on the Emulsion Properties of Beef by Using a Model System

    OpenAIRE

    Şükrü Kurt; Huriye Gözde Ceylan

    2018-01-01

    The effects of ground flaxseed (0-0.5%) and pH (3.88-8.12) on the emulsion properties of beef were studied using a model system. A central composite rotatable design was used to determine the response surface. pH, flaxseed and their interactions had significant effects on the emulsion properties of beef. pH and the interaction between pH and flaxseed increased emulsion capacity (EC). Flaxseed and pH increased emulsion stability (ES) until a critical point, which was reached at a flaxseed lev...

  14. The effect of sympathectomy on bone blood flow in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, T.; Alhava, E.M.; Hyoedynmaa, S.; Hendolin, H.; Oksala, I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of lumbar sympathectomy on bone blood flow was measured in seven patients with a Xe-133 washout method. On the third postoperative day there was a significant increase of blood flow in the proximal femur and a slight increase in the proximal tibia. Two months after the operation blood flow in the proximal part of the femur was no more significantly increased but in the proximal tibia there was a significant increase. The study suggests that the positive effect of sympathectomy on bone blood flow may be of value in cases where the increase of blood flow to peripheral bones is required

  15. Metabolism of the intervertebral disc: effects of low levels of oxygen, glucose, and pH on rates of energy metabolism of bovine nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibby, Susan R S; Jones, Deborah A; Ripley, Ruth M; Urban, Jill P G

    2005-03-01

    In vitro measurements of metabolic rates of isolated bovine nucleus pulposus cells at varying levels of oxygen, glucose, and pH. To obtain quantitative information on the interactions between oxygen and glucose concentrations and pH, and the rates of oxygen and glucose consumption and lactic acid production, for disc nucleus cells. Disc cells depend on diffusion from blood vessels at the disc margins for supply of nutrients. Loss of supply is thought to lead to disc degeneration, but how loss of supply affects nutrient concentrations in the disc is not known; nutrient concentrations within discs can normally only be calculated, because concentration measurements are invasive. However, realistic predictions cannot be made until there are data from measurements of metabolic rates at conditions found in the disc in vivo, i.e., at low levels of oxygen, glucose, and pH. A metabolism chamber was designed to allow simultaneous recording of oxygen and glucose concentrations and of pH. These concentrations were measured electrochemically with custom-built glucose and oxygen sensors; lactic acid was measured biochemically. Bovine nucleus pulposus cells were isolated and inserted into the chamber, and simultaneous rates of oxygen and glucose consumption and of lactic acid production were measured over a range of glucose, oxygen, and pH levels. There were strong interactions between rates of metabolism and oxygen consumption and pH. At atmospheric oxygen levels, oxygen consumption rate at pH 6.2 was 32% of that at pH 7.4. The rate fell by 60% as oxygen concentration was decreased from 21 to 5% at pH 7.4, but only by 20% at pH 6.2. Similar interactions were seen for lactic acid production and glucose consumption rates; we found that glycolysis rates fell at low oxygen and glucose concentrations and low pH. Equations were derived that satisfactorily predict the effect of nutrient and metabolite concentrations on rates of lactic acid production rate and oxygen consumption. Disc

  16. Effect of pH to adsorption behavior of Pu on bentonite in aqueous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoqiang; Tuo Xianguo; Li Pingchuan; Leng Yangchun; Su Jilong; Yueping

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pH to the adsorption behavior of Pu in GMZ-bentonite, Lingshou Ca-bentonite, Na-bentonite and bleaching earth were tested by static adsorption experiments in aqueous environment. The results show that the adsorption equilibrium time of Pu is four days in GMZ-bentonite and 5-6 days in bleaching earth, Ca-bentonite and Na-bentonite. In aqueous environment, the adsorption capacity of bentonite to Pu increases with pH in water phase, and it is weak in acidic aqueous environment and strong in alkaline aqueous environment extremely. (authors)

  17. The effect of pH on the properties of ammonium uranate precipitated with gaseous ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolfrey, J.L.

    1976-11-01

    Ammonium uranate (AU) powders were precipitated from a uranyl nitrate solution using gaseous ammonia to determine the effect of pH of precipitation on their composition and morphology. Increasing pH of precipitation increased the ammonia and nitrate contents and the specific surface area but decreased the crystallite size of the AU powders. The specific surface area was also increased by increasing the ammonia content of the powder. The composition and morphology of the powders were similar to those reported in the literature for AU precipitated with NH 4 OH. (author)

  18. Effect of pH on the morphology, mechanical and optical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Indian Academy of Sciences. 1419. Effect of pH on the morphology, mechanical and optical properties of .... 1 mm and the focal length ( f ) of the convex lens used to focus the laser beam was 300 mm. In the present work,. 20 laser shots ...

  19. The effects of diet ingredients on gastric ulceration and salivary pH in gestating sows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet and stress are thought to have a significant influence on the development of ulceration of the pars esophagea (UPE) region of the stomach in swine. the objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of diet ingredients on UPE and salivary pH in breeding sows. Forty-eight sows were ra...

  20. Temporary contracts : Effect on job satisfaction and personal lives of recent PhD graduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijer, C.J.F.; Belder, R.; Sonneveld, H.; Van, Bochove C.A.; Van, der Weijden I.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we assess the effects of temporary employment on job satisfaction and the personal lives of recent PhD graduates. Temporary employment is becoming increasingly prevalent in many sectors, but has been relatively common in academia, especially for early career scientists. Labor market

  1. Effect of pH and inoculum size on pentachlorophenol degradation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The success of this depends on finding strains able to degrade PCP in a changeable environment. The aim of this work was to study the influence of pH of the medium and the effect of inoculum size on pentachlorophenol degradation by Pseudomonas sp. A study of PCP degradation kinetics was performed to assess such ...

  2. Effect of Temperature and PH on Biogas Production from Cow Dung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of feed, temperature and pH on biogas production was investigated using 500 ml small scale laboratory flasks. Feed containing cow dung and dog faeces produced the most biogas for small scale experiments. The combinations were scaled up to assess the feasibility of producing biogas from two 150 L ...

  3. The effects of temperature and pH bacterial degradation of latex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to integrate the activities of paint deterioration of microbial communities (microcosms) on the basis of environmental factors. The effect of temperature and pH on bacterial degradation of latex paint under humid condition by bacterial isolates was studied. Results obtained revealed that paint ...

  4. pH Effects in Foods: Development, Validation and Calibration of a Fundamental Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Biekman, E.S.A.; Greiner, R.; Seyhan, F.; Barringer, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of pH observed in the activity of a number of enzymes from different origins and the degradation of green colour in blanched vegetables, was modelled based on fundamental kinetic principles by considering hydrogen ions as an integral part of the reaction mechanism. Parameters were

  5. The Effects of pH and Heat Treatment Processing on the Stability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of pH and heat treatment processing on stability and natural food colours used in dairy products. A repeated laboratory experiment was conducted in which loss of colour intensity or change in shade of natural food colours used in acid and nearly neutral dairy products at ...

  6. Antibacterial and antifungal effect of high pH and paraffin wax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial and antifungal effects of high pH (9, 10) and paraffin wax were determined. Determination of antibacterial and antifungal activity of the combined treatments was achieved by aerobic mesophilic count of bacteria and fungi on the surface of the tomatoes, peppers and oranges using serial dilution and pour ...

  7. Effects of pH, titratable acidity and calcium concentration of non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has also been reported that experimental addition of calcium in beverages can reduce the progression of erosion. This study was carried out to investigate effects the of pH, titratable acidity and calcium concentration of non alcoholic carbonated beverages on enamel erosion of extracted human premolar teeth. Method: ...

  8. Effects of pH and chloride concentration on pitting corrosion of AA6061 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, B.; Saidi, D.; Benzaid, A.; Hadji, S.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of pH solution and chloride (Cl - ) ion concentration on the corrosion behaviour of alloy AA6061 immersed in aqueous solutions of NaCl have been investigated using measurements of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarisation, linear polarisation, cyclic polarisation experiment combined with open circuit potential transient technique and optical or scanning electron microscopy. The corrosion behaviour of the AA6061 aluminum alloy was found to be dependant on the pH and chloride concentration [NaCl] of solution. In acidic or slightly neutral solutions, general and pitting corrosion occurred simultaneously. In contrast, exposure to alkaline solutions results in general corrosion. Experience revealed that the alloy AA6061 was susceptible to pitting corrosion in all chloride solution of concentration ranging between 0.003 wt% and 5.5 wt% NaCl and an increase in the chloride concentration slightly shifted both the pitting E pit and corrosion E cor potentials to more active values. In function of the conditions of treatment, the sheets of the alloy AA6061 undergo two types of localised corrosion process, leading to the formation of hemispherical and crystallographic pits. Polarisation resistance measurements in acidic (pH = 2) and alkaline chloride solutions (pH = 12) which are in good agreement with those of weight loss, show that the corrosion kinetic is minimised in slightly neutral solutions (pH = 6)

  9. Effect of Water Chemistry Factors on Flow Accelerated Corrosion : pH, DO, Hydrazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Hong Pyo

    2013-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion(FAC) of the carbon steel piping in pressurized water reactors(PWRs) has been major issue in nuclear industry. Severe accident at Surry Unit 2 in 1986 initiated the worldwide interest in this area. Major parameters influencing FAC are material composition, microstructure, water chemistry, and hydrodynamics. Qualitative behaviors of FAC have been well understood but quantitative data about FAC have not been published for proprietary reason. In order to minimize the FAC in PWRs, the optimal method is to control water chemistry factors. Chemistry factors influencing FAC such as pH, corrosion potential, and hydrazine contents were reviewed in this paper. FAC rate decreased with pH up to 10 because magnetite solubility decreased with pH. Corrosion potential is generally controlled dissolved oxygen (DO) and hydrazine in secondary water. DO increased corrosion potential. FAC rate decreased with DO by stabilizing magnetite at low DO concentration or by formation of hematite at high DO concentration. Even though hydrazine is generally used to remove DO, hydrazine itself thermally decomposed to ammonia, nitrogen, and hydrogen raising pH. Hydrazine could react with iron and increased FAC rate. Effect of hydrazine on FAC is rather complex and should be careful in FAC analysis. FAC could be managed by adequate combination of pH, corrosion potential, and hydrazine

  10. Cation effects on phosphatidic acid monolayers at various pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Cathcart, Matthew G; Vidalis, Andrew S; Allen, Heather C

    2016-10-01

    The impact of pH and cations on phase behavior, stability, and surface morphology for dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA) monolayers was investigated. At pHCations are found to expand and stabilize the monolayer in the following order of increasing magnitude at pH 5.6: Na + >K + ∼Mg 2+ >Ca 2+ . Additionally, cation complexation is tied to the pH and protonation state of DPPA, which are the primary factors controlling the monolayer surface behavior. The binding affinity of cations to the headgroup and thus deprotonation capability of the cation, ranked in the order of Ca 2+ >Mg 2+ >Na + >K + , is found to be well explained by the law of matching water affinities. Nucleation of surface 3D lipid structures is observed from Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , and Na + , but not from K + , consistent with the lowest binding affinity of K + . Unraveling cation and pH effects on DPPA monolayers is useful in further understanding the surface properties of complex systems such as organic-coated marine aerosols where organic films are directly influenced by the pH and ionic composition of the underlying aqueous phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dendritic Zinc Growth in Acid Electrolyte: Effect of the pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoa, Leandro N.; Pary, Paola; Seré, Pablo R.; Conconi, M. Susana; Egli, Walter A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, dendritic growth at the edges of electrogalvanized steel strip has been studied using a specially designed rotating washer electrode which simulates the fluid dynamic conditions and the current density distribution at the steel strip edge found in a production line. The effect of electrolyte pH and current density on dendritic growth in an acidic zinc plating bath (ZnSO4 and H2SO4) was addressed. The temperature was kept constant at 60 °C. Solution pH was adjusted to 1, 2 or 3 using different amounts of H2SO4. In addition, the influence of temperature on the pH of the solution was determined. The current density was set at 40 or 60 A/dm2, similar to that used in the industry. Deposits were characterized using SEM and XRD. The results showed that pH strongly affects dendrites shape, length and texture. Furthermore, the morphology of dendrites at the washer edge and of deposits on the flat portion of the washer changed considerably as solution pH was increased from 1 to 3. It was found that the morphology of dendrites at the washer edge stems from the morphology of the deposit on its flat portion, which in turn determines their shape.

  12. Effect of pH and nitrogen source in carboxylation by seedlings of wheat and maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Pineda, D.; Saez, R.M.; Solano, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Carboxylation has been studied in leaves homogenate, expressed as RuBP-carboxylase activity, using as one of the substrates NaH 14 CO 3 , and giving the acitivity value as nanomols of 14 CO 2 incorporated by mg.. of protein per minute in the determined conditions. The variable is the pH of the culture media. Cultures has been studied with pH values between 3.5 and 6.2. Three different nitrogen sources has been used, carefully calculating the composition of each medium in order that all of them have same nitrogen content:1) Nitrate medium, 2) Ammonium sulfate medium and 3) Ammonium nitrate medium. The results are presented graphically with a discussion about them. It is shown that the effect of pH is less pronounced in maize that in wheat, with NO 3 nitrogen source that with NH 4 + , and in plants 28 days age than in plants 7 days age. (author)

  13. Effect of pH and dissociation on the fate and exposure of ionizable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Ionizable organic chemicals comprise an important fraction of pharmaceuticals, pesticides as well as industrial chemicals. It has been estimated that 33% of the preregistered REACH substances is mostly ionized at pH 7. To extend the appliccability of existing exposure models, a Multimedia Activity...... parameters. The sensitivity analysis showed that the parameters describing ionization, pH and the dissociation constant (pKa), are among the most sensitive model parameters. The uncertainty analysis, however, indicated that these parameters are not the major source of uncertainty, which statistically...... and sediments. In most cases, the uncertainty of PECs and of persistance is largely explained by the uncertainty of (bio)degradation rates, which may be caused by model assumptions, experimental or estimation errors or by the environmental variability, including the effect of pH....

  14. THE FLOCCULATION MAXIMUM (pH) OF FIBRINOGEN AND SOME OTHER BLOOD-CLOTTING REAGENTS. (RELATIVE TURBIDIMETRY WITH THE EVELYN PHOTOELECTRIC COLORIMETER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J H

    1942-03-20

    By means of a novel adaptation of the Evelyn photoelectric colorimeter to the measurement of relative turbidities, the question of the flocculation maximum (F.M.) in acetate buffer solutions of varying pH and salt content has been studied on (a) an exceptionally stable prothrombin-free fibrinogen and its solutions after incipient thermal denaturation and incomplete tryptic proteolysis, (b) plasma, similarly treated, (c) prothrombin, thrombin, and (brain) thromboplastin solutions. All the fibrinogens show a remarkable uniformity of the precipitation pattern, viz. F.M. =4.7 (+/-0.2) pH in salt-containing buffer solutions and pH = 5.3 (+/-0.2) in salt-poor buffer (N/100 acetate). The latter approximates the isoelectric point (5.4) obtained by cataphoresis (14). There is no evidence that denaturation or digestion can produce any "second maximum." The data support the view that fibrin formation (under the specific influence of thrombin) is intrinsically unrelated to denaturation and digestion phenomena, although all three can proceed simultaneously in crude materials. A criticism is offered, therefore, of Wöhlisch's blood clotting theory. Further applications of the photoelectric colorimeter to coagulation problems are suggested, including kinetic study of fibrin formation and the assay of fibrinogen, with a possible sensitivity of 7.5 mg. protein in 100 cc. solution.

  15. Effect of soy and bovine milks on the dental plaque pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyvand Moeiny

    2016-11-01

    (P<0.05. Conclusion: Bovine milk in none of frequent timing dropped its pH below basic pH but also significantly increased the plaque pH above the critical pH. The maximum pH drop for soy milk was in 2minutes after consumption but it never reached below the critical pH.

  16. Blood donation and blood donor mortality after adjustment for a healthy donor effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that blood donors experience lower mortality than the general population. While this may suggest a beneficial effect of blood donation, it may also reflect the selection of healthy persons into the donor population. To overcome this bias, we...... investigated the relation between blood donation frequency and mortality within a large cohort of blood donors. In addition, our analyses also took into consideration the effects of presumed health differences linked to donation behavior. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Using the Scandinavian Donation...... and mortality. The magnitude of the association was reduced after adjustment for an estimate of self-selection in the donor population. Our observations indicate that repeated blood donation is not associated with premature death, but cannot be interpreted as conclusive evidence of a beneficial health effect....

  17. Effects of extracellular pH on UV-induced K+ efflux from cultured rose cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, A.J.; Murphy, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light causes a specific leakage of K + from cultured rose cells (Rosa damascena). During K + efflux, there is also an increase in extracellular HCO 3 - and acidification of the cell interior. We hypothesized that the HCO 3 - originated from intracellular hydration of respiratory CO 2 and served as a charge balancing mechanism during K + efflux, the K + and HCO 3 - being co transported out of the cell through specific channels. An alternative hypothesis which would yield similar results would be the counter transport of K + and H + . To test these hypotheses, we studied the effect of a range of external pH values (pH 5-9), regulated by various methods (pH-stat, 100 millimolar Tris-Mes buffer, or CO 2 partial pressure), on the UV-induced K + efflux. Both UV-C (less than 290 nanometers) and UV-B (290-310 nanometers) induced K + efflux with a minimum at about pH 6 to 7, and greater efflux at pH values of 5, 8, and 9. Since pH values of 8 and 9 increased instead of reduced the efflux of K + , these data are not consistent with notion that the efflux of K + is dependent on an influx of H + , a process that would be sensitive to external H + concentration. We suggest that the effect of pH on K + efflux may be mediated through the titration of specific K + -transporting proteins or channels in the plasma membrane. Since we could not detect the presence of carbonic anhydrase activity in cell extracts, we could not use the location of this enzyme to aid in our interpretation regarding the site of hydration of CO 2 . (author)

  18. Effects of Red Blood Cell Aggregation on the Apparent Viscosity of Blood Flow in Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Lowe, Mary L.

    1996-11-01

    In arterioles and venules (20-200μ diameter), the low shear rates enable red blood cells to form aggregate structures of varying sizes and morphology. The size and distribution of the aggregates affect the flow impedance within a microvascular network; this effect may be characterized by an "apparent viscosity". In this study, we measure the apparent viscosity of blood flow in 50μ glass tubes as a function of shear rate and red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit); for a fixed tube geometry and an imposed flow rate, the viscosity is determined by measuring the pressure drop across the tube. To correlate the apparent viscosity with the size and spatial distribution of the aggregates in the flow, video images of the flow are recorded and analyzed using power spectral techniques. Pig blood and sheep blood are used as the models for aggregating and non-aggregating blood, respectively. Supported by NSF PFF Award CTS-9253633

  19. Ultimate pH values and bacteriological condition of meat and stress metabolites in blood of transported reindeer bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wiklund

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-three reindeer bulls, aged 2-3 years, fed during two winter months at the Vuolda reindeer research station in Arjeplog, Sweden, were used in the study. The first group of eight reindeer was moved from their feeding corral to a selection corral, captured by lasso and stunned with a captive bolt outside the selection corral. The second group of seven reindeer was moved to the selection corral, captured by lasso and restrained, after which they were loaded onto a lorry- and transported for 1 hour and then slaughtered. The third group of eight reindeer was moved to the selection corral and herded directly onto the lorry, without any manual handling. They were transported for 5 h and then slaughtered. In both transport groups, four reindeer were fitted with pre-programmed automatic blood sampling equipment (ABSE. ABSE sampled blood at predetermined times via a jugular vein catheter. Ultimate pH-values in three muscles (Mm. longissimus, triceps brachii and biceps femoris were significantly lower in the group carefully handled and transported for 5 h compared with the other two groups. The physiological mechanisms behind these results are discussed. Samples from M. semimembranosus were collected at slaughter and after 2, 6 and 10 days of refrigerated storage (+4 °C. The samples were analysed for total counts of aerobic bacteria (pour-plated in Tryptone Glucose Extract Agar, Difco, incubated at 20 °C and 30 °C, respectively for 72 h, coliform bacteria 37 °C (pour-plated in Violet Red Bile Agar, Oxoid, incubated at 37 °C for 24 h, Enterococci (surface-plated onto Slantez and Bartley Agar, Oxoid, incubated at 44 °C for 48 h and Bacillus cereus (surface-plated onto Blood Agar Plates (Blood Agar Base, Difco, supplemented with 5% defibrinated horse blood 30 °C for 24 h. All samples fell in the range 'fit for consumption'. At slaughter, there was no difference in ASAT activity, urea and Cortisol concentrations between the two transported groups

  20. The effects of endurance and resistance training on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R S; Hirth, V A

    1995-10-01

    There now exists substantial clinical data supporting a blood pressure lowering effect of endurance training. Though the effect is modest (5-10 mmHg), epidemiologic studies indicate the possibility of protection against the development of hypertension and also indicate significantly reduced cardiovascular mortality and increased longevity associated with chronic endurance exercise. The data for blood pressure lowering effects of resistive training are much less compelling, and this area requires additional investigation. However, it appears that resistance training is not associated with chronic elevations in blood pressure. Future studies need to focus on: 1) the relative efficacy of low-, moderate- and high-intensity training on lowering blood pressure; 2) the effect of training on ambulatory blood pressure; 3) targeting of at risk and high responding populations; and 4) the importance of insulinemia, SNS tone and central adiposity in the mechanism of any blood pressure lowering effect of training.

  1. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Materials and methods Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. Results During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. Discussion These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance. PMID:22153688

  2. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance.

  3. Effect of Kombucha Tea on Blood Sugar and Blood Lipid Profiles in Diabetic Rats: Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malekaneh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Kombucha tea is made through fermentation of sweet tea by Kombucha fungus. It has beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of many diseases. The present study aimed at examining the effect of Kombucha tea extract on blood sugar and blood lipid profiles in diabetes. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight Wistar rats weighing about 250g were divided into 4 equal groups and then injected intraperitoneally (IP with alloxan to induce diabetes. The administered concentrations were 20 and 80 mg/kg of Kombucha tea and 20 mg/kg of black ordinary tea for one month. The rats’ blood sugar and weight were tested before and after the intervention period but blood lipid parameters per either administration were also assessed at the end of the period. Results: Mean blood sugar in the diabetic rats receiving Kombucha tea was reduced. Maximum reduction in blood sugar was observed in the group receiving Kombucha tea with concentration of 80 mg/kg. However, black tea significantly reduced blood sugar. Conclusion: Kombucha tea consumption for a month only reduced blood sugar levels in diabetic patients. But increased the weight and not have favorable effects on lipid profile.

  4. The Effect of Blood Transfusion on Outcomes in Aortic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Camilo A; Singh, Mrinal; Bin Mahmood, Syed Usman; Brownstein, Adam J; Zafar, Mohammad A; Saeyeldin, Ayman; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-09-01

    The use of blood transfusion in cardiac surgery varies widely. The beneficial effects of blood products are offset by an increase in morbidity and mortality. Despite multiple studies showing an association between blood product exposure and adverse short- and long-term events, it is difficult to determine causality. Nevertheless, the implication is sufficient to warrant the search for alternative strategies to reduce the use of blood products while providing a standard of care that optimizes postoperative outcomes. Aortic surgery, in particular, is associated with an increased risk of bleeding requiring a blood transfusion. There is a paucity of evidence within aortic surgery regarding the deleterious effects of blood products. Here, we review the current evidence regarding patient outcomes after blood transfusion in cardiac surgery, with special emphasis on aortic surgery.

  5. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Karami Nogourani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6 min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for 6 consecutive days. After unstimulated saliva was collected, stimulated saliva was collected at interval of 0-1, 1–3, and 3–6 minutes after the start of different flavored chewing gums. The SFR and salivary pH were measured. The SFR increased in all five flavored gums at 1, 3, and 6 minutes after start of chewing gums (<0.001. The flow rate of all products reached peak in the 1st minute of stimulation, except spearmint-flavored gums which reached peak in the 6th minute. In the 1st minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest SFR. During 1–3 minutes, strawberry- and apple-flavored gums showed higher SFR, respectively. Only the spearmint- and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased salivary pH. Gum flavored can affect the SFR and pH and special flavors can be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions.

  6. Effects of pH upon the environmental fate of [14C]fenitrothion in an aquatic microcosm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    The environmental fate of [ 14 C]fenitrothion was evaluated in aquatic microcosms held at pH 8.3 or 6.7. No general effect attributable to pH was observed; however, several significant interactions were identified. Of these, the findings that statistically higher amounts of radioactivity were present in water held at pH 6.7 and that significantly less metabolism of the parent compound occurred in the organisms at pH 8.3 were preeminent. These differences seen in metabolism and environmental fate between pH values are relatively minor and do not compromise the safety of the compound

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on blood and blood components: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The present publication reviews, in a comprehensive manner, the relevant literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on whole blood, blood cells, and other blood components. It presents the interested reader with sufficient information and data to facilitate rational decisions in relation to the feasibility of irradiation of blood and blood products for the purposes stated above. The IAEA expects that this can promote a wider use of the technology for improving health care practice in Member States, particularly in view of the recent spread of conventional as well as ''modern'' diseases which exert immunosuppressive effects in afflicted patients, with pathological consequences. Innumerable patients could thus benefit from this application of ionizing energy. 209 refs, 1 tab

  8. Modeling of pH Dependent Electrochemical Noise in Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors ISFET

    OpenAIRE

    M. P. Das; M. Bhuyan

    2013-01-01

    pH ISFETs are very important sensor for in vivo continuous monitoring application of physiological and environmental system. The accuracy of Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor (ISFET) output measurement is greatly affected by the presences of noise, drift and slow response of the device. Although the noise analysis of ISFET so far performed in different literature relates only to sources originated from Field Effect Transistor (FET) structure which are almost constant for a particular devi...

  9. Photoconductivity, pH Sensitivity, Noise, and Channel Length Effects in Si Nanowire FET Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Ferdinand; Zadorozhnyi, Ihor; Khondkaryan, Hrant; Arakelyan, Armen; Vitusevich, Svetlana

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanowire (NW) field-effect transistor (FET) sensors of various lengths were fabricated. Transport properties of Si NW FET sensors were investigated involving noise spectroscopy and current-voltage (I-V) characterization. The static I-V dependencies demonstrate the high quality of fabricated silicon FETs without leakage current. Transport and noise properties of NW FET structures were investigated under different light illumination conditions, as well as in sensor configuration in an aqueous solution with different pH values. Furthermore, we studied channel length effects on the photoconductivity, noise, and pH sensitivity. The magnitude of the channel current is approximately inversely proportional to the length of the current channel, and the pH sensitivity increases with the increase of channel length approaching the Nernst limit value of 59.5 mV/pH. We demonstrate that dominant 1/f-noise can be screened by the generation-recombination plateau at certain pH of the solution or external optical excitation. The characteristic frequency of the generation-recombination noise component decreases with increasing of illumination power. Moreover, it is shown that the measured value of the slope of 1/f-noise spectral density dependence on the current channel length is 2.7 which is close to the theoretically predicted value of 3.

  10. Effect of pH on Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 growth, spore heat resistance and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtimet, Narjes; Guégan, Stéphanie; Durand, Lucile; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are potential contaminants in several industrial sectors involving high temperatures (40-65 °C) in the manufacturing process. Among those thermophilic spore-forming bacteria, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, called "the swelling canned food spoiler", has generated interest over the last decade in the food sector. The aim of this study was to investigate and to model pH effect on growth, heat resistance and recovery abilities after a heat-treatment of T. thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571. Growth and sporulation were conducted on reinforced clostridium media and liver broth respectively. The highest spore heat resistances and the greatest recovery ability after a heat-treatment were obtained at pH condition allowing maximal growth rate. Growth and sporulation boundaries were estimated, then models using growth limits as main parameters were extended to describe and quantify the effect of pH on recovery of injured spores after a heat-treatment. So, cardinal values were used as a single set of parameters to describe growth, sporulation and recovery abilities. Besides, this work suggests that T. thermosaccharolyticum preserve its ability for germination and outgrowth after a heat-treatment at a low pH where other high resistant spore-forming bacteria like Geobacillus stearothermophilus are unable to grow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of glucose on the formation of PhIP in a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, K; Jägerstad, M

    1991-12-01

    The effect of glucose on the formation of the food mutagen PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine) was studied in a model system. When a mixture of creatine (0.9 mmol), phenylalanine (0.9 mmol) and glucose (0.45 mmol) was heated in diethylene glycol and water (3 ml, 5:1) for 10 min at 180 or 225 degrees C several mutagens were produced. Identification by HPLC, UV absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry revealed the presence of PhIP as well as 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and minor amounts of 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline. Heating the system without glucose produced PhIP as a single mutagen, but in considerably lower amount. An inhibiting effect of glucose in high concentrations was demonstrated. When glucose was added in more than or equimolar amounts of the other two reactants, the formation of mutagens was markedly reduced. Tyrosine heated under the same conditions, with creatine and glucose, showed mutagenic activity. However, no PhIP nor any other known food mutagen was identified from the tyrosine mixture.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimal, Anjali J; Smith, Catherine C; Laros, Russell K; Caughey, Aaron B; Cheng, Yvonne W

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the cost-effectiveness of private umbilical cord blood banking. A decision-analytic model was designed comparing private umbilical cord blood banking with no umbilical cord blood banking. Baseline assumptions included a cost of $3,620 for umbilical cord blood banking and storage for 20 years, a 0.04% chance of requiring an autologous stem cell transplant, a 0.07% chance of a sibling requiring an allogenic stem cell transplant, and a 50% reduction in risk of graft-versus-host disease if a sibling uses banked umbilical cord blood. Private cord blood banking is not cost-effective because it cost an additional $1,374,246 per life-year gained. In sensitivity analysis, if the cost of umbilical cord blood banking is less than $262 or the likelihood of a child needing a stem cell transplant is greater than 1 in 110, private umbilical cord blood banking becomes cost-effective. Currently, private umbilical cord blood banking is cost-effective only for children with a very high likelihood of needing a stem cell transplant. Patients considering private blood banking should be informed of the remote likelihood that a unit will be used for a child or another family member. III.

  13. Effect of pH on the adsorption of carbendazim in Polish mineral soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszko, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the influence of pH on the adsorption of carbendazim in soil profiles of three mineral agricultural soils: Hyperdystric Arenosol, Haplic Luvisol and Hypereutric Cambisol. In the examined pH range between 3 and 7 the adsorption of carbendazim was inversely correlated to the pH of the soil. The adsorption coefficients were in the range between 0.3 and 151.8 mL g −1 . Decreasing the pH in the soil suspensions from 7 to 3 increased the value of this coefficient by 3 to 70 times. A decrease in the amounts of organic matter down the soil profiles was not associated with weaker carbendazim adsorption. In the samples from all soil horizons, at pH values between 3 and 6, the predominant sorption process was carbendazim adsorption on clay minerals. The adsorption of carbendazim on organic matter prevailed over that on clays only at pH > 6 and only in the Ap horizon of the examined soils. The developed mathematical models yielded very good results when the adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim was assumed to be the predominant adsorption process on clays together with the adsorption of neutral molecules on organic matter and clays. The results from both the model fitting and the experiments revealed the negative effect of Al oxides and hydroxides and Al cations on the adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim on clay minerals. The developed models successfully described the pH-dependent adsorption processes of carbendazim for both data from particular soil horizons and those from all three examined soil profiles. -- Highlights: ► Adsorption of carbendazim in soils was inversely correlated to soil pH. ► At low pH carbendazim was adsorbed predominantly by clay minerals. ► Al 3+ influenced adsorption of the protonated form of carbendazim on clays. ► Created models predict pH-dependent sorption processes in the whole soil profiles.

  14. [Blood conservation effect and safety of shed mediastinal blood autotransfusion after cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, T; Ban, K; Yamazaki, K; Date, O; Nakamura, T; Kanzaki, Y

    1998-10-01

    Autotransfusion of shed mediastinal blood after cardiac surgery has been used to reduce risks related to homologous blood transfusions. To document the efficacy and safety of autotransfusion, we compared clinical findings of 80 patients receiving shed mediastinal blood (autotransfusion group) with those of the control group of 52 patients. The amount of the autotransfusion was limited to 800 ml, given the potentially harmful effects of shed blood transfusion. The mean transfused shed volume was 314 +/- 236 ml (S.D.). The serum levels of FDP-E, D-dimer and TAT after autotransfusion were higher in the autotransfusion group than in the control group (p = 0.01, p = 0.0004, p = 0.001, respectively). However, postoperative blood loss and the rate of reexploration for bleeding were similar in the two groups. The patients receiving blood products were fewer in the autotransfusion group than those in the control group (21% vs 44%; p = 0.005). Autotransfusion did not increase postoperative complications, including infection. Thus, although autotransfusion of mediastinal shed blood has the potential to affect hemostasis, unless the amount of autotransfusion exceeds 800 ml, it appears that this method is clinically safe and effective as a mean of blood conservation.

  15. Effects of feeding on arterial blood gases in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, M; Overgaard, J; Hicks, J W; Bennett, A F; Wang, T

    2000-10-01

    Reptiles habitually ingest large meals at infrequent intervals, leading to changes in acid-base status as the net secretion of acid to the stomach causes a metabolic alkalosis (the alkaline tide). In chronically cannulated and undisturbed amphibians and reptiles, the pH changes in arterial blood are, nevertheless, reduced by a concomitant respiratory acidosis (increased P(CO2) caused by a relative hypoventilation). Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) have been reported to exhibit exceptionally large increases in plasma [HCO3(-)] following feeding, but these studies were based on blood samples obtained by cardiac puncture, so stress and disturbance may have affected the blood gas levels. Furthermore, crocodilian haemoglobin is characterised by a unique binding of HCO3(-) that act to reduce blood oxygen-affinity, and it has been proposed that this feature safeguards oxygen offloading by counteracting pH effects on blood oxygen-affinity. Therefore, to study acid-base regulation and the interaction between the alkaline tide and oxygen transport in more detail, we describe the arterial blood gas composition of chronically cannulated and undisturbed alligators before and after voluntary feeding (meal size 7.5+/-1% of body mass). Digestion was associated with an approximately fourfold increase in metabolic rate (from 0.63+/-0.04 to 2.32+/-0.24 ml O(2) min(-1)kg(-1)) and was accompanied by a small increase in the respiratory gas exchange ratio. The arterial P(O2) of fasting alligators was 60.3+/-6.8 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) and reached a maximum of 81.3+/-2.7 mmHg at 96 h following feeding; there was only a small increase in lactate levels, so the increased metabolic rate seems to be entirely aerobic. Plasma [HCO3(-)] increased from 24.4+/-1.1 to 36.9+/-1.7 mmol l(-1) (at 24 h), but since arterial P(CO2) increased from 29.0+/-1.1 to 36.8+/-1.3 mmHg, arterial pH remained virtually unaffected (changing from 7.51+/-0.01 to 7.58+/-0.01 at 24 h). The changes in plasma [HCO

  16. Effects of low pH on decomposition, primary production and nutrient recycling in the littoral zone. Effekter ev lav ph pa produksjon, nedbrytning og stoffkretslop i littoralsonen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laake, M

    1976-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted in Tovdal, Southern Norway, to investigate the effects of low pH on decomposition, primary production and nutrient recycling in the littoral zone of softwater lakes. Sediment cores were incubated in throughflow boxes at pH 4, variable pH (4.5 to 5.6) and pH 6 at natural temperature conditions. One dark experiment with cores enriched with allochtonous material, and one natural light experiment with natural cores were conducted, lasting for 6 and 3 months respectively. The results show an overall reduction in decomposition with increasing acidity as measured by oxygen uptake and glucose turnover, although successions and adaptions occurred in enriched cores. Primary production of the flowering plant Lobelia dortmanna l. was inhibited at pH 4, while the acid conditions favoured epiphytic growth of the filamentous algae Mougeotia sp. turnover of phosphate reflected the activity of decomposers, while no pH-effect of phosphate uptake in plants was evident. Enriched cores developed heavy growth of ilamentous fungi at the surface, indicating a shift from bacterial to fungal decomposition with increasing acidity. More reduced conditions in sediments with increasing acidity were observed in some cases, which may be due to reduced oxygen diffusion through surface layers of gelatinous masses of fungi and bacteria. The results correlate very well with field observations of increased accumulation of organics and a reduction in macrophyte vegetation reported from Swedish lakes. It is concluded that the effects observed may have serious implications for the productivity in the littoral zone and in oligotrophic soft water lakes as a whole.

  17. Effect of Sodium Chloride and pH on Enterotoxin C Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genigeorgis, Constantin; Foda, Mohamed S.; Mantis, Antony; Sadler, Walter W.

    1971-01-01

    Growth and production of enterotoxin C by Staphylococcus aureus strain 137 in 3% + 3% protein hydrolysate powder N-Z Amine NAK broths with 0 to 12% NaCl and an initial pH of 4.00 to 9.83 were studied during an 8-day incubation period at 37 C. Growth was initiated at pH values as low as 4.00 and as high as 9.83 at 0% salt level as long as the inoculum contained at least 108 cells per ml. Rate of growth decreased as the NaCl concentration was increased gradually to 12%. Enterotoxin C was produced in broths inoculated with 108 cells per ml and above and having initial pH ranges of 4.00 to 9.83, 4.40 to 9.43, 4.50 to 8.55 and respective NaCl concentrations of 0, 4, and 8%. In the presence of 10% NaCl, the pH range supporting enterotoxin C production was 5.45 to 7.30 for an inoculum level of 108 cells per ml and 6.38 to 7.30 for 3.6 × 106 cells per ml. In repeated experiments in which the inoculum contained 108 cells per ml, we failed to demonstrate enterotoxin C production in broths with 12% NaCl and a pH range of 4.50 to 8.55 and concentrated up to 14 times. The effect of NaCl on enterotoxin C production followed the same pattern as its effect on enterotoxin B production. As the concentration of NaCl increased from 0 to 10%, yields of enterotoxin B and C decreased to undetectable amounts. PMID:5574320

  18. Influence of adding borax and modifying pH on effectiveness of food attractants for melon fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyck, P F; Rousse, P; Ryckewaert, P; Fabre, F; Quilici, S

    2004-06-01

    The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most damaging pest of cucurbits in Reunion Island. The influence of adding borax and modifying pH on the effectiveness of different food attractants for both sexes of the melon fly is analyzed by a release-recapture method in field cages. Adding borax to protein hydrolysates Nulure and Buminal strongly reduced their attractiveness for B. cucurbitae. Acidification of 5% Buminal solution (from pH 6 to pH 3) doubled its attractiveness for melon fly. Conversely, Torula yeast at pH 10.5 was significantly more attractive than the standard Torula yeast at pH 9 (28% of captured flies compared with 17%). However, a further pH increase of the yeast solution does not improve its attractiveness. The results are discussed in relation to other studies on pH modification of various baits for Tephritidae.

  19. Effect of pH and soil structure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Yol; Huwe, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effect of solution pH and soil structure on transport of sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and sulfamethazine) in combination with batch sorption tests and column experiments. Sorption isotherms properly conformed to Freundlich model, and sorption potential of the antibiotics is as follows; sulfadimethoxine > sulfamethoxazole > sulfamethazine. Decreasing pH values led to increased sorption potential of the antibiotics on soil material in pH range of 4.0-8.0. This likely resulted from abundance of neutral and positive-charged sulfonamides species at low pH, which electrostatically bind to sorption sites on soil surface. Due to destruction of macropore channels, lower hydraulic conductivities of mobile zone were estimated in the disturbed soil columns than in the undisturbed soil columns, and eventually led to lower mobility of the antibiotics in disturbed column. The results suggest that knowledge of soil structure and solution condition is required to predict fate and distribution of sulfonamide antibiotics in environmental matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ph effect on tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2) thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera V, A.; Zarate M, J.; Lemus R, J.; Sanchez, A.; Rivera M, T.

    2015-10-01

    The study of the ph effect is presented on thermoluminescent response of calcium phosphates synthesized by precipitation process. For the synthesis by precipitation, were used: calcium nitrate (Ca(NO 3 ) 2 and ammonium phosphate dibasic ((NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 ) as precursors. Samples were obtained at ph 7, 8, 9 and 10 and subjected to a calcination s temperature of 1100 C. Samples were also irradiated with X rays of 6 MV to a dose of 2 Gy. Samples prior to irradiation showed no luminescence, the irradiated samples displayed a luminescent curve which is due to the X-ray response. Powders synthesized at ph 7 showed a well-defined peak centered at 267 grades C. The rest of the prepared samples showed a luminescent curve composed of several peaks. By analyzing the curve at ph 7 by the method of the shape of the curve, was found to have an order of 1.7, with an activation energy, E = 1.44 ± 0.04 eV. (Author)

  1. Enhanced electrochemomechanical activity of polyaniline films towards high pH region: contribution of Donnan effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Wataru; Nakashima, Megumi; Pandey, Shyam S.; Kaneto, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    Enhancement of electrochemomechanical deformation (ECMD) and expansion of ECMD activity towards high pH have been simultaneously achieved in the electrolytes equilibrated with HCl and NaCl solutions for polyaniline (PANI) film. The maximum deformation has been reached to 6.7% in the mixture of 3 M HCl and 3 M NaCl equilibrated at pH 3 at ambient temperature. By comparing the fact that the ECMD magnitude is 3.2% in 1 M HCl equilibrated at pH 0.5, the simple judicious selection of electrolyte condition leads to the enhancement of ECMD magnitude by around two times. The concentration dependence on both electrical conductivity and absorption spectra elucidates the increase of protonation ratio as a function of electrolyte concentration. The results indicate that the high concentration retains both the electrochemical and ECMD activities in PANI film towards high pH region, which is the enhanced functionality of PANI supported by Donnan effect

  2. Blood pressure lowering effect of Tylophora hirsuta wall | Ahmad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crude hydromethanolic extract of Tylophora hirsuta (Th.Cr) was studied in spontaneous hypertensive Wistar rats for possible effects on high blood pressure and heart rate. In the absence of atropine, fall in arterial blood pressure was 64±7 mmHg at the dose of 100 mg/kg while in the presence of atropine, there was no effect ...

  3. Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on Blood Pressure and Electrolyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on Blood Pressure and Electrolyte Profile of Mild to Moderate Hypertensive Nigerians: A Comparative Study with Hydrochlorothiazide. ... Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of HS consumption on blood pressure (BP) and electrolytes of mild to moderate hypertensive Nigerians ...

  4. Effects of aging on blood pressure variability in resting conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, D. P.; Imholz, B. P.; Wieling, W.; Karemaker, J. M.; van Montfrans, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aging on beat-to-beat blood pressure and pulse interval variability in resting conditions and to determine the effect of aging on the sympathetic and vagal influence on the cardiovascular system by power spectral analysis of blood pressure

  5. Effect of fenofibrate on blood pressure reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Lipatenkova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по материалам статей 1. Gilbert K, Nian H, Yu C, Luther JM, Brown NJ. Fenofibrate lowers blood pressure in salt-sensitive but not salt-resistant hypertension. J Hypertens. 2013 Apr;31(4:820-9. doi: 10.1097/HJH.0b013e32835e8227. 2. Kwang K. K. Does Fenofibrate Lower Blood Pressure? Hypertension. 2013 Mar;61(3:e27. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00792.

  6. The gecko visual pigment: a pH indicator with a salt effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescitelli, F

    1981-12-01

    1. Unlike rhodopsin, the extracted 521-pigment of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) is pH-sensitive and changes its spectral absorbance in the pH range of 4.5-7.3. The colour change is reversible and pH can be employed to adjust the spectral maximum anywhere between 490 nm and its native location at 521 nm.2. The hypsochromic shift with increasing acidity is opposite to that expected for the protonation of the Schiff base nitrogen and suggests an action on the secondary system of interacting charges that have long been postulated to adjust vertebrate visual pigment colour within the visible spectrum.3. Chloride ions modulate this pH effect in a systematic and significant manner. For the pigment extracted in the chloride-deficient state the colour change occurs in the pH range of 6.0-7.0, the midpoint being close to 6.5, suggesting the possible participation of the imidazole group of histidine as the functional moiety. With added NaCl the colour shifts to the region below pH 6.2.4. The modulating action of chloride is postulated to be a conformational change of the opsin leading to a shift of the secondary interacting site from one functional group to another or else to a change in pK of a single group due to the conformational alteration of the electrostatics of the system.5. At pH values between 7.5 and 9.0 a different mechanism becomes apparent. In this region a decrease occurs in the photopigment density as well as a shift in absorbance toward the blue. This alkaline effect is readily reversed either by adding NaCl or else by lowering the pH. Along with the other protective effects of chloride these ions serve to reduce or prevent this alkaline loss in density.6. Associated with this reversible photopigment loss is a reversible appearance of a product with a maximum at about 366 nm. The spectrum of this product is like that produced by the addition of 11-cis retinal to the extract. Acidification of the alkaline preparation leads to a restitution of the photopigment

  7. Effect of long-term smoking on salivary flow rate and salivary pH

    OpenAIRE

    Mala Singh; Navin Anand Ingle; Navpreet Kaur; Pramod Yadav; Ekta Ingle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Saliva is a complex and important body fluid which is very essential for oral health and it is the first biological fluid that is exposed to cigarette smoke, which contains numerous toxic compositions responsible for structural and functional changes in saliva. Aim: To evaluate the long-term effect of smoking on salivary flow rate (SFR) and salivary pH. Materials and Methods: The subjects of the study were divided into smokers and nonsmokers. Each group comprised of 35 male adul...

  8. Effect of pH on-Sr adsorption on bentonite Lieskovec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of changes in pH environment on the adsorption of Sr 2+ has been studied by radioisotope indications, using of radioisotope 85 Sr with energy γ-rays 0.514 MeV, in a static arrangement of the experiment, under aerobic conditions. The concentration range was 1 · 10 -5 - 5 · 10 -2 mol dm -3 . The samples of bentonite from Lieskovec deposit were tested which could be assigned into the Fe-montmorillonite group. (Author)

  9. Experimental Precipitation of Carbonate Minerals: Effect of pH, Supersaturation and Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Tetteh, Abednego

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the controlling factors and elucidating the requirements and conditions necessary for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage by mineral trapping (or carbonation) is of paramount interest for any technical application as a means for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). The effect of pH, supersaturation and substrate has been studied using non-stirred batch reactors at initial constant temperature of 150 oC. These conditions are relevant for mineral trapping. A set of experiments was c...

  10. Stabilizing sodium hypochlorite at high pH: effects on soft tissue and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbluth, Holger; Marending, Monika; De-Deus, Gustavo; Sener, Beatrice; Zehnder, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    When sodium hypochlorite solutions react with tissue, their pH drops and tissue sorption decreases. We studied whether stabilizing a NaOCl solution at a high pH would increase its soft-tissue dissolution capacity and effects on the dentin matrix compared with a standard NaOCl solution of the same concentration and similar initial pH. NaOCl solutions were prepared by mixing (1:1) a 10% stock solution with water (standard) or 2 mol/L NaOH (stabilized). Physiological saline and 1 mol/L NaOH served as the controls. Chlorine content and alkaline capacity of NaOCl solutions were determined. Standardized porcine palatal soft-tissue specimens and human root dentin bars were exposed to test and control solutions. Weight loss percentage was assessed in the soft-tissue dissolution assay. Three-point bending tests were performed on the root dentin bars to determine the modulus of elasticity and flexural strength. Values between groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance with the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (α pH level of 7.5, respectively. The stabilized NaOCl dissolved significantly more soft tissue than the standard solution, and the pH remained high. It also caused a higher loss in elastic modulus and flexure strength (P < .05) than the control solutions, whereas the standard solution did not. NaOH-stabilized NaOCl solutions have a higher alkaline capacity and are thus more proteolytic than standard counterparts. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted

  12. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted

  13. Effects of endurance training on blood pressure, blood pressure-regulating mechanisms, and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Véronique A; Fagard, Robert H

    2005-10-01

    Previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials on the effects of chronic dynamic aerobic endurance training on blood pressure reported on resting blood pressure only. Our aim was to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis including resting and ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure-regulating mechanisms, and concomitant cardiovascular risk factors. Inclusion criteria of studies were: random allocation to intervention and control; endurance training as the sole intervention; inclusion of healthy sedentary normotensive or hypertensive adults; intervention duration of > or =4 weeks; availability of systolic or diastolic blood pressure; and publication in a peer-reviewed journal up to December 2003. The meta-analysis involved 72 trials, 105 study groups, and 3936 participants. After weighting for the number of trained participants and using a random-effects model, training induced significant net reductions of resting and daytime ambulatory blood pressure of, respectively, 3.0/2.4 mm Hg (Phypertensive study groups (-6.9/-4.9) than in the others (-1.9/-1.6; Pendurance training decreases blood pressure through a reduction of vascular resistance, in which the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system appear to be involved, and favorably affects concomitant cardiovascular risk factors.

  14. Methods of pH determination in Calcareous soils of Oman: The effect of Electrolyte and soil solution ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Busaidi, A.; Cookson, P.

    2002-01-01

    Determination of pH assists in understanding many reactions that occur in soil. Soil pH values are highly sensitive to the procedure used for determination. In this study, pH was measured in different electrolytes [distilled water (pHw), 0.01MCaCl2 (pHCa), 1MKCl (pHk), and 0.01MBaCl2 (pHba)] with different soil: electrolyte ratios (i.e. 1:1, 1:2.5 and 1:5). The objective was to determine the effect of each electrolyte and dilution ratio on pH of saline and non-saline soils from Oman. It was found that ph values varied significantly between electrolytes and with different dilution ratios. Linear regression equations were generated between electrolytes, dilution ratios and were mostly significant. Soil pH values determined in different electrolytes were significantly interrelated. Water appeared as a highly suitable solvent for soil pH measurements because it is simple and values familiar to soil users. However, alkaline errors and electrode instabilities due to liquid junction and soluble salt effects, affected soil pH measurements, especially in water, and resulted in alkaline errors during pH measurements. Errors were minimized when pH was measured in electrolytes rather than in water. (author)

  15. Study on pH Effect in Process of an Entero-gastric Fiber-optic Sensor Design

    OpenAIRE

    Guo-ping, Chen; Rong-min, Xia; Jun, Gong; Wen-de, Shou

    2002-01-01

    The pH effect on design of a fiber optic sensor newly developed for monitoring entero-gastric reflux is investigated. The research has been carried out by utilizing the sensor to measure characteristic absorption of bilirubin standard solution (used as a calibrator) at different pH values from about 1 to 8. The results show explicitly that the estimation error according to the calibration curves with pH

  16. HIGH ALTITUDES EFFECTS ON HEMATOLOGIC BLOOD PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasim Rushiti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The approach and the objective of this experiment are consistent with the determination of changes of blood parameters after the stay of the students at an altitude of 1800-2300 meters, for a ten-day long ski course. In this paper are included a total of 64 students of the Faculty of Sport Sciences in Prishtina, of the age group of 19-25 (the average age is 21. All students previously have undergone a medical check for TA, arterial pulse and respiratory rate. In particular, the health situation is of subjects was examined, then, all students, at the same time, gave blood for analysis. In this experiment, three main hematologic parameters were taken in consideration: such as hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cells. The same analyses were carried out after the 10-day stay at a high altitude. The results of the experiment have shown significant changes after the ten-day stay at high altitude, despite the previous results that show changes only after the twenty-day stay in such elevations.

  17. Effect of gamma radiation on pH of commercial salad dressings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Sabato, Susy F.

    2011-01-01

    The demand for salad dressing has evolved significantly in recent years, and has been a frequent choice of meal. This can be attributed to the increasing consumption of healthier foods, low fat, convenience, availability and variety. Salad dressing is an oil-based emulsion in water (O/W) stabilized by proteins, phospholipids, and polysaccharides. It can be defined technically as a liquid medium used to add flavor, moisture, taste and adjust the appearance and texture of culinary preparations. Considering the positive effects of gamma irradiation in foods, such as improved security and stability of food products on shelves, pH is a key factor in addition to conservation as well. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation in the pH of 10 varieties of salad dressings, ready for consumption on the market in Sao Paulo, submitted to doses of 3.0 and 5.0 kGy in the irradiator Multipurpose IPEN / CNEN-SP. The irradiated samples were compared to control samples. The results showed no statistical difference by ANOVA and Tukey test at the 5% level of significance, which demonstrated that the application of radiation in addition to providing greater security to the product, do not interfere with their quality while maintaining a constant pH after irradiation. (author)

  18. Effect of irradiation on the pH for 11 commercial salad dressings near expiration date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Hirashima, Fabiana K.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Sabato, Susy F.

    2013-01-01

    The demand for salad dressings has evolved significantly in recent years and has become a frequent option in the meal. The pH values for salad dressings are low, precisely because they are emulsions acidified by adding ingredients, such as, acetic acid and / or citric acid and preservatives like benzoic acid and / or sorbic those provide an environment unfavorable to the growth of many microorganisms. However, the deterioration of such products occur as a result of growth of lactobacilli, bacilli, yeasts, once damaged, can present loss of taste and dark spots on the surface as an indication of yeast colony formation. Whereas, the positive effects of gamma irradiation on food, such as improved safety and stability of food products on shelves, the pH is a key factor for assessing not only the conservation, but also to the quality. The aim of this study was to reassess the effects of radiation on the pH of 9 varieties of commercial salad dressing after 6 months of storage, near the expiration of samples validity. The samples were acquired on the market of Sao Paulo and subjected to low doses of radiation at irradiator Multipurpose IPEN / CNEN-SP. The irradiated samples were compared to control. Statistical analyzes were performed using the program Graph Pad 5 and adopting a significance level of 5% (p <0.05). (author)

  19. Effect of gamma radiation on pH of commercial salad dressings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Sabato, Susy F., E-mail: juliana.sagretti@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The demand for salad dressing has evolved significantly in recent years, and has been a frequent choice of meal. This can be attributed to the increasing consumption of healthier foods, low fat, convenience, availability and variety. Salad dressing is an oil-based emulsion in water (O/W) stabilized by proteins, phospholipids, and polysaccharides. It can be defined technically as a liquid medium used to add flavor, moisture, taste and adjust the appearance and texture of culinary preparations. Considering the positive effects of gamma irradiation in foods, such as improved security and stability of food products on shelves, pH is a key factor in addition to conservation as well. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation in the pH of 10 varieties of salad dressings, ready for consumption on the market in Sao Paulo, submitted to doses of 3.0 and 5.0 kGy in the irradiator Multipurpose IPEN / CNEN-SP. The irradiated samples were compared to control samples. The results showed no statistical difference by ANOVA and Tukey test at the 5% level of significance, which demonstrated that the application of radiation in addition to providing greater security to the product, do not interfere with their quality while maintaining a constant pH after irradiation. (author)

  20. Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles: effects of polyelectrolyte concentration and pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquijo, J. P., E-mail: jurquijo@fisica.udea.edu.co; Casanova, Herley; Garces, Javier; Morales, Alvaro L. [Universidad de Antioquia (Colombia)

    2011-11-15

    This study refers to the effect of sodium polyacrylate concentration (1 to 5 mass %) and pH (10 to 12) on the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetite-maghemite) and their characterization by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic particles were obtained by coprecipitation method using iron chloride (II) and iron chloride (III) as precursor reagents and sodium polyacrylate as stabilizing agent. All samples showed Moessbauer broad resonance lines in typical doublet and sextets patterns of magnetite or maghemite with corresponding wide particle size distributions. The stability of magnetic particles was carried out by measuring particle sizes with dynamic light scattering (DLS). The z-average values for magnetic particles were in the range 24 to 590 nm and no significant change in size was observed on aging by leaving this material in air for 20 days. X-ray diffraction patterns showed characteristic peaks of the spinel structure and have an increase in their broadening as the pH decreases, effect that is dominated by the decrease in crystallite sizes. The nanoparticles showed to be magnetic at pH 12 and at room temperature.

  1. Effect of irradiation on the pH for 11 commercial salad dressings near expiration date

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagretti, Juliana M.A.; Fabbri, Adriana D.T.; Hirashima, Fabiana K.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Sabato, Susy F., E-mail: jusagretti@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The demand for salad dressings has evolved significantly in recent years and has become a frequent option in the meal. The pH values for salad dressings are low, precisely because they are emulsions acidified by adding ingredients, such as, acetic acid and / or citric acid and preservatives like benzoic acid and / or sorbic those provide an environment unfavorable to the growth of many microorganisms. However, the deterioration of such products occur as a result of growth of lactobacilli, bacilli, yeasts, once damaged, can present loss of taste and dark spots on the surface as an indication of yeast colony formation. Whereas, the positive effects of gamma irradiation on food, such as improved safety and stability of food products on shelves, the pH is a key factor for assessing not only the conservation, but also to the quality. The aim of this study was to reassess the effects of radiation on the pH of 9 varieties of commercial salad dressing after 6 months of storage, near the expiration of samples validity. The samples were acquired on the market of Sao Paulo and subjected to low doses of radiation at irradiator Multipurpose IPEN / CNEN-SP. The irradiated samples were compared to control. Statistical analyzes were performed using the program Graph Pad 5 and adopting a significance level of 5% (p <0.05). (author)

  2. Oxygen affinity and Bohr effect responses to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in equine and human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    diBella, G; Scandariato, G; Suriano, O; Rizzo, A

    1996-05-01

    The dependence of blood oxygen affinity and the Bohr effect on the concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) in erythrocytes was investigated in 24 trotter horses and 24 healthy men. The oxygen tension at half saturation and standard conditions (P50st at pH 7.4, PCO2(40) mmHg and 37 degrees C) and the carbon dioxide or fixed-acid-induced Bohr effect (dlogP50/dpH) were determined. Samples of fresh blood and blood depleted of or enriched with DPG were studied. In the absence of measurable DPG, the equine and human blood had similar mean (SD) values of P50st (16.6 [0.6] and 16.2 [0.7] mmHg, respectively). In both species these values increased with increasing DPG, but the response of equine blood was significantly lower, at least up to physiological values (P50st = 24.6 [0.6] and 26.2 [0.7]) mmHg; DPG = 14([1.8] and 12.8 [1.2] mumol gHb-1, respectively, in fresh blood). For concentrations above 20 to 25 mumol gHb-1 of DPG the difference between the values of P50st in the two species tended to decrease because the response in human blood reached a plateau. The interactions between the Bohr effect and the concentration of DPG showed that in the horses, as in the men, the level of DPG played an important role in governing the relative magnitude of carbon dioxide and fixed acid factors. The difference between them, which is associated with the oxylabile carbamino binding, was greatest in DPG-depleted blood, but whereas in the men the difference was suppressed by an above normal DPG concentration, in the horses it was still measurable.

  3. Effect of fluocinolone acetonide cream on human skin blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimoskey, J.E.; Holloway, A. Jr.; Flanagan, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    Blood flow rate was measured in the forearm skin of human subjects exposed to ultraviolet irradiation. Blood flow was determined by the 133 Xe disappearance technique 18 hr after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with a Westinghouse RS sunlamp held 10 inches from the skin for 10 min. Ultraviolet irradiation caused skin blood flow to increase. Application of fluocinolone acetonide cream, 0.025 percent, 4 times in the 16 hr following UV irradiation had no effect on either control skin blood flow or the UV-induced hyperemia

  4. The Effect of pH and High-Pressure Homogenization on Droplet Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah Pis Yong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to revisit the effect of high pressure on homogenization and the influence of pH on the emulsion droplet sizes. The high-pressure homogenization (HPH involves two stages of processing, where the first stage involves in blending the coarse emulsion by a blender, and the second stage requires disruption of the coarse emulsion into smaller droplets by a high-pressure homogenizer. The pressure range in this review is in between 10-500 MPa. The homogenised droplet sizes can be reduced by increasing the homogenization recirculation, and there is a threshold point beyond that by applying pressure only, the size cannot be further reduced. Normally, homogenised emulsions are classified by their degree of kinetic stability. Dispersed phase present in the form of droplets while continuous phase also known as suspended droplets. With a proper homogenization recirculation and pressure, a more kinetically stable emulsion can be produced. The side effects of increasing homogenization pressure are that it can cause overprocessing of the emulsion droplets where the droplet sizes become larger rather than the expected smaller size. This can cause kinetic instability in the emulsion. The droplet size is usually measured by dynamic light scattering or by laser light scattering technique. The type of samples used in this reviews are such as chocolate and vanilla based powders; mean droplet sizes samples; basil oil; tomato; lupin protein; oil; skim milk, soymilk; coconut milk; tomato homogenate; corn; egg-yolk, rapeseed and sunflower; Poly(4-vinylpyridine/silica; and Complex 1 until complex 4 approaches from author case study. A relationship is developed between emulsion size and pH. Results clearly show that lower pH offers smaller droplet of emulsion and the opposite occurs when the pH is increased.

  5. The effect of pH and DNA concentration on organic thin-film transistor biosensors

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Hadayat Ullah

    2012-03-01

    Organic electronics are beginning to attract more interest for biosensor technology as they provide an amenable interface between biology and electronics. Stable biosensor based on electronic detection platform would represent a significant advancement in technology as costs and analysis time would decrease immensely. Organic materials provide a route toward that goal due to their compatibility with electronic applications and biological molecules. In this report, we detail the effects of experimental parameters, such as pH and concentration, toward the selective detection of DNA via surface-bound peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequences on organic transistor biosensors. The OTFT biosensors are fabricated with thin-films of the organic semiconductor, 5,5′-bis-(7-dodecyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)-2,2′-bithiophene (DDFTTF), in which they exhibit a stable mobility of 0.2 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in buffer solutions (phosphate-buffer saline, pH 7.4 or sodium acetate, pH 7). Device performance were optimized to minimize the deleterious effects of pH on gate-bias stress such that the sensitivity toward DNA detection can be improved. In titration experiments, the surface-bound PNA probes were saturated with 50 nM of complementary target DNA, which required a 10-fold increase in concentration of single-base mismatched target DNA to achieve a similar surface saturation. The binding constant of DNA on the surface-bound PNA probes was determined from the concentration-dependent response (titration measurements) of our organic transistor biosensors. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of pH and DNA concentration on organic thin-film transistor biosensors

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Hadayat Ullah; Roberts, Mark E.; Johnson, Olasupo B.; Knoll, Wolfgang; Bao, Zhenan

    2012-01-01

    Organic electronics are beginning to attract more interest for biosensor technology as they provide an amenable interface between biology and electronics. Stable biosensor based on electronic detection platform would represent a significant advancement in technology as costs and analysis time would decrease immensely. Organic materials provide a route toward that goal due to their compatibility with electronic applications and biological molecules. In this report, we detail the effects of experimental parameters, such as pH and concentration, toward the selective detection of DNA via surface-bound peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequences on organic transistor biosensors. The OTFT biosensors are fabricated with thin-films of the organic semiconductor, 5,5′-bis-(7-dodecyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)-2,2′-bithiophene (DDFTTF), in which they exhibit a stable mobility of 0.2 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in buffer solutions (phosphate-buffer saline, pH 7.4 or sodium acetate, pH 7). Device performance were optimized to minimize the deleterious effects of pH on gate-bias stress such that the sensitivity toward DNA detection can be improved. In titration experiments, the surface-bound PNA probes were saturated with 50 nM of complementary target DNA, which required a 10-fold increase in concentration of single-base mismatched target DNA to achieve a similar surface saturation. The binding constant of DNA on the surface-bound PNA probes was determined from the concentration-dependent response (titration measurements) of our organic transistor biosensors. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Amylase for Apple Juice Processing: Effects of pH, Heat, and Ca2+ Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana N. Ceci

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of pH, heat, and Ca2+ ions on the α-amylase activities in a commercial amylolytic enzyme (Tyazyme L300, used for apple juice processing. Kinetics of thermal inactivation was studied in acetate and citrate/phosphate buffers at different temperatures (55–70 °C and enzyme concentrations (0.276 and 0.552 mL/100 mL. Maximum α-amylase activity was observed at pH=3.4 in both buffers. Effects of the addition of calcium chloride during and after thermal treatments were also investigated. α-amylase activities were measured by an iodometric method and thermal inactivation constants and D values (time for reducing 90 % of the enzymatic activity were estimated. The enzyme was more sensible to pH changes and heat when citrate ions were present in the reaction medium. If Ca2+ in the enzyme structure is bound to citrate then the resistance of the enzyme to pH changes and heat is lowered. Kinetics obtained according to Arrhenius equation and two enzymatic fractions (thermo-labile and thermoresistant were observed too. In citrate buffer the following relation was observed for thermo-labile fraction: log (D value = -0.144 t/°C + 12.992. The level of thermal inactivation also depended on the enzyme concentration. Higher thermal inactivation rates were obtained by increasing the enzyme concentration in the case when citrate was present. It was also found that the addition of calcium chloride (1 g/L after thermal treatment in median containing citrate reactivated the enzyme treated at 60 and 65 °C. The possible implications of these findings in apple juice processing were discussed.

  8. Effects of blood glucose, blood lipids and blood pressure control on recovery of patients with gastric cancer complicated with metabolic syndrome after radical gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Zhou, Pingping; Hua, Qingli; Jin, Changming; Guo, Chunling; Song, Bing

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of blood glucose, blood lipids and blood pressure control on recovery of patients with gastric cancer complicated with metabolic syndrome (MS) after radical gastrectomy. A total of 150 patients with gastric cancer, who were treated in Daqing Longnan Hospital from November, 2015 to May, 2017, were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into the MS group (80 cases) and non-MS group (70 cases). Patients in the MS group were given corresponding drugs to control blood pressure, blood lipids and blood glucose, while patients in the non-MS group were not treated with those drugs. Patients in the MS group were divided into the normal and abnormal groups according to the levels of blood glucose, blood lipids and blood pressure. Moreover, occurrences of complications were compared between the normal and abnormal groups. Before surgery, blood glucose, blood lipids and blood pressure in the MS group were significantly higher than those in the non-MS group (pblood glucose, blood lipids and blood pressure of the MS group decreased significantly compared to those before operation (pblood glucose, 2 h postprandial blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, total triglycerides (TGs), LDL, mean blood pressure and BMI (pblood glucose, blood lipids and blood pressure in patients with gastric cancer complicated with MS after radical gastrectomy can reduce the incidence of postoperative complications and promote postoperative recovery.

  9. Effect of Marijuana Smoking on Blood Chemistry and Serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of marijuana smoking on blood chemistry and serum biogenic amines concentrations in humans was investigated. Eighty Marijuana addicts and twenty non- marijuana smokers were used in the study. Blood chemistry and serum biogenic amines concentrations of the marijuana addicts and controls, were ...

  10. Effects of Malaria on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Electrocardiogram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of malaria on blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiogram and the cardiovascular responses to postural change were studied in malaria patients. Blood pressure was measured by the sphygmomanometric-auscultatory method. Standard ECG machine was used to record the electrocardiogram. Heart rate was ...

  11. Reactivity of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron in Unbuffered Systems: Effect of pH and Fe(II) Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sungjun; Hanna, Khalil

    2015-09-01

    While most published studies used buffers to maintain the pH, there is limited knowledge regarding the reactivity of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) in poorly buffered pH systems to date. In this work, the effect of pH and Fe(II) dissolution on the reactivity of NZVI was investigated during the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in unbuffered pH systems. The reduction rate increased exponentially with respect to the NZVI concentration, and the ratio of dissolved Fe(II)/initial NZVI was related proportionally to the initial pH values, suggesting that lower pH (6-7) with low NZVI loading may slow the 4-NP reduction through acceleration of the dissolution of NZVI particles. Additional experiments using buffered pH systems confirmed that high pH values (8-9) can preserve the NZVI particles against dissolution, thereby enhancing the reduction kinetics of 4-NP. Furthermore, reduction tests using ferrous ion in suspensions of magnetite and maghemite showed that surface-bound Fe(II) on oxide coatings can play an important role in enhancing 4-NP reduction by NZVI at pH 8. These unexpected results highlight the importance of pH and Fe(II) dissolution when NZVI technology is applied to poorly buffered systems, particularly at a low amount of NZVI (i.e., <0.075 g/L).

  12. The effect of repeated blood donations on the iron status of male Saudi blood donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Saleh M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Regular blood donation can lead to iron deficiency. Screening donors’ serum ferritin levels at the time of first donation and subsequently once every year is a very rational way to pick up iron deficiency in a voluntary blood donor population. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of blood donation and the prevalence of erythropoiesis with iron deficiency (sideropenia) in Saudi male blood donors. Materials and methods. The study was prospectively conducted, between December 2008 and March 2009, on 182 male native Saudi blood donors at King Fahd Central Hospital in Jazan region, Saudi Arabia. Each donor gave 450±50 mL of whole blood. Following the donation, samples were removed into 2.5 mL EDTA tubes for measurement of mean cell volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and into 7.5 mL plain tubes for estimation of iron and serum ferritin concentrations. The blood donors were divided into five groups, according to the number of donations they had given in the preceding 3 years. The blood donors in group I were first-time donors, with no previous history of blood donation. Group II donors had donated once in the last 3 years. Subjects in groups III, IV and V had donated more than once in the preceding 3 years and were considered regular donors. Results. The mean serum iron was significantly higher among subjects with no previous history of blood donation (group I) than among regular donors who had donated twice or more. The difference in serum ferritin concentration was statistically significant (pdonated once in the last 3 years, and in first-time blood donors (131.4 μg/L) was not statistically significant (pdonated between two to five times had iron deficiency. The prevalence of erythropoiesis with iron deficiency in regular blood donors was 4.3%. Conclusion. The results of this study show that an increase in the number of donations results in an increase in the frequency of depleted iron stores and subsequently in

  13. Effect of blood activity on dosimetric calculations for radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, Alexandra; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Li, Wei Bo; Schlattl, Helmut; Oeh, Uwe; Zankl, Maria; Graner, Frank Philipp; Hoeschen, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Parodi, Katia; Schwaiger, Markus

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of the definition of blood as a distinct source on organ doses, associated with the administration of a novel radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging—(S)-4-(3-18F-fluoropropyl)-L-glutamic acid (18F-FSPG). Personalised pharmacokinetic models were constructed based on clinical PET/CT images from five healthy volunteers and blood samples from four of them. Following an identifiability analysis of the developed compartmental models, person-specific model parameters were estimated using the commercial program SAAM II. Organ doses were calculated in accordance to the formalism promulgated by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) using specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons previously derived for the ICRP reference adult computational voxel phantoms. Organ doses for two concepts were compared: source organ activities in organs parenchyma with blood as a separate source (concept-1); aggregate activities in perfused source organs without blood as a distinct source (concept-2). Aggregate activities comprise the activities of organs parenchyma and the activity in the regional blood volumes (RBV). Concept-1 resulted in notably higher absorbed doses for most organs, especially non-source organs with substantial blood contents, e.g. lungs (92% maximum difference). Consequently, effective doses increased in concept-1 compared to concept-2 by 3-10%. Not considering the blood as a distinct source region leads to an underestimation of the organ absorbed doses and effective doses. The pronounced influence of the blood even for a radiopharmaceutical with a rapid clearance from the blood, such as 18F-FSPG, suggests that blood should be introduced as a separate compartment in most compartmental pharmacokinetic models and blood should be considered as a distinct source in

  14. Effect of organic matter and pH on the adsorption of metalaxyl and penconazole by soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondar, Dora; López, Rocío [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Antelo, Juan [Departamento de Edafología y Química Agrícola, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fiol, Sarah, E-mail: sarah.fiol@usc.es [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Arce, Florencio [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The adsorption of non-ionic pesticides on soils is affected by pH. • At pH < 5, the C{sub s}{sup OC}/C{sub e} ratio increased as the pH of the medium decreased. • The effect of pH on adsorption is related to the ionization of carboxylic groups. • SOM charge had similar effect on C{sub s}{sup OC}/C{sub e} in the four soils under study. -- Abstract: Soil organic matter (SOM) is considered to be the primary adsorbent of non-ionic pesticides, and it is therefore thought to determine the concentration of such pesticides in the soil solution and how they are transported throughout the medium. It is generally assumed that the sorption capacity of different soils is the same per unit mass of SOM; however, the reactivity also depends on the SOM composition and the pH of the medium. We carried out experiments to study the effects of pH and ionic strength on the adsorption of the non-ionic fungicides metalaxyl and penconazole on four soils containing different amounts of organic carbon. The adsorption isotherms fitted a Freundlich equation. For pH > 5, partitioning of the fungicides between the solid phase and the soil solution did not vary with the pH, while at lower pH, the fraction adsorbed on the solid phase increased as the pH decreased. The response was related to the effect of pH on the ionization of the carboxylic groups of the SOM and therefore to the hydrophilic nature of the SOM. Analysis of the charge effect on the partitioning of both fungicides revealed a common response in all four soils. Adsorption appears to be related to the magnitude of the charge developed at the SOM due to ionization of the carboxylic acid groups.

  15. The effect of partial portal decompression on portal blood flow and effective hepatic blood flow in man: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, A S; McAllister, E W; Godellas, C V; Goode, S E; Albrink, M H; Fabri, P J

    1995-12-01

    With the advent of transjugular intrahepatic porta-systemic stent shunt and the wider application of the surgically placed small diameter prosthetic H-graft portacaval shunt (HGPCS), partial portal decompression in the treatment of portal hypertension has received increased attention. The clinical results supporting the use of partial portal decompression are its low incidence of variceal rehemorrhage due to decreased portal pressures and its low rate of hepatic failure, possibly due to maintenance of blood flow to the liver. Surprisingly, nothing is known about changes in portal hemodynamics and effective hepatic blood flow following partial portal decompression. To prospectively evaluate changes in portal hemodynamics and effective hepatic blood flow brought about by partial portal decompression, the following were determined in seven patients undergoing HGPCS: intraoperative pre- and postshunt portal vein pressures and portal vein-inferior vena cava pressure gradients, intraoperative pre- and postshunt portal vein flow, and pre- and postoperative effective hepatic blood flow. With HGPCS, portal vein pressures and portal vein-inferior vena cava pressure gradients decreased significantly, although portal pressures remained above normal. In contrast to the significant decreases in portal pressures, portal vein blood flow and effective hepatic blood flow do not decrease significantly. Changes in portal vein pressures and portal vein-inferior vena cava pressure gradients are great when compared to changes in portal vein flow and effective hepatic blood flow. Reduction of portal hypertension with concomitant maintenance of hepatic blood flow may explain why hepatic dysfunction is avoided following partial portal decompression.

  16. [Study on effect of pH on rectum permeability of active ingredients in Reduning suppositories in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming; Wei, Ying-chun; Meng, Jin; Xu, Dian-hong; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effect of different pH on rectum permeability of chlorogenic acid and geniposide. Four kinds of Reduning suppositories of different pH were separated and put into the rectum to study the suppositories in vitro and the content of chlorogenic acid and geniposide samples was determined by HPLC to calculate the permeation in 24 hours. With increase of pH within 2.5-7.4, the steady state flux of chlorogenic acid was increased, but the steady state flux of geniposidesamples was steady. Adjusted the pH can increase the rectum permeability of active ingredients in Reduning auppositories.

  17. Effect of hematocrit and systolic blood pressure on cerebral blood flow in newborn infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younkin, D.P.; Reivich, M.; Jaggi, J.L.; Obrist, W.D.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of hematocrit and systolic blood pressure on cerebral blood flow were measured in 15 stable, low birth weight babies. CBF was measured with a modification of the xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) clearance technique, which uses an intravenous bolus of 133 Xe, an external chest detector to estimate arterial 133 Xe concentration, eight external cranial detectors to measure cephalic 133 Xe clearance curves, and a two-compartmental analysis of the cephalic 133 Xe clearance curves to estimate CBF. There was a significant inverse correlation between hematocrit and CBF, presumably due to alterations in arterial oxygen content and blood viscosity. Newborn CBF varied independently of systolic blood pressure between 60 and 84 mm Hg, suggesting an intact cerebrovascular autoregulatory mechanism. These results indicate that at least two of the factors that affect newborn animal CBF are operational in human newborns and may have important clinical implications

  18. HIGH ALTITUDES EFFECTS ON HEMATOLOGIC BLOOD PARAMETERS

    OpenAIRE

    Hasim Rushiti; Florian Miftari; Besim Halilaj

    2015-01-01

    The approach and the objective of this experiment are consistent with the determination of changes of blood parameters after the stay of the students at an altitude of 1800-2300 meters, for a ten-day long ski course. In this paper are included a total of 64 students of the Faculty of Sport Sciences in Prishtina, of the age group of 19-25 (the average age is 21). All students previously have undergone a medical check for TA, arterial pulse and respiratory rate. In particular, the health situat...

  19. Sorption of uranyl ions on silica. Effects of contact time, pH, ionic strength, concentration and phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongxia; Tao Zuyi

    2002-01-01

    The sorption of UO 2 2+ and phosphate on silica were simultaneously studied. The effect of contact time between the solid phase and aqueous solution, pH and ionic strength on the UO 2 2+ sorption in the absence and the presence of phosphate was investigated. The effect of contact time between the solid phase and aqueous solution, pH and ionic strength on the phosphate sorption was investigated too. The isotherms of UO 2 2+ and phosphate sorption at different pH values were determined. It was found that as compared with the sorption in the absence of phosphate, the sorption of UO 2 2+ on silica in the presence of phosphate is increased at low pH and decreased at high pH; the abruptly increased with increasing pH in the pH range 3-6; the sorption is gradually decreased with increasing pH in the pH range 2-12; the sorption insensitive and the sorption of phosphate is sensitive to ionic strength. (author)

  20. Effects of pH on antioxidant and prooxidant properties of common medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayliak Maria M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We studied in vitro and vivo antioxidant and prooxidant abilities of aqueous extracts from Rosa canina L., Rhodiola rosea L., Hypericum perforatum L., and Gentiana lutea L. Methodology: Total antioxidant capacity was measured by four assays (phosphomolybdate method, Fe3+-reducing activity, ABTS•+ scavenging, H2O2 scavenging. Prooxidant activity was estimated by H2O2 production. Yeast viability in the presence of H2O2 and/or plant extracts was determined by plating or by counting live cells’ number. Results: Plant extracts differed in the total phenolic content (R. canina > R. rosea > H. perforatum > G. lutea which clearly correlated with their ABTS•+ scavenging activity (R2 = 0.963. H2O2 scavenging activity was not clearly associated with plant phenol levels and was significantly higher in acidic, than in alkaline medium. In line with this, plant extracts effectively protected yeast S. cereviasiae against H2O2 and stimulated reproductive ability of yeast cells at acidic but not at alkaline pH. At alkaline pH, plant extracts produced certain amounts of H2O2 which were related to their phenolic content. Conclusion: The antioxidant activity of plant extracts is decreased at alkaline pH with an increase in the prooxidant activity. It reduces protective capacity of plant extracts against oxidative and other stresses in vivo.

  1. Effect of pH on Physicochemical Properties of Cassava Starch Modification Using Ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudjihastuti Isti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, starch modification is carried out in order to change the native properties into the better ones, such as high stability, brightness, and better texture. The objectives of this study are to investigate the effect of pH on carboxyl content, swelling power, and water solubility of starch. This research was divided into two main stages, i.e. starch modification by ozone oxidation and analysis. The physicochemical properties of modified cassava starch were investigated under various reaction pH of 7-10 and the reaction time between 0-240 minutes. Reaction condition at pH 10 provided the higher value of carboxyl content and water solubility, but the lower of swelling power. This increase in solubility indicates that the modified oxidation starch readily dissolves in water, due to its small size granules and high amylose content. The significant changes of both parameters were achieved in the first 120 minutes of ozone reaction times. The graphic pattern of water solubility was in contrast with swelling power.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of Intensive Blood Pressure Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richman, Ilana B; Fairley, Michael; Jørgensen, Mads Emil

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Among high-risk patients with hypertension, targeting a systolic blood pressure of 120 mm Hg reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality compared with a higher target. However, intensive blood pressure management incurs additional costs from treatment and from adverse events......-effectiveness of intensive blood pressure management among 68-year-old high-risk adults with hypertension but not diabetes. We used the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to estimate treatment effects and adverse event rates. We used Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Life Tables to project age...... and accrued $155 261 in lifetime costs, while intensive management yielded 10.5 QALYs and accrued $176 584 in costs. Intensive blood pressure management cost $23 777 per QALY gained. In a sensitivity analysis, serious adverse events would need to occur at 3 times the rate observed in SPRINT and be 3 times...

  3. Modeling the effect of pH on biosorption of heavy metals by citrus peels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, Silke; Patil, Santosh B.

    2008-01-01

    Biosorption by materials such as citrus peels could be a cost effective technique for removing toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Orange peels, lemon peels and lemon-based protonated pectin peels (PPP) had Langmuir sorption capacities of 0.7-1.2 mequiv./g (39-67 mg/g) of Cd per biosorbent dry weight. A potentiometric titration was interpreted using a continuous pK a spectrum approach. It revealed four acidic sites with pK a values of 3.8, 6.4, 8.4 and 10.7, and a total site quantity of 1.14 mequiv./g. Sorption isotherms of untreated citrus peels showed an unusual shape with two plateau values. Protonated pectin peels on the other hand showed a typical Langmuir behavior with a higher sorption capacity than untreated peels. At lower pH, metal binding was reduced due to increased competition by protons. This was modeled using pH-sensitive isotherm equations. It was not necessary to assume four binding sites; using one site with pK a 3.8 and a quantity of 1.14 mequiv./g was sufficient. It was possible to accurately predict metal uptake at one pH using the metal binding constant determined at a different pH. A 1:1 stoichiometry model fit the sorption isotherms shape better than a 1:2 stoichiometry. For constant pH, the 1:1 stoichiometry reduces to the Langmuir model

  4. Effect of hospitalization on gastrointestinal motility and pH in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrit, Kanawee; Boscan, Pedro; Ferguson, Leah E; Bradley, Allison M; Dowers, Kristy L; Twedt, David C

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of hospitalization on gastrointestinal motility and pH in healthy dogs. DESIGN Experimental study. ANIMALS 12 healthy adult dogs. PROCEDURES A wireless motility capsule (WMC) that measured pressure, transit time, and pH within the gastrointestinal tract was administered orally to dogs in 2 phases. In the first phase, dogs received the WMC at the hospital and then returned to their home to follow their daily routine. In the second phase, dogs were hospitalized, housed individually, had abdominal radiography performed daily, and were leash exercised 4 to 6 times/d until the WMC passed in the feces. All dogs received the same diet twice per day in both phases. Data were compared between phases with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS Data were collected from 11 dogs; 1 dog was excluded because the WMC failed to exit the stomach. Median gastric emptying time during hospitalization (71.8 hours; range, 10.7 to 163.0 hours) was significantly longer than at home (17.6 hours; range, 9.7 to 80.8 hours). Values of all other gastric, small bowel, and large bowel parameters (motility index, motility pattern, pH, and transit time) were similar between phases. No change in gastric pH was detected over the hospitalization period. High interdog variability was evident for all measured parameters. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Hospitalization of dogs may result in a prolonged gastric emptying time, which could adversely affect gastric emptying of meals, transit of orally administered drugs, or assessments of underlying motility disorders.

  5. Dissolved Divalent Metal and pH Effects on Amino Acid Polymerization: A Thermodynamic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2017-03-01

    Polymerization of amino acids is a fundamentally important step for the chemical evolution of life. Nevertheless, its response to changing environmental conditions has not yet been well understood because of the lack of reliable quantitative information. For thermodynamics, detailed prediction over diverse combinations of temperature and pH has been made only for a few amino acid-peptide systems. This study used recently reported thermodynamic dataset for the polymerization of the simplest amino acid "glycine (Gly)" to its short peptides (di-glycine and tri-glycine) to examine chemical and structural characteristics of amino acids and peptides that control the temperature and pH dependence of polymerization. Results showed that the dependency is strongly controlled by the intramolecular distance between the amino and carboxyl groups in an amino acid structure, although the side-chain group role is minor. The polymerization behavior of Gly reported earlier in the literature is therefore expected to be a typical feature for those of α-amino acids. Equilibrium calculations were conducted to examine effects of dissolved metals as a function of pH on the monomer-polymer equilibria of Gly. Results showed that metals shift the equilibria toward the monomer side, particularly at neutral and alkaline pH. Metals that form weak interaction with Gly (e.g., Mg 2+ ) have no noticeable influence on the polymerization, although strong interaction engenders significant decrease of the equilibrium concentrations of Gly peptides. Considering chemical and structural characteristics of Gly and Gly peptides that control their interactions with metals, it can be expected that similar responses to the addition of metals are applicable in the polymerization of neutral α-amino acids. Neutral and alkaline aqueous environments with dissolved metals having high affinity with neutral α-amino acids (e.g., Cu 2+ ) are therefore not beneficial places for peptide bond formation on the primitive

  6. Modeling the effect of pH on biosorption of heavy metals by citrus peels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiewer, Silke [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, PO Box 755900, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States)], E-mail: ffsos@uaf.edu; Patil, Santosh B. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, PO Box 755900, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States)

    2008-08-30

    Biosorption by materials such as citrus peels could be a cost effective technique for removing toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Orange peels, lemon peels and lemon-based protonated pectin peels (PPP) had Langmuir sorption capacities of 0.7-1.2 mequiv./g (39-67 mg/g) of Cd per biosorbent dry weight. A potentiometric titration was interpreted using a continuous pK{sub a} spectrum approach. It revealed four acidic sites with pK{sub a} values of 3.8, 6.4, 8.4 and 10.7, and a total site quantity of 1.14 mequiv./g. Sorption isotherms of untreated citrus peels showed an unusual shape with two plateau values. Protonated pectin peels on the other hand showed a typical Langmuir behavior with a higher sorption capacity than untreated peels. At lower pH, metal binding was reduced due to increased competition by protons. This was modeled using pH-sensitive isotherm equations. It was not necessary to assume four binding sites; using one site with pK{sub a} 3.8 and a quantity of 1.14 mequiv./g was sufficient. It was possible to accurately predict metal uptake at one pH using the metal binding constant determined at a different pH. A 1:1 stoichiometry model fit the sorption isotherms shape better than a 1:2 stoichiometry. For constant pH, the 1:1 stoichiometry reduces to the Langmuir model.

  7. The effect of pH on cell viability, cell migration, cell proliferation, wound closure, and wound reepithelialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Singh, Mansher; Targosinski, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    primary keratinocyte and fibroblast function in vitro and on wound healing in vivo. In vitro, primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts were cultured in different levels of pH (5.5-12.5) and the effect on cell viability, proliferation, and migration was studied. A rat full-thickness wound model was used...... to investigate the effect of pH (5.5-9.5) on wound healing in vivo. The effect of pH on inflammation was monitored by measuring IL-1 α concentrations from wounds and cell cultures exposed to different pH environments. Our results showed that both skin cell types tolerated wide range of pH very well. They further...... demonstrated that both acidic and alkaline environments decelerated cell migration in comparison to neutral environments and interestingly alkaline conditions significantly enhanced cell proliferation. Results from the in vivo experiments indicated that a prolonged, strongly acidic wound environment prevents...

  8. Preventing blood transfusion failures: FMEA, an effective assessment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Zhila; Hasoumi, Mojtaba; Behzadi, Faranak; Mohamadi, Efat; Jafary, Mohamadreza; Saeedi, Morteza

    2017-06-30

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a method used to assess the risk of failures and harms to patients during the medical process and to identify the associated clinical issues. The aim of this study was to conduct an assessment of blood transfusion process in a teaching general hospital, using FMEA as the method. A structured FMEA was recruited in our study performed in 2014, and corrective actions were implemented and re-evaluated after 6 months. Sixteen 2-h sessions were held to perform FMEA in the blood transfusion process, including five steps: establishing the context, selecting team members, analysis of the processes, hazard analysis, and developing a risk reduction protocol for blood transfusion. Failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers (RPNs) were identified. The overall RPN scores ranged from 5 to 100 among which, four failure modes were associated with RPNs over 75. The data analysis indicated that failures with the highest RPNs were: labelling (RPN: 100), transfusion of blood or the component (RPN: 100), patient identification (RPN: 80) and sampling (RPN: 75). The results demonstrated that mis-transfusion of blood or blood component is the most important error, which can lead to serious morbidity or mortality. Provision of training to the personnel on blood transfusion, knowledge raising on hazards and appropriate preventative measures, as well as developing standard safety guidelines are essential, and must be implemented during all steps of blood and blood component transfusion.

  9. Effect of childhood malnutrition on salivary flow and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psoter, Walter J; Spielman, Andrew L; Gebrian, Bette; St Jean, Rudolph; Katz, Ralph V

    2008-03-01

    While protein-energy malnutrition may have multiple effects on oral tissues and subsequent disease development, reports of the effect of malnutrition on the human salivary glands are sparse. A retrospective cohort study of the effect of early childhood protein-energy malnutrition (EC-PEM) and adolescent nutritional status on salivary flow and pH was conducted with rural Haitian children, ages 11-19 years (n=1017). Malnutrition strata exposure cohorts were based on 1988-1996 weight-for-age records which covered the birth through 5-year-old period for all subjects. Then, data on current anthropometrical defined nutritional status categories, stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates, and salivary pH were collected for the same subjects of 11-19 years old during field examinations in the summer of 2005. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used for the analyses. Stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were reduced at statistically significant levels in subjects who had experienced severe malnutrition in their early childhood or who had continuing nutrition stress which resulted in delayed growth, as measured at ages 11-19 years. Salivary pH demonstrated little clinically meaningful variability between malnourished and nonmalnourished groups. This study is the first to report of a continuing effect on diminished salivary gland function into adolescence as a result of early childhood malnutrition (EC-PEM) and suggests that exocrine glandular systems may be compromised for extended periods following EC-PEM, which may have important implications for the body's systemic antimicrobial defences.

  10. Effect of pH on boron adsorption in some soils of Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Steiner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporary B deficiency can be triggered by liming of acid soils because of increased B adsorption at higher soil pH. Plants respond directly to the activity of B in soil solution and only indirectly to B adsorbed on soil constituents. Because the range between deficient and toxic B concentration is relatively narrow, this poses difficulty in maintaining appropriate B levels in soil solution. Thus, knowledge of the chemical behavior of B in the soil is particularly important. The present study investigated the effect of soil pH on B adsorption in four soils of Paraná State, and to correlate these values with the physical and chemical properties of the soils. Surface samples were taken from a Rhodic Hapludox, Arenic Hapludalf, Arenic Hapludult, and one Typic Usthorthent. To evaluate the effect of pH on B adsorption, subsamples soil received the application of increasing rates of calcium carbonate. Boron adsorption was accomplished by shaking 2.0 g soil, for 24 h, with 20 mL of 0.01 mol L¹ NaCl solution containing different concentrations (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, 2.0, and 4.0 mg B L-1. Sorption was fitted to non-linear form of the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Boron adsorption increased as concentration increased. Boron adsorption was dependent on soil pH, increasing as a function of pH in the range between 4.6 and 7.4, although the bonding energy has decreased. Maximum adsorption capacity (MAC of B was observed in the Arenic Hapludalf (49.8 mg B kg-1 soil followed by Arenic Hapludult (22.5 mg kg-1, Rhodic Hapludox (17.4 mg kg-1, and Typic Usthorthent (7.0 mg kg-1. The organic matter content, clay content, and aluminum oxide content (Al2O3 were the soils properties that affecting the B adsorption on Paraná soils.

  11. Analysis of pH Sensitive Hydrogel Coating Effect to Fiber Bragg Grating Properties for pH Sensor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, Ian; Supa'at, Abu Sahmah M.; Idrus, Sevia M.; Kurdi, Ojo

    2011-12-01

    This paper demonstrates the analysis of fiber Bragg grating properties due to hydrogel coating swelling effect. The modeling was done by simulating the hydrogel swelling behavior, and then carried out strain and stress analysis induced on the fiber due to hydrogel expansion. Meshless numerical method was adopted to solve the Poison Nernst Planck equation coupled to mechanical equation to simulate the hydrogel swelling. The hydrogel coating thickness was varied for 4 values, namely 30 μm, 40 μm, 50 μm and 60 μm. The strain and stress analysis were done numerically using finite element method. The results show that the strain on the fiber increases as the hydrogel coating thickness increased. The increase of hydrogel thickness results in the improvement of sensor sensitivity at the expense of stress value.

  12. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focosi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. Significance The aging population in Western countries is causing a progressive reduction of blood donors and a constant increase of blood recipients. Because blood is the main therapeutic option to treat acute hemorrhage, cost-effective alternatives to blood donations are being actively investigated. The enormous replication capability of induced pluripotent stem cells and their promising results in many other fields of medicine could be an apt solution to produce the large numbers of viable cells required in transfusion and usher in a new era in transfusion medicine. The present report describes the potentiality, technological hurdles, and promises of induced pluripotent stem cells to generate red blood cells by redifferentiation. PMID:26819256

  13. Effect of Pre-Hospital Red Blood Cell Transfusion on Mortality and Time of Death in Civilian Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Marius; Weaver, Anne; Brohi, Karim; Eshelby, Sarah; Green, Laura; Røislien, Jo; Lockey, David J

    2018-04-16

    Current management principles of haemorrhagic shock after trauma emphasize earlier transfusion therapy to prevent dilution of clotting factors and correct coagulopathy. London's air ambulance (LAA) was the first UK civilian pre-hospital service to routinely offer pre-hospital red blood cell (RBC) transfusion (phRTx). We investigated the effect of phRTx on mortality. Retrospective trauma database study comparing mortality before-implementation with after-implementation of phRTx in exsanguinating trauma patients. Univariate logistic regression was performed for the unadjusted association between phRTx and mortality was performed, and multiple logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders. We identified 623 subjects with suspected major haemorrhage. We excluded 84 (13.5%) patients due to missing data on survival status. Overall 187 (62.3%) patients died in the before phRTx period and 143 (59.8%) died in the after phRTx group. There was no significant improvement in overall survival after the introduction of phRTx (p = 0.554). Examination of pre-hospital mortality demonstrated 126 deaths in the pre-phRTx group (42.2%) and 66 deaths in the RBC administered group (27.6%) There was a significant reduction in pre-hospital mortality in the group who received RBC (p < 0.001). phRTx was associated with increased survival to hospital, but not overall survival. The "delay death" effect of phRTx carries an impetus to further develop in-hospital strategies to improve survival in severely bleeding patients.

  14. Effect of warming and flow rate conditions of blood warmers on red blood cell integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, T G; Pruneau, D; Dorval, J; Thibault, L; Fisette, J-F; Bédard, S K; Jacques, A; Beauregard, P

    2016-11-01

    Fluid warmers are routinely used to reduce the risk of hypothermia and cardiac complications associated with the infusion of cold blood products. However, warming blood products could generate haemolysis. This study was undertaken to compare the impact of temperature of blood warmers on the per cent haemolysis of packed red blood cells (RBCs) heated at different flow rates as well as non-flow conditions. Infusion warmers used were calibrated at 41·5°C ± 0·5°C and 37·5°C ± 0·5°C. Cold RBC units stored at 4°C in AS-3 (n = 30), aged 30-39 days old, were divided into half units before being allocated under two different scenarios (i.e. infusion pump or syringe). Blood warmers were effective to warm cold RBCs to 37·5°C or 41·5°C when used in conjunction with an infusion pump at flow rate up to 600 ml/h. However, when the warmed blood was held in a syringe for various periods of time, such as may occur in neonatal transfusions, the final temperature was below the expected requirements with measurement as low as 33·1°C. Increasing the flow with an infusion pump increased haemolysis in RBCs from 0·2% to up to 2·1% at a flow rate of 600 ml/h regardless of the warming device used (P < 0·05). No relevant increase of haemolysis was observed using a syringe. The use of a blood warmer adjusted to 41·5°C is probably the best choice for reducing the risk of hypothermia for the patient without generating haemolysis. However, we should be cautious with the use of an infusion pump for RBC transfusion, particularly at high flow rates. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  15. Effect of Nutrition Solution pH and Electrical Conductivity on Fusarium Wilt on Strawberry Plants in Hydroponic Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Hyeon Nam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt on strawberry plants caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae (Fof is a major disease in Korea. The prevalence of this disease is increasing, especially in hydroponic cultivation in strawberry field. This study assessed the effect of nutrition solution pH and electrical conductivity (EC on Fusarium wilt in vitro and in field trials. pH levels of 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, and 7.5 were assayed in vitro and in field trials. EC levels at 0, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0, and 1.5 dS∙m⁻¹ were assayed in field trials. Mycelial growth of Fof increased with increasing pH and was highest at 25°C pH 7 and lowest at 20°C, pH 5.0 in vitro. The incidence of Fusarium wilt was lowest in the pH 6.5 treatment and highest in the pH 5 treatment in field trials. At higher pH levels, the EC decreased in the drain solution and the potassium content of strawberry leaves increased. In the EC assay, the severity of Fusarium wilt and nitrogen content of leaves increased as the EC increased. These results indicate that Fusarium wilt is related to pH and EC in hydroponic culture of strawberry plants.

  16. Experimental verification of concrete resistance against effect of low pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobias, D.; Rehacek, S.; Pokorny, P.; Citek, D.; Kolisko, J.

    2018-03-01

    In the introductory part of this article, the principles of a concrete degradation by organic acids are mentioned, these acids occur, particularly in silage and haylage troughs, biogas stations, on concrete floors and grates in the vicinity of drinking basins with an addition of formic acid and also in fermenters and slurry reservoirs. In the experimental part, the first results of monitoring resistance of a concrete with a sealing admixture on the basis of styrene-acrylate against an effect of a low pH are presented. Additional accompanying tests are stated in the tested concretes.

  17. Effect of chloride concentration and pH on pitting corrosion of waste package container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Gordon, S.R.

    1996-12-01

    Electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization experiments were performed on several candidate waste package container materials to evaluate their susceptibility to pitting corrosion at 90 degrees C in aqueous environments relevant to the potential underground high-level nuclear waste repository. Results indicate that of all the materials tested, Alloy C-22 and Ti Grade-12 exhibited the maximum corrosion resistance, showing no pitting or observable corrosion in any environment tested. Efforts were also made to study the effect of chloride ion concentration and pH on the measured corrosion potential (Ecorr), critical pitting and protection potential values

  18. Effect of pH on chitosan hydrogel polymer network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    2017-06-29

    Chitosan is a molecule that can form water-filled 3D polymer networks with a wide range of applications. A new coarse-grained model for chitosan hydrogel was developed to explore its pH-dependent self-assembly behavior and mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the underlying polymer physical crosslinking pattern induced by solution pH has a significant effect on hydrogel elastic moduli. With this model, we obtain pH-dependent structural and mechanical property changes in agreement with experimental observations, and provide a molecular mechanism behind the changes in polymer crosslinking patterns.

  19. Effect of concentrate level on feeding behavior and rumen and blood parameters in dairy goats: relationships between behavioral and physiological parameters and effect of between-animal variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger-Reverdin, S; Rigalma, K; Desnoyers, M; Sauvant, D; Duvaux-Ponter, C

    2014-07-01

    This work aimed first to compare 2 diets differing in their percentage of concentrate [low (LO): 30% concentrate vs. High (HI): 60% concentrate] by measuring simultaneously feeding behavior, rumen parameters, blood and plasma parameters, and milk yield and composition in 8 mid-lactation goats. The second aim was to study the interrelationships between these variables and to analyze the between-animal variability to better understand the between-animal differences in acidosis susceptibility. All of the animals received the 2 diets ad libitum as total mixed ration according to a crossover design of two 4-wk periods. Mean daily DMI was similar between the 2 diets but the variability was higher for the HI than for the LO diet. Goats produced more milk when fed the HI diet compared with the LO diet but with a lower fat:protein ratio (0.81 vs. 0.99). They ate more rapidly the HI than the LO diet but stopped eating sooner after the afternoon feed allowance, and spent less time chewing. The increase in concentrate percentage modified rumen parameters: the pH and acetate:propionate ratio decreased and total VFA, ammonia, and soluble carbohydrate concentrations increased. Hematocrit, plasma NEFA, and blood K and Ca concentrations decreased but glycemia and uremia increased. Other parameters were not modified: milk fat content, blood pH, and bicarbonate and Na concentrations. A large between-animal variability was detected for all the measured parameters, especially for feeding behavior, with important consequences on rumen and blood parameters. This work confirmed the effects of a high percentage of concentrate on feeding behavior, rumen and blood parameters, and milk production, and some known relationships such as the positive link between rumen pH and chewing index. It also pointed out other relationships between parameters seldom measured at the same time, such as rumen redox potential or blood pH and chewing index, or the negative link between blood and rumen pH. When

  20. Fetal scalp pH testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal scalp blood; Scalp pH testing; Fetal blood testing - scalp; Fetal distress - fetal scalp testing; Labor - fetal scalp testing ... a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus ...

  1. Blood harmane, blood lead, and severity of hand tremor: evidence of additive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Gerbin, Marina; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph H; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng, Wei

    2011-03-01

    Tremor is a widespread phenomenon in human populations. Environmental factors are likely to play an etiological role. Harmane (1-methyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-β]indole) is a potent tremor-producing β-carboline alkaloid. Lead is another tremor-producing neurotoxicant. The effects of harmane and lead with respect to tremor have been studied in isolation. We tested the hypothesis that tremor would be particularly severe among individuals who had high blood concentrations of both of these toxicants. Blood concentrations of harmane and lead were each quantified in 257 individuals (106 essential tremor cases and 151 controls) enrolled in an environmental epidemiological study. Total tremor score (range = 0-36) was a clinical measure of tremor severity. The total tremor score ranged from 0 to 36, indicating that a full spectrum of tremor severities was captured in our sample. Blood harmane concentration correlated with total tremor score (p = 0.007), as did blood lead concentration (p = 0.045). The total tremor score was lowest in participants with both low blood harmane and lead concentrations (8.4 ± 8.2), intermediate in participants with high concentrations of either toxicant (10.5 ± 9.8), and highest in participants with high concentrations of both toxicants (13.7 ± 10.4) (p=0.01). Blood harmane and lead concentrations separately correlated with total tremor scores. Participants with high blood concentrations of both toxicants had the highest tremor scores, suggesting an additive effect of these toxicants on tremor severity. Given the very high population prevalence of tremor disorders, identifying environmental determinants is important for primary disease prevention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of low pH on the survival and emergence of aquatic insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, H L

    1971-01-01

    Mature larvae and nymphs of 9 species of aquatic insects (dragonflies, stoneflies, caddisflies, and mayfly) were tested in the laboratory at pH values from 1.0 to 7.0. The tl/sub 50/ values (pH at which 50 per cent of the organisms died) at 30 days ranged from pH 2.45 (Brachycentrus americanus) to pH 5.38 (Ephemeralla subvaria). The range at which 50 per cent of the insects emerged was pH 4.0 -5.9. The 9 species tested were all more sensitive to low pH during the period of emergence.

  3. Effects of natural current pH variability on the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus larvae development and settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Eliseba; Clemente, Sabrina; Hernández, José Carlos

    2018-08-01

    One of the most important environmental factors controlling the distribution, physiology, morphology and behaviour of marine invertebrates is ocean pH. In the last decade, the effects of decreasing ocean pH as a result of climate change processes (i.e. ocean acidification) on marine organisms have been target of much research. However, the effects of natural pH variability in the species' niche have been largely neglected. Marine coastal habitats are characterized by a high environmental variability and, in some cases, organisms are already coping with pH values predicted by the end of the century. It is thought that because of adaptation or acclimation to natural environmental variability, intertidal species may have some resilience to future changes. In this study, we explored the sensitivities of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus during its larvae development and settlement undergoing two different daily pH frequencies (12 h fluctuation from 7.7 to 8.1 units of pH, and constant pH treatment of 8.1 units of pH) that have been currently recorded in the sampling region (Canary Islands). Results showed that, despite larvae development was slightly enhanced by moderated fluctuating pH regimes, P. lividus larva was able to develop normally in both, fluctuating and constant, pH environments. Results of the settlement experiment showed very clear patterns since postlarvae settlement was only successful when a covering of algae was added, regardless of the pH fluctuation applied. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of diphtheria toxin T-domain on endosomal pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Labyntsev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A key step in the mode of cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin (DT is the transfer of its catalytic domain (Cd from endosomes into the cytosol. The main activity in this process is performed by the transport domain (Td, but the molecular mechanism of its action remains unknown. We have previously shown that Td can have some influence on the endosomal transport of DT. The aim of this work was to study the effect of diphtheria toxin on the toxin compartmentalization in the intracellular transporting pathway and endosomal pH. We used recombinant fragments of DT, which differed only by the presence of Td in their structure, fused with fluorescent proteins. It was shown that the toxin fragment with Td moved slower by the pathway early-late endosomes-lysosomes, and had a slightly different pattern of colocalization with endosomal markers than DT fragment without Td. In addition, endosomes containing DT fragments with Td had a constant pH of about 6.5 from the 10th to 50th minute of observation, for the same time endosomes containing DT fragments without Td demons­trated a decrease in pH from 6.3 to 5.5. These results indicate that Td inhibits acidification of endosomal medium. One of possible explanations for this may be the effect of the ion channel formed by the T-domain on the process of the endosomal acidification. This property of Td may not only inhibit maturation of endosomes but also inhibit activation of endosomal pH-dependent proteases, and this promotes successful transport of Cd into the cell cytosol.

  5. [Effects of soil pH on the competitive uptake of amino acids by maize and microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qing Xu; Wang, Jun; Cao, Xiao Chuang; Sun, Yan; Sun, Tao; Wu, Liang Huan

    2017-07-18

    Organic nitrogen can play an important role in plant growth, and soil pH changed greatly due to the over-use of chemical fertilizers, but the effects of soil pH on the competitive uptake of amino acids by plants and rhizosphere microorganisms are lack of detailed research. To study the effects of soil pH on the uptake of amino acids by maize and soil microorganisms, two soils from Hangzhou and Tieling were selected, and the soil pH was changed by the electrokinesis, then the 15 N-labeled glycine was injected to the centrifuge tube with a short-term uptake of 4 h. Soil pH had a significant effect on the shoot and root biomass, and the optimal pH for maize shoot growth was 6.48 for Hangzhou red soil, while it was 7.65 for Tieling brown soil. For Hangzhou soil, the 15 N abundance of maize shoots under pH=6.48 was significantly higher than under other treatments, and the uptake amount of 15 N-glycine was also much higher. However, the 15 N abundance of maize shoots and roots under pH=7.65 Tieling soil was significantly lower than it under pH=5.78, but the uptake amount of 15 N-glycine under pH=7.65 was much higher. The microbial biomass C was much higher in pH=6.48 Hangzhou soil, while it was much lower in pH=7.65 Tieling soil. According to the results of root uptake, root to shoot transportation, and the competition with microorganisms, we suggested that although facing the fierce competition with microorganisms, the maize grown in pH=6.48 Hangzhou soil increased the uptake of glycine by increasing its root uptake and root to shoot transportation. While in pH=7.65 Tieling soil, the activity of microorganisms was decreased, which decreased the competition with maize for glycine, and increased the uptake of glycine by maize.

  6. Peripheral vascular effects on auscultatory blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbany, S Y; Drzewiecki, G M; Noordergraaf, A

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the accuracy of the conventional auscultatory method of blood pressure measurement. The influence of the physiologic state of the vascular system in the forearm distal to the site of Korotkoff sound recording and its impact on the precision of the measured blood pressure is discussed. The peripheral resistance in the arm distal to the cuff was changed noninvasively by heating and cooling effects and by induction of reactive hyperemia. All interventions were preceded by an investigation of their effect on central blood pressure to distinguish local effects from changes in central blood pressure. These interventions were sufficiently moderate to make their effect on central blood pressure, recorded in the other arm, statistically insignificant (i.e., changes in systolic [p cooling experiments was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Moreover, both measured systolic (p < 0.004) and diastolic (p < 0.001) pressure decreases during the reactive hyperemia experiments were statistically significant. The findings demonstrate that alteration in vascular state generates perplexing changes in blood pressure, hence confirming experimental observations by earlier investigators as well as predictions by our model studies.

  7. The effect of fish oil supplements on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, R P; Wilt, T J; Nichol, K L; Crespin, L; Pluhar, R; Eckfeldt, J

    1993-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to determine the effects of fish oil supplementation on blood pressure in middle-aged men. Subjects were randomly assigned to consume either 20 g of fish oil or safflower oil for 12 weeks and then consume the other oil for an additional 12 weeks after a 4-week washout period. We found no significant changes from the pretreatment value in systolic or diastolic blood pressure with the use of fish oil supplements. In addition, there were no significant differences in the posttreatment blood pressures comparing the fish and safflower oil phases of the study. PMID:8427339

  8. The effect of pH profiles in methanogenic aggregates on the kinetics of acetate conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, de D.; Huisman, J.W.; Heuvel, van den J.C.; Ottengraf, S.P.P.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the conversion of acetic acid into the weaker carbonic acid and CH4, the pH inside methanogenic aggregates is higher than in the bulk liq. The pH profiles in aggregates were measured with pH microelectrodes. These profiles strongly det. the macro-kinetics of the aggregate, by their influence

  9. The Possible "Proton Sponge " Effect of Polyethylenimine (PEI) Does Not Include Change in Lysosomal pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2013-01-01

    is still elusive. The "proton sponge " hypothesis remains the most generally accepted mechanism, although it is heavily debated. This hypothesis is associated with the large buffering capacity of PEI and other polycations, which has been interpreted to cause an increase in lysosomal pH even though...... no conclusive proof has been provided. In the present study, we have used a nanoparticle pH sensor that was developed for pH measurements in the endosomal/lysosomal pathway. We have carried out quantitative measurements of lysosomal pH as a function of PEI content and correlate the results to the "proton sponge...... " hypothesis. Our measurements show that PEI does not induce change in lysosomal pH as previously suggested and quantification of PEI concentrations in lysosomes makes it uncertain that the "proton sponge " effect is the dominant mechanism of polyplex escape.Molecular Therapy (2012); doi:10.1038/mt.2012.185....

  10. Effect of overtime work on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Yamaoka, K; Yano, E

    1996-10-01

    Recently, the adverse effects of long working hours on the cardiovascular systems of workers in Japan, including "Karoshi" (death from overwork), have been the focus of social concern. However, conventional methods of health checkups are often unable to detect the early signs of such adverse effects. To evaluate the influence of overtime work on the cardiovascular system, we compared 24-hour blood pressure measurements among several groups of male white-collar workers. As a result, for those with normal blood pressure and those with mild hypertension, the 24-hour average blood pressure of the overtime groups was higher than that of the control groups; for those who periodically did overtime work, the 24-hour average blood pressure and heart rate during the busy period increased. These results indicate that the burden on the cardiovascular system of white-collar workers increases with overtime work.

  11. The effect of chewing gum's flavor on salivary flow rate and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami-Nogourani, Maryam; Kowsari-Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini-Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2011-12-01

    Chewing sugar-free gums is a convenient way to increase salivary flow. Salivary flow increases in response to both gustatory (taste) and mechanical (chewing) stimuli, and chewing gum can provide both of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of five different flavors of sugar-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH. Fifteen dental students volunteered at the same time on six consecutive days, to collect one minute unstimulated saliva. After five minutes, while some volunteers continued to collect only unstimulated saliva, the others asked to start chewing one of the five flavored gums randomly. The flavors were spearmint, cinnamon, watermelon, strawberry, and apple. The whole saliva was collected over time periods of 0 - 1, 1 - 3, and 3 - 6 minutes, and the SFR and pH were also measured. The data were subjected to pair t-test, repeated-measures analysis of variance, and Duncan tests. Compared to the unstimulated rate, all five different flavored gums significantly increased the SFR within six minutes. Although the flow rate peaked during the first minute of stimulation with all five products, it reduced gradually, but still remained above the unstimulated saliva, after six minutes. In the first minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest weight, yet, it only induced a significantly higher SFR compared to the cinnamon-flavored gums. During one to three minutes, strawberry and apple-flavored gums showed significantly higher SFR, respectively, compared to cinnamon-flavored gums. There were no significant differences in the flow rates elicited by each flavored gum through the three-to-six minute interval, although the spearmint-flavored gums induced slightly higher SFR. Only the spearmint and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased the salivary pH. Gum flavor can affect the SFR and special flavors may be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions.

  12. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND pH OF MODIFICATION PROCESS ON THE PHYSICAL-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED CASSAVA STARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Wicaksono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of cassava starch for excipient in the manufacturing of the tablet has some problems, especially on physical-mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the differentness of temperature and pH in the process of modification on the physical-mechanical properties of modified cassava starch. Modifications were performed by suspending cassava starch into a solution of 3 % (w/v PVP K30. The effect of the difference of temperature was observed at temperatures of 25; 45 and 65 0C, while the effect of the difference of pH was observed at pH of 4.0; 7.0 and 12.0. The results showed that the temperature and pH did not affect the physical-mechanical properties of the modified cassava starch. Modification of cassava starch at pH and temperature of 7.0 and 45 0C was produced modified cassava starch with the most excellent solubility, while the best swelling power were formed by the modification process at pH and temperature of 7.0 and 25 0C. Overall, the most excellent compression properties of modified cassava starch resulted from the modification process at pH 12.

  13. Cost-effective practices in the blood service sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaliaki, Korina

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study is to recommend alternative policies, which are tested on a computer simulation model, towards a more cost-effective management of the blood supply chain in the UK. With the use of primary and secondary data from the National Blood Service (NBS) and the supplied hospitals, statistical analysis is conducted and a detailed discrete event simulation model of a vertical part of the UK supply chain of blood products is developed to test and identify good ordering, inventory and distribution practices. Fewer outdates, group substitutions, shortages and deliveries could be achieved by blood banks: holding stock of rare blood groups of red blood cells (RBC), having a second routine delivery per weekday, exercising a more insensitive ordering point for RBC, reducing the total crossmatch release period to less than 1.5 days, increasing the transfusion-to-crossmatch ratio to 70%, adhering to an age-based issuing of orders, holding RBC stock of a weighted average of approximately 4 days. The blood supply simulation model can offer useful pieces of advice to the stakeholders of the examined system which leads to cost reductions and increased safety. Moreover, it provides a great range of experimental capabilities in a risk-free environment.

  14. Effect of temperature and ph on the drug release rate from a polymer conjugate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenawy, E.; Abdel-Hay, F.I.; El-Newehy, M.H.; Ottenbrite, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroximide and A-methylhydroxamic acid of poly(ethylene-altmaleic anhydride) (average MW 100-500 k) were used as a carrier for a new drug delivery system. The synthesis of the hydroximide and N methylhydroxamic acid of poly(ethylene-alt-maleic anhydride) were carried out by chemical modification of poly(ethylene-alt-maleic anhydride) with hydroxylamine and N-methyl hydroxylamine, respectively, in N,N- dimethylformamide at room temperature to yield water soluble copolymer. Ketoprofen was reacted with hydroximide and N-methylhydroxamic acid derivatives of poly(ethylene-alt-maleic anhydride) using dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as condensation agent at -5 degree C to yield water insoluble ketoprofen conjugates. All products were characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and 1HNMR spectra. The in-vitro ketoprofen release was carried out by UV spectrophotometer at max =260 nm. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of hydroximide and N-methylhydroxamic acid of polyethylene-alt-maleic anhydride) as a drug delivery system. The release rates were studied at various ph and temperatures. The copolymer-drug adducts released the drug very slowly at the low ph found in the stomach thus protecting the drug from the action of high concentrations of digestive acids. These results showed the usefulness of hydroxamic acid polymer-drug conjugates as a new drug delivery system for drugs to be targeted to sites in the GI system

  15. Effects of pH on nano-bubble stability and transport in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Takemura, Takato; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Nishimura, Taku

    2018-01-01

    An understanding of nano-scale bubble (NB) transport in porous media is important for potential application of NBs in soil/groundwater remediation. It is expected that the solution chemistry of NB water highly influences the surface characteristics of NBs and porous media and the interaction between them, thus affecting the stability and transport characteristics of NB. In this study, in addition to stability experiments, one-dimensional column transport experiments using glass beads were conducted to investigate the effects of pH on the NB transport behavior. The results showed that the NBs were more stable under higher pH. Column transport experiments revealed that entrapment of NBs, especially larger ones, was enhanced in lower-pH water, likely suggesting pH-dependent NB attachment and physical straining, both of which are also probably influenced by bubble size. Although relatively smaller NBs were released after switching the eluting fluid to one with lower ionic strength, most of the NBs in lower-pH water were still retained in the porous media even altering the chemical condition.

  16. Effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness of 17-4 PH stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capeletti, T.L.

    1976-01-01

    Fracture toughness (K/sub c/) of 17-4 PH stainless steel decreased significantly with increased hydrogen test pressure for a variety of heat treatment conditions: solution annealed, underaged, peak-aged, and overaged. Minimum toughness (13 MPa√m) was obtained with peak-aged samples tested in 69.5-MPa hydrogen; toughness was maximum (100 MPa√m) for samples tested in helium. Aging treatments increased the hardness from 28 R/sub c/ for solution-annealed material to 42 R/c/ for peak-aged material and correspondingly decreased the fracture toughness in high-pressure hydrogen (K/sub H/) from 31 to 13 MPa√m. However, increased hardness had no substantial effect on the K/sub c/ in helium. Fracture mechanism changed from predominantly ductile rupture in helium to cleavage in 69.5-MPa hydrogen, with mixed-mode fractures at lower hydrogen pressure (3.5-MPa). On the basis of these data, 17-4 PH stainless steel is not recommended for hydrogen service

  17. Effect of Chewing Bicarbonate-containing Sugar-free Gum on the Salivary pH: An in vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Raksha K; Bhat, Sham S; Ramdas, Shenoy Shailesh; Ballal, Shrinidhi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of chewing gum on the salivary pH and to compare the effect of chewing bicarbonate-containing sugar-free gum on salivary pH against that of standard sugar-free gum. The experiment was carried out on 30 volunteers aged 20-22 years (mean age = 21 years) who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The test gum was sugar-free greenmint-flavored bicarbonate-containing gum and the standard control was sugar-free spearmint-flavored gum. The pH was measured immediately using pH strips. According to statistical analysis, the mean salivary pH of the bicarbonate gum at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes is 6.9713, 6.5667, 6.4267, 6.3867 and 6.3233 respectively. There is decrease in pH from 0 to 20 minutes. According to Bonferroni, there was no significant difference in pH from 0 to 20 minutes, 10 to 20 minutes and 15 to 20 minutes, but there was a significant difference in salivary pH from 5 to 20 minutes (p = 0.014). The mean salivary pH of the standard gum at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes is 6.8767, 6.6067, 6.4200, 6.4027 and 6.3000 respectively. There is decrease in pH from 0 to 20 minutes. According to Bonferroni, there was no significant difference in pH from 0 to 20 minutes, 5 to 20 minutes, 10 to 20 minutes and 15 to 20 minutes. Thus, the higher salivary pH achieved with chewing bicarbonate gum compared with a standard sugar-free gum may have important oral health implications. How to cite this article: Ballal RK, Bhat SS, Ramdas SS, Ballal S. Effect of Chewing Bicarbonate-containing Sugar-free Gum on the Salivary pH: An in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):35-38.

  18. Esophageal blood flow in the cat. Normal distribution and effects of acid perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollwarth, M.E.; Smith, M.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    The radioactive microsphere technique was used to estimate blood flow to different regions of the esophagus and to adjacent regions of the stomach before and after perfusion of the esophagus with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) for 5 min. Under resting conditions total blood flow, as well as blood flow to the mucosal-submucosal layer and the muscular layer, to both sphincters was significantly higher than to the esophageal body. Blood flow to the adjacent regions of the stomach was significantly higher than esophageal blood flow. Acid perfusion resulted in a large increase in total blood flow in both sphincters and the lower esophageal body. Gastric blood flow was not altered by acid perfusion. The esophageal hyperemia resulted primarily from an increase in blood flow to the muscular layer; mucosal-submucosal blood flow was increased only in the lower esophageal sphincter. The present study indicates that short periods (5 min) of gastroesophageal reflux may increase esophageal blood flow

  19. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reduced production of red blood cells, including: Iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and ... inflammatory bowel disease are especially likely to have iron deficiency anemia. Anemia due to chronic disease. People with chronic ...

  20. Low-dose effect on blood chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Linear dose response relationships of biological effects at low doses are experimentally and theoretically disputed. Structural chromosome aberration rates at doses ranging from normal background exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr in vivo and up to 50 mGy in vitro were investigated by the author and other scientists. Results are comparable and dose effect curves reveal following shapes; within the normal burden and up to 2-10 mGy/yr in vivo rates they increase sharply to about 3-6 times the lowest values; subsequent doses either from natural, occupational or accidental exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr yield either constant aberration rates, assuming a plateau, or perhaps even a decrease. In vitro experiments show comparable results up to 50 mGy. Other biological effects seem to have similar dose dependencies. The non-linearity of low-dose effects can be explained by induction of repair enzymes at certain damage to the DNA. This hypothesis is sustained experimentally and theoretically by several papers in literature. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  1. Effect of sampling site, repeated sampling, pH, and PCO2 on plasma lactate concentration in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D; Rozanski, E R; Shofer, F S; Laster, L L; Drobatz, K J

    1999-04-01

    To characterize the variation in plasma lactate concentration among samples from commonly used blood sampling sites in conscious, healthy dogs. 60 healthy dogs. Cross-sectional study using a replicated Latin square design. Each dog was assigned to 1 of 6 groups (n = 10) representing all possible orders for 3 sites (cephalic vein, jugular vein, and femoral artery) used to obtain blood. Samples were analyzed immediately, by use of direct amperometry for pH, PO2, Pco2, glucose, and lactate concentration. Significant differences in plasma lactate concentrations were detected among blood samples from the cephalic vein (highest), femoral artery, and jugular vein (lowest). Mean plasma lactate concentration in the first sample obtained, irrespective of sampling site, was lower than in subsequent samples. Covariation was identified among plasma lactate concentration, pH, and PCO2, but correlation coefficients were low. Plasma lactate concentrations differed among blood samples from various sites. A reference range for plasma lactate concentration was 0.3 to 2.5 mmol/L. Differences in plasma lactate concentrations among samples from various sites and with repeated sampling, in healthy dogs, are small. Use of the reference range may facilitate the clinical use of plasma lactate concentration in dogs.

  2. Growth-promoting effects of a seaweed concentrate at various pH and water hardness conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina D. Arthur

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Kelpak® – a liquid seaweed concentrate made from the kelp Ecklonia maxima (Osbeck Papenfuss – is used as a natural biostimulant to promote rooting and improve yield in crops. Plant–soil environmental conditions and the chemistry of water used for irrigation may affect the efficiency of Kelpak. The effect of pH (pH 4.5, 6.5 and 8.5 and water hardness (200 mg/L and 400 mg/L Ca2+ on the growth-promoting ability of Kelpak was assessed using the mungbean rooting bioassay and in a pot trial with Swiss chard. Kelpak promoted rooting in all the treatments in the mungbean bioassay with maximum rooting generally achieved with 20% Kelpak. With 20% Kelpak, the addition of 200 mg/L and 400 mg/L Ca2+ decreased rooting at pH 4.5, increased rooting at pH 6.5 and did not affect rooting at pH 8.5. A similar trend was observed in the pot trial with Swiss chard: leaf and root (fresh weight and pigment content (chl a, chl b and carotenoids improved with the addition of 200 mg/L Ca2+ + 5% Kelpak at pH 6.5 or pH 8.5, while Kelpak was able to partially mask the negative effect of 200 mg/L Ca2+ at pH 4.5. These results suggest that while Kelpak is most effective in neutral pHs, it can be used to promote plant growth in a wide range of pH and water hardness conditions.

  3. Effects of pH during liquid storage of goat semen on sperm viability and fertilizing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-He; Dong, Hai-Bo; Ma, Dong-Li; Li, You-Wei; Han, Dong; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Chang, Zhong-Le; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    A specific problem in goat semen preservation is the detrimental effect of seminal plasma on sperm viability in extenders containing yolk or milk. Thus, the use of chemically defined extenders will have obvious advantages. Although previous studies indicate that the initial pH of an extender is crucial to sustain high sperm motility, changes in extender pH during long-term semen storage have not been observed. Monitoring extender pH at different times of semen storage and modeling its variation according to nonlinear models is thus important for protocol optimization for long-term liquid semen preservation. The present results showed that during long-term liquid storage of goat semen, both sperm motility and semen pH decreased gradually, and a strong correlation was observed between the two. Whereas increasing the initial extender pH from 6.04 to 6.25 or storage with stabilized pH improved, storage with artificially lowered pH impaired sperm motility. Extender renewal improved sperm motility by maintaining a stable pH. Sperm coating with chicken (Gallus gallus) egg yolk improved motility by increasing tolerance to pH decline. A new extender (n-mZAP) with a higher buffering capacity was formulated, and n-mZAP maintained higher sperm motility, membrane integrity and acrosome intactness than the currently used mZAP extender did. Goat semen liquid-stored for 12 d in n-mZAP produced pregnancy and kidding rates similar to those obtained with freshly collected semen following artificial insemination. In conclusion, maintenance of a stable pH during liquid semen storage dramatically improved sperm viability and fertilizing potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects on artificial blood substitute (Fluosol-DA) by 60Co gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa-Itoh, Youko; Ayakawa, Yoshio; Miyata, Nobuki

    1982-01-01

    It had been demonstrated the high oxygen solubility of perfluorochemical emulsion (Fluosol-DA), and Fluosol-DA is going to apply as an oxygen carrier, namely artificial blood substitutes for clinical application. There have been many reports on physical, chemical and biological aspects of Fluosol-DA, but not have been reported on irradiation effects. In this paper, we investigated the effects on Fluosol-DA by 60 Co γ-ray irradiation. 1. pH of Fluosol-DA was increased apparently, this effect was not by irradiation, but by thermal effect. 2. Optical density of Fluosol-DA at 620 nm which meaned an effect on particles of Fluosol-DA was not changed by γ-irradiation. 3. F - ion concentration of Fluosol-DA which meaned an effect on structure of perfluorochemical was not changed merkedly. 4. The solubility of oxygen of Fluosol-DA was slightly increased by γ-irradiation at 25 0 C and 11 0 C, but this effect was disregarded. These results suggested that 60 Co γ-irradiation did not effect on pH, size or aggregation of particles, release of F - ion from Fluosol-DA and solubility of oxygen of Fluosol-DA. (author)

  5. The effect of pre-oxidation on NDMA formation and the influence of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Kim, Daekyun; Karanfil, Tanju

    2014-12-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a probable human carcinogen, is a disinfection by-product that has been detected in chloraminated drinking water systems. Pre-oxidation of the NDMA precursors prior to chloramination can be a viable approach for water utilities to control the NDMA levels. This study examined the effects of (i) commonly used oxidants (i.e., chlorine, chlorine dioxide and ozone) in water treatment, (ii) oxidant concentration and contact time (CT), and (iii) pre-oxidation pH on the formation of NDMA from subsequent chloramination. Fifteen model precursors with NDMA molar yields ranging from approximately 0.1%-90% were examined. Pre-chlorination reduced NDMA formation from most precursors by 10%-50% except quaternary amine polymers (i.e., PolyDADMAC, PolyACRYL, PolyAMINE). Pre-oxidation with chlorine dioxide and ozone achieved the same or higher deactivation of NDMA precursors (e.g., ranitidine) while increasing NDMA formation for some other precursors (e.g., daminozid). The increases with chlorine dioxide exposure were attributed to the release of oxidation products with dimethylamine (DMA) moiety, which may form more NDMA upon chloramination than the unoxidizied parent compound. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide was effective, if a precursors NDMA yield were higher than DMA. The ozone-triggered increases could be related to direct NDMA formation from DMA which are released by ozonation of amines with DMA moiety, amides or hydrazines. However, hydroxyl radicals formed from the decomposition of ozone would be also involved in decomposition of formed NDMA, reducing the overall NDMA levels at longer contact times. pH conditions influenced significantly the effectiveness of deactivation of precursors depending on the type of precursor and oxidant used. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of pH on the Structural and Magnetic Properties of Magnetite Nanoparticles Synthesised by Co-Precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, W.; Kareem, M.; Hannoyer, B.; Saha, Sh.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4, nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation aqueous method at room temperature and at different pH, from 8 to 12.5. The pH value was found to influence greatly the resulting phases and has no significant effect on the particle size. In all cases, magnetite was found to be the main phase but the contribution of Goethite phase was identified clearly with the increase in pH. Significant reduction in saturation magnetization was evident. Structural and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were examined using; XRD, TEM, Raman Spectroscopy and SQUID. (author)

  7. Effects of Watermelon ( Citrullus lanatus ) Seed on Blood Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the prevalence of diabetes worldwide, with its associated complications, this study is aimed at investigating the effect of citrullus lanatus seed extract on blood glucose concentration and electrolyte parameters. Citrullus lanatus is an antioxidant and has been shown to reduce oxidative stress (Khaki et al., 2013). Effects ...

  8. Radioprotective effect of antioxidants on human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingsuo; Gu Xuandi; Zhu Genbo; Feng Jixing; Su Liaoyuan

    1991-09-01

    By using an improved fluorometric method with 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as fluorometric agent, the antiradiation effects of four kinds of antioxidants on 60 Co γ-ray irradiation inducing final products of lipid peroxides (LPO), i.e. malodialdehyde (MDA) content changes in human blood lymphocytes, were investigated with LPO value as an indicator. The results of the experiment were as following: (1)The radioprotective effect of exogenous antioxidants added to human blood lymphocytes on radiation-induced LPO damage of cellular membrane were remarkable; (2)The radioprotective beneficial sequences of four kinds of antioxidants were arranged like this: SOD > VE >VC, Se 4+ ; (3)Radioprotective effects of antioxidants on radiation-induced damage varied especially with the property of antioxidants, drug concentration, and pretreatment and monitoring time, etc., as well as irradiated dosage and various kinds of incubated cells. In addition, the mechanism of these antioxidants as radioprotectants on human blood lymphocytes is discussed in connection with LPO damage and radioprotection

  9. Coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowires extended-gate field-effect transistor as pH sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hung-Hsien; Yang, Chi-En; Kei, Chi-Chung; Su, Chung-Yi; Dai, Wei-Syuan; Tseng, Jung-Kuei; Yang, Po-Yu; Chou, Jung-Chuan; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2013-01-01

    An extended-gate field-effect transistor (EGFET) of coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowires as pH sensor was demonstrated in this paper. The oriented 1-μm-long silicon nanowires with the diameter of about 50 nm were vertically synthesized by the electroless metal deposition method at room temperature and were sequentially capped with the ZnO films using atomic layer deposition at 50 °C. The transfer characteristics (I DS –V REF ) of such ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor exhibited the sensitivity and linearity of 46.25 mV/pH and 0.9902, respectively for the different pH solutions (pH 1–pH 13). In contrast to the ZnO thin-film ones, the ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor achieved much better sensitivity and superior linearity. It was attributed to a high surface-to-volume ratio of the nanowire structures, reflecting a larger effective sensing area. The output voltage and time characteristics were also measured to indicate good reliability and durability for the ZnO/silicon nanowires sensor. Furthermore, the hysteresis was 9.74 mV after the solution was changed as pH 7 → pH 3 → pH 7 → pH 11 → pH 7. - Highlights: ► Coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET was demonstrated as pH sensor. ► EMD and ALD methods were proposed to fabricate ZnO/silicon nanowires. ► ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor achieved better sensitivity and linearity. ► ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor had good reliability and durability

  10. The effect of pH, temperature and plaque thickness on the hydrolysis of monofluorophosphate in experimental dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, E I F; Dibdin, G H

    2003-01-01

    Monofluorophosphate (MFP), an anti-caries agent commonly used in toothpaste, is known to be degraded to fluoride and orthophosphate by bacterial phosphatases in dental plaque. We have examined the effect of pH, temperature, plaque thickness and some ions on this process. Both natural plaque and artificial microcosm plaque incubated with purified MFP at pH 4-10 showed an optimum pH of approximately 8 for hydrolysis. Diffusion and concomitant hydrolysis were examined in an apparatus in which artificial plaque was held between rigid membranes separating two chambers. When MFP diffused through a plaque of 0.51-mm thickness over 4 h it was almost completely hydrolysed at pH 8, but hydrolysis on diffusion decreased as the pH deviated from 8. MFP in toothpaste extract showed a similar pH susceptibility to hydrolysis, according to the inherent pH of the toothpaste. Hydrolysis of MFP in the toothpaste was reduced by no more than 10% when compared with a matched-pH control, suggesting that other toothpaste ingredients had no major influence on hydrolysis. Transport was slower and hydrolysis at pH 6 more complete the thicker the plaque, but hydrolysis was not significantly slower at 23 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. The addition of various potential activating or inhibiting ions at 0.1 and 1.0 mmol/l had small and non-significant effects on hydrolysis. The results suggest that MFP toothpaste should be formulated and used to maximise enzymic hydrolysis of this complex anion, and that plaque pH control is probably the most important factor. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Comparison of the effect of a single dose of omeprazole or lansoprazole on intragastric pH in Japanese participants: a two-way crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaki, Yasushi; Tokudome, Kentaro; Izawa, Shinya; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Iida, Akihito; Mizuno, Mari; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Sasaki, Makoto; Kasugai, Kunio

    2013-03-01

    It is known that the pharmacokinetic profile of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) after postprandial administration may differ among PPIs. The purpose of this study was to compare the inhibitory effects of gastric acid secretion by PPIs administered after a meal, based on a 24-hour intragastric pH monitoring. Ten healthy men who provided written informed consent participated in the study. They were given a 20-mg omeprazole tablet and a 30-mg lansoprazole orally dispersing tablet in a two-way crossover manner. At baseline, the anti-HP-IgG antibody levels in blood and the pepsinogen (PG) I/II ratio were measured. Participants were given a standardized meal and 200 mL of water at 9:30 am, 13:30 pm, and 18.30 pm. Participants took the PPI after breakfast. Two of the ten participants tested positive for Helicobacter pylori infection. The PG I/II ratio indicated negative gastric atrophy in all the participants. The percentage 24-hour intragastric pH > 4 holding times (median, range) with omeprazole and lansoprazole were 29.3, 19.3-50.0% and 27.8, 13.0-42.3%, respectively, which shows that with the administration of omeprazole, the pH was maintained at >4 for a longer period (p lansoprazole (p lansoprazole, a single postprandial dose of omeprazole showed a more rapid and sustained acid-inhibitory effect. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Interactive effects of pH and metals on mitochondrial functions of intertidal bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanina, Anna V.; Sokolova, Inna M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Interactive effects of trace metals Cd and Cu and pH were studied in mitochondria of clams and oysters. •Mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential of bivalves were robust to pH variation (6.6–7.8). •Elevated levels of Cd and Cu inhibited mitochondrial respiration in the pH-dependent manner but did not affect the membrane potential. •Negative effects of Cd and Cd on mitochondrial respiration were alleviated at low pH (7.0 and below). •Moderate acidosis may protect molluscan mitochondria from metal toxicity. -- Abstract: Intertidal bivalves experience broad fluctuations of environmental temperature, pH and oxygen content which could change their intracellular pH. They are also exposed to trace metals such as cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) that accumulate in their tissues and may negatively affect mitochondrial functions and bioenergetics. We determined the interactive effects of pH and trace metals (25 μM Cd or Cu) on mitochondrial functions (including respiration and membrane potentials in both ADP-stimulated (state 3) and resting (state 4) states) of two common marine bivalves, the hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) and eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). In the absence of the trace metals, mitochondrial functions of C. virginica and M. mercenaria were insensitive to pH in a broad physiologically relevant range (6.6–7.8). Mitochondrial respiration was generally suppressed by 25 μM Cd or Cu (with the stronger effects observed for ADP-stimulated compared to the resting respiration) while the mitochondrial membrane potential was unaffected. pH modulated the effects of Cu and Cd on mitochondrial respiration of the bivalves. In oysters, Cu suppressed ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration at high and low pH values (6.6 and 7.8, respectively), but had no effect in the intermediate pH range (7.0–7.4). In clams, the negative effect of Cu on ADP-stimulated respiration was only observed at extremely high pH (7.8). A decrease in pH

  13. Interactive effects of pH and metals on mitochondrial functions of intertidal bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanina, Anna V.; Sokolova, Inna M., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Interactive effects of trace metals Cd and Cu and pH were studied in mitochondria of clams and oysters. •Mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential of bivalves were robust to pH variation (6.6–7.8). •Elevated levels of Cd and Cu inhibited mitochondrial respiration in the pH-dependent manner but did not affect the membrane potential. •Negative effects of Cd and Cd on mitochondrial respiration were alleviated at low pH (7.0 and below). •Moderate acidosis may protect molluscan mitochondria from metal toxicity. -- Abstract: Intertidal bivalves experience broad fluctuations of environmental temperature, pH and oxygen content which could change their intracellular pH. They are also exposed to trace metals such as cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) that accumulate in their tissues and may negatively affect mitochondrial functions and bioenergetics. We determined the interactive effects of pH and trace metals (25 μM Cd or Cu) on mitochondrial functions (including respiration and membrane potentials in both ADP-stimulated (state 3) and resting (state 4) states) of two common marine bivalves, the hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) and eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). In the absence of the trace metals, mitochondrial functions of C. virginica and M. mercenaria were insensitive to pH in a broad physiologically relevant range (6.6–7.8). Mitochondrial respiration was generally suppressed by 25 μM Cd or Cu (with the stronger effects observed for ADP-stimulated compared to the resting respiration) while the mitochondrial membrane potential was unaffected. pH modulated the effects of Cu and Cd on mitochondrial respiration of the bivalves. In oysters, Cu suppressed ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration at high and low pH values (6.6 and 7.8, respectively), but had no effect in the intermediate pH range (7.0–7.4). In clams, the negative effect of Cu on ADP-stimulated respiration was only observed at extremely high pH (7.8). A decrease in pH

  14. ASYMMETRIC SULFOXIDATION OF ALBENDAZOLE TO RICOBENDAZOLE BY FUNGI: EFFECT OF pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Barth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Albendazole (ABZ is an anthelmintic drug used for the treatment of infectious diseases in veterinary and human medicine. This drug is a prochiral drug that after administration, is rapidly oxidized in the pharmacologically active sulfoxide metabolite, which is also known as ricobendazole (ABZSOX. ABZSOX has a stereogenic center and possibly two enantiomers, (+-ABZSOX and (--ABZSOX. In the present work, we investigate the pH effect on the asymmetric stereoselective sulfoxidation of ABZ into ABZSOX by employing the fungi Nigrospora sphaerica, Papulaspora immera Hotson, and Mucor rouxii. The results show a possibility of obtaining the pure enantiomers of the ricobendazole drug using fungi as biocatalytic agents. The three fungi showed a high degree of enantioselectivity expressed by enantiomeric excess. In addition, M. rouxii can be used as an alternative to obtain the (+-ABZSOX enantiomer (ee 89.8%.

  15. Effect of pH on the Removal of Chromium (Cr (VI by Sugar Cane Bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Ahmed Khan

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The industrial estates in India are dominated by small and medium scale industries, which are posing a serious threat to the environment by virtue of discharging effluents of a polluting nature. The problems become severe due to the presence of heavy metals in the effluents. Chromium is widely used in a number of industries such as electroplating, metal finishing, cooling towers, dyes, paints, anodising and leather tanning industries. The toxicity of chromium (VI is well known and is considered a hazard to the health of humans and animals. The presence of chromium (VI in aquatic environments at high concentrations is also lethal to marine species. The treatment of chromium bearing effluents have been reported through several methods, such as chemical reduction,  precipitation, ion exchange, electrochemical reduction, evaporation, reverse osmosis and adsorption. However among these, adsorption is found to be highly effective, inexpensive and an easy method to operate. India is an agricultural country and generates a considerable amount of agricultural wastes such as sugar cane bagassess, coconut jute, nut shell, rice straw, rice husk, waste tea leaves, ground nut husk, crop wastes, peanut hulls and fertilizer wastes. Successful studies on these materials could be beneficial to developing countries and could be easily applied as adsorbents for the removal of chromium from wastewater. Most of the previous work highlights the use of commercial activated carbon but these adsorbents are relatively expensive and less feasible to be used in developing countries. Keeping these in view batch experiments have been designed to study the feasibility of sugar cane bagasse to remove chromium (VI from the aqueous solutions. While evaluationg the impact of various parameters, such as adsorbent does, contact time, initial concentration and pH on chromium removal efficiency, the results indicate a prominent effect of pH on the chromium reduction by the adsorbent

  16. Effect of pH value of applied solution on radioiodine sorption by soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabova, T.

    1976-01-01

    Sorption of radioiodine by soils was followed under static conditions at different pH values of the initial solution in five soil types. Sorption of radioiodine by soils is affected by the amount of the organic mass and by the pH of solutions. With the same pH, soils containing a higher amount of the organic mass absorb more radioiodine. The highest sorption percentage of 131 I - for all pH values was found in meadow chernozem soil and the lowest in the rendzina and in carboniferous meadow soils. The highest sorption of 131 I - for degraded chernozem, meadow chernozem soils and brown soil was recorded at pH 5 and for carboniferous meadow soil and rendzina at pH 7. (author)

  17. Salinity and pH effects on floating and emergent macrophytes in a constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, H R; Mufarrege, M M; Di Luca, G A; Maine, M A

    2017-04-01

    Salvinia herzogii, Pistia stratiotes and Eichhornia crassipes (floating species) were the dominant macrophytes in a constructed wetland (CW) over the first years of operation. Later, the emergent Typha domingensis displaced the floating species, becoming dominant. The industrial effluent treated at this CW showed high pH and salinity. The aim of this work was to study the tolerance of floating species and T. domingensis exposed to different pH and salinity treatments. Treatments at pH 8, 9, 10 and 11 and salinities of 2,000; 3,000; 4,000; 6,000; and 8,000 mg L -1 were performed. Floating macrophytes were unable to tolerate the studied pH and salinity ranges, while T. domingensis tolerated higher pH and salinity values. Many industrial effluents commonly show high pH and salinity. T. domingensis demonstrated to be a suitable macrophyte to treat this type of effluents.

  18. Observed and modeled effects of pH on bioconcentration of diphenhydramine, a weakly basic pharmaceutical, in fathead minnows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathead minnows were exposed to diphenhydramine (DPH), a weakly basic pharmaceutical (pKa = 9.1), to examine pH effects on uptake and accumulation. Fish were exposed to 10 ìg/L DPH in water for up to 96 h at three nominal pH levels: 6.7, 7.7, and 8.7. In each case, an appa...

  19. Effect of Consuming Tea with Stevia on Salivary pH - An In Vivo Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallepati, Akhil; Yavagal, Puja; Veeresh, D J

    To assess the effect of consuming tea with stevia on salivary pH. This randomised controlled trial employed a Latin square design. Twenty-four male students aged 20-23 years were randomly allocated to 4 different groups, 3 experimental with tea sweetened by sucrose, jaggery or stevia, and one unsweetened control. Salivary pH assessments were performed at baseline and 1 min, 20 and 60 min after consumption of the respective tea. One-way ANOVA and repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc tests were employed to analyse the data. One minute after tea consumption, the salivary pH of the sucrose group significantly decreased compared to the stevia group (p = 0.01). There was a significant difference between baseline mean salivary pH and post-interventional mean salivary pH values at all time intervals in the tea + sucrose, tea + jaggery, and plain tea groups (p stevia and plain tea groups, but it remained lower in the sucrose and jaggery groups. The results of the present study, in which the salivary pH values returned to baseline pH 1 h after drinking stevia-sweetened tea, suggest stevia's potential as a non-cariogenic sweetener.

  20. Effect of pH on Cleavage of Glycogen by Vaginal Enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg T Spear

    Full Text Available Glycogen expressed by the lower genital tract epithelium is believed to support Lactobacillus growth in vivo, although most genital isolates of Lactobacillus are not able to use glycogen as an energy source in vitro. We recently reported that α-amylase is present in the genital fluid of women and that it breaks down glycogen into small carbohydrates that support growth of lactobacilli. Since the pH of the lower genital tract can be very low, we determined how low pH affects glycogen processing by α-amylase. α-amylase in saliva degraded glycogen similarly at pH 6 and 7, but activity was reduced by 52% at pH 4. The glycogen degrading activity in nine genital samples from seven women showed a similar profile with an average reduction of more than 50% at pH 4. However, two samples collected from one woman at different times had a strikingly different pH profile with increased glycogen degradation at pH 4, 5 and 6 compared to pH 7. This second pH profile did not correlate with levels of human α-acid glucosidase or human intestinal maltase glucoamylase. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography showed that mostly maltose was produced from glycogen by samples with the second pH profile in contrast to genital α-amylase that yielded maltose, maltotriose and maltotetraose. These studies show that at low pH, α-amylase activity is reduced to low but detectable levels, which we speculate helps maintain Lactobacillus growth at a limited but sustained rate. Additionally, some women have a genital enzyme distinct from α-amylase with higher activity at low pH. Further studies are needed to determine the identity and distribution of this second enzyme, and whether its presence influences the makeup of genital microbiota.

  1. The Effect of Shape Memory on Red Blood Cell Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiting; Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-11-01

    An elastic spring model is applied to study the effect of the shape memory on the motion of red blood cell in flows. In shear flow, shape memory also plays an important role to obtain all three motions: tumbling, swinging, and tank-treading. In Poiseuille flow, cell has an equilibrium shape as a slipper or parachute depending on capillary number. To ensure the tank-treading motion while in slippery shape, a modified model is proposed by introducing a shape memory coefficient which describes the degree of shape memory in cells. The effect of the coefficient on the cell motion of red blood cell will be presented.

  2. Effects of pH on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, N.; Shamaila, S.; Sharif, R.; Wali, H.; Naseem, S.; Riaz, S.; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide templates with pore diameter of 40 nm and inter pore separation of 100 nm are prepared by two step anodization in 0.3 M oxalic acid solution. These templates are used to fabricate dc-deposited Co nanowires at different pH values of acidic bath. Continuous and densely packed nanowires having length ∼8 µm are observed. The hcp configuration appeared at moderate and high pH whereas both fcc and hcp phases are observed at low pH. However the crystallinity distorted at high pH due to formation of polycrystalline structure of cobalt nanowires. Alignment of easy-axis of nanowires can be tailored by varying pH of solution. - Highlights: • Variation in the structure of dc deposited cobalt nanowires can be obtained by varying pH of acidic bath. • The hcp structure is stable at room temperature with low voltage deposition for electrodeposited Co nanowires. Co with fcc structure, is stable at temperatures above 422 °C or at pH<3 with high potential. • The hcp (100) plane is obtained with pH∼3.5 and (101) is stable at pH∼5.5 due to variation in temperature inside the pores with respect to the pH. • Alignment of easy-axis of nanowires can be tailored by varying pH of solution

  3. Effects of elevated pH on marine copepods in mass cultivation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni Winding; Hansen, Per Juel; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2017-01-01

    both Acartia spp. and C. typicus had higher mortality at pH 9.5 than at the other pH regimes while E. affinis nauplii were not affected by pH. Wild Acartia spp. and A. tonsa from a culture showed some differences in response although of minor practical importance for aquaculture; both produced no eggs......Female tolerance to pH (8.0–9.5) by six marine copepods, Oithona similis, Temora longicornis, Acartia spp., Centropages typicus, Pseudocalanus elongatus and Eurytemora affinis was investigated to identify robust species for live feed production. The species with the most oceanic...

  4. Effects of fasting on Blood pressure in normotensive males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Samad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Muslims all over the world fast in the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting means abstinence from drinking any liquids, eating, smoking and taking anything parenterally.  It is intermittent in nature from the start of dawn to end at dusk. Fasting has various physiological effects on different biological parameters of the human body. Previous studies that look at effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure have focused mainly on hypertensive patients and patients with already established heart disease.(1,2There is very limited data regarding the effect of fasting on the normal population. (3,4 A few previous studies have advocated a hypotensive role of fasting.(5 In our study published in Journal of Ayub Medical College Abbottabad (JAMC in 2015, “Effects of Ramadan Fasting on Blood pressure in normotensive males”, we investigated the effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure of normotensive men. We conducted a repeated measure observational study in Karachi, Pakistan on 70 individuals who were normotensive, non-smokers between the ages of 18–50 years. . Blood pressure, pulse, BMI of each participant was recorded one week before the start of Ramadan and in the first, second and third week of Ramadan. The results of our study show that intermittent fasting has a hypotensive effect in normotensive males as proven in animal models and certain human population. There was an average drop of 8/3 mmHg and while the results are significant, their clinical relevance needs to be analysed. Studies on animal models have suggested atrial natriuretic peptide, catecholamines, opiates and body mass index as possible reasons for the decrease in blood pressure due to fasting.(3, 6  Dewanti et al suggested that the cause of drop in blood pressure was the drop in BMI however in our study we found that a drop in BMI only occurred before Iftar towards the end of the fast. There was no significant drop in post-Iftar BMI although there was a significant drop in blood

  5. Effect of paddock vs. stall housing on 24 hour gastric pH within the proximal and ventral equine stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, L; Sanchez, L C; Olsen, S N; Baptiste, K E; Merritt, A M

    2008-06-01

    Stall housing has been suggested as a risk factor for ulcer development in the equine stomach; however, the exact pathogenesis for this has not been established. To investigate the effect of 3 environmental situations (grass paddock, stall alone or stall with adjacent companion) on pH in the proximal and the ventral stomach. Six horses with permanently implanted gastric cannulae were used in a randomised, cross-over, block design. Each horse rotated through each of three 24 h environmental situations. Horses remained on their normal diet (grass hay ad libitum and grain b.i.d.) throughout the study. Intragastric pH was measured continuously for 72 h just inside the lower oesophageal sphincter (proximal stomach) and via a pH probe in the gastric cannula (ventral stomach). Neither proximal nor ventral 24 h gastric pH changed significantly between the 3 environmental situations. Mean hourly proximal gastric pH decreased significantly in the interval from 01.00-09.00 h compared to the interval from 13.00-20.00 h, regardless of environmental situation. Median hourly proximal pH only differed in the interval from 06.00-07.00 h compared to the interval 14.00-19.00 h. Neither mean nor median hourly ventral gastric pH varied significantly with the time of day. The change in housing status used in the current study did not affect acid exposure within either region of the equine stomach. The pH in the ventral stomach was uniformly stable throughout the study, while the proximal pH demonstrated a 24 h circadian pattern.

  6. The effect of antacid on salivary pH in patients with and without dental erosion after multiple acid challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuhair, Sarah; Dennison, Joseph B; Yaman, Peter; Neiva, Gisele F

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of antacid swish in the salivary pH values and to monitor the pH changes in subjects with and without dental erosion after multiple acid challenge tests. 20 subjects with tooth erosion were matched in age and gender with 20 healthy controls according to specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Baseline measures were taken of salivary pH, buffering capacity and salivary flow rate using the Saliva Check System. Subjects swished with Diet Pepsi three times at 10-minute intervals. Changes in pH were monitored using a digital pH meter at 0-, 5-, and 10- minute intervals and at every 5 minutes after the third swish until pH resumed baseline value or 45 minutes relapse. Swishing regimen was repeated on a second visit, followed by swishing with sugar-free liquid antacid (Mylanta Supreme). Recovery times were also recorded. Data was analyzed using independent t-tests, repeated measures ANOVA, and Fisher's exact test (α= 0.05). Baseline buffering capacity and flow rate were not significantly different between groups (P= 0.542; P= 0.2831, respectively). Baseline salivary pH values were similar between groups (P= 0.721). No significant differences in salivary pH values were found between erosion and non-erosion groups in response to multiple acid challenges (P= 0.695) or antacid neutralization (P= 0.861). Analysis of salivary pH recovery time revealed no significant differences between groups after acid challenges (P= 0.091) or after the use of antacid (P= 0.118). There was a highly significant difference in the survival curves of the two groups on Day 2, with the non-erosion group resolving significantly faster than the erosion group (P= 0.0086).

  7. Effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanaprakash, G. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mahadevan, S. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kalyanasundaram, P. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Philip, John [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in; Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report the effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles during co-precipitation. We synthesized nanoparticles by keeping the initial pH at 0.7, 1.5, 3.0, 4.7, 5.7, 6.7 for two different temperatures of 30 and 60 deg. C. When the initial pH (prior to alkali addition) of the salt solution was below 5, the nanoparticles formed were 100% spinel iron oxide. Average size of the magnetite particles increases with initial pH until ferrihydrite is formed at a pH of 3 and the size remains the same till 4.7 pH. The percentage of goethite formed along with non-stoichiometric magnetite was 35 and 78%, respectively, when the initial pH of the solution was 5.7 and 6.7. As the reaction temperature was increased to 60 deg. C, maintaining a pH of 6.7, the amount of goethite increased from 78 to 100%. These results show that the initial pH and temperature of the ferrous and ferric salt solution before initiation of the precipitation reaction are critical parameters controlling the composition and size of nanoparticles formed. We characterize the samples using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The results of the present work provide the right conditions to synthesis pure magnetite nanoparticles, without goethite impurities, through co-precipitation technique for ferrofluid applications.

  8. The effect of dietary phytase on broiler performance and digestive, bone, and blood biochemistry characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JPL de Sousa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The dietary inclusion of phytase increases nutrient and energy bioavailability for broilers. The effect of phytase increases nutrients and energy bioavailability for either the objective of this experiment was to evaluate the influence of nutrient and energy reduction in diets supplemented with phytase on the performance, gastrointestinal pH, organ and bone composition, and blood biochemistry of broilers between eight and 21 days of age. In the study, 1.120 male Cobb 500(r broilers, with 161±1g average weight, were used. At eight days of age, birds were distributed according to a completely randomized experimental design with seven treatments in a 3x2+1 factorial arrangement with eight replicates of 20 broiler each. Treatments corresponded to reduction of calcium (Ca and phosphorus (P, amino acids and energy, or reduction of Ca, P, amino acids and energy; supplementation or not of phytase; and a positive control treatment. Broiler fed the diet with reduced Ca and P levels and phytase supplementation presented the best performance of all groups. The diet with reduced amino acid and energy levels and phytase addition reduced gizzard and proventriculus pH. Dietary Ca and P reduction increased relative liver and heart weights, as well as albumin blood levels. The bones of broilers fed phytase-supplemented diets presented higher ash content.

  9. Effect of salivary pH on diametral tensile strength of glass ionomer cement coated with coating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahdillah; Triaminingsih, S.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of salivary pH to diametral tensile strength of glass ionomer cement (GIC) coated with a coating agent. GIC specimens coated with varnish and nano-filled coating agent were stored in artificial saliva at pH values of 4.5, 5.5, and 7 for 24 h at 37°C, then the diametral tensile strength was tested by universal testing machine. Results showed that there was no significant difference in the diametral tensile strength of the GIC coated with varnish and nano-filled coating agent with decreasing of salivary pH (p salivary pH does not affect the diametral tensile strength of GIC coated by varnish or nano-filled coating agent

  10. Effect of pH values on the extracellular polysaccharide secreted by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans during chalcopyrite bioleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Run-lan; Liu, Jing; Tan, Jian-xi; Zeng, Wei-min; Shi, Li-juan; Gu, Guo-hua; Qin, Wen-qing; Qiu, Guan-zhou

    2014-04-01

    The pH value plays an important role in the bioleaching of sulphide minerals. The effect of pH values on the extracellular polysaccharide secreted by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was investigated in different phases of bacterial growth during chalcopyrite bioleaching. It is found that extracellular polysaccharide secretion from the cells attached to chalcopyrite is more efficiently than that of the free cells in the bioleaching solution. Three factors, pH values, the concentration of soluble metal ions, and the bacterial growth and metabolism, affect extracellular polysaccharide secretion in the free cells, and are related to the bacterial growth phase. Extracellular polysaccharide secretion from the attached cells is mainly dependent on the pH value of the bacterial culture.

  11. High Sensitivity pH Sensor Based on Porous Silicon (PSi) Extended Gate Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hardan, Naif H; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Ahmed, Naser M; Jalar, Azman; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Kar Keng, Lim; Chiu, Weesiong; Al-Rawi, Hamzah N

    2016-06-07

    In this study, porous silicon (PSi) was prepared and tested as an extended gate field-effect transistor (EGFET) for pH sensing. The prepared PSi has pore sizes in the range of 500 to 750 nm with a depth of approximately 42 µm. The results of testing PSi for hydrogen ion sensing in different pH buffer solutions reveal that the PSi has a sensitivity value of 66 mV/pH that is considered a super Nernstian value. The sensor considers stability to be in the pH range of 2 to 12. The hysteresis values of the prepared PSi sensor were approximately 8.2 and 10.5 mV in the low and high pH loop, respectively. The result of this study reveals a promising application of PSi in the field for detecting hydrogen ions in different solutions.

  12. The Effect of PH and Molecular Weight of Chitosan on Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by γ-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phu, Dang Van; Duy, Nguyen Ngoc; Quoc, Le Anh; Hien, Nguyen Quoc [Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology, Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute, 202a, 11 Street, Linh Xuan Ward, Thu Duc District, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2011-07-01

    Radiation-induced synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using chitosan (CTS) as a stabilizer and free radical scavenger is feasible and satisfiable for green method. The conversion dose (Ag{sup +} into Ag{sup 0}) was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy and Ag-NPs size was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of pH and molecular weight (Mw) of CTS on diameter and size distribution of Ag-NPs was investigated. The obtained results showed that CTS with higher M{sub w} has better stability for colloidal Ag-NPs. The average diameter of Ag-NPs was of 5-16 nm with narrow size distribution. The colloidal Ag-NPs prepared from Ag{sup +}/CTS solution with pH adjustment (pH~6) have smaller size (7 nm) compared to that (15 nm) from Ag{sup +}/CTS solution without pH (~3) adjustment. (author)

  13. High Sensitivity pH Sensor Based on Porous Silicon (PSi Extended Gate Field-Effect Transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif H. Al-Hardan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, porous silicon (PSi was prepared and tested as an extended gate field-effect transistor (EGFET for pH sensing. The prepared PSi has pore sizes in the range of 500 to 750 nm with a depth of approximately 42 µm. The results of testing PSi for hydrogen ion sensing in different pH buffer solutions reveal that the PSi has a sensitivity value of 66 mV/pH that is considered a super Nernstian value. The sensor considers stability to be in the pH range of 2 to 12. The hysteresis values of the prepared PSi sensor were approximately 8.2 and 10.5 mV in the low and high pH loop, respectively. The result of this study reveals a promising application of PSi in the field for detecting hydrogen ions in different solutions.

  14. Effect of pH on the Structure and DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blane, Ashleigh; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2015-06-30

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a transcription factor expressed in cardiovascular, intestinal, and neural tissues during embryonic development and is implicated in language development. FOXP2 like other FOX proteins contains a DNA binding domain known as the forkhead domain (FHD). The FHD interacts with DNA by inserting helix 3 into the major groove. One of these DNA-protein interactions is a direct hydrogen bond that is formed with His554. FOXP2 is localized in the nuclear compartment that has a pH of 7.5. Histidine contains an imidazole side chain in which the amino group typically has a pKa of ~6.5. It seems possible that pH fluctuations around 6.5 may result in changes in the protonation state of His554 and thus the ability of the FOXP2 FHD to bind DNA. To investigate the effect of pH on the FHD, both the structure and the binding affinity were studied in the pH range of 5-9. This was done in the presence and absence of DNA. The structure was assessed using size exclusion chromatography, far-UV circular dichroism, and intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence. The results indicated that while pH did not affect the secondary structure in the presence or absence of DNA, the tertiary structure was pH sensitive and the protein was less compact at low pH. Furthermore, the presence of DNA caused the protein to become more compact at low pH and also had the potential to increase the dimerization propensity. Fluorescence anisotropy was used to investigate the effect of pH on the FOXP2 FHD DNA binding affinity. It was found that pH had a direct effect on binding affinity. This was attributed to the altered hydrogen bonding patterns upon protonation or deprotonation of His554. These results could implicate pH as a means of regulating transcription by the FOXP2 FHD, which may also have repercussions for the behavior of this protein in cancer cells.

  15. Analyses of Blood Bank Efficiency, Cost-Effectiveness and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hwai-Tai Chen

    In view of the increasing costs of hospital care, it is essential to investigate methods to improve the labor efficiency and the cost-effectiveness of the hospital technical core in order to control costs while maintaining the quality of care. This study was conducted to develop indices to measure efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and the quality of blood banks; to identify factors associated with efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality; and to generate strategies to improve blood bank labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Indices developed in this study for labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness were not affected by patient case mix and illness severity. Factors that were associated with labor efficiency were identified as managerial styles, and organizational designs that balance workload and labor resources. Medical directors' managerial involvement was not associated with labor efficiency, but their continuing education and specialty in blood bank were found to reduce the performance of unnecessary tests. Surprisingly, performing unnecessary tests had no association with labor efficiency. This suggested the existence of labor slack in blood banks. Cost -effectiveness was associated with workers' benefits, wages, and the production of high-end transfusion products by hospital-based donor rooms. Quality indices used in this study included autologous transfusion rates, platelet transfusion rates, and the check points available in an error-control system. Because the autologous transfusion rate was related to patient case mix, severity of illness, and possible inappropriate transfusion, it was not recommended to be used for quality index. Platelet-pheresis transfusion rates were associated with the transfusion preferences of the blood bank medical directors. The total number of check points in an error -control system was negatively associated with government ownership and workers' experience. Recommendations for improving labor efficiency and cost-effectiveness

  16. Acute effect of glucose on cerebral blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pascual, Juan M; Xiao, Guanghua; Huang, Hao; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-02-01

    While it is known that specific nuclei of the brain, for example hypothalamus, contain glucose-sensing neurons thus their activity is affected by blood glucose level, the effect of glucose modulation on whole-brain metabolism is not completely understood. Several recent reports have elucidated the long-term impact of caloric restriction on the brain, showing that animals under caloric restriction had enhanced rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle flux accompanied by extended life span. However, acute effect of postprandial blood glucose increase has not been addressed in detail, partly due to a scarcity and complexity of measurement techniques. In this study, using a recently developed noninvasive MR technique, we measured dynamic changes in global cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (CMRO2 ) following a 50 g glucose ingestion (N = 10). A time dependent decrease in CMRO2 was observed, which was accompanied by a reduction in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with unaltered cerebral blood flow (CBF). At 40 min post-ingestion, the amount of CMRO2 reduction was 7.8 ± 1.6%. A control study without glucose ingestion was performed (N = 10), which revealed no changes in CMRO2 , CBF, or OEF, suggesting that the observations in the glucose study was not due to subject drowsiness or fatigue after staying inside the scanner. These findings suggest that ingestion of glucose may alter the rate of cerebral metabolism of oxygen in an acute setting. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Influence of Baseline Diastolic Blood Pressure on Effects of Intensive Compared With Standard Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddhu, Srinivasan; Chertow, Glenn M; Cheung, Alfred K; Cushman, William C; Rahman, Mahboob; Greene, Tom; Wei, Guo; Campbell, Ruth C; Conroy, Margaret; Freedman, Barry I; Haley, William; Horwitz, Edward; Kitzman, Dalane; Lash, James; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Pisoni, Roberto; Riessen, Erik; Rosendorff, Clive; Watnick, Suzanne G; Whittle, Jeffrey; Whelton, Paul K

    2018-01-09

    In individuals with a low diastolic blood pressure (DBP), the potential benefits or risks of intensive systolic blood pressure (SBP) lowering are unclear. SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) was a randomized controlled trial that compared the effects of intensive (target baseline DBP. Mean baseline SBP and DBP were 139.7±15.6 and 78.1±11.9 mm Hg, respectively. Regardless of the randomized treatment, baseline DBP had a U-shaped association with the hazard of the primary cardiovascular disease outcome. However, the effects of the intensive SBP intervention on the primary outcome were not influenced by baseline DBP level ( P for interaction=0.83). The primary outcome hazard ratio for intensive versus standard treatment was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.57-1.07) in the lowest DBP quintile (mean baseline DBP, 61±5 mm Hg) and 0.74 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.90) in the upper 4 DBP quintiles (mean baseline DBP, 82±9 mm Hg), with an interaction P value of 0.78. Results were similar for all-cause death and kidney events. Low baseline DBP was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease events, but there was no evidence that the benefit of the intensive SBP lowering differed by baseline DBP. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01206062. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. The effect of glycerol on regional cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Nagata, Izumi; Yamagata, Sen; Taki, Waro; Kobayashi, Akira; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Nishizawa, Sadahiko.

    1989-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography with 15 O-labelled CO 2 , O 2 and CO gases, the effects of glycerol on regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO 2 ) were investigated in 6 patients with meningioma accompanying peritumoral brain edema. The same study was done in 5 normal volunteers. The changes of blood gases, hematocrit and hemoglobin were also examined. After a drip infusion of glycerol, the regional CBF increased not only in the peritumoral cortex and white matter but also in the intact cortex and white matter on the contralateral side. The increase of CBF was extensive and substantially there were no regional differences. In contrast, the changes of CMRO 2 were not significant. This was derived from the increase in oxygen extraction fraction throughout extensive areas including the peritumoral area. There were no changes in CBV. Hematocrit and hemoglobin decreased to a small degree. In the normal volunteers, the same findings were noted. Thus, glycerol increases the functional reserve for cerebral oxygen metabolism, not only in the peritumoral regions but also in the intact regions. The effects of glycerol on hemodynamics and metabolism were discussed with reference to some differences from mannitol. (author)

  19. U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. Effects of pH, U(VI) concentration and oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Gao; Ziqian Yang; Keliang Shi; Xuefeng Wang; Zhijun Guo; Wangsuo Wu

    2010-01-01

    U(VI) sorption on kaolinite was studied as functions of contact time, pH, U(VI) concentration, solid-to-liquid ratio (m/V) by using a batch experimental method. The effects of sulfate and phosphate on U(VI) sorption were also investigated. It was found that the sorption kinetics of U(VI) can be described by a pseudo-second-order model. Potentiometric titrations at variable ionic strengths indicated that the titration curves of kaolinite were not sensitive to ionic strength, and that the pH of the zero net proton charge (pH PZNPC ) was at 6.9. The sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite increased with pH up to 6.5 and reached a plateau at pH >6.5. The presence of phosphate strongly increased U(VI) sorption especially at pH <5.5, which may be due to formation of ternary surface complexes involving phosphate. In contrast, the presence of sulfate did not cause any apparent effect on U(VI) sorption. A double layer model was used to interpret both results of potentiometric titrations and U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. (author)

  20. Effect of pH and VFA on hydrolysis of organic solid waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, A.H.M.; Kalyuzhnyi, S.; Scharff, H.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The anaerobic hydrolysis rate of organic solid waste was studied at fixed volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations ranging from 3 to 30 g COD/L and fixed pH values between 5 and 7. For separate control of both VFA and pH, a special completely mixed reactor was designed. In this way, it was possible

  1. Effect of soil pH on sorption of salinomycin in clay and sandy soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    The sorption of salinomycin to the sandy soil marginally increased as the pH decreased, while the sorption to the two .... plastic containers at room temperature for further analysis. ... The pH was adjusted eight times over 20 days to stabilize at.

  2. Effects of pH on the life cycle of the midge Tanytansus dissimilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, H L

    1970-01-01

    All stages of the life cycle of the midge Tanytarsus (paratanytarsus) dissimilis joh. were subjected to low pH and the exremes of tolerance were determined. The life cycle could not be completed below a pH of 5.5.

  3. Effect of pH on dissociation of casein micelles in yak skim milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Zhang, G D; Yang, J T; Sun, D; Wen, P C; Zhang, W B

    2018-04-01

    The dissociation of yak casein (CN) micelles was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, particle size, fluorescence properties, and soluble mineral and CN molecule content at pH 4.6 to 8.2. The results showed that the size of CN micelles remained constant with decreasing pH from 8.2 to 5.8 but sharply increased at pH ≤5.4. Casein micelles began to aggregate at pH 5.4, and the serum magnesium, potassium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese levels had their minimum values at this pH level. During acidification, colloidal calcium phosphate dramatically disassociated from yak CN micelles, but the soluble CN monomer content decreased slightly. During alkalization, the soluble calcium and phosphorus content decreased below pH 6.8 but increased with pH increases from 6.8 to 8.2. However, the soluble CN content increased markedly during alkalization. The emission wavelength of 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid sodium salt fluorescence decreased during both acidification and alkalization from pH 6.6, whereas the opposite was found for intrinsic fluorescence. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of wine pH and bottle closure on tannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Jacqui M; Kassara, Stella; Kennedy, James A; Waters, Elizabeth J; Smith, Paul A

    2013-11-27

    The impact of wine pH and closure type on color, tannin concentration, and composition was investigated. A single vintage of Cabernet Sauvignon wine was divided into three batches, the pH was adjusted to 3.2, 3.5 or 3.8, and the wines were bottled under screw caps with either SaranTin (ST) or Saranex (Sx) liners. After 24 months, the tannin concentration, tannin percent yield (relating to the proportion of acid-labile interflavan bonds), and the mean degree of polymerization (mDp) had decreased significantly, all of which can contribute to the softening of wine astringency with aging. The higher pH wines contained less percent (-)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate subunits, whereas the Sx pH 3.2 wines were significantly lower in percent yield and mDp than the other wines. Overall, the tannin structure and wine color of the lower pH wines (pH 3.2) bottled under Sx screw caps changed more rapidly with aging than those of the higher pH wines (pH 3.8) bottled under ST screw caps.

  5. Effects of an exopolysaccharide (kefiran) on lipids, blood pressure, blood glucose, and constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiroaki; Zhu, Xia; Omura, Kazunobu; Suzuki, Shiho; Kitamura, Shinichi

    2004-01-01

    Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens was reported to produce an exopolysaccharide named kefiran. In the present study, we developed a new medium, rice hydrolyzate (RH) medium, for the culture of L. kefiranofaciens. Structural analyses revealed that the exopolysaccharide produced by L. kefiranofaciens from RH medium was composed of a hexasaccharide repeating unit, and essentially identical to the kefiran reported in previous studies. A study on the effects of kefiran in animals demonstrated that kefiran significantly suppressed increase of blood pressure and reduced the serum cholesterol levels in SHRSP/Hos rats when subjects consumed excessive dietary cholesterol. Kefiran supplementation demonstrated the ability to significantly lower blood glucose in KKAy mice. In addition, the administration of kefiran in constipated SD rats caused an obvious improvement in the levels of fecal moisture and wet weights of feces. These results suggest that kefiran could be used as a functional food to prevent some commonly occurring diseases.

  6. [Effects of simulated acid rain on respiration rate of cropland system with different soil pH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xue-zhu; Zhang, Gao-chuan; Li, Hui

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the respiration rate of cropland system, an outdoor pot experiment was conducted with paddy soils of pH 5.48 (S1), pH 6.70 (S1) and pH 8.18 (S3) during the 2005-2007 wheat-growing seasons. The cropland system was exposed to acid rain by spraying the wheat foliage and irrigating the soil with simulated rainwater of T1 (pH 6.0), T2 (pH 6.0, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), and T3 (pH 4.4, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), respectively. The static opaque chamber-gas chromatograph method was used to measure CO2 fluxes from cropland system. The results showed that acid rain affected the respiration rate of cropland system through crop plant, and the cropland system could adapt to acid rain. Acid rainwater significantly increased the average respiration rate in alkaline soil (S3) cropland system, while it had no significant effects on the average respiration rate in neutral soil (S2) and acidic soil (S1) cropland systems. During 2005-2006, after the alkaline soil cropland system was treated with rainwater T3, the average respiration rate was 23.6% and 27.6% higher than that of alkaline soil cropland system treated with rainwater T1 and T2, respectively. During March to April, the respiration rate was enhanced with the increase of rainwater ionic concentration, while it was dropped with the decrease of rainwater pH value in acidic soil cropland system. It was demonstrated that soil pH and crop plant played important roles on the respiration rate of cropland system.

  7. Effects of Reduced pH on Macoma balthica Larvae from a System with Naturally Fluctuating pH-Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jansson

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is causing severe changes in the inorganic carbon balance of the oceans. The pH conditions predicted for the future oceans are, however, already regularly occurring in the Baltic Sea, and the system might thus work as an analogue for future ocean acidification scenarios. The characteristics of the Baltic Sea with low buffering capacity and large natural pH fluctuations, in combination with multiple other stressors, suggest that OA effects may be severe, but remain largely unexplored. A calcifying species potentially affected by low pH conditions is the bivalve Macoma balthica (L.. We investigated larval survival and development of M. balthica by exposing the larvae to a range of pH levels: 7.2, 7.4, 7.7 and 8.1 during 20 days in order to learn what the effects of reduced pH are on the larval biology and thus also potentially for the population dynamics of this key species. We found that even a slight pH decrease causes significant negative changes during the larval phase, both by slowing growth and by decreasing survival. The growth was slower in all reduced pH treatments compared to the control treatment. The size of 250 µm that is considered indicative to imminent settling in our system was reached by 22% of the larvae grown in control conditions after 20 days, whereas in all reduced pH treatments the size of 250 µm was reached by only 7-14%. The strong impact of ocean acidification on larvae is alarming as slowly growing individuals are exposed to higher predation risk in response to the longer time they are required to spend in the plankton, further decreasing the ecological competence of the species.

  8. The effects of Moringa stenopetala on blood parameters and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Moringa stenopetala and related species are commonly used in folk medicine for various human diseases such as antimalarial, antihypertensive, antidiabetic and as antispasmodic. Objective: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of aqueous extract of M. stenopetala on blood parameters, and ...

  9. Effect Of Exogenous Progesterone On Blood Chemistry Of Large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exogenous hormones are major economic factors in swine production. This study evaluate the effects of exogenous administration of progesterone on the blood chemistry of pigs.Experiment involved weekly injections of progesterone to 24 pigs (12 males and 12 females)from day old to 24 weeks and only corn oil to another ...

  10. effects of septrin administration on blood cells parameters in humans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    honey

    2014-03-31

    Mar 31, 2014 ... RESEARCH PAPER. EFFECTS OF SEPTRIN ADMINISTRATION ON BLOOD CELLS PARAMETERS IN. HUMANS. *1Onyebuagu P.C., 2Kiridi K. and 1Pughikumo D.T.. 1Department of Human Physiology, Niger Delta University, Bayelsa, Nigeria. 2Department of Radiology, Niger. Delta University, Bayelsa ...

  11. Data-driven analysis of blood glucose management effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannings, B.; Abu-Hanna, A.; Bosman, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The blood-glucose-level (BGL) of Intensive Care (IC) patients requires close monitoring and control. In this paper we describe a general data-driven analytical method for studying the effectiveness of BGL management. The method is based on developing and studying a clinical outcome reflecting the

  12. Some central nervous system and blood pressure lowering effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methanol extract of the leaves of Spondias mombin (SP) was evaluated for some central nervous system and blood pressure lowering effect in albino wistar rats and mice. The extract was administered to pre-weighed mice (20-35 g), divided into five groups of five mice each at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg for the ...

  13. Effects of aqueous leaves extract of Ocimum gratissimum on blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 6 (18), pp. ... Full Length Research Paper. Effects of ... blood glucose level (P<0.05) of the diabetic rats by 81.3% after 24 h of extract administration. ..... The endocrine pancreas and the.

  14. Effects of Triphasic Exercise on Blood Rheology and Pathophysiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to study the relevance of physiology and pathophysiology in blood rheology as effects of triphasic exercise. Regular exercise which has been established as life prolonging has led to decrease in both peripheral vascular and coronary morbidity that has been associated with certain improvements in ...

  15. Model system evaluation of the effects of pea and pH on the emulsion properties of beef

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Ş.; Ceylan, H. G.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of dried ground pea (0 - 1%) and pH (4.80 - 7.20) on the emulsion properties of beef were investigated using the model system. The study was designed according to the central composite rotatable design using the Response Surface Methodology. Pea had significant effects on emulsion activity and stability. The effects of pH on emulsion capacity, stability, activity, density, viscosity and apparent yield stress were significant. In addition, the interaction of both factors (pea and p...

  16. In-pile loop studies of the effect of PWR coolant pH on corrosion product radionuclide deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Harling, O.K.; Kohse, G.E.

    1992-02-01

    An in-pile loop which simulates the primary coolant system of a PWR has been constructed and operated in the MIT research reactor. A total of seven one-month-long irradiations have been carried out to evaluate the effect of coolant pH controlled by variation in LiOH/H 3 BO 3 concentrations. With the exception of one run at zero boron, all employed 800 ppm B; pH 300degreesC values of 6.5, 7.0, 7.2, 7.5 were studied, and two runs each at 7.0 and 7.2 were carried out. Finally, one of the runs at a pH 300degreesC of 7.2 was conducted with special care to exclude zinc because of its potential effects on cobalt deposition. The results show the expected benefits of high pH in reducing the rate of activity deposition on plant surfaces, but pH 300degreesC = 7.2 is approximately as effective as 7.5, while pH 300degreesC = 6.5 exhibits much larger activity transport and qualitatively different deposition behavior. Significant heat flux effects not predicted by current models have been consistently observed. While not as extensively studied, the zero-boron run suggests that the presence of boron species, at fixed pH, may reduce the net amount of activity deposited on ex-core surfaces. Neutron activation analysis of a variety of samples ruled out Zircaloy as an important source of Co-60, since its cobalt content is less than one ppm, considerably less than the applicable ASTM specification of ≤ 20 ppm. Amendment of the latter has been recommended

  17. The effects of extracellular pH and hydroxycinnamic acids influence the intracellular pH of Brettanomyces bruxellensis DSM 7001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolongo, Simona; Siegumfeldt, Henrik; Aabo, Thomas Ask

    2014-01-01

    and intracellular pH changes in B. bruxellensis DSM 7001, in response to extracellular pH, as well as to the presence of an energy source and hydroxycinnamic acids, have been investigated in this paper by means of Fluorescent Ratio Imaging Microscopy (FRIM). The results show that B. bruxellensis DSM 7001 is able...

  18. Manganese toxicity in pasture legumes. II. Effects of pH and molybdenum levels in the substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, N V; Andrew, C S; Wilson, G L

    1971-06-01

    The effects of pH and Mo levels in the growing media on Mn toxicity were investigated for white clover and five tropical pasture legume species. In solution culture, high Mo supply did not influence Mn toxicity. However, in two species, it caused Mo toxicity. High solution pH intensified Mn toxicity in white clover, probably by way of uptake. The effects of Ca and P on Mn toxicity reported in a previous paper, were not greatly influenced by solution pH. In the soil, Mo application greatly increased dry matter yield of white clover grown on soils high in exchangeable Mn. This effect was more easily attributed to an influence on N metabolism of the legume plant than on Mn toxicity. Measured soil pH was found to have little influence on the level of exchangeable Mn in the soil. However the larger pH changes in small soil pockets, resulting from non-uniform incorporation of chemicals in the soil, might have a more important effect on this fraction of soil Mn. 31 references, 7 tables.

  19. Effect of Ramadan Fasting on Blood Pressure and Lipid Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam sadat Amirkalali sijavandi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ramadan is a holy month for Muslims during which avoid from eating, drinking and sexual intercourse for about 13-17 hours. The aim of this study was surveying the effects of Islamic fasting in Ramadan on lipid profile and blood pressure.Materials and Methods: we designed this study in two phases, a week before and a week after Ramadan month. Eighty nine healthy subjects with 20-50 years old were participated in this study. Blood sampling for lipid profile measurement was done in the morning and blood pressure was measured in the afternoon with digital sphygmomanometer. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 16.0 software.Results: In a week after Ramadan, body weight and body mass index (BMI decreased in both sexes, comparing with the week before Ramadan measurements (p

  20. Effects of nattokinase on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Gum, Si Nae; Paik, Jean Kyung; Lim, Hyo Hee; Kim, Kyong-Chol; Ogasawara, Kazuya; Inoue, Kenichi; Park, Sungha; Jang, Yangsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of nattokinase supplementation on blood pressure in subjects with pre-hypertension or stage 1 hypertension. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 86 participants ranging from 20 to 80 years of age with an initial untreated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 130 to 159 mmHg received nattokinase (2,000 FU/capsule) or a placebo capsule for 8 weeks. Seventy-three subjects completed the protocol. Compared with the control group, the net changes in SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were -5.55 mmHg (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -0.57 mmHg; pnattokinase group compared with the control group (pnattokinase supplementation resulted in a reduction in SBP and DBP. These findings suggest that increased intake of nattokinase may play an important role in preventing and treating hypertension.

  1. Antimony leaching release from brake pads: Effect of pH, temperature and organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingyun; He, Mengchang; Li, Sisi

    2015-03-01

    Metals from automotive brake pads pollute water, soils and the ambient air. The environmental effect on water of antimony (Sb) contained in brake pads has been largely untested. The content of Sb in one abandoned brake pad reached up to 1.62×10(4) mg/kg. Effects of initial pH, temperature and four organic acids (acetic acid, oxalic acid, citric acid and humic acid) on Sb release from brake pads were studied using batch reactors. Approximately 30% (97 mg/L) of the total Sb contained in the brake pads was released in alkaline aqueous solution and at higher temperature after 30 days of leaching. The organic acids tested restrained Sb release, especially acetic acid and oxalic acid. The pH-dependent concentration change of Sb in aqueous solution was best fitted by a logarithmic function. In addition, Sb contained in topsoil from land where brake pads were discarded (average 9×10(3) mg/kg) was 3000 times that in uncontaminated soils (2.7±1 mg/kg) in the same areas. Because potentially high amounts of Sb may be released from brake pads, it is important that producers and environmental authorities take precautions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. [Health and exercise: effects of exercise on high blood pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Nanri, H; Himeno, E

    1993-09-01

    Many factors, such as genetic, psychological, environmental, and socioeconomical factors, influence the health of individuals. Recently behavioral risks which cause preventable chronic diseases or premature death have been increasing. These risk factors are mainly due to living habits, such as over-eating, less exercise and psychological stress. Physical activity or fitness is reported to be inversely associated with morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases diabetes mellitus, cancer and so on. Hypertension has also been reported to be associated with low physical fitness in cross-sectional studies. We have so far reported a significant blood pressure reduction in mild hypertensive patients who completed mild intensity exercise training in well controlled studies. Exercise seemed to modify the multiple factors that might participate in raising and maintaining high blood pressure. The mechanisms of lowering blood pressure by exercise training are mainly due to a depletion of blood volume or the reduction of both cardiac output and the sympathetic tone. They were supported by the evidence of increased levels of prostaglandin E, dopamine, taurine, and decreased levels of plasma norepinephrine and endogenous ouavain-like substance. In this article, we have reviewed the physiological and biochemical roles of exercise, the effects of exercise on high blood pressure, and the hypotensive mechanism of mild aerobic exercise hypertensive patients.

  3. Effect of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood on magnetic particle capture in occluded blood vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Magnetic carrier particles with surface-bound drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from the desired target site, and are captured at the target site via a local applied magnetic field. Herein, a numerical investigation of steady magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using functionalized magnetic micro-spheres in partly occluded blood vessel having a 90° bent is presented considering the effects of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the insert configuration and its position from the central plane of the artery (zoffset), particle size (dp) and its magnetic property (χ) and the magnitude of current (I) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. Analysis shows that there exists an optimum regime of operating parameters for which deposition of the drug carrying magnetic particles in a target zone on the partly occluded vessel wall can be maximized. The results provide useful design bases for in vitro set up for the investigation of MDT in stenosed blood vessels.

  4. Effects of Nattokinase on Whole Blood Viscosity and Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Cengiz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nattokinase is a serin protease having potent fibrinolytic effect derived from fermentation of boiled soy bean by the use of Basillus Subtilis Natto. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of intragastric Nattokinase (6 mg/day administration for 7 days prior to formation of sepsis on plasma fibrinogen levels, whole blood viscosity and mortality in rats. Materials and Methods: Intraabdominal sepsis were performed by cecal ligation and puncture in rats supplemented with nattokinase or olive oil for 7 days prior to sepsis formation. Plasma fibrinogen, whole blood viscosity analysis and survival analysis was performed after intraabdominal sepsis formation. Results: Mean blood viscosity of rats was lower in Nattokinase and cecal ligation group at lowest shear rate (p<0.05. However, the differences between groups were not significant at higher shear rates. No difference was found in survival rates and survival times of Nattokinase and cecal ligation and cecal ligation and puncture groups. Conclusion: Our results were unable to show the effects of intragastric nattokinase supplementation prior to sepsis on plasma fibrinogen levels or whole blood viscosity, except low shear rate. Nattokinase did not altered survival in septic rats. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9: 85-9

  5. The potential effects of pH and buffering capacity on dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Barry M

    2007-01-01

    Soft drink pH (initial pH) has been shown to be a causative factor--but not necessarily the primary initiating factor--of dental erosion. The titratable acidity or buffering capacity has been acknowledged as playing a significant role in the etiology of these lesions. This in vitro study sought to evaluate five different soft drinks (Coca-Cola Classic, Diet Coke, Gatorade sports drink, Red Bull high-energy drink, Starbucks Frappucino coffee drink) and tap water (control) in terms of initial pH and buffering capacity. Initial pH was measured in triplicate for the six beverages. The buffering capacity of each beverage was assessed by measuring the weight (in grams) of 0.10 M sodium hydroxide necessary for titration to pH levels of 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, and 8.3. Coca-Cola Classic produced the lowest mean pH, while Starbucks Frappucino produced the highest pH of any of the drinks except for tap water. Based on statistical analysis using ANOVA and Fisher's post hoc tests at a P Starbucks Frappucino.

  6. A NBD-based simple but effective fluorescent pH probe for imaging of lysosomes in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiang-Jian [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Chen, Li-Na [Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Xuan [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Jin-Ting [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Chen, Ming-Yu [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wu, Qiu-Rong [Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Taishan College, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Miao, Jun-Ying, E-mail: miaojy@sdu.edu.cn [Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhao, Bao-Xiang, E-mail: bxzhao@sdu.edu.cn [Institute of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2016-05-12

    NBDlyso with lysosome-locating morpholine moiety has been developed as a high selective and sensitive fluorescent pH probe. This probe can respond to acidic pH (2.0–7.0) in a short time (less than 1 min) and not almost change after continuously illuminated for an extended period by ultraviolet light. The fluorescence intensity of NBDlyso enhanced 100-fold in acidic solution, with very good linear relationship (R{sup 2} = 0.996). The pK{sub a} of probe NBDlyso is 4.10. Therefore, NBDlyso was used to detect lysosomal pH changes successfully. Besides, X-ray crystallography was used to verify the structure of NBDlyso, and the recognition mechanism involving photo-induced electron transfer was interpreted theoretically by means of DFT and TDDFT calculations skillfully when NBDlyso comes into play under the acidic condition. This probe showed good ability to sense pH change in living cell image. - Highlights: • An effective NBD-based fluorescent pH probe was developed. • The sensing mechanism was interpreted by theoretical calculation. • This probe was successfully used to monitor lysosoml pH changes in Hela cells.

  7. A NBD-based simple but effective fluorescent pH probe for imaging of lysosomes in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiang-Jian; Chen, Li-Na; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Jin-Ting; Chen, Ming-Yu; Wu, Qiu-Rong; Miao, Jun-Ying; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    NBDlyso with lysosome-locating morpholine moiety has been developed as a high selective and sensitive fluorescent pH probe. This probe can respond to acidic pH (2.0–7.0) in a short time (less than 1 min) and not almost change after continuously illuminated for an extended period by ultraviolet light. The fluorescence intensity of NBDlyso enhanced 100-fold in acidic solution, with very good linear relationship (R"2 = 0.996). The pK_a of probe NBDlyso is 4.10. Therefore, NBDlyso was used to detect lysosomal pH changes successfully. Besides, X-ray crystallography was used to verify the structure of NBDlyso, and the recognition mechanism involving photo-induced electron transfer was interpreted theoretically by means of DFT and TDDFT calculations skillfully when NBDlyso comes into play under the acidic condition. This probe showed good ability to sense pH change in living cell image. - Highlights: • An effective NBD-based fluorescent pH probe was developed. • The sensing mechanism was interpreted by theoretical calculation. • This probe was successfully used to monitor lysosoml pH changes in Hela cells.

  8. Effects of midazolam on cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, A.; Juge, O.; Morel, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of intravenously administered midazolam on cerebral blood flow were evaluated in eight healthy volunteers using the 133 Xe inhalation technique. Six minutes after an intravenous dose of 0.15 mg/kg midazolam, the cerebral blood flow decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) from a value of 40.6 +/- 3.3 to a value of 27.0 +/- 5.0 ml . 100 g-1 . min-1. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) increased from 2.8 +/- 0.2 to 3.9 to 0.6 mmHg/(ml . 100 g-1 . min-1)(P less than 0.001). Mean arterial blood pressure decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) from 117 +/- 8 to 109 +/- 9 mmHg and arterial carbon dioxide tension increased from 33.9 +/- 2.3 to 38.6 +/- 3.2 mmHg (P less than 0.05). Arterial oxygen tension remained stable throughout the study, 484 +/- 95 mmHg before the administration of midazolam and 453 +/- 76 mmHg after. All the subjects slept after the injection of the drug and had anterograde amnesia of 24.5 +/- 5 min. The decrease in mean arterial blood pressure was probably not important since it remained in the physiologic range for cerebral blood flow autoregulation. The increase in arterial carbon dioxide tension observed after the midazolam injection may have partially counteracted the effect of this new benzodiazepine on cerebral blood flow. Our data suggest that midazolam might be a safe agent to use for the induction of anethesia in neurosurgical patients with intracranial hypertension

  9. Effects of Aggregation on Blood Sedimentation and Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhbanov, Alexander; Yang, Sung

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test has been used for over a century. The Westergren method is routinely used in a variety of clinics. However, the mechanism of erythrocyte sedimentation remains unclear, and the 60 min required for the test seems excessive. We investigated the effects of cell aggregation during blood sedimentation and electrical conductivity at different hematocrits. A sample of blood was drop cast into a small chamber with two planar electrodes placed on the bottom. The measured blood conductivity increased slightly during the first minute and decreased thereafter. We explored various methods of enhancing or retarding the erythrocyte aggregation. Using experimental measurements and theoretical calculations, we show that the initial increase in blood conductivity was indeed caused by aggregation, while the subsequent decrease in conductivity resulted from the deposition of erythrocytes. We present a method for calculating blood conductivity based on effective medium theory. Erythrocytes are modeled as conducting spheroids surrounded by a thin insulating membrane. A digital camera was used to investigate the erythrocyte sedimentation behavior and the distribution of the cell volume fraction in a capillary tube. Experimental observations and theoretical estimations of the settling velocity are provided. We experimentally demonstrate that the disaggregated cells settle much slower than the aggregated cells. We show that our method of measuring the electrical conductivity credibly reflected the ESR. The method was very sensitive to the initial stage of aggregation and sedimentation, while the sedimentation curve for the Westergren ESR test has a very mild slope in the initial time. We tested our method for rapid estimation of the Westergren ESR. We show a correlation between our method of measuring changes in blood conductivity and standard Westergren ESR method. In the future, our method could be examined as a potential means of accelerating

  10. Effect of Probiotic Curd on Salivary pH and Streptococcus mutans: A Double Blind Parallel Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shivangi; Saha, Sabyasachi; Kumari, Minti; Mohd, Shafaat

    2016-02-01

    Dairy products like curd seem to be the most natural way to ingest probiotics which can reduce Streptococcus mutans level and also increase salivary pH thereby reducing the dental caries risk. To estimate the role of probiotic curd on salivary pH and Streptococcus mutans count, over a period of 7 days. This double blind parallel randomized clinical trial was conducted at the institution with 60 caries free volunteers belonging to the age group of 20-25 years who were randomly allocated into two groups. Test Group consisted of 30 subjects who consumed 100ml of probiotic curd daily for seven days while an equal numbered Control Group were given 100ml of regular curd for seven days. Saliva samples were assessed at baseline, after ½ hour 1 hour and 7 days of intervention period using pH meter and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar to estimate salivary pH and S. mutans count. Data was statistically analysed using Paired and Unpaired t-test. The study revealed a reduction in salivary pH after ½ hour and 1 hour in both the groups. However after 7 days, normal curd showed a statistically significant (psalivary pH while probiotic curd showed a statistically significant (psalivary pH. Similarly with regard to S. mutans colony counts probiotic curd showed statistically significant reduction (psalivary pH elevation and reduction of salivary S. mutans counts and thus can be exploited for the prevention of enamel demineralization as a long-term remedy keeping in mind its cost effectiveness.

  11. Effect of soft drinks on proximal plaque pH at normal and low salivary secretion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Lingström, Peter; Birkhed, Dowen

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different types of drinks on plaque pH during normal and drug-induced low salivary secretion rates. Three drinks were tested in 10 healthy adult subjects: 1) Coca-Cola regular, 2) Coca-Cola light, and 3) fresh orange juice. pH was measured in the maxillary incisor and premolar region with the microtouch method. The area under the pH curve (AUC) was calculated. During normal salivary condition, mouth-rinsing with Coca-Cola regular resulted in a slightly more pronounced drop in pH during the first few minutes than it did with orange juice. After this initial phase, both products showed similar and relatively slow pH recovery. Coca-Cola light also resulted in low pH values during the very first minutes, but thereafter in a rapid recovery back to baseline. During dry mouth conditions, the regular Cola drink showed a large initial drop in pH, and slightly more pronounced than for orange juice. After the initial phase, both products had a similar and slow recovery back to baseline. At most time-points, AUC was significantly greater in dry conditions compared to normal conditions for Coca-Cola regular and orange juice, but not for Coca-Cola light. Coca-Cola light generally showed a significantly smaller AUC than Coca-Cola regular and orange juice. The main conclusion from this study is that a low salivary secretion rate may accentuate the fall in pH in dental plaque after gentle mouth-rinsing with soft drinks.

  12. Effect of pH on the adsorption of dodecylamine on montmorillonite: Insights from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chenliang; Min, Fanfei; Liu, Lingyun

    2017-12-01

    The hydrophobic aggregation in cationic surfactant suspension is an effective method to enhance the dewatering of clay-rich tailing. The solution pH can affect the adsorption behavior of cationic surfactant on clay mineral. The effect of pH on the adsorption of dodecylamine (DDA) on montmorillonite was investigated by the sedimentation test and the characterization of flocs images, contact angle, adsorption quantity, and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It was found that DDA ions were adsorbed on montmorillonite basal surfaces mainly by physical adsorption, including the electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. A certain number of neutral DDA molecules can favor the adsorption of DDA. At pH around 8, the effect of hydrophobic modification was the best because DDA molecules and ions form compact and well-organized monolayer. The MD simulation results were in good agreement with that of contact angle, adsorption quantity and FTIR.

  13. The effect of whole-blood donor adverse events on blood donor return rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bruce H; Newman, Daniel T; Ahmad, Raffat; Roth, Arthur J

    2006-08-01

    Some blood donation-related adverse events (AEs) can negatively impact the blood donor return rate (BDRR) and decrease donor retention. One-thousand randomly selected whole-blood donors were interviewed 3 weeks after a 525-mL index whole-blood donation for seven AEs. The number of return visits and duration of follow-up were recorded for each of the 1000 donors. A negative binomial regression analysis was used to determine the contribution of the four most common AEs to the BDRR, and interactions between these AEs were also evaluated. The four most common AEs were bruise alone (15.1%), sore arm "alone" (7.0%), fatigue "alone" (5.1%), and donor reaction "alone" (4.2%), where "alone" is defined to also include donors who had a bruise but no other AE. The estimated BDRR for donations without AEs was 1.32 visits per year. The estimated BDRRs for the four most common AEs were: bruise alone, 1.32 visits per year; sore arm alone, 1.30 visits per year (2% reduction in BDRR); fatigue alone, 1.06 visits per year (20% reduction in BDRR); and donor reaction alone, 0.87 visits per year (34% reduction in BDRR). The BDRR for donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm together was 0.20 visits per year (85% reduction in BDRR). Donor reaction had the most negative impact on the BDRR. There appears to be a synergistic effect between donor reaction, fatigue, and sore arm. Theoretically, amelioration of some AEs has the potential to improve BDRRs.

  14. Effects of Nattokinase on Whole Blood Viscosity and Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Melike Cengiz; Pınar Karadamar; Murat Yılmaz; Nesil Coşkunfırat; Atilla Ramazanoğlu; Sabahat Özdem; Oğuz Kerim Başkurt; Herbert J Meiselman

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Nattokinase is a serin protease having potent fibrinolytic effect derived from fermentation of boiled soy bean by the use of Basillus Subtilis Natto. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of intragastric Nattokinase (6 mg/day) administration for 7 days prior to formation of sepsis on plasma fibrinogen levels, whole blood viscosity and mortality in rats. Materials and Methods: Intraabdominal sepsis were performed by cecal ligation and puncture in rats s...

  15. pH effect on structural and optical properties of nanostructured zinc oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munef, R. A. [Kirkuk Iraq, Kirkuk university, college of science physics department, phone: 009647702180337, Iraq Rafeamonef@yahoo.com (Iraq)

    2015-03-30

    ZnO nanostructures were Deposited on Objekttrager glasses for various pH values by chemical bath deposition method using Zn (NO3)2·6H2O (zinc nitrate hexahydrate) solution at 75°C reaction temperature without any posterior treatments. The ZnO nanostructures obtained were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, UV). The structure was hexagonal and it was found that some peaks disappear with various pH values. The grain sizes of ZnO films increases from 22-to-29nm with increasing pH. The transmission of the films was (85-95%)

  16. Effects of pH and ionic strength on the thermodynamics of human serum albumin-photosensitizer binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Cecil L.; Dickson, TiReJe; Hayes, Ronald; Thomas, Lana

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The pH dependence of entropy and enthalpy changes was determined for zinc phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid, ZnPcS 4 binding to human serum albumin, HSA. ► The ionic strength dependence of entropy and enthalpy changes was determined for ZnPcS 4 acid binding to HSA. ► The primary driving force governing the interaction between ZnPcS 4 and HSA over the range of pH and ionic strength was solution dynamics. ► The interplay between entropy and enthalpy changes was demonstrated. - Abstract: Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the effects of pH and ionic strength on thermodynamic parameters governing the interaction of human serum albumin with zinc phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid. Fluorescence emission of zinc phthalocyanine increases at 686 nm with increasing concentrations of the protein. The non-linear correlation between protein concentration and emission of the photosensitizer was fitted using Chipman's analysis to calculate the binding affinities. The standard enthalpy and entropy changes were estimated from van’t Hoff analysis of data that were acquired from temperature ramping studies. Results show that reaction is primarily driven by solution dynamics and that the change in enthalpy for the system becomes increasingly unfavorable with increasing pH and ionic strength. The effect of ionic strength on the entropy change for binding is shown to be significantly greater than the effects of pH. The interplay between entropy and enthalpy changes is demonstrated.

  17. Effect of ionite decomposition products on the reactor coolant pH in a boiling-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredikhin, V.Ya.; Moskvin, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of products resulting from thermal radiolysis of ionites on water-chemical regime of NPP with RBMK is considered basing on investigations conducted in a boiling type experimental reactor. Data are presented on dynamics of changes in the specific electric conductivity and pH of the coolant following destruction of ion exchange groups and ionite matrix under the effect of reactor radiation. The authors draw a conclusion that radiation destruction of ionito fine disperse suspension or high-molecular soluble compounds in the reactor are, probably, one of the main reasons for variations in pH values of the coolant at NPP in non-correction water chemical regime

  18. The effect of different phosphate ion concentrations and ph of the phosphate buffer on lipase bioproduction by rhizopus oligosporus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, I.; Ali, S.; Awan, U.F.; Javed, W.; Mirza, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the present investigation, we report the effect of phosphate ion concentration and different ph of the phosphate buffer (as diluent) on lipase bioproduction by Rhizopus oligosporus. For this purpose, solid state fermentation was employed. Different agricultural by-products such as wheat bran, rice husk, almond meal, soybean meal and sunflower meal were used as substrate. The maximum lipase activity (72.60 U/g) was observed with the almond meal. Addition of phosphate ions (K/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/) influenced the lipase production. The ph of the phosphate buffer (7.0) was found to be effective for higher yield of lipase. (author)

  19. Effects of buffer composition, pH and temperature on oxygen binding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-03-14

    Mar 14, 1989 ... best stability against methaemoglobin formation. The highest ... regarding their capacity to hold water or to keep the temperature, pH ... pore (Lever & Bekius 1965). ..... fore meaningless and were discarded when the slope of.

  20. Oxidation of tartrazine with ultraviolet light emitting diodes: pH and duty cycles effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brandon M; Miller, Michael E; Kempisty, David M; Stubbs, John; Harper, Willie F

    2018-03-01

    The presence of tartrazine (TAR) in the water cycle poses serious threats to human health. This study investigated the used of light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the advanced oxidation of TAR under different pH and duty cycle (DC) conditions. The first order reaction rate constant for TAR oxidation was positively correlated with DC, negatively correlated with pH, and typically greatest at pH 6. Chemical byproduct analysis indicated that OH addition, H abstraction, and electron transfer without molecule transfer were among the relevant reaction mechanisms for TAR degradation. Six byproducts were identified, four were reported for the first time, and two demonstrated that TAR rings were cleaved. This research is the first to determine the optimal pH for UVLED-driven oxidation of TAR and the first to identify new TAR-related byproducts from UVLED-based water treatment.

  1. Correlating rheological properties and printability of collagen bioinks: the effects of riboflavin photocrosslinking and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantides, Nicole; Wang, Louis; Pruiksma, Tylar; Siemiatkoski, Joseph; Dugopolski, Caroline; Shortkroff, Sonya; Kennedy, Stephen; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-07-05

    Collagen has shown promise as a bioink for extrusion-based bioprinting, but further development of new collagen bioink formulations is necessary to improve their printability. Screening these formulations by measuring print accuracy is a costly and time consuming process. We hypothesized that rheological properties of the bioink before, during, and/or after gelation can be used to predict printability. In this study, we investigated the effects of riboflavin photocrosslinking and pH on type I collagen bioink rheology before, during, and after gelation and directly correlated these findings to the printability of each bioink formulation. From the riboflavin crosslinking study, results showed that riboflavin crosslinking increased the storage moduli of collagen bioinks, but the degree of improvement was less pronounced at higher collagen concentrations. Dots printed with collagen bioinks with riboflavin crosslinking exhibited smaller dot footprint areas than those printed with collagen bioinks without riboflavin crosslinking. From the pH study, results showed that gelation kinetics and final gel moduli were highly pH dependent and both exhibited maxima around pH 8. The shape fidelity of printed lines was highest at pH 8-9.5. The effect of riboflavin crosslinking and pH on cell viability was assessed using bovine chondrocytes. Cell viability in collagen gels was found to decrease after blue light activated riboflavin crosslinking but was not affected by pH. Correlations between rheological parameters and printability showed that the modulus associated with the bioink immediately after extrusion and before deposition was the best predictor of bioink printability. These findings will allow for the more rapid screening of collagen bioink formulations.

  2. PH sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Artero, C.; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a design of a marine instrument for the measurement of pH in seawater. The measurement system consists of a pH electrode connected to the underwater observatory OBSEA. The extracted data are useful for scientists researching ocean acidification. Peer Reviewed

  3. Effects of Blood-cooling and Stasis-removing Formula on Hemorheology in Rats with Acute Blood Stasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyi Ning

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of blood-cooling and stasis-removing formula on hemorheology in rats with acute blood stasis induced by mutifactor stimuli. Methods: The selected SD rats orally took blood-cooling and stasis-removing granule for six days, then the model of acute blood stasis was prepared on the fifth day by injection of epinephrine combined with ice-water bath. The variations of blood-cooling and stasis-removing granule on hemorheology were detected. Results: The high-dose group of blood-cooling and stasis-removing formula can decrease plasma viscosity in rats with acute blood stasis, and obviously reduce the blood viscosity under the condition of shear rates (200s-1, 30s-1, 5s-1, 1s-1 (P < 0.01, P < 0.05. The middle-dose group can decrease the blood viscosity under the condition of shear rate (30s-1 (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Blood-cooling and stasis-removing formula can improve abnormal hemorheology in rats with acute blood stasis.

  4. Effect of pH on desorption of CO2 from alkanolamine - rich solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min

    2017-08-01

    Adipic acid was used as a pH regulator, which was added to 0.4 mol/L MEA, DEA and MDEA solvents during CO2 desorption process. It is found that when pH value of the solvents swing between 8-10, CO2 desorption rate enhanced, and energy consumption has declined obviously. This research may have reference significance on optimization of alkanolamine CO2 capture process.

  5. Effects of pH on uranium uptake and oxidative stress responses induced in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Saenen, Eline; Horemans, Nele; Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Biermans, Geert; Van Hees, May; Wannijn, Jean; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (U) causes oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown at pH 5.5. However, U speciation and its toxicity strongly depend on environmental parameters, for example pH. It is unknown how different U species determine U uptake and translocation within plants and how they might affect the oxidative defense mechanisms of these plants. The present study analyzed U uptake and oxidative stress-related responses in A. thaliana (Columbia ecotype) under contrasted U chemical speciation ...

  6. The effect of pH on the stability of smectite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, R.M.; Miller, H.G.

    1984-11-01

    The hydrothermal stability of smectite at temperatures less than 275 degrees C was investigated experimentally over a range of pH values. In the near-neutral pH region, the smectite to illite conversion predominated; in the mildly acid region, there was extensive formation of aluminum hydroxy interlayers in the clay; and in the alkaline region, framework silicates (feldspar and zeolites) were produced. The geological evidence for these reactions is also reviewed

  7. The Effects of Blood Transfusion on Delirium Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Vera; Beishuizen, Sara J; Scholtens, Rikie M; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; de Rooij, Sophia E; van Munster, Barbara C

    2016-08-01

    Both anemia and blood transfusion could be precipitating factors for delirium; hence in postoperative patients with anemia at high risk for delirium, it is controversial whether transfusion is the best option. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of anemia and delirium and the role of blood transfusion within the multicomponent prevention strategy of delirium. We conducted a substudy of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Four hundred fifteen patients aged 65 to 102 years old admitted for hip fracture surgery were enrolled. Delirium was assessed daily using criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. Data on hemoglobin values and transfusion were collected from the electronic medical records. One hundred fifteen (32.5%) patients experienced delirium during hospitalization, 238 (57.5%) had a hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L (9.7 g/dL) at any time during hospitalization, and 140 (33.7%) received a blood transfusion. Anemia (a hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L [9.7 g/dL]) was associated with delirium (odds ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.86). Blood transfusion was a protective factor for delirium in patients with the lowest measured hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L (9.7 g/dL) (odds ratio, 0.26; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.70). Low hemoglobin level is associated with delirium, and receiving a blood transfusion is associated with a lower delirium incidence. It would be interesting to investigate the effect of blood transfusion as part of the multicomponent treatment of delirium in patients with anemia. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of pH on simultaneous saccharification and isomerization by glucoamylase and glucose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Abha; Debnath Das, Meera

    2002-01-01

    pH and temperature play critical roles in multistep enzymatic conversions. In such conversions, the optimal pH for individual steps differs greatly. In this article, we describe the production of glucoamylase (from Aspergillus oryzae MTCC152 in solid-state fermentation) and glucose isomerase (from Streptomyces griseus NCIM2020 in submerged fermentation), used in industries for producing high-fructose syrup. Optimum pH for glucoamylase was found to be 5.0. For glucose isomerase, the optimum pH ranged between 7.0 and 8.5, depending on the type of buffer used. Optimum temperature for glucoamylase and glucose isomerase was 50 and 60 degrees C, respectively. When both the enzymatic conversions were performed simultaneously at a compromised pH of 6.5, both the enzymes showed lowered activity. We also studied the kinetics at different pHs, which allows the two-step reaction to take place simultaneously. This was done by separating two steps by a thin layer of urease. Ammonia generated by the hydrolysis of urea consumed the hydrogen ions, thereby allowing optimal activity of glucose isomerase at an acidic pH of 5.0.

  9. Effect of pH on molecular constitution and distribution of hemoglobin in living erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Huang, Yao-Xiong; Kang, Li-Li; Wu, Zheng-Jie; Luo, Man

    2010-04-01

    The molecular constitution of in situ hemoglobin (Hb) and their distribution in living erythrocyte were investigated versus pH using the technique of confocal Raman microscopy. Both Raman point spectra and line mapping measurements were performed on living erythrocytes in suspensions with pH values from 4.82 to 9.70. It was found that the Hb inside a living erythrocyte would dissociate into monomer/dimer when the cells are in low and high pH environments. In contrast to the homogeneous distribution of the Hbs in the cells in neutral suspension, there are more Hbs distributing around the cell membrane or binding to the membrane as pH increases. While in low pH, as the cell become spherical, most of the Hbs distribute to the central part of the cell. In summary, our investigation suggests that the variation of the external pH not only brings changes in the morphology and membrane structure of an erythrocyte, but also affects the constitution and distribution of its intracellular Hbs, thereby the flexibility of the cell membrane and the oxygenation ability of the Hb.

  10. Effects of lowered pH on marine phytoplankton growth rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berge, Terje; Daugbjerg, Niels; Andersen, Betinna Balling

    2010-01-01

    concentration of seawater. Ocean acidification may potentially both stimulate and reduce primary production by marine phytoplankton. Data are scarce on the response of marine phytoplankton growth rates to lowered pH/increased CO2. Using the acid addition method to lower the seawater pH and manipulate...... the carbonate system, we determined in detail the lower pH limit for growth rates of 2 model species of common marine phytoplankton. We also tested whether growth and production rates of 6 other common species of phytoplankton were affected by ocean acidification (lowered to pH 7.0). The lower pH limits...... statistically similar in the pH range of ~7.0 to 8.5. Our results and literature reports on growth at lowered pH indicate that marine phytoplankton in general are resistant to climate change in terms of ocean acidification, and do not increase or decrease their growth rates according to ecological relevant...

  11. Effects of high medium pH on growth, metabolism and transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Antonio; Sánchez, Norma Silvia; Álvarez, Helber; Calahorra, Martha; Ramírez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stopped by maintaining the pH of the medium in a pH-stat at pH 8.0 or 9.0. Studying its main physiological capacities and comparing cells after incubation at pH 6.0 vs. 8.0 or 9.0, we found that (a) fermentation was moderately decreased by high pH and respiration was similar and sensitive to the addition of an uncoupler, (b) ATP and glucose-6-phosphate levels upon glucose addition increased to similar levels and (c) proton pumping and K(+) transport were also not affected; all this indicating that energy mechanisms were preserved. Growth inhibition at high pH was also not due to a significant lower amino acid transport by the cells or incorporation into proteins. The cell cycle stopped at pH 9.0, probably due to an arrest as a result of adjustments needed by the cells to contend with the changes under these conditions, and microarray experiments showed some relevant changes to this response. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  12. Effect of initial pH in levan production by Zymomonas mobilis immobilized in sodium alginate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidiany Aparecida Queiroz Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Zymomonas mobilis was immobilized using a cell suspension fixed to 8.6 x 107 CFU mL-1 by spectrophotometry. This biomass was suspended in sodium alginate solution (3% that was dropped with a hypodermic syringe into 0.2 M calcium chloride solution. Was test two initial pH of fermentation medium (4 and 5 and different sucrose concentrations 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35% at 30˚C, without stirring for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. The levan production to pH 4 was high in sucrose 25% for 24 (16.51 g L-1 and 48 (15.31 g L-1 hours. The best values obtained to pH 5 was in sucrose 35% during 48 (22.39 g L-1 and 96 (23.5 g L-1 hours, respectively. The maximum levan yield was 40.8% and 22.47% in sucrose 15% to pH 4 and 5, respectively. Substrate consumption to pH 4 was bigger in sucrose 15 (56.4% and 20% (59.4% and to pH 5 was in 25 (68.85% and 35% (64.64%. In relation to immobilization efficiency, Zymomonas mobilis showed high adhesion and colonization in support, indicated by cell growth increased from 107 to 109 CFU mL-1 during fermentation time.

  13. Effect of ph and temperature on the activity of phytase products used in broiler nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L de P Naves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The activity of three commercial microbial phytase (Aspergillus oryzae, A. niger, and Saccharomyces cerevisae products used in broiler nutrition was determined at different pH (2.0 to 9.0 and temperature (20 to 90°C values. Enzymatic activity was determined according to the reaction of the phytase with its substrate (sodium phytate, in four replicates, and was expressed in units of phytase activity (FTU. A. oryzae phytase exhibited optimal activity at pH 4.0 and 40°C, but its absolute activity was the lowest of the three phytases evaluated. A. niger phytase exhibited maximal activity close to pH 5.0 and 45ºC, whereas S. cerevisae phytase presented its highest activity at pH close to 4.5 and temperatures ranging between 50 and 60°C. It was concluded that A. niger and S. cerevisae phytase products exhibited the highest absolute activities in vitro at pH and temperature values (pH lower than 5.0 and 41ºC corresponding to the ideal physiological conditions of broilers, which would theoretically allow high hydrolysis rate of the phytate contained in the feed.

  14. The effect of pH on UV-based advanced oxidation technologies - 1,4-Dioxane degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vescovi, Tania [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Coleman, Heather M., E-mail: h.coleman@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Amal, Rose [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    1,4-Dioxane, is a synthetic organic compound used widely throughout industry as a solvent. 1,4-Dioxane causes liver damage and kidney failure and has been shown to be carcinogenic to animals, and is a potential carcinogen to humans. Its recalcitrant nature means that conventional water treatment methods are ineffective in removing it from water. A class of technologies called advanced oxidation technologies has been shown to completely mineralise 1,4-dioxane. In this study the effects of pH on TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis reactor systems were investigated. pH was found to significantly affect the efficiencies of these processes with neutral pH conditions the most effective.

  15. Do PhDs Voluntarily Opt for Private Sector Employment? Evidence of Push and Pull Effects on Mobility Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Heidi Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark, policy makers have increased admissions to PhD programs to ensure the flow of researchers into the private sector, thereby increasing knowledge transfer. However, we know little about the factors influencing the sector mobility of PhD graduates. While opting for employment...... in the private sector might be driven by personal preferences, there might also be external factors pushing PhDs to choose the private sector. This article examines the push and pull effects on mobility choices using duration models to estimate the transition rates to private sector employment. The analyses show...... that the preference for and ability to do academic science reduces transition rates to the private sector, whereas being in a research position and earnings potential are attractors to the private sector. Hence, both push and pull effects determine sector mobility. Once the initial sector choice has been made...

  16. Effect of pH, ionic strength and fulvic acid on the sorption and desorption of cobalt to bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Sh.M.; Ren, A.P.; Chen, Ch.L.; Chen, Y.X.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Humic substances and bentonite have attracted great interest in radioactive waste management. Here the sorption of cobalt on bentonite in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) under ambient conditions was studied. The effects of pH, ionic strength, FA and solution concentrations on cobalt sorption to bentonite were also investigated using batch techniques. The results indicate that the sorption of cobalt is strongly dependent on pH and is independent of ionic strength under our experimental conditions. Surface complexation is considered the main mechanism of cobalt sorption to bentonite. In the presence of FA, little effect of FA on cobalt sorption was found at pH 8. The addition sequences of FA/Co 2+ to the bentonite suspension on the sorption of cobalt to FA-coated bentonite were also studied. The results indicated that the sorption is not influenced by the addition sequences. Some possible mechanisms are discussed

  17. Effect of pH and temperature on browning intensity of coconut sugar and its antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karseno

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Coconut sugar is produced by heating coconut neera. The brown color of sugar is derived from non-enzymatic browning Maillard reaction. It is strongly influenced by pH and temperature. In this study, the effect of pH and temperature on browning intensity and antioxidant activity of coconut sugar were examined. The pH of coconut neera was adjusted at 6 and 8 and the temperature of its heating was 100ºC, 105 ºC, 110ºC, and 115ºC, respectively. The browning intensity of sugar was determined by spectrophotometrically at 420 nm. Total phenolic content of sugar was estimated by Folin-Ciocalteu method and antioxidant activity was expressed as DPPH scavenging activity. The results showed that browning intensity and antioxidant activity of sugars was increased with increasing pH of coconut neera and temperature. It was found that the effect of pH at 8 and temperature at 115ºC show highest total phenolics (0.48% and browning intensity (0.35 of sugar. The treatment also exhibited good antioxidant activity (DPPH scavenging activity as high as 40%. This result also indicates that there is a significant correlation between browning intensity and antioxidant activity of coconut sugar.

  18. The effect of pH and chloride concentration on the stability and antimicrobial activity of chlorine-based sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian W; Hung, Yen-Con

    2014-04-01

    Chlorinated water and electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water solutions were made to compare the free chlorine stability and microbicidal efficacy of chlorine-containing solutions with different properties. Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was greatest in fresh samples (approximately 9.0 log CFU/mL reduction). Chlorine loss in "aged" samples (samples left in open bottles) was greatest (approximately 40 mg/L free chlorine loss in 24 h) in low pH (approximately 2.5) and high chloride (Cl(-) ) concentrations (greater than 150 mg/L). Reduction of E. coli O157:H7 was also negatively impacted (pH and high Cl(-) . Higher pH values (approximately 6.0) did not appear to have a significant effect on free chlorine loss or numbers of surviving microbial cells when fresh and aged samples were compared. This study found chloride levels in the chlorinated and EO water solutions had a reduced effect on both free chlorine stability and its microbicidal efficacy in the low pH solutions. Greater concentrations of chloride in pH 2.5 samples resulted in decreased free chlorine stability and lower microbicidal efficacy. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Effects of system net charge and electrostatic truncation on all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-01-01

    Constant pH molecular dynamics offers a means to rigorously study the effects of solution pH on dynamical processes. Here we address two critical questions arising from the most recent developments of the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method: 1) What is the effect of spatial electrostatic truncation on the sampling of protonation states? 2) Is the enforcement of electrical neutrality necessary for constant pH simulations? We first examined how the generalized reaction field and force shifting schemes modify the electrostatic forces on the titration coordinates. Free energy simulations of model compounds were then carried out to delineate the errors in the deprotonation free energy and salt-bridge stability due to electrostatic truncation and system net charge. Finally, CpHMD titration of a mini-protein HP36 was used to understand the manifestation of the two types of errors in the calculated pK a values. The major finding is that enforcing charge neutrality under all pH conditions and at all time via co-titrating ions significantly improves the accuracy of protonation-state sampling. We suggest that such finding is also relevant for simulations with particle-mesh Ewald, considering the known artifacts due to charge-compensating background plasma. PMID:25142416

  20. Effects of system net charge and electrostatic truncation on all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Jana K

    2014-10-15

    Constant pH molecular dynamics offers a means to rigorously study the effects of solution pH on dynamical processes. Here, we address two critical questions arising from the most recent developments of the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method: (1) What is the effect of spatial electrostatic truncation on the sampling of protonation states? (2) Is the enforcement of electrical neutrality necessary for constant pH simulations? We first examined how the generalized reaction field and force-shifting schemes modify the electrostatic forces on the titration coordinates. Free energy simulations of model compounds were then carried out to delineate the errors in the deprotonation free energy and salt-bridge stability due to electrostatic truncation and system net charge. Finally, CpHMD titration of a mini-protein HP36 was used to understand the manifestation of the two types of errors in the calculated pK(a) values. The major finding is that enforcing charge neutrality under all pH conditions and at all time via cotitrating ions significantly improves the accuracy of protonation-state sampling. We suggest that such finding is also relevant for simulations with particle mesh Ewald, considering the known artifacts due to charge-compensating background plasma. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. EFFECT OF ADDING THE INTERNAL STANDARD TO BLOOD SAMPLES, PRIOR TO THE PREPARATION OF BLOOD SPOTS FOR ACYLCARNITINE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, José Henry; Pourfarzam, Morteza

    2010-01-01

    Background: some general factors can influence when determining acylcarnitines through tandem mass spectrometry. Objective: to study the effect of adding the internal standard to blood samples before the preparation of filter paper cards compared with the addition of internal standard after having the filter paper cards prepared for determining acylcarnitines in blood for tandem mass spectrometry. Methodology: two groups of blood samples were prepared: group one without adding internal standa...

  2. Control of red cell volume and pH in trout: Effects of isoproterenol, transport inhibitors, and extracellular pH in bicarbonate/carbon dioxide-buffered media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NIKINMAA, M; STEFFENSEN, JF; TUFTS, BL

    1987-01-01

    The effects of extracellular pH and beta-adrenergic stimula-tion on the volume and pH of rainbow. trout red cells were studied in HCO3-/ CO2 butfered media. A decrease in extracellular pH caused an increase in red cell volume and a decrease in intracellular pH. The pH-induced changes in cell volume......, and that the Na+/H+ exchanger is not activated by changes in intracellular pH alone. The adrenergic drug, isoproterenol, promoted cell swelling and proton extrusion even in the presence of 10 mM HCO3-, showing that the adrenergic response plays a significant role in the control of cytoplasmic pH. These responses...... were enhanced by a decrease in extracellular pH, showing that the adrenergic response is of benefit to stressed animals. DIDS markedly enhanced the effect of isoproterenol on the pHi, but abolished the increase in red cell volume. The effects of furosemide were similar to those of DIDS, suggesting...

  3. Effectiveness of the Stewart Method in the Evaluation of Blood Gas Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezer, Mustafa; Bulucu, Fatih; Ozturk, Kadir; Kilic, Selim; Kaldirim, Umit; Eyi, Yusuf Emrah

    2015-03-01

    In 1981, Peter A. Stewart published a paper describing his concept for employing Strong Ion Difference. In this study we compared the HCO3 levels and Anion Gap (AG) calculated using the classic method and the Stewart method. Four hundred nine (409) arterial blood gases of 90 patients were collected retrospectively. Some were obtained from the same patients in different times and conditions. All blood samples were evaluated using the same device (ABL 800 Blood Gas Analyzer). HCO3 level and AG were calculated using the Stewart method via the website AcidBase.org. HCO3 levels, AG and strong ion difference (SID) were calculated using the Stewart method, incorporating the parameters of age, serum lactate, glucose, sodium, and pH, etc. According to classic method, the levels of HCO3 and AG were 22.4±7.2 mEq/L and 20.1±4.1 mEq/L respectively. According to Stewart method, the levels of HCO3 and AG were 22.6±7.4 and 19.9±4.5 mEq/L respectively. There was strong correlation between the classic method and the Stewart method for calculating HCO3 and AG. The Stewart method may be more effective in the evaluation of complex metabolic acidosis.

  4. Effects of pH values on the properties of buffalo and cow butter-based low-fat spreads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeldaiem, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of pH values (5, 5.5, 6, 6.5 and 7 on the properties of buffalo and cow butter-based low-fat spreads. Sensory evaluation of the samples decreased with an increase in pH values and during the storage periods. In addition, phase separation occurred with pH 6, 6.5 and 7. The differences in peroxide values and oil stability index among the samples compared to the control samples were slight, while peroxide values and oil stability index decreased during the storage periods. Changes in fatty acid composition among the pH treatments and during the storage periods were detected. Differences in solid fat contents among pH treatments separately and during the storage periods were negligible. A decline in the hardness and viscosity of the samples were accompanied by an increase in pH values, and the treatments had increased effects during the storage periods. Generally, an increase of pH values did not affect the melting profiles of the spreads. Additionally, changes between the melting profiles of buffalo and cow butter-based low-fat spreads were detected.El objetivo fue determinar los efectos del pH (5, 5.5, 6, 6.5 y 7 en las propiedades de mantequillas para untar bajas en grasa de búfalos y vacas. La puntuación sensorial de las muestras disminuyó con el aumento del pH y durante los períodos de almacenamiento, además, la separación de fases se produjo con pH de 6, 6,5 y 7. Se observaron diferencias en los valores de peróxido e índice de estabilidad de la grasa de las muestras en comparación con las muestras control, mientras que los valores de peróxido incrementaron, el índice de estabilidad de la grasa disminuyó durante los períodos de almacenamiento. Se observan cambios en la composición de ácidos grasos entre los tratamientos de pH y durante los períodos de almacenamiento. Las diferencias en el contenido de grasa sólida entre los tratamientos de pH por separado y durante los

  5. Effects of blood collection conditions on ovarian cancer serum markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Thorpe

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating diagnostic and early detection biomarkers requires comparing serum protein concentrations among biosamples ascertained from subjects with and without cancer. Efforts are generally made to standardize blood processing and storage conditions for cases and controls, but blood sample collection conditions cannot be completely controlled. For example, blood samples from cases are often obtained from persons aware of their diagnoses, and collected after fasting or in surgery, whereas blood samples from some controls may be obtained in different conditions, such as a clinic visit. By measuring the effects of differences in collection conditions on three different markers, we investigated the potential of these effects to bias validation studies.We analyzed serum concentrations of three previously studied putative ovarian cancer serum biomarkers-CA 125, Prolactin and MIF-in healthy women, women with ovarian cancer undergoing gynecologic surgery, women undergoing surgery for benign ovary pathology, and women undergoing surgery with pathologically normal ovaries. For women undergoing surgery, a blood sample was collected either in the clinic 1 to 39 days prior to surgery, or on the day of surgery after anesthesia was administered but prior to the surgical procedure, or both. We found that one marker, prolactin, was dramatically affected by collection conditions, while CA 125 and MIF were unaffected. Prolactin levels were not different between case and control groups after accounting for the conditions of sample collection, suggesting that sample ascertainment could explain some or all of the previously reported results about its potential as a biomarker for ovarian cancer.Biomarker validation studies should use standardized collection conditions, use multiple control groups, and/or collect samples from cases prior to influence of diagnosis whenever feasible to detect and correct for potential biases associated with sample collection.

  6. Binding of chloroquine to ionic micelles: Effect of pH and micellar surface charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Santos, Marcela de, E-mail: marcelafarmausp77@gmail.com [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida do Café, s/n, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-903 (Brazil); Perpétua Freire de Morais Del Lama, Maria, E-mail: mpemdel@fcfrp.usp.br [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida do Café, s/n, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-903 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Departamento de Química Analítica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Cidade Universitária Zeferino Vaz, s/n, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-970 (Brazil); Siuiti Ito, Amando, E-mail: amandosi@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes, 3900, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil); and others

    2014-03-15

    The pharmacological action of chloroquine relies on its ability to cross biological membranes in order to accumulate inside lysosomes. The present work aimed at understanding the basis for the interaction between different chloroquine species and ionic micelles of opposite charges, the latter used as a simple membrane model. The sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence of chloroquine to changes in its local environment was used to probe its interaction with cetyltrimethylammonium micelles presenting bromide (CTAB) and sulfate (CTAS) as counterions, in addition to dodecyl sulfate micelles bearing sodium (SDS) and tetramethylammonium (TMADS) counterions. Counterion exchange was shown to have little effect on drug–micelle interaction. Chloroquine first dissociation constant (pKa{sub 1}) shifted to opposite directions when anionic and cationic micelles were compared. Chloroquine binding constants (K{sub b}) revealed that electrostatic forces mediate charged drug–micelle association, whereas hydrophobic interactions allowed neutral chloroquine to associate with anionic and cationic micelles. Fluorescence quenching studies indicated that monoprotonated chloroquine is inserted deeper into the micelle surface of anionic micelles than its neutral form, the latter being less exposed to the aqueous phase when associated with cationic over anionic assemblies. The findings provide further evidence that chloroquine–micelle interaction is driven by a tight interplay between the drug form and the micellar surface charge, which can have a major effect on the drug biological activity. -- Highlights: • Chloroquine (CQ) pKa{sub 1} increased for SDS micelles and decreased for CTAB micelles. • CQ is solubilized to the surface of both CTAB and SDS micelles. • Monoprotonated CQ is buried deeper into SDS micelles than neutral CQ. • Neutral CQ is less exposed to aqueous phase in CTAB over SDS micelles. • Local pH and micellar surface charge mediate interaction of CQ with

  7. Effects of water pH on gamete activation, embryonic development, and larval normality in Prochilodus lineatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Antônio Sanches

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of breeding water pH on the spermatic motility, artificial fertilization, and initial development of offspring in curimba, Prochilodus lineatus. After hormonal induction, we conducted gamete activation, artificial fertilization, and embryo incubation in water with pH values of 4.43 ± 0.13, 5.82 ± 0.14, 7.37 ± 0.10, 8.21 ± 0.06, and 9.57 ± 0.16. When the water pH was 6.65, spermatic motility was maintained for ?25.21 s (P < 0.05. The highest fertilization rates (P < 0.05 were obtained when the water pH ranged from 5.82 ± 0.14 to 8.21 ± 0.06, and the highest hatching rates (P < 0.05 were observed when the water pH was 7.37 ± 0.10. A water pH of between 7.37 ± 0.10 and 8.21 ± 0.06 resulted in more complete formation of the perivitelline space (P < 0.05; additionally, embryos incubated in alkaline waters produced a higher percentage of normal larvae (P < 0.05, despite increased mortality levels. Our results indicate that the pH of the water used for gamete activation, artificial oocyte fertilization, and incubation of eggs and larvae of P. lineatus should be ~7, in order to promote successful breeding and normal larval production.

  8. Effect of chitosan on the heat stability of whey protein solution as a function of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengtao; Xiao, Qian

    2017-03-01

    Chitosan was reported to interact with proteins through electrostatic interactions. Their interaction was influenced by pH, which was not fully characterized. Further research on the interactions between protein and chitosan at different pH and their influence on the thermal denaturation of proteins is necessary. In this research, the effect of chitosan on the heat stability of whey protein solution at pH 4.0-6.0 was studied. At pH 4.0, a small amount chitosan was able to prevent the heat-induced denaturation and aggregation of whey protein molecules. At higher pH values (5.5 and 6.0), whey proteins complexed with chitosan through electrostatic attraction. The formation of chitosan-whey protein complexes at pH 5.5 improved the heat stability of dispersions and no precipitation could be detected up to 20 days. The dispersion with a medium amount of chitosan (chitosan:whey protein 1:5) produced the most stable particles, which had an average radius of 135 ± 14 nm and a zeta potential value of 36 ± 1 mV. In contrast, at pH 6.0 only the dispersion with a high amount of chitosan (chitosan:whey protein 1:2) showed good shelf stability up to 20 days. It was possible to produce heat-stable whey protein beverages by regulating the interaction between chitosan and whey protein molecules. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Antimony leaching from MSWI bottom ash: modelling of the effect of pH and carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Geert; Van Gerven, Tom; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2012-02-01

    Development of treatment methods to reduce Sb leaching from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash, such as accelerated carbonation, is being complicated by insufficient understanding of Sb geochemistry. The leaching of antimonate (Sb(V)) and antimonite (Sb(III)) in MSWI bottom was studied as a function of pH and degree of carbonation. While total (Sb(V)+Sb(III)) leaching was lowest (1.2 mg kg(-1)) at the natural pH (i.e. 10.6) of uncarbonated bottom ash, HPLC-ICP-MS analysis showed that acidification and carbonation increased Sb(V) leaching, but decreased Sb(III) leaching, probably because Sb(III)(OH)(4)(-) became less stable. PHREEQC geochemical modelling suggested that Sb(V) concentrations approached equilibrium with the romeites, i.e. calcium antimonates, Ca(1.13)Sb(2)(OH)(0.26)·0.74H(2)O at pH=10.6 and Ca[Sb(OH)(6)](2) at pH=8. It is hypothesised that not interaction with ettringite but dissolution of romeite controls antimonate leaching in the pH range 8-11 in MSWI bottom ash, because while Ca is preferentially leached from romeite, the mineral structures containing more Ca at higher pH are less soluble. A model was proposed where acidification and carbonation both lead to lower Ca(2+) and/or hydroxyl concentration, which removes Ca(2+) and hydroxyls from the romeite structure and leads to comparably higher Sb(V) concentration in equilibrium with romeite. Sb solubility depends on pH and Ca(2+) availability in this model, which has implications for bottom ash valorisation and risk assessment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of ethanol on red blood cell rheological behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabai, M; Detterich, J A; Wenby, R B; Toth, K; Meiselman, H J

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of red wine is associated with a decreased risk of several cardiovascular diseases (e.g., coronary artery disease, stroke), but unfortunately literature reports regarding ethanol's effects on hemorheological parameters are not concordant. In the present study, red blood cell (RBC) deformability was tested via laser ektacytometry (LORCA, 0.3-30 Pa) using two approaches: 1) addition of ethanol to whole blood at 0.25%-2% followed by incubation and testing in ethanol-free LORCA medium; 2) addition of ethanol to the LORCA medium at 0.25%-6% then testing untreated native RBC in these media. The effects of ethanol on deformability for oxidatively stressed RBC were investigated as were changes of RBC aggregation (Myrenne Aggregometer) for cells in autologous plasma or 3% 70 kDa dextran. Significant dose-related increases of RBC deformability were observed at 0.25% (p health benefits of moderate wine consumption require further investigation.

  11. Sb(V reactivity with human blood components: redox effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana López

    Full Text Available We assessed the reactivity of Sb(V in human blood. Sb(V reactivity was determined using an HPLC-HG-AFS hyphenated system. Sb(V was partially reduced to Sb(III in blood incubation experiments; however, Sb(III was a highly unstable species. The addition of 0.1 mol L(-1 EDTA prevented Sb(III oxidation, thus enabling the detection of the reduction of Sb(V to Sb(III. The transformation of Sb(V to Sb(III in human whole blood was assessed because the reduction of Sb(V in human blood may likely generate redox side effects. Our results indicate that glutathione was the reducing agent in this reaction and that Sb(V significantly decreased the GSH/GSSG ratio from 0.32 ± 0.09 to 0.07 ± 0.03. Moreover, the presence of 200 ng mL(-1 of Sb(V increased the activity of superoxide dismutase from 4.4 ± 0.1 to 7.0 ± 0.4 U mL(-1 and decreased the activity of glutathione peroxidase from 62 ± 1 to 34 ± 2 nmol min(-1 mL(-1.

  12. Effect of environmental and cultural conditions on medium pH and explant growth performance of Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii) shoot cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Bates, Rick; Carlson, John

    2015-01-01

    The medium pH level of plant tissue cultures has been shown to be essential to many aspects of explant development and growth. Sensitivity or tolerance of medium pH change in vitro varies according to specific requirements of individual species. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine medium pH change over time in storage conditions and with presence of explants, 2) evaluate the effects of medium pH change on explant growth performance and 3) assess the effects of adding a pH stabili...

  13. pH effects of the addition of three biochars to acidic Indonesian mineral soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, V; Alling, V; Nurida, N L

    2015-01-01

    of increasing amounts (0–30%; weight:weight) of three types of field-produced BCs (from cacao (Theobroma cacao. L.) shell, oil palm (Elaeis guineensis. Jacq.) shell and rice (Oryza sativa. L.) husk) on soil pH and CEC. Soils were sampled from croplands at Java, Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia. All BCs caused...... a significant increase in mean soil pH with a stronger response and a greater maximum increase for the cacao shell BC addition, due to a greater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and larger amounts of extractable base cations. At 1% BC addition, corresponding to about 30 tons ha−1, the estimated increase in soil...... pH from the initial mean pH of 4.7 was about 0.5 units for the cacao shell BC, whereas this was only 0.05 and 0.04 units for the oil palm shell and rice husk BC, respectively. Besides depending on BC type, the increase in soil pH upon the addition of each of the three BCs was mainly dependent...

  14. Effect of the pH on the radiocesium adsorption in tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, Mario Lucio; Boaretto, Antonio E.; Moniz, Antonio C; Smolders, Erik E. T.

    2002-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate that the pH dependent charges are specific change sites for radiocesium. Clay minerals occurrence in superficial samples of eight tropical soils was analyzed by X-Ray diffractometry. The variation of superficial charge of these soils were quantify by potentiometric titration in a range from 3 to 8 pH values. The results of radiocesium interception potential showed the presence of specific sites of adsorption of this radionuclide for all the soils. The variation of radiocesium adsorption for all soils was quantified in a pH defined range. The increase on the pH values caused increase on the radiocesium adsorption by the soils and a consequent decrease in the radiocesium activity in the equilibrium solution. The soil with predominance of the 2:1 clay minerals showed higher radiocesium adsorption than the soils with 1:1 clay minerals or iron and aluminum oxides. The increase on the negative charge in consequence of pH increase caused increase on radiocesium adsorption. The correction of soil acidity with lime by increasing the specific sites charge for radiocesium and decreasing the radionuclide activity in soil solution may cause decrease on the transference of radiocesium from soil to plant. (author)

  15. Effect of Solution pH on the Adsorption of Paracetamol on Chemically Modified Activated Carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Bernal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Paracetamol adsorption in acidic, neutral and basic media on three activated carbons with different chemistry surfaces was studied. A granular activated carbon (GAC was prepared from coconut shell; starting from this sample, an oxidized activated carbon (GACo was obtained by treating the GAC with a boiling solution of 6 M nitric acid, so to generate a greater number of oxygenated surface groups. In addition, a reduced activated carbon (GACr was obtained by heating the GAC at 1173 K, to remove the oxygenated surface groups. Paracetamol adsorption was higher for GACr due to the lower presence of oxygenated surface functional groups. Moreover, adsorption was highest at neutral pH. The magnitude of the interactions between paracetamol molecules and activated carbons was studied by measuring the immersion enthalpies of activated carbons in solution of paracetamol at different concentrations and pH values and by calculating the interaction enthalpy. The highest value was obtained for GACr in a paracetamol solution of 1000 mg L−1 at pH 7, confirming that paracetamol adsorption is favoured on basic activated carbons at pH values near to neutrality. Finally, the Gibbs energy changes confirmed the latter result, allowing explaining the different magnitudes of the interactions between paracetamol and activated carbons, as a function of solution pH.

  16. pH Memory Effects of Tunable Block Copolymer Photonic Gels and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youngjong; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2007-03-01

    Materials with hysteresis, showing a bistable state to the external stimuli, have been widely investigated due to their potential applications. For example, they could be used as memory devices or optical switches when they have magnetic or optical hysteresis response to the external stimuli. Here we report pH tunable photonic gels which are spontaneously assembled from block copolymers. The general idea of this research is based on the selective swelling of block copolymer lamellar mesogels, where the solubility of one block is responsive to the change of pH. In this system, the domain spacing of the lamellar is varied with the extent of swelling. As a model system, we used protonated polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinly pyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) block copolymers forming lamellar structures. The photonic gel films prepared from protonated PS-b-P2VP show a strong reflectance in aqueous solution and the band position was varied with pH. Interestingly, a very strong optical hysteresis was observed while the reflection band of photonic gels was tuned by changing pH. We anticipate that pH tunable photonic gels with hysteresis can be applicable to novel applications such as a component of memory devices, photonic switches or drug delivery vehicles.

  17. Predicting bifurcation angle effect on blood flow in the microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiho; Pak, Y Eugene; Lee, Tae-Rin

    2016-11-01

    Since blood viscosity is a basic parameter for understanding hemodynamics in human physiology, great amount of research has been done in order to accurately predict this highly non-Newtonian flow property. However, previous works lacked in consideration of hemodynamic changes induced by heterogeneous vessel networks. In this paper, the effect of bifurcation on hemodynamics in a microvasculature is quantitatively predicted. The flow resistance in a single bifurcation microvessel was calculated by combining a new simple mathematical model with 3-dimensional flow simulation for varying bifurcation angles under physiological flow conditions. Interestingly, the results indicate that flow resistance induced by vessel bifurcation holds a constant value of approximately 0.44 over the whole single bifurcation model below diameter of 60μm regardless of geometric parameters including bifurcation angle. Flow solutions computed from this new model showed substantial decrement in flow velocity relative to other mathematical models, which do not include vessel bifurcation effects, while pressure remained the same. Furthermore, when applying the bifurcation angle effect to the entire microvascular network, the simulation results gave better agreements with recent in vivo experimental measurements. This finding suggests a new paradigm in microvascular blood flow properties, that vessel bifurcation itself, regardless of its angle, holds considerable influence on blood viscosity, and this phenomenon will help to develop new predictive tools in microvascular research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of urinary pH and nicotine excretion rate on plasma nicotine during cigarette smoking and chewing nicotine gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, C.; Russell, M. A. H.

    1978-01-01

    1 Plasma nicotine levels produced by chewing nicotine gum were compared with those obtained by cigarette smoking under conditions of controlled urinary pH. 2 Although absorption was slower, plasma levels comparable to cigarette smoking were built up on 4 mg (but not 2 mg) nicotine gum. 3 Urinary excretion of nicotine was influenced markedly by pH and the rate of urine flow. 4 Plasma nicotine was higher under alkaline compared to acidic conditions (P < 0.001) but the rate of urinary nicotine excretion appeared to have little effect on the plasma level.

  19. Effect of pH 5 enzyme from liver on the protein synthesis by mammary gland subcellular fractions in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jaspal; Singh, Ajit; Ganguli, N.C.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of pH 5 enzyme fraction of liver on the protein synthesizing activity of the subcellular fractions of the mammary gland has been investigated. Results indicate that (1) lactating liver pH 5 enzyme stimulates protein synthesis which is enhanced by the addition of ATP-generating system and (2) the enzyme fractions from the non-lactating liver inhibits the protein synthesis by mammary fractions, but in some cases like mitochondrial and supernatant fractions of mammary it elevates the synthesis when supplemented with ATP-generating system. Chlorella protein hydrolysate- 14 C was used as a tracer and rabits were used as experimental animals. (M.G.B.)

  20. Gammaradiation effect on spectral properties of oxyhemoglobin solutions of different pH in the presence of serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artyukhov, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    Changes in spectral properties of oxyhemoglobin solutions (pH 3 to 12) of mice exposed to gammaradiation (6000R) in the presence of serotonin have been studied. It was established that serotonin (5x10 -5 M) exerts a radioprotective effect in respect of oxyhemoglobin solutions of pH 5 to 9. Serotonin fails to protect protein in the presence of catalase (1x10 -6 M). It is stated that the process of formation of hydrogen peroxide/serotonin complex appreciably contributes to the protective action of the radioprotective agent in respect of gammairradiated oxyhemoglobin solutions

  1. Extracting Tenebrio molitor protein while preventing browning: effect of pH and NaCl on protein yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, L.; Boekel, van T.; Lakemond, C.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    The potential of insects as an alternative protein source for food applications was investigated by studying the effect of pH and NaCl on extraction yield of water-soluble proteins from Tenebrio molitor, while preventing browning due to polyphenol oxidation. Minimum protein solubility (29.6%) was at

  2. Effect of pH on the Heat-Induced Denaturation and Renaturation of Green Fluorescent Protein: A Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa V.; Sola, Hilda M.; Torres, Juan C.; Torres, Rafael E.; Guzman, Ernick E.

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence spectroscopy experiment is described where students integrated biochemistry and instrumental analysis, while characterizing the green fluorescent protein excitation and emission spectra in terms of its phenolic and phenolate chromophores. Students studied the combined effect of pH and temperature on the protein's fluorescence,…

  3. Effect of N, P and K humates on dry matter of Zea mays and soil pH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ammonia volatilization from surface-applied urea reduces urea-N use efficiency in crop production and it also pollutes the environment; it is an economic loss. A greenhouse study was conducted to confirm the effect of similar fertilizer formulations (N, P and K humates) on soil pH, exchangeable ammonium, available nitrate ...

  4. Growth limitation of three Arctic sea-ice algae species: effects of salinitty, pH and inorganic carbon availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Hansen, Per Juel; Rysgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The effect of salinity, pH, and dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO(2)) on growth and survival of three Arctic sea ice algal species, two diatoms (Fragilariopsis nana and Fragilariopsis sp.), and one species of chlorophyte (Chlamydomonas sp.) was assessed in controlled laboratory experiments. Our res...

  5. The effect of neutral and acidic oligosaccharides on stool viscosity, stool frequency and stool pH in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerbeek, E. A. M.; Hensgens, R. L.; Mihatsch, W. A.; Boehm, G.; Lafeber, H. N.; van Elburg, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of neutral oligosaccharides [small-chain galacto-oligosaccharides/long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS)] in combination with acidic oligosaccharides (pAOS) on stool viscosity, stool frequency and stool pH in preterm infants. In this explorative RCT, preterm infants

  6. The Effect of Nitrogen Form on pH and Petunia Growth in a WholeTree Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of our research was to investigate the effect of nitrogen form and proportion on peat-lite (PL) and WholeTree (WT) substrate pH and petunia growth. Chipped whole pine trees (consisting of needles, limbs, bark, wood and cones) were obtained from a commercial fuel wood chipping operation...

  7. Effect of Sulfide Removal on Sulfate Reduction at pH 5 in a Hydrogen fed Gas-Lift Bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmans, M.F.M.; Dopson, M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    UNCORRECTED PROOF J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2007), 17(4), ¿ Effect of Sulfide Removal on Sulfate Reduction at pH 5 in a Hydrogen fed Gas-Lift Bioreactor Bijmans, Martijn F. M.1*, Mark Dopson2, Frederick Ennin1, Piet N. L. Lens1, and Cees J. N. Buisman1 1Sub Department of Environmental Technology,

  8. Effective RES blood flow changes in children with homozygous β-thalassemia in relation to blood transfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpathios, T.; Dimitriou, P.; Giamouris, J.; Nicolaidou, P.; Antipas, S.E.; Matsaniotis, N.

    1983-01-01

    Denatured radioiodinated human serum albumin (DHA) clearance studies at a dose of 1 mg/kg body wt., were carried out in 16 thalassemic children, prior to and 7-10 days following blood transfusion, to investigate changes of the effective RES blood flow which might accompany the posttransfusion spleen size diminution. A statistically significant increase (P<0.001) of the DHA plasma clearance rate was observed 7-10 days following blood transfusion denoting an increase of the blood flow to the effective RES while at the same time the spleen diminished in size. It is suggested that changes in the effective RES blood flow in these patients are directly related to changes in the intrasplenic circulatory capacity. (orig.)

  9. The effect of pH on the erosion of dentine and enamel by dietary acids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N X; Hughes, J A; Addy, M

    2001-09-01

    The reported incidence of tooth erosion caused by acidic soft drinks has been increasingly documented. Citric and phosphoric acids are the two main dietary acids present in these soft drinks. Many variables need to be determined in order to assess risk factors for dental erosion caused by beverage consumption including pH, titratable acidity, pKa, buffering capacity, hence the aim of these in vitro investigations. Methodologies included profiling flat enamel and dentine samples (acidic solutions adjusted with alkali over the available pH range; citric, phosphoric and hydrochloric acid were adjusted with sodium hydroxide and citric acid with trisodium citrate. Tissue loss was calculated by profilometry. Results showed that under these conditions citric acid caused far more erosion over the pH range employed than phosphoric acid for both tissue types. Citric acid compared with hydrochloric acid highlighted dissolution and chelation effects. Phosphoric acid caused minimal erosion over pH 3 for enamel and pH 4 for dentine. These factors could be considered in order to reduce the erosivity of acidic soft drinks.

  10. Effect of initial protein concentration and pH on in vitro gastric digestion of heated whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sha; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2014-02-15

    The in vitro digestion of heated whey protein aggregates having different structure and physicochemical properties was evaluated under simulated gastric conditions. Aggregates were formed by heating whey protein isolates (WPI) at 3-9% w/w initial protein concentration and pH 3.0-7.0. Results showed that high protein concentration led to formation of larger WPI aggregates with fewer remaining monomers. Aggregates formed at high protein concentrations showed slower degradation rate compared to those formed at low protein concentration. The effect of initial protein concentration on peptide release pattern was not apparent. Heating pH was a significant factor affecting digestion pattern. At pH above the isoelectric point, the majority of the proteins involved in the aggregation, and aggregates formed at pH 6.0 were more susceptible to pepsin digestion than at pH 7.0. At acidic conditions, only small amount of proteins was involved in the aggregation and heated aggregates were easily digested by pepsin, while the remaining unaggregated proteins were very resistant to gastric digestion. The potential physiological implication of these results on satiety was discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sorption of triclosan onto activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite: effects of pH, ionic strength, and humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Shishir Kumar; Oh, Seok-Young; Park, Hung-Suck

    2010-07-15

    Sorption of triclosan on three sorbents, viz., activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite was studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and humic acid (HA) concentration through controlled batch experiments. Triclosan sorption was found to be higher in the acidic pH range, as varying pH showed significant influence on the surface charge of the sorbents and degree of ionization of the sorbate. Sorption capacity of the sorbents increased with an increase in the ionic strength of solution. At low pH (pH 3), the overall increase in triclosan sorption was 1.2, approximately 4 and 3.5 times, respectively for activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite when ionic strength was increased from 1x10(-3) to 5x10(-1) M. Triclosan sorption onto activated carbon decreased from 31.4 to 10.6 mg g(-1) by increasing the HA concentration to 200 mg C L(-1). However, during sorption onto kaolinite and montmorillonite, the effect of HA was very complex probably due to (i) hydrophobicity (log K(ow)=4.76) of triclosan; and (ii) complexation of HA with triclosan. Though triclosan sorption onto activated carbon is higher, the potential of kaolinite and montmorillonite in controlling the transport of triclosan in subsurface environment can still be appreciable. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effect of pH on Slurry Erosion-Corrosion of Tungsten Carbide Overlays Alloyed with Ru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelwalani, Ndivhuwo B.; van der Merwe, Josias W.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of Ru additions to WC-Fe overlays when exposed to low pH slurry erosion conditions. These overlays were applied through Plasma Transferred Arc, and the original bulk Ru powder concentrations varied from 0.5 to 5 wt.%. A slurry jet impingement erosion-corrosion test rig was used to evaluate wear, and electrochemical measurements were performed to characterize the corrosion properties. The slurry mixtures contained silica sand and synthetic mine water. The pH was varied between 3 and 6.5 for the slurry erosion tests and lowered further for the corrosion characterization. Samples were examined optically and with a scanning electron microscope using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the phases present. For the slurry erosion-corrosion results at the pH of 6.5, addition of Ru did not show a decrease in erosion-corrosion rates. However, when the pH was decreased to 3, by the addition of HCl, Ru improved the resistance. From the electrochemistry, it was also clear that Ru additions improved the corrosion resistance, but more than 1 wt.% Ru was required. At very low pH levels, the presence of Ru was not able to prevent corrosion.

  13. Optimization of food waste hydrolysis in leach bed coupled with methanogenic reactor: effect of pH and bulking agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Su Yun; Lam, Hoi Pui; Karthikeyan, O Parthiba; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2011-02-01

    The effects of pH and bulking agents on hydrolysis/acidogenesis of food waste were studied using leach bed reactor (LBR) coupled with methanogenic up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. The hydrolysis rate under regulated pH (6.0) was studied and compared with unregulated one during initial experiment. Then, the efficacies of five different bulking agents, i.e. plastic full particles, plastic hollow sphere, bottom ash, wood chip and saw dust were experimented under the regulated pH condition. Leachate recirculation with 50% water replacement was practiced throughout the experiment. Results proved that the daily leachate recirculation with pH control (6.0) accelerated the hydrolysis rate (59% higher volatile fatty acids) and methane production (up to 88%) compared to that of control without pH control. Furthermore, bottom ash improved the reactor alkalinity, which internally buffered the system that improved the methane production rate (0.182 l CH(4)/g VS(added)) than other bulking agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of pH on Separation of Solid Content from Paint Contained Wastewater by a Coagulant-flocculant Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Semnani Rahbar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical wastewater treatment is one of the attracting and common methods for wastewater treatment among the currently employed chemical unit processes. The use of coagulant-flocculant compound is one of the efficient methods for separating of paint and recovery of water. In this research, it was introduced and the effect of pH on removal of solid content from solution was studied experimentally. For this purpose, sludge and suspended solid content of the solution were determined in a jar test by measurement of UV absorption of treated solution and solid separation percentage. The results showed that in pH range 9.5-10.5, maximum efficiency of solid content removal was up to 95%. Consequently, maximum paint removal was obtained in this range of pH. The separation of solid content of the solution was due to formation of aluminum hydroxide. As shown by the results, the reduction of potassium hydroxide as pH adjuster caused decrease of pH and consequently decreases of aluminum hydroxide and solid content removal.  

  15. Effect of external pH on the cytoplasmic and vacuolar pHs in Mung bean root-tip cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torimitsu, Keiichi; Yazaki, Yoshiaki; Nagasuka, Kinuyo; Ohta, Eiji; Sakata, Makoto

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the external pH on the intracellular pH in mung bean (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) root-tip cells was investigated with the 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method. The 31 P NMR spectra showed three peaks caused by cytoplasmic G-6-P, cytoplasmic Psub(i) and vacuolar Psub(i). The cytoplasmic and vacuolar pHs could be determined by comparing the Psub(i) chemical shifts with the titration curve. When the external pH was changed over a range from pH 3 to 10, the cytoplasmic pH showed smaller changes than the vacuolar pH, suggesting that the former is regulated more strictly than the latter. The H + -ATPase inhibitor, DCCD, caused the breakdown of the mechanism that regulates the intracellular pH. H + -ATPase appears to have an important part in the regulation of the intracellular pH. (author)

  16. Effects of blood sample handling procedures on measurable inflammatory markers in plasma, serum and dried blood spot samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skogstrand, K.; Thorsen, P.; Vogel, I.

    2008-01-01

    of whole blood samples at low temperatures and rapid isolation of plasma and serum. Effects of different handling procedures for all markers studied are given. DBSS proved to be a robust and convenient way to handle samples for immunoassay analysis of inflammatory markers in whole blood Udgivelsesdato......The interests in monitoring inflammation by immunoassay determination of blood inflammatory markers call for information on the stability of these markers in relation to the handling of blood samples. The increasing use of stored biobank samples for such ventures that may have been collected...... and stored for other purposes, justifies the study hereof. Blood samples were stored for 0, 4, 24, and 48 h at 4 degrees C, room temperature (RT), and at 35 degrees C, respectively, before they were separated into serum or plasma and frozen. Dried blood spot samples (DBSS) were stored for 0, 1, 2, 3, 7...

  17. Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on nitrous oxide production rates in autotrophic partial nitrification granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnayake, Rathnayake M L D; Oshiki, Mamoru; Ishii, Satoshi; Segawa, Takahiro; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH on nitrous oxide (N2O) production rates and pathways in autotrophic partial nitrification (PN) granules were investigated at the granular level. N2O was primarily produced by betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, mainly Nitrosomonas europaea, in the oxic surface layer (production increased with increasing bulk DO concentration owing to activation of the ammonia (i.e., hydroxylamine) oxidation in this layer. The highest N2O emissions were observed at pH 7.5, although the ammonia oxidation rate was unchanged between pH 6.5 and 8.5. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in situ analyses of PN granules are essential to gaining insight into N2O emission mechanisms in a granule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial Production of Xylitol from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Hydrolysate: Effects of Inoculum and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T.A.P. Kresnowati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering its high content of hemicellulose, oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB lignocellulosic biomass waste from palm oil processing has the potential to be utilized as the raw material for the production of xylitol, a low calorie, low GI, and anti cariogenic alternative sugar with similar sweetness to sucrose. This research explored the possibility of converting EFB to xylitol via green microbial fermentation, in particular the effects of inoculum and initial pH on the fermentation performance. It was observed that the cell concentration in the inoculum and the initial pH affect cell growth and xylitol production. pH 5 was observed to give the best fermentation performance. Further, the fermentation tended to yield more xylitol at higher initial cell concentration. It was also observed that no growth or fermentation inhibitory compounds were found in the EFB hydrolysate obtained from enzymatic hydrolysis of EFB. Thus it can be used directly as substrate for xylitol fermentation.

  19. Effects of pH, initial Pb2+ concentration, and polyculture on lead remediation by three duckweed species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Chen, Chunxia; Chen, Lei; Daroch, Maurycy; Cui, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Various geographical duckweed isolates have been developed for phytoremediation of lead. The Pb 2+ removal efficiency of Lemna aequinoctialis, Landoltia punctata, and Spirodela polyrhiza was investigated in monoculture and polyculture at different levels of pH and initial Pb 2+ concentrations. L. aequinoctialis was not sensitive to the tested pH but significantly affected by initial Pb 2+ concentration, whereas synergistic effect of pH and initial Pb 2+ concentration on removal efficiency of L. punctata and S. polyrhiza was found. Although the majority of polycultures showed median removal efficiency as compared to respective monocultures, some of the polycultures achieved higher Pb 2+ removal efficiencies and can promote population to remove Pb 2+ . Besides, the three duckweed strains could be potential candidates for Pb 2+ remediation as compared to previous reports. Conclusively, this study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed phytoremediation.

  20. Effects of blood contamination on resin-resin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksson, Sigurdur O; Pereira, Patricia N R; Swift, Edward J; Heymann, Harald O; Sigurdsson, Asgeir

    2004-02-01

    Incremental placement and curing of resin composites has been recommended. However, this requires longer operating time, and therefore, increased risk of contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination on microtensile bond strengths (microTBS) between resin interfaces and to determine the best decontamination method to re-establish the original resin-resin bond strength. The top surfaces of 64, 4-mm composite blocks (Z-250, Renew, APX, Pertac II) were untreated as the control, or were treated as follows: blood applied and dried on the surface (Treatment 1), blood applied, rinsed, dried (Treatment 2), blood applied, rinsed, and an adhesive applied (Single Bond, One-Step, Clearfil SE, Prompt L-Pop) (Treatment 3). Fresh composite was applied and light-cured in 2-mm increments. After 24 h storage in water, the specimens were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slabs, trimmed to a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2), and loaded to failure at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min using an Instron universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test (pcontamination resulted in resin-resin bond strengths of only 1.0-13.1 MPa. Rinsing raised bond strengths to over 40 MPa for each material. Use of an adhesive further increased bond strengths except for Pertac II. Rinsing blood from contaminated surfaces increases the resin-resin bond strength significantly and the application of an appropriate adhesive increases the bond strength to control levels.

  1. Effect of pH on lead removal from water using tree fern as the sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2005-07-01

    The sorption of lead from water onto an agricultural by-product, tree fern, was examined as a function of pH. The sorption processes were carried out using an agitated and baffled system. Pseudo-second-order kinetic analyses were performed to determine the rate constant of sorption, the equilibrium sorption capacity, and the initial sorption rate. Application of the pseudo-second-order kinetics model produced very high coefficients of determination. Results showed the efficiency of tree fern as a sorbent for lead. The optimum pH for lead removal was between 4 and 7, with pH 4.9 resulting in better lead removal. Ion exchange occurred in the initial reaction period. In addition, a relation between the change in the solution hydrogen ion concentration and equilibrium capacity was developed and is presented.

  2. Effect of Low ph on Carbohydrate Production by a Marine Planktonic Diatom (Chaetoceros muelleri)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, D.C.O.

    2009-01-01

    Rising carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations in the atmosphere due to human activity are causing the surface ocean to become more acidic. Diatoms play a pivotal role in biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem function in the ocean. ph affected the quantum efficiency of photosystem II and carbohydrate metabolism in a planktonic diatom (Chaetoceros muelleri), representative of a widely distributed genus. In batch cultures grown at low ph, the proportion of total carbohydrate stored within the cells decreased and more dissolved carbohydrates were exuded from the cells into the surrounding medium. Changes in productivity and the way in which diatoms allocate carbon into carbohydrates may affect ecosystem function and the efficiency of the biological carbon pump in a low ph ocean.

  3. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Steel: Effect of Formation Temperature and pH of the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Vivekanand; Kain, Vivekanand

    2017-11-01

    The nature of surface oxide formed on carbon steel piping used in nuclear power plants affects flow-accelerated corrosion. In this investigation, carbon steel specimens were oxidized in an autoclave using demineralized water at various temperatures (150-300 °C) and at pH levels (neutral, 9.5). At low temperatures ( 240 °C) as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical impedance measurement followed by Mott-Schottky analysis indicated an increase in defect density with exposure duration at 150 °C at neutral pH but a low and stable defect density in alkaline environment. The defect density of the oxide formed at neutral pH at 150-300 °C was always higher than that formed in alkaline environment as reported in the literature.

  4. The Effect of pH and Time on The Stability of Superparamagnetic Maghemite Nanoparticle Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdin Irwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles have been synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method. The morphology and particle size is characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic characterization using Alternating Gradient Magnetometry (AGM. The stability of the maghemite nanoparticles suspension were studied at different pH and time of storage. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS and Zeta Potential were conducted to determine the stability of the suspensions. TEM observation showed that the particles size is 9.6 nm and have spherical morphology. The particles showed superparamagnetic behavior with saturation magnetization 25.5 emu/g. The suspensions are stable in the acidic condition at pH 4 and alkaline condition at pH 10. The suspensions remain stable after 4 weeks of storage.

  5. Ocean acidification reverses the positive effects of seawater pH fluctuations on growth and photosynthesis of the habitat-forming kelp, Ecklonia radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Damon; Cornwall, Christopher E; Revill, Andrew T; Hurd, Catriona L; Johnson, Craig R

    2016-05-27

    Ocean acidification (OA) is the reduction in seawater pH due to the absorption of human-released CO2 by the world's oceans. The average surface oceanic pH is predicted to decline by 0.4 units by 2100. However, kelp metabolically modifies seawater pH via photosynthesis and respiration in some temperate coastal systems, resulting in daily pH fluctuations of up to ±0.45 units. It is unknown how these fluctuations in pH influence the growth and physiology of the kelp, or how this might change with OA. In laboratory experiments that mimicked the most extreme pH fluctuations measured within beds of the canopy-forming kelp Ecklonia radiata in Tasmania, the growth and photosynthetic rates of juvenile E. radiata were greater under fluctuating pH (8.4 in the day, 7.8 at night) than in static pH treatments (8.4, 8.1, 7.8). However, pH fluctuations had no effect on growth rates and a negative effect on photosynthesis when the mean pH of each treatment was reduced by 0.3 units. Currently, pH fluctuations have a positive effect on E. radiata but this effect could be reversed in the future under OA, which is likely to impact the future ecological dynamics and productivity of habitats dominated by E. radiata.

  6. Effect of pH on cadmium biosorption by coconut copra meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofomaja, Augustine E.; Ho, Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Biosorption of cadmium ion by coconut copra meal, an agricultural waste product was investigated as a function of initial solution pH and initial cadmium concentration. Pseudo-second-order kinetic analyses were performed to determine the rate constant of biosorption, the equilibrium capacity, and initial biosorption rate. Cadmium biosorption by copra meal was found to be dependent on the initial solution pH and initial cadmium concentration. Ion exchange occurred in the initial biosorption period. In addition, mathematical relationships were drawn to relate the change in the solution hydrogen ion concentration with equilibrium biosorption capacity, initial cadmium concentration, and equilibrium biosorption capacity

  7. Effects of pH on the growth and NH4-N uptake of Skeletonema costatum and Nitzschia closterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xingyan; Li, Keqiang; Pang, Kai; Ma, Yunpeng; Wang, Xiulin

    2017-11-30

    Ocean acidification (OA) and eutrophication intensifies in coastal sea under anthropogenic impact. OA coupled with the NH 4 -N source effect in coastal water is likely to affect the planktonic ecosystem. In this work, Skeletonema costatum and Nitzschia closterium were chosen as typical species of diatom in Chinese coastal ecosystems to test the potential effect of OA and NH 4 -N. Results showed that the growth and NH 4 -N uptake of S. costatum and N. closterium were significantly inhibited by pH decline. The maximum uptake rate is higher than the maximum growth rate, implying that NH 4 -N was assimilated faster for S. costatum and N. closterium with decreasing pH. Therefore, the inhibition rate of the growth of the two diatoms by the coupling effect of OA and eutrophication (pH7.45) is higher that than in the coastal sea by the end of the 21st century (pH7.71). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The haemostatic effect of 51Cr-labelled blood platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernson, J.; Aursnes, I.

    1977-01-01

    The haemostatic effect of 51 Cr-labelled platelets was studied in 5 rabbits made thrombocytopenic (35,000/μl blood) by whole body ionizing irradiation. Bleeding times were recorded after standardized cuts on the inner side of the rabbit's ear, a method with an acceptable reproducibility. The animals were then each transfused with concentrates of labelled pletelets from 2 healthy donor rabbits. This increased the platelet counts to about 2 x 10 5 /μl blood. Bleeding time values were markably prolonged before transfusion and became normalized when tested 1 and 4 h after transfusion. In 3 control experiments, where unlabelled platelet rich plasma was transfused to thrombocytopenic recipients, a similar shortening of the bleeding time was observed. It is concluded that 51 Cr-labelled platelets retain haemostatic ability comparable to non-labelled platelets, when circulating in a recipient animal. (author)

  9. Environmental pH, O2 and Capsular Effects on the Geochemical Composition of Statoliths of Embryonic Squid Doryteuthis opalescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O. Navarro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spawning market squid lay embryo capsules on the seafloor of the continental shelf of the California Current System (CCS, where ocean acidification, deoxygenation and intensified upwelling lower the pH and [O2]. Squid statolith geochemistry has been shown to reflect the squid’s environment (e.g., seawater temperature and elemental concentration. We used real-world environmental levels of pH and [O2] observed on squid-embryo beds to test in the laboratory whether or not squid statolith geochemistry reflects environmental pH and [O2]. We asked whether pH and [O2] levels might affect the incorporation of element ratios (B:Ca, Mg:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca, Pb:Ca, U:Ca into squid embryonic statoliths as (1 individual elements and/or (2 multivariate elemental signatures, and consider future applications as proxies for pH and [O2] exposure. Embryo exposure to high and low pH and [O2] alone and together during development over four weeks only moderately affected elemental concentrations of the statoliths, and uranium was an important element driving these differences. Uranium:Ca was eight-times higher in statoliths exposed to low pHT (7.57–7.58 and low [O2] (79–82 µmol·kg−1 than those exposed to higher ambient pHT (7.92–7.94 and [O2] (241–243 µmol·kg−1. In a separate experiment, exposure to low pHT (7.55–7.56 or low [O2] (83–86 µmol·kg−1 yielded elevated U:Ca and Sr:Ca in the low [O2] treatment only. We found capsular effects on multiple elements in statoliths of all treatments. The multivariate elemental signatures of embryonic statoliths were distinct among capsules, but did not reflect environmental factors (pH and/or [O2]. We show that statoliths of squid embryos developing inside capsules have the potential to reflect environmental pH and [O2], but that these “signals” are generated in concert with the physiological effects of the capsules and embryos themselves.

  10. Shifting the pH Profile of Aspergillus niger PhyA Phytase To Match the Stomach pH Enhances Its Effectiveness as an Animal Feed Additive

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Taewan; Mullaney, Edward J.; Porres, Jesus M.; Roneker, Karl R.; Crowe, Sarah; Rice, Sarah; Ko, Taegu; Ullah, Abul H. J.; Daly, Catherine B.; Welch, Ross; Lei, Xin Gen

    2006-01-01

    Environmental pollution by phosphorus from animal waste is a major problem in agriculture because simple-stomached animals, such as swine, poultry, and fish, cannot digest phosphorus (as phytate) present in plant feeds. To alleviate this problem, a phytase from Aspergillus niger PhyA is widely used as a feed additive to hydrolyze phytate-phosphorus. However, it has the lowest relative activity at the pH of the stomach (3.5), where the hydrolysis occurs. Our objective was to shift the pH optim...

  11. Ratiometric pH Imaging with a CoII2 MRI Probe via CEST Effects of Opposing pH Dependences (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-13

    acid-catalyzed proton exchange, respectively. Importantly, the pH calibration curve is independent of the probe concentration and is identical in...in aqueous solutions containing 50 mM HEPES and 100 mM NaCl buffered at various pH values were acquired using D2O in an inner capillary to lock the...ppm using a presaturation pulse applied for 6 s at a power level (B1) of 24 μT. D2O was placed in an inner capillary within the NMR sample tube to lock

  12. Effect of delayed processing on nutrient composition, pH and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish are a nutrient rich food but highly perishable due to its high water activity, protein content, neutral pH and presence of autolytic enzymes. This explains why fresh fish quality deteriorates rapidly if not properly stored after catch such as use of low temperature. The implication is that delayed processing of fresh fish ...

  13. Effect of carbohydrate source and rumen pH on enteric methane from dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Brask, Maike; Lund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to measure the enteric methane emissions in dairy cows fed diets rich in starch or sugar with and without manipulation of rumen pH. The rations were based on grass-clover silage supplemented with either wheat (W), NaOH treated wheat (WNaOH), sugar beet molasses (M...

  14. Effect of pH, temperature and water activity on the inhibition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WiN 7

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Low values of water activity and acid pH were unfavourable for the growth inhibition. ... treatments, such as surface sterilization and high-dose irradiation ..... biological control of grey mould (Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr.) on fresh-.

  15. Effect of elemental sulphur and compost on pH, electrical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... temperature was kept to 25 ± 5°C. Before the experiment, the physicochemical properties of soil and chemical properties of the compost were measured. At eight, 16 and 32 weeks of incubation, compound soil samples were collected from pots, and their pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and phosphorus (P) were measured.

  16. Effect of sewage sludge and synthetic fertilizer on pH, available N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... Key words: Sewage sludge, synthetic fertilizer, pH, N, P, available duration. INTRODUCTION ... nutrient availability of N and P from organic amendments .... likened to 98.8 ton/ha applied in a semi-arid rangeland (Fish, 1995).

  17. Comprehensive study of buffer systems and local pH effects in electromembrane extraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Restan, M. S.; Jensen, H.; Shen, X.; Huang, Ch.; Martinsen, O. G.; Kubáň, Pavel; Gjelstad, A.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 984, SEP (2017), s. 116-123 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09135S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : electromembrane extraction * local pH changes * extraction efficiency Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 4.950, year: 2016

  18. Effect of ph and nutrient starvation on biodegradation of azo dyes by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orange II and Direct Blue 71) by Cellulomonas sp. was investigated. Highest percentage decolourization values of 62.85% and 56.23% were obtained at pH 6.5 for Orange II and Direct Blue 71 respectively. Rate of decolourization decreased with ...

  19. Effect of pH and ionic strength on the bioadhesive properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prosopis gum (PG) extracted from Prosopis africana was investigated for bioadhesive properties as affected by pH and ionic strength. The bioadhesive properties were evaluated using the adhesion of gum dispersion-coated glass beads on the antrum region of the porcine gastrointestinal tract and Lecomte Du Nouy ...

  20. Effects of pH and microbial composition on odour in food waste composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Cecilia; Yu, Dan; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid; Kauppi, Sari; Smårs, Sven; Insam, Heribert; Romantschuk, Martin; Jönsson, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    A major problem for composting plants is odour emission. Slow decomposition during prolonged low-pH conditions is a frequent process problem in food waste composting. The aim was to investigate correlations between low pH, odour and microbial composition during food waste composting. Samples from laboratory composting experiments and two large scale composting plants were analysed for odour by olfactometry, as well as physico-chemical and microbial composition. There was large variation in odour, and samples clustered in two groups, one with low odour and high pH (above 6.5), the other with high odour and low pH (below 6.0). The low-odour samples were significantly drier, had lower nitrate and TVOC concentrations and no detectable organic acids. Samples of both groups were dominated by Bacillales or Actinobacteria, organisms which are often indicative of well-functioning composting processes, but the high-odour group DNA sequences were similar to those of anaerobic or facultatively anaerobic species, not to typical thermophilic composting species. High-odour samples also contained Lactobacteria and Clostridia, known to produce odorous substances. A proposed odour reduction strategy is to rapidly overcome the low pH phase, through high initial aeration rates and the use of additives such as recycled compost. PMID:23122203

  1. Effect of soil pH on sorption of salinomycin in clay and sandy soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Desorption of salinomycin with methanol over a 72 h period was 70% with a phosphate buffer (pH 7). Since the phosphate buffer would mimic, to some extent, the quality of water flowing through field soils containing various salts, it was concluded that salinomycin could pose ...

  2. Effect of pH on the sorption properties of bentonite Kopernica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, M.; Paucova, V.

    2009-01-01

    In this work sorption of strontium-85 on Slovak bentonites was studied. Sorption experiments that were conducted at four different values of pH = 2, 4, 6 and 8 showed that by increasing of pH in the solution an increasing of values of percentage of sorption and of distribution relationships occur. Value approaching 99% was achieved during the sorption of strontium cations from the bentonite deposits Kopernica only at pH = 8. It can be concluded that in addition to the basic mechanism of sorption, which is ion exchange, complex-forming reactions with surface groups of bentonite take place there at higher values. The increase in value attributable to R 'hydrolytic' adsorption, because there is a reaction between Sr(OH) + and OH-groups and H + ion competition is stifled. At pH = 2 in the whole studied range of concentrations low values of sorption percent, distribution ratio and adsorbed amount of strontium were observed. It can be attributed to a significant competitive impact of hydrogen ions and disruption of the structure of bentonite.

  3. The effects of pH on N-methacryloyl glycine primer on bond strength to acid-etched dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, N; Suzuki, K; Asakura, T; Nakai, H; Yasuda, S; Nemoto, K

    1996-07-01

    To develop a more effective adhesive primer, it is imperative to understand the adhesion mechanisms of the resin to the demineralized dentin through a dentin primer. When the bonding agent was directly applied to the dentin etched by 40 wt % phosphoric acid without a primer pretreatment, the bond strength of the resin to the dentin was 5 MPa. Conversely, when the demineralized dentin was pretreated with the N-methacryloyl glycine (NM alpha A) primer solution with a pH value of 1.5, the bond strength increased considerably to 15 MPa. However, the bond strength dropped dramatically from 15 to 3 MPa when the sodium salt of NM alpha A was added, thereby increasing the pH value of the NM alpha A primer solution from 3.2 to 5.0. When the pH value was increased above 3.5 (pKa value), the number of ionized NM alpha A species increased in the solution. As a result, the bond strength of the resin fell to approximately 3 MPa. This result was obtained despite the 5-micron-thick hybrid layer that was created in the subsurface of the intertubular dentin. The number of unionized NM alpha A species increased by lowering the pH value below 3.5. As a result, the NM alpha A primer provided a higher bond strength of the resin to the demineralized dentin. In contrast, when 10 wt % citric acid containing 3 wt % ferric chloride was applied to the dentin, maximum bond strength was obtained when the pH value of the NM alpha A primer solution was 3.5. The pH dependency of the bond strength obtained following 10 wt % citric acid containing 3 wt % ferric chloride etching is different from the results obtained from 40 wt % phosphoric acid etching. This can be attributed to the difference in the characteristics of the demineralized collageous layer.

  4. Effects of feeding on luminal pH and morphology of the gastroesophageal junction of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Scott M; Secor, Stephen M

    2012-10-01

    At the gastroesophageal junction, most vertebrates possess a functional lower esophageal sphincter (LES) which may serve to regulate the passage of liquids and food into the stomach and prevent the reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. Snakes seemingly lack an LES and consume meals large enough to extend anteriorly from the stomach into the esophagus thereby providing the opportunity for the reflux of gastric juices. To explore whether snakes experience or can prevent gastric reflux, we examined post-feeding changes of luminal pH of the distal esophagus and stomach, the fine scale luminal pH profile at the gastroesophageal junction, and the morphology of the gastroesophageal junction for the Burmese python (Python molurus), the African brown house snake (Lamprophis fuliginosus), and the diamondback water snake (Nerodia rhombifer). For each species fasted, there was no distension of the gastroesophageal junction and only modest changes in luminal pH from the distal esophagus into the stomach. Feeding resulted in marked distension and changes in tissue morphology of the gastroesophageal junction. Simultaneously, there was a significant decrease in luminal pH of the distal esophagus for pythons and house snakes, and for all three species a steep gradient in luminal pH decreasing across a 3-cm span from the distal edge of the esophagus into the proximal edge of the stomach. The moderate acidification of the distal most portion of the esophagus for pythons and house snakes suggests that there is some anterior movement of gastric juices across the gastroesophageal junction. Given that this modest reflux of gastric fluid is localized to the most distal region of the esophagus, snakes are apparently able to prevent and protect against acid reflux in the absence of a functional LES. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of acetic acid and arginine on pH elevation and growth of Bacillus licheniformis in an acidified cucumber juice medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenquan; Meng, Xia; Breidt, Frederick; Dean, Lisa L; Arritt, Fletcher M

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus licheniformis has been shown to cause pH elevation in tomato products having an initial pH below 4.6 and metabiotic effects that can lead to the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Because of this, the organism poses a potential risk to acidified vegetable products; however, little is known about the growth and metabolism of this organism in these products. To clarify the mechanisms of pH change and growth of B. licheniformis in vegetable broth under acidic conditions, a cucumber juice medium representative of a noninhibitory vegetable broth was used to monitor changes in pH, cell growth, and catabolism of sugars and amino acids. For initial pH values between pH 4.1 to 6.0, pH changes resulted from both fermentation of sugar (lowering pH) and ammonia production (raising pH). An initial pH elevation occurred, with starting pH values of pH 4.1 to 4.9 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and was apparently mediated by the arginine deiminase reaction of B. licheniformis. This initial pH elevation was prevented if 5 mM or greater acetic acid was present in the brine at the same pH. In laboratory media, under favorable conditions for growth, data indicated that growth of the organism was inhibited at pH 4.6 with protonated acetic acid concentrations of 10 to 20 mM, corresponding to 25 to 50 mM total acetic acid; however, growth inhibition required greater than 300 mM citric acid (10-fold excess of the amount in processed tomato products) products under similar conditions. The data indicate that growth and pH increase by B. licheniformis may be inhibited by the acetic acid present in most commercial acidified vegetable products but not by the citric acid in many tomato products.

  6. The effects of low pH and elevated aluminum on yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farag, A.M.; Woodward, D.F.; Little, E.E.; Steadman, B.; Vertucci, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Although acid deposition is not considered a problem in the western US, surface waters in high elevations and fish inhabiting these waters may be vulnerable to acidification. This study examined the sensitivity of a wester salmonid to acid and aluminum stress. Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri; YSC) were exposed for 7 d during each of four early life stages, or continuously from fertilization to 40 d post-hatch, to decreased pH and elevated Al. The authors monitored survival, growth, whole-body ion content, and behavior of the exposed fish. Sensitivity of early life stages of YSC may be expressed by survival or by survival and sublethal effects. In their study, eggs were the most sensitive life stage of YSC to low pH if survival alone was considered. However, the sublethal effects on growth, tissue ion content, and behavior revealed the alevins and swim-up larvae were more sensitive to reduced pH and increased Al than eggs or eyed embryos. They also observed that survival was significantly decreased if YSC were exposed to pH 6.0 and 50 μg Al per liter continuously from fertilization to 40 d post-hatch

  7. Effect of the presence of dental plaque on oral sugar clearance and salivary pH: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Debapriya; Jain, Deepak; Gulati, Amit; Kolhe, Swapnil J; Baad, Rajendra; Rao, B Sunil

    2012-11-01

    Fermentable carbohydrates and microorganisms in the plaque play a significant role in the pathogenesis of dental caries. Oral clearance of sugars and salivary pH is affected by the presence of plaque. This study was conducted to study the effect of the presence of plaque on the salivary clearance of sucrose and on salivary pH. The study design was of a randomized controlled parallel group clinical trial and included two groups: The control group and plaque group, as follows: Control group--subjects without plaque and plaque group--subjects with plaque. Salivary sucrose determination was done by using the anthrone technique. A digital pH meter estimated the salivary pH. The Student's t test and Mann-Whitney test was employed to compare the intergroup differences. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for analysis. The salivary sucrose clearance time was increased by presence of plaque. The presence of plaque led to increased salivary sucrose concentrations and increased the salivary sucrose clearance time. The dental caries is the dynamic relationship among the dental plaque microbiota, dietary carbohydrates, saliva and cariogenic potential of the dental plaque. Caries occur preferentially in the dentition sites characterized by high exposure to carbohydrate and diminished salivary effect.

  8. The effect of pomegranate mouthrinse on Streptococcus mutans count and salivary pH: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Dilshad; Dilshad, Bahija; Farhan, Mohammed; Ali, Arshiya; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    Herbal mouthwashes have been considered to be a more advantageous option to their chemical counterparts, for a long-time. The use of pomegranate fruit dates from ancient times and reports of its therapeutic abilities have echoed throughout the ages. To evaluate the effect on the salivary pH and the Streptococcus mutans count in healthy subjects before and after pomegranate mouthrinse. Fifty healthy patients were randomly divided into two groups of 25 subjects each. Group A was treated with 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse; while Group B was treated with pomegranate peel extract (PPE) mouthrinse and the saliva samples were collected at three different intervals: Prerinse, after 10 min, and 60 min. The salivary pH was measured using a digital pH meter and the S. mutans count was determined by the commercial system Dentocult SM. The statistical analyses used in this study are Mann-Whitney U-test and t-test. PPE mouthrinse had an inhibitory effect on S. mutans count in adults. There was also an increase in the salivary pH after 10 min of the mouthrinse. PPE mouthrinse may be considered as a potential anticariogenic mouthrinse.

  9. Variation in gastric pH may determine kiwifruit's effect on functional GI disorder: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Bruce; Rush, Elaine; Young, Owen; Winger, Ray

    2014-04-11

    Consumption of kiwifruit is reported to relieve symptoms of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. The effect may be related to the proteases in kiwifruit. This in vitro study aimed to measure protein hydrolysis due to kiwifruit protease under gastric and duodenal conditions. A sequence of experiments incubated meat protein, with and without kiwifruit, with varying concentrations of pepsin and hydrochloric acid, at 37 °C for 60 min over the pH range 1.3-6.2 to simulate gastric digestion. Duodenal digestion was simulated by a further 120 min incubation at pH 6.4. Protein digestion efficiency was determined by comparing Kjeldahl nitrogen in pre- and post-digests. Where acid and pepsin concentrations were optimal for peptic digestion, hydrolysis was 80% effective and addition of kiwifruit made little difference. When pH was increased to 3.1 and pepsin activity reduced, hydrolysis decreased by 75%; addition of kiwifruit to this milieu more than doubled protein hydrolysis. This in vitro study has shown, when gastric pH is elevated, the addition of kiwifruit can double the rate of hydrolysis of meat protein. This novel finding supports the hypothesis that consumption of kiwifruit with a meal can increase the rate of protein hydrolysis, which may explain how kiwifruit relieves functional GI disorder.

  10. Variation in Gastric pH May Determine Kiwifruit’s Effect on Functional GI Disorder: An in Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Donaldson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of kiwifruit is reported to relieve symptoms of functional gastrointestinal (GI disorder. The effect may be related to the proteases in kiwifruit. This in vitro study aimed to measure protein hydrolysis due to kiwifruit protease under gastric and duodenal conditions. A sequence of experiments incubated meat protein, with and without kiwifruit, with varying concentrations of pepsin and hydrochloric acid, at 37 °C for 60 min over the pH range 1.3–6.2 to simulate gastric digestion. Duodenal digestion was simulated by a further 120 min incubation at pH 6.4. Protein digestion efficiency was determined by comparing Kjeldahl nitrogen in pre- and post-digests. Where acid and pepsin concentrations were optimal for peptic digestion, hydrolysis was 80% effective and addition of kiwifruit made little difference. When pH was increased to 3.1 and pepsin activity reduced, hydrolysis decreased by 75%; addition of kiwifruit to this milieu more than doubled protein hydrolysis. This in vitro study has shown, when gastric pH is elevated, the addition of kiwifruit can double the rate of hydrolysis of meat protein. This novel finding supports the hypothesis that consumption of kiwifruit with a meal can increase the rate of protein hydrolysis, which may explain how kiwifruit relieves functional GI disorder.

  11. Acid or N? Disentangling Nutrient- and pH Effects of Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition to Forest Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen deposition can act as both a nutrient and acidifying agent with sometimes synergistic and sometimes contradictory effects on ecosystem processes. However, these two roles are rarely separated. Similarly, deposition patterns of N and S often covary, making it difficult to correctly attribute their respective roles on the biogeochemistry of downwind ecosystems. In 2011, we initiated a N x pH (S) experiment in six mixed hardwood stands (3 primary, 3 secondary) in Central New York designed to separate nutrient and acidifying impacts of N and S deposition. Three treatments included two 50 N ha-1 yr-1 additions in forms intended to raise (NaNO3) or lower ((NH4)2SO4) soil pH as well as elemental S treatment to acidify without N. Five years of treatment shifted surface soil pH in the expected directions. Treatment effects on soil extract DOC correlated with pH, with lower DOC concentration and aromaticity in the acidifying treatments. Foliar litterfall did not vary by stand age or treatment, but N and S treatments enriched litterfall N and S concentrations, respectively. Wood production did not vary significantly by stand age or treatment but trended toward an increase in response to the N additions in both stand ages. The treatments did not affect early stages of litter decomposition, but both N additions and acidification suppressed decomposition in later stages, with largest effects from acidification alone. Soil respiration responses followed those of litter decomposition, except that the response of respiration to the NaNO3 addition depended on the stand's mycorrhizal composition, with greater suppression in stands with a higher fraction of ectomycorrhizal tree species. Together, these results show that both N addition and acidification can suppress decomposition rates, but likely for different reasons that may be linked to plant carbon allocation (for N) and microbial function (pH). Distinguishing these mechanisms will be important for projecting recovery of

  12. EFFECTS OF RAMADAN FASTING ON BLOOD PRESSURE IN NORMOTENSIVE MALES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Fatima; Qazi, Fahd; Pervaiz, Mohammad B; Kella, Danesh K; Mansoor, Maryah; Osmani, Bushra Z; Mir, Fazia; Kadir, Muhammad Masood

    2015-01-01

    Research has been done to investigate the effect of intermittent complete fasting on human physiological parameters but the effect of fasting on blood pressure remains relatively unexplored. Research in animal models suggests a hypotensive effect with an undetermined mechanism. Muslims worldwide fast daily from dawn to dusk throughout the Islamic month of Ramadan. This study was to investigate the proposed hypotensive effect of Ramadan fasting in males over A period of 20 days and to study the relationship of the pattern of blood pressure variation with body mass index change. A repeated measures observational study design was implemented with convenient sampling. Study group included 40 normotensive, non-smoker males with no known comorbidities between the ages of 18-40 who fasted daily in the month of Ramadan. One set of BP readings, each, was taken one week before the start of Ramadan and on the 7th, 14th and 21st day of Ramadan which included pre and post Iftar measurements along with other variables. Data was analysed by repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS. The differences were compared with critical values generated by Tukey's Method. There was a significant drop in systolic BP of 7.61 mmHg before Iftar, 2.72 mm-Hg after Iftar (peffect of Ramadan on diastolic BP (p<0.005), the drop being 3.19 mmHg. The drop in body mass index was significant only before Iftar at 0.3 kg/m2 (p<0.005). Pulse rate showed a significant drop of 7.79 bpm before Iftar and a significant rise of 3.96 bpm (p<0.005). Intermittent fasting causes a drop in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in normotensive males.

  13. Food web analysis reveals effects of pH on mercury bioaccumulation at multiple trophic levels in streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, Timothy D., E-mail: tim.jardine@usask.ca [Canadian Rivers Institute and Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, NB E2L 4L5 (Canada); Kidd, Karen A. [Canadian Rivers Institute and Department of Biology, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, NB E2L 4L5 (Canada); O’ Driscoll, Nelson [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS B4P 2R6 (Canada)

    2013-05-15

    concentrations in the diets of primary consumers and predatory insects in lower pH waters led to lower BMFs, these feeding groups showed insignificant relationships between Hg and pH; thus, altered BMFs associated with dietary concentrations can dampen the effects of environmental conditions on Hg concentrations.

  14. Food web analysis reveals effects of pH on mercury bioaccumulation at multiple trophic levels in streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, Timothy D.; Kidd, Karen A.; O’ Driscoll, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    of primary consumers and predatory insects in lower pH waters led to lower BMFs, these feeding groups showed insignificant relationships between Hg and pH; thus, altered BMFs associated with dietary concentrations can dampen the effects of environmental conditions on Hg concentrations

  15. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complex I and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Lindsay

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS emission is a critical component in the etiolo-gy of ischemic injury. Complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain are considered the primary sources of ROS emission during cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (IR injury. Several factors modulate ischemic ROS emission, such as an increase in extra-matrix Ca2+, a decrease in extra-matrix pH, and a change in substrate utilization. Here we examined the combined effects of these factors on ROS emission from respiratory complex I and III under conditions of simulated IR injury. Guinea pig heart mitochondria were suspended in experimental buffer at a given pH and incubated with or without CaCl2. Mitochondria were then treated with either pyruvate, a complex I substrate, followed by rote-none, a complex I inhibitor, or succinate, a complex II substrate, followed by antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor. H2O2 release rate and matrix volume were compared with and without adding CaCl2 and at pH 7.15, 6.9, or 6.5 with pyruvate + rotenone or succinate + antimycin A to simulate conditions that may occur during in vivo cardiac IR injury. We found a large increase in H2O2 release with high [CaCl2] and pyruvate + rotenone at pH 6.9, but not at pHs 7.15 or 6.5. Large increases in H2O2 release rate also occurred at each pH with high [CaCl2] and succinate + antimycin A, with the highest levels observed at pH 7.15. The increases in H2O2 release were associated with significant mitochondrial swelling, and both H2O2 release and swelling were abolished by cyclosporine A, a desensitizer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. These results indicate that ROS production by complex I and by III is differently affected by buffer pH and Ca2+ loading with mPTP opening. The study sug-gests that changes in the levels of cytosolic Ca2+ and pH during IR alter the relative amounts of ROS produced at mitochondrial respiratory complex I and complex III.

  16. Effect of aerosolized acetylcholine on bronchial blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charan, N B; Carvalho, P; Johnson, S R; Thompson, W H; Lakshminarayan, S

    1998-08-01

    We studied the effects of aerosolized as well as intravenous infusion of acetylcholine on bronchial blood flow in six anesthetized sheep. Intravenous infusion of acetylcholine, at a dose of 2 microg/kg, increased bronchial blood flow from 45 +/- 15 (SE) to 74 +/- 30 ml/min, and vascular conductance increased by 76 +/- 22%. In contrast, aerosolized acetylcholine at doses of 2 and 20 microg/kg decreased bronchial vascular conductance by approximately 10%. At an aerosolized dose of 200 microg/kg, the bronchial vascular conductance increased by approximately 15%, and there was no further increase in conductance when the aerosolized dose was increased to 2,000 microg/kg. Pretreatment of animals with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, partially blocked the vasodilatory effects of intravenous acetylcholine and completely blocked the vasodilatory effects of high-dose aerosolized acetylcholine. These data suggest that aerosolized acetylcholine does not readily penetrate the vascular wall of bronchial circulatory system and, therefore, has minimal vasodilatory effects on the bronchial vasculature.

  17. Effect of Fe, Ni, and Cr on the corrosion behaviour of hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy under different pH conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salim Kaiser

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Fe, Ni and Cr on the corrosion behaviour of hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy was studied. The test of corrosion behaviour at different environmental pH 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13 was performed using conventional gravimetric measurements and complemented by resistivity, optical micrograph, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray analyser (EDX investigations. The highest corrosion rate was observed at pH 13 followed by pH 1, while in the pH range of 3.0 to 11, there is a high protection of surface due to formation of stable surface oxide film. The highest corrosion rate at pH 13 is due to presence of sodium hydroxide in the solution in which the surface oxide film is soluble. At pH 1, however, high corrosion rate can be attributed to dissolution of Al due to the surface attack by aggressive chloride ions. Presence of Fe, Ni and Cr in hyper-eutectic Al-Si automotive alloy has significant effect on the corrosion rate at both environmental pH values. Resistivity of alloy surfaces initially decreases at pH 1 and pH 13 due to formation of thin films. The SEM images of corroded samples immersed in pH 1 solution clearly show pores due to uniform degradation of the alloy. In pH 13 solution, however, the corrosion layer looks more packed and impermeable.

  18. The effect of pH and storage on copper speciation and bacterial growth in complex growth media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Bjerrum, Morten J.; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2009-01-01

    correlation between the free copper concentration and bacterial growth, than for the total copper concentration and growth. Furthermore, it is shown that the initial pH influences the amount of free copper ions in the media and that this has a direct effect on the ability of bacterial cultures to grow......In this paper we examine how the bacterial growth is influenced by the availability of copper ions in complex Mueller Hinton growth media. The data shows that the free copper concentration is seven to eight orders of magnitude lower the total copper concentration and that there seems to be a better....... However, there still remains an effect of pH on bacterial growth which cannot be attributed to the influence of the Cu2+ concentration alone. The study also shows that the sterilization treatment can have some effect on the availability of copper ions in the media over time. Freshly autoclaved and sterile...

  19. Development of a poultice for electrochemical desalination of porous building materials: desalination effect and pH changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, I.

    2013-01-01

    vaults two different techniques are applied: poultices or establishment of climate chambers. Both techniques can result in ion transport away from the valuable surfaces with murals, but satisfying desalination has not been obtained according to conservators from the Danish National Museums mural...... experiment with a traditional poultice significant pH changes and an absence of satisfying high desalination effect was measured. The new idea in the present paper was to introduce a calculated amount of buffer components corresponding to the productions during the electrode processes to a poultice (a solid......) to minimize the adverse effects and to optimize on the effects. The results showed good ability to retain neutral pH values in the substrate which is of major importance when the method should be applied on existing structures. Also the desalination process continued until a very low and harmless salt content...

  20. Ocean acidification and kelp development: Reduced pH has no negative effects on meiospore germination and gametophyte development of Macrocystis pyrifera and Undaria pinnatifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Pablo P; Hurd, Catriona L; Fernández, Pamela A; Roleda, Michael Y

    2017-06-01

    The absorption of anthropogenic CO 2 by the oceans is causing a reduction in the pH of the surface waters termed ocean acidification (OA). This could have substantial effects on marine coastal environments where fleshy (non-calcareous) macroalgae are dominant primary producers and ecosystem engineers. Few OA studies have focused on the early life stages of large macroalgae such as kelps. This study evaluated the effects of seawater pH on the ontogenic development of meiospores of the native kelp Macrocystis pyrifera and the invasive kelp Undaria pinnatifida, in south-eastern New Zealand. Meiospores of both kelps were released into four seawater pH treatments (pH T 7.20, extreme OA predicted for 2300; pH T 7.65, OA predicted for 2100; pH T 8.01, ambient pH; and pH T 8.40, pre-industrial pH) and cultured for 15 d. Meiospore germination, germling growth rate, and gametophyte size and sex ratio were monitored and measured. Exposure to reduced pH T (7.20 and 7.65) had positive effects on germling growth rate and gametophyte size in both M. pyrifera and U. pinnatifida, whereas, higher pH T (8.01 and 8.40) reduced the gametophyte size in both kelps. Sex ratio of gametophytes of both kelps was biased toward females under all pH T treatments, except for U. pinnatifida at pH T 7.65. Germling growth rate under OA was significantly higher in M. pyrifera compared to U. pinnatifida but gametophyte development was equal for both kelps under all seawater pH T treatments, indicating that the microscopic stages of the native M. pyrifera and the invasive U. pinnatifida will respond similarly to OA. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  1. Sucralose sweetener in vivo effects on blood constituents radiolabeling, red blood cell morphology and radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, G.S.; Pereira, M.O.; Benarroz, M.O.; Frydman, J.N.G.; Rocha, V.C.; Pereira, M.J.; Fonseca, A.S.; Medeiros, A.C.; Bernardo-Filho, M.

    2011-01-01

    Effects of sucralose sweetener on blood constituents labelled with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) on red blood cell (RBC) morphology, sodium pertechnetate (Na 99m TcO 4 ) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with 99m Tc ( 99m Tc-DTPA) biodistribution in rats were evaluated. Radiolabeling on blood constituents from Wistar rats was undertaken for determining the activity percentage (%ATI) on blood constituents. RBC morphology was also evaluated. Na 99m TcO 4 and 99m Tc-DTPA biodistribution was used to determine %ATI/g in organs. There was no alteration on RBC blood constituents and morphology %ATI. Sucralose sweetener was capable of altering %ATI/g of the radiopharmaceuticals in different organs. These findings are associated to the sucralose sweetener in specific organs.

  2. Sucralose sweetener in vivo effects on blood constituents radiolabeling, red blood cell morphology and radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, G.S.; Pereira, M.O. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010180 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Benarroz, M.O.; Frydman, J.N.G.; Rocha, V.C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pereira, M.J. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Fisiologia, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto Biomedico, Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas, Rua Frei Caneca, 94, Rio de Janeiro 20211040 (Brazil); Medeiros, A.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010180 Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, M. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, Vila Isabel, 20551030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Coordenadoria de Pesquisa Basica, Praca Cruz Vermelha, 23, 20230130 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Effects of sucralose sweetener on blood constituents labelled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) on red blood cell (RBC) morphology, sodium pertechnetate (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with {sup 99m}Tc ({sup 99m}Tc-DTPA) biodistribution in rats were evaluated. Radiolabeling on blood constituents from Wistar rats was undertaken for determining the activity percentage (%ATI) on blood constituents. RBC morphology was also evaluated. Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} and {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA biodistribution was used to determine %ATI/g in organs. There was no alteration on RBC blood constituents and morphology %ATI. Sucralose sweetener was capable of altering %ATI/g of the radiopharmaceuticals in different organs. These findings are associated to the sucralose sweetener in specific organs.

  3. Aerobic biodegradation of amphoteric amine-oxide-based surfactants: Effect of molecular structure, initial surfactant concentration and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Francisco; Lechuga, Manuela; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    The present study was designed to provide information regarding the effect of the molecular structure of amphoteric amine-oxide-based surfactants and the initial surfactant concentration on their ultimate biodegradation. Moreover, given this parameter's pH-dependence, the effect of pH was also investigated. Three amine-oxide-based surfactants with structural differences in their hydrophobic alkyl chain were tested: Lauramine oxide (AO-R 12 ), Myristamine oxide (AO-R 14 ) and Cocamidopropylamine oxide (AO-Cocoamido). We studied the ultimate biodegradation using the Modified OECD Screening Test at initial surfactant concentrations ranged from 5 to 75 mg L -1 and at pH levels from 5 to 7.4. The results demonstrate that at pH 7.4, amine-oxide-based surfactants are readily biodegradable. In this study, we concluded that ω-oxidation can be assumed to be the main biodegradation pathway of amine-oxides and that differences in the biodegradability between them can be explained by the presence of an amide group in the alkyl chain of AO-Cocoamido; the CN fission of the amide group slows down their mineralization process. In addition, the increase in the concentration of the surfactant from 5 to 75 mg L -1 resulted in an increase in the final biodegradation of AO-R 12 and AO-R 14 . However, in the case of AO-Cocoamido, a clear relationship between the concentration and biodegradation cannot be stated. Conversely, the biodegradability of AO-R 12 and AO-R 14 was considerably lower in an acid condition than at a pH of 7.4, whereas AO-Cocoamido reached similar percentages in acid conditions and at a neutral pH. However, microorganisms required more time to acclimate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of pH on the bioconcentration and toxicity of weak organic electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendal, Cecilie

    to the bioconcentration of ionizing organic compounds showed that this fraction cannot safely be overlooked. The work presented in this thesis suggests that the standard test procedures used to test toxicity and bioconcentration are not sufficient to fully illuminate the ecotoxicity of ionizing organic compounds unless......Many of the compounds in use today have ionizing properties. Investigations have shown that around half of the compounds preregistered for REACH and over 70% of all pharmaceuticals are ionizing organic compounds. These compounds may pose a risk when they are released into the environment....... Ionization, however, complicates the environmental risk assessment of these compounds because the uptake processes of the neutral fraction differ from the processes of the ionized fraction. Acids are increasingly neutral at pH levels below the pKa while bases are increasingly neutral at pH levels above the p...

  5. Control of lead solubility in soil contaminated with lead shot: Effect of soil pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooney, Corinne P.; McLaren, Ronald G.; Condron, Leo M.

    2007-01-01

    An incubation experiment was carried out to assess the rate of oxidation of Pb shot and subsequent transfer of Pb to the soil under a range of soil pH conditions. Lead shot corrosion was rapid, so that soil solution and fine earth ( 3 (CO 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 ), developed in crusts surrounding individual Pb pellets. However, irrespective of pH, Pb 2+ activities in the soil solutions, modelled using WHAM 6, were much lower than would be the case if they were controlled by the solubility of the dominant Pb compounds present in the Pb shot crust material. In contrast, modelling of soil solid-solution phase distribution of Pb, again using WHAM 6, suggested that, at least during the 24 months of the study, soil solution Pb concentrations were more likely to be controlled by sorption of Pb by the soil solid phase. - Sorption processes control Pb 2+ ion activity in soils contaminated with Pb shot

  6. Effect of Fixed Orthodontic Treatment on Salivary Flow, pH and Microbial Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Sepideh; Nouhzadeh Malekshah, Sepideh; Abouei Mehrizi, Ehsan; Ebrahimi Khanghah, Anita; Naseh, Roya; Imani, Mohammad Moslem

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the changes in saliva properties and oral microbial flora in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Two important saliva properties namely the salivary flow rate and pH as well as oral microbial flora were assessed in 30 orthodontic patients before starting fixed orthodontic treatment and after six, 12 and 18 weeks of treatment. Selective media, Sabouraud dextrose agar, Mitis salivarius agar and Rogosa agar were used for isolation of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using Friedman and Dunn's tests. Porthodontic treatment, the total colony counts of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus showed a significant increase. The saliva pH decreased during the orthodontic treatment (Porthodontic treatment causes major changes in the saliva properties. The changes in oral microflora and saliva properties show the importance of caries preventive measures during orthodontic treatment.

  7. The Effects of Dietary Factors on Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Lawrence J

    2017-05-01

    Evidence supports that multiple dietary factors affect blood pressure (BP). Dietary changes that effectively lower BP are weight loss, reduced sodium intake, increased potassium intake, moderation of alcohol intake, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension-style and vegetarian dietary patterns. In view of the increasing levels of BP in children and adults and the continuing epidemic of BP-related cardiovascular and renal diseases, efforts to reduce BP in both nonhypertensive and hypertensive individuals are warranted. The challenge to health care providers, researchers, government officials, and the general public is developing and implementing clinical and public health strategies that lead to sustained dietary changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adsorption of diclofenac onto organoclays: Effects of surfactant and environmental (pH and temperature) conditions

    OpenAIRE

    De Oliveira , Tiago; Guégan , Régis; Thiebault , Thomas; Le Milbeau , Claude; Muller , Fabrice; Teixeira , Vinicius; Giovanela , Marcelo; Boussafir , Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Accepted Manuscript; International audience; Among pharmaceutical products (PPs) recalcitrant to water treatments, diclofenac shows a high toxicity and remains at high concentration in natural aquatic environments. The aim of this study concerns the understanding of the adsorption mechanism of this anionic PP onto two organoclays prepared with two long-alkyl chains cationic surfactants showing different chemical nature for various experimental pH and temperature conditions. The experimental d...

  9. Effect of temperature and pH on ethanol production by a putative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ojes PC2

    2013-02-06

    Feb 6, 2013 ... 2Department of Food Science and Technology, Rivers State University of Science and Technology,. Nkpolu, P.M.B 5080, Port Harcourt, Rivers ... As the world advances more and more in science and .... The amounts of ethanol produced at various temperature levels. pH. 5.0. 4.5. 4.0. 3.5. 3.0. 2.5. 2.0. 1.5.

  10. Effects of pH and Salts on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Pea Starch Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, W S; Patel, D; Han, J H

    2016-07-01

    To identify the significant contribution of intermolecular hydrogen bonds of starch molecules to the film structure formation, pH of film-forming solutions was adjusted and also various salts (NaCl, CaCl2 , CaSO4 , and K2 SO4 ) were mixed into the glycerol-plasticized pea starch film. The film made from pH 7 possessed the highest tensile strength-at-break (2 times) and elastic modulus (4 to 15 times) and the lowest elongation-at-break compared with those of the films made from acid and alkali environments. The pH 7 film also has the highest film density and the lowest total soluble matter. At the level of 0.01 to 0.1 M of CaSO4 and 0.1 M of K2 SO4 in a kilogram of starch, the water solubility of the film increased, while chloride salts slightly lowered the solubility. NaCl and CaSO4 reduced water vapor permeability (WVP), while CaCl2 slightly increased WVP at 0.01 and 0.06 M concentrations, and K2 SO4 significantly increased WVP at 0.03 and 0.15 M. Presence of salts increased tensile strength (5 to 14 times than the control films) and elastic modulus (35 to 180 times) of starch film at 0.01 to 0.03 M of CaSO4 and K2 SO4 . Elongation-at-break increased significantly as salt concentration increases to an optimal level. However, when the concentration exceeded above the optimal level, the E of starch films decreased and showed no significant difference from the control film. Overall, the addition of salts modified physical and mechanical properties of pea starch films more than pH adjustment without any salt addition. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Effect of pH fermentation on production bioethanol from jackfruit seeds (Artocarpus heterophyllus) through separate fermentation hydrolysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, A. R.; Natsir, H.; Rohani, H.; Karim, A.

    2018-03-01

    Bioethanol is one of the alternative energy sourced from natural products containing carbohydrates through hydrolysis and fermentation process. Jackfruit seeds is one of the feedstock that contain high carbohydrate content but less utilized. The aims of this study to determine the effect of pH hydrolysis in the process of production bioethanol from jackfruit seeds (Artocarpus heterophyllus) through separate fermentation hydrolysis (SHF) method. The hydrolysis process uses H2SO4 as a hydrolyzing agent. The fermentation process used Saccharomyces cereviceae as a fermentor with a variation of pH 2,3 4 and 5 for 70 hours. The results showed that glucose content of 75% and pH 3 was the optimum pH of fermentation with the content of bioethanol 57.94%. The fermentation stage has an important role in increasing the levels of glucose and bioethanol in linear. The content of glucose and bioethanol of jackfruit seeds showed a great potential for development as the feedstock in bioethanol production.

  12. Effect of Growth Medium pH of Aeropyrum pernix on Structural Properties and Fluidity of Archaeosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Ota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of pH (6.0; 7.0; 8.0 of the growth medium of Aeropyrum pernix K1 on the structural organization and fluidity of archaeosomes prepared from a polar-lipid methanol fraction (PLMF was investigated using fluorescence anisotropy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. Fluorescence anisotropy of the lipophilic fluorofore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and empirical correlation time of the spin probe methylester of 5-doxylpalmitate revealed gradual changes with increasing temperature for the pH. A similar effect has been observed by using the trimethylammonium-6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, although the temperature changes were much smaller. As the fluorescence steady-state anisotropy and the empirical correlation time obtained directly from the EPR spectra alone did not provide detailed structural information, the EPR spectra were analysed by computer simulation. This analysis showed that the archaeosome membranes are heterogeneous and composed of several regions with different modes of spin-probe motion at temperatures below 70°C. At higher temperatures, these membranes become more homogeneous and can be described by only one spectral component. Both methods indicate that the pH of the growth medium of A. pernix does not significantly influence its average membrane fluidity. These results are in accordance with TLC analysis of isolated lipids, which show no significant differences between PLMF isolated from A. pernix grown in medium with different pH.

  13. Effects of Iodide and Hydrogen Peroxide on Measuring High Temperature pH in Various Lithium Borate Buffer Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae Sik; Yun, Myung Hee; Yeon, Jei Won; Song, Kyu Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In a reactor coolant system of nuclear power plants, the need for reliable high temperature pH electrodes has resulted from interests in the corrosion and corrosion product behaviors of the structural materials in a high temperature coolant system. In developing the electrodes for measuring the high temperature pH of aqueous solutions, it is necessary to note two major problems: the chemical stability of an electrode against other chemical impurities, and an electrode's integrity as the temperature and pressure are varied between operational extremes. Over the past decade Macdonald et al. and Danielson et al. have developed many ceramic membrane pH electrodes based on a yttrium stabilized zirconium oxide. However, there are still many experimental difficulties associated with the problems in obtaining electrochemical information across different pressure boundaries and against many kinds of chemical impurities caused by the radiolysis of water and the leakage of a fuel clad. In the present work, we investigated the effects of the environmental factors on a high temperature pH. The selected environmental factors are as follows: system pressure, and chemical species such as iodide and hydrogen peroxide ions.

  14. Effect of pH and chloride concentration on the removal of hexavalent chromium in a batch electrocoagulation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo, M.G.; Perez-Herranz, V.; Montanes, M.T.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Guinon, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the effect of pH and chloride ions concentration on the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater by batch electrocoagulation using iron plate electrodes has been investigated. The initial solution pH was adjusted with different concentrations of H 2 SO 4 . The presence of chloride ions enhances the anode dissolution due to pitting corrosion. Fe 2+ ions formed during the anode dissolution cause the reduction of Cr(VI) to form Cr(III), which are co-precipitated with Fe 3+ ions at relatively low pH. The reduction degree of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and the solubility of metal hydroxide species (both chromic and iron hydroxides) depend on pH. At higher concentrations of H 2 SO 4 , the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by Fe 2+ ions is preferred, but the coagulation of Fe 3+ and Cr(III) is favoured at the lower H 2 SO 4 concentrations.

  15. Effect of pH and chloride concentration on the removal of hexavalent chromium in a batch electrocoagulation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo, M.G. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Herranz, V., E-mail: vperez@iqn.upv.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montanes, M.T.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Guinon, J.L. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-09-30

    In this work, the effect of pH and chloride ions concentration on the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater by batch electrocoagulation using iron plate electrodes has been investigated. The initial solution pH was adjusted with different concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The presence of chloride ions enhances the anode dissolution due to pitting corrosion. Fe{sup 2+} ions formed during the anode dissolution cause the reduction of Cr(VI) to form Cr(III), which are co-precipitated with Fe{sup 3+} ions at relatively low pH. The reduction degree of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and the solubility of metal hydroxide species (both chromic and iron hydroxides) depend on pH. At higher concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by Fe{sup 2+} ions is preferred, but the coagulation of Fe{sup 3+} and Cr(III) is favoured at the lower H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentrations.

  16. A pilot study comparing the effect of orally administered esomeprazole and omeprazole on gastric fluid pH in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxford, K E; Dart, A J; Perkins, N R; Bell, R; Jeffcott, L B

    2017-11-01

    AIMS To compare the efficacy of an enteric coated esomeprazole paste with an enteric coated omeprazole paste to increase gastric pH after oral administration in horses. METHODS Nine adult Standardbred horses were randomly assigned to three groups, each containing three horses, for a study comprising three phases of 10 days, with an 18-day washout period between each phase. In each phase, three horses received either 0.5 mg/kg esomeprazole, 1 mg/kg omeprazole or a placebo, as an oral paste, once daily for 10 days (Days 0-9). Over the course of study all horses received all three treatments. Gastric fluid samples were collected using a gastroscope on Days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 10, with food and water withheld for 16 hours prior to collection of samples. The pH of all samples was measured immediately after collection. RESULTS Mean pH (3.38; SD 1.75) of the gastric fluid samples in the horses that received the placebo was lower than in the horses that received esomeprazole (6.28; SD 1.75) or omeprazole (6.13; SD 1.75) (phorses receiving esomeprazole and those receiving omeprazole (p=0.56). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Under these study conditions, esomeprazole paste was equally as effective as omeprazole paste in increasing gastric pH in horses. Enteric coated esomeprazole, may be a therapeutic alternative to omeprazole for the prevention of gastric ulcers in horses.

  17. Effect of pH on particles size and gas sensing properties of In_2O_3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, Kanica; Thangaraj, Rengasamy; Singh, Ravi Chand

    2016-01-01

    In this work, indium oxide (In_2O_3) nanoparticles have been synthesized by co-precipitation method and the effect of pH on the structural and sensor response values of In_2O_3 nanoparticles has been reported. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) revealed the formation of cubic phase In_2O_3 nanoparticles. FESEM results indicate the formation of nearly spherical shape In_2O_3 nanoparticles. The band gap energy value changed with change in pH value and found to have highest value at pH 9. Indium oxide nanoparticles thus prepared were deposited as thick films on alumina substrates to act as gas sensors and their sensing response to ethanol vapors and LPG at 50 ppm was investigated at different operating temperatures. It has been observed that all sensors exhibited optimum response at 300°C towards ethanol and at 400°C towards LPG. In_2O_3 nanoparticles prepared at pH 9, being smallest in size as compared to other, exhibit highest sensor response (SR).

  18. Effects of the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) on pH, net oxygen production, and respiration by algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholefield, Ronald J.; Fredricks, Kim T.; Slaght, Karen S.; Seelye, James G.

    1999-01-01

    The lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) has been used in the United States and Canada for more than 35 years to control larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) in tributaries of the Great Lakes. Occasionally, during stream treatments with TFM, nontarget-fish mortality reaches unacceptable levels. These losses could be due to the presence of sensitive fish species, excess TFM, or a combination of factors that influence the toxicity of TFM, such as delays in daily stream reaeration by algae resulting in extended periods of low pH and low dissolved oxygen (DO). We determined the effects of a broad range of TFM concentrations on net DO production and respiration by two species of algae, in two culture media (high alkalinity and low alkalinity). The pH and DO in cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Selenastrum capricornutum were recorded at time zero and again after a 9-h exposure to TFM under either lighted or dark conditions. Algal cultures exposed to TFM concentrations typical of those used to control sea lampreys in streams showed only small changes in pH (<0.1) and small reductions in DO (about 8% in lighted conditions and 11% in dark conditions). Changes in pH and DO of this magnitude probably do not change the efficacy of TFM or cause nontarget fish mortality if algae are the predominant photosynthetic organisms in the stream.

  19. The effect of solution pH and peroxide in the TiO2-induced photocatalysis of chlorinated aniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.; Choy, W.K.; So, T.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorinated anilines are frequently used in the industry as starting materials for chemical synthesis. This type of compounds can end up as pollutants in wastewater. 2-Chloroaniline (2-ClA) was selected irradiating under monochromatic UV light at 300 nm. The reaction rate could be enhanced by introducing low level of H 2 O 2 into the UV/TiO 2 system. Excess H 2 O 2 could not increase the HO· generation but retarded the reaction rate. The pH effect was also investigated in UV/TiO 2 and UV/TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 systems. All the experimental results show that pH is a sensitive parameter to the rate of degradation. Low reaction rate at acidic pH could be accounted by the dark adsorption test which has also proven the photocatalysis of TiO 2 may contribute to a two-step process: (1) 2-ClA pre-adsorbed onto TiO 2 and (2) photoexcitation of TiO 2 . At high pH, rate enhancement could be observed at UV/TiO 2 system because of the increase generation of HO·. However, the introduction of H 2 O 2 slowdown the decay rate at such alkaline medium

  20. Cord blood testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood culture (if an infection is suspected) Blood gases (including oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH levels) Blood ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  1. Harvesting Chlorella vulgaris by natural increase in pH: effect of medium composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Dong Phuong; Frappart, Matthieu; Jaouen, Pascal; Pruvost, Jérémy; Bourseau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris was harvested by autoflocculation resulting from the precipitation of magnesium or calcium compounds induced by a slow increase in pH in the absence of CO2 input. Autoflocculation was tested in two culture media with, respectively, ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) ions as nitrogen source. The culture pH increased because of photosynthesis and CO2 stripping. pH rose to 11 after 8 h in the NO3- medium, but did not exceed 9 in the NH4+ medium. No flocculation took place in any of the media. Autoflocculation tests were repeated in the NO(3-)-based culture medium by progressively increasing the concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ until inorganic compounds precipitated and flocculated microalgae. The minimal concentrations for flocculation were found to be 120 mg Ca2 L(-1) and 1000 mg Mg2+ L(-1). These values were, respectively, 3.5 times and 20 times higher than those allowing flocculation by NaOH addition. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, zeta potential measurement, and ionic chromatography suggest that the mechanisms involved are different. The rate of cell removal was close to 90% in both cases, but cells were more concentrated in the aggregates obtained by magnesium compound precipitation, with an estimated concentration close to 33 g (dry matter) L(-1), against 19 g L(-1) for calcium phosphates.

  2. Effects of particle size and pH value on the hydrophilicity of graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xuebing [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Inorganic Membrane, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, Jingdezhen 333001 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing, 100049 (China); Yu, Yun, E-mail: yunyush@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Hou, Weimin [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing, 100049 (China); Zhou, Jianer [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Membrane, Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, Jingdezhen 333001 (China); Song, Lixin, E-mail: lxsong@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Graphene-based material has attracted extensive attention from both experimental and theoretical scientific communities due to its extraordinary properties. As a derivative of graphene, graphene oxide has also become an attractive material and been investigated widely in many areas since the ease of synthesizing graphene oxide and its solution processability. In this paper, we prepared graphene oxide by the modified Hummers method. The hydrophilicity of graphene oxide with different particle sizes and pH values was characterized with water contact angle. And we find the water contact angle of the different graphene oxides decreases from 61.8° to 11.6°, which indicates graphene oxide has the excellent hydrophilicity. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta potential and dynamic light scattering measurements were taken to study the chemical state of elements and the performances of graphene oxide in this experiment. The results show the hydrophilicity of graphene oxide is sensitive to particle size and pH value, which result in the variations of the ionizable groups of graphene oxide. Our work provides a simple ways to control the hydrophilicity of graphene oxide by adjusting particle size and pH value.

  3. Effect of pH change on the primary uran-mica mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmariovich, E M; Zhil' tsova, I G; Pakul' nis, G V; Shugina, G A [Ministerstvo Geologii SSR, Moscow

    1982-01-01

    Conditions of the formation of ore bodies of hexavalent uranium minerals represented by uranyl vanadates and phosphates which are primary and sedimented from low temperature solutions (carnotite deposits in calcretes and carnotite - autunite deposits in black shale formations) are considered. Thermodynamic curves of the solubility dependence of various uranyl minerals on pH medium in the absence of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ ions and for sulphate-carbonate solutions have been calculated using dissociation constants of corresponding acids and ..delta..G/sup 0/f(298.15) values. It has been ascertained that uranyl mineral compounds according to the dependence of their solubility on ph medium form a distinct series from molybdates through arsenates, phosphates, vanadates and silicates to minerals of uranophane and kasolite group. It is shown that during the formation of infiltration deposits with uranyl mineralization a decisive role is played by the contrast change of pH value of medium caused by the presence of acid geochemical barrier (uranyl molybdates, arsenates, phosphates and vanadates are precipitating) or neutralizing alkaline barriers (uran-mica and uranyl silicates are precipitating) on the path of movement of oxygen metal-bearing solutions.

  4. A Maple Program That Illustrates the Effect of pH on Peptide Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, Charles W.

    1998-11-01

    One topic covered early in an introductory biochemistry course is acid-base chemistry and the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (buffer equation). Using this equation a biochemistry student can determine the partial charges of amino acids in a peptide chain. This is an important concept to master for a student who is learning the structure-function relationship in proteins. The program described in this paper, written for Maple V, release 3 (Waterloo Maple Software, Waterloo, ON, Canada), uses the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation to calculate the partial charges of individual amino acids and the net charge of a peptide over the pH range 0 to 14. The amino acid sequence of a peptide is entered and an animated histogram is displayed illustrating the partial charge of the amino acids over the pH range. A graph showing the net charge of the peptide from pH 0 to 14 is also given. The program has been used with success in an introductory biochemistry course as an in-class demonstration as well as for individual homework assignments. The program is available through the Web page of the Journal of Chemical Education.

  5. Effect of flomoxef on blood coagulation and alcohol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K; Matsubara, T

    1991-01-01

    The effect of flomoxef, a newly developed oxacephem antibiotic with an N-hydroxyethyltetrazolethiol (HTT) side chain, on blood coagulation and alcohol metabolism was compared with that of a series of cephalosporin antibiotics with N-methyltetrazolethiol (NMTT), thiadiazolethiol (TDT) or methylthiadiazolethiol (MTDT) side chains in position 3' of the cephalosporin nucleus known to cause hypoprothrombinemia and bleeding in patients who are malnourished, debilitated and/or of high age. A disulfiram-like effect caused by inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed for NMTT-containing antibiotics. Studies were carried out on healthy volunteers and on rats. Eight-day treatment with 2 g flomoxef i.v. once or twice daily in five and six healthy male volunteers, respectively, did not cause any significant changes in prothrombin time (PT), coagulation factors II, VII, IX or X, in hepaplastin values or fibrinogen levels, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), platelet counts, bleeding time, or collagen- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Inhibition of vitamin K epoxide reductase was observed in rats treated with flomoxef, yet to a much lesser extent than observed for cephalosporins with NMTT, TDT or MTDT side chains. This defect was quickly normalized by vitamin K injection. There were no differences between oxacephem (1-O) and cephem (1-S) compounds with respect to effects on blood clotting and platelet aggregation. Flomoxef and its side chain HTT showed no influence on alcohol metbolism.

  6. Acute effects of copper and lead on some blood parameters on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-18

    Apr 18, 2011 ... various physiological processes in fish, including blood ... and flow-through well water (T= 13°C, pH= 7.1, hardness= 25 mg/l .... 3208 Afr. J. Biotechnol. Figure 2. Erythrocyte shape and size of coruh trout (S. coruhensis) control ...

  7. The Effect of Curcumin on Intracellular pH (pHi), Membrane Hyperpolarization and Sperm Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2014-04-01

    Curcumin has shown to affect sperm motility and function in vitro and fertility in vivo. The molecular mechanism(s) by which curcumin affects sperm motility has not been delineated. Since modulation of intracellular pH (pHi) and plasma membrane polarization is involved in sperm motility, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of curcumin on these sperm (human and murine) parameters. The effect of curcumin on sperm forward motility was examined by counting percentages of forward moving sperm. The effect of curcumin on intracellular pH (pHi) was measured by the fluorescent pH indicator 2,7-bicarboxyethyl-5,6-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM). The effect of curcumin on plasma membrane polarization was examined using the fluorescence sensitive dye bis (1,3-dibarbituric acid)-trimethine oxanol [DiBAC4(3)]. Curcumin caused a concentration-dependent (ppHi) in both human and mouse sperm. Curcumin induced significant (ppHi and membrane polarization that affect sperm forward motility. These exciting findings will have application in deciphering the signal transduction pathway involved in sperm motility and function and in development of a novel non-steroidal contraceptive for infertility.

  8. Effect of pH, buffer concentration and buffer composition on the absorption of theophylline from the small intestine of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaey, C.J. de; Schurgers, N.

    1984-01-01

    The absorption of theophylline from the small intestine of the rat was investigated using buffer solutions of different pH (3.0–9.2), composition and concentration. The technique used, encloses luminal perfusion of an intestinal loop with collection of the blood draining the perfused loop, which

  9. Efeito do pH e da hidrólise tríptica sobre as propriedades emulsionantes da globina bovina The effect of the pH and the tryptic hydrolysis on the emulsifying properties of bovine globin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleia Batista Dias ORNELLAS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available No intuito de estudar o efeito do pH e da ação da tripsina sobre as propriedades emulsionantes da globina bovina, extraída pelo método da acetona acidificada, foram determinados neste trabalho, a capacidade emulsionante (EC, o índice de atividade emulsionante (EAI e a estabilidade da emulsão (ES. Testaram-se os valores de pH de 3,0 a 8,0 e os tempos de hidrólise de 5,0 a 60 min. Os dados obtidos indicam que os maiores valores de EC e ES foram obtidos no pH 5,0 e 6,0, respectivamente, correspondente à faixa de alta solubilidade da proteína. Por outro lado, o EAI, além de apresentar um máximo no pH 3,0, foi igualmente elevado nos valores de pH 7,0 e 8,0, situados na zona onde a globina é praticamente insolúvel. A hidrólise tríptica, nas condições empregadas, contribuiu para melhorar a EC, em toda a faixa de pH estudada, enquanto que para o EAI somente foi benéfico em pH 4,0 e 5,0. No caso da ES, este tratamento enzimático não foi vantajoso, promovendo melhoras apenas no pH 7,0, onde a proteína é insolúvel, e somente após 60 min de hidrólise.The effect of the pH and of the trypsin on the emulsifying properties of bovine globin, extracted by the acidified acetone method, was studied. The emulsifying capacity (EC, the emulsifying activity index (EAI and the emulsion stability (ES were determined at pH varying from 3.0 to 8.0 and employing hydrolysis times from 5 to 60 min. The highest vaules for EC and ES were obtained at pH 5.0 and 6.0, respectively, corresponding to the range of large protein solubility. On the other hand, the EAI was higher at pH 3.0 and also at pH 7.0 and 8.0, where the protein is insoluble. The tryptic hydrolysis produced an increase in EC, in all pH ranges studied, while for the EAI the same effect was observed only in pH 4.0 and 5.0, and for ES at pH 7.0 after 60 min of hydrolysis.

  10. Cost effectiveness of cord blood versus bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bart

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Thomas BartSwiss Blood Stem Cells, Bern, SwitzerlandAbstract: Umbilical cord blood (CB has become, since its first successful use more than two decades ago, an increasingly important source of blood stem cells. In this light, an overview of current usage of CB in the field of unrelated hematopoietic blood stem cell transplantation (HSCT is given. The three main sources of hematopoietic stem cells: bone marrow (BM, peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC, and cord blood (CB are compared as regards their current quantitative usage in HSCT. A cost analysis of the named three hematopoietic blood stem cell (HSC sources, taking into account various factors, is undertaken. The health economical comparison shows significant differences between CB on the one side, and BM and PBSC on the other. The consequences for the public health side and propositions for a possible health care policy, especially regarding future resource allocation towards the different choices for HSCT products, are discussed. An outlook on the possible future usage of BM, PBSC, and CB and its implications on health systems, donor registries, and CB banks is given.Keywords: health economy, cord blood, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  11. L-Cysteine ethyl ester reverses the deleterious effects of morphine on, arterial blood-gas chemistry in tracheotomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, James; Passafaro, Rachael; Baby, Santhosh; Young, Alex P; Bates, James N; Gaston, Benjamin; Lewis, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    This study determined whether the membrane-permeable ventilatory stimulant, L-cysteine ethylester (L-CYSee), reversed the deleterious actions of morphine on arterial blood-gas chemistry in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Morphine (2 mg/kg, i.v.) elicited sustained decreases in arterial blood pH, pO₂ and sO₂, and increases in pCO₂ (all responses indicative of hypoventilation) and alveolar-arterial gradient (indicative of ventilation-perfusion mismatch). Injections of L-CYSee (100 μmol/kg, i.v.) reversed the effects of morphine in tracheotomized rats but were minimally active in non-tracheotomized rats. L-cysteine or L-serine ethylester (100 μmol/kg, i.v.) were without effect. It is evident that L-CYSee can reverse the negative effects of morphine on arterial blood-gas chemistry and alveolar-arterial gradient but that this positive activity is negated by increases in upper-airway resistance. Since L-cysteine and L-serine ethylester were ineffective, it is evident that cell penetrability and the sulfur moiety of L-CYSee are essential for activity. Due to its ready penetrability into the lungs, chest wall muscle and brain, the effects of L-CYSee on morphine-induced changes in arterial blood-gas chemistry are likely to involve both central and peripheral sites of action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Lack of the correlation between biochemical effects on rats and blood carboxyhemoglobin concentrations in various conditions of single acute exposure to carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokal, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between conditions of exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) and biochemical effects was investigated in experiments on rats. The magnitude and the time of biochemical disturbances in the tissues resulting from two different exposures consisting of 1 vol. percent CO for 4 min and 0.4 vol. percent CO for 40 min respectively were compared. In both cases, at the end of exposure the same level of blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) (about 50 percent) was reached. The biochemical determinations in the blood (pH, glucose, lactate, pyruvate) and brain tissue (lactate, pyruvate) were carried out immediately after termination of the exposure and after the time periods of restitution. CO exposure resulted in a decreased blood pH, increased level of blood glucose, as well as that of lactate and pyruvate both in blood and brain tissue. These changes were much more pronounced following the longer-lesser exposure than after the shorter-intense one, although blood concentrations of COHb was the same. The observed phenomenon puts some light on the frequently encountered lack of the correlation between COHb level in blood and severity of CO intoxication in clinical practice.

  13. The Effects of Exercise on Judoists’ Circulating Blood Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Type, intensity and duration of exercises exert pivotal effects on athletes’ immune system and probably athletes’ susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infections. In this study we examined the effects of one session of moderate-intensity exercise on male judoists’ circulating blood neutrophil counts (BNC and respiratory burst, and self-reported upper respiratory clinical infections 24 hours after the exercise and during the sport seasons. Methods: Ten male judoists after obtaining informed consent were included in the study. The athletes took part in a session of moderate-intensity exercise (60 minutes running on a treadmill at 60% of maximum heart rate. Blood samples were drawn at rest immediately after the exercise. Blood neutrophil count and percentage of Phorbol Myristate Acetate (PMA stimulated neutrophils in whole blood were assessed [as a marker of oxidative burst (OB quality]. Athletes were asked about any signs of upper respiratory infections 24 hours after the exercise and during sport seasons. Paired-t test was used for statistical analysis and statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: BNC were in normal range at rest, and meaningfully increased immediately after the exercise (p<0.05. At rest, the OB activity was in normal range, and increased immediately after the exercise (not significant. During 24 hours after the exercise, athletes showed no signs of upper respiratory system infections. Also they mentioned no history of increased susceptibility of upper respiratory infections during sport seasons. Conclusion: Continuous judo exercises have no negative effects on BNC and OB activity. This finding is in accordance with the absence of self-reported upper respiratory infections in judoists during sport seasons. Significant increase in BNC after a session of exercise was a

  14. Effect of temperature, pH and detergents on the antifungal activity of bacterial culture filtrates against Mycosphaerella fijiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilyn Mena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria associated to crops have been studied as potential biocontrol agents. However, few investigations on the interaction Musa spp. - Mycosphaerella fijiensis-Musa associated bacteria have been developed. Consequently, bacterial metabolites involved and the effect on them of physical and chemical factors remain unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effect of temperature, pH and detergents on bacterial culture filtrates with antifungal activity in vitro against Mycosphaerella fijiensis. The pathogen growth inhibition was assessed by absorbance reading at OD 565nm. It was found that the antifungal activity of the bacterial culture filtrates against M. fijiensis, varied in the presence of different values of temperature, pH, and types of detergents and this was related to the bacterial strain. The results suggested the possible protein nature of the metabolites with antifungal activity. Keywords: bacteria, biological control, antifungal metabolites

  15. Effects of buffers and pH on in vitro binding of 67Ga by L1210 leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickson, J.D.; Webb, J.; Gams, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of sodium nitrate and a series of buffers on in vitro 67 Ga binding to L1210 leukemic cells at pH 6.8 +- 0.2 and 37 0 at concentrations of 10 -7 to 10 -2 M has been investigated. The relative ability of these agents to inhibit cellular incorporation of 67 Ga is given. Inhibition probably results from formation of gallium(III) complexes which are either impermeable to the tumor membrane or which compete with intracellular receptor complexes. However, direct interaction of buffers with the cell membrane or with gallium(III) receptors, as well as effects of buffers on cellular metabolism, have not been excluded. A monotonic decrease in the cellular incorporation of 67 Ga occurs between pH 6.2 and 7.8 in the presence of the inert buffer, 10 -2 M morpholinopropane sulfonic acid. (U.S.)

  16. Assessing the effects of seawater temperature and pH on the bioaccumulation of emerging chemical contaminants in marine bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Camacho, Carolina; Barbosa, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Emerging chemical contaminants [e.g. toxic metals speciation, flame retardants (FRs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), among others], that have not been historically recognized as pollutants nor their toxicological hazards, are increasingly more present in the marine environment. Furthermore......, the effects of environmental conditions (e.g. temperature and pH) on bioaccumulation and elimination mechanisms of these emerging contaminants in marine biota have been poorly studied until now. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the effect of warmer seawater...... and Ruditapes philippinarum). Overall, results showed that warming alone or combined with acidification promoted the bioaccumulation of some compounds (i.e. dechloranes 602, 604, TBBPA), but also facilitated the elimination of others (i.e. iAs, TBBPA). Similarly, lower pH also resulted in higher levels...

  17. Effects of Cortical Spreading Depression on Synaptic Activity, Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Piilgaard

    2010-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates I have during my PhD studied the effects of cortical spreading depression (CSD) on synaptic activity, blood flow and oxygen consumption in rat cerebral cortex. This was performed in vivo using an open cranial window approach in anesthetized rats. I applied...... parameters of the whisker/infraorbital nerve etwork (IO) targeting the same cortical area. We tested the hypothesis that the relation between increases in CBF and CMRO2 evoked by stimulation and synaptic activity differed for the two activated networks and that activation of two distinct networks activate...

  18. The effect of ventricular assist devices on cerebral blood flow and blood pressure fractality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellapart, Judith; Fraser, John F; Chan, Gregory S H; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Ainslie, Philip N; Dunster, Kimble R; Barnett, Adrian G; Boots, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Biological signals often exhibit self-similar or fractal scaling characteristics which may reflect intrinsic adaptability to their underlying physiological system. This study analysed fractal dynamics of cerebral blood flow in patients supported with ventricular assist devices (VAD) to ascertain if sustained modifications of blood pressure waveform affect cerebral blood flow fractality. Simultaneous recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity using transcranial Doppler were obtained from five cardiogenic shock patients supported by VAD, five matched control patients and five healthy subjects. Computation of a fractal scaling exponent (α) at the low-frequency time scale by detrended fluctuation analysis showed that cerebral blood flow velocity exhibited 1/f fractal scaling in both patient groups (α = 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.97 ± 0.12, respectively) as well as in the healthy subjects (α = 0.86 ± 0.07). In contrast, fluctuation in blood pressure was similar to non-fractal white noise in both patient groups (α = 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.52 ± 0.09, respectively) but exhibited 1/f scaling in the healthy subjects (α = 0.87 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 compared with the patient groups). The preservation of fractality in cerebral blood flow of VAD patients suggests that normal cardiac pulsation and central perfusion pressure changes are not the integral sources of cerebral blood flow fractality and that intrinsic vascular properties such as cerebral autoregulation may be involved. However, there is a clear difference in the fractal scaling properties of arterial blood pressure between the cardiogenic shock patients and the healthy subjects

  19. [Alpha but not beta-adrenergic stimulation has a positive inotropic effect associated with alkalinization of intracellular pH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambassi, G; Lakatta, E G; Capogrossi, M C

    1991-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that alpha-adrenoceptors also exist in the myocardium and that an increase in force of contraction may be produced by stimulation of these sites. This positive inotropism seems to be dependent either on an increased amount of Ca++ released into the cytosol with each action potential or on increased myofilament responsiveness. In contrast, beta-adrenergic stimulation reduces the sensitivity of the contractile proteins and the positive inotropic effect is due to the activation of L-type calcium channels on the sarcolemma. We used single, isolated, enzymatically dissociated, adult rat ventricular myocytes. Cells were loaded either with the ester derivative of the Ca++ probe Indo-1 or with the intracellular pH probe Snarf-1 and at the same time we measured the contractile parameters and monitored the fluorescence as an index of intracellular calcium concentration or pH value. The single cells (bicarbonate buffer continuously gassed with O2 95%, CO2 5%, Ca++ 1.5 mM, field stimulation 0.5 Hz) were exposed to phenylephrine (50 microM) and nadolol (1 microM). Alpha-adrenergic stimulation increased twitch amplitude (delta ES = 1.93 +/- 0.77, n = 8; p less than 0.05) and showed only a slight increase in Ca++ transient. On the other end, the positive inotropic effect (delta ES = 2.84 +/- 0.86, n = 4; p less than 0.02) obtained with beta-adrenergic stimulation (isoproterenol 50 nM, bicarbonate buffer, Ca++ 0.5 mM, field stimulation 0.2 Hz) was always associated with a large increase in intracellular Ca++ concentration. Isoproterenol did not change intracellular pH (delta pH = 0.006 +/- 0.006, n = 4; NS) while phenylephrine increased it significantly (delta pH = 0.055 +/- 0.011, n = 8; p less than 0.002). Moreover, there was a statistically significant correlation between delta ES and delta pH (R2 = 0.532; p less than 0.05) when phenylephrine was present. This alkalinization as well as the increased contractility was antagonized by treatment with

  20. Negative Effect of Ellagic Acid on Cytosolic pH Regulation and Glycolytic Flux in Human Endometrial Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid N. M. Abdelazeem; Yogesh Singh; Florian Lang; Madhuri S. Salker

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: Key properties of tumor cells include enhanced glycolytic flux with excessive consumption of glucose and formation of lactate. As glycolysis is highly sensitive to cytosolic pH, maintenance of glycolysis requires export of H+ ions, which is in part accomplished by Na+/H+ exchangers, such as NHE1. The carrier is sensitive to oxidative stress. Growth of tumor cells could be suppressed by the polyphenol Ellagic acid, which is found in various fruits and vegetables. An effect of ...

  1. The Effect of pH on Rabbit Septal Cartilage Shape Change: Exploring the Mechanism of Electromechanical Tissue Reshaping

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Wong, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) involves the application of an electrical current to mechanically deformed cartilage to create sustained tissue shape change. Although EMR may evolve to become an inexpensive and reliable way of producing shape change in cartilage during reconstructive surgery, the precise mechanism of EMR is unknown. We aim to examine the isolated effect of protonation (pH) on shape change in cartilage. Methods: Nasal septal cartilages of rabbits were mechanica...

  2. Sorption of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) to an organic soil horizon - Effect of cation composition and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Pereira, Hugo; Ullberg, Malin; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Ahrens, Lutz

    2018-09-01

    Accurate prediction of the sorption of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in soils is essential for environmental risk assessment. We investigated the effect of solution pH and calculated soil organic matter (SOM) net charge on the sorption of 14 PFASs onto an organic soil as a function of pH and added concentrations of Al 3+ , Ca 2+ and Na + . Often, the organic C-normalized partitioning coefficients (K OC ) showed a negative relationship to both pH (Δlog K OC /ΔpH = -0.32 ± 0.11 log units) and the SOM bulk net negative charge (Δlog K OC  = -1.41 ± 0.40 per log unit mol c g -1 ). Moreover, perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) sorbed more strongly than perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) and the PFAS sorption increased with increasing perfluorocarbon chain length with 0.60 and 0.83 log K OC units per CF 2 moiety for C 3 -C 10 PFCAs and C 4 , C 6 , and C 8 PFSAs, respectively. The effects of cation treatment and SOM bulk net charge were evident for many PFASs with low to moderate sorption (C 5 -C 8 PFCAs and C 6 PFSA). However for the most strongly sorbing and most long-chained PFASs (C 9 -C 11 and C 13 PFCAs, C 8 PFSA and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA)), smaller effects of cations were seen, and instead sorption was more strongly related to the pH value. This suggests that the most long-chained PFASs, similar to other hydrophobic organic compounds, are preferentially sorbed to the highly condensed domains of the humin fraction, while shorter-chained PFASs are bound to a larger extent to humic and fulvic acid, where cation effects are significant. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of emulin on blood glucose in type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Milton Joseph; Thompson, Daryl L

    2013-03-01

    Emulin™ is a patented blend of chlorogenic acid, myricetin, and quercetin that has shown efficacy in reducing midday and post-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) area under the curve (AUC) glucose in streptozotocin-treated rats. The purpose of this study was to determine if similar effects would be evident in type 2 diabetic humans. Forty human subjects with confirmed type 2 diabetes (10 each in 4 groups: placebo/no medication, Emulin/no medication, placebo/metformin and Emulin/metformin) were evaluated. At the end of 1 week, fasting blood glucose, 2 h postprandial, actual peak glucose, and AUC (post-50 g OGTT) were determined. The placebo-only group had a large (5%-13%) increase in all parameters. The Emulin group and those on metformin performed similarly with reductions between 1% and 5%, with Emulin slightly outperforming the medication-alone group. The most significant reduction occurred in the Emulin/metformin group, with decreases in the parameters by up to 20%. These results suggest that Emulin, if consumed regularly, could not only have the acute effect of lowering the glycemic impact of foods, but chronically lower background blood glucose levels of type 2 diabetics.

  4. Effects of some organic materials on bicarbonate extractable phosphate content of soils having different pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutullah Özdemir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of rice husk compost (RC, town waste compost (TW and tobacco waste (TB on bicarbonate extractable phosphate content (P in soils having different pH levels under greenhouse conditions. Soil samples used in this study were taken from surfaces (0-20 cm of agricultural fields around Samsun, Northern Anatolia. The experiment was conducted according to split plot design with four doses of organic matterials (0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5, %. After a month of mixing organic matterials into soils, lettuce were grown in the medias. According to the results, RC, TW and TB applications into acidic (Tepecik, neutral (Kampüs and alkaline (Çetinkaya soils increased extractable P content. It was observed that effectiveness of organic matterials changed depend on soil reaction, type and dose of organic matterials. All organic wastes were more effective on increment of bicarbonate extractable phosphate content in neutral soil pH when compared the other soil pH levels.

  5. Effects of carbon, nitrogen and ambient pH on patulin production and related gene expression in Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yuanyuan; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2015-08-03

    Patulin, a potent mycotoxin which can cause serious health concerns, is mainly produced in foods by Penicillium expansum. Environmental factors play important roles in regulating biosynthesis of mycotoxins; however, information about the effects of environmental factors on patulin production and the involved mechanisms in P. expansum is limited. Here, we investigated the effects of different carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) sources, and ambient pH on patulin production in three P. expansum strains T01, M1 and Pe21, and the expression profile of 15 genes involved in patulin biosynthetic pathway. It was found that C and N sources and pH had great influence on patulin production in P. expansum. In general, patulin production of all three P. expansum strains showed similar trends under different C and N sources and pH conditions, though there were some differences in the optimal conditions among these strains. Glucose-containing sugars, complex N sources, and acidic conditions were favorable conditions for patulin production. The results of RT-qPCR showed that the relative expressions of most of the patulin genes were up-regulated under patulin-permissive conditions, indicating that patulin biosynthesis was mainly regulated at transcriptional level by these environmental factors. These findings will provide useful information to better understand the regulation mechanisms of patulin biosynthesis, and be helpful in developing effective means for controlling patulin contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of erythropoietin and its effects on blood lactate and 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate in premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubasi, V; Kremenopoulos, G; Tsantali, C; Savopoulou, P; Mussafiris, C; Dimitriou, M

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHu-EPO) on oxygen affinity and adequate oxygen delivery to the tissues of stable premature infants. 36 very-low-birth-weight infants were randomly assigned to either receive rHu-EPO (200 units/kg every other day) or not, and both groups were supplemented with iron, folic acid and vitamin E. Arterial blood gases, oxygen saturation, complete blood counts, fetal haemoglobin, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and blood lactate were analysed weekly, from the 1st week till discharge. Patients in the two groups were comparable. There was a trend in increasing lactate values towards the 4th to 5th weeks of life, which did not reach statistical significance. There was no correlation between lactate values and the studied variables (pH, BE, oxygen saturation). In 35 transfusions, pre- and 24 h post-transfusion blood lactate status was studied. In 23 of them, a decrease in post-transfusion lactate was noticed, whilst an increased post-transfusion level was shown in 10 cases and no change in 2 cases. The mean pre-transfusion lactate value was significantly higher than the post-transfusion one (24.04 +/- 11.9 mg/dl before and 16.27 +/- 8.5 mg/dl after transfusion; p = 0.0025). In both groups there was a steady rise in 2,3-DPG concentration over the period of study, and the 2,3-DPG values at the end of our study were significantly increased in the rHu-EPO group (rHu-EPO 5.98 +/- 0.9, control 4.84 +/- 0.7; p = 0.04). In conclusion, the use of rHu-EPO did not affect blood lactate levels compared to the control group. Regarding oxygen affinity, it seems that rHu-EPO causes a shift of the oxy-haemoglobin dissociation curve to the right. This is a previously unreported effect of rHu-EPO and its clinical use may, thus, confer to preterm babies an added advantage.

  7. Inhibitors of acid secretion can benefit gastric wound repair independent of luminal pH effects on the site of damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demitrack, Elise S; Aihara, Eitaro; Kenny, Susan; Varro, Andrea; Montrose, Marshall H

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The authors’ goal was to measure pH at the gastric surface (pHo) to understand how acid secretion affects the repair of microscopic injury to the gastric epithelium. Methods Microscopic gastric damage was induced by laser light, during confocal/two-photon imaging of pH-sensitive dyes (Cl-NERF, BCECF) that were superfused over the mucosal surface of the exposed gastric corpus of anaesthetised mice. The progression of repair was measured in parallel with pHo. Experimental conditions included varying pH of luminal superfusates, and using omeprazole (60 mg/kg ip) or famotidine (30 mg/kg ip) to inhibit acid secretion. Results Similar rates of epithelial repair and resting pHo values (~pH 4) were reported in the presence of luminal pH 3 or pH 5. Epithelial repair was unreliable at luminal pH 2 and pHo was lower (2.5±0.2, P pH 3). Epithelial repair was slower at luminal pH 7 and pHo was higher (6.4±0.1, PpH 3 or pH 7, omeprazole reduced maximal damage size and accelerated epithelial repair, although only at pH 3 did omeprazole further increase surface pH above the level caused by imposed damage. At luminal pH 7, famotidine also reduced maximal damage size and accelerated epithelial repair. Neither famotidine nor omeprazole raised plasma gastrin levels during the time course of the experiments. Conclusions Epithelial repair in vivo is affected by luminal pH variation, but the beneficial effects of acutely blocking acid secretion extend beyond simply raising luminal and/or surface pH. PMID:21997560

  8. The effect of pH on the toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles to Folsomia candida in amended field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalewijn-Kool, Pauline L; Ortiz, Maria Diez; Lofts, Stephen; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2013-10-01

    The effect of soil pH on the toxicity of 30 nm ZnO to Folsomia candida was assessed in Dorset field soils with pHCaCl2 adjusted to 4.31, 5.71, and 6.39. To unravel the contribution of particle size and dissolved Zn, 200 nm ZnO and ZnCl2 were tested. Zinc sorption increased with increasing pH, and Freundlich kf values ranged from 98.9 (L/kg)(1/n) to 333 (L/kg)(1/n) for 30 nm ZnO and from 64.3 (L/kg)(1/n) to 187 (L/kg)(1/n) for ZnCl2. No effect of particle size was found on sorption, and little difference was found in toxicity between 30 nm and 200 nm ZnO. The effect on reproduction decreased with increasing pH for all Zn forms, with 28-d median effective concentrations (EC50s) of 553 mg Zn/kg, 1481 mg Zn/kg, and 3233 mg Zn/kg for 30 nm ZnO and 331 mg Zn/kg, 732 mg Zn/kg, and 1174 mg Zn/kg for ZnCl2 at pH 4.31, 5.71, and 6.39, respectively. The EC50s based on porewater Zn concentrations increased with increasing pH for 30 nm ZnO from 4.77 mg Zn/L to 18.5 mg Zn/L, while for ZnCl2 no consistent pH-related trend in EC50s was found (21.0-63.3 mg Zn/L). Porewater calcium levels were 10 times higher in ZnCl2 -spiked soils than in ZnO-spiked soils. The authors' results suggest that the decreased toxicity of ZnCl2 compared with 30 nm ZnO based on porewater concentrations was because of a protective effect of calcium and not a particle effect. © 2013 SETAC.

  9. Effect on osmotic fragility of red blood cells of whole blood submitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... hertz (Hz)], vibration magnitude measured as amplitude. [displacement of the ... the work in the OP and the body position/posture on the platform. ... place through the pressure applied from outside on blood vessels when ...

  10. Microbial communities in low permeability, high pH uranium mine tailings: characterization and potential effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondici, V F; Lawrence, J R; Khan, N H; Hill, J E; Yergeau, E; Wolfaardt, G M; Warner, J; Korber, D R

    2013-06-01

    To describe the diversity and metabolic potential of microbial communities in uranium mine tailings characterized by high pH, high metal concentration and low permeability. To assess microbial diversity and their potential to influence the geochemistry of uranium mine tailings using aerobic and anaerobic culture-based methods, in conjunction with next generation sequencing and clone library sequencing targeting two universal bacterial markers (the 16S rRNA and cpn60 genes). Growth assays revealed that 69% of the 59 distinct culturable isolates evaluated were multiple-metal resistant, with 15% exhibiting dual-metal hypertolerance. There was a moderately positive correlation coefficient (R = 0·43, P tailings depth was shown to influence bacterial community composition, with the difference in the microbial diversity of the upper (0-20 m) and middle (20-40 m) tailings zones being highly significant (P tailings zone being significant (P tailings environment, along with their demonstrated capacity for transforming metal elements, suggests that these organisms have the potential to influence the long-term geochemistry of the tailings. This study is the first investigation of the diversity and functional potential of micro-organisms present in low permeability, high pH uranium mine tailings. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Effect of Fixed Orthodontic Treatment on Salivary Flow, pH and Microbial Count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Arab

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate the changes in saliva properties and oral microbial flora in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment.Materials and Methods: Two important saliva properties namely the salivary flow rate and pH as well as oral microbial flora were assessed in 30 orthodontic patients before starting fixed orthodontic treatment and after six, 12 and 18 weeks of treatment. Selective media, Sabouraud dextrose agar, Mitis salivarius agar and Rogosa agar were used for isolation of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using Friedman and Dunn’s tests. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: After six, 12 and 18 weeks of commencing fixed orthodontic treatment, the total colony counts of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus showed a significant increase. The saliva pH decreased during the orthodontic treatment (P< 0.05 while the salivary flow did not change significantly. Conclusions: Fixed orthodontic treatment causes major changes in the saliva properties. The changes in oral microflora and saliva properties show the importance of caries preventive measures during orthodontic treatment.

  12. Effect of pH on the spontaneous synthesis of palladium nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaorui [Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Ooki, Wataru; Kosaka, Yoshinori R.; Okonogi, Akinori [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Marzun, Galina; Wagener, Philipp; Barcikowski, Stephan [Technical Chemistry I and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 7, D-45141 Essen (Germany); NanoEnergieTechnikZentrum (NETZ), University of Duisburg-Essen, Carl-Benz-Strasse 199, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany); Kondo, Takahiro [Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science (TIMS) & Center for Integrated Research in Fundamental Science and Engineering (CiRfSE), University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, 305-8573 (Japan); Nakamura, Junji, E-mail: nakamura@ims.tsukuba.ac.jp [Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science (TIMS) & Center for Integrated Research in Fundamental Science and Engineering (CiRfSE), University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, 305-8573 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Palladium metal nanoparticles were spontaneously formed on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via a redox reaction in H{sub 2}O. • The amount of Pd deposited on rGO was affected by pH. • The amount of oxygen-containing functional groups in rGO was increased with the deposition of palladium. • The importance of redox potential in spontaneous deposition was demonstrated by an experiment with Zn, Ni, Pt, Pd, etc.. • The spontaneous redox deposition method is facile, environmentally friendly, and needs no external reducing agents. - Abstract: Palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were spontaneously deposited on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) without any external reducing agents. The prepared Pd/rGO composites were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spontaneous deposition occurred because of a redox reaction between the Pd precursor and rGO, which involved reduction of bivalent Pd to metallic Pd{sup 0} and oxidation of the sp{sup 2} carbon of rGO to oxygen-containing functional groups. The amount of Pd deposited on rGO varied with pH, and this was attributed to electrostatic interactions between the Pd precursor and rGO based on the results of zeta potential measurements. The importance of the redox reaction in the spontaneous deposition was demonstrated in the experiment with Zn, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, Pd, and Au.

  13. Zinc(II Adsorption by Low-Carbon Shungite: The Effect of pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel R. Fischer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Shungite is a carbonaceous rock which is abundant in Karelia (Russian Federation. Large deposits of shungite with low levels of carbon (approx. 10% C are also found in Kazakhstan, where it is mined under the trade name Taurit (Koksu Mining Company. Although Taurit has been reported to be used as an adsorbent for hazardous compounds in water treatment, there is very little precise data about its adsorption capacity or the compounds adsorbed. In this study, the ability of Taurit to adsorb Zn(II was investigated and Freundlich isotherms were determined for both distilled water and tap water. Taurit was found to have a high buffer capacity leading to pH values > 7.0 in aqueous solution. Because dissolved zinc precipitates as Zn(OH2 under alkaline conditions, the pH must be carefully controlled and kept ≤7.0. Despite the small inner surface area (BET of Taurit (13.4 m2 g−1, Freundlich coefficients for distilled water (Kf = 2.4, n = 4.0 and tap water (Kf = 1.5, n = 2.5 were similar to other adsorbents. Our results indicate that Taurit could provide a cheap alternative to activated carbon since both substances have a similar adsorption capacity (at least for Zn(II.

  14. Effect of pH on the spontaneous synthesis of palladium nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaorui; Ooki, Wataru; Kosaka, Yoshinori R.; Okonogi, Akinori; Marzun, Galina; Wagener, Philipp; Barcikowski, Stephan; Kondo, Takahiro; Nakamura, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Palladium metal nanoparticles were spontaneously formed on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via a redox reaction in H_2O. • The amount of Pd deposited on rGO was affected by pH. • The amount of oxygen-containing functional groups in rGO was increased with the deposition of palladium. • The importance of redox potential in spontaneous deposition was demonstrated by an experiment with Zn, Ni, Pt, Pd, etc.. • The spontaneous redox deposition method is facile, environmentally friendly, and needs no external reducing agents. - Abstract: Palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were spontaneously deposited on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) without any external reducing agents. The prepared Pd/rGO composites were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spontaneous deposition occurred because of a redox reaction between the Pd precursor and rGO, which involved reduction of bivalent Pd to metallic Pd"0 and oxidation of the sp"2 carbon of rGO to oxygen-containing functional groups. The amount of Pd deposited on rGO varied with pH, and this was attributed to electrostatic interactions between the Pd precursor and rGO based on the results of zeta potential measurements. The importance of the redox reaction in the spontaneous deposition was demonstrated in the experiment with Zn, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, Pd, and Au.

  15. Assessment of the effect of probiotic curd consumption on salivary pH and streptococcus mutans counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, R; Praveen, P; Anantharaj, A; Venkataraghavan, Karthik

    2012-07-01

    Antimicrobial methods of controlling dental caries that include probiotic agents can play a valuable role in establishing caries control in children at moderate to high risk for developing dental caries. Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of use of various Probiotic products including curd. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of short-term consumption of probiotic curd containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and normal curd on salivary Streptococcus Mutans counts, as well as salivary pH. Forty, caries-free, 10-12 years old children were selected and randomly allocated to two groups. Test Group consisted of 20 children who consumed 200ml of probiotic curd daily for 30 days. Control Group consisted of 20 children who were given 200ml of regular curd for 30 days. Salivary pH and salivary Streptococcus Mutans counts were recorded at baseline and after 30 days and statistically compared using the Student's t-test. Consumption of probiotic curd resulted in a statistically significant reduction in S. Mutans colony counts (PpH (P>0.05) in both the groups. Short-term consumption of probiotic curds can reduce oral S. Mutans counts. However, this caused a slight reduction in salivary pH.

  16. Transport of vanadium (V in saturated porous media: effects of pH, ionic-strength and clay mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulu Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium, a hazardous pollutant, has been frequently detected in soil and groundwater, however, its transport behavior in porous media were not clearly understood. In this study, the effects of solution pH, ionic strength (IS and the effect of clay mineral on the transport of vanadium in saturated porous media were investigated. Laboratory experiments using a series of columns packed with quartz sand were carried out to explore the retention and transport of vanadium with a range of ionic-strength (0.001–0.1 M and pH (4–8 and two different types of clay minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite. Results of the breakthrough experiments showed that vanadium was highly mobile in the saturated porous media. The increase in pH rendered a higher transport of vanadium in saturated porous media. The study also indicated an easier transfer of vanadium with an increase in IS. Montmorillonite enhanced the mobility of vanadium in the column when compared to kaolinite. A mathematical model based on advection-dispersion equation coupled with equilibrium and kinetic reactions was used to describe the retention and transport of vanadium in the columns very well.

  17. Effect of Carbonated Beverage Intake on Blood Gases and Some Biochemical Parameters in Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, M.S.; Osman, H.F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of carbonated beverage (colourless or black coloured drinks) on arterial blood gases, kidney function, bone mineral density (BMD), glucose and insulin. The rats were divided into three groups; ten rats per each group. Group (I) used as control, group (II) rats supplemented with colourless carbonated beverage (10 ml /100 ml water) and group (III) rats supplemented with black coloured carbonated beverage (10 ml /100 ml water) for three months. The arterial blood gases were evaluated by measuring ph PO 2 , , PCO 2 , , H + a nd HCO 3 -. Rats receiving the coloured drinks showed high significant increase in ph while PO 2 showed very high significant decrease in both groups. PCO 2 showed high significant decrease in groups (II) and (III) while H + showed high significant decrease in group (III) only. HCO 3 - showed high significant increase in group III. All these changes were related to carbonic acid dissolved in water and the increased ph lead to alkalinity of the blood and it is inversely proportional to the number of hydrogen ions (H + ). Non-significant changes were observed in sodium ions while potassium ions showed significant increase in group (II) and high significant increase in group (III). The level of urea showed high and very high significant increase in groups (II) and (III), respectively. Creatinine level showed non-significant increase in group (III). The histopathology changes were observed in kidney tissues in rats of groups (II) and (III). From these results, it appears that black coloured beverage can increase the risk of kidney problems more than colourless beverages. Ca + and inorganic phosphorous levels showed non- significant change except Ca ions showed a significant decrease in rats of group (III). The acidity of carbonated beverage leads to weak bones by promoting the loss of calcium. The decrease of bone mineral density was more pronounced in some parts of femur of rats receiving black

  18. Theater Blood Application Was Not Effectively Developed and Implemented

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-17

    blood product by unit; and • monitor non- Food and Drug Administration Blood Product Testing. The CONOPS document also identified over 400 specific...time of a transfusion. However, this requirement was not identified in the CONOPS document. Further, PEO DHCS officials provided a traceability ...the CONOPS document, requirements management database, and the traceability matrix increased the risk that the Theater Blood Application

  19. Removal of Radium-226 from Radium-Contaminated Soil using Distilled Water and Humic Acid: Effect of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, E.; Muhammad Samudi Yasir; Muhamat Omar

    2011-01-01

    Effect of washing solutions' pH removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid extracted from Malaysian peat soil was studied by batch washing method. The study encompassed the extraction of humic acid and the washing of radium-contaminated soil using distilled water and humic acid solutions of 100 ppm, both with varying pHs in the range of 3 to 11. The radioactivity concentration of radium-226 was determined by gamma spectrometer.The removal of radium-226 was greater when humic acid solutions were used compared to distilled water at the pH range studied and both washing solutions showed greater removal of radium-226 when basic solutions were used. Nevertheless, comparable removal efficiencies were observed when neutral and highly basic humic acid solutions were used. (author)

  20. Incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with ascites. Diagnostic value of white blood cell count and pH measurement in ascitic fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, J S; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Hegnhøj, J

    1991-01-01

    During a 21-month period, 65 consecutive patients admitted with ascites were included in a prospective study of the incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and paracentesis was performed on admission. The ascitic fluid was cultured, ascitic leucocytes were counted and pH was measured....... Bacterial growth was found in five patients with chronic liver disease, who were diagnosed as having spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), since no intra-abdominal focus could be demonstrated. Thus, the incidence of SBP in this material was 7.7% (95% confidence limits: 2.5-17%). SBP was caused...