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Sample records for blood loss tells

  1. Measuring and communicating blood loss during obstetric hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Kristi T; Weeber, Tracy A

    2012-01-01

    Accurate quantification of blood loss is an essential skill necessary to prevent maternal morbidity and mortality associated with obstetric hemorrhage. Visual estimation of blood has been consistently shown to be extremely inaccurate. The nurse plays a pivotal role in quantifying blood loss after birth, recognizing triggers, mobilizing needed interventions, and providing essential communication. PMID:22548283

  2. Management of major blood loss: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Ostrowski, S R; Secher, N H

    2010-01-01

    the early control of the cause of bleeding by non-definitive means, while haemostatic control resuscitation seeks early control of coagulopathy. Haemostatic resuscitation provides transfusions with plasma and platelets in addition to red blood cells (RBCs) in an immediate and sustained manner as part...... of the transfusion protocol for massively bleeding patients. Transfusion of RBCs, plasma and platelets in a similar proportion as in whole blood prevents both hypovolaemia and coagulopathy. Although an early and effective reversal of coagulopathy is documented, the most effective means of preventing...... survival. Furthermore, viscoelastic whole blood assays, such as thrombelastography (TEG)/rotation thromboelastometry (ROTEM), appear advantageous for identifying coagulopathy in patients with severe haemorrhage, as opposed to conventional coagulation assays. In our view, patients with uncontrolled bleeding...

  3. Faecal blood loss in response to exercise.

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, J D; Maughan, R J; Davidson, R J

    1987-01-01

    Recently qualitative tests have indicated that gastrointestinal bleeding during exercise may be an important contributory factor in sports anaemia. In six healthy men who walked 37 km on four consecutive days faecal haemoglobin content remained normal (reference range 0.10-2.53 mg/g faeces) with no significant differences between values. In 28 marathon runners who refrained from taking drugs or food containing blood the median faecal haemoglobin content increased by 0.42 mg/g faeces (95% conf...

  4. The comparison of placental removal methods on operative blood loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On an average 1 litre of blood is lost during Caesarean Section. Many variable techniques have been tried to reduce this blood loss. Many study trials have shown the spontaneous delivery of placenta method to be superior over manual method because of reduced intra operative blood loss and reduced incidence of post operative endometritis. The main objective of our study was to compare the risk of blood loss associated with spontaneous and manual removal of the placenta during caesarean section. This study was conducted at Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Islamic International Medical Complex, Islamabad from September 2004 to September 2005. All Women undergoing elective or emergency caesarean section were included in the study. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy below 37 weeks, severe maternal anaemia, and prolonged rupture of the membranes with fever, placenta praevia, placenta accreta and clotting disorders. Patients were allocated to the two groups randomly. Group A comprised of women in whom the obstetrician waited a maximum of 5 minutes till the placenta delivered spontaneously. In group B the obstetrician manually cleaved out the placenta as soon as the infant was delivered. The primary outcome measures noted were difference in haemoglobin of >2 gm/dl (preoperatively and postoperatively), time interval between delivery of baby and placenta, significant blood loss (>1000 cc), additional use of oxytocics, total operating time and blood transfusions. Data was analysed by SPSS. Statistical tests used for specific comparison were chi square-test and Student's t-test. One hundred and forty-five patients were allocated to two groups randomly. Seventy-eight patients were allocated to group A and 67 patients allocated to group B. Mean maternal age, birth weight, and total operating time were the same in two groups, but blood loss as measured by a difference in haemoglobin of greater then 2 grams/dl was statistically significant. Significant blood loss (>1000 cc

  5. Low central venous pressure reduces blood loss in hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Dong Wang; Li-Jian Liang; Xiong-Qing Huang; Xiao-Yu Yin

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of low central venous pressure (LCVP) on blood loss during hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: By the method of sealed envelope,50 HCC patients were randomized into LCVP group (n = 25) and control group (n = 25). In LCVP group,CVP was maintained at 2-4 mmHg and systolic blood pressure (SBP) above 90 mmHg by manipulation of the patient's posture and administration of drugs during hepatectomy, while in control group hepatectomy was performed routinely without lowering CVP. The patients'preoperative conditions, volume of blood loss during hepatectomy, volume of blood transfusion, length of hospital stay, changes in hepatic and renal functions were compared between the two groups.RESULTS: There were no significant differences in patients' preoperative conditions, maximal tumor dimension, pattern of hepatectomy, duration of vascular occlusion, operationtime, weight of resected liver tissues, incidence of post-operative complications, hepatic and renal functions between the two groups. LCVP group had a markedly lower volume of total intraoperative blood loss and blood loss during hepatectomy than the control group, being 903.9±180.8 mL vs 2 329.4±2 538.4(W=495.5, P<0.01) and 672.4±429.9 mL vs1 662.6± 1932.1 (W=543.5, P<0.01). There were no remarkable differences in the pre-resection and post-resection blood losses between the two groups. The length of hospital stay was significantly shortened in LCVP group as compared with the control group, being 16.3±6.8 d vs21.5 ± 8.6 d (W= 532.5, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: LCVP is easily achievable in technique.Maintenance of CVP≤4 mmHg can help reduce blood loss during hepatectomy, shorten the length of hospital stay, and has no detrimental effects on hepatic or renal function.

  6. Perioperative blood loss and diclofenac in major arthroplastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gvozdenović

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contemporary literature indicates precaution over the perioperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, since they can potentially increase perioperative blood loss related to their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on perioperative blood loss undergoing hip arthroplasty and its correlation with general and regional anesthesia.Methods: This prospective study included 120 patients who had undergone elective unilateral total hip arthroplasty. Patients were allocated into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 were pretreated with diclofenac and operated in general and regional anesthesia. Group 3 and 4 weren’t pretreated with any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and were, as well, operated in general and regional anesthesia. Diclofenac was administered orally two times a day 75 mg (total 150 mg and also as intramuscular injection (75 mg preoperatively and 12 hours later on a day of surgery.Results: The perioperative blood loss in the rst 24 hours showed an increase of 29.4% in the diclofenac group operated in general anesthesia and increase of 26.8% in patients operated in regional anesthesia (P < 0.05 compared to control group. Statistical data evaluation of patients operated in general anesthesia compared to regional anesthesia, the overall blood loss in the rst 24 h after surgery, showed an increase of 6.4% in the diclofenac group and increase of 3.6% in placebo group. This was not statistically significant.Conclusion: Pretreatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac before elective unilateral total hip arthroplasty increases the perioperative blood loss signficantly. Early discontinuation of non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is advised.

  7. Analysis on hidden blood loss of total knee arthroplasty in treating knee osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hui-liang; LI Zheng; FENG Ming-li; CAO Guang-le

    2011-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an important therapy for the treatment of various late-stage knee diseases. However, it has been observed that patients have lower hemoglobin (HB) counts postoperatively, which are significantly inconsistent with the measured blood loss. Although the concept of hidden blood loss has been presented in 2000, very little clinical attention has been paid since then. In this study, we investigated the characteristics and influential factor of hidden blood loss after TKA in treating knee osteoarthritis.Methods One hundred and eight patients, with 42 males and 66 females, were retrospectively analyzed. The perioperative blood loss and the hidden blood loss following TKA were calculated by Gross formula. Potential factors affecting perioperative and hidden blood loss included gender, surgical time, tourniquet time, hemostasis (during operation with deflating tourniquet), and reinfusion of salvaged blood.Results The average perioperative blood loss was found to be (1553±356) ml and the average hidden blood loss was (793±223) ml. The hidden blood loss of the male was significantly higher than that of the female, and was reduced by hemostasis during the operation with a deflating tourniquet. Hidden blood loss was not affected by postoperative blood salvage and reinfusion, surgical time, or tourniquet time.Conclusions When calculating the value of hidden blood loss by Gross formula, the lowest value of hematocrit should be chosen as the parameter so that hidden blood loss would not be underestimated. No significant differences could be found in hidden blood loss for males compared to females. Hidden blood loss can be reduced by hemostasis during operation with a deflating tourniquet. Although reinfusion of salvaged blood could not reduce the perioperative blood loss or hidden blood loss, it was still an effective method to reduce transfusion rate.

  8. Loss of deformability of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. Majid; Feng, James

    2012-11-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is largely due to stiffening of the infected red blood cells (RBCs). Contemporary understanding ascribes the loss of RBC deformability to a 10-fold increase in membrane stiffness caused by extra cross-linking in the spectrin network. Local measurements by micropipette aspiration, however, have reported only an increase of 3-fold in the shear modulus. We believe the discrepancy stems from the rigid parasite particles inside infected cells, and have carried out numerical simulations to demonstrate this mechanism. The cell membrane is represented by a set of discrete particles connected by linearly elastic springs. The cytosol is modeled as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid, and discretized by particles as in standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The malaria parasite is modeled as an aggregate of particles constrained to rigid-body motion. We simulate RBC stretching tests by optical tweezers in three dimensions. The results demonstrate that the presence of a sizeable parasite greatly reduces the ability of RBCs to deform under stretching. With the solid inclusion, the observed loss of deformability can be predicted quantitatively using the local membrane elasticity measured by micropipettes.

  9. [Effects of volume and rate of blood loss on indicators of auto-hemodilution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval'skaia, K S; Baluev, E P; Krivitskiĭ, N M

    1991-06-01

    The results of synchronous monitoring of blood impedance versus body impedance in dog experiments showed that the speed of physiological hemodilution related to blood loss up to 30 ml/kg is poorly dependent on the rate of blood loss (0.4-1.0 ml/kg/min) and averages 0.186 +/- 0.02 ml/min/kg. Termination of blood loss is followed by marked reduction in the rate of auto-hemodilution. In bloodletting the studies revealed a linear dependence between the volume of blood loss up to 30 ml/kg and tissue fluid volume entering the blood stream. In blood loss intestinal absorption of fluid does not block the fluid introduction from the interstice. When associated, both these flows increase volume of fluid filling vascular bed and promote stable recovery of the baseline circulating blood volume. PMID:1893173

  10. Comparison of coagulation factors and blood loss between O and non-O blood types following hydroxyethyl starch infusion

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Soo Joo; Ahn, Hyun Joo; Lee, Jae Ik

    2010-01-01

    Background Individuals with type O blood are more likely to have reduced factor VIII and von Willebrand factor levels compared to their non-O counterparts. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES), which is widely used for blood volume replacement, can induce coagulopathy. Therefore, we tested whether blood type O patients show more coagulopathy and blood loss than non-O patients after infusion of 6% HES. Methods Thirty-four non-O and 20 type O patients scheduled for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)...

  11. Safe surgery: how accurate are we at predicting intra-operative blood loss?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Introduction Preoperative estimation of intra-operative blood loss by both anaesthetist and operating surgeon is a criterion of the World Health Organization\\'s surgical safety checklist. The checklist requires specific preoperative planning when anticipated blood loss is greater than 500 mL. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of surgeons and anaesthetists at predicting intra-operative blood loss. Methods A 6-week prospective study of intermediate and major operations in an academic medical centre was performed. An independent observer interviewed surgical and anaesthetic consultants and registrars, preoperatively asking each to predict expected blood loss in millilitre. Intra-operative blood loss was measured and compared with these predictions. Parameters including the use of anticoagulation and anti-platelet therapy as well as intra-operative hypothermia and hypotension were recorded. Results One hundred sixty-eight operations were included in the study, including 142 elective and 26 emergency operations. Blood loss was predicted to within 500 mL of measured blood loss in 89% of cases. Consultant surgeons tended to underestimate blood loss, doing so in 43% of all cases, while consultant anaesthetists were more likely to overestimate (60% of all operations). Twelve patients (7%) had underestimation of blood loss of more than 500 mL by both surgeon and anaesthetist. Thirty per cent (n = 6\\/20) of patients requiring transfusion of a blood product within 24 hours of surgery had blood loss underestimated by more than 500 mL by both surgeon and anaesthetist. There was no significant difference in prediction between patients on anti-platelet or anticoagulation therapy preoperatively and those not on the said therapies. Conclusion Predicted intra-operative blood loss was within 500 mL of measured blood loss in 89% of operations. In 30% of patients who ultimately receive a blood transfusion, both the surgeon and anaesthetist significantly underestimate

  12. Blood loss estimation in Schistosoma incognitum by the use of 51Cr labelled red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C42 Red blood cells labelled with 51Cr were used to study the pathophysiology of S. incognitum infection. Blood volume, cell volume, faecal blood excretion and the half life of the red cells were determined. It was shown that in rabbits infected with the blood fluke, there was loss of blood, which may result in the development of anaemia in the infected animals. (author)

  13. Gastrointestinal blood loss induced by three different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, A; Hammermaier, A; Nagyiványi, P; Pabst, G; Waitzinger, J

    1995-04-01

    A clinical study was performed on 18 healthy volunteers to compare the gastrointestinal daily blood loss induced by oral intake of three different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, lysine clonixinate (CAS 55837-30-4), ibuprofen (CAS 15687-27-1) and acetylsalicylic acid (CAS 50-78-2 ASA). For quantitative determination of gastrointestinal blood loss, autologous erythrocytes were radiolabelled in vitro with 51Cr and reinfused at study start. The amount of radioactivity excreted in faeces was measured during a placebo baseline phase of three days, a treatment phase of five days with thrice daily dosing of ASA, ibuprofen or lysine clonixinate and a subsequent wash-out phase of five days. The highest increase of mean daily blood loss over baseline was observed after treatment with ASA (+ 1.66 ml/d versus baseline). Treatment with ibuprofen led to an increase of mean daily blood loss by + 0.52 ml/d. During treatment with lysine clonixinate the mean increase of daily blood loss was +0.32 ml/d versus baseline. In the ibuprofen and lysine clonixinate treatment groups the values of mean daily blood loss decreased during the wash-out phase with respect to the verum phase, whereas the mean daily blood loss during the wash-out phase after treatment with ASA even increased in comparison to the verum phase (mean daily blood loss: +2.07 ml/d versus baseline. PMID:7779148

  14. Surgeons often underestimate the amount of blood loss in replacement surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Ganesan Ganesan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective:To assess the accuracy of the clinically estimated blood loss (EBL when compared with the actual blood loss (ABL in replacement surgeries. Methods: This prospective study was done in Sri Ramachandra Medical Centre from April 2011 to April 2013. Altogether 140 patients undergoing total hip replacement or total knee replacement were included with the inclusion criteria being patients with haemoglobin higher than 100 g/ml and coagulation profile within normal limits. Exclusion criteria were intake of antiplatelet drug or anti-coagulant, bleeding disorders, thrombotic episode, and haematological disorders. There were 65 men and 75 women. In this study, the consultants were free to use any clinical method to estimate the blood loss, including counting the blood-soaked mops and gauze pieces (estimating the volume of blood carried in all the mops and gauzes, measuring blood lost to suction bottles and blood in and around the operative field. The ABL was calculated based on a modification of the Gross’s formula using haematocrit values. Results: In 42 of the 140 cases, the EBL exceeded the ABL. These cases had a negative difference in blood loss (or DIFF-BL<0 and were included in the overestimation group, which accounted for 30% of the study population. Of the remaining 98 cases (70%, the ABL exceeded the EBL. Therefore they were put into the underestimation group who had a positive difference in blood loss (DIFF-BL>0. We found that when the average blood loss was small, the accuracy of estimation was high. But when the average blood loss exceeded 500 ml, the accuracy rate decreased significantly. This suggested that clinical estimation is inaccurate with the increase of blood loss. Conclusion:This study has shown that using clinical estimation alone to guide blood transfusion is inadequate. In this study, 70% of patients had their blood loss underestimated, proving that surgeons often underestimate blood loss in replacement

  15. Surgeons often underestimate the amount of blood loss in replacement surgeries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ganesan Ganesan Ram; Perumal Suresh; Phagal Varthi Vijayaraghavan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To assess the accuracy of the clinically estimated blood loss (EBL) when compared with the actual blood loss (ABL) in replacement surgeries.Methods:This prospective study was done in Sri Ramachandra Medical Centre from April 2011 to April 2013.Altogether 140 patients undergoing total hip replacement or total knee replacement were included with the inclusion criteria being patients with haemoglobin higher than 100 g/ml and coagulation profile within normal limits.Exclusion criteria were intake of antiplatelet drug or anti-coagulant,bleeding disorders,thrombotic episode,and haematological disorders.There were 65 men and 75 women.In this study,the consultants were free to use any clinical method to estimate the blood loss,including counting the blood-soaked mops and gauze pieces (estimating the volume of blood carded in all the mops and gauzes),measuring blood lost to suction bottles and blood in and around the operative field.The ABL was calculated based on a modification of the Gross's formula using haematocrit values.Results:In 42 of the 140 cases,the EBL exceeded the ABL.These cases had a negative difference in blood loss (or DIFF-BL<0) and were included in the overestimation group,which accounted for 30% of the study population.Of the remaining 98 cases (70%),the ABL exceeded the EBL.Therefore they were put into the underestimation group who had a positive difference in blood loss (DIFF-BL>0).We found that when the average blood loss was small,the accuracy of estimation was high.But when the average blood loss exceeded 500 ml,the accuracy rate decreased significantly.This suggested that clinical estimation is inaccurate with the increase of blood loss.Conclusion:This study has shown that using clinical estimation alone to guide blood transfusion is inadequate.In this study,70% of patients had their blood loss underestimated,proving that surgeons often underestimate blood loss in replacement surgeries.

  16. Four Methods for Calculating Blood-loss after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Qiang Gao; Zi-Jian Li; Ke Zhang; Wei Sun; Hong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Currently,various calculation methods for evaluating blood-loss in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are applied in clinical practice.However,different methods may yield different results.The purpose of this study was to determine the most reliable method for calculating blood-loss after primary TKA.Methods:We compared blood-loss in 245 patients who underwent primary unilateral TKA from February 2010 to August 2011.We calculated blood-loss using four methods:Gross equation,hemoglobin (Hb) balance,the Orthopedic Surgery Transfusion Hemoglobin European Overview (OSTHEO) formula,and Hb-dilution.We determined Pearson's correlation coefficients for the four methods.Results:There were large differences in the calculated blood-loss obtained by the four methods.In descending order of combined correlation coefficient based on calculated blood-loss,the methods were Hb-balance,OSTHEO formula,Hb-dilution,and Gross equation.Conclusions:The Hb-balance method may be the most reliable method of estimating blood-loss after TKA.

  17. Factors influencing intraoperative blood loss in orthognathic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastum, M; Andersen, K; Rude, K; Nørholt, S E; Blomlöf, J

    2016-01-01

    the estimated preoperative total blood volume, and then correlated with body mass index (BMI), age, sex, operating time, and treatment modality in a multivariate stepwise regression analysis. Operating time (P<0.001), BMI (P<0.001), and treatment modality (P<0.001) had a significant impact on relative...

  18. Individual-Specific, Beat-to-beat Trending of Significant Human Blood Loss: The Compensatory Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A; Howard, Jeffrey T; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Cardin, Sylvain; Batchelder, Paul; Mulligan, Jane; Grudic, Gregory Z; Moulton, Steven L; MacLeod, David B

    2015-08-01

    Current monitoring technologies are unable to detect early, compensatory changes that are associated with significant blood loss. We previously introduced a novel algorithm to calculate the Compensatory Reserve Index (CRI) based on the analysis of arterial waveform features obtained from photoplethysmogram recordings. In the present study, we hypothesized that the CRI would provide greater sensitivity and specificity to detect blood loss compared with traditional vital signs and other hemodynamic measures. Continuous noninvasive vital sign waveform data, including CRI, photoplethysmogram, heart rate, blood pressures, SpO2, cardiac output, and stroke volume, were analyzed from 20 subjects before, during, and after an average controlled voluntary hemorrhage of ∼1.2 L of blood. Compensatory Reserve Index decreased by 33% in a linear fashion across progressive blood volume loss, with no clinically significant alterations in vital signs. The receiver operating characteristic area under the curve for the CRI was 0.90, with a sensitivity of 0.80 and specificity of 0.76. In comparison, blood pressures, heart rate, SpO2, cardiac output, and stroke volume had significantly lower receiver operating characteristic area under the curve values and specificities for detecting the same volume of blood loss. Consistent with our hypothesis, CRI detected blood loss and restoration with significantly greater specificity than did other traditional physiologic measures. Single measurement of CRI may enable more accurate triage, whereas CRI monitoring may allow for earlier detection of casualty deterioration. PMID:25565640

  19. Continuous Postoperative Pericardial Flushing: A Pilot Study on Safety, Feasibility, and Effect on Blood Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan S.J. Manshanden

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: CPPF after cardiac surgery was found to be safe and feasible in this experimental setting. The clinically relevant effect on blood loss needs to be confirmed in a randomized clinical trial.

  20. Lack of correlation between fecal blood loss and drug-induced gastric mucosal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedenbro, J.L.; Wetterberg, P.; Vallgren, S.; Bergqvist, L.

    1988-05-01

    Increased fecal blood loss was produced in healthy volunteers by the administration of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), naproxen or fenflumizole. Basal as well as drug-induced gastrointestinal blood loss was measured using /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling. Median rise in daily fecal blood loss was 432%. All subjects were endoscoped at the initiation and at the completion of the study. Endoscopic findings were assessed quantitatively by two observers in two different ways. All subjects but three had gastric mucosal lesions at follow-up endoscopy. There was a good correlation between the endoscopic assessments but no statistical correlation between the endoscopic assessment and the increase in fecal blood loss. The data suggest that factors other than gastric mucosal lesions have to be taken into account when investigating NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeding.

  1. Lack of correlation between fecal blood loss and drug-induced gastric mucosal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased fecal blood loss was produced in healthy volunteers by the administration of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), naproxen or fenflumizole. Basal as well as drug-induced gastrointestinal blood loss was measured using 51Cr erythrocyte labeling. Median rise in daily fecal blood loss was 432%. All subjects were endoscoped at the initiation and at the completion of the study. Endoscopic findings were assessed quantitatively by two observers in two different ways. All subjects but three had gastric mucosal lesions at follow-up endoscopy. There was a good correlation between the endoscopic assessments but no statistical correlation between the endoscopic assessment and the increase in fecal blood loss. The data suggest that factors other than gastric mucosal lesions have to be taken into account when investigating NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeding

  2. Hidden blood loss and its influential factors after total hip arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Kaisong; Ni, Su; Zhou, Xianju; Xu, Nanwei; Sun, Rongbin; Zhuang, Chao; Wang, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Background Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a vital therapy for various hip joint diseases. However, patients have lower hemoglobin level post-operatively, remarkably inconsistent with the measured blood loss. The inconsistence is majorly attributed to hidden blood loss (HBL). In this study, we investigated the HBL and its influential factors among patients after THA. Methods From January 2008 to June 2014, 322 patients (99 males and 223 females) undergoing THA were enrolled in this study. All...

  3. Effect of Desmopressin on Platelet Aggregation and Blood Loss in Patients Undergoing Valvular Heart Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Jin; Hong-Wen Ji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blood loss after cardiac surgery can be caused by impaired platelet (PLT) function after cardiopulmonary bypass. Desmopressin or 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) is a synthetic analog of vasopressin. DDAVP can increase the level of von Willebrand factor and coagulation factor VIII, thus it may enhance PLT function and improve coagulation. In this study, we assessed the effects of DDAVP on PLT aggregation and blood loss in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods:...

  4. Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Reilly, Marie; Hjalgrim, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term deleterious effects of repeated blood donations may be masked by the donors' healthy lifestyle. To investigate possible effects of blood donation and iron loss through blood donation on cancer incidence while minimizing "healthy donor effects," we made dose......-response comparisons within a cohort of Swedish and Danish blood donors. METHODS: We used a nested case-control study design, in which case patients were defined as all donors who were diagnosed with a malignancy between their first recorded blood donation and study termination (n = 10866). Control subjects (n...... = 107140) were individually matched on sex, age, and county of residence. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated relative risks of cancer according to number of blood donations made or estimated iron loss 3-12 years before a case patient was diagnosed with cancer. All statistical tests were...

  5. Doppler Assessment of Uterine Blood Flow in Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Barzin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent spontaneous abortion affects 2%-5% of"ncouples. Uterine perfusion is considered as one of the"nfactors that influences the success of implantation."nDuring the normal menstrual cycle, the impedance"nto uterine artery blood flow diminishes progressively"nduring the luteal phase, reaching the lowest values"nin the period coinciding with the implantation time."nImpedance of uterine arteries is a good indicator of"nthe possibility of a subsequent pregnancy. High blood"nflow resistance is associated with a reduced conception"nrate and women with lower pulsatility index values"nhave the highest possibility of becoming pregnant. An"nimpaired uterine perfusion could play a major role in"nthe pathogenesis of recurrent spontaneous abortion. In"nthis study, we examined sixty women with recurrent"nspontaneous abortion and a control group including"nthirty normal women with at least one previous"nuncomplicated pregnancy and without history of any"nabortion. Transvaginal sonography associated with"nDoppler flow measurement was performed during"nthe midluteal phase of a cycle in all women. The"nmeasurement of the ascending branch of both right"nand left uterine arteries was taken lateral to the cervix"nat the level of the internal os. The pulsatility and"nresistance index of both uterine arteries were calculated"nand compared in both groups. In this presentation we"nreport our finding in two groups. We also explain the"nexact method of study and present some interesting"ncases

  6. Clinical effects of applying a tourniquet in total knee arthroplasty on blood loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fu-jiang; XIAO Yu; LIU Ya-bin; TIAN Xu; GAO Zhi-guo

    2010-01-01

    Background Tourniquets used during total knee arthroplasty may lead to many complications. The aim of this study was to determine perioperative blood loss and its clinical relevance in total knee replacement surgery after applying a tourniquet.Methods From June 2009 to October 2009, 60 consecutive patients who underwent routine total knee arthroplasty were randomly divided into two groups and were treated with or without a tourniquet (30 patients/group). There were no significant differences in patient baseline characteristics between the two groups. We compared the two groups of patients in terms of intra- and postoperative bleeding, invisible or visible bleeding, and total blood loss.Results None of the patients showed poor wound healing, lower extremity deep venous thrombosis or other complications. The amount of blood loss during surgery was lower in the tourniquet group than in the control group (P<0.01). However, postoperative visible bleeding (P <0.05) and occult bleeding (P <0.05) were significantly greater in the toumiquet group than in the control group. There was no significant difference in the total amount of blood loss between the two groups (P >0.05).Conclusions Tourniquet can reduce bleeding during total knee replacement surgery, but is associated with greater visible and invisible blood loss.

  7. Continuous Postoperative Pericardial Flushing: A Pilot Study on Safety, Feasibility, and Effect on Blood Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshanden, Johan S.J.; Gielen, Chantal L.I.; de Borgie, Corianne A.J.M.; Klautz, Robert J.M.; de Mol, Bas A.J.M.; Koolbergen, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged or excessive blood loss is a common complication after cardiac surgery. Blood remnants and clots, remaining in the pericardial space in spite of chest tube drainage, induce high fibrinolytic activity that may contribute to bleeding complications. Continuous postoperative pericardial flushing (CPPF) with an irrigation solution may reduce blood loss by preventing the accumulation of clots. In this pilot study, the safety and feasibility of CPPF were evaluated and the effect on blood loss and other related complications was investigated. Methods Between November 2011 and April 2012 twenty-one adult patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) received CPPF from sternal closure up to 12 h postoperative. With an inflow Redivac drain that was inserted through one of the chest tube incision holes, an irrigation solution (NaCl 0.9% at 38 °C) was delivered to the pericardial cavity using a volume controlled flushing system. Safety aspects, feasibility issues and complications were registered. The mean actual blood loss in the CPPF group was compared to the mean of a retrospective group (n = 126). Results CPPF was successfully completed in 20 (95.2%) patients, and no method related complications were observed. Feasibility was good in this experimental setting. Patients receiving CPPF showed a 30% (P = 0.038) decrease in mean actual blood loss 12 h postoperatively. Conclusions CPPF after cardiac surgery was found to be safe and feasible in this experimental setting. The clinically relevant effect on blood loss needs to be confirmed in a randomized clinical trial. PMID:26501121

  8. Loss of alveolar membrane diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Farha Samar; Laskowski Daniel; George Deepa; Park Margaret M; Tang WH Wilson; Dweik Raed A; Erzurum Serpil C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Reduced gas transfer in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is traditionally attributed to remodeling and progressive loss of pulmonary arterial vasculature that results in decreased capillary blood volume available for gas exchange. Methods We tested this hypothesis by determination of lung diffusing capacity (DL) and its components, the alveolar capillary membrane diffusing capacity (Dm) and lung capillary blood volume (Vc) in 28 individuals with PAH in c...

  9. Radiochromium (chromium-51) evaluation of gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lussier, A.; LeBel, E.

    1987-10-30

    Gastrointestinal blood loss is one of the most serious clinical events induced by drugs. To date, almost no nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug has been shown to be devoid of that side effect in a strictly controlled study. The objective of this study was to assess quantitatively, by use of radioactive chromium (chromium-51)-labeled red blood cells, gastrointestinal blood loss associated with nabumetone (1000 mg daily), aspirin (3.6 g daily), and placebo. A total of 37 normal subjects, divided among the three treatment groups and a fourth group that received no treatment, were assessed clinically and quantitatively for gastrointestinal blood loss over a period of 28 days of active treatment. The results with chromium-51, analyzed on a logarithmic scale, revealed no statistically significant differences between the nabumetone, placebo, and control groups. Gastrointestinal blood loss in the aspirin group, however, was elevated when compared with all other groups at a high level of statistical significance (p less than 0.001). It is concluded that, under conditions in which aspirin causes substantial gastrointestinal microbleeding, nabumetone is not significantly different from placebo.

  10. The effect of aspirin on blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients with femoral neck fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, Brian J

    2012-02-03

    Although it is widely accepted that aspirin will increase the risk of intra- and post-operative bleeding, clinical studies have not consistently supported this assumption. We aimed to assess the effect of pre-operative aspirin on blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing emergency fixation of femoral neck fractures. A prospective case-control study was undertaken in patients presenting with femoral neck fractures. Parameters recorded included intra-operative blood loss, post-operative blood loss, transfusion requirements and peri-operative reduction in haemoglobin concentration. Of 89 patients presenting with femoral neck fractures 32 were on long-term aspirin therapy. Pre-operative aspirin ingestion did not significantly affect peri-operative blood loss, or change in haemoglobin concentration or haematocrit. However those patients taking aspirin pre-operatively had a significantly lower haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit and were more likely to be anaemic at presentation than those who were not receiving aspirin. Patients taking aspirin were also more likely to receive blood transfusion post-operatively.

  11. Significant reduction in blood loss in patients undergoing minimal extracorporeal circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W. B.; van Boven, W. J.; Smelt, M.; Morshuis, W. J.; van Dongen, H. P.; Haas, F. J.; Aarts, L. P.

    2006-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown differences in blood loss and allogeneic transfusion requirements between on-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Recently a new concept, the mini-extracorporeal circulation, was introduced to minimize the side effects of extracorporeal circulat

  12. Estimation and comparison of intra operative blood loss in patients with and without venous thromboembolism prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate and compare intraoperative blood loss in surgical patients with and without deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis using unfractionated heparin Study Design: Clinical Trial Place and Duration: Surgery Department of Fauji Foundation Hospital and Physiology Department Foundation University Medical College from October 2011 to August 2012 Patients and Methodology: Patients were selected by non probability purposive sampling. Patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were divided into 2 groups 25 each on the basis of order of presentation at Fauji Foundation Hospital until cohort numbers were reached. Group I received no heparin whereas group II received heparin. Written informed consent was taken from the patient after explaining the procedure of the study. Coagulation profile was done for both groups before the planned surgery. Heparin in a dose of 5000 units was administered subcutaneously to group II on the morning of the planned surgery and it was stopped 24 hours post operatively. Blood loss was estimated in both groups by weighing cotton swabs pre and post operatively. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 17. Results: Demographic data and surgical procedure time between the two groups did not differ. Blood loss between the two groups did not show any statistically significant difference. Conclusion: DVT prophylaxis using unfractionated heparin did not lead to any significant overt blood loss when compared with those without it. (author)

  13. Vaccination with recombinant aspartic hemoglobinase reduces parasite load and blood loss after hookworm infection in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Loukas

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hookworms infect 730 million people in developing countries where they are a leading cause of intestinal blood loss and iron-deficiency anemia. At the site of attachment to the host, adult hookworms ingest blood and lyse the erythrocytes to release hemoglobin. The parasites subsequently digest hemoglobin in their intestines using a cascade of proteolysis that begins with the Ancylostoma caninum aspartic protease 1, APR-1. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We show that vaccination of dogs with recombinant Ac-APR-1 induced antibody and cellular responses and resulted in significantly reduced hookworm burdens (p = 0.056 and fecal egg counts (p = 0.018 in vaccinated dogs compared to control dogs after challenge with infective larvae of A. caninum. Most importantly, vaccinated dogs were protected against blood loss (p = 0.049 and most did not develop anemia, the major pathologic sequela of hookworm disease. IgG from vaccinated animals decreased the catalytic activity of the recombinant enzyme in vitro and the antibody bound in situ to the intestines of worms recovered from vaccinated dogs, implying that the vaccine interferes with the parasite's ability to digest blood. CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a recombinant vaccine from a hematophagous parasite that significantly reduces both parasite load and blood loss, and it supports the development of APR-1 as a human hookworm vaccine.

  14. Hydroxyethyl Starch Reduces Coagulation Competence and Increases Blood Loss During Major Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C; Johansson, Pär I; Højskov, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated whether administration of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 affects coagulation competence and influences the perioperative blood loss. BACKGROUND: Artificial colloids substitute blood volume during surgery; with the administration of HES 130/0.4 (Voluven, Fresenius...... Kabi, Uppsala, Sweden) only a minor effect on coagulation competence is expected. METHODS: Eighty patients were scanned for enrollment in the study, and 40 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Two patients withdrew their consent to participate in the study, and 5 patients were excluded. Thus, 16...... patients were randomized to receive lactated Ringer's solution and 17 to receive HES 130/0.4. RESULTS: Among the patients receiving HES 130/0.4, thrombelastography indicated reduced clot strength (P < 0.001) and blinded evaluation of the perioperative blood loss was 2.2 (range 0.5 to 5.0) versus 1.4 (range...

  15. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss and blood transfusions in primary total hip arthroplasty: a prospective randomized double-blind study in 40 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Blønd, Lars; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Holm, Gitte; Jacobsen, Tine W; Gebuhr, Peter

    2003-01-01

    . PATIENTS AND METHODS: 40 patients were randomized to tranexamic acid (10 mg/kg given as a bolus intravenous injection, followed by a continuous infusion of 1 mg/kg/hour for 10 hours) or placebo (20 mL saline given intravenously) 15 minutes before the incision. We recorded the peroperative and postoperative......INTRODUCTION: We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study on 40 patients scheduled for primary total hip arthroplasty due to arthrosis or osteonecrosis to determine the effect of tranexamic acid on per- and postoperative blood losses and on the number of blood transfusions needed...... blood losses at removal of the drain 24 hours after the operation and the number of blood transfusions. RESULTS: Patients receiving tranexamic acid had a mean peroperative blood loss of 480 mL versus 622 mL in patients receiving placebo (p = 0.3), a postoperative blood loss of 334 mL versus 609 mL (p...

  16. Telling time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Populizio Ivan

    2002-06-01

    the two opposite options of inquiring and telling about the time. The first task has traditionally been dealt with by science and philosophy, the latter by art, in particular through the narrative imagination and the opportunity to create a story. To reach “objective” and verifiable knowledge, science and philosophy had to pay the price of denying,though not completely, time as experienced by people. Art, on the other hand, has been able to put into practice the opportunities offered by the unreality of the time told, thus offering a provisional solution – poetic rather than theoretical – to the aporias raised by the clash between the time which is “made of moments” and the time that “passes”.

  17. Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the 51Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients

  18. Tranexamic acid for control of blood loss in bilateral total knee replacement in a single stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep S Dhillon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tranexamic acid (TEA reduces blood loss and red cell transfusions in patients undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA. However, there is not much literature regarding the use of TEA in patients undergoing bilateral TKA in a single stage and the protocols for administration of TEA in such patients are ill-defined. Materials and Methods: We carried out a case control study evaluating the effect of TEA on postoperative hemoglobin (Hb, total drain output, and number of blood units transfused in 52 patients undergoing bilateral TKA in a single stage, and compared it with 56 matched controls who did not receive TEA. Two doses of TEA were administered in doses of 10 mg / kg each (slow intravenous (IV infusion, with the first dose given just before tourniquet release of the first knee and the second dose three hours after the first one. Results: A statistically significant reduction in the total drain output and requirement of allogenic blood transfusion in cases who received TEA, as compared to the controls was observed. The postoperative Hb and Hb at the time of discharge were found to be lower in the control group, and this result was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: TEA administered in patients undergoing single stage bilateral TKA helped reduce total blood loss and decreased allogenic blood transfusion requirements. This might be particularly relevant, where facilities such as autologous reinfusion might not be available.

  19. Use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee replacement: effects on perioperative blood loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Volquind

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee replacement surgeries has been the subject of constant study. The strategies to reduce bleeding are aimed at reducing the need for blood transfusion due to the risks involved. In this study we evaluated the use of tranexamic acid in reducing bleeding, need for blood transfusion, and prevalence of postoperative deep vein thrombosis in primary total knee replacement. METHOD: 62 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement were enrolled in the study, from June 2012 to May 2013, and randomized to receive a single dose of 2.5 g of intravenous tranexamic acid (Group TA or saline (Group GP, 5 min before opening the pneumatic tourniquet, respectively. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and blood loss were recorded 24 h after surgery. Deep vein thrombosis was investigated during patient's hospitalization and 15 and 30 days after surgery in review visits. RESULTS: There was no demographic difference between groups. Group TA had 13.89% decreased hematocrit (p = 0.925 compared to placebo. Group TA had a decrease of 12.28% (p = 0.898 in hemoglobin compared to Group GP. Group TA had a mean decrease of 187.35 mL in blood loss (25.32% compared to group GP (p = 0.027. The number of blood transfusions was higher in Group GP (p = 0.078. Thromboembolic events were not seen in this study. CONCLUSION: Tranexamic acid reduced postoperative bleeding without promoting thromboembolic events.

  20. Influence of curve magnitude and other variables on operative time, blood loss and transfusion requirements in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, M

    2015-05-03

    Posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion for correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) typically requires lengthy operating time and may be associated with significant blood loss and subsequent transfusion. This study aimed to identify factors predictive of duration of surgery, intraoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in an Irish AIS cohort.

  1. Relationships between micronutrient losses in sweat and blood pressure among heat-exposed steelworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong-Mei; Wang, Dao-Gang; Li, Jun; Li, Xing-Hua; Wang, Qian; Liu, Nan; Liu, Wei-Tian; Li, Ying-Xue

    2016-06-10

    We aimed to examine the effect of micronutrient losses through sweat on blood pressure (BP) among heat-exposed steelworkers. A total of 224 heat-exposed male steelworkers from an ironworks facility were evaluated in July 2012. We measured the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Index to evaluate the level of heat stress in the workplace. We collected sweat from the workers during an eight-hour work, and then we measured the micronutrients in the sweat. We also measured the BP of each worker. The results revealed that vitamin C, potassium, and calcium losses in sweat were positively correlated with systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (all P900 mg, or >100 mg, respectively. Further, DBP increased when potassium or calcium losses in sweat were >600 mg or >130 mg, respectively. Therefore, vitamin C, potassium, and calcium losses in sweat may adversely effect BP. To help steelworkers maintain healthy BP, facilities with high temperatures should try to lower environmental temperatures to reduce vitamin C, potassium, and calcium losses in sweat. Additionally, heat-exposed steelworkers may need to increase their dietary intakes of vitamin C, potassium, and calcium. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and support these recommendations. PMID:27087421

  2. The beneficial effect of Batroxobin on blood loss reduction in spinal fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hui-Min; Chen, Li; Frary, Charles Edward;

    2015-01-01

    with 100 patients who were randomized equally into 2 groups (Batroxobin and placebo). Patients received either 2 ku IV 15 min before surgery and followed 1 ku IM of Batroxobin following surgery, or an equivalent volume of placebo (normal saline). Cost of Batroxobin treatment is amounted to 84.75 euros...... use of Batroxobin for patients undergoing one-level PLIF surgery safely and effectively reduced the total amount of perioperative blood loss...

  3. Blood Loss and Transfusion After Topical Tranexamic Acid Administration in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Shen, Bin; Zeng, Yi

    2015-11-01

    There has been much debate and controversy about the safety and efficacy of the topical use of tranexamic acid in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate whether there is less blood loss and lower rates of transfusion after topical tranexamic acid administration in primary TKA. A systematic review of the electronic databases PubMed, CENTRAL, Web of Science, and Embase was undertaken. All randomized, controlled trials and prospective cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of topical tranexamic acid during primary TKA were included. The focus of the analysis was on the outcomes of blood loss results, transfusion rate, and thromboembolic complications. Subgroup analysis was performed when possible. Of 387 studies identified, 16 comprising 1421 patients (1481 knees) were eligible for data extraction and meta-analysis. This study indicated that when compared with the control group, topical application of tranexamic acid significantly reduced total drain output (mean difference, -227.20; 95% confidence interval, -347.11 to -107.30; Pdeep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism due to tranexamic acid administration. Topical tranexamic acid was effective for reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirements without increasing the prevalence of thromboembolic complications. PMID:26558665

  4. Modeling of Blood Lead Levels in Astronauts Exposed to Lead from Microgravity-Accelerated Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, H.; James, J.; Tsuji, J.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to lead has been associated with toxicity to multiple organ systems. Studies of various population groups with relatively low blood lead concentrations (lead level with lower cognitive test scores in children, later onset of puberty in girls, and increased blood pressure and cardiovascular mortality rates in adults. Cognitive effects are considered by regulatory agencies to be the most sensitive endpoint at low doses. Although 95% of the body burden of lead is stored in the bones, the adverse effects of lead correlate with the concentration of lead in the blood better than with that in the bones. NASA has found that prolonged exposure to microgravity during spaceflight results in a significant loss of bone minerals, the extent of which varies from individual to individual and from bone to bone, but generally averages about 0.5% per month. During such bone loss, lead that had been stored in bones would be released along with calcium. The effects on the concentration of lead in the blood (PbB) of various concentrations of lead in drinking water (PbW) and of lead released from bones due to accelerated osteoporosis in microgravity, as well as changes in exposure to environmental lead before, during, and after spaceflight were evaluated using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model that incorporated exposure to environmental lead both on earth and in flight and included temporarily increased rates of osteoporosis during spaceflight.

  5. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss and blood transfusions in primary total hip arthroplasty: a prospective randomized double-blind study in 40 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Blønd, Lars; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Holm, Gitte; Jacobsen, Tine W; Gebuhr, Peter Henrik

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study on 40 patients scheduled for primary total hip arthroplasty due to arthrosis or osteonecrosis to determine the effect of tranexamic acid on per- and postoperative blood losses and on the number of blood transfusions needed...

  6. Mosaic Loss of Chromosome Y in Blood Is Associated with Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumanski, Jan P; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Rasi, Chiara; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Davies, Hanna; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Campion, Dominique; Dufouil, Carole; Pasquier, Florence; Amouyel, Philippe; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Kilander, Lena; Lind, Lars; Forsberg, Lars A

    2016-06-01

    Men have a shorter life expectancy compared with women but the underlying factor(s) are not clear. Late-onset, sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) is a common and lethal neurodegenerative disorder and many germline inherited variants have been found to influence the risk of developing AD. Our previous results show that a fundamentally different genetic variant, i.e., lifetime-acquired loss of chromosome Y (LOY) in blood cells, is associated with all-cause mortality and an increased risk of non-hematological tumors and that LOY could be induced by tobacco smoking. We tested here a hypothesis that men with LOY are more susceptible to AD and show that LOY is associated with AD in three independent studies of different types. In a case-control study, males with AD diagnosis had higher degree of LOY mosaicism (adjusted odds ratio = 2.80, p = 0.0184, AD events = 606). Furthermore, in two prospective studies, men with LOY at blood sampling had greater risk for incident AD diagnosis during follow-up time (hazard ratio [HR] = 6.80, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 2.16-21.43, AD events = 140, p = 0.0011). Thus, LOY in blood is associated with risks of both AD and cancer, suggesting a role of LOY in blood cells on disease processes in other tissues, possibly via defective immunosurveillance. As a male-specific risk factor, LOY might explain why males on average live shorter lives than females. PMID:27231129

  7. Extended interferon-alpha therapy accelerates telomere length loss in human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M O'Bryan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I interferons have pleiotropic effects on host cells, including inhibiting telomerase in lymphocytes and antiviral activity. We tested the hypothesis that long-term interferon treatment would result in significant reduction in average telomere length in peripheral blood T lymphocytes. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a flow cytometry-based telomere length assay on peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from the Hepatitis-C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C study, we measured T cell telomere lengths at screening and at months 21 and 45 in 29 Hepatitis-C virus infected subjects. These subjects had failed to achieve a sustained virologic response following 24 weeks of pegylated-interferon-alpha plus ribavirin treatment and were subsequently randomized to either a no additional therapy group or a maintenance dose pegylated-IFNα group for an additional 3.5 years. Significant telomere loss in naïve T cells occurred in the first 21 months in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere losses were similar in both groups during the final two years. Expansion of CD8(+CD45RA(+CD57(+ memory T cells and an inverse correlation of alanine aminotransferase levels with naïve CD8(+ T cell telomere loss were observed in the control group but not in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere length at screening inversely correlated with Hepatitis-C viral load and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sustained interferon-alpha treatment increased telomere loss in naïve T cells, and inhibited the accumulation of T cell memory expansions. The durability of this effect and consequences for immune senescence need to be defined.

  8. Telling It Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, Barbara; Burns, Ann, Comp.

    2007-01-01

    Everybody has a story to tell, but not everybody can tell it well, which it why some first novels jump to the best sellers lists and others fade away. This year's crop of successful first novelists come from all walks of life--there's journalist Vanora Bennett and historian Alison Weir, dance critic Anita Amirrezvani, and financial analyst manque…

  9. What economic theory tells us about the impacts of reducing food losses and/or waste: implications for research, policy and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background - Whereas the prevalence of hunger and food insecurity is often cited as a motivation for reducing losses and waste in agriculture and food systems, the impacts of such reduction on food security and the wider economy have not yet been investigated. This paper gives insights into these effects, the factors of influence, and derives implications for applied research, policy and practice. Methods - We used economic theory to analyse the impacts of food loss reductions on the supply s...

  10. Whole body 59Fe-elimination rates and corresponding blood losses in patients with factitious anemia induced by self-blood letting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within a year two cases were identified and quantitated for blood losses by whole body counting of retained iron. Whereas the 2 patients did not lose much blood during their observation within the hospital their blood losses increased upon release from the hospital. Although they lost about 5 liter blood in 50 days faecal occult blood tests were always negative and the daily faecal and urinary 59Fe-excretion was within the normal range. Haemoglobin and erythrocyte levels were stable during the periods of clinical observation when the whole body 59Fe-elimination rates were only just above the normal range. These values dropped however to very low values during or following periods of extremely elevated whole body 59Fe-elimination rates immediately after release of the patients from the hospital. Blood losses of up to 145 ml/d (=50 mg Fe/d) can be compensated by oral ferrous iron therapy with 4 x 50 = 200 mg Fe2+ /d. The patients did however refuse to take oral or parenteral iron and insisted in one case on regular blood transfusions twice per week. Two more probable cases of factitious anemia were subsequently observed and partially investigated. (orig./MG)

  11. Loss of alveolar membrane diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farha Samar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced gas transfer in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is traditionally attributed to remodeling and progressive loss of pulmonary arterial vasculature that results in decreased capillary blood volume available for gas exchange. Methods We tested this hypothesis by determination of lung diffusing capacity (DL and its components, the alveolar capillary membrane diffusing capacity (Dm and lung capillary blood volume (Vc in 28 individuals with PAH in comparison to 41 healthy individuals, and in 19 PAH patients over time. Using single breath simultaneous measure of diffusion of carbon monoxide (DLCO and nitric oxide (DLNO, DL and Dm were respectively determined, and Vc calculated. Dm and Vc were evaluated over time in relation to standard clinical indicators of disease severity, including brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD and right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP by echocardiography. Results Both DLCO and DLNO were reduced in PAH as compared to controls and the lower DL in PAH was due to loss of both Dm and Vc (all p CO of PAH patients did not change over time, DLNO decreased by 24 ml/min/mmHg/year (p = 0.01. Consequently, Dm decreased and Vc tended to increase over time, which led to deterioration of the Dm/Vc ratio, a measure of alveolar-capillary membrane functional efficiency without changes in clinical markers. Conclusions The findings indicate that lower than normal gas transfer in PAH is due to loss of both Dm and Vc, but that deterioration of Dm/Vc over time is related to worsening membrane diffusion.

  12. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF MEAN ARTERIAL PRESSURE ON ESTIMATED BLOOD LOSS DURING ENDOSCOPIC SINUS SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W Williams

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The current practice of lowering mean arterial pressure (MAP during endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS is common, but unproven with regard to peer reviewed literature. The controlled hypotension induced is aimed for improved surgical field and lower the blood loss. Lower mean arterial pressures especially for prolonged surgeries may result in end organ hypoperfusion. The authors reviewed all patients who underwent outpatient endoscopic sinus surgery for the diagnosis of chronic sinusitis from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 at Memorial Hermann Hospital – Texas Medical Centre. We individually reviewed case sheets of every patient and documented blood loss as recorded on the anaesthesia record or in the surgical procedure note, among other variables. A total of 326 patients were included in this study. The median estimated blood loss (EBL was found to be 50 ml. The multivariate regression analysis between these three groups showed that EBL was higher in MAP 75 group. The average of EBL in MAP75 group and the average of EBL in MAP 65-70 group is 42% higher than that in MAP>75 group when other variables were fixed. Hence we found the trend toward higher blood loss with lower MAP. The authors conclude that lower MAP does not result in lower EBL in endoscopic sinus surgery. Furthermore, increases in BMI and crystalloid administered during an aesthetic management of these cases correlates with increased estimate blood loss.

  13. Bioethics of the refusal of blood by Jehovah's Witnesses: Part 3. A proposal for a don't-ask-don't-tell policy.

    OpenAIRE

    Muramoto, O

    1999-01-01

    Of growing concern over Jehovah's Witnesses' (JWs) refusal of blood is the intrusion of the religious organisation into its members' personal decision making about medical care. The organisation currently may apply severe religious sanctions to JWs who opt for certain forms of blood-based treatment. While the doctrine may be maintained as the unchangeable "law of God", the autonomy of individual JW patients could still be protected by the organisation modifying its current policy so that it s...

  14. Perioperative blood loss in open retropubic radical prostatectomy - is it safe to get operated at an educational hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blood loss during radical prostatectomy has been a long term issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the training level of the first assistant regarding blood loss in open retropubic radical prostatectomy at an educational hospital. Material and methods 364 patients underwent radical prostatectomy from 11/2006 to 10/2007 at one institution operated by one surgeon. In 319 patients all predefined parameters were obtained. Training level was determined by year of residency (1-5 yrs or consultant status. Perioperative blood loss was calculated using three parameters: Hemoglobin level before and after surgery, postoperative sucker volume and weight of compresses. Furthermore the influence of prostatic size and BMI was analyzed. Results The Hb-decrease 24 h postoperatively was 2.4 g/dl median (-0.4-7.6 g/dl; sucker volume was 250 ml median (10-1500 ml; weight of compresses and swabs was 412 g median (0-972 g. One patient needed a transfusion with two erythrocyte concentrates one day after the surgery. There was no significant correlation regarding Hb-decrease (p = 0.86 or sucker volume plus weight of compresses (p = 0.59 in regard to the years of residency of the assisting physician. Also the number of assisted operations (n = 20 had no significant influence on calculated blood loss (p = 0.38. Conclusions For an experienced surgeon the impact of the assistant regarding blood loss seems negligible. The training level of the assistant was not significantly correlated to a rise or decrease of perioperative blood loss. In our data radical prostatectomy could be safely performed at an educational hospital independent of the training level of the first assistant.

  15. Which Route of Tranexamic Acid Administration is More Effective to Reduce Blood Loss Following Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Esmailiejah, Ali Akbar; Abbasian, Mohammad Reza; Safdari, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most appropriate route of tranexamic acid administration is controversial. In the current study, we compared the efficacy of intravenous (IV) and topical intra-articular tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss and transfusion rate in patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred twenty 120 patients were scheduled to undergo primary total knee arthroplasty. Patients were randomly allocated to three equal groups: IV tranexamic acid (500 mg), topical tranexamic acid (3 g in 100 mL normal saline) and the control. In the topical group, half of the volume was used to irrigate the joint and the other half was injected intra-articularly. The volume of blood loss, hemoglobin (Hb) level at 24 hours postoperative, and rate of transfusion was compared between groups. Results: The blood loss and Hb level were significantly greater and lower in the control group, respectively (P=0.031). Also, the rate of transfusion was significantly greater in the control group (P=0.013). However, IV and topical groups did not differ significantly in terms of measured variables. No patient experienced a thromboembolic event in our study. Conclusion: Tranexamic acid is a useful antifibrinolytic drug to reduce postoperative blood loss, Hb drop, and rate of blood transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The route of tranexamic acid administration did not affect the efficacy and safety. PMID:26894222

  16. Hepcidin is a Better Predictor of Iron Stores in Premenopausal Women than Blood Loss or Dietary Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Karen H C; Booth, Alison O; Nowson, Caryl A; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Irving, David O; Riddell, Lynn J

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between dietary intake, circulating hepcidin and iron status in free-living premenopausal women has not been explored. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify dietary determinants of iron stores after accounting for blood loss and to determine whether iron intake predicts iron stores independently of hepcidin in a sample of Australian women. Three hundred thirty eight women aged 18-50 years were recruited. Total intake and food sources of iron were determined via food frequency questionnaire; the magnitude of menstrual losses was estimated by self-report; and blood donation volume was quantified using blood donation records and self-reported donation frequency. Serum samples were analysed for ferritin, hepcidin and C-reactive protein concentrations. Linear regression was used to investigate associations. Accounting for blood loss, each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron was associated with a 3% increase in iron stores (p = 0.027); this association was not independent of hepcidin. Hepcidin was a more influential determinant of iron stores than blood loss and dietary factors combined (R² of model including hepcidin = 0.65; R² of model excluding hepcidin = 0.17, p for difference strategies to increase iron intake may be important means of improving iron status in women with depleted iron stores. PMID:27598194

  17. Preoperative Factors Predicting Intraoperative Blood Loss in Female Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Yang, Mingyuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chuanfeng; Fan, Jianping; Chen, Ziqiang; Wei, Xianzhao; Zhang, Guoyou; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Xie, Yang; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this article, a retrospective analysis of 161 female patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is performed who underwent posterior correction and fusion using all-pedicle screw instrument. The aim of this article is to find out preoperative factors that influence intraoperative blood loss (IOBL) in female patients with AIS. The IOBL in posterior correction and fusion surgery for patients with idiopathic scoliosis greatly varies. The variables affecting the IOBL also greatly vary among different studies. Medical records of all female patients with AIS who underwent posterior correction and fusion operations using the all-pedicle screw system in our hospital from January 2012 to January 2014 were reviewed. Patients with irregular menstruation, who underwent osteotomy, and using coagulants were excluded. Preoperative clinical data, including patient age, height, weight, Risser sign, day after last menstruation, major curve Cobb angle, fulcrum-bending Cobb angle, curve flexibility index, sagittal thoracic Cobb angle, sagittal lumbar Cobb angle, albumin, hemoglobin, platelet, activated partial thromboplastic time (APTT), prothrombin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, fusion level, menstrual phase, and blood type, were collected. Data were further analyzed using multiple linear regression with forward elimination. A total of 161 patients were included in this study. The mean IOBL was 933.98 ± 158.10 mL (500–2000 mL). Forward selection showed that fulcrum-bending Cobb angle, fusion level, Risser sign, APTT, fibrinogen, and menstrual phase were the preoperative factors that influenced the IOBL in female patients with AIS. Equation of IOBL was built by multiple linear regression: IOBL = −966.228 + 54.738 Risser sign + 18.910 fulcrum-bending Cobb angle + 114.737 fibrinogen + 21.386 APTT − 71.312 team 2 − 177.985 team 3 − 165.082 team 4 + 53.470 fusion level. R = 0.782. Operation for patients with AIS was featured by large IOBL

  18. Effects of Three Types of Long-acting Contraceptive Implants on Menstrual Blood Loss in 89 Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩丽晖; 范慧民; 龚泉; 谢争; 孟凡; 洪玉凤; 王文娟

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of three types of contraceptive implants: the domestic No I , No I implants and Norplant on menstrual blood loss (MBL). Method: Eighty-nine healthy subjects were randomly allocated to three groups.Menstrual blood loss was measured before implanting and 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. Results: MBL of the three groups prior to the use of implant were 43. 3±6. 9ml,48.9±4. 3 ml, and 43.7±5. 5ml respectively, and decreased significantly at all post-implantation periods. MBLs were 32. 8±13. 2ml, 24. 8±5. 5ml, and 19. 7±9.3ml at the 3rd month after implantation and 23. 9±5. 9 ml, 40. 8±10. 4 ml, 25. 9±6. 0 ml at the 12th month after implantation respectively, sigmficantly less than before implantation(P<0. 05~0. 01). A tendency was seen in increase of hemoglobin concentraition. Conclusion: Long-acting contraceptive implants decreased menstrual blood loss and elevates hemoglobin concentration. They are applicable to women as a contraceptive method without blood loss effects.

  19. Does the number of prior oocyte retrieval practices increase the amount of blood loss in subsequent OPU procedures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Ozdamar

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Our study results reveal that the amount of the blood loss in OPU does not significantly vary between women subjected to the procedure for the first time and for more than 1 time. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(2.000: 276-279

  20. Effect of antifibrinolytic drugs on transfusion requirement and blood loss during orthotopic liver transplantation: Results from a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: During orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT, activation of the fibrinolytic system can contribute significantly to perioperative bleeding. Prophylactic administration of antifibrinolytic agents has been shown to reduce blood loss and the need for allogenic transfusion. Objective: To study the effect of antifibrinolytics on requirement of blood components, blood loss and operative time during OLT in patients with end stage liver disease, reporting to a single centre. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients who underwent OLT at this centre during the period February 2003-October 2007 were the subjects of this study. Based on the individual anesthesiologist′s preference, patients were assigned to receive either two million units of aprotinin (AP as a bolus followed by 5,00,000 units/hour or 10 mg/kg tranexamic acid (TAas a bolus followed by 10 mg/kg every six to eight hours, administered from the induction till the end of the surgery. Transfusion policy was standardized in all patients. Intraoperative red cell salvage was done wherever possible. The effect of these two antifibrinolytic drugs on transfusion requirement was evaluated as a whole and in a sub group of patients from each treatment group and compared with a concurrent control group that did not receive antifibrinolytic drugs. Results: Fifty patients (40 M / 10 F, 44 adults, 6 pediatric patients underwent OLT in the study period. Fourteen patients were given AP, 25 patients were given TA and 11 patients did not receive any of the agents(control group. The median volume of total blood components transfused in antifibrinolytic group (n=39 was 4540 ml(0-19,200ml, blood loss 5 l(0.7-35l and operative time 9h (4.5-17h and that of control group(n=11 was 5700 ml(0-15,500ml, 10 l(0.6-25 l and 9h (6.4-15.8h respectively. The median volume of blood transfusions, blood loss and operative time was lesser in AP group(n=14 than that of TA group(n=25. Conclusion: There is definite

  1. Home blood sugar testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check your blood sugar level as often as instructed by your health care provider. Write down the results. This will tell you how ... everyone with diabetes needs to check their blood sugar every day. Some people need to check it ...

  2. EFFICACY OF TRANEXAMIC ACID IN DECREASING BLOOD LOSS DURING AND AFTER CAESAREAN SECTION: A RANDOMIZED CASE CONTROL PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullika

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: To reduce maternal mortality and morbidity caused by bleeding, it is important to reduce the amount of bleeding during and after lower segment caesarean section (LSCS. Tranexamic acid helps to reduce bleeding during and after LSCS. OBJECTIVES: To study the efficacy and safety of Tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during and after Lower segment Caesarean Section (LSCS. METHODS: A randomized case controlled prospective study was conducted on 200 women undergoing lower segment cesarean section. Hundreds of them that were given tranexamic acid immediately before LSCS were compared to hundred others to whom tranexamic acid was not given. Blood loss was collected and measured during the two periods, from plancental delivery to end of LSCS and second from end of LSCS to two hours postpartum. RESULTS: Tranexamic acid significantly reduced the quantity of blood loss from placental delivery to end of LSCS, 202.25ml in the study group vs392.20 ml in the control group (p<0.001; from the end of LSCS, to 2 hours postpartum 3.80ml in the study group versus 112.25ml in the control group (p<0.001; In totality, it significantly reduced the quantity of blood loss from placental delivery to two hours postpartum i.e. 27.05ml in the study group versus 510.45ml in the control group (p < 0.001. No complications or side effects were noted. CONCLUSION: Tranexamic acid significantly reduced the amount of blood loss during and after LSCS. Tranexamic acid can be used prophylactically; moreover it is safer and effective in women undergoing LSCS.

  3. Why Tell Stories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Jordan S.; Jones, Rose B.

    2009-01-01

    Storytelling was first developed as a means of transferring important historical information from one generation to another. Though stories are told today more often for entertainment and amusement, the art of storytelling remains of significant value to society. Whether the children are telling the story or simply listening to it, the benefits of…

  4. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  5. Manage your blood sugar (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checking your blood sugar levels often and writing down the results will tell you how well you are managing your diabetes so ... as possible. The best times to check your blood sugar are before meals and at bedtime. Your blood ...

  6. Manage your blood sugar (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checking your blood sugar levels often and writing down the results will tell you how well you are managing your diabetes so you ... possible. The best times to check your blood sugar are before meals and at bedtime. Your blood ...

  7. Hepcidin is a Better Predictor of Iron Stores in Premenopausal Women than Blood Loss or Dietary Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen H. C. Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between dietary intake, circulating hepcidin and iron status in free-living premenopausal women has not been explored. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify dietary determinants of iron stores after accounting for blood loss and to determine whether iron intake predicts iron stores independently of hepcidin in a sample of Australian women. Three hundred thirty eight women aged 18–50 years were recruited. Total intake and food sources of iron were determined via food frequency questionnaire; the magnitude of menstrual losses was estimated by self-report; and blood donation volume was quantified using blood donation records and self-reported donation frequency. Serum samples were analysed for ferritin, hepcidin and C-reactive protein concentrations. Linear regression was used to investigate associations. Accounting for blood loss, each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron was associated with a 3% increase in iron stores (p = 0.027; this association was not independent of hepcidin. Hepcidin was a more influential determinant of iron stores than blood loss and dietary factors combined (R2 of model including hepcidin = 0.65; R2 of model excluding hepcidin = 0.17, p for difference <0.001, and increased hepcidin diminished the positive association between iron intake and iron stores. Despite not being the biggest contributor to dietary iron intake, unprocessed meat was positively associated with iron stores, and each 10% increase in consumption was associated with a 1% increase in iron stores (p = 0.006. No other dietary factors were associated with iron stores. Interventions that reduce hepcidin production combined with dietary strategies to increase iron intake may be important means of improving iron status in women with depleted iron stores.

  8. The association between low levels of lead in blood and occupational noise-induced hearing loss in steel workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the use of leaded gasoline has ceased in the last decade, background lead exposure has generally been reduced. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low-level lead exposure on human hearing loss. This study was conducted in a steel plant and 412 workers were recruited from all over the plant. Personal information such as demographics and work history was obtained through a questionnaire. All subjects took part in an audiometric examination of hearing thresholds, for both ears, with air-conducted pure tones at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000 and 8000 Hz. Subjects' blood samples were collected and analyzed for levels of manganese, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead with inductive couple plasma-mass spectrometry. Meanwhile, noise levels in different working zones were determined using a sound level meter with A-weighting network. Only subjects with hearing loss difference of no more than 15 dB between both ears and had no congenital abnormalities were included in further data analysis. Lead was the only metal in blood found significantly correlated with hearing loss for most tested sound frequencies (p < 0.05 to p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age and noise level, the logistic regression model analysis indicated that elevated blood lead over 7 μg/dL was significantly associated with hearing loss at the sound frequencies of 3000 through 8000 Hz with odds ratios raging from 3.06 to 6.26 (p < 0.05 ∼ p < 0.005). We concluded that elevated blood lead at level below 10 μg/dL might enhance the noise-induced hearing loss. Future research needs to further explore the detailed mechanism.

  9. Telling the truth.

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, J

    1991-01-01

    Are doctors and nurses bound by just the same constraints as everyone else in regard to honesty? What, anyway, does honesty require? Telling no lies? Avoiding intentional deception by whatever means? From a utilitarian standpoint lying would seem to be on the same footing as other forms of intentional deception: yielding the same consequences. But utilitarianism fails to explain the wrongness of lying. Doctors and nurses, like everyone else, have a prima facie duty not to lie--but again like ...

  10. Impact of early versus delayed umbilical cord clamping on post partum blood loss: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogiraj Vaijanathrao Chidre,Vijayalakshmi Chirumamilla

    2015-08-01

    Methods: A randomized, controlled trial was performed on 183 consenting women fulfilling eligibility criteria in labour ward of a teaching hospital in India. They were randomly assigned into early cord clamping or delayed cord clamping group; other components of active management of third stage of labour being same for all. The duration of third stage of labour was noted. Quantitative assessment of post partum blood loss was done using BRASSS-V drapes and weighing blood soaked pads. Cord blood haemoglobin and hematocrit at birth and infant haemoglobin and hematocrit at 90 +/-7 days were estimated. Statistical analysis done using students unpaired and lsquo;t' test. Results: No difference was noted in the mean blood loss (203.52 +/- 122.74 ml versus 200.74+/- 104.07 ml in early and delayed cord clamping respectively and the duration of third stage of labour (Mean: 296.59+/- 98.97 seconds versus 281.79+/-104.59 seconds for early and delayed clamping respectively. Infant haemoglobin at 90 +/-7 days was 11.07 +/- 1.27 gm/dl versus 12.70+/- 1.41 gm/dl (p=0.0000 and infant hematocrit at 90 +/-7 days was 34.13+/-3.93 % versus 39.33 +/-4.88 % in early and delayed clamping respectively (p=0.0000. Conclusion: The timing of cord clamping has no impact on the mean blood loss and duration of third stage of labour. Delayed clamping significantly increases mean venous haemoglobin and hematocrit at 90 +/-7 days without increasing NICU admissions. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 1103-1108

  11. Wilhelm Tell vor Schiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Jurt

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Na Suíça, a figura de Guilherme Tell representava duas tradições, por um lado o herói que expressa o orgulho dos confederados, por outro, a encarnação dos oprimidos em geral. Na peça ‘Grisler ou l’Helvétie délivrée’ (1748 do autor de Berna Samuel Henzi, a figura central é a do déspota Grisler, a quem Guilherme Tell se opõe. Após a deposição do tirano é introduzido um programa republicano que se baseia na idéia de igualdade frente à lei. Na tragédia ‘Guillaume Tell’ (1766 de Antoine-Marin Lemierre virtude e senso de liberdade são postos em relação com o motivo topológico das montanhas. Tell não aparece aqui mais como um solitário e sim como um dos confederados. Na época da revolução francesa, Guilherme Tell aparece ao lado de Brutus como uma figura emblemática da resistência do povo contra a tirania, e a peça de Lemierre obteve então grande sucesso. Schiller também associou em seu ‘Wilhelm Tell’ (1804 a idéia de liberdade suíça à representação da natureza sublime, como era propagado nos relatos de viagem. Sua peça, no entanto, se contrapunha à usurpação da figura de Tell pelos jacobinos e invocava uma comunidade baseada na fraternidade que deveria substituir o velho modelo social marcado pela figura do super-pai.

  12. Coagulation competence and fluid recruitment after moderate blood loss in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaar, Morten; Mørkeberg, Jakob; Pott, Frank C;

    2014-01-01

    blood cell count (4.80 ± 0.33 to 4.64 ± 0.37 × 10(12) cells l(-1), P < 0.05) indicating that 218 ± 173 ml fluid was recruited to the circulation. Withdrawing 450 ml blood reduced the time until initial fibrin formation (R: 6.5 ± 0.9 to 5.1 ± 1.0 min, P < 0.01), whereas the rate of clot formation...

  13. First Trimester Pregnancy Loss and the Expression of alternatively spliced NKp30 isoforms in Maternal Blood and Placental Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avishai eShemesh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to investigate whether first trimester pregnancy loss is associated with differences in expression of NKp30 splice variants (isoforms in maternal peripheral blood or placental tissue. We conducted a prospective case-control study; a total of 33 women undergoing dilation and curettage due to first trimester pregnancy loss were further subdivided into groups with sporadic or recurrent pregnancy loss. The control group was comprised of women undergoing elective termination of pregnancy. The qPCR approach was employed to assess the relative expression of NKp30 isoforms as well as the total expression of NKp30 and NKp46 receptors between the selected groups. Results show that in both PBMC and placental tissue, NKp46 and NKp30 expression was mildly elevated in the pregnancy loss groups compared with the elective group. In particular, NKp46 elevation was significant. Moreover, expression analysis of NKp30 isoforms manifested a different profile between PBMC and the placenta. NKp30-a and NKp30-b isoforms in the placental tissue, but not in PBMC, showed a significant increase in the pregnancy loss groups compared with the elective group. Placental expression of NKp30 activating isoforms -a and -b in the pregnancy loss groups was negatively correlated with PLGF expression. In contrast, placental expression of these isoforms in the elective group was positively correlated with TNFα, IL-10 and VEGF-A expression. The altered expression of NKp30 activating isoforms in placental tissue from patients with pregnancy loss compared to the elective group and the different correlations with cytokine expression point to the involvement of NKp30-mediated function in pregnancy loss.

  14. The Value of Tranexamic Acid in Reducing Blood Loss following Hip Reconstruction in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Majid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective study of 51 consecutive hip reconstructions in children with cerebral palsy performed between 2011 and 2013. Tranexamic acid (TXA was used in 14 hip reconstructions only. Transfusion rate was higher, postoperative Hb was lower, and patients stayed longer in the TXA group. This did not reach a statistical significance (P = 0.75, 0.5, and 0.71, resp.. More than half of the patients who had TXA underwent bilateral hip reconstructions in comparison with 27% only in the non-TXA group. Bilateral hip reconstructions mean more surgery, more blood loss, and more blood transfusion. The patients who had TXA were significantly more disabled as evident by the higher proportions of patient with worse GMFCS levels. Although we have not been able to demonstrate the value of TXA in reducing blood loss and transfusion rate in children with CP who underwent hip reconstruction, it is hoped that an interest in exploring the value of TXA in paediatric orthopaedic surgery is generated. Ideally this should be explored further in an adequately powered, randomised controlled trial where risk of bias is minimized.

  15. Use of recombinant activated factor VII for reduction of perioperative blood loss during elective surgical correction of spine deformity in a Jehovah's Witness. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kącka, Katarzyna; Kącki, Wojciech; Merak, Joanna; Błęka, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Planned surgical procedures at patients who refuse allogenic blood transfusion because of religious convictions are important problem, not only medical but also ethical and juristical. At the study authors report the successful use of activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa) for the reduction of perioperative blood loss in four years old child - Jehovah's Witness, who had planned Torode kyphectomy. Applied perioperative management together with preparing to surgery with erythropoietin allowed for reduction of blood loss and avoiding of blood transfusion. Authors state, that appropriate perioperative proceeding makes a possibility of safe surgical procedures also at patients who refuse the transfusion. PMID:21057153

  16. Anesthetic management of a patient with 10 l of blood loss during operation for a retroperitoneal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqin Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding is a common problem during resection of a retroperitoneal mass. Massive bleeding may occur in case of injury of an adjacent major vessel or organ. This case report describes a successful anesthetic management of a patient with 10 l of blood loss within three hours surgery. A 44-year-old woman who underwent an operation for resection of a retroperitoneal mass, went to a hypovolemic shock, due to acute life-threatening intra-operative bleeding, and was successfully rescued with a combination of measures, including control of surgical bleeding, supportive treatment with rapid fluid infusion, massive transfusion of blood products and administration of intravenous vasoactive agents for maintaining tissue perfusion and oxygenation, utilizing intraoperative autologous blood salvaged via cell saver, as well as prevention and treatment of complications. The patient received a total of 22 units of Packet Red Blood Cells (PRBCs, 18 units of Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP, 10 units of cryoprecipitate, 3750 ml of her own salvage blood. Postoperatively, she was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU with mechanical ventilator support, where she received another 5.4 units of FFP, 10 units of cryoprecipitate. The patient developed features of early acute lung injury such as fever and hypoxemia, and was managed successfully with mechanical ventilator support for a few days. At a three-month follow-up, the patient was doing very well. This paper explores the pathogenesia, implications, prevention and treatment of the transfusion-associated complications such as acidosis, hypothermia, electrolyte abnormalities, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI. Particular attention is given to the prevention of secondary coagulopathy of the patient requiring massive blood transfusion. This case study presents a good reference for similar anesthetic scenario in the future.

  17. Rate of blood loss and timing of exsanguination on prevalence of ecchymosis in fallow deer (Dama dama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, R C; Falepau, D F; Flesch, J S; Wiklund, E

    2010-05-01

    Blood loss associated with four combinations of stunning and exsanguination methods was determined as part of studying prevalence of ecchymosis in slaughtered fallow deer (Dama dama). A fifth treatment simulated incomplete severance of the extended neck after captive bolt stunning. Predicted mean weights of blood collected from the five slaughter treatments, including electrical stunning followed by the thoracic stick method of exsanguination, captive bolt stunning followed by the thoracic stick, captive bolt stunning followed by the gash cut method of exsanguination, electrical stunning followed by the gash cut, and captive bolt stunning followed by incomplete severance of the extended neck, were 1458.7, 1072.7, 684.5, 463.7, and 228.5 g, respectively. The overall effect of exsanguination method was highly significant (p<0.001) with the thoracic stick resulting in the greatest weight of blood collection in the 10s period immediately after initiation. The overall effect of stunning method on blood loss was not significant, although there was a significant (p<0.05) stunning method by exsanguination method interaction. Ecchymosis of varying severity occurred in some carcases from all treatment groups. Using the total loin and round ecchymosis scores, when little or no ecchymosis (grades 0 or 1) was compared with some ecchymosis (grade 2) by logistic regression, castrated bucks were 9.8 times more likely (p=0.002) and does 4.2 times more likely (p=0.06) to have some ecchymosis than entire bucks. The results indicate that ecchymosis can be reduced in fallow deer carcases by thoracic stick exsanguination incorporated less than 10s after stunning. PMID:20374859

  18. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... visit the health care provider, he or she should tell you what your blood pressure numbers are; if he or she does not, you should ask for your readings. Blood Pressure Severity and ...

  19. Effects of stunning and decapitation on broiler activity during bleeding, blood loss, carcass, and breast meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, W D; Fletcher, D L; Buhr, R J

    2003-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to determine the effects of electrical stunning and decapitation on bird activity as well as carcass and meat quality. In Experiment 1, broilers were subjected to one of four stunning and killing methods: no stun and neck cut, stun and neck cut, no stun and decapitation, and stun and decapitation. Birds were scored for severity of physical activity on a scale of 1 to 4 with 1 being no activity and 4 being severe wing flapping and muscular contractions. Carcasses were also scored for red wing tips and broken bones. In Experiments 2 to 4, all birds were stunned prior to neck cut or decapitation. Carcasses were scored as described in Experiment 1 as well as measurements of blood loss, feather removal, and breast meat pH, color, cook loss, and tenderness. Based on carcass activity in Experiment 1, decapitation following stunning was similar to a conventional stun and unilateral neck cut, except there was almost no late activity (after 60 s) observed in the decapitated birds. Decapitation following stunning did not result in any consistent carcass quality defects compared to conventional killing in the four experiments. No differences were found in 24-h lightness values, yellowness, cook yield, tenderness, and ultimate pH between conventionally killed and decapitated birds. Blood loss and breast meat redness were inconsistent. These results indicate that high frequency stunning and decapitation may be an acceptable alternative to conventional slaughter based on carcass and meat quality and by ensuring an irreversible loss of consciousness. PMID:12580261

  20. Effect of a high-protein diet on maintenance of blood pressure levels achieved after initial weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberink, M F; Geleijnse, J M; Bakker, S J L;

    2015-01-01

    Randomized trials have shown significant blood pressure (BP) reductions after increased protein compared with carbohydrate intake, but the effect on BP maintenance after initial weight loss is unclear. We examined the effect of a high-protein diet on the maintenance of reduced BP after weight loss...... in 420 overweight adults from the Diet, Obesity and Genes study. After an 8-week weight-loss period (>8% BW), subjects (42±6 years) were randomized to either a high-protein diet (23-28 en% protein) or a lower-protein control diet (10-15 en% protein) for 26 weeks. BMI after weight loss was 30.3±4.3 kg...... m(-2), BP was 118/73 mm Hg and 28 subjects (6.5%) used antihypertensive agents. Systolic BP during 26 weeks of weight maintenance dietary intervention increased in both treatment groups, but it was 2.2 mm Hg less (95% CI: -4.6 to 0.2 mm Hg, P=0.08) in the high-protein group than in the lower...

  1. COMPARISON OF HAEMODYNAMICS AND BLOOD LOSS IN URETHROPLASTY SURGERIES DONE UNDER GENERAL ANAESTHESIA WITH AND WITHOUT CAUDAL BLOCK IN CHILDREN AGED BETWEEN 2–5 YRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aavula

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urethroplasty surgery is a painful procedure demanding high doses of analgesics, which may be associated with adverse effects and associated with significant blood loss. Caudal blockade provides good analgesia and hemodynamic stability and is probably a useful supplement in these surgeries. OBJECTIVES To compare the heart rate, blood pressure response to surgical stimuli and the incidence of blood transfusion rate post-operatively between 2 groups – A General Anaesthesia only. B General Anaesthesia with caudal block. SETTINGS AND DESIGN Study was conducted in 100 children, randomly divided into two groups A and B. Only ASA grade 1 patients aged 2-5yrs. undergoing urethroplasty for hypospadias were included. MATERIALS AND METHODS 1ml/kg of 0.125% bupivacaine was used for caudal blockade in group B (GA+CAUDAL and compared with group A (Only GA. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded for every 5 min. Blood loss and requirement of blood transfusions were recorded at the end of the surgery. RESULTS There were statistically significant haemodynamic changes and blood transfusion requirement during surgery in group A. In Group B haemodynamic parameters were stable (P value 0 and blood transfusion requirement was also less (p value 0.00054 (P<0.01. CONCLUSION Caudal blockade when supplemented with general anaesthesia reduces blood loss, decreases requirement for blood transfusion and maintains haemodynamic stability.

  2. Operative blood loss and use of blood products after full robotic and conventional low anterior resection with total mesorectal excision for treatment of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Roberto; Luca, Fabrizio; Pozzi, Simonetta; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Valvo, Manuela; Sonzogni, Angelica; Radice, Davide; Ghezzi, Tiago Leal

    2011-06-01

    To date, no studies have investigated the estimated blood loss (EBL) after full robotic low anterior resection (R-LAR) in a case-matched model, comparing it with the conventional open approach (O-LAR). Forty-nine patients in the R-LAR and 105 in the O-LAR group were matched for age, gender, BMI (body mass index), ASA (American Society of Anesthesiology) class, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification and UICC (Union for International Cancer Control) stage, distance of the lower edge of the tumor from the anal verge, presence of comorbidities, and preoperative hemoglobin (Hb). EBL was significantly higher in the O-LAR group (P superior to O-LAR. PMID:21765876

  3. Blood Loss From Diagnostic Laboratory Tests in Critically III Patient and Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Kelebek Girgin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anemia is very common problem in critically ill patients, and it has many deleterious effects of morbidity and mortality, decreased in oxygen carrying capacity. Phlebotomy is an important factor contributing to anemia and the need for transfusion. We aimed to evaluate the volumes of blood drawn for laboratory tests from critically ill patients, and effect on anemia and transfusion practices. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 60 critically ill patients. Data were recorded daily including volume of the withdrawn blood, hemoglobin (Hb, indication for transfusion, and number of units transfused. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II ve Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA scores, the length of stay (LOS in the intensive care unit (ICU. Results: Thirty six of the patients (60% that transfused had significantly higher admitting APACHE II and SOFA scores (p<0.01, p<0.001. The average total volume drawn per patient was 13.05 mL for the 24-hour period except the first day in admission the ICU. The mean volume drawn the first day was detected as 27.90 mL. Total volumes drawn were significantly higher in patients that transfused at the end of second and third week (p<0.001, p<0.001. The mean pretransfusion Hb level was 8.17 g/dL, and 44.5% of all transfusions were performed within the first week. The mean ICU LOS was longer in transfused patients (p<0.001 and mortality in the transfused patients also was significantly higher (p<0.05. Conclusion: Blood drawn and transfusion need increased with prolonged ICU stay. Additionally, patients’ health condition affects the requirement of transfusion. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 61-5

  4. Teaching ethics: telling stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, A

    1995-02-01

    In order to develop moral literacy, nursing students should be exposed both to traditional rules and justice-based ethics, and to a feminist care perspective. Justice and truth are not objective and abstract, but are embedded in context and are relative in nature. Nurses may be given the tools with which to analyse and understand ethical dilemmas from a justice-based view and an opportunity to tell their stories in order to understand the roles, motives, relational considerations and contextual influences on decision outcomes. If we are serious about our desire to raise critical consciousness of students and nurses in practice, we must attend to and join feminists in their attempts to validate women's ways of knowing, to assist women to question their contexts, and to put aside preconceived positions and notions about moral reasoning among women. PMID:7708027

  5. Effect of a high-protein diet on maintenance of blood pressure levels achieved after initial weight loss: the DiOGenes randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, M.F.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Bakker, S.J.L.; Larsen, T.

    2015-01-01

    Randomized trials have shown significant blood pressure (BP) reductions after increased protein compared with carbohydrate intake, but the effect on BP maintenance after initial weight loss is unclear. We examined the effect of a high-protein diet on the maintenance of reduced BP after weight loss i

  6. Effect of a high-protein diet on maintenance of blood pressure levels achieved after initial weight loss : the DiOGenes randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, M. F.; Geleijnse, J. M.; Bakker, S. J. L.; Larsen, T. M.; Handjieva-Darlesnka, T.; Kafatos, A.; Martinez, J. A.; Pfeiffer, A. F. H.; Kunesova, M.; Jebb, S. A.; Holst, C.; Astrup, A.; Saris, W. H. M.; Brink, E. J.; van Baak, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Randomized trials have shown significant blood pressure (BP) reductions after increased protein compared with carbohydrate intake, but the effect on BP maintenance after initial weight loss is unclear. We examined the effect of a high-protein diet on the maintenance of reduced BP after weight loss i

  7. Measuring Post-Partum Haemorrhage in Low-Resource Settings: The Diagnostic Validity of Weighed Blood Loss versus Quantitative Changes in Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atukunda, Esther Cathyln; Mugyenyi, Godfrey Rwambuka; Obua, Celestino; Atuhumuza, Elly Bronney; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Tornes, Yarine Fajardo; Agaba, Amon Ganaafa; Siedner, Mark Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate estimation of blood loss is central to prompt diagnosis and management of post-partum hemorrhage (PPH), which remains a leading cause of maternal mortality in low-resource countries. In such settings, blood loss is often estimated visually and subjectively by attending health workers, due to inconsistent availability of laboratory infrastructure. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of weighed blood loss (WBL) versus changes in peri-partum hemoglobin to detect PPH. Methods Data from this analysis were collected as part of a randomized controlled trial comparing oxytocin with misoprostol for PPH (NCT01866241). Blood samples for complete blood count were drawn on admission and again prior to hospital discharge or before blood transfusion. During delivery, women were placed on drapes and had pre-weighed sanitary towels placed around their perineum. Blood was then drained into a calibrated container and the sanitary towels were added to estimate WBL, where each gram of blood was estimated as a milliliter. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values (PPVs) were calculated at various blood volume loss and time combinations, and we fit receiver-operator curves using blood loss at 1, 2, and 24 hours compared to a reference standard of haemoglobin decrease of >10%. Results A total of 1,140 women were enrolled in the study, of whom 258 (22.6%) developed PPH, defined as a haemoglobin drop >10%, and 262 (23.0%) had WBL ≥500mL. WBL generally had a poor sensitivity for detection of PPH (85%) in high prevalence settings when WBL exceeds 750mL. Conclusion WBL has poor sensitivity but high specificity compared to laboratory-based methods of PPH diagnosis. These characteristics correspond to a high PPV in areas with high PPH prevalence. Although WBL is not useful for excluding PPH, this low-cost, simple and reproducible method is promising as a reasonable method to identify significant PPH in such settings where quantifiable red cell

  8. Comparative gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone as assessed by radiochromium (/sup 51/Cr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lussier, A.; Davis, A.; Lussier, Y.; Lebel, E.

    1989-03-01

    Nabumetone differs from most other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It is presented to the gut as a nonacidic prodrug, and is metabolized to its active form after absorption. Studies in animals and humans suggest it is less irritating to the gastrointestinal mucosa. This study compared the gastrointestinal microbleeding induced by nabumetone to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), and placebo in a double blind parallel study using chromium /sup 51/Cr labelled red cells to quantitate fecal blood loss (FBL) in healthy volunteers. Thirty subjects were randomized to treatment with nabumetone (2000 mg), ASA (3.6 g) or placebo for 21 days following a 7 day placebo period. Six subjects served as untreated controls. FBL in nabumetone treated subjects was not significantly different to placebo or untreated subjects. In contrast, ASA-treated subjects exhibited significantly increased FBL than the other 3 groups (P less than .0001).

  9. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal stenosis with instability: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative spinal stenosis and instability requiring multilevel spine surgery has been associated with large blood losses. Factors that affect perioperative blood loss include time of surgery, surgical procedure, patient height, combined anterior/posterior approaches, number of levels fused, blood salvage techniques, and the use of anti-fibrinolytic medications. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in spine surgery. Methods This retrospective case control study includes 97 patients who had to undergo surgery because of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and instability. All operations included spinal decompression, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (4-5 segments. Forty-six patients received 1 g tranexamic acid intravenous, preoperative and six hours and twelve hours postoperative; 51 patients without tranexamic acid administration were evaluated as a control group. Based on the records, the intra- and postoperative blood losses were measured by evaluating the drainage and cell saver systems 6, 12 and 24 hours post operation. Additionally, hemoglobin concentration and platelet concentration were reviewed. Furthermore, the number of red cell transfusions given and complications associated with tranexamic acid were assessed. Results The postoperative hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.0130 showing superiority for tranexamic acid use (tranexamic acid group: 11.08 g/dl, SD: 1.68; control group: 10.29 g/dl, SD: 1.39. The intraoperative cell saver volume and drainage volume after 24 h demonstrated a significant difference as well, which indicates a less blood loss in the tranexamic acid group than the control group. The postoperative drainage volume at12 hours showed no significant differences; nor did the platelet concentration Allogenic blood transfusion (two red cell units was needed for eight patients

  10. Blood profile of proteins and steroid hormones predicts weight change after weight loss with interactions of dietary protein level and glycemic index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Weight regain after weight loss is common. In the Diogenes dietary intervention study, high protein and low glycemic index (GI diet improved weight maintenance. OBJECTIVE: To identify blood predictors for weight change after weight loss following the dietary intervention within the Diogenes study. DESIGN: Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 8-week low caloric diet-induced weight loss from 48 women who continued to lose weight and 48 women who regained weight during subsequent 6-month dietary intervention period with 4 diets varying in protein and GI levels. Thirty-one proteins and 3 steroid hormones were measured. RESULTS: Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE was the most important predictor. Its greater reduction during the 8-week weight loss was related to continued weight loss during the subsequent 6 months, identified by both Logistic Regression and Random Forests analyses. The prediction power of ACE was influenced by immunoproteins, particularly fibrinogen. Leptin, luteinizing hormone and some immunoproteins showed interactions with dietary protein level, while interleukin 8 showed interaction with GI level on the prediction of weight maintenance. A predictor panel of 15 variables enabled an optimal classification by Random Forests with an error rate of 24±1%. A logistic regression model with independent variables from 9 blood analytes had a prediction accuracy of 92%. CONCLUSIONS: A selected panel of blood proteins/steroids can predict the weight change after weight loss. ACE may play an important role in weight maintenance. The interactions of blood factors with dietary components are important for personalized dietary advice after weight loss. REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00390637.

  11. Cytokine-Mediated Loss of Blood Dendritic Cells During Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Acute Infectious Mononucleosis: Implication for Immune Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkar, Archana; Smith, Corey; Hislop, Andrew; Tellam, Nick; Dasari, Vijayendra; Hogquist, Kristin A; Wykes, Michelle; Moss, Denis J; Rickinson, Alan; Balfour, Henry H; Khanna, Rajiv

    2015-12-15

    Acute infectious mononucleosis (IM) is associated with altered expression of inflammatory cytokines and disturbed T-cell homeostasis, however, the precise mechanism of this immune dysregulation remains unresolved. In the current study we demonstrated a significant loss of circulating myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) during acute IM, a loss correlated with the severity of clinical symptoms. In vitro exposure of blood DCs to acute IM plasma resulted in loss of plasmacytoid DCs, and further studies with individual cytokines showed that exposure to interleukin 10 could replicate this effect. Our data provide important mechanistic insight into dysregulated immune homeostasis during acute IM. PMID:26080368

  12. [Occult stromal tumour of the small intestine: a cause of chronic intestinal blood loss in a 70 year-old woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimone, F; Gerini, A; Moncini, C; Di Stefano, S; Pagni, V; Pastine, F; Del Corso, L

    1999-03-01

    The case of a 70 year-old woman with a chronic gastrointestinal blood loss due to a stromal tumor located in the middle third of the small intestine is reported. The peculiarities of the case are the characteristic immunohistochemistry of the neoplasm and, particularly, the mimetic clinical presentation, a kind of ''phantom tumor'' confirmed only with celiotomy and surgical excision. PMID:16498316

  13. Seven-Day Mortality Can Be Predicted in Medical Patients by Blood Pressure, Age, Respiratory Rate, Loss of Independence, and Peripheral Oxygen Saturation (the PARIS Score)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Knudsen, Torben;

    2015-01-01

    . The outcome was defined as seven-day all-cause mortality. 76 patients (2.5%) met the endpoint in the development cohort, 57 (2.0%) in the first validation cohort, and 111 (4.3%) in the second. Systolic blood Pressure, Age, Respiratory rate, loss of Independence, and peripheral oxygen Saturation were...

  14. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My World From the Label to the Table! Food Labels Tell the Story! What is in food? Food provides your body with all of the ... your food choices. Nutrition Facts—the Labels on Food Products Beginning in 1994, the US government began ...

  15. Relationship of hidden blood loss, implants and sex during the perioperative treatment of elderly intertrochanteric fracture Relationship of hidden blood loss, implants and sex during the perioperative treatment of elderly intertrochanteric fracture%老年股骨转子间骨折围修复期隐性失血量与内固定植入物及性别的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王峰; 李振武; 尹锐锋; 李志安

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the continuous renewal and development of clinical repair techniques, the intraoperatie blood loss has been greatly reduced in the treatment of intertrochanteric fracture; however, no matter what kind of repair methods should be adopted, there are stil a large amount of perioperative hidden blood loss, however, there are few clinical reports for the reasons and related factors. OBJECTIVE: To study the correlation of perioperative hidden blood loss with gender and internal fixation methods in the surgery of elderly femoral intertrochanteric fractures.METHODS: Total y 121 patients with elderly femoral intertrochanteric fractures who received the treatment at Department of Orthopedics, Nanyang City Center Hospital from March 2010 to June 2013 were divided into two groups according to the condition and treatment wishes of patients, and were respectively treated with dynamic hip screw and proximal femoral anti-rotation intramedul ary nail internal fixation. The preoperative hidden blood loss, postoperative hidden blood loss, the total hidden blood loss, dominant blood loss and total blood loss of patients in these two groups were compared. The multiple linear regression analysis on the correlation of perioperative hidden blood loss with gender and internal fixation methods was conducted. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in the preoperative hidden blood loss between these two groups (P > 0.05). The total blood loss, postoperative hidden blood loss and total hidden blood loss in the proximal femoral anti-rotation intramedul ary nail group were significantly higher than those in the dynamic hip screw group (P 0.05);股骨近端防旋髓内钉组患者的总失血量、治疗后隐性失血量及总隐性失血量均明显高于动力髋螺钉组(P <0.05),而显性失血量明显低于动力髋螺钉组(P <0.05)。治疗前、治疗后隐性失血量及总隐性失血量男性均显著低于女性

  16. Pentylentetrazole-induced loss of blood-brain barrier integrity involves excess nitric oxide generation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjo, Sonoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masatomo; Nakamura, Yu; Itoh, Kouichi

    2013-09-12

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major pathophysiological consequences of epilepsy. The increase in the permeability caused by BBB failure is thought to contribute to the development of epileptic outcomes. We developed a method by which the BBB permeability can be demonstrated by gadolinium-enhanced T1 weighted imaging (GdET1WI). The present study examined the changes in the BBB permeability in mice with generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) induced by acute pentylentetrazole (PTZ) injection. At 15min after PTZ-induced GCS, the BBB temporarily leaks BBB-impermeable contrast agent into the parenchyma of the diencephalon, hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice, and the loss of BBB integrity was gradually recovered by 24h. The temporary BBB failure is a critical link to the glutamatergic activities that occur following the injection of PTZ. PTZ activates the glutamatergic pathway via the NMDA receptor, then nitric oxide (NO) is generated by NMDA receptor-coupled neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). To examine the influence of nNOS-derived NO induced by PTZ on the increases of the BBB permeability, GdET1WI was performed using conventional nNOS gene-deficient mice with or without PTZ injection. The failure of the BBB induced by PTZ was completely protected by nNOS deficiency in the brain. These results suggest that nNOS-derived excess NO in the glutamatergic pathway plays a key role in the failure of the BBB during PTZ-induced GCS. The levels of NO synthetized by nNOS in the brain may represent an important target for the future development of drugs to protect the BBB. PMID:23831997

  17. Analysis of predonation loss of blood donors due to deferrals - in a tertiary care hospital set up

    OpenAIRE

    Shreedevi S Bobati; Vijaya Basavraj; Pallavi Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Context: Blood is a living tissue that is transfused into another human body and hence blood safety is a major issue in transfusion medicine. It is well-known that a large number of apparently healthy donors are deferred from successful blood donation because of varied reasons. They are the potential motivated donors the society is losing. Hence, it is very important to analyze the reasons for deferral and retain the motivated donors. Aims: The objective of this study was to determine the...

  18. Die betroubaarheid van saamgestelde tellings

    OpenAIRE

    J. M. Schepers

    1993-01-01

    The reliability of composite scores. A formula for estimating the reliability of composite scores is developed on the basis of the formal definition of reliability. This formula is less restricting than Cronbach's alpha coefficient and Spearman and Brown's prophecy formula. It is similar to Mosier's Formula 18, but uses less information. The application of the formula is illustrated with real data. Opsomming 'n Formule om die betroubaarheid van saamgestelde tellings te beraam, is aan die han...

  19. Is accurate and reliable blood loss estimation the 'crucial step' in early detection of postpartum haemorrhage: an integrative review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hancock, Angela; Weeks, Andrew D; Lavender, Dame Tina

    2015-01-01

    Background Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality in low-income countries and severe maternal morbidity in many high-income countries. Poor outcomes following PPH are often attributed to delays in the recognition and treatment of PPH. Experts have suggested that improving the accuracy and reliability of blood loss estimation is the crucial step in preventing death and morbidity from PPH. However, there is little guidance on how this can be achieved. The aim of...

  20. Impact of preoperative 5α-reductase inhibitors on perioperative blood loss in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yi-Ping; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Shi, Guo-Hai; Ye, Ding-wei

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability of 5α-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) to decrease blood loss during transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) remains controversial. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to establish the role of 5ARI use prior to TURP. Methods We searched studies from the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Cochrane Library from inception to March 25, 2014. Meta-analysis was performed using t...

  1. Effect of desmopressin administration on intraoperative blood loss and quality of the surgical field during functional endoscopic sinus surgery: a randomized, clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Hua; Kuang, Li-Ting; Hou, Wei-Jian; Zhang,Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background Bleeding during functional endoscopic sinus surgery is a challenge for the quality of the surgical field for surgeons. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of desmopressin premedication on blood loss and the quality of the surgical field in endoscopic sinus surgery. Methods A total of 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II patients underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic sinusitis. They were randomly allocated to receive either desmopressin 0.3 μg/k...

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Antifibrinolytic Agents in Reducing Perioperative Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements in Scoliosis Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Meng; Zheng, Xin-Feng; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine use of antifibrinolytic agents in spine surgery is still an issue of debate. Objective To gather scientific evidence for the efficacy and safety of antifibrinolytic agents including aprotinin, tranexamic acid (TXA) and epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA, traditionally known as Amicar) in reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in scoliosis surgery. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), retrosp...

  3. The Telling Takes Us Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, G. M.

    2013-04-01

    Carl Sagan reminded us in Cosmos that we have wondered about the stars for as long as we have been human. “Star tellers” like Von Del Chamberlain and Lynn Moroney remind us that, for just as long, we have been telling stories about the stars to explain what we observed. This presentation describes methods of reuniting science and storytelling as complementary approaches to comprehending the cosmos. Examples illustrate how stories can serve as “springboards,” inspire their listeners to new awareness, and involve astronomy educators as reporters, tellers, and mediators.

  4. Mathematical tablets from Tell Harmal

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This work offers a re-edition of twelve mathematical tablets from the site of Tell Harmal, in the borders of present-day Baghdad. In ancient times, Tell Harmal was Šaduppûm, a city representative of the region of the Diyala river and of the kingdom of Ešnunna, to which it belonged for a time. These twelve tablets were originally published in separate articles in the beginning of the 1950s and mostly contain solved problem texts. Some of the problems deal with abstract matters such as triangles and rectangles with no reference to daily life, while others are stated in explicitly empirical contexts, such as the transportation of a load of bricks, the size of a vessel, the number of men needed to build a wall and the acquisition of oil and lard. This new edition of the texts is the first to group them, and takes into account all the recent developments of the research in the history of Mesopotamian mathematics. Its introductory chapters are directed to readers interested in an overview of the mathematical con...

  5. Bodily Synchronization Underlying Joke Telling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Schmidt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances in video and time series analysis have greatly enhanced our ability to study the bodily synchronization that occurs in natural interactions. Past research has demonstrated that the behavioral synchronization involved in social interactions is similar to dynamical synchronization found generically in nature. The present study investigated how the bodily synchronization in a joke telling task is spread across different nested temporal scales. Pairs of participants enacted knock-knock jokes and times series of their bodily activity were recorded. Coherence and relative phase analyses were used to evaluate the synchronization of bodily rhythms for the whole trial as well as at the subsidiary time scales of the whole joke, the setup of the punch line, the two-person exchange and the utterance. The analyses revealed greater than chance entrainment of the joke teller’s and joke responder’s movements at all time scales and that the relative phasing of the teller’s movements led those of the responder at the longer time scales. Moreover, this entrainment was greater when visual information about the partner’s movements was present but was decreased particularly at the shorter time scales when explicit gesturing in telling the joke was performed. In short, the results demonstrate that a complex interpersonal bodily dance occurs during structured conversation interactions and that this dance is constructed from a set of rhythms associated with the nested behavioral structure of the interaction.

  6. The condition of hemato and liquor-encephalic barriers of the human brain in acute blood loss on the background of alcoholemia and drug intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Indiaminov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of the histological methods, scanning and transmission electronic microscopy the cerebral cortex of the brain (field 6, the walls of III and IV ventricles of the brain of dead people, who had died of acute anemia on the background of alcohol intoxication and drug intoxication, have been studied. Examination has found thinning of the basal membrane of capillaries, development of fissures in the places of contact of neighboring endothelial cells, also between basal membrane and endothelial cells, and swelling of pericytes. In the wall of brain ventricles, a marked polymorphism of the ependymal cells and disturbance of the continuity of the layer are noted. Accumulation of blood cells, thickening of detritus, crystal structures are seen on ependymal surface. Reported symptoms reflect the disturbance of permeability of hematoencephalic and liquor-encephalic barriers of the brain with a combination of traumatic blood loss with alcohol and drug intoxication.

  7. CO2 blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  8. Activating Brown Adipose Tissue for Weight Loss and Lowering of Blood Glucose Levels: A MicroPET Study Using Obese and Diabetic Model Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chenxi; Cheng, Wuying; Sun, Yi; Dang, Yonghong; Gong, Fengying; Zhu, Huijuan; Li, Naishi; Li, Fang; Zhu, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aims at using 18F-FDG microPET to monitor the brown adipose tissue (BAT) glucose metabolism in obese and diabetic mouse models under different interventions, and study the therapeutic potential of BAT activation for weight loss and lowering of blood glucose in these models. Methods Obese mice were established by a high-fat diet for eight weeks, and diabetes mellitus(DM) models were induced with Streptozocin in obese mice. 18F-FDG microPET was used to monitor BAT function du...

  9. Transplantation of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Their Conditioned Medium Prevents Bone Loss in Ovariectomized Nude Mice

    OpenAIRE

    An, Jee Hyun; Park, Hyojung; Song, Jung Ah; Ki, Kyung Ho; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Choi, Hyung Jin; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Sang Wan; Kim, Seong Yeon; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Baek, Wook-Young; Kim, Jung-Eun; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Shin, Chan Soo

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has recently been recognized as a new source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for use in stem cell therapy. We studied the effects of systemic injection of human UCB-MSCs and their conditioned medium (CM) on ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss in nude mice. Ten-week-old female nude mice were divided into six groups: Sham-operated mice treated with vehicle (Sham-Vehicle), OVX mice subjected to UCB-MSCs (OVX-MSC), or human dermal fibroblast (OVX-DFB) transplantation, ...

  10. Use of Tranexamic acid is a cost effective method in preventing blood loss during and after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Chaudhry Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Purpose Allogenic blood transfusion in elective orthopaedic surgery is best avoided owing to its associated risks. Total knee replacement often requires blood transfusion, more so when bilateral surgery is performed. Many strategies are currently being employed to reduce the amount of peri-operative allogenic transfusions. Anti-fibrinolytic compounds such as aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid have been used systemically in perioperative settings with promising results. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of tranexamic acid in reducing allogenic blood transfusion in total knee replacement surgery. Methodology This was a retrospective cohort study conducted on patients undergoing total knee replacement during the time period November 2005 to November 2008. Study population was 99 patients, of which 70 underwent unilateral and 29 bilateral knee replacement. Forty-seven patients with 62 (49.5% knees (group-I had received tranexamic acid (by surgeon preference while the remaining fifty-two patients with 66 (51.5% knees (group-II had did not received any tranexamic acid either pre- or post-operatively. Results The mean drop in the post-operative haemoglobin concentration in Group-II for unilateral and bilateral cases was 1.79 gm/dl and 2.21 gm/dl, with a mean post-operative drainage of 1828 ml (unilateral and 2695 ml (bilateral. In comparison, the mean drop in the post-op haemoglobin in Group-I was 1.49 gm/dl (unilateral and 1.94 gm/dl (bilateral, with a mean drainage of 826 ml (unilateral and 1288 ml (bilateral (p-value Interpretation Tranexamic acid is effective in reducing post-operative drainage and requirement of blood transfusion after knee replacement.

  11. Relationships Between Selected Gene Polymorphisms and Blood Pressure Sensitivity to Weight Loss in Elderly Persons With Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Kostis, William J; Cabrera, Javier; Hooper, W. Craig; Whelton, Paul K.; Espeland, Mark A.; Cosgrove, Nora M.; Cheng, Jerry Q; Deng, Yingzi; De Staerck, Christine; Pyle, Meredith; Maruthur, Nisa; Reyes, Ingrid; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Liu, Jie; Kostis, John B

    2013-01-01

    Salt sensitivity, the heterogeneity in the response of blood pressure (BP) to alterations in sodium intake, has been studied extensively, whereas weight sensitivity, the heterogeneity in BP response to weight change, has received scant attention. We examined the relationship of 21 gene polymorphisms previously found to be associated with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or obesity, with weight sensitivity in the Trial of Nonpharmacologic Interventions in the Elderly, where participants with h...

  12. Comparison of Effects of Labetalol and Nitroglycerine on Intraoperative Blood Loss and Surgical Field Quality in Rhinoplasty Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Mohamad Reza; Zarei, Yadollah; Tarogh, Shojaolhagh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rhinoplasty is one of the most common surgeries of the plastic surgery and as well as ear, throat and nose. Intra-operative bleeding during surgery is one of the most important factors that may impair the surgeon’s job. Providing a clean blood-free surgical filed makes the operation faster, easier and with a better quality. One way to achieve this goal is to induce hypotension. This study aimed to compare the impacts and outcomes of administration of labetalol or nitroglycerin for ...

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Antifibrinolytic Agents in Reducing Perioperative Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements in Scoliosis Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    Full Text Available Routine use of antifibrinolytic agents in spine surgery is still an issue of debate.To gather scientific evidence for the efficacy and safety of antifibrinolytic agents including aprotinin, tranexamic acid (TXA and epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA, traditionally known as Amicar in reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in scoliosis surgery.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for randomized controlled trials (RCTs, retrospective case-control studies, and retrospective cohort studies on the use of antifibrinolytic agents in scoliosis surgery by searching in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Controlled Trials of papers published from January 1980 through July 2014. Safety of the antifibrinolytic agents was evaluated in all included studies, while efficacy was evaluated in RCTs.Eighteen papers with a total of 1,158 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. Among them, 8 RCTs with 450 patients were included for evaluation of pharmacologic efficacy (1 RCT was excluded because of a lack of standard deviation data. Mean blood loss was reduced in patients with perioperative use of antifibrinolytic agents by 409.25 ml intraoperatively (95% confidence interval [CI], 196.57-621.94 ml, 250.30 ml postoperatively (95% CI, 35.31-465.30, and 601.40 ml overall (95% CI, 306.64-896.16 ml. The mean volume of blood transfusion was reduced by 474.98 ml (95% CI, 195.30-754.67 ml. The transfusion rate was 44.6% (108/242 in the patients with antifibrinolytic agents and 68.3% (142/208 in the patients with placebo. (OR 0.38; 95% CI; 0.25-0.58; P<0.00001, I2 = 9%. All studies were included for evaluation of safety, with a total of 8 adverse events reported overall (4 in the experimental group and 4 in the control group.The systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that aprotinin, TXA, and EACA all significantly reduced perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements

  14. Loss of T Follicular Helper Cells in the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, David A; Wang, Hongbo; Aurora, Mukta; MacMillan, Margaret L; Holtan, Shernan G; Bergerson, Rachel; Cao, Qing; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Cooley, Sarah; Brunstein, Claudio; Miller, Jeffery S; Wagner, John E; Blazar, Bruce R; Verneris, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    B cell antihost antibody production plays a central role in chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). T follicular helper (TFH) cells drive B cell responses and are implicated in this process. Given differences in cGVHD incidence between umbilical cord blood (UCB) and adult donor transplant recipients, we evaluated TFH cell reconstitution kinetics to define graft source differences and their potential pathogenic role in cGVHD. Although we observed significantly fewer TFH cells in the blood of UCB recipients (versus matched related donors [MRD]) early after transplantation, by 1 year the numbers of TFH cells were similar. Additionally, at both early (day 60) and late (1 year) time points, TFH cell phenotype was predominantly central memory cells in both cohorts. TFH cells were functional and able to produce multiple cytokines (INF-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17, and IL-21) after stimulation. In contrast to mouse models, where an enhanced frequency of splenic TFH cells contributes to cGVHD, patients with cGVHD showed significantly depleted circulating TFH cells after both UCB and MRD transplantation. Low numbers of TFH cells early after UCB transplantation could directly contribute to less cGVHD in this cohort. Additionally, systemic therapy (including steroids and calcineurin inhibitors) may contribute to decreases in TFH cells in patients with cGVHD. These data provide further evidence supporting the importance of TFH cells in cGVHD pathogenesis. PMID:26806586

  15. Novel application of pre-operative vertebral body embolization to reduce intraoperative blood loss during a three-column spinal osteotomy for non-oncologic spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Alexander; Mehta, Vivek A; Mack, William J; Acosta, Frank L

    2015-04-01

    Three column osteotomies (3CO) of the lumbar spine are powerful corrective procedures used in the treatment of kyphoscoliosis. Their efficacy comes at the cost of high reported complication rates, notably significant estimated blood loss (EBL). Previously reported techniques to reduce EBL have had modest efficacy. Here we describe a potential technique to decrease EBL during pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) of the lumbar spine by means of pre-operative vertebral body embolization - a technique traditionally used to reduce blood loss prior to spinal column tumor resection. We present a 62-year-old man with iatrogenic kyphoscoliosis who underwent staged deformity correction. Stage 1 involved thoracolumbar instrumentation followed by transarterial embolization of the L4 vertebral body through bilateral segmental arteries. A combination of polyvinyl alcohol particles and Gelfoam (Pfizer, New York, NY, USA) were used. Following embolization there was decreased angiographic blood flow to the small vessels of the L4 vertebral body, while the segmental arteries remained patent. Stage 2 consisted of an L4 PSO and fusion. The EBL during the PSO procedure was 1L, which compared favorably to that during previous PSO at this institution as well as to quantities reported in previous literature. There have been no short term (5 month follow-up) complications attributable to the vertebral body embolization or surgical procedure. Although further investigation into this technique is required to better characterize its safety and efficacy in reducing EBL during 3CO, we believe this patient illustrates the potential utility of pre-operative vertebral embolization in the setting of non-oncologic deformity correction surgery. PMID:25564274

  16. Hidden blood loss in total knee arthroplasty under high negative pressure drainage%全膝关节置换后高负压引流下的隐性失血

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻长纯; 杨明路; 杜兴升

    2013-01-01

    背景:通常评价关节置换患者出血量主要是记录置换中的出血量和置换后的引流量,这些只是显性失血量,研究表明隐性失血量可达到并超过总量的50%。  目的:比较全膝关节置换高负压引流和普通负压引流失血量,评价高负压引流对全膝关节置换隐性失血的影响。  方法:60例单侧全膝人工关节置换患者根据置换后采用的负压吸引不同分为高负压引流组和普通负压引流组(对照组),每组30例。通过Gross方程推算,对膝关节置换后总失血量(显性失血量+隐性失血最)和输血量进行分析,并对两组置换后并发症及功能恢复状况进行比较。  结果与结论:高负压引流组患者总失血量为(646±184) mL,隐性失血量为(215±128) mL;对照组患者总失血量为(867±296) mL,隐性失血量(457±268) mL;高负压引流组总失血量及隐性失血量均明显少于对照组(P METHODS:A total of 60 patients undergoing lateral total knee arthroplasty were equal y divided into high negative pressure drainage group and conventional drainage group (control group). We calculated the total blood loss (dominant blood loss and hidden blood loss) and blood transfusion amount with the Gross equation. The recovery after surgery and complications were compared. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:In high negative pressure drainage group, the total blood loss was (646±184) mL and the hidden blood loss was (215±128) mL. In the control group, the total blood loss was (867±296) mL and the hidden blood loss was (457±268) mL. The total blood loss and hidden blood loss in the high negative pressure drainage group were significantly less than those in the control group (P<0.05). The average blood transfusion amount was 224 mL in the high negative pressure drainage group and 467 mL in the control group. Fol owing unilateral total knee arthroplasty, total blood loss, hidden blood loss and blood transfusion

  17. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1

  18. Pregnancy Loss in Dairy Cattle: Relationship of Ultrasound, Blood Pregnancy-Specific Protein B, Progesterone and Production Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gábor, G; Kastelic, J P; Abonyi-Tóth, Z; Gábor, P; Endrődi, T; Balogh, O G

    2016-08-01

    Objectives were to determine associations between percentage pregnancy loss (PPL) in dairy cattle and: (i) pregnancy diagnosis by ultrasonography; (ii) pregnancy diagnosis by serum pregnancy-specific protein B (PSPB) concentrations, with or without serum progesterone concentrations; and (iii) production and environmental factors. This study included 149 822 pregnancy diagnoses conducted over 13 years in Holstein-Friesian cows in Hungarian dairy herds. The following were determined: PPL in cows diagnosed pregnant by transrectal ultrasonography 29-42 days after artificial insemination (AI; n = 11 457); PPL in cows diagnosed pregnant by serum PSPB 29-35 days after AI (n = 138 365); and PPL and its association with serum progesterone concentrations, PSPB and production/environmental variables. The definition of PPL was percentage of cows initially diagnosed pregnant based on ultrasonography or PSPB, but not pregnant when examined by transrectal palpation 60 -70 days after AI. The PPL was lower (p 1.1 ng/ml) was lowest (15.0%), whereas cows with low concentrations of both PSPB and progesterone (0.6-1.1 and <2 ng/ml, respectively) had the highest PPL (76.3%; p < 0.0001). Furthermore, PPL was higher in cows with advanced parity and with high milk production, when ambient temperatures were high, although body condition score (BCS) had no effect on PPL. Finally, there were no significant associations between serum PSPB and environmental temperatures or number of post-partum uterine treatments. PMID:27198072

  19. The expression of cytokines and chemokines in the blood of patients with severe weight loss from anorexia nervosa: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, D S; Trace, S E; Brownley, K A; Hamer, R M; Zucker, N L; Roux-Lombard, P; Dayer, J-M; Bulik, C M

    2014-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious, potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by severe weight loss, dysregulated eating, and often excessive exercise. While psychiatric illnesses such as depression are associated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, evidence for such disturbances in patients with AN has been less clear. In an exploratory study of possible disturbances in immune responses in AN, we assayed a panel of cytokines and chemokines in the blood of patients undergoing inpatient treatment, testing the hypothesis that metabolic disturbances in this disease would lead to a pattern of immune disturbances distinct from that of other psychiatric diseases. For this purpose, we evaluated patients by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire and assessed cytokines and chemokines by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patients reported a moderate level of depression (mean BDI-II = 22.6) but exhibited few immunologic abnormalities of the kind associated with major depressive disorder [e.g., increased interleukin (IL)-6]; RANTES showed the most frequent elevations and was increased in 4 of the patients studied. Together, these findings suggest that features of AN such as loss of adipose tissue and excessive exercise may attenuate cytokine production and thus modulate the experience of illness that impacts on core features of disease. PMID:25022969

  20. Are antifibrinolytic drugs equivalent in reducing blood loss and transfusion in cardiac surgery? A meta-analysis of randomized head-to-head trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stokes Barrie J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aprotinin has been shown to be effective in reducing peri-operative blood loss and the need for re-operation due to continued bleeding in cardiac surgery. The lysine analogues tranexamic acid (TXA and epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA are cheaper, but it is not known if they are as effective as aprotinin. Methods Studies were identified by searching electronic databases and bibliographies of published articles. Data from head-to-head trials were pooled using a conventional (Cochrane meta-analytic approach and a Bayesian approach which estimated the posterior probability of TXA and EACA being equivalent to aprotinin; we used as a non-inferiority boundary a 20% increase in the rates of transfusion or re-operation because of bleeding. Results Peri-operative blood loss was significantly greater with TXA and EACA than with aprotinin: weighted mean differences were 106 mls (95% CI 37 to 227 mls and 185 mls (95% CI 134 to 235 mls respectively. The pooled relative risks (RR of receiving an allogeneic red blood cell (RBC transfusion with TXA and EACA, compared with aprotinin, were 1.08 (95% CI 0.88 to 1.32 and 1.14 (95% CI 0.84 to 1.55 respectively. The equivalent Bayesian posterior mean relative risks were 1.15 (95% Bayesian Credible Interval [BCI] 0.90 to 1.68 and 1.21 (95% BCI 0.79 to 1.82 respectively. For transfusion, using a 20% non-inferiority boundary, the posterior probabilities of TXA and EACA being non-inferior to aprotinin were 0.82 and 0.76 respectively. For re-operation the Cochrane RR for TXA vs. aprotinin was 0.98 (95% CI 0.51 to 1.88, compared with a posterior mean Bayesian RR of 0.63 (95% BCI 0.16 to 1.46. The posterior probability of TXA being non-inferior to aprotinin was 0.92, but this was sensitive to the inclusion of one small trial. Conclusion The available data are conflicting regarding the equivalence of lysine analogues and aprotinin in reducing peri-operative bleeding, transfusion and the need for re

  1. A comparison of blood loss during the Halal slaughter of lambs following Traditional Religious Slaughter without stunning, Electric Head-Only Stunning and Post-Cut Electric Head-Only Stunning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Rizvan; Knowles, Toby G; Wotton, Steve B

    2015-12-01

    Blood lost at exsanguination during the Halal slaughter of lambs was compared between the slaughter methods of Traditional Religious Slaughter without stunning (TRS), Electric Head-Only Stunning (EHOS) and Post-Cut Electric Head-Only Stunning (PCEHOS). Two protocols were examined, Experimental (80 lambs) and Commercial (360 lambs), assessing varying periods of animal orientation during the 4 min bleeding process (upright orientation before vertical hanging). Live-weight, blood weight (Experimental only), carcass weights and by-product weights were recorded. The Experimental protocol highlighted an increase in blood loss at 60s in EHOS and PCEHOS compared to TRS (P0.05) in final blood loss between treatments. This research was undertaken to inform discussion on the merits of different slaughter methods compatible with Halal requirements. PMID:26159062

  2. Tiny Molybdenites Tell Diffusion Tales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, H. J.; Hannah, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion invokes micron-scale exchange during crystal growth and dissolution in magma chambers on short time-scales. Fundamental to interpreting such data are assumptions on magma-fluid dynamics at all scales. Nevertheless, elemental diffusion profiles are used to estimate time scales for magma storage, eruption, and recharge. An underutilized timepiece to evaluate diffusion and 3D mobility of magmatic fluids is high-precision Re-Os dating of molybdenite. With spatially unique molybdenite samples from a young ore system (e.g., 1 Ma) and a double Os spike, analytical errors of 1-3 ka unambiguously separate events in time. Re-Os ages show that hydrous shallow magma chambers locally recharge and expel Cu-Mo-Au-silica as superimposed stockwork vein networks at time scales less than a few thousand years [1]. Re-Os ages provide diffusion rates controlled by a dynamic crystal mush, accumulation and expulsion of metalliferous fluid, and magma reorganization after explosive crystallization events. Importantly, this approach has broad application far from ore deposits. Here, we use Re-Os dating of molybdenite to assess time scales for generating and diffusing metals through the deep crust. To maximize opportunity for chemical diffusion, we use a continental-scale Sveconorwegian mylonite zone for the study area. A geologically constrained suite of molybdenite samples was acquired from quarry exposures. Molybdenite, previously unreported, is extremely scarce. Tiny but telling molybdenites include samples from like occurrences to assure geologic accuracy in Re-Os ages. Ages range from mid-Mesoproterozoic to mid-Neoproterozoic, and correspond to early metamorphic dehydration of a regionally widespread biotite-rich gneiss, localized melting of gneiss to form cm-m-scale K-feldspar ± quartz pods, development of vapor-rich, vuggy mm stringers that serve as volatile collection surfaces in felsic leucosomes, and low-angle (relative to foliation) cross-cutting cm-scale quartz veins

  3. The LHCb DAQ interface board TELL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefeli, G.; Bay, A.; Gong, A.; Gong, H.; Muecke, M.; Neufeld, N.; Schneider, O.

    2006-05-01

    We have developed an electronic board (TELL1) to interface the DAQ system of the LHCb experiment at CERN. 289 TELL1 boards are needed to read out the different subdetectors. Each board can handle either 64 analog or 24 digital optical links. The TELL1 mother board provides common mode correction, zero suppression, data formatting, and a large network interface buffer. To satisfy the different requirements we have adopted a flexible FPGA design and made use of mezzanine cards. Mezzanines are used for data input from digital optical and analog copper links as well as for the Gigabit Ethernet interface to DAQ. The LHCb timing and trigger control signals are transported by a dedicated optical link, while the board slow-control is provided by an embedded PC running a Linux kernel.

  4. Decrease in symptoms, blood loss and uterine size with nafarelin acetate before abdominal hysterectomy: a placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylikorkala, O; Tiitinen, A; Hulkko, S; Kivinen, S; Nummi, S

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nafarelin before hysterectomy in a prospective placebo-controlled trial, we randomized 188 pre-menopausal women with uterine fibroids (n = 111), menometrorrhagia (n = 58) or pelvic pain (n = 19) to receive either nafarelin (200 micrograms twice daily as a nasal spray) or a placebo for 3 months before abdominal hysterectomy. The data analysis could be performed in 166 women, of whom 107 received nafarelin and 59 a placebo. Nafarelin led to a rise in blood haemoglobin (5.5 g/l) and to a decrease in uterine volume (23.7%). This, however, gave no objective benefit during surgery (similar operative durations and blood losses). The uteri from patients treated with nafarelin (255.5 +/- 12.6 g, mean +/- SD) were significantly lighter (P = 0.029) than those from patients treated with a placebo (346.2 +/- 35.7 g). Histological examination of the fibroids or uteri revealed changes typical for hypo-oestrogenism, but no specific histological pattern could be established. The endometrium was proliferative in 56% and showed mild hyperplastic features in 10% of patients given nafarelin, whereas the respective figures for the placebo group were 41 and 0%. Hot flushes were the most common side-effects, being reported by 61% in the nafarelin group and 35% in the placebo group. Nafarelin can be useful as a pre-surgical adjunct in a patient scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy if there is a need to raise the haemoglobin concentration or to reduce the size of the uterus. PMID:7593517

  5. Morphological dependency of cutaneous blood flow and sweating during compensable heat stress when heat-loss requirements are matched across participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notley, Sean R; Park, Joonhee; Tagami, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2016-07-01

    Human heat loss is thought, in part, to be morphologically related. It was therefore hypothesized that when heat-loss requirements and body temperatures were matched, that the mass-specific surface area alone could significantly explain both cutaneous vascular and sudomotor responses during compensable exercise. These thermoeffector responses were examined in 36 men with widely varying mass-specific surface areas (range, 232.3-292.7 cm(2)/kg), but of similar age, aerobic fitness, and adiposity. Subjects completed two trials under compensable conditions (28.1°C, 36.8% relative humidity), each involving rest (20 min) and steady-state cycling (45 min) at two matched metabolic heat-production rates (light, ∼135 W/m(2); moderate, ∼200 W/m(2)). Following equivalent mean body temperature changes, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance (r = 0.63 and r = 0.65) shared significant, positive associations with the mass-specific surface area during light work (P < 0.05), explaining ∼45% of the vasomotor variation. Conversely, during light and moderate work, whole body sweat rate, as well as local sweat rate and sudomotor sensitivity at three of four measured sites, revealed moderate, negative relationships with the mass-specific surface area (correlation coefficient range -0.37 to -0.73, P < 0.05). Moreover, those relationships could uniquely account for between 10 and 53% of those sweating responses (P < 0.05). Therefore, both thermoeffector responses displayed a significant morphological dependency in the presence of equivalent thermoafferent drive. Indeed, up to half of the interindividual variation in these effector responses could now be explained through morphological differences and the first principles governing heat transfer. PMID:27125845

  6. Autologous blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2004-01-01

    Although preoperative autologous blood donation is employed in elective surgery, this is declining because of the increasingly safe allogeneic blood supply. However, it continues to be used because of the public's perception of allogeneic blood risks and increasing blood shortages. Patients may donate a unit of blood (450 ± 45 ml) as often as twice weekly, up to 72 hours before surgery. Preoperative autologous blood is most beneficial in procedures that cause significant blood loss. It has be...

  7. Postoperative blood loss reduction in computer-assisted surgery total knee replacement by low dose intra-articular tranexamic acid injection together with 2-hour clamp drain: a prospective triple-blinded randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paphon Sa-ngasoongsong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-dose local tranexamic acid has been introduced in total knee arthroplasty for bleeding control. We are not sure about the systemic absorption and side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low dosage of intra-articular tranexamic acid injection combined with 2-hour clamp drain in minimally bleeding computer-assisted surgery total knee replacement (CAS-TKR. A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted in a total of 48 patients underwent CAS-TKR. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either of a mixed intra-articular solution of tranexamic acid 250 mg with physiologic saline (TXA group, or physiologic saline (control group and then followed by clamp drain for 2 hours. Postoperative blood loss was measured by three different methods as drainage volume, total hemoglobin loss and calculated total blood loss. Transfusion requirement and postoperative complications were recorded. All patients were screened for deep vein thrombosis and the functional outcomes were evaluated at 6 months after surgery. The mean postoperative drainage volume, total hemoglobin loss and calculated total blood loss in TXA group were 308.8 mL, 2.1 g/dL and 206.3 mL compared to 529.0 mL, 3.0 g/dL and 385.1 mL in the control group (P=0.0003, 0.0005 and <0.0001 respectively. Allogenic blood transfusion was needed for one patient (4.2% in TXA group and for eight patients (33.3% in the control group. Postoperative knee scores were not significantly different between groups. No deep vein thrombosis, infection or wound complication was detected in both groups. In this study, low dose intra-articular tranexamic acid injection combined with 2-hour clamping drain was effective for reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirement in CAS-TKR without significant difference in postoperative complications or functional outcomes.

  8. Postoperative blood loss reduction in computer-assisted surgery total knee replacement by low dose intra-articular tranexamic acid injection together with 2-hour clamp drain: a prospective triple-blinded randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-ngasoongsong, Paphon; Channoom, Thanaphot; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj; Woratanarat, Patarawan; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Wibulpolprasert, Bussanee; Wongsak, Siwadol; Udomsubpayakul, Umaporn; Wechmongkolgorn, Supaporn; Lekpittaya, Nantaporn

    2011-01-01

    A high-dose local tranexamic acid has been introduced in total knee arthroplasty for bleeding control. We are not sure about the systemic absorption and side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low dosage of intra-articular tranexamic acid injection combined with 2-hour clamp drain in minimally bleeding computer-assisted surgery total knee replacement (CAS-TKR). A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted in a total of 48 patients underwent CAS-TKR. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either of a mixed intra-articular solution of tranexamic acid 250 mg with physiologic saline (TXA group), or physiologic saline (control group) and then followed by clamp drain for 2 hours. Postoperative blood loss was measured by three different methods as drainage volume, total hemoglobin loss and calculated total blood loss. Transfusion requirement and postoperative complications were recorded. All patients were screened for deep vein thrombosis and the functional outcomes were evaluated at 6 months after surgery. The mean postoperative drainage volume, total hemoglobin loss and calculated total blood loss in TXA group were 308.8 mL, 2.1 g/dL and 206.3 mL compared to 529.0 mL, 3.0 g/dL and 385.1 mL in the control group (P=0.0003, 0.0005 and <0.0001 respectively). Allogenic blood transfusion was needed for one patient (4.2%) in TXA group and for eight patients (33.3%) in the control group. Postoperative knee scores were not significantly different between groups. No deep vein thrombosis, infection or wound complication was detected in both groups. In this study, low dose intra-articular tranexamic acid injection combined with 2-hour clamping drain was effective for reducing postoperative blood loss and transfusion requirement in CAS-TKR without significant difference in postoperative complications or functional outcomes. PMID:22053253

  9. Bullying and the Politics of "Telling"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Christine; Candappa, Mano

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of pupils' views about tackling bullying and discusses the findings in the context of related research on "telling" and other coping strategies. The research was undertaken in two related phases. In the first phase, in-depth focus groups were conducted with pupils in Years 5 and 8 in twelve participating schools…

  10. Telling time in the Fourth Gospel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome H. Neyrey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available When we begin the task of telling time in the Fourth Gospel, we bring something not found in any previous study, namely, a model of time articulated by cross- ultural anthropologists (Bordieu, in Pitt-Rivers 1963:55-72, Ayoade, in Wright 1984:71-89. As much as we admire Davies’ study, she has no notes to her chapter on time nor any citations in her bibliography to indicate that she has any conversation partners, much less cultural experts, a deficit to be filled in this study. Learning to tell time entails three theoretical considerations: a definition of time, key classifications of it, and special attention to what the ancients meant by past, present and future. With these lenses we are prepared to do as thorough a study as we can on telling time in the Fourth Gospel. As we consider each classification, we will suggest a brief meaning of it from the experts on time, then present a body of Greco-Roman materials illustrative of the classification, and finally use it to gather and interpret data in John. Proving the native existence of these classifications for telling time in antiquity is essential for readers to have a background against which to compare their usage with that of the Fourth Gospel.

  11. [3H]Methotrexate loss from the rat brain following enhanced uptake by osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Right brain regions of anesthetized rats were loaded with [3,5,7-3H]methotrexate ([3H]MTX) or with [14C]sucrose by infusing the tracers into the right carotid artery, after the blood-brain barrier had been opened by right carotid infusion of a hypertonic arabinose solution. During the 6 hr following the procedure, the [3H]MTX concentration in 7 right-sided brain regions, when normalized to the plasma concentration integral during tracer infusion, fell, with an average half-time of 4.8 hr as compared to less than 20 min for the initial rate of loss [14C]sucrose. Right-left brain concentration differences 3 hr after treatment were statistically significant (p less than 0.05) for [3H]MTX but not for [14C]sucrose. The results indicate that intracerebral [3H]MTX is lost more slowly than is intracerebral [14C]sucrose, possibly because [3H]MTX enters brain cells, whereas [14C]sucrose remains largely extracellular

  12. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells or their conditioned medium prevents bone loss in ovariectomized nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jee Hyun; Park, Hyojung; Song, Jung Ah; Ki, Kyung Ho; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Choi, Hyung Jin; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Sang Wan; Kim, Seong Yeon; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Baek, Wook-Young; Kim, Jung-Eun; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Shin, Chan Soo

    2013-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has recently been recognized as a new source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for use in stem cell therapy. We studied the effects of systemic injection of human UCB-MSCs and their conditioned medium (CM) on ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss in nude mice. Ten-week-old female nude mice were divided into six groups: Sham-operated mice treated with vehicle (Sham-Vehicle), OVX mice subjected to UCB-MSCs (OVX-MSC), or human dermal fibroblast (OVX-DFB) transplantation, OVX mice treated with UCB-MSC CM (OVX-CM), zoledronate (OVX-Zol), or vehicle (OVX-Vehicle). Although the OVX-Vehicle group exhibited significantly less bone mineral density (BMD) gain compared with the Sham-Vehicle group, transplantation of hUCB-MSCs (OVX-MSC group) has effectively prevented OVX-induced bone mass attenuation. Notably, the OVX-CM group also showed BMD preservation comparable to the OVX-MSC group. In addition, microcomputed tomography analysis demonstrated improved trabecular parameters in both the OVX-MSC and OVX-CM groups compared to the OVX-Vehicle or OVX-DFB group. Histomorphometric analysis showed increased bone formation parameters, accompanied by increased serum procollagen type-I N-telopeptide levels in OVX-MSC and OVX-CM mice. However, cell-trafficking analysis failed to demonstrate engraftment of MSCs in bone tissue 48 h after cell infusion. In vitro, hUCB-MSC CM increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in human bone marrow-derived MSCs and mRNA expression of collagen type 1, Runx2, osterix, and ALP in C3H10T1/2 cells. Furthermore, hUCB-MSC CM significantly increased survival of osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells, while it inhibited osteoclastic differentiation. To summarize, transplantation of hUCB-MSCs could effectively prevent OVX-mediated bone loss in nude mice, which appears to be mediated by a paracrine mechanism rather than direct engraftment of the MSCs. PMID:23215868

  13. Telling time in the absence of clocks.

    OpenAIRE

    Uma R. Karmarkar; Buonomano, Dean V.

    2007-01-01

    Decisions based on the timing of sensory events are fundamental to sensory processing. However, the mechanisms by which the brain measures time over ranges of milliseconds to seconds remain unknown. The dominant model of temporal processing proposes that an oscillator emits events that are integrated to provide a linear metric of time. We examine an alternate model in which cortical networks are inherently able to tell time as a result of time-dependent changes in network state. Using compute...

  14. What I Tell My Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lennard J.

    2011-01-01

    This author realizes that an important part of his job is to make sure his graduate students get their own jobs. What that means is talking about job placement as soon as they walk in the door and tell him they want to do a Ph.D. First he informs them of the current job situation, whatever that is at the time. He makes it clear that the first…

  15. Member State Event: Telling CERN's story !

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the events to mark the Laboratory's fiftieth anniversary, members of the CERN personnel are telling the story of CERN. Robert Cailliau (on the right), currently responsible for CERN's external communications, and Chiara Mariotti (in the center), a physicist working at CMS, were invited to talk about the history of CERN and the Web at a conference in the 'Science Thursdays' series entitled 'From the Quark to the Web' in Turin on 26 February.

  16. Use of an ex-vivo porcine kidney model to compare the blood loss of different size of nephrostomy tracts%经皮肾镜术大小通道出血量的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷华; 王德娟; 罗建斌; 邱剑光

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较经皮肾镜术大小通道出血量.方法 采用离体的生理盐水持续灌注的猪肾脏模型.在猪肾上建立穿刺通道后,先后建立16、18、22、24、30F5组通道,每组10个通道,分别测量失血量.结果 5组通道的出血量分别为(5.84±0.98)、(5.99±0.85)、(9.76±1.05)、(11.90±1.49)、(14.48±1.30) g/min,通道越大,出血量越多,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).16 F与18F通道出血量之间比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 在经皮肾镜手术中,通道越大,出血量越多,小通道经皮肾镜术可减少术中出血量.%Objective To compare the blood loss of different size of nephrostomy tracts in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL).Methods The model of isolated normal saline ( NS)-perfused porcine kidney was used to determine the blood loss of different size of nephrostomy tracts.By applying the technique of percutaneous nephrostomy,five groups of different size of nephrostomy tracts ( 16,18,22,24,30 F) were established on the porcine kidney gradually,with 10 tracts in every group,then the blood loss of each group was measured respectively.Results The blood loss of the five tracts ( 16,18,22,24,30 F)was (5.84±0.98),(5.99±0.85),(9.76±1.05),(11.90±1.49),(14.48±1.30) g/min,respectively.The blood loss was increased with the size of the tract diameter ( P < 0.05 ).There was no significant difference between 16 F and 18 F groups ( P > 0.05 ).Conclusion The blood loss of PCNL was increased with the size of the nephrostomy tracts.Mini-PCNL could cause less bleeding than standard-PCNL.

  17. Association of Bone Loss with the Upregulation of Survival-Related Genes and Concomitant Downregulation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Osteoblast Differentiation-Related Genes in the Peripheral Blood of Late Postmenopausal Osteoporotic Women

    OpenAIRE

    Tchetina, Elena V.; Karina A. Maslova; Mikhail Y. Krylov; Myakotkin, Valery A.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to identify bone related markers in the peripheral blood of osteoporotic (OP) patients that pointed toward molecular mechanisms underlying late postmenopausal bone loss. Whole blood from 22 late postmenopausal OP patients and 26 healthy subjects was examined. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DXA. Protein levels of p70-S6K, p21, MMP-9, TGFβ1, and caspase-3 were quantified by ELISA. Gene expression was measured using real-time RT-PCR. OP registered by low BMD indices in late ...

  18. THE YARMOUKIAN POTTERY ASSEMBLAGE OF TELL ABU SUWWAN, JORDAN

    OpenAIRE

    Al Nahar, Maysoon; Kafafi, Zeidan

    2015-01-01

    The archaeological excavations conducted at the site Tell Abu Suwwan indicated that it was continuously occupied during two main periods from the Middle Pre-Pottery Neolithic B through the Pottery Neolithic (Yarmoukian). The main focus of this paper is to study the pottery assemblage encountered in the Yarmoukian strata at Abu Tell Suwwan. Excavations at Tell Abu Suwwan in 2005 - 2008 yielded a total of 488 pieces of Yarmoukian pottery. The sample under study includes 86 Yarmoukian pottery sh...

  19. A randomised controlled trial of oxytocin 5IU and placebo infusion versus oxytocin 5IU and 30IU infusion for the control of blood loss at elective caesarean section--pilot study. ISRCTN 40302163.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the blood loss at elective lower segment caesarean section with administration of oxytocin 5IU bolus versus oxytocin 5IU bolus and oxytocin 30IU infusion and to establish whether a large multi-centre trial is feasible. STUDY DESIGN: Women booked for an elective caesarean section were recruited to a pilot randomised controlled trial and randomised to either oxytocin 5IU bolus and placebo infusion or oxytocin 5IU bolus and oxytocin 30IU infusion. We wished to establish whether the study design was feasible and acceptable and to establish sample size estimates for a definitive multi-centre trial. The outcome measures were total estimated blood loss at caesarean section and in the immediate postpartum period and the need for an additional uterotonic agent. RESULTS: A total of 115 women were randomised and 110 were suitable for analysis (5 protocol violations). Despite strict exclusion criteria 84% of the target population were considered eligible for study participation and of those approached only 15% declined to participate and 11% delivered prior to the planned date. The total mean estimated blood loss was lower in the oxytocin infusion arm compared to placebo (567 ml versus 624 ml) and fewer women had a major haemorrhage (>1000 ml, 14% versus 17%) or required an additional uterotonic agent (5% versus 11%). A sample size of 1500 in each arm would be required to demonstrate a 3% absolute reduction in major haemorrhage (from baseline 10%) with >80% power. CONCLUSION: An additional oxytocin infusion at elective caesarean section may reduce blood loss and warrants evaluation in a large multi-centre trial.

  20. Telling Successes of Japanese Foreign Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    tell about the successes, the paper illustrates and argues that the impact of foreign aid can be measured in many ways beyond economic growth. However, in order for a diverse impact to become measurable, we need the historians’ attention to individual stories over long periods of time. Institutions...... interested in evaluating the impact of foreign aid define criteria for success that can be measured preferably in numbers just as the investment in foreign aid is measured in amounts of money. This essay is about how a number of different stakeholders negotiate narratives of successful impact of private...... sector training programs partly financed by Japanese Official development Assistance (ODA)....

  1. "The Tramp", a blood donation propagandist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, J-J; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    The French pioneer for blood transfusion, who eventually organized the very early blood transfusion centers worldwide, went to imagine a scenario written in purpose for Charlie Chaplin, the unique character of "The Tramp" ("Charlot" in French). The movie Star was offered to feature a blood donation propagandist, and no longer the perpetual, well-known, "loser". This anecdote, besides being amusing, tells a lot on how Arnault Tzank encompassed all the difficulties in collecting blood enough to meet the demand, at all times; his proposal turns out to be extremely modern and questions nowadays marketing for blood donation. PMID:26778105

  2. Analysis on related factors of amount of blood loss during delivery in pregnant women combined with hysteromyoma%妊娠合并子宫肌瘤分娩出血量的相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慧敏; 张丽丽

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨影响妊娠合并子宫肌瘤孕妇分娩出血量的相关因素.方法:2007~2011年在产前检查时发现子宫肌瘤且至少有1个直径≥5 cm肌瘤的孕妇192例,分析产妇的年龄、产次、分娩方式、新生儿体重及肌瘤的数量、单发肌瘤的最大径线、多发肌瘤最大径线之和、肌瘤的位置与分娩出血量的关系.结果:孕妇的年龄及肌瘤的数量与出血量呈正相关,而分娩方式、新生儿体重及肌瘤的大小和位置与出血量无显著相关性.结论:高龄和多发性子宫肌瘤是妊娠合并子宫肌瘤孕妇分娩出血量多的重要因素,必须提前做好产前准备,备足充足的血源,以避免严重产后出血导致产妇死亡.%Objective: To explore the related influencing factors of amount of blood loss during delivery in pregnant women combined with hysteromyoma. Methods; A total of 192 pregnant women were found with hysteromyoma and at least the diameter of one myoma ^ 5 cm during prenatal examination from 2007 to 2011; the relationship between maternal age, parity, delivery modes, neonatal weight, the number of myoma, the longest diameter of single myoma, the sum of longest diameters of multiple myoma, the location of myoma and the a-mount of blood loss during delivery was analyzed. Results; There was a positive correlation between maternal age, the number of myoma and the amount of blood loss; delivery modes, neonatal weight, the size and location of myoma were not correlated with the amount of blood loss during delivery. Conclusion; Advanced age and multiple hysteromyoma were important factors inducing excessive hemorrhage during delivery in pregnant women combined with hysteromyoma, prenatal preparation should be conducted and sufficient blood resource should be prepared to avoid maternal death induced by serious postpartum hemorrhage.

  3. What Is High Blood Pressure Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use a medicine calendar. • Set a reminder on your smartphone. What types of drugs are there? • D IURETICS rid the ... by heart Lifestyle + Risk Reduction High Blood ... types may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if you have side effects, but don’ ...

  4. Academic Training: Telling the truth with statistics

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 21, 22, 23, 24 & 25 February from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Telling the truth with statistics by G. D'Agostini / NFN, Roma, Italy The issue of evaluating and expressing the uncertainty in measurements, as well as that of testing hypotheses, is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the frontier cases typical of particle physics experiments. Fundamental aspects of probability will be addressed and the applications, solely based on probability theory, will cover several topics of practical interest, including counting experiments, upper/lower bounds, systematic errors, fits and comparison of hypotheses. ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  5. Telling the truth and medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, R

    1985-11-30

    Gillon discusses the conflicting moral implications of the principles of respect for autonomy and of beneficence and non-maleficence when telling patients the truth about their illnesses and treatments. The case for nondisclosure is usually based on three major arguments: that doctors' Hippocratic obligations to benefit and not harm their patients take precedence over not deceiving them; that the range of possible conditions and prognoses makes it difficult for physicians to know the full truth or for patients to comprehend it; and that patients do not wish to be told dire news. Gillon rejects each of these arguments, contending that avoiding deceit is a basic moral norm that can be defended from utilitarian as well as deontological points of view. With regard to the argument concerning patient attitudes, he recommends that pilot studies be done, asking patients what their preferences are at the time they register with a doctor or hospital. PMID:3933749

  6. High Blood Cholesterol Q&A Dr. Michael Lauer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol High Blood Cholesterol Q&A with Dr. Michael Lauer Past Issues / ... heavier and older, what does recent research on cholesterol and heart health tell us that Americans need ...

  7. Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Index A-Z Blood Clots Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood that can be stationary (thrombosis) ... treated? What are blood clots? Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood. Normally, blood flows freely through ...

  8. La ceramica dei livelli Uruk di Tell Hassan, Hamrin

    OpenAIRE

    Nannucci, Simone

    2012-01-01

    International audience Tell Hassan is one of the few sites in the Hamrin basin region in Iraq that hasshown remains of an Uruk period settlement along with Tell Rubeidheh and Tell al-Ahmad Hattu. The site was excavated by the archaeological mission of the Centro Ricerche Archeologiche e Scavi di Torino per il Medio Oriente e l’Asia in the late ‘70s. The investigations have unearthed at least three different Uruk levels but only the two most recent ones have been investigated on a limited s...

  9. Loss of bone marrow adrenergic beta 1 and 2 receptors modifies transcriptional networks, reduces circulating inflammatory factors, and regulates blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmari, Niousha; Schmidt, Jordan T; Krane, Gregory A; Malphurs, Wendi; Cunningham, Bruce E; Owen, Jennifer L; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Zubcevic, Jasenka

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a prevalent condition with complex etiology and pathophysiology. Evidence exists of significant communication between the nervous system and the immune system (IS), and there appears to be a direct role for inflammatory bone marrow (BM) cells in the pathophysiology of hypertension. However, the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying this interaction have not been characterized. Here, we transplanted whole BM cells from the beta 1 and 2 adrenergic receptor (AdrB1(tm1Bkk)AdrB2(tm1Bkk)/J) knockout (KO) mice into near lethally irradiated C57BL/6J mice to generate a BM AdrB1.B2 KO chimera. This allowed us to evaluate the role of the BM beta 1 and beta 2 adrenergic receptors in mediating BM IS homeostasis and regulating blood pressure (BP) in an otherwise intact physiological setting. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting demonstrated that a decrease in systolic and mean BP in the AdrB1.B2 KO chimera is associated with a decrease in circulating inflammatory T cells, macrophage/monocytes, and neutrophils. Transcriptomics in the BM identified 7,419 differentially expressed transcripts between the C57 and AdrB1.B2 KO chimera. Pathway analysis revealed differentially expressed transcripts related to several cell processes in the BM of C57 compared with AdrB1.B2 KO chimera, including processes related to immunity (e.g., T-cell activation, T-cell recruitment, cytokine production, leukocyte migration and function), the cardiovascular system (e.g., blood vessel development, peripheral nerve blood flow), and the brain (e.g., central nervous system development, neurite development) among others. This study generates new insight into the molecular events that underlie the interaction between the sympathetic drive and IS in modulation of BP. PMID:27235450

  10. Is This School a Learning Organization? 10 Ways to Tell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Ron

    2003-01-01

    We know how to address individual learning, but what are the characteristics of organizational learning? How can you tell if your organization is adaptable and changing? Ten characteristics describe organizations that are learning, and examples show each characteristic in practice.

  11. Uudised : Rossini "Wilhelm Tell" Estonias. Cavalli ooper Amsterdamis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Gioachino Rossini ooperi "Wilhelm Tell" kontsertettekandest 18. ja 20. dets. Rahvusooper Estonias (peaosas Rauno Elp, külalisesinejaks Mario Zeffiri). Itaalia barokihelilooja Francesco Cavalli ooperi "Ercole amante" lavastamisest Madalmaade Ooperis Amsterdamis (lavastaja David Alden, esietendus 11. jaanuaril)

  12. Freud's Psychoanalysis of The Tell-Tale Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜红云; 梁静

    2014-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe is a famous American poet, short fiction writer and critic. He is good at writing horror tale and detective story. Many of his short stories show the narrator's abnormal mind. The Tell-Tale Heart is one of his famous short stories. This paper will analyze Poe's The Tell-Tale Heart by using Freud's psychoanalysis theory:the three-level personality.

  13. Freud’s Psychoanalysis of The Tell-Tale Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜红云; 梁静

    2014-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe is a famous American poet,shor fiction writer and critic.He is good at writing horror tale and detective story.Many of his short stories show the narrator’s abnormal mind.The Tell-Tale Heart is one of his famous shor stories.This paper will analyze Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart by using Freud’s psychoanalysis theory:the three-level personality.

  14. Children's drawing and telling of sustainability in the home

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins, Audrey; Wakkary, Ron

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study about children’s perspective on environmental sustainability in the home through the drawing-telling technique. We utilize the drawing-telling technique as described by Susan Wright [6] for interviewing children about issues related to sustainability. The participants (children from age 10 to 13) were asked to draw two houses (current and ideal) and then describe their drawings in terms of sustainable actions and features. This pilot study is an initial step...

  15. Member State Event: Telling CERN's Story

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the events to mark the Laboratory's fiftieth anniversary, members of the CERN personnel are telling the story of CERN. Robert Cailliau (on the right of the photograph), co-inventor of the Web and currently responsible for CERN's external communications, and Chiara Mariotti (in the center), a physicist working at CMS, were invited to talk about the history of CERN and the Web at a conference in the 'Science Thursdays' series entitled 'From the Quark to the Web' in Turin on 26 February. This was not their first appearance before a non-specialist audience (almost 1000 people that day!) eager to find out what goes on in a unique research centre like CERN as talking about the Laboratory's activities and its history are part and parcel of their work for the Organization. Anniversary Events in the Member States: This 'Science Thursday' event devoted to CERN was one of Italy's contributions to CERN's fiftieth anniversary celebrations. Coming up soon in the Member States: Italy International Centre...

  16. Do I Tell Anyone I Have Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... continue to provide patient support and education and fund research to improve outcomes for all blood cancer patients. Give Now Previous Article Tips for Talking with Your Employer and Your Workplace Rights Next Article Talking with ...

  17. Special Blood Donation Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sugar Control Helps Fight Diabetic Eye Disease Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... donor's blood pressure could become low enough to cause symptoms, such as light-headedness or loss of ...

  18. Oral lipid-based nanoformulation of tafenoquine enhanced bioavailability and blood stage antimalarial efficacy and led to a reduction in human red blood cell loss in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melariri P

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Paula Melariri,1 Lonji Kalombo,2 Patric Nkuna,2 Admire Dube,2,3 Rose Hayeshi,2 Benhards Ogutu,4,5 Liezl Gibhard,6 Carmen deKock,6 Peter Smith,6 Lubbe Wiesner,6 Hulda Swai2 1Polymers and Composites, Material Science and Manufacturing, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Port Elizabeth, South Africa; 2Polymer and Composites, Material Science and Manufacturing, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa; 3School of Pharmacy, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa; 4Centre for Research in Therapeutic Sciences, Strathmore University, Nairobi, Kenya; 5Centre for Clinical Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya; 6Division of Pharmacology, University of Cape Town Medical School, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa Abstract: Tafenoquine (TQ, a new synthetic analog of primaquine, has relatively poor bioavailability and associated toxicity in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient individuals. A microemulsion formulation of TQ (MTQ with sizes <20 nm improved the solubility of TQ and enhanced the oral bioavailability from 55% to 99% in healthy mice (area under the curve 0 to infinity: 11,368±1,232 and 23,842±872 min·µmol/L for reference TQ and MTQ, respectively. Average parasitemia in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice was four- to tenfold lower in the MTQ-treated group. In vitro antiplasmodial activities against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum indicated no change in half maximal inhibitory concentration, suggesting that the microemulsion did not affect the inherent activity of TQ. In a humanized mouse model of G6PD deficiency, we observed reduction in toxicity of TQ as delivered by MTQ at low but efficacious concentrations of TQ. We hereby report an enhancement in the solubility, bioavailibility, and efficacy of TQ against blood stages of Plasmodium parasites without a corresponding increase in toxicity

  19. How evolution tells us to induce allotolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Walter Gottlieb

    2015-04-01

    Modern immunology, in many ways, is based on 3 major paradigms: the clonal selection theory (Medawar, Burnet; 1953/1959), the pattern recognition theory (Janeway; 1989), and the danger/injury theory (Matzinger, Land; 1994). The last theory holds that any cell stress and tissue injury including allograft injury, via induction of damage-associated molecular patterns, induces immunity including alloimmunity leading to allograft rejection. On the other hand, the concept precludes that "non-self " per se induces immunity as proposed by the two former theories. Today, the danger/injury model has been largely accepted by immunologists, as documented by a steadily increasing number of publications. In particular, overwhelming evidence in support of the correctness of the model has come from recent studies on the gut microbiota representing a huge assemblage of "non-self. " Here, harmless noninjurious commensal microbes are protected by innate immunity-based immune tolerance whereas intestinal injury-causing pathogenic microbes are immunology attacked. The ability of the immune system to discriminate between harmless beneficial "non-self " to induce tolerance and harmful life-threatening "non-self " to induce immunity has apparently emerged during evolution: Protection of innate immunity-controlled beneficial "non-self " (eg, as reflected by microbiotas but also by the fetus of placental mammals) as well as immune defense responses to injuring/injured "non-self " (eg, as reflected by plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stress and allograft rejection in mammals) evolved under pressure across the tree of life, that is, in plants, lower and higher invertebrates as well as lower and higher vertebrates. And evolution tells us why the overall existence of protected microbiotas really makes sense: It is the formation of the "holobiont, " - a metaorganism - that is, the host plus all of its associated microorganisms that - in terms of a strong unit of selection in evolution

  20. Efficacy Analysis of a Script-based Guide for EVAR Execution: is it Possible to Reduce Patient Exposure to Contrast, Operative Time and Blood Loss even when Advanced Technologies are not Available?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani José Dal Poggetto Molinari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Despite the patient and medical staff exposure to radiation in endovascular aneurysm repair, the benefits of this abdominal aortic aneurysm type of surgical management are justfied by minor recovery time and hospitalization, as well as an option for patients not elected to conventional open repair. In this minimally invasive surgical aproach, time of procedure and radiation doses can be substantial - and the increasing frequency of these procedures and it's complexity have impelled vascular surgeons to face additional and successive risk to occupational radiation exposure. Meticulous study of the computed tomography angiography during the endovascular aneurysm repair preparation allows reduction of unnecessary radiation exposure, as also reduces consecutive image acquisition and contrast use (that may be related to renal overload in susceptible patients. Some studies have proposed strategies to optimize endovascular intervention to reduce contrast use and X-ray exposure. Although they might prove to be effective, they rely on use of additional specific and advanced equipment, available only in major centers. As an alternative to this expensive and restrict technology, it is presented a simpler technique through image manipulation on software OsiriX, aiming to reduce both exposures. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the efficacy of the adoption of a study protocol and a script-based guide in preparation for endovascular aneurysm repair through verifying it's impact over the surgical procedure - as referred to intravascular contrast infuse, effects over renal function, blood loss and operatory time. METHODS: A longitudinal prospective study from March 2014 through March 2015, where 30 performed endovascular aneurysm repair were compared to a historic control group. The planning for endovascular aneurysm repair through the patient's tomographic image manipulation in the prospective group was performed with OsiriX MD software. A script

  1. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart contracts, which ... as it relaxes, which is called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure ...

  2. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this ... several sources of blood which are described below. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  3. Blood Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Group Links Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Basics Blood is a specialized body fluid. It ... about 9 pints. Jump To: The Components of Blood and Their Importance Many people have undergone blood ...

  4. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  5. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  6. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Ask ...

  7. Sexual Freedom Rights for Adolescents? A Rejoinder to Agnes Tellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steutel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Agnes Tellings rightly observes that adolescents, if compared with pre-pubescent children, are much more capable of making their own choices and therefore should be granted much more freedom to arrange their own lives. However, the capacity of adolescents to make prudent choices still seems to be below the threshold of competence. Therefore,…

  8. Dyslexia and the Brain: What Does Current Research Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Roxanne F.; High, Leslie; Al Otaiba, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Dyslexia is a disorder of the language-processing systems in the brain. It is a specific learning disability in reading that often affects spelling as well. This article describes: (1) Common characteristics experienced by people with dyslexia or reading disabilities; (2) Common misconceptions about dyslexia; (3) What brain research tell us about…

  9. Mirror Neurons, the Development of Empathy, and Digital Story Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of work in media education, religious education, concerns about digital cultures' impact on human relationality, and the possible role that mirror neurons might play in the development of empathy. Digital story telling--particularly as embodied in the work of the Center for Digital Storytelling…

  10. Telling Their Stories: Women Construct/Instruct through Survival Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Eileen M.

    Malika Oufkir of Morocco recounts her story in "Stolen Lives." Loung Ung of Cambodia relates her story in "First, They Killed My Father." Susan McDougal of Arkansas, USA, tells her story in the aptly named, "The Woman Who Wouldn't Talk." This paper looks at the struggles of these three very different women from very different cultures, struggles…

  11. "Carne Neemerranner"--Telling Places and History on the Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Patsy; Miller, Linn

    2009-01-01

    In the language of the Tebrikunna (Cape Portland) clan, "Carne Neemerranner" is "telling ground". It is also what we call the research methodology designed for "Meeting at Bark Hut", a recent community-engaged Aboriginal history project conducted in northeast Tasmania. The project examined, retraced and explored one brief, but poignant, episode in…

  12. How Do Children Tell Us about Their Childhoods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling

    2004-01-01

    Noting that quality in early childhood education is related to the quality of communication and interaction among teachers and children, this article explores how teachers can facilitate children's telling others about their perspectives of the world. The paper asks the questions: "How do we as researchers and teachers interpret the child and…

  13. If You Listen, the Patient Will Tell You the Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Since the time of Hippocrates, professors in medical schools have been telling their students to listen to patients. Medical students and young doctors all come to realize that the medical history, the patient's account of his or her own illness, is the best source of information with which to make an accurate diagnosis. The physical examination,…

  14. Telling Tales: What Stories Can Teach Us about Racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lee Anne

    2003-01-01

    Examines stories that racially diverse, college educated adults tell about race and racism. Discusses the function of stories in culture, presenting counternarratives told predominantly by respondents of color and hegemonic narratives told predominantly by Whites. Analyzes the prevalence and effects of color blind ideology in white stories.…

  15. Seven-day mortality can be predicted in medical patients by blood pressure, age, respiratory rate, loss of independence, and peripheral oxygen saturation (the PARIS score: a prospective cohort study with external validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Brabrand

    Full Text Available Most existing risk stratification systems predicting mortality in emergency departments or admission units are complex in clinical use or have not been validated to a level where use is considered appropriate. We aimed to develop and validate a simple system that predicts seven-day mortality of acutely admitted medical patients using routinely collected variables obtained within the first minutes after arrival.This observational prospective cohort study used three independent cohorts at the medical admission units at a regional teaching hospital and a tertiary university hospital and included all adult (≥ 15 years patients. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify the clinical variables that best predicted the endpoint. From this, we developed a simplified model that can be calculated without specialized tools or loss of predictive ability. The outcome was defined as seven-day all-cause mortality. 76 patients (2.5% met the endpoint in the development cohort, 57 (2.0% in the first validation cohort, and 111 (4.3% in the second. Systolic blood Pressure, Age, Respiratory rate, loss of Independence, and peripheral oxygen Saturation were associated with the endpoint (full model. Based on this, we developed a simple score (range 0-5, ie, the PARIS score, by dichotomizing the variables. The ability to identify patients at increased risk (discriminatory power and calibration was excellent for all three cohorts using both models. For patients with a PARIS score ≥ 3, sensitivity was 62.5-74.0%, specificity 85.9-91.1%, positive predictive value 11.2-17.5%, and negative predictive value 98.3-99.3%. Patients with a score ≤ 1 had a low mortality (≤ 1%; with 2, intermediate mortality (2-5%; and ≥ 3, high mortality (≥ 10%.Seven-day mortality can be predicted upon admission with high sensitivity and specificity and excellent negative predictive values.

  16. Story-telling, Earth-Sciences and Geoethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohle, Martin; Sibilla, Anna; Graells, Robert Casals i.

    2015-04-01

    People are engineers, even the artist. People like stories, even the engineers. Engineering shapes the intersections of humans and their environments including with the geosphere. Geoethics considers values upon which to base practices how to intersect the geosphere. Story-telling is a skilful human practice to describe perception of values in different contexts to influence their application. Traditional earth-centric narrations of rural communities have been lost in the global urbanisation process. These former-time narrations related to the "sacrum" - matters not possible to be explained with reasoning. Science and technology, industrialisation and global urbanisation require an other kind of earth-centric story-telling. Now at the fringe of the Anthropocene, humans can base their earth-centricity on knowledge and scientific thinking. We argue that modern story-telling about the functioning of Earth's systems and the impact of humankind's activities on these systems is needed, also in particular because citizens rarely can notice how the geosphere intersects with their daily dealings; putting weather and disasters aside. Modern earth-centric story-telling would offer citizens opportunities to develop informed position towards humankind's place within earth-systems. We argue that such "earth-science story-lines" should be part of the public discourse to engage citizens who have more or less "expert-knowledge". Understanding the functioning of the Earth is needed for economy and values suitable for an anthropophil society. Multi-faceted discussion of anthropogenic global change and geoengineering took off recently; emerging from discussions about weather and hazard mitigation. Going beyond that example; we illustrate opportunities for rich story-telling on intersections of humans' activities and the geosphere. These 'modern narrations' can weave science, demographics, linguistics and cultural histories into earth-centric stories around daily dealings of citizens

  17. Management of major blood loss: an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Ostrowski, S R; Secher, N H

    2010-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Trauma and massive transfusion are associated with coagulopathy secondary to tissue injury, hypoperfusion, dilution and consumption of clotting factors and platelets. Concepts of damage control surgery have evolved, prioritizing...... coagulopathy of massive transfusion remains debated and randomized controlled studies are lacking. Results from recent before-and-after studies in massively bleeding patients indicate that trauma exsanguination protocols involving the early administration of plasma and platelets are associated with improved......, regardless of its cause, should be treated with goal-directed haemostatic control resuscitation involving the early administration of plasma and platelets and based on the results of the TEG/ROTEM analysis. The aim of the goal-directed therapy should be to maintain a normal haemostatic competence until...

  18. Perda auditiva induzida por ruído e hipertensão em condutores de ônibus Noise-induced hearing loss and high blood pressure among city bus drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleno Rodrigues Corrêa Filho

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar as prevalências de perda auditiva induzida por ruído e hipertensão arterial em condutores de ônibus urbanos. MÉTODOS: Executou-se estudo transversal em amostra probabilística de 108 motoristas da cidade de Campinas, SP. Aplicou-se questionário sobre história profissional, jornadas de trabalho e repouso, e realizou-se exame físico e laboratorial incluindo medida da pressão arterial, audiometria tonal limiar, logoaudiometria e dados antropométricos, após a obtenção de consentimento. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de perda auditiva induzida por ruído foi de 32,7% do total examinado. Segundo a classificação de Merluzzi, nos 31 casos classificados em primeiro e segundo graus, observou-se que a freqüência audiométrica com perda auditiva mais acentuada foi a de 6 kHz (61,3%, seguida pela de 4 kHz (38,7%, sem diferenças significantes quanto à lateralidade. A prevalência de hipertensão arterial diastólica (PAD³90 mmHG; PAS³140 mmHG foi de 13,2% dos examinados. CONCLUSÕES: O risco de disacusia induzida por ruído foi maior para os motoristas com mais de seis anos de trabalho, após ajuste para a perda relacionada com a idade, com um odds ratio de 19,25 (1,59OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of occupational noise-induced hearing loss and arterial hypertension among city bus drivers. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out on a probability random sample of 108 city bus drivers taken out of a total of 1,529 estimated professionals in the city of Campinas, Brazil, in 1991. Drivers were interviewed using questionnaires on job history, shift work and vacation schedules and underwent clinical and laboratory examinations including measures of blood pressure, pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and anthropometric data analysis after an informed consent was obtained. RESULTS: The prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss was 32.7%. According to Merluzzi's classification, 91.2% (31 cases were classified as

  19. Hidden loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Johansen, Karen Lise Gaardsvig

    2013-01-01

    finding indicates that the children experienced numerous losses, many of which were often suppressed or neglected by the children to protect the ill parents. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that the children seemed to make a special effort to hide their feelings of loss and grief in order to protect...

  20. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Types KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Types Print A A ... or straight hair instead of curly. ...Make Eight Blood Types The different markers that can be found in ...

  1. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confidence to respond in emergency situations with the skills that can help to save a life. Learn more » Red Cross Information Donating Blood Learn About Blood Hosting a Blood Drive For Hospitals Engage with Us About Us Media ...

  2. On telling the truth to patients with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Marzanski, Marek

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To discover what dementia sufferers think is wrong with them, what they have been told and by whom, and what they wish to know about their illness. Background Ethical guidelines regarding telling truth appear to be equivocal. Declarations of cognitively intact subjects, attitudes of family members, and current psychiatric practice all vary, but no previous research has been published concerning what patients with dementia would like to know about their diagnosis and prognosis. Desi...

  3. Teaching children with autism to tell socially appropriate lies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Ryan; Najdowski, Adel C; Alvarado, Marisela; Tarbox, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    This study used a nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design to evaluate the use of rules, role-play, and feedback for teaching 3 children with autism spectrum disorder to tell socially appropriate lies when (a) presented with an undesired gift and (b) someone's appearance changed in an undesired way. The intervention was effective in teaching use of socially appropriate lies, and generalization to untrained people and gifts or appearances was observed. PMID:26831011

  4. Men and Domestic Violence: What research tells us

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health

    2003-01-01

    Men and Domestic Violence: What research tells us In late 2000, the Department of Health and Children, in conjunction with the North Eastern Health Board, commissioned Kieran McKeown Limited, Social and Economic Consultants to prepare a literature review of research carried out in other jurisdictions Click here to download PDF 578kb Background Note PDF 10kb Peer Review 1 PDF 21kb Peer Review 2 PDF 17kb

  5. Archaeological and chemical analysis of Tell el Yahudiyeh ware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typological and geographic analyses indicate that Tell el Yahudiyeh ware (found in Cyprus, Egypt, Nubia, and the Levant during the Middle Bronze period, c. 1750-1550 B.C.) were probably manufactured in two areas, the Nile Valley and the Levant. Activation analysis was carried out and correlated with the archaeological analyses. Results confirm the two ''families'' of the ware, one Egyptian and one Levantine. Speculations are offered on the social interaction of the period. 11 figures, 2 tables

  6. What does global mean temperature tell us about local climate?

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Rowan; Suckling, Emma; Hawkins, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The subject of climate feedbacks focuses attention on global mean surface air temperature (GMST) as the key metric of climate change. But what does knowledge of past and future GMST tell us about the climate of specific regions? In the context of the ongoing UNFCCC process, this is an important question for policy-makers as well as for scientists. The answer depends on many factors, including the mechanisms causing changes, the timescale of the changes, and the variables and regions of intere...

  7. Assessment of the effect on blood loss and transfusion requirements when adding a polyethylene glycol sealant to the anastomotic closure of aortic procedures: a case–control analysis of 102 patients undergoing Bentall procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natour Ehsan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of CoSeal®, a polyethylene glycol sealant, in cardiac and vascular surgery for prevention of anastomotic bleeding has been subject to prior investigations. We analysed our perioperative data to determine the clinical benefit of using polyethylene glycol sealant to inhibit suture line bleeding in aortic surgery. Methods From January 2004 to June 2006, 124 patients underwent aortic surgical procedures such as full root replacements, reconstruction and/or replacement of ascending aorta and aortic arch procedures. A Bentall procedure was employed in 102 of these patients. In 48 of these, a polyethylene glycol sealant was added to the anastomotic closure of the aortic procedure (sealant group and the other 54 patients did not have this additive treatment to the suture line (control group. Results There were no significant between-group differences in the demographic characteristics of the patients undergoing Bentall procedures. Mean EuroSCORES (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation were 13.7 ± 7.7 (sealant group and 14.4 ± 6.2 (control group, p = NS. The polyethylene glycol sealant group had reduced intraoperative and postoperative transfusion requirements (red blood cells: 761 ± 863 versus 1248 ± 1206 ml, p = 0.02; fresh frozen plasma: 413 ± 532 versus 779 ± 834 ml, p = 0.009; and less postoperative drainage loss (985 ± 972 versus 1709 ± 1302 ml, p = 0.002. A trend towards a lower rate of rethoracotomy was observed in the sealant group (1/48 versus 6/54, p = 0.07 and there was significantly less time spent in the intensive care unit or hospital (both p = 0.03. Based on hypothesis-generating calculations, the resulting economic benefit conferred by shorter intensive care unit and hospital stays, reduced transfusion requirements and a potentially lower rethoracotomy rate is estimated at €1,943 per patient in this data analysis

  8. Immunoelectrophoresis - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    IEP - serum; Immunoglobulin electrophoresis - blood; Gamma globulin electrophoresis; Serum immunoglobulin electrophoresis ... A blood sample is needed. For information on how this is done, see: Venipuncture

  9. Common Weight Loss Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tell me that they’ve been drinking sugary soft drinks all their lives, and they’re not willing ... some ground. If they need to have sugary soft drinks, ask them to indulge at work and leave ...

  10. History of a Bronze Age tell and its environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gabriella; Füleky, György; Vicze, Magdolna

    2016-04-01

    Százhalombatta-Földvár is the most excessively researched Bronze Age tell site in Hungary. Parallel to the investigation of the settlement structure and activity patterns the changes of the landscape and the effect of human alteration is also studied. Significant changes of the landscape can be detected from the Bronze Age until the recent natural and cultural heritage protection of the area. Archaeological, soil analytical and thin section soil micromorphological methods are used to reconstruct the past 4000 years of the tell and its immediate surroundings. Prior to the Bronze Age the area was covered by forest vegetation, so the initial settling could only be realised after deforestation (2000 BC). The result of the soil corings and the prepared soil thin sections are solid proves of this action. It also became evident that at some areas - so far it seems that at locales where house floors were laid for the very first time - even the topsoil was removed so intensively that only the B horizon of the relict forest soil can be found. This observation needs to be further tested outside the habitation area to define the horizontal extension of the forest clearance and the topsoil removal. The northern side of the settlement is bordered by a natural erosion gully. At 2000 BC it was just a natural depression, but by 1500 BC it was deepened to serve as a fortification ditch. Around 1200 BC the ditch started to be filled in and by 1000 BC it was refilled to such an extent that its surface was utilised again. At about 600 BC (Late Iron Age) a smaller inner rampart was erected on the southern side of the ditch for inner separation. Not much is known about the Roman period of this area (200 AD) but the remnants of a watchtower indicate their presence. During the 18th century AD the area was used for grape cultivation and later for hobby gardens up until the protection of the area in the late 20th century. Since then species of the original vegetation started to grow back

  11. Memory loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    A person with memory loss needs a lot of support. It helps to show the person familiar objects, music, or and photos or play familiar music. Write down when the person should take any medicine or do other ...

  12. Perioperative neonatal and paediatric blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avnish Bharadwaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric patients undergoing surgical procedures commonly require some volume of blood or blood component replacement in the perioperative period. Paediatric patients undergoing major surgery associated with substantial blood loss should be evaluated pre-operatively. Pre-operative correction of anaemia may be done considering the age, plasma volume status, clinical status and comorbidities. Maximum allowable blood loss (MABL for surgery must be calculated, and appropriate quantity of blood and blood components should be arranged. Intraoperative monitoring of blood loss should be done, and volume of transfusion should be calculated in a protocol based manner considering the volemia and the trigger threshold for transfusion for the patient and the MABL. Early haemostasis should be achieved by judicious administration of red blood cells, blood components and pharmacological agents.

  13. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  14. NASA tells physicists to aim for the stars

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    Dan Goldin, administrator at NASA, suggested that the next generation of instruments for high-energy physics research should be built in space. This did not go down well at Fermilab where a case is being made for a new ground-based accelerator. Goldin's aim though was simply to tell the scientific community that NASA is prepared to spend big money on physics in space. NASA also wants to work more closely with the DOE and the NSF to support space-based experiments (1 page).

  15. I vote the young lady tells us a story

    OpenAIRE

    Busby, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    I vote the young lady tell us a story turns ephemeric readymade items into small interactive audio playback devices suitable for DJ-ing existing audio. This work presented a series of new compositions (in response to the theme of ‘Alice in Wonderland’ as set by the initial commissioning gallery - the compositions were intended to loosely ‘score’ the Carroll books) which were resonated using piezo disc systems through a series of 12 ephemeric readymades. These resonators were DJ-ed alongside e...

  16. Memory as resistance, and the telling of a dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, P

    1992-01-01

    Traditional analytic orientation to memory as subject to repression has overshadowed examination of some of the ego's other activities bearing on memory. The author examines the defensive use of memory with the analytic goal of maximum autonomous access for the patient to the ego's previously unconscious management of intrapsychic conflict. A close scrutiny of an example of this in the form of the telling of a dream explores this resistance process and illustrates a technical approach. Some aspects of this perspective are considered in relation to traditional approaches to dream material. Certain technical priorities for differing clinical settings are discussed. PMID:1593074

  17. FORTUNE TELLINGS THAT RELATED FRUITS / MEYVELERIN DILINDEN FAL VE ISARETLER

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Saadettin EĞRİ

    2008-01-01

    This study discusses the meanings attributed tovarious fruit in the fortune telling book Hursidname.Hursidname is located in the Library of Manuscripts andAncient Printed Books in Bursa and it’s characteristicsare interesting. It was written in the 18th century bySıdki and it is the only copy. In this book there are 36fruit and plant names. Every fruit’s loacations in the textwere given and all the fruit’s means were defined.Generally in this book there are some expectations andinformations a...

  18. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osmotic fragility ) Deficiency of an enzyme called lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase Abnormalities of hemoglobin , the protein in ... sickle and Pappenheimer Red blood cells, target cells Formed elements of blood References Bain BJ. The peripheral ...

  19. Use of blood and blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, E; Wood, B

    1999-11-01

    It is sometimes necessary for the practitioner to transfuse the ruminant with whole blood or plasma. These techniques are often difficult to perform in practice, are time-consuming, expensive, and stressful to the animal. Acute loss of 20% to 25% of the blood volume will result in marked clinical signs of anemia, including tachycardia and maniacal behavior. The PCV is only a useful tool with which to monitor acute blood loss after intravascular equilibration with other fluid compartments has occurred. An acutely developing PCV of 15% or less may require transfusion. Chronic anemia with PCV of 7% to 12% can be tolerated without transfusion if the animal is not stressed and no further decline in erythrocyte mass occurs. Seventy-five percent of transfused bovine erythrocytes are destroyed within 48 hours of transfusion. A transfusion rate of 10 to 20 mL/kg recipient weight is necessary to result in any appreciable increase in PCV. A nonpregnant donor can contribute 10 to 15 mL of blood/kg body weight at 2- to 4-week intervals. Sodium citrate is an effective anticoagulant, but acid citrate dextrose should be used if blood is to be stored for more than a few hours. Blood should not be stored more than 2 weeks prior to administration. Heparin is an unsuitable anticoagulant because the quantity of heparin required for clot-free blood collection will lead to coagulation defects in the recipient. Blood cross-matching is only rarely performed in the ruminant. In field situations, it is advisable to inject 200 mL of donor blood into the adult recipient and wait 10 minutes. If no reaction occurs, the rest of the blood can probably be safely administered as long as volume overload problems do not develop. Adverse reactions are most commonly seen in very young animals or pregnant cattle. Signs of blood or plasma transfusion reaction include hiccoughing, tachycardia, tachypnea, sweating, muscle tremors, pruritus, salivation, cough, dyspnea, fever, lacrimation, hematuria

  20. TellTable: Collaborative Work Using Single User Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Nash

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Many work environments require collaborative writing and editing of documents in diverse formats. In simple cases, there is essentially one author who receives approvals and comments from others. In other cases, the document is genuinely collaboratively authored using asynchronous or synchronous methods. A common way to collaboratively edit a document is to exchange draft versions between authors via email. This method introduces the possibility of conflicting changes and missed contributions as well as a significant burden as all members of the team are responsible for version control. The principle difficulty is that independent changes can be made to different versions, which must later be reconciled manually. It is also difficult to determine when and why a change was made. This article introduces TellTable, an open source system designed to allow single-user software applications to be managed in a collaborative manner. We will discuss current collaboration models, the technical aspects of the TellTable software framework, security issues in its implementation, and tests of performance.

  1. The Analysis of the Gothic Element--High Emotion in The Tell-tale Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莎

    2014-01-01

    The Tell-tale Heart is one of the most typical gothic novel of Allen Poe’s. This article intends to analyse one of the gothic elements, that is, high emotion which is employed in The Tell-tale Heart to contribute to the horror effect.

  2. The Analysis of the Gothic Element——High Emotion in The Tell-tale Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莎

    2014-01-01

    The Tell-tale Heart is one of the most typical gothic novel of Allen Poe’s. This article intends to analyse one of the gothic elements, that is, high emotion which is employed in The Tell-tale Heart to contribute to the horror effect.

  3. Burning Down the House: the Burnt Building V6 at Late Neolithic Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akkermans, Peter M.M.G.; Brüning, Merel L.; Hammers, Neeke Mineke;

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the remains of a T-shaped burnt building found in trench V6 in Operation II at Late Neolithic Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria. The burnt building closely resembles the so-called Burnt Village excavated earlier at Tell Sabi Abyad in Operation I, level 6, but is slightly older. Many...

  4. A comparison of blood loss during the Halal slaughter of lambs following Traditional Religious Slaughter without stunning, Electric Head-Only Stunning and Post-Cut Electric Head-Only Stunning

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Rizvan; Knowles, Toby; Wotton, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Blood lost at exsanguination during the Halal slaughter of lambs was compared between the slaughter methodsof Traditional Religious Slaughter without stunning (TRS), Electric Head-Only Stunning (EHOS) and Post-CutElectric Head-Only Stunning (PCEHOS). Two protocols were examined, Experimental (80 lambs) and Commercial(360 lambs), assessing varying periods of animal orientation during the 4 min bleeding process (uprightorientation before vertical hanging). Live-weight, blood weight (Experimenta...

  5. 初次单侧骨水泥型全膝关节置换:氨甲环酸使用方式对失血量的影响%Primary unilateral cemented total knee arthroplasty:effect of tranexamic acid usage on blood loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯振扬; 苏长征; 庞涛; 吕东; 朱彪; 孙义玲; 李振; 柴星宇; 许正文

    2015-01-01

      结果与结论:B组及C组患者显性失血量和隐性失血量均较A组明显减少,差异有显著性意义(P0.05),在隐性失血量方面B组显著小于C组(P OBJECTIVE:To explore and discuss the effect of tranexamic acid and different usage methods on blood loss in the perioperative period of primary unilateral cemented total knee arthroplasty. METHODS:Sixty patients who were candidates for unilateral cemented total knee replacement in the Second Department of Joint Sports Medicine, Tengzhou Central People’s Hospital, from January 2013 to June 2014, were included in this study. Al patients were randomly divided into three groups. Group A (n=20):patients were injected with 100 mL normal saline through intravenous drip when the operation began, and then with 10 mL normal saline through intra-articular injection after skin closure. Group B (n=20):patients were injected with 10 mg/kg tranexamic acid which was dissolved in 100 mL normal saline when the operation began, and then with 10 mL normal saline through intra-articular injection after skin closure. Group C (n=20):patients were injected with 100 mL normal saline when the operation began, and then with 500 mg tranexamic acid dissolved in 10 mL normal saline through intra-articular injection after skin closure. The dominant blood loss, hidden blood loss, blood transfusion ratio and per capita of each group were compared. Clinical symptoms of pulmonary embolism and lower limb deep vein thrombosis were observed. Doppler ultrasound examine on lower extremity would be performed if necessary. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Dominant and hidden blood loss of patients from groups B and C were significantly lower than that of patients from group A (P0.05), the hidden blood loss in group B was significantly less than that in group C (P<0.05). The transfusion population and ratio of patients from groups B and C were significantly lower than that of patients from group A (P<0.05). In al three groups, no deep

  6. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  7. Advances in Weight Loss Surgery: The Fully Robotic Gastric Bypass

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... know, diabetics are patients who have no blood control of -- no control of their blood sugar, and because of this, ... of infection because of their loss of glucose control. But our infection rates in those patients that ...

  8. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the market in October 2010 because it caused heart problems and strokes. “We’ve also found weight- ... of weight loss products, including increased blood pressure, heart palpitations (a pounding or racing heart), stroke, seizure ...

  9. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are imported, sold online, and heavily promoted on social media sites. Some can also be found on ... use of weight loss products, including increased blood pressure, heart palpitations (a pounding or racing heart), stroke, ...

  10. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers ... Weight Loss Products More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical ...

  11. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For ... Contaminated Weight Loss Products More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food ...

  12. Genetic basis of rare blood group variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wigman

    2013-01-01

    A transfusion of donor red blood cells can be life saving In individuals with massive blood loss due to an accident or surgery or in individuals with constitutive anemia due to a defect in erythropoiesis. Donor blood can, however, not be simply transfused to every patient. When a recipient of a red

  13. Blood / Money

    OpenAIRE

    Strong, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Marilyn Strathern has argued that "nature" in Euro-American culture has appeared as constraint; it has figured the givens of existence on which human artifice is seen to construct "society" or "culture."(5) Among those givens is the notion that human beings are naturally individuals. And blood, too, images individuality: "The very thought of blood, individual blood, touches the deepest feelings in man about life and death" ([RIchard Titmuss] 16.) Transfusion medicine, then, draws on a series ...

  14. Tell el Yahudiyeh Ware: a re-evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, M.F.; Harbottle, G.; Sayre, E.V.

    1980-01-01

    The TY (Tell el Yahudiyeh ware) project has implications for understanding the cultural interactions. The Second Intermediate Period (1750-1550 B.C.), one during which centraized government in Egypt collapses and, it is generally assumed, so does her trade network. Foreigners - the Hyksos - are able to enter the country and rule at least part of it. Results of this study (which includes activation analysis), however, indicate the TY is primarily an Egyptian pottery which appeared before the Hyksos entered and may have continued in use after they left. It cannot, therefore, be tightly associated with the Hyksos nor can it be used to judge the extent of their influence. Its wide distribution shows that Egypt continued to trade goods outside her boundaries throughout this period. Finally, not only goods travelled between what were generally considered to have been hostile neighbors, but the trade appears to have included ideas and technology as well.

  15. Selling or telling? A theory of ruin value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Ole Verner

    2011-01-01

    Selling or telling? : A theory of ruin value  Abstract: To what extent can tourism be described as an agent of peace? Can war and conflict be reconciled through tourism? Why is the children's memorial in Hiroshima so important and why is the Holocaust memorial in Berlin a reconciliating...... on this planet? War and disasters have a deep impact and are major aesthetic objects of fascination. The Nazi death cult was carefully designed mass propaganda based on a fascinating, mass hysterical carnival of the dead. Architecture and design play an important yet unpleasant part in this.   This paper...... will explore four tracks of this doomsday vision: in fiction, facts and in the world of tourism. 1. The architect who, as Faust, sold his soul for immortality and the consequences thereof. 2. The artist who creates a personal vision of our fear and anxiety. 3. A comparative analysis of a group of mainstream...

  16. Tell el Yahudiyeh Ware: a re-evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TY (Tell el Yahudiyeh ware) project has implications for understanding the cultural interactions. The Second Intermediate Period (1750-1550 B.C.), one during which centraized government in Egypt collapses and, it is generally assumed, so does her trade network. Foreigners - the Hyksos - are able to enter the country and rule at least part of it. Results of this study (which includes activation analysis), however, indicate the TY is primarily an Egyptian pottery which appeared before the Hyksos entered and may have continued in use after they left. It cannot, therefore, be tightly associated with the Hyksos nor can it be used to judge the extent of their influence. Its wide distribution shows that Egypt continued to trade goods outside her boundaries throughout this period. Finally, not only goods travelled between what were generally considered to have been hostile neighbors, but the trade appears to have included ideas and technology as well

  17. How Networked Communication Has Changed the Ways We Tell Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Notaro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the midst of the digital revolution, we are confronted with the task of defining how media will change our lives and how we communicate with each other in the years to come. Narrative, as one of the most ancient communication tools, has undergone substantial structural changes. This paper addresses how these changes impact the way we read and write. Does the same story conveyed through different media channels signify in the same manner? In other words, what are the differences between a printed story and a digitally presented one? Have electronic reader devices altered the way stories are told and created? And how is networked communication changing the ways we tell stories?

  18. AIDS and journalism. Trying to tell too clear a story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J

    1994-12-01

    Much in science is complex. Scientists, by definition, work within the realm of complex hypothesis, empirical evidence, and proof. Questions, answers, details, complexities; that is the domain of the scientist. Journalists, on the other hand, are paid to develop and present stories which are clearly read and interpreted by the general public. The mechanics and dynamics of HIV and AIDS are among the most complex scientific challenges in the history of humankind. Journalists calling upon scientists to obtain and report clear, concise, information about the agent and its resulting pandemic are therefore surely not always going to receive simple, readily reportable responses. HIV is a moving target upon which research continues. While there are some definitively affirmative and some definitively negative factors about HIV, the gray areas and speculation remain vast. The author gives a few examples of AIDS stories which the media mishandled because they were trying to tell too clear a story. He then discusses stories flawed because scientists managed to present clear information about which journalists were overly skeptical. In one case, the public was informed that AIDS vaccines were not working, with headlines which insinuated that the vaccines themselves were causing infections. None of the vaccines, however, contained infectious materials. As a result, people became overly fearful of participating in HIV vaccine trials. Coverage of the potential identification of HIV-3 was premature and only scared people, while Rolling Stone magazine's article hypothesizing the origin of HIV via trials of a contaminated polio vaccine in the Belgium Congo in the late 1950s should not have been published. Clear answers about HIV/AIDS are few and far between, but interesting and significant stories can still be found; they are just hard to tell. PMID:12319130

  19. Understanding Blood Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lab and Imaging Tests Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts Understanding Blood Counts SHARE: Print Glossary Blood cell counts give ... your blood that's occupied by red cells. Normal Blood Counts Normal blood counts fall within a range ...

  20. NARRATIVE STRUCTURES ACROSS TELLINGS OF THE SAME “GOOD” TEACHING EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ernest Mambu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper investigates narrative structures of the same story told three times by an advanced male EFL (i.e., English as a foreign language learner. By narrative structures in this paper, I mean the sequence of narrative, especially in the light of the Labovian tradition of narrative analysis (Labov & Waletzky, 1997; Labov, 1972; Wu, 1995, and how each narrative component (e.g., abstract, orientation, complicating action, result/resolution, evaluation, and coda is fleshed out within and across tellings. Data analysis in this paper will attempt to answer the question of the extent to which these structures in one telling are similar or different across tellings of the same “good” experiences (cf. Chafe, 1998; Polanyi, 1981; Prior, 2011. In Labov’s (1972 data, “bad” near-death experiences were elicited, and yet a “good” result is conspicuous: death was overcome. Being asked to tell his “good” story, the EFL learner concentrated on the favorable experience. This said, some hints at unfavorable experiences—typically filling in the complicating action slot, like in telling bad or embarrassing stories (as in Wu, 1995—also emerged, which make analysis of “good” experiences worthwhile in its own right. In particular, it can be hypothesized that the underlying structure of good experiences fits into the Labovian narrative structure with some nuanced variations across tellings. The findings support the hypothesis and suggest that repeated tellings of the same story provided the speaker in this study ample room to reflect on his past experience such that subsequent tellings can be more engaging than the first (or previous telling.

  1. Blood donation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A blood donation is organised by the Cantonal Hospital of Geneva On Thursday 19 March 2009 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT 2 Number of donations during the last blood donations :135 donors in July 2008 122 donors in November 2008 Let’s do better in 2009 !!! Give 30 minutes of your time to save lives...

  2. BLOOD DONATION

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A blood donation, organized by EFS (Etablissement Français du Sang) of Annemasse will take place On Wednesday 12 November 2008, from 8:30 to 16:00, at CERN Restaurant 2 If possible, please, bring your blood group Card.

  3. Tainted blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Ida; Sheikh, Zainab Afshan; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    study of the historical rise and current workings of safety practices in the Danish blood system. Here, we identify a strong focus on contamination in order to avoid 'tainted blood', at the expense of working with risks that could be avoided through enhanced blood monitoring practices. Of further...... significance to this focus are the social dynamics found at the heart of safety practices aimed at avoiding contamination. We argue that such dynamics need more attention, in order to achieve good health outcomes in transfusion medicine. Thus, we conclude that, to ensure continuously safe blood systems, we...... need to move beyond the bifurcation of the social and medical aspects of blood supply as two separate issues and approach social dynamics as key medical safety questions....

  4. Estradiol blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    E2 test ... temporarily stop taking certain medicines that may affect test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ... helps prevent sperm from dying too early. This test may be ordered to check: How well your ...

  5. How to Tell If Your Teen Has a Mental Health Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How to Tell If Your Teen Has a Mental Health Problem 1 in 5 kids develop a serious ... make it difficult for parents to spot serious mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, an expert ...

  6. AMIDST: Attracting Minorities to Geosciences Through Involved Digital Story Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A.; Ohler, J.; Cooper, C.; McDermott, M.; Heinrich, J.; Johnson, R.; Leeper, L.; Polk, N.; Wimer, T.

    2009-12-01

    Attracting Minorities to Geosciences Through Involved Digital Story Telling (AMIDST) is a project funded by the Geoscience Directorate of the National Science Foundation through their program entitled Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in Geosciences. This project centers around the idea of integrating place-based geoscience education with culturally sensitive digital story telling, to engage and attract Alaska’s native and rural children from grades 3 through 5 to geosciences. In Spring 2008 we brought together a team 2 native elders, a group of scientists and technicians, an evaluator, 2 teachers and their 24 third grade students from Fairbanks (interior Alaska) to create computer-based digital stories around the geoscience themes of permafrost, and forest fires. These two to four minutes digital narratives consisted of a series of images accompanied by music and a voice-over narration by the children. In Fall 2008 we worked with a similar group from Nome (coastal town in western Alaska). The geoscience themes were climate change, and gold in Alaska. This time the students used the same kind of “green screen” editing so prevalent in science fiction movies. Students enacted and recorded their stories in front of a green screen and in post-production replaced the green background with photos, drawings and scientific illustrations related to their stories. Evaluation involved pre and post project tests for all participants, mid-term individual interviews and exit-interviews of selected participants. Project final assessment results from an independent education evaluator showed that both students and teachers improved their geo science content knowledge about permafrost, forest fires, gold mining, and sea ice changes. Teachers and students went through a very steep learning curve and gained experience and new understanding in digital storytelling in the context of geologic phenomena of local interest. Children took pride in being creators, directors and

  7. Donating Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... And be sure to drink plenty of water, milk, or other liquids. Before donating, you'll need to answer some questions about your medical history, and have your temperature, pulse, blood pressure, and ...

  8. Blood smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of RBCs due to body destroying them ( immune hemolytic anemia ) Low number of RBCs due to some red ... of Heinz bodies may indicate: Alpha thalassemia Congenital hemolytic anemia Disorder in which red blood cells break down ...

  9. Amylase - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylase is an enzyme that helps digest carbohydrates. It is made in the pancreas and the glands ... saliva. When the pancreas is diseased or inflamed, amylase releases into the blood. A test can be ...

  10. Telling the truth: what do general practitioners say to patients with dementia or terminal cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Vassilas, C A; Donaldson, J

    1998-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to all general practitioners (GPs) in Cambridgeshire asking them about their practice in telling patients with dementia or terminal cancer their diagnosis. Although the majority of GPs would always or often tell patients of a diagnosis of terminal cancer, this was not the case in dementia; uncertainty of diagnosis was cited as the most important factor in not giving the diagnosis. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of the GP's role in dement...

  11. Transitional Justice: History-Telling, Collective Memory, and the Victim-Witness

    OpenAIRE

    Chrisje Brants; Katrien Klep

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the complex, inherently political, and often contradictory processes of truth-finding, history-telling, and formation of collective memory through transitional justice. It explores tensions between history-telling and the normative goals of truth commissions and international criminal courts, taking into account the increasing importance attributed to victims as witnesses of history. The legal space these instruments of transitional justice offer is determined b...

  12. Moving blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelis, K

    1997-01-01

    Our internationally acclaimed journalist Sanguinia has returned safely from her historic assignment. Travelling from Homeric Greece to British Romanticism, she was witness to blood drinking, letting, bathing, and transfusion. In this report, she explores connections between the symbolic and the sadistic; the mythic and the medical--all in an effort to appreciate the layered meanings our culture has given to the movement of blood between our bodies. PMID:9407636

  13. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and ... Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood Clots ...

  14. Biology of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mail Facebook TwitterTitle Google+ LinkedIn Home Blood Disorders Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Medical Dictionary Also ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of Blood Overview of Blood Components of Blood ...

  15. Blood (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Print A A A ... about the mysterious, life-sustaining fluid called blood. Blood Basics Two types of blood vessels carry blood ...

  16. Blood Facts and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Blood > Blood Facts and Statistics Printable Version Blood Facts and Statistics Facts about blood needs Facts ... about American Red Cross Blood Services Facts about blood needs Every two seconds someone in the U.S. ...

  17. Catecholamine blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norepinephrine -- blood; Epinephrine -- blood; Adrenalin -- blood; Dopamine -- blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... the test. This is especially true if both blood and urine catecholamines are to be measured. You ...

  18. Showing and telling: using tablet technology to engage students in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Naomi; Williamson-Leadley, Sandra; Pratt, Keryn

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative investigation into the use of Show and Tell tablet technology in mathematics classrooms. A Show and Tell application (app) allows the user to capture voice and writing or text in real time. Described here are the perceptions of 11 teachers during and after their exploration into the use of Show and Tell in their primary and secondary classrooms. These perceptions were used to evaluate Show and Tell tablet technology against a framework of student engagement and effective pedagogy. The results of the study indicated that the teachers perceived both the level and the quality of the students' engagement were high. Using Show and Tell apps enabled the teachers to enact effective pedagogy within their classroom practices. Importantly, through the use of Show and Tell recordings, students' thinking became visible to themselves, their teachers and other students in the class. This thinking then formed the basis of robust discussions and negotiation about the mathematical concepts and the strategies the students used to solve problems.

  19. Bringing it all Back Home: the Practical Visual Environments of Southeast European Tells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Trick

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to further our understanding of tells in southeast Europe by considering their landscape context, where the research methodology comprises an innovative hybrid of modern landscape theory, and GIS-based visual analysis. Tell landscapes are explored through the detailed analysis of a group of case study tells located in the Romanian Plain, in southern Romania, dating to the fifth millennium BC. A visual, so-called phenomenological approach is adopted, but novel to this paradigm is the use of GIS as the prime tool with which to conduct visual research. GIS offers a convenient means to visualise and quantify visual parameters of landscape, but its formal nature also brings some rigour to phenomenological research, which has been criticised for lack of standard method. Viewshed tools are utilised in standard form, but also in enriched ‘Higuchi’ and ‘Directional’ forms. The temporal nature of tell settlements is explored through the generation of viewshed maps from different cultural levels of the mound. Results of the analysis are presented and common patterns in the dataset identified. Taking inspiration from the Heideggarian notion of dwelling, a generalised interpretive framework is forwarded. It is suggested that tells were located with respect to visual entities in the environment, and that the nature of the visibility tells us something of the lives of people dwelling on and around them. The article is derived from a lecture given at the Theoretical Archaeology Group conference, Manchester, December 2002.

  20. What can causal networks tell us about metabolic pathways?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Hageman Blair

    Full Text Available Graphical models describe the linear correlation structure of data and have been used to establish causal relationships among phenotypes in genetic mapping populations. Data are typically collected at a single point in time. Biological processes on the other hand are often non-linear and display time varying dynamics. The extent to which graphical models can recapitulate the architecture of an underlying biological processes is not well understood. We consider metabolic networks with known stoichiometry to address the fundamental question: "What can causal networks tell us about metabolic pathways?". Using data from an Arabidopsis Bay[Formula: see text]Sha population and simulated data from dynamic models of pathway motifs, we assess our ability to reconstruct metabolic pathways using graphical models. Our results highlight the necessity of non-genetic residual biological variation for reliable inference. Recovery of the ordering within a pathway is possible, but should not be expected. Causal inference is sensitive to subtle patterns in the correlation structure that may be driven by a variety of factors, which may not emphasize the substrate-product relationship. We illustrate the effects of metabolic pathway architecture, epistasis and stochastic variation on correlation structure and graphical model-derived networks. We conclude that graphical models should be interpreted cautiously, especially if the implied causal relationships are to be used in the design of intervention strategies.

  1. What the Toadfish Ear Tells the Toadfish Brain About Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edds-Walton, Peggy L

    2016-01-01

    Of the three, paired otolithic endorgans in the ear of teleost fishes, the saccule is the one most often demonstrated to have a major role in encoding frequencies of biologically relevant sounds. The toadfish saccule also encodes sound level and sound source direction in the phase-locked activity conveyed via auditory afferents to nuclei of the ipsilateral octaval column in the medulla. Although paired auditory receptors are present in teleost fishes, binaural processes were believed to be unimportant due to the speed of sound in water and the acoustic transparency of the tissues in water. In contrast, there are behavioral and anatomical data that support binaural processing in fishes. Studies in the toadfish combined anatomical tract-tracing and physiological recordings from identified sites along the ascending auditory pathway to document response characteristics at each level. Binaural computations in the medulla and midbrain sharpen the directional information provided by the saccule. Furthermore, physiological studies in the central nervous system indicated that encoding frequency, sound level, temporal pattern, and sound source direction are important components of what the toadfish ear tells the toadfish brain about sound. PMID:26515316

  2. Truth Telling, Companionship, and Witness: An Agenda for Narrative Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Arthur W

    2016-05-01

    Narrative ethics holds that if you ask someone what goodness is, as a basis of action, most people will first appeal to various abstractions, each of which can be defined only by other abstractions that in turn require further definition. If you persist in asking what each of these abstractions actually means, eventually that person will have to tell you a story and expect you to recognize goodness in the story. Goodness and badness need stories to make them thinkable and to translate them into individual and collective actions. Yet after more than two decades of considering the issue, I do not believe that a collection of stories can by itself guide actions in ways that are sufficient to respond to ethical troubles in institutional settings. The question will always remain open for me, but my present belief is that narrative bioethics is always hyphenated, in the sense that guidance from stories needs to be allied with other ethical guidance. Each side of the hyphen qualifies the other side. The hyphenation I will argue for in this essay is "narrative-deontology." PMID:27150414

  3. What Gay-Lussac didn't tell us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrow, C. H.; Amato, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Gay-Lussac's 1801 experiments establishing the law of volumes for gases are brilliantly simple, and he described them with a level of detail that was new to physics writing. But he did not present his actual measurements or tell us how he analyzed them to conclude that between 0 to 100 °C, a volume of any gas will expand by about 37.5%. We review his experiments and conclude that he measured initial and final volumes at slightly different pressures. By using the gas laws and his apparatus diagrams, we corrected his data so that they correspond to constant pressure. His corrected results give ΔV/V=36.6%, the currently accepted value for nearly ideal gases. Aside from their intrinsic interest, our analyses can provide students intriguing applications of the gas laws and Pascal's law and motivate them to consider Pascal's paradox. We also note the influence of ballooning and of the French Revolution on Gay-Lussac.

  4. A paródia da autobiografia em Lygia Fagundes Telles = A parody of autobiographies in Lygia Fagundes Telles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Magno Santos Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo defende a hipótese de que o romance As horas nuas (1989, de Lygia Fagundes Telles, apresenta um sofisticado jogo auto-referencial da obra dentro da obra. As cenas em que Rosa, a protagonista, tenta escrever suas memórias, mas é consumida peloalcoolismo, fortalecem as idéias de paródia e de descentramento estético, presentes nesse romance. Rosa narra e comenta a superficialidade de suas memórias até abandonar seu projeto de escrita, que pode ser lido como uma paródia das autobiografias. Essa hipótese será sustentada metodologicamente pelos conceitos pós-estruturalistas propostos por Jacques Derrida, que defende a escrita como jogo, remédio, veneno ou teatro, entre outrosconceitos. A partir dos suplementos estéticos da encenação de Rosa, o leitor, preocupado com o “como” a obra foi construída, descobre novos roteiros desse romance que se autoquestiona no próprio desenrolar da narrativa. Ao final, interpreta-se o silêncio de Rosa como uma crítica à superficialidade e ao narcisismo do gênero autobiográfico.This study defends the idea that the novel As horas nuas (1989, by Lygia Fagundes Telles, presents a sophisticated auto-referential game concerning the artistic production in itself. The scenes in which Rosa, the main character, tries to write her memories, but is absorbed by alcoholism, strengths the idea of parody and esthetic disorder in this novel. Rosa narrates and comments the superficiality of her memories until the moment that she abandons herwriting project, which can be read as a parody of autobiographies. This hypothesis is supported methodologically by the post-structuralism concepts proposed by Jacques Derrida, which defends the writing as a game, medicine, poison or theater, beyond other concepts. Using the esthetic supplements of Rosa’s staging, which narrates her memories to a recorder, the reader concerned about “how” the novel was built discovers new scripts of the novel that provokes

  5. Blood transfusion requirements in otolaryngology - head and neck surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dulguerov, Pavel; Quinodoz, Didier François; Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Tassonyi, Edomer; Beris, Photis

    1998-01-01

    Blood requirements for Head and Neck surgical procedures have not been studied carefully. In order to set up an autotransfusion program, the blood loss and transfusion requirements should be known precisely.

  6. Vision Loss, Sudden

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of age-related macular degeneration. Spotlight on Aging: Vision Loss in Older People Most commonly, vision loss ... Some Causes and Features of Sudden Loss of Vision Cause Common Features* Tests Sudden loss of vision ...

  7. Older Adults and Smell Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... beverages or the scents and fragrances in our environment. More importantly, we would be deprived of an ... functions. It tells us what is in the environment and it warns us of dangers, such as ...

  8. Older Adults and Smell Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be able to enjoy food and beverages or the scents and fragrances in our environment. More importantly, ... main functions. It tells us what is in the environment and it warns us of dangers, such ...

  9. Older Adults and Smell Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it serves two main functions. It tells us what is in the environment and it warns us ... think they have a problem with taste, when what they really have is a problem with smell. ...

  10. Older Adults and Smell Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because it serves two main functions. It tells us what is in the environment and it warns us of dangers, such as bad smells, it attracts us to good smells. But it also has another ...

  11. Older Adults and Smell Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Our sense of smell is very important. Without it, we would not be able to enjoy food ... Beauchamp: he sense of smell is important because it serves two main functions. It tells us what ...

  12. Telling partners about chlamydia: how acceptable are the new technologies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Rhian M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partner notification is accepted as a vital component in the control of chlamydia. However, in reality, many sexual partners of individuals diagnosed with chlamydia are never informed of their risk. The newer technologies of email and SMS have been used as a means of improving partner notification rates. This study explored the use and acceptability of different partner notification methods to help inform the development of strategies and resources to increase the number of partners notified. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 40 people who were recently diagnosed with chlamydia from three sexual health centres and two general practices across three Australian jurisdictions. Results Most participants chose to contact their partners either in person (56% or by phone (44%. Only 17% chose email or SMS. Participants viewed face-to-face as the "gold standard" in partner notification because it demonstrated caring, respect and courage. Telephone contact, while considered insensitive by some, was often valued because it was quick, convenient and less confronting. Email was often seen as less personal while SMS was generally considered the least acceptable method for telling partners. There was also concern that emails and SMS could be misunderstood, not taken seriously or shown to others. Despite these, email and SMS were seen to be appropriate and useful in some circumstances. Letters, both from the patients or from their doctor, were viewed more favourably but were seldom used. Conclusion These findings suggest that many people diagnosed with chlamydia are reluctant to use the new technologies for partner notification, except in specific circumstances, and our efforts in developing partner notification resources may best be focused on giving patients the skills and confidence for personal interaction.

  13. USArray Siting Outreach: Telling the EarthScope Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, P. M.; Taber, J. J.; McQuillan, P.; Busby, R. W.; Woodward, R.

    2013-12-01

    USArray has engaged in a variety of activities that involve students in and inform the general public about EarthScope. Examples include the highly successful Transportable Array Student Siting Program that employed students and faculty from colleges and universities in the identification of sites for future Transportable Array stations in their region, and a range of informal education and media opportunities where information about EarthScope and its discoveries are shared with educators and the public. During the course of eight summers, more than 135 students from about 55 institutions conducted site reconnaissance for nearly 1375 sites from the West Coast to the East Coast, and from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes and southern Canada. While telling the EarthScope story, students who participated in the program increased their professional skills and deepened their personal growth. Other students had opportunities to engage in EarthScope-related research as part of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program. Several EarthScope-focused outreach products for the public and educational audiences have been developed including Ground Motion Visualizations, EarthScope-centric and regional content sets for the IRIS Active Earth Monitor (AEM), and animations of earth processes. A kiosk loan program has helped to broadly disseminate the AEM displays. There have also been articles published in university, local and regional newspapers; stories appearing in national and international print and broadcast media; and documentaries produced by some of the world's most respected scientific and educational production companies that have included a segment about EarthScope and the Transportable Array. Over the next five years, USArray will be deploying and operating Transportable Array stations in Alaska and western Canada. This challenging environment will offer new opportunities to connect with communities throughout the region including native populations.

  14. What Can Sounds Tell Us About Earthquake Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, C.; Peng, Z.

    2012-12-01

    interactions can tell us about the source characteristics of earthquakes and tremors.

  15. Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to infections including those we develop from our vaccinations (such as poliovirus antibodies, which are made by ... the Transfusion Medicine Unit, Blood Bank, and Stem Cell Storage Facility University of Rochester Medical ... and health educators who are available by phone Monday through Friday, 9 am to 9 pm ( ...

  16. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... BMP) Blood Test: Complete Blood Count Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Getting a Blood Test (Video) Blood Test: ...

  17. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor prescribes it, medicine. What Is Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood flow inside ... Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you won't ...

  18. Blood Pressure Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  19. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... right away. continue How Do Doctors Measure Blood Pressure? Blood pressure readings are fast and painless. Blood pressure ... same age, height, and gender have lower blood pressure. Blood pressure between 90% and 95% of the normal ...

  20. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The ...

  1. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Transfusions Print A ... United States get blood transfusions. A Bit About Blood As blood moves throughout the body, it carries ...

  2. Blood Count Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your blood contains red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in your blood. This helps doctors check on your overall health. ...

  3. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Awards Membership ASH Foundation Global Programs Newsroom facebook twitter youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda ... View all publications For Patients Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding Disorders Blood Cancers Blood Clots Blood ...

  4. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For Patients Blood Disorders Blood Clots Blood Clotting & Pregnancy If you are pregnant, or you have just ... The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is increased by the following: Previous blood clots ...

  5. Balancing truth-telling in the preservation of hope: a relational ethics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergert, Pernilla; Lützén, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Truth-telling in healthcare practice can be regarded as a universal communicative virtue; however, there are different views on what consequence it has for giving or diminishing hope. The aim of this article is to explore the relationship between the concepts of truth-telling and hope from a relational ethics approach in the context of healthcare practice. Healthcare staff protect themselves and others to preserve hope in the care of seriously sick patients and in end-of-life care. This is done by balancing truth-telling guided by different conditions such as the cultural norms of patients, family and staff. Our main conclusion is that the balancing of truth-telling needs to be decided in a mutual understanding in the caring relationship, but hope must always be inspired. Instead of focusing on autonomy as the only guiding principle, we would like to propose that relational ethics can serve as a meaningful perspective in balancing truth-telling. PMID:22140184

  6. Living with vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - vision loss; Retinopathy - vision loss; Low vision; Blindness - vision loss ... Low vision is a visual disability. Wearing regular glasses or contacts does not help. People with low vision have ...

  7. Imaging: what can it tell us about parkinsonian gait?

    OpenAIRE

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Jahn, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has provided new tools to study cerebral gait control in Parkinson disease (PD). First, imaging of blood flow functions has identified a supraspinal locomotor network that includes the (frontal) cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem tegmentum and the cerebellum. These studies emphasize also the cognitive and attentional dependency of gait in PD. Furthermore, gait in PD and related syndromes like progressive supranuclear palsy may be associated with dysfunction of the indire...

  8. Performance of an injector system for the ETL electron linac, TELL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new injector of the ETL linac TELL was prepared to improve the quality of the electron beam and the efficiency of injection to storage rings, TERAS, NIJI-IV, and so on. The generation of the beam current 600mA(pulse width of 1μs) from an electron gun and the generation of 2ns short pulsed beam required for the single bunch injection to NIJI-IV were already achieved. The emittance and the energy spread of the electron beams will be measured downstream of the new injector. The operation of TELL by using the new injector will be started after the measurements. (author)

  9. Lying through Their Teeth: Third Party Advice and Truth Telling in a Strategy Proof Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Guillén, Pablo; Hing, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We test the effect of advice on the well known top trading cycles (TTC) matching algorithm in a school choice frame work. We compare three treatments involving third party advice [right advice (R), wrong advice (W), and both right and wrong advice (RW)] to a no-advice baseline (B). In line with previous literature the truth telling rate is higher than 80% in the baseline, but it becomes as low as 35% in the W treatment. Truth telling rates are also significantly lower in R than in B, and much...

  10. Economic Loan Loss Provision and Expected Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hlawatsch

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The intention of a loan loss provision is the anticipation of the loan's expected losses by adjusting the book value of the loan. Furthermore, this loan loss provision has to be compared to the expected loss according to Basel II and, in the case of a difference, liable equity has to be adjusted. This however assumes that the loan loss provision and the expected loss are based on a similar economic rationale, which is only valid conditionally in current loan loss provisioning methods according to IFRS. Therefore, differences between loan loss provisions and expected losses should only result from different approaches regarding the parameter estimation within each model and not due to different assumptions regarding the outcome of the model. The provisioning and accounting model developed in this paper overcomes the before-mentioned shortcomings and is consistent with an economic rationale of expected losses. Additionally, this model is based on a close-to-market valuation of the loan that is in favor of the basic idea of IFRS. Suggestions for changes in current accounting and capital requirement rules are provided.

  11. 41 CFR 105-64.104 - What must the system manager tell me when soliciting personal information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... manager tell me when soliciting personal information? 105-64.104 Section 105-64.104 Public Contracts and... Responsibilities § 105-64.104 What must the system manager tell me when soliciting personal information? When soliciting information from you or a third party for a system of records, system managers must: Cite...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1588 - Your responsibility to tell us of events that may change your disability status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Your responsibility to tell us of events that may change your disability status. 404.1588 Section 404.1588 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... Continuing Or Stopping Disability § 404.1588 Your responsibility to tell us of events that may change...

  13. Managing your blood sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperglycemia - control; Hypoglycemia - control; Diabetes - blood sugar control ... Know how to: Recognize and treat low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Recognize and treat high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) ...

  14. Analysis on key problems of mountain torrent disaster loss assessment system in Liaohe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Liaohe river basin mountain torrent disaster serious, this paper tells a system of flood loss assessment which would be helpful for the decrease of the geologic disastrous loss. Firstly, it mainly analyzes four uncertainties aspects of flood loss: precision of prediction and simulation, accounting standard of asset, asset vulnerability and flood prevention ability. Secondly, EasyDHM has been selected for forecast flood, the simulation forecast time is 6h before real flood peak coming; flood inundation model is selected for flood submerged level information extracted and flood submerged map. In the end, the model of flood Lose calculation is used to calculation the loss by the extracted information from stacking social economic data and water data. The feasibility of flood loss assessment system has been proved by flood simulation in 1998, 2003 and 2005. The unified assessment criteria make the assessment result difference, but this system of flood loss assessment has some value in system integration.

  15. Blood transfusion practices in liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M N Chidananda Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood loss and blood transfusion have been inherently associated with liver transplantation. Bleeding has been attributed to the various factors which are associated with chronic liver dysfunction. Various surgical and anaesthetic strategies have been developed over the years to reduce bleeding and also to optimise the usage of various blood and blood products perioperatively. The present day success of liver transplantation can be attributed to these issues where transfusion practices have changed. Although several centres are successfully performing liver transplantations in large numbers, there is still a large variability in the usage of blood and blood products perioperatively among the institutions and even among different anaesthesiologists from the same institution. The present article deals with the various factors confounding this concept of blood transfusion practices and the various strategies adopted to reduce the transfusion requirements in the perioperative period.

  16. What do the biodiversity experiments tell us about consequences of plant species loss in the real world?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lepš, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2004), s. 529-534. ISSN 1439-1791 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Species richness * species traits * ecosystem functioning Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.824, year: 2004

  17. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet & Menopause Bone Loss How are bone loss and menopause related? Throughout life your body keeps a balance between the loss ... The sooner you take steps to prevent bone loss, the lower your risk of osteoporosis later in life. If you are skipping menstrual periods, have had ...

  18. Globalisation and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert

    2009-05-01

    Globalisation may be viewed as the growing interdependence of countries worldwide through the increasing volume and variety of cross-border transactions in goods and services, and also through the more rapid and widespread diffusion of technology. Globalisation is not just an economic phenomenon, although it is frequently described as such, but includes commerce, disease and travel, and immigration, and as such it affects blood safety and supply in various ways. The relatively short travel times offered by modern aviation can result in the rapid spread of blood-borne pathogens before measures to counteract transmission can be put in place; this would have happened with SARS if the basic life cycle of the SARS virus included an asymptomatic viraemia. This risk can be amplified by ecological factors which effect the spread of these pathogens once they are transferred to a naïve ecosystem, as happened with West Nile Virus (WNV) in North America. The rationalization and contraction of the plasma products industry may be viewed as one aspect of globalisation imposed by the remorseless inevitability of the market; the effect of this development on the safety and supply of products has yet to be seen, but the oversight and assurance of a shrinking number of players will present particular challenges. Similarly, the monopolization of technology, through patent enforcement which puts access beyond the reach of developing countries, can have an effect on blood safety. The challenges presented to blood safety by globalisation are heightening the tensions between the traditional focus on the product safety - zero risk paradigm and the need to view the delivery of safe blood as an integrated process. As an illustration of this tension, donor deferral measures imposed by globalisation-induced risks such as vCJD and WNV have resulted in the loss of the safest and most committed portion of the blood donor population in many Western countries, leading to an increased risk to

  19. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 6, 2016, San Diego, CA Abstracts Registration Housing Travel Information Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood ... Blood Clots Blood Clotting and Pregnancy Clots and Travel DVT Myths vs. Facts Blood Detectives Find a ...

  20. Types of Blood Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Double Red Cell Plasma Platelets Red Cells What blood donation type is best for me? **If you do not ... blood type, a whole blood donation is recommended** Blood Donation Types: Volunteer Donations The standard or most common type ...

  1. Blood Type Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Blood Type Game Printable Version Blood Type Game This feature requires version 6 or later ... many points as possible by matching the appropriate blood type of a donor to the blood type of ...

  2. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is the AHA recommendation for healthy blood pressure? This blood pressure chart reflects categories defined by the American ... unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare providers will want to get ...

  3. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Programs and Awards View all Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Collections Submit to Blood View ... Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood: How I Treat A ...

  4. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connected Home » High Blood Pressure Heath and Aging High Blood Pressure What Is Blood Pressure? Do ... high blood pressure increases as you get older. Gender. Before age 55, men have a greater chance ...

  5. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000367.htm Blood donation before surgery To use the sharing features ... vessels. Several sources of blood are described here. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  6. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Transfusions Print A ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. ...

  7. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... choose to use a method called autologous blood donation. Autologous blood is blood donated by you, which you later receive if you need a transfusion during or after surgery. You can have blood ...

  8. High blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you are at risk for: Bleeding from the aorta, the large blood vessel that supplies blood to ... tests Blood pressure check Blood pressure References American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes-2015 ...

  9. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... raise public awareness of these blood conditions and increase research on the causes, prevention, and treatment. Blood ... of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is increased by the following: Previous blood clots A genetic ...

  10. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Housing Travel Information Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances ... reflect the most recent scientific research View all publications For Patients Blood Basics Blood Disorders Anemia Bleeding ...

  11. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... received numerous reports of harm associated with the use of weight loss products, including increased blood pressure, ... for example, “lose 10 pounds in one week.” use of the words “guaranteed” or “scientific breakthrough.” products ...

  12. The Loss of Multifractality in Migraines

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, M; Latka, D; West, B J; Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J.

    2002-01-01

    We study the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAfv) in humans using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). The time series of the axial flow velocity averaged over a cardiac beat interval is found to exhibit clear multifractal properties for healthy subjects. We observe a loss of multifractality for subjects with migraine.

  13. Does erythropoietin augment noise induced hearing loss?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Lund, Søren Peter;

    2007-01-01

    in fact augment noise-induced hearing loss. This is contradictory to the beneficial effect of EPO reported by the vast majority of studies on stressed neural tissues. EPO administration may alter the blood flow dynamics of the cochlear vascular bed during or after noise exposure, by a potential...

  14. Schooling and Globalization: What Do We Tell Our Kids & Clients? What Are We Being Told?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Carl A.; Grant, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    With the effects of globalization everywhere, what should we say to our children and grandchildren about globalization and education? What are the print media--the books and magazines--telling us about globalization and education? This article examines what a person may take from the print media to talk with their children about effects of…

  15. Telling Stories and Making Social Relations: Transnational Women's Ways of Belonging in Intercultural Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hakyoon

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how transnational women construct their social relations by telling stories in a lingua franca environment (Firth 1996). My main interest lies in naturally occurring and interactionally achieved stories (Bamberg 2004; Georgakopoulou 2007) told during break time of an adult English as a Second Language (ESL) class in…

  16. TELL SABI ABYAD, SYRIA : RADIOCARBON CHRONOLOGY, CULTURAL CHANGE, AND THE 8.2 KA EVENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plicht, J.; Akkermans, P. M. M. G.; Nieuwenhuyse, O.; Kaneda, A.; Russell, A.

    2011-01-01

    At Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria, we obtained a robust chronology for the 7th to early 6th millennium BC, the Late Neolithic. The chronology was obtained using a large set of radiocarbon dates, analyzed by Bayesian statistics. Cultural changes observed at similar to 6200 BC are coeval with the 8.2 ka clima

  17. Young Children's Metacognition in the Context of Telling a Written Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wu-Ying; Ku, Yu-Min; Chen, Yi-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    This study examines young children's metacognition in the context of telling a written story. The participants were 36 children: 12 preschoolers, 12 kindergarteners, and 12 first graders in a kindergarten and a nearby elementary school in a northwestern city in Taiwan. Each child was asked to "read" a 13-page wordless picture book…

  18. Documenting the Then and the Now: Tucson Youth Tell Tucson Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisele, Kimi

    2001-01-01

    A nonprofit organization in Tucson (Arizona) trains low-income adolescents to document neighborhood histories and tell their own. Working with professionals in the field, Mexican American and other minority youths learn to research, interview, write, photograph, and edit. After four books documenting Tucson history, a magazine was launched that…

  19. Hair loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfmann, Katya L; Bechtel, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Hair loss is a common cause of morbidity for many women. As a key member of the woman's health care team, the obstetrician/gynecologist may be the first person to evaluate the complaint of hair loss. Common types of nonscarring hair loss, including female pattern hair loss and telogen effluvium, may be diagnosed and managed by the obstetrician/gynecologist. A systematic approach to diagnosis and management of these common forms of hair loss is presented. PMID:25517757

  20. Types of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Information for the Public » Health Topics » Blood Transfusion » Types of Blood Transfusions Explore Blood Transfusion What Is... ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Blood Transfusions Blood is transfused either as whole blood ( ...

  1. Cord blood testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to evaluate the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH levels) Blood sugar level Blood type and Rh Complete blood count ( ... means you have a blood infection (septicemia). High levels of blood sugar (glucose) in the cord blood may be found ...

  2. Blood and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Process Risks and Complications History of Blood Transfusion Iron and Blood Donation Iron Info. for All Donors Iron Info. for ... Donation Student Donors Donation Process Eligibility Blood FAQs Blood Donor ... of Blood Transfusion Hosting a Blood Drive What to Expect Hosting ...

  3. 'People look down on you when you tell them how he died': Qualitative insights into stigma as experienced by suicide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kath; Cunningham, Colleen; Murphy, Gillian; Jackson, Debra

    2016-06-01

    This paper aims to present findings that convey how people felt stigmatized after the loss of a loved one to suicide. A qualitative design was used for the purpose of this study. Data were collected using in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Audio-recordings of the interviews were transcribed and thematically analyzed. Ten people bereaved by suicide participated in the study. Four themes emerged from the data namely: Feeling blamed, shamed and judged; Feeling isolated/rejected by friends and community; Feeling silenced and Feeling the burden of others' discomfort. Findings show that stigmatization of the bereaved by suicide had detrimental effects on their relationships and their help seeking behaviours. Further, due to stigma imposed on them by others, participants were denied the opportunity to tell their stories which further complicated their grieving process. Further education and training is required for health professionals to enhance understanding of the specific needs of those bereaved by suicide. PMID:26889754

  4. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  5. Intracorneal blood removal six weeks after canaloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Rossetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a 71-year-old patient with bilateral open-angle glaucoma, intracorneal blood was found after a canaloplasty procedure in the right eye. Six weeks after surgery on ultrasound biomicroscopy examination, liquified blood and blood clots could be observed nasally in the deep corneal stroma close to the Descemet′s membrane. The intracorneal blood was washed out with balanced saline solution following deep corneal incision and lamellar dissection. Descemet′s membrane was reattached with air injection into the anterior chamber. Two months later, visual acuity improved to 20/50, intraocular pressure was 16 mm Hg without medication and confocal microscopy showed deep stromal folds and limited endothelial cell loss. Viscoelastic entering the cornea at Schwalbe′s line and reflux of blood from the collector channels to Schlemm′s canal can account for corneal hematoma. Even six weeks after canaloplasty, successful blood removal could be fulfilled without rupturing the Descemet′s membrane.

  6. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  7. Pregnancy Loss and Miscarriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this: Page Content What is pregnancy loss/miscarriage? A miscarriage, also called pregnancy loss or spontaneous abortion, is ... D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia. (2010, November 21). Miscarriage . Retrieved May 21, 2012, from http://www.ncbi. ...

  8. Hair Loss (Alopecia Areata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hair Loss (Alopecia Areata) Information for adults A A A This ... scalp with a round area of non-scarring hair loss typical of alopecia areata. Overview Alopecia areata is ...

  9. Coping with Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Coping With Memory Loss Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... a health professional. back to top What Causes Memory Loss? Anything that affects cognition—the process of ...

  10. Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eating disorder: When a person has an eating disorder, hair loss is common. Anorexia (not eating enough) and bulimia (vomiting after eating) can cause hair loss. Medicine Some prescription medicines can cause ...

  11. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  12. Hearing loss and music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise induced hearing loss - music; Sensory hearing loss - music ... damaged by loud sounds. The human ear is like any other body part -- too much use can damaged it. Over time, repeated exposure to loud noise and music can cause hearing loss.

  13. The use of a blood conservation device to reduce red blood cell transfusion requirements: a before and after study

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Yip, Hwee S; Prabhuswamy, Dimple; Chan, Yiong H; Phua, Jason; Lim, Tow K; Leong, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Anaemia and the associated need for packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions are common in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Among many causes, blood losses from repeated diagnostic tests are contributory. Methods This is a before and after study in a medical ICU of a university hospital. We used a closed blood conservation device (Venous Arterial blood Management Protection, VAMP, Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) to decrease PRBC transfusion requirements...

  14. Beta-carotene blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotene test ... anything for up to 8 hours before the test. You may also be asked not to eat ... vitamin A (carotene) for 48 hours before the test. Your provider may also tell you to temporarily ...

  15. When Blood Won't Tell: An Intra-Categorical Intersectional Framework for Understanding the Construction of Race

    OpenAIRE

    Carbado, Asmara Gabrielle

    2012-01-01

    This thesis employs the theory of intersectionality to broaden our understanding of the social construction of race. To do so, the thesis explicates a 1806 Virginia Supreme Court decision, Hudgins v. Wright, to illustrate how race is intersectionally constituted. I employ the term "intra-categorical intersectionality" to describe this dynamic. By intra-categorical intersectionality I mean to the process by which a number of factors intersect to construct race. First, the thesis discusses ...

  16. Telling better stories: strengthening the story in story and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2012-12-01

    analysis', which maximizes a quantitative measure of the spread of a set of qualitative scenarios defined by states of driving forces (Carlsen 2009). It could also include a survey of different worldviews, and the qualitative models that they imply, such as that carried out by Sunderlin (Sunderlin 2003). Futures studies has moved forward from the time the SRES was published, and new techniques are now available that can help us to tell better stories of the future. References Alcamo J 2001 Scenarios as Tools for International Environmental Assessments (Cophenhagen: European Environment Agency) Alcamo J 2008 The SAS approach: combining qualitative and quantitative knowledge in environmental scenarios Environmental Futures—The Practice of Environmental Scenario Analysis vol 2, ed J Alcamo (Amsterdam: Elsevier) pp 123-50 Carlsen H 2009 Climate change and the construction of scenario sets that span the range of societal uncertainties Paper for International Studies Association Annual Convention 2009 (New York City, February) Jackson T 2009 Prosperity Without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet (London: Earthscan) Kriegler E, O'Neill B C, Hallegatte S, Kram T, Lempert R J, Moss R H and Wilbanks T 2012 The need for and use of socio-economic scenarios for climate change analysis: a new approach based on shared socio-economic pathways Glob. Environ. Change 22 807-22 Nakicenovic N and Swart R (eds) 2000 Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) Raskin P, Monks F, Ribeiro T, van Vuuren D and Zurek M 2005 Global scenarios in historical perspective Ecosystems and Human Well-Being: Scenarios: Findings of the Scenarios Working Group vol 2, ed S R Carpenter et al (Washington, DC: Island) pp 35-44 Schweizer V J and Kriegler E 2012 Improving environmental change research with systematic techniques for qualitative scenarios Environ. Res. Lett. 7 044011 Sunderlin W D 2003 Ideology, Social Theory, and the Environment (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield

  17. Medications and Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Medications and Blood Pressure Updated:Jul 6,2016 When your blood pressure ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Why HBP ...

  18. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  19. Reiter's syndrome and hearing loss: a possible association?

    OpenAIRE

    Monsanto, Rafael C; Neto, Arlindo C L; Lorenzetti, Fábio T M

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Patient complained of hearing loss and tinnitus after the onset of Reiter's syndrome. Audiometry confirmed the hearing loss on the left ear; blood work showed increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C3 fraction of the complement. Genotyping for HLA-B27 was positive. Treatment with prednisolone did not improve the hearing levels.

  20. What does spatial alternation tell us about retrosplenial cortex function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Dudley Nelson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The retrosplenial cortex supports navigation, but there are good reasons to suppose that the retrosplenial cortex has a very different role in spatial memory from that of the hippocampus and anterior thalamic nuclei. For example, retrosplenial lesions appear to have little or no effect on standard tests of spatial alternation. To examine these differences, the current study sought to determine whether the retrosplenial cortex is important for just one spatial cue type (e.g. allocentric, directional or intra-maze cues or whether the retrosplenial cortex helps the animal switch between competing spatial strategies or competing cue types. Using T-maze alternation, retrosplenial lesion rats were challenged with situations in which the available spatial information between the sample and test phases was changed, so taxing the interaction between different cue types. Clear lesion deficits emerged when intra- and extra-maze cues were placed in conflict (by rotating the maze between the sample and choice phases, or when the animals were tested in the dark in a double-maze. Finally, temporary inactivation of the retrosplenial cortex by muscimol infusions resulted in a striking deficit on standard T-maze alternation, indicating that, over time, other sites may be able to compensate for the loss of the retrosplenial cortex. This pattern of results is consistent with the impoverished use of both allocentric and directional information, exacerbated by an impaired ability to switch between different cue types.

  1. What information can frictional properties of polymer brushes tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Moxey, Mark; Morse, Andrew; Armes, Steven; Lewis, Andrew; Geoghegan, Mark; Leggett, Graham

    2013-03-01

    We have used friction force microscopy (FFM) to quantitatively examine surface grown zwitterionic polymer brushes: poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC), and to establish the correlation between its frictional behaviour to other intrinsic properties. In a good solvent, it was found that the coefficient of friction (μ) decreased with increasing film thickness. We conclude that the amount of bound solvent increases as the brush length increases, causing the osmotic pressure to increase and yielding a reduced tendency for the brush layer to deform under applied load. When measured in a series of alcohol/water mixtures, a significant increase in μ was observed for ethanol/water mixtures at a volume fraction of 90%. This is attributed to brush collapse due to co-nonsolvency, leading to loss of hydration of the brush chains and hence substantially reduced lubrication. We show that single asperity contact mechanics is strongly dependent on solvent quality. Friction-load relationship was found linear in methanol (good solvent), but sub-linear in water and ethanol (moderate solvent).

  2. Scales tell a story on the stress history of fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Johan; Metz, Juriaan Rogier; Ampe, Bart; Decostere, Annemie; Flik, Gert; De Saeger, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Fish faced with stressful stimuli launch an endocrine stress response through activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI-) axis to release cortisol into the blood. Scientifically validated biomarkers to capture systemic cortisol exposure over longer periods of time are of utmost importance to assess chronic stress in governmental, wildlife, aquaculture and scientific settings. Here we demonstrate that cortisol in scales of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) is the long-sought biomarker for chronic stress. Undisturbed (CTR) and daily stressed (STRESS) carp were compared. Dexamethasone (DEX) or cortisol (CORT) fed fish served as negative and positive controls, respectively. Scale cortisol was quantified with a validated ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. An increase in scale cortisol content was found in STRESS and CORT but not in CTR and DEX fish. Scale cortisol content reflects its accumulation in a stressor and time dependent manner and validates the scale cortisol content as biomarker for chronic stress. Plasma analyses confirmed that (i) CTR, DEX and CORT treatments were effective, (ii) plasma cortisol of STRESS fish showed no signs of chronic HPI-axis activation, and (iii) plasma cortisol is a poor predictor for chronic stress. The expression of HPI key genes crf, pomc, and star were up-regulated in STRESS fish in the absence of a plasma cortisol response, as was the target gene of cortisol encoding subunit α1 of the Na+/K+-ATPase in gills. When lost, scales of fish regenerate fast. Regenerated scales corroborate our findings, offering (i) unsurpassed time resolution for cortisol incorporation and as such for stressful events, and (ii) the possibility to investigate stress in a well defined and controlled environment and time frame creating novel opportunities for bone physiological research. We conclude that the cortisol content in ontogenetic and regenerated scales is an innovative biomarker for chronic

  3. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M A

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  4. Time telling devices used in Danish health care are not synchronized

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Hosbond, Susanne; Petersen, Dan Brun;

    2012-01-01

    Many patients begin their encounter with the health-care services in an ambulance. In some critical patients, it is pivotal that the timing of treatment and events is registered correctly. When patients are transferred from one health care provider to another, there is a risk that the time tellin...... devices used are not synchronized. It has never been examined if this is a problem in Denmark. We performed the present study to examine if time telling devices used in the pre-hospital setting were synchronized with devices used in emergency departments.......Many patients begin their encounter with the health-care services in an ambulance. In some critical patients, it is pivotal that the timing of treatment and events is registered correctly. When patients are transferred from one health care provider to another, there is a risk that the time telling...

  5. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  6. Postpartum Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infection Postpartum Blood Clots Postpartum Thyroid Disorders Postpartum Depression The risk of developing blood clots (thrombophlebitis) is increased for about 6 to 8 weeks after delivery (see Thromboembolic Disorders During Pregnancy ). Typically, blood clots occur in the deep veins ...

  7. Blood Type Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Presents a blood type puzzle that provides a visual, hands-on mechanism by which students can examine blood group reactions. Offers students an opportunity to construct their own knowledge about blood types. (JRH)

  8. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics . ...

  9. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  10. What Is Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Member Blood Centers Our Partners What is blood? PUBLICATIONS EDUCATION PRESS ROOM BLOG CAREERS CONTACT ABC ... for patients who need it. One unit of blood can be separated into the following components: Nearly ...

  11. Ketones blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight ... there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  12. Magnesium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium - blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon ...

  13. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... facts about high blood pressure [PDF-255K] . High Blood Pressure in the United States About 70 million ...

  14. Managing your blood sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000086.htm Managing your blood sugar To use the sharing features on this page, ... way your doctor or nurse recommends. Check your Blood Sugar Often Checking your blood sugar levels often and ...

  15. High blood sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000332.htm High blood sugar To use the sharing features on this page, ... later when energy is needed. Symptoms of High Blood Sugar Symptoms of high blood sugar can include: Being ...

  16. Home blood sugar testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000324.htm Home blood sugar testing To use the sharing features on this ... with their nutrition and activity plans. Check Your Blood Sugar Often Usual times to test your blood sugar ...

  17. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  18. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... back to top How are Blood Clots in Pregnant Women Treated? Typically, blood clots are treated with ... you think you have one. If you are pregnant and have concerns about blood clots, talk with ...

  19. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms include the following: High blood glucose High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased ... you should check and what your blood glucose levels should be. Checking your blood and then treating ...

  20. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure and should be taken seriously. Over time, consistently high blood pressure weakens and damages ... of landmark NIH blood pressure study confirm that lower blood pressure target can reduce ...

  1. When Video Games Tell Stories: A Model of Video Game Narrative Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Marcello Arnaldo Picucci

    2014-01-01

    In the present study a model is proposed offering a comprehensive categorization of video game narrative structures intended as the methods and techniques used by game designers and allowed by the medium to deliver the story content throughout the gameplay in collaboration with the players. A case is first made for the presence of narrative in video games and its growth of importance as a central component in game design. An in-depth analysis ensues focusing on how games tell stories, guided ...

  2. The Spatial Dimensions of Early Mesopotamian Urbanism: The Tell Brak Suburban Survey, 2003-2006

    OpenAIRE

    Ur, Jason Alik; Karsgaard, Philip; Oates, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The 2003–2006 Suburban Survey at Tell Brak investigated the spatial dimensions of the city’s urban origins and evolution via intensive systematic surface survey. This report places this research in the broader context of research on Near Eastern urban origins and development, describes the survey and remote sensing methods and summarises the results, which challenge several long-held models for the timing and geographical origins of urbanism in the Near East. Urbanism at Brak coalesced over t...

  3. Let the man choose what to do: Neural correlates of spontaneous lying and truth-telling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lijun; Reuter, Martin; Weber, Bernd

    2016-02-01

    Many previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on deception used a paradigm of "instructed lies", which is different than other, more spontaneous forms of lying behavior. The present study aimed to investigate the neural processes underlying spontaneous and instructed lying and truth-telling, and to investigate the different mechanisms involved. This study used a modified sic bo gambling game with real payoffs in order to induce lying. In the spontaneous sessions, the participants themselves decided whether or not to lie, whereas in the instructed sessions they were explicitly told to respond either honestly or dishonestly. In the spontaneous lying (vs. truth-telling) condition, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC) showed significantly higher activity, whereas the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL) were more strongly activated when participants spontaneously told the truth (vs. lied). Our results suggest that the extra cognitive control required for suppressing the self-interest motives in spontaneous truth-telling is associated with higher activity in the fronto-parietal network, while the process of negative emotion in spontaneous lying induced greater involvement of the sACC. Although similar to spontaneous deception, instructed deception engenders greater involvement of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), left supplementary motor area (SMA), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), IPL and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) compared to baseline, instructed decisions did not elicit similar activation patterns in the regions of sACC, DLPFC, VLPFC and IPL which were sensitive to either spontaneous truth-telling or lying. PMID:26685089

  4. Does special relativity theory tell us anything new about space and time?

    OpenAIRE

    Szabo, Laszlo E.

    2003-01-01

    It will be shown that, in comparison with the pre-relativistic Galileo-invariant conceptions, special relativity tells us nothing new about the geometry of spacetime. It simply calls something else "spacetime", and this something else has different properties. All statements of special relativity about those features of reality that correspond to the original meaning of the terms "space" and "time" are identical with the corresponding traditional pre-relativistic statements. It will be also a...

  5. Telling Stories: A Process of Identification for Six Neophyte Teacher Educators

    OpenAIRE

    Amott, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    This study engaged new teacher educator participants in narrative story telling which facilitated a process of ‘identification’ that was supportive of their identity transformation. The study considers the process of identity transformation as these experienced teachers move into their new roles as teacher educators. The narrative method was sensitive to a poststructuralist view of identity. Six neophyte teacher educators shared their Professional Life Histories for this study. This adapted l...

  6. Don't Ask, Don't Tell: A Costly and Wasteful Policy 

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Johnny L.

    2004-01-01

    Since the current policy known as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" was adopted in the early 1990s, several changes have taken place which call into question the policy's validity. Firstly, the argument proponents of the ban use to justify it, namely that cohesion would suffer if admitted homosexuals were allowed to serve, has been undercut by social science analyses on the correlation between cohesion and performance. Their argument has also been undercut by empirical evidence from several nations tha...

  7. Every picture tells a story. Communicatie door gebruik van innovatieve datavisualisatie: Aanvraag RAAK-MKB

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, Piet

    2011-01-01

    Het doel van het project Every Picture Tells a Story is om samen met het werkveld methoden, technieken en kennis te ontwikkelen voor het produceren van effectieve infographics. Dit is nodig omdat de vraag naar infographics in de markt snel toeneemt. Bedrijfsleven en overheden kiezen er steeds vaker voor om infographics te gebruiken om grote hoeveelheden of complexe informatie begrijpelijk te maken voor hun doelgroepen. Om aan de vraag van deze opdrachtgever te kunnen blijven voldoen hebben pr...

  8. Analysis on the Hero's Abnormal Psychology in The tell-tale heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王嘉维

    2009-01-01

    The Tell-Tale Heart is one of the horror stories of Edgar Allan Poe's,who was a master of the horror tale in American.The hero in this story is always afraid of the eyes of an old man.He is extreme anxiety under the eyes,for avoiding this anxiety,he kills the old n33n.This paper is to analyze the hero's abnormal psychology.

  9. Narrating Gypsies, Telling Travellers : A Sudy of the Relational Self in Four Life Stories

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Martin

    2006-01-01

    To say that Gypsy and/or Traveller and/or Romany life stories have existed on the periphery of literary studies can be considered an understatement. In this study of the relational self, Narrating Gypsies, Telling Travellers, examines the discursive and structural complexities involved in the practices of writing and speaking in the production process and narrative trajectories of the life stories of Gordon Sylvester Boswell (1970), Nan Joyce (1985), Jimmy Stockins (2000), and Jess Smith (200...

  10. More Than Telling a Story: Transforming Data into Visually Shared Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongshin; Riche, Nathalie Henry; Isenberg, Petra; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2015-01-01

    The authors take a closer look at how the visualization community has discussed visual storytelling and present a visual data storytelling process, incorporating steps involved in finding insights (explore data), turning these insights into a narrative (make a story), and communicating this narrative to an audience (tell a story). They also discuss opportunities for future research in visualization as a storytelling medium in the light of this broader process. PMID:26416365

  11. Transitional Justice: History-Telling, Collective Memory, and the Victim-Witness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisje Brants

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the complex, inherently political, and often contradictory processes of truth-finding, history-telling, and formation of collective memory through transitional justice. It explores tensions between history-telling and the normative goals of truth commissions and international criminal courts, taking into account the increasing importance attributed to victims as witnesses of history. The legal space these instruments of transitional justice offer is determined by both their historical and political roots, and specific goals and procedures. Because the legal space that truth commissions offer for history-telling ismore flexible and their report open to public debate, they may open up alternative public spaces and enable civil society to contest the master narrative. The legal truth laid down in the rulings of an international criminal court is by definition closed. The verdict of a court is definite and authoritative; closure, not continued debate about what it has established as the truth, is its one and only purpose. In conclusion, the article calls for a critical appraisal of transitional justice as acclaimed mediator of collective memories in post-conflict societies.

  12. Superconductivity. Discoveries and discoverers. Ten physics nobel laureates tell their story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Displays the life and work of 10 Nobel laureates. Presents interesting background information on how great science is achieved. Presents the history of superconductivity through 100 years of progress. 10 great scientists tell their unique stories in their own words. Personal stories of Bednorz, Mueller and 8 other Nobel laureates. This book is about the work of 10 great scientists; who they were and are, their personal background and how they achieved their outstanding results and took their prominent place in science history. We follow one of physics and science history's most enigmatic phenomena, superconductivity, through 100 years, from its discovery in 1911 to the present, not as a history book in the usual sense, but through close ups of the leading characters and their role in that story, the Nobel laureates, who were still among us in the years 2001-2004 when the main round of interviews was carried out. Since then two of them already passed away. For each one of the 10 laureates, the author tells their story by direct quotation from interviews in their own words. Each chapter treats one laureate. The author first gives a brief account of the laureates' scientific background and main contribution. Then each laureate tells his own story in his own words. This book is unique in its approach to science history.

  13. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... these blood conditions and increase research on the causes, prevention, and treatment. Blood clots are also potentially ... immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) ...

  14. Study protocol. ECSSIT - Elective Caesarean Section Syntocinon Infusion Trial. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of oxytocin (Syntocinon) 5 IU bolus and placebo infusion versus oxytocin 5 IU bolus and 40 IU infusion for the control of blood loss at elective caesarean section.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Caesarean section is one of the most commonly performed major operations in women throughout the world. Rates are escalating, with studies from the United States of America, the United Kingdom, China and the Republic of Ireland reporting rates between 20% and 25%. Operative morbidity includes haemorrhage, anaemia, blood transfusion and in severe cases, maternal death. The value of routine oxytocics in the third stage of vaginal birth has been well established and it has been assumed that these benefits apply to caesarean delivery as well. A slow bolus dose of oxytocin is recommended following delivery of the baby at caesarean section. Some clinicians use an additional infusion of oxytocin for a further period following the procedure. Intravenous oxytocin has a very short half-life (4-10 minutes) therefore the potential advantage of an oxytocin infusion is that it maintains uterine contractility throughout the surgical procedure and immediate postpartum period, when most primary haemorrhages occur. The few trials to date addressing the optimal approach to preventing haemorrhage at caesarean section have been under-powered to evaluate clinically important outcomes. There has been no trial to date comparing the use of an intravenous slow bolus of oxytocin versus an oxytocin bolus and infusion. METHODS AND DESIGN: A multi-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. The study will take place in five large maternity units in Ireland with collaboration between academics and clinicians in the disciplines of obstetrics and anaesthetics. It will involve 2000 women undergoing elective caesarean section after 36 weeks gestation. The main outcome measure will be major haemorrhage (blood loss >1000 ml). A study involving 2000 women will have 80% power to detect a 36% relative change in the risk of major haemorrhage with two-sided 5% alpha. DISCUSSION: It is both important and timely that we evaluate the optimal approach to the management of the third stage at

  15. Study protocol. ECSSIT - Elective Caesarean Section Syntocinon Infusion Trial. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of oxytocin (Syntocinon) 5 IU bolus and placebo infusion versus oxytocin 5 IU bolus and 40 IU infusion for the control of blood loss at elective caesarean section.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caesarean section is one of the most commonly performed major operations in women throughout the world. Rates are escalating, with studies from the United States of America, the United Kingdom, China and the Republic of Ireland reporting rates between 20% and 25%. Operative morbidity includes haemorrhage, anaemia, blood transfusion and in severe cases, maternal death. The value of routine oxytocics in the third stage of vaginal birth has been well established and it has been assumed that these benefits apply to caesarean delivery as well. A slow bolus dose of oxytocin is recommended following delivery of the baby at caesarean section. Some clinicians use an additional infusion of oxytocin for a further period following the procedure. Intravenous oxytocin has a very short half-life (4-10 minutes) therefore the potential advantage of an oxytocin infusion is that it maintains uterine contractility throughout the surgical procedure and immediate postpartum period, when most primary haemorrhages occur. The few trials to date addressing the optimal approach to preventing haemorrhage at caesarean section have been under-powered to evaluate clinically important outcomes. There has been no trial to date comparing the use of an intravenous slow bolus of oxytocin versus an oxytocin bolus and infusion. METHODS AND DESIGN: A multi-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. The study will take place in five large maternity units in Ireland with collaboration between academics and clinicians in the disciplines of obstetrics and anaesthetics. It will involve 2000 women undergoing elective caesarean section after 36 weeks gestation. The main outcome measure will be major haemorrhage (blood loss >1000 ml). A study involving 2000 women will have 80% power to detect a 36% relative change in the risk of major haemorrhage with two-sided 5% alpha. DISCUSSION: It is both important and timely that we evaluate the optimal approach to the management of the third stage at

  16. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is an essential component of emergency obstetric care and appropriate blood transfusion significantly reduces maternal mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage, especially postpartum haemorrhage, remains one of the major causes of massive haemorrhage and a prime cause of maternal mortality. Blood loss and assessment of its correct requirement are difficult in pregnancy due to physiological changes and comorbid conditions. Many guidelines have been used to assess the requirement and transfusion of blood and its components. Infrastructural, economic, social and religious constraints in blood banking and donation are key issues to formulate practice guidelines. Available current guidelines for transfusion are mostly from the developed world; however, they can be used by developing countries keeping available resources in perspective.

  17. Transfusion of blood and blood component therapy for postpartum haemorrhage at a tertiary referral center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the practice of transfusion of blood and blood products in cases of postpartum haemorrhage, at a tertiary referral center. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted where medical records were reviewed for women, who either delivered or were admitted in labour suite with diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage. The study period extended from Jan 2008 to Oct 2009. During a period of 22 months, records were reviewed for transfusion of blood and blood products in above group of women. Data were analyzed for descriptive statistics. Results: During the study period, a total of 4744 patients were admitted in the labour suite. A total of 113 (2.36%) women were diagnosed with Post partum haemorrhage. Uterine atony was the commonest cause of PPH, followed by genital tract trauma. A total of 81(71%) women received transfusion of blood and blood components (1.6%). The mean blood loss was 1088 ml (+- 584ml). Transfusion of blood and blood component therapy was significantly more in women who underwent caesarean section, compared to those women who delivered vaginally. There was one case of acute tubular necrosis due to PPH, and seven maternal deaths. The mean hospital stay was of +- 3 days. Conclusion: In this hospital based study, the prevalence of PPH was 2.36 +- %, and the rate of transfusion of blood and blood products was 1.6%.

  18. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window. PMID:26096663

  19. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how often you should check and what your blood glucose levels should be. Checking your blood and then treating ... I Treat Hyperglycemia? You can often lower your blood glucose level by exercising. However, if your blood glucose is ...

  20. BUN - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood urea nitrogen ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health ... if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this ...

  1. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  2. Understanding Rural Population Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, David A.; Beale, Calvin L.

    2002-01-01

    A quarter of nonmetro counties lost population in the 1990s, but population loss was not related to poverty rate or low educational levels, perhaps because low-skill workers can no longer expect better wages in urban areas. Population loss was related to low population density and remoteness (which decrease access to services), lack of natural…

  3. Loss muinasjuturaamatust / Agu Veetamm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veetamm, Agu, 1953-

    2004-01-01

    Ballindaloch on üks väheseid Shoti losse, kus omanikud aastaringselt elavad. 450 aastat on loss kuulunud Macpherson-Grantide suguvõsale. Praegu on lossi omanikuks Clare Nancy Macpherson-Grant Russell, kelle kujundatud on kiviktaimla ja rosaarium. Lossi ajaloost, omanikest, ümberehitustest, ringkäigust lossis, pargist. 14 ill

  4. Help! It's Hair Loss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Help! It's Hair Loss! KidsHealth > For Kids > Help! It's Hair Loss! Print A A A Text Size ... part above the skin, is dead. (That's why it doesn't hurt to get a haircut!) This ...

  5. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight through diet and exercise or have serious health problems caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the ...

  6. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies. PMID:27259171

  7. Acute loss of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness. PMID:25702218

  8. What Can I Do About Smell Loss?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... problems with your nose and sinuses. Tell me a little bit about when those problems started. Maryann: ... you first notice? Maryann: It first started with a chronic cough, and then eventually drainage... Narrator: Maryann ...

  9. What Can I Do About Smell Loss?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you've been having some problems with your nose and sinuses. Tell me a little bit about ... of smell. Dr. Oringer: Difficulty breathing through your nose with that? Maryann: In the beginning, yes. But ...

  10. Archaeological record of earthquake ruptures in Tell Ateret, the Dead Sea Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenblum, Ronnie; Marco, Shmuel; Kool, Robert; Davidovitch, Uri; Porat, Roi; Agnon, Amotz

    2015-10-01

    The archaeological Tell Ateret (North Israel), constructed on the active Dead Sea Fault, was intermittently settled for over six millennia. Structures on the Tell that have been offset by earthquake ruptures provide a remarkable record of alternating construction and slip. We excavated the site in order to resolve the geometry and to time the earthquake rupture history back to the earliest settlement. The measurements of faulted archaeological walls are complemented with data from historical documents, numismatic analysis, and geological observations. We report three newly discovered offsets that add to two previously resolved slip events (the 20 May 1202 and 30 October 1759 earthquakes), completing a three millennia archaeoseismic record. The oldest offset measuring at least ~2 m bisected Iron Age IIA fortifications. The second offset, the largest of all five, reaching ~2.5 m, is dated to circa 142 BCE The third, whose post-Hellenistic date is not determined, is of ~1.5 m, possibly resulting from multiple earthquakes. We constrain the time of the largest offset by a hoard of 45 coins, the latest of which had been minted 143/142 BCE. Indicative pottery and historic texts support the year 143/142 as terminus post-quem of the rupture at this site. These observations, together with a new kinematic approach, show uneven slip distribution in time and variable amounts of slip along the Jordan Gorge segment of the Dead Sea Fault. We suggest, based on previous palaeomagnetic measurements, that distributed deformation west of Tell Ateret can explain the apparent missing slip of 4.5 ± 3.5 m since the Hellenistic times.

  11. When Video Games Tell Stories: A Model of Video Game Narrative Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaldo Picucci, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    [EN] In the present study a model is proposed offering a comprehensive categorization of video game narrative structures intended as the methods and techniques used by game designers and allowed by the medium to deliver the story content throughout the gameplay in collaboration with the players. A case is first made for the presence of narrative in video games and its growth of importance as a central component in game design. An in-depth analysis ensues focusing on how games tell stories, gu...

  12. TWO RHODIAN STAMPED AMPHORA HANDLES FROM TELL ES-SUKHNAH (JORDAN): A CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Nabil; Bader, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    During recent excavations at the archaeological site of Tell Es-Sukhnah in north east Jordan, an in-situ Rohdian amphora was found. The most important thing about that amphora is that both handles are carrying stamps in Greek scripts. The texts contain the name of an eponym, a Rhodian month-name and the fabricant’s name. Similar objects in the southern Levant enable dating the stamps to the second century B.C. The imported Amphora at Es-Sukhnah, besides other small finds, highlights the...

  13. Analytical investigations of cooking pottery from Tell Beydar (NE-Syria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of a technological and socio-economical study of pottery production in Tell Beydar (NE-Syria) during the third millennium BC, the chemical composition and mineralogy of cooking pottery from that site has been studied using polarizing microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray detection (SEM-EDX) and X-ray diffraction by means of synchrotron radiation (SR-XRD). The obtained data were used to make inferences concerning the pottery's technology, such as clay preparation and firing techniques

  14. What's Hearing Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cochlea during an operation. It takes over the job of the damaged or destroyed hair cells in the ... and Communicating A kid with hearing loss may attend a special school, special classes within ...

  15. Bone Loss in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DENSITY? Although bone seems as hard as a rock, it’s actually living tissue. Throughout your life, old ... available Bone Loss (.pdf) File: 290 KB 733 Third Avenue, Suite 510, New York, NY 10017 | 800- ...

  16. Weight loss - unintentional

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of laxatives Other causes such as: Eating disorders, anorexia nervosa that have not been diagnosed yet Diabetes that ... do not know the reason. You have other symptoms along with the weight loss.

  17. Understanding Grief and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other common behaviors include restlessness and excessive activity. Religion and spirituality Grief and loss may also cause ... The grieving person’s age and gender The life history of the person who is grieving, including previous ...

  18. Nickel hydrogen capacity loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goualard, Jacques; Paugam, D.; Borthomieu, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The results of tests to assess capacity loss in nickel hydrogen cells are presented in outline form. The effects of long storage (greater than 1 month), high hydrogen pressure storage, high cobalt content, and recovery actions are addressed.

  19. Prizes for weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englberger, L.

    1999-01-01

    A programme of weight loss competitions and associated activities in Tonga, intended to combat obesity and the noncommunicable diseases linked to it, has popular support and the potential to effect significant improvements in health. PMID:10063662

  20. Types of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this topic can be found in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. Hearing loss can be categorized ... speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. ...

  1. Occupational hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... music can cause hearing loss. Sounds above 80 decibels (dB, a measurement of the loudness or strength ... is allowed. Both the length of exposure and decibel level are considered. If the sound is at ...

  2. Prizes for weight loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Englberger, L

    1999-01-01

    A programme of weight loss competitions and associated activities in Tonga, intended to combat obesity and the noncommunicable diseases linked to it, has popular support and the potential to effect significant improvements in health.

  3. Extracellular RNA constitutes a natural procoagulant cofactor in blood coagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kannemeier, Christian; Shibamiya, Aya; Nakazawa, Fumie; Trusheim, Heidi; Ruppert, Clemens; Markart, Philipp; Song, Yutong; Tzima, Eleni; Kennerknecht, Elisabeth; Niepmann, Michael; von Bruehl, Marie-Luise; Sedding, Daniel; Massberg, Steffen; Günther, Andreas; Engelmann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, locally controlled haemostasis prevents life-threatening blood loss and ensures wound healing. Intracellular material derived from damaged cells at these sites will become exposed to blood components and could contribute to blood coagulation and pathological thrombus formation. So far, the functional and mechanistic consequences of this concept are not understood. Here, we present in vivo and in vitro evidence that different forms of eukaryotic and prokaryotic RNA serve ...

  4. Comparing energy loss phenomenology

    OpenAIRE

    van Leeuwen, M.(Institute for Subatomic Physics of Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    High-pT particle production is suppressed in heavy ion collisions due to parton energy loss in dense QCD matter. Here we present a systematic comparison of two different theoretical approximations to parton energy loss calculations: the opacity expansion and the multiple-soft scattering approximation for the simple case of a quark traversing a homogeneous piece of matter with fixed length (the TECHQM 'brick problem'), with focus on the range of parameters that is relevant for interpreting RHI...

  5. Sleep Loss and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Mullington, Janet M.; Simpson, Norah S.; Meier-Ewert, Hans K.; Haack, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Controlled, experimental studies on the effects of acute sleep loss in humans have shown that mediators of inflammation are altered by sleep loss. Elevations in these mediators have been found to occur in healthy, rigorously screened individuals undergoing experimental vigils of more than 24 hours, and have also been seen in response to various durations of sleep restricted to between 25 and 50% of a normal 8 hour sleep amount. While these altered profiles represent small changes, such sub-cl...

  6. Female pattern hair loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İdil Ünal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Female androgenetic alopecia is the commonest cause of hair loss in women. It is characterized by a diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline and a characteristic pattern distribution in genetically predisposed women. Because of the uncertain relationship with the androgens Female Pattern Hair Loss (FPHL is the most preferred definition of the condition. This review has been focused on the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment alternatives of FPHL.

  7. Female pattern hair loss

    OpenAIRE

    İdil Ünal

    2014-01-01

    Female androgenetic alopecia is the commonest cause of hair loss in women. It is characterized by a diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline and a characteristic pattern distribution in genetically predisposed women. Because of the uncertain relationship with the androgens Female Pattern Hair Loss (FPHL) is the most preferred definition of the condition. This review has been focused on the clinical features, diagnosis and treatm...

  8. Female pattern hair loss

    OpenAIRE

    Archana Singal; Sidharth Sonthalia; Prashant Verma

    2013-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a common cause of hair loss in women characterized by diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline. Its prevalence increases with advancing age and is associated with significant psychological morbidity. The pathophysiology of FPHL is still not completely understood and seems to be multifactorial. Although androgens have been implicated, the involvement of androgen-independent mechanisms is evident...

  9. Female Pattern Hair Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Tosti, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Context: Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) also known as female androgenetic alopecia is a common condition afflicting millions of women that can be cosmetically disrupting. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential for obtaining optimal outcome. This review addresses the clinical presentation of female pattern hair loss, its differential diagnosis and treatment modalities. Evidence Acquisition: A) Diffuse thinning of the crown region with preservation of the frontal hairline (Ludwig’s type)...

  10. Loss Allocation in Securitization Transactions

    OpenAIRE

    Günter Franke; Markus Herrmann; Thomas Weber

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the loss allocation to First, Second and Third Loss Positions in European collateralized debt obligation transactions. The quality of the underlying asset pool plays a predominant role for the loss allocation. A lower asset pool quality induces the originator to take a higher First Loss Position, but, in a synthetic transaction, a smaller Third Loss Position. The share of expected default losses, borne by the First Loss Position, is largely independent of asset pool qualit...

  11. Story-telling, women's authority and the "Old Wife's Tale": "The Story of the Bottle of Medicine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is a single personal narrative – a Shetland woman's telling of a story about two girls on a journey to fetch a cure for a sick relative from a wise woman. The story is treated as a cultural document which offers the historian a conduit to a past that is respectful of indigenous woman-centred interpretations of how that past was experienced and understood. The "story of the bottle of medicine" is more than a skilful telling of a local tale; it is a memory practice that provides a path to a deeper and more nuanced understanding of a culture. Applying perspectives from anthropology, oral history and narrative analysis, three sets of questions are addressed: the issue of authenticity; the significance of the narrative structure and storytelling strategies employed; and the nature of the female performance. Ultimately the article asks what this story can tell us about women's interpretation of their own history. PMID:22830093

  12. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ...

  13. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  14. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) Multiple births Increased maternal age Other medical illness (e.g., cancer, infection) back to top How are Blood ...

  15. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the field Hematology 2015 A collection of articles from the 2015 ASH Annual Meeting Education Program Blood: How I Treat A compendium of Blood articles updated to reflect the most recent scientific research ...

  16. Blood Donation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Donating Blood > Donation Process Printable Version Donation Process View Video Getting Ready for Your Donation The ... worry about. Make a Donation Appointment The Donation Process Step by Step Donating blood is a simple ...

  17. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes Challenge Type 1 Type 2 Facts About Type 2 Enroll ...

  18. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a ... If you find that you are interested in learning more about blood diseases and disorders, here are ...

  19. Blood Pressure Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart ... kidney failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  20. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ASH Apps Share Your Idea Donate My Account Search Show Main Menu + About Awards Membership ASH Foundation ... help: Results of Clinical Studies Published in Blood Search Blood , the official journal of ASH, for the ...

  1. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and eAG Hypoglycemia (Low blood glucose) Hyperglycemia (High blood glucose) Dawn Phenomenon Checking for Ketones Tight Diabetes Control donate en -- Diabetes Must Be Stopped - 2016-06-donation- ...

  2. Genetics Blood Card Use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — SOP guiding collection of blood for genetics analysis. Provides stepwise instructions and guidance on how to collect DNA sample using a whole blood blot card

  3. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... San Diego, CA Abstracts Registration Housing Travel Information Government Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood Current Issue ... clot. Blood clots in pregnant women tend to form in the deep veins of the legs or ...

  4. Blood Sugar and Fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperglycemia) can be a sign of the disease diabetes mellitus. High blood sugar levels can eventually damage ... treated with the same medications used to treat diabetes. There is no simple blood test for insulin ...

  5. America's Blood Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or less. Please donate now! Full Stoplight Report America's Blood Centers is... FEATURED TODAY Support the Foundation ... purchase will be donated to the Foundation for America's Blood Centers! Simply Click Here! "We Are" This ...

  6. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood clots A genetic predisposition to blood clots Obesity Prolonged immobility (e.g., bedrest, long distance travel) ... Programs and Awards ASH Agenda for Hematology Research Education For Clinicians For Trainees For Educators For Patients ...

  7. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  8. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To ... Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And ...

  9. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... harming your baby. Jump To: Am I at Risk? The risk of developing a blood clot during pregnancy is ... prevent blood clots during pregnancy: Be aware of risk factors. Know your family history. Make sure your ...

  10. Symptoms of Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... Blood Disorders Bone Marrow Examination Blood disorders can cause various symptoms in almost any area of the ...

  11. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a unique focus on scholarly and educational ... Studies Published in Blood Search Blood , the official journal of ASH, for the results of the latest ...

  12. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hematologist Clinical Trials Talking with Your Doctor Patient Group Links Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Disorders ... a request to the Blood Publishing Office . Patient Groups A list of Web links to patient groups ...

  13. Blood Culture Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficult to grow in culture, and additional blood cultures using special nutrient media may be done to try to grow and identify the pathogen . Viruses cannot be detected using blood culture bottles designed to grow bacteria. If the health ...

  14. National Blood Clot Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Home About Us Mission & Vision Board of Directors and Officers Medical & Scientific Advisory Board (MASAB) NBCA Operations Programs & Services About Clots Know Your Risk for Blood Clots Signs and Symptoms of Blood ...

  15. Ferritin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum ferritin level ... The amount of ferritin in the blood (serum ferritin level) is directly related to the amount of iron stored in your body. Iron is important for red blood cell production. Your doctor ...

  16. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood: How I Treat A compendium of Blood articles that have been updated to reflect the most ... Sixth Edition Hematology 2015 A collection of review articles from the Education Program at the 2015 ASH ...

  17. Anthrax - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The best test for diagnosing anthrax is a culture of affected tissue or blood. Alternative Names Anthrax serology test; Antibody test for anthrax; Serologic test for B anthracis Images Blood test Bacillus anthracis References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. ...

  18. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnancy: Be aware of risk factors. Know your family history. Make sure your doctor knows about any ... blood clots or blood clotting disorders in your family. Remain active, with your doctor's approval. Be aware ...

  19. Blood and Lymph Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in direct contact with the external environment, the circulatory system acts as a transport system for these cells. Two distinct fluids move through the circulatory system: blood and lymph. Blood carries oxygen and nutrients ...

  20. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women ... Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A ...

  1. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patients Resources for Industry Professionals View all Guidelines & Quality Care Resources to help practitioners improve patient care ... Concierge View all meetings Publications Blood Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood: How I Treat A compendium ...

  2. Telling tails

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Mary B; Manzerra, Pat

    2001-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor is one of three major classes of receptors for glutamate, the principle excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It plays a key role in learning and in the formation of memories by acting as a "coincidence detector" that initiates changes in synaptic strength that lead to the formation of new neural networks (1). It is also an important mediator of several forms of pathological neuronal toxicity. The NMDA receptor respo...

  3. Telling time

    OpenAIRE

    Populizio Ivan

    2002-01-01

    According to Einstein’s renowned declaration, for those who believe in physics – or, more precisely, in its capability to offer a “scientific” representation of the world – the distinction between present, past and future is just “an illusion, though obstinate”. If we consider an effective analogy by Mauro Dorato, we can state that those who agree with the famous German scientist will recognize in the present, past and future a relationship very similar to that between “here” and “somewhere e...

  4. Blood groups systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ranadhir Mitra; Nitasha Mishra; Girija Prasad Rath

    2014-01-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importa...

  5. Blood Donation Management System

    OpenAIRE

    K M Akkas Ali; Israt Jahan; Md. Ariful Islam; Md. Shafa-at Parvez

    2015-01-01

    This paper is focused on Blood Donation Management System which is a web application with supporting mobile application aimed to serve as a communication tool between patients (who need blood) and blood donor. To become members of the system, donors need to create their profiles by providing fundamental information like name, blood group, email address, password, and exact location from “Google Map”. In order to find out the exact location of a donor, Google Map is integrated with this app...

  6. Automated decoding of facial expressions reveals marked differences in children when telling antisocial versus prosocial lies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, Sarah; Gao, Xiaoqing; Brunet, Megan; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Lee, Kang

    2016-10-01

    The current study used computer vision technology to examine the nonverbal facial expressions of children (6-11years old) telling antisocial and prosocial lies. Children in the antisocial lying group completed a temptation resistance paradigm where they were asked not to peek at a gift being wrapped for them. All children peeked at the gift and subsequently lied about their behavior. Children in the prosocial lying group were given an undesirable gift and asked if they liked it. All children lied about liking the gift. Nonverbal behavior was analyzed using the Computer Expression Recognition Toolbox (CERT), which employs the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), to automatically code children's facial expressions while lying. Using CERT, children's facial expressions during antisocial and prosocial lying were accurately and reliably differentiated significantly above chance-level accuracy. The basic expressions of emotion that distinguished antisocial lies from prosocial lies were joy and contempt. Children expressed joy more in prosocial lying than in antisocial lying. Girls showed more joy and less contempt compared with boys when they told prosocial lies. Boys showed more contempt when they told prosocial lies than when they told antisocial lies. The key action units (AUs) that differentiate children's antisocial and prosocial lies are blink/eye closure, lip pucker, and lip raise on the right side. Together, these findings indicate that children's facial expressions differ while telling antisocial versus prosocial lies. The reliability of CERT in detecting such differences in facial expression suggests the viability of using computer vision technology in deception research. PMID:27318957

  7. Monitor blood glucose - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100220.htm Monitoring blood glucose - Series—Monitoring blood glucose: Using a self-test meter To use the ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Blood Sugar A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  8. Blood Test: Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Glucose Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de sangre: glucosa What It Is A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose (the main ...

  9. Right patient, Right blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selberg, Hanne; Madsen, Trine Stougaard

    2014-01-01

    Right patient, Right Blood Simulation based training in blood transfusion practice in nursing education Background: In spite of strict checking procedures to handling transfusion of blood severe adverse reactions are likely to happen and the major cause of morbidity occurs to be liable to human...

  10. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: ... and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood Glucose A1C ...

  11. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page Text Size: ... and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood Glucose A1C ...

  12. Examining blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent specification relates to an invention concerned with improvements in or relating to the examination of blood vessels of interest. Particles of dimensions not greater than 8 microns capable of providing detectable signals, are introduced into the blood for examination of a blood vessel. The particles may be sources of radiation, e.g. Ga68. (author)

  13. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Blood Glucose Testing Share: Print Page ... and-how-tos, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Blood Glucose Testing Checking Your Blood ...

  14. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... see "What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?" ) Blood bank staff also screen each blood donation to find out whether it's type A, B, AB, or O and whether it's Rh-positive or Rh-negative. Getting a blood type that ... blood for a transfusion, some blood banks remove white blood cells. This ...

  15. Being asked to tell an unpleasant truth about another person activates anterior insula and medial prefrontal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Littlefield, Melissa M; Dietz, Martin; Fitzgerald, Des;

    2015-01-01

    “Truth” has been used as a baseline condition in several functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of deception. However, like deception, telling the truth is an inherently social construct, which requires consideration of another person’s mental state, a phenomenon known as Theory of...... about another person. At the behavioral level, participants were slower at responding to social compared to simple questions about another person. These findings suggest that telling the truth is a nuanced cognitive operation that is dependent on the degree of mentalizing. Importantly, we show that the...

  16. Mass loss from stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses the different mass-loss processes of stars and how mass-loss rates determine the fate of stars in advanced stages of stellar evolution. Main sequence stars have their atmospheric structure dominated by radiation pressure. The pressure exerted by energetic photons is sufficient to drive gases off into space. This process can impact enormous turbulence to the local interstellar medium. Evolutionary effects keep these stars from fully evaporating, but the very course of their evolution is determined by this mass shedding process. Lower main sequence stars, like the sun, have a turbulent atmosphere enveloped in hot, thin coronal gas, blowing off a light stellar breeze. As the main sequence star evolves to a giant, its corona dissipates and the breeze turns into a strong stellar wind. Intermitten sputters combined with pulsational instabilities can lead to partial ejection of the atmosphere and envelope of a red giant, i.e. a planetary nebula results. The mass-loss from stars through planetary nebule combined with other mass-loss processes such as stellar winds returns a substantial amount of material to the interstellar environment. Mass-loss in binary systems is also discussed

  17. "I Tell Them I Know How to Do My ABCs!": Kindergartners' School-Related Conversations with Parents and Associations with Adjustment and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Helen; Johnson, Kiana R.; Mantzicopoulos, Panayota; Gray, DeLeon L.

    2011-01-01

    We examined kindergartners' (N = 160) reports of their conversations with parents about school, including whether parents ask about school, what parents ask about, what children tell them, and whether children want to tell their parents. We also investigated whether school adjustment and achievement were associated with either parent questions or…

  18. Influence of gear loss factor on the power loss prediction

    OpenAIRE

    C. M. C. G. Fernandes; P. M. T. Marques; R. C. Martins; J. H. O. Seabra

    2015-01-01

    In order to accurately predict the power loss generated by a meshing gear pair the gear loss factor must be properly evaluated. Several gear loss factor formulations were compared, including the author's approach. A gear loss factor calculated considering the load distribution along the path of contact was implemented. The importance of the gear loss factor in the power loss predictions was put in evidence comparing the predictions with experimental results. It was ...

  19. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems

  20. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  1. Blood Component Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kelton, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Human blood has been transfused for about 60-70 years. Over this time, the practice of blood transfusion has changed dramatically. One major change is the separation of blood into its various components. As a result, the patient can receive only the blood component in which he is deficient. In this way, the risk of side effects—particularly hepatitis—is lessened. This article briefly reviews the various blood products, the indications for their use, and some associated risks. These products i...

  2. BLOOD SERVICE IN FINLAND

    OpenAIRE

    TASHTEMIROV K.K.; LATVALA E.; IMANGAZINOV S.B.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the post is to summarize the experience of blood service in Finland by the result of the business move and examination of the service activities at the point.The research materials indicate that the blood service in Finland is a non-profit organization and is an independent part of the Finnish Red Cross (FRC). All expenses and development of Blood Service are covered by the sale of blood and blood products and expert services in the Finnish health care system. It is responsible fo...

  3. Mass loss-formula, recipe, prescription or algorithm?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many formulae have been proposed to describe how stars lose mass. Most of them were determined by fitting observational data, but a few developed from theoretical models. We may define the deathline as where M-dot=M-dotcrit=MX-dot/X, where X is a variable that follows the evolutionary track. For the stars near the tip of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) this may be expressed in terms of L, and all empirical formulae take 1 Mo-dot stars to M-dotcrit=5 x 10-7 Modot yr-1 at log L=3.6-3.7, and 2 Mo-dot to M-dotcrit=10-6 Modot yr-1 between log L=4.0 and 4.1. However, the log-log slopes of these relations, the exponents in a fitted power law near the deathline, vary from <3 to nearly 20 from one rule to another. How can mass loss be included in stellar evolution modelling if the formulae are so varied? Here, we describe an approach that emphasizes what the observations actually tell us: a prescription for mass loss to be included in stellar evolution models. We then examine examples of two cases that describe most of the mass loss that affects the future of a star like our Sun, and discuss how these may be handled. The first is the case of positive feedback, mass loss on the AGB; the second is a case of negative feedback, mass loss from a subset of red giant branch (RGB) stars.

  4. Blood Donation Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Akkas Ali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on Blood Donation Management System which is a web application with supporting mobile application aimed to serve as a communication tool between patients (who need blood and blood donor. To become members of the system, donors need to create their profiles by providing fundamental information like name, blood group, email address, password, and exact location from “Google Map”. In order to find out the exact location of a donor, Google Map is integrated with this application. The mobile application always updates the location of a donor. As a result, the system can automatically find a registered donor wherever he/she goes. Visitors can search blood donors from the home page by blood group and the place where blood is needed. The system will show the available donors along with their phone number, email address and mailing address through arranging them by nearest place and blood donation expire date. Visitors can send message to all donors through email but a member can send message using email and mobile phone. An appointment will be created only whenever a donor confirms that he/she will donate blood. Then the system will alert the donor before 12 hours of donation. Blood donors can also be searched from the mobile application, but this is only accessible for registered members. The goal of this paper is to reduce the complexity of the system to find blood donors in an emergency situation.

  5. Blood groups systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranadhir Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system.

  6. Blood groups systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ranadhir; Mishra, Nitasha; Rath, Girija Prasad

    2014-09-01

    International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system. PMID:25535412

  7. Monitoring Blood Sugar: The Importance of Checking Blood Sugar Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Monitoring Blood Sugar KidsHealth > For Parents > Monitoring Blood Sugar Print ... Other Tests Record Keeping The Importance of Checking Blood Sugar Levels Besides helping to keep blood sugar ...

  8. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 10, 2015 The Heart Truth ® —a national heart disease awareness campaign for women—is sponsored by the ... urgent wakeup call about their risk for heart disease. Every woman has a story to tell and ...

  9. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... September 10, 2015 The Heart Truth ® —a national heart disease awareness campaign for women—is sponsored by the ... and urgent wakeup call about their risk for heart disease. Every woman has a story to tell and ...

  10. Diagnosis of High Blood Pressure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... urgent wakeup call about their risk for heart disease. Every woman has a story to tell and the power to take action to protect her heart health. Share your story with other women on Facebook . The Heart Truth campaign offers a variety of ...

  11. Telogen Effluvium Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Authors Information for Reviewers Human & Animal Rights Job Postings Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Telogen Effluvium Hair Loss Share | It is normal to lose up to ...

  12. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that focuses on hearing loss and hearing issues. Miracle Ear Children’s Foundation P.O. Box 59261 Minneapolis, MN 55459-0261 (800) 234-5422 www.miracle-ear.com Miracle Ear Children’s Foundation provides free ...

  13. Autism and Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhall, Ulf; Nordin, Viviann; Sandstrom, Mikael; Ahlsen, Gunilla; Gillberg, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Children and adolescents (N=199) with autistic disorder were audiologically evaluated. Mild to moderate hearing loss was diagnosed in 7.9 percent, with deafness diagnosed in 3.5 percent of all cases, which represented a prevalence considerably above that in the general population and comparable to the prevalence found in populations with mental…

  14. Cascadia's Staggering Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Vogt, B.

    2001-05-01

    Recent worldwide earthquakes have resulted in staggering losses. The Northridge, California; Kobe, Japan; Loma Prieta, California; Izmit, Turkey; Chi-Chi, Taiwan; and Bhuj, India earthquakes, which range from magnitudes 6.7 to 7.7, have all occurred near populated areas. These earthquakes have resulted in estimated losses between \\3 and \\300 billion, with tens to tens of thousands of fatalities. Subduction zones are capable of producing the largest earthquakes. The 1939 M7.8 Chilean, the 1960 M9.5 Chilean, the 1964 M9.2 Alaskan, the 1970 M7.8 Peruvian, the 1985 M7.9 Mexico City and the 2001 M7.7 Bhuj earthquakes are damaging subduction zone quakes. The Cascadia fault zone poses a tremendous hazard in the Pacific Northwest due to the ground shaking and tsunami inundation hazards combined with the population. To address the Cascadia subduction zone threat, the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries conducted a preliminary statewide loss study. The 1998 Oregon study incorporated a M8.5 quake, the influence of near surface soil effects and default building, social and economic data available in FEMA's HAZUS97 software. Direct financial losses are projected at over \\$12 billion. Casualties are estimated at about 13,000. Over 5,000 of the casualties are estimated to result in fatalities from hazards relating to tsunamis and unreinforced masonry buildings.

  15. Heat loss from Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Kenneth; Næraa, Rikke

    1997-01-01

    Determination of heat loss coefficients for buildings in Denmark. The coefficient are determined for 15 building groups and 3 year intervals. They are based on the BBR-registre and assumptions of U-values(W/K*m2)and computed in a simple spreed sheet model.The results are used in the REVEILLE...

  16. Independents' group posts loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low oil gas prices and special charges caused the group of 50 U.S. independent producers Oil and Gas Journal tracks to post a combined loss in first half 1992. The group logged a net loss of $53 million in the first half compared with net earnings of $354 million in first half 1991, when higher oil prices during the Persian Gulf crisis buoyed earnings in spite of crude oil and natural gas production declines. The combined loss in the first half follows a 45% drop in the group's earnings in 1991 and compares with the OGJ group of integrated oil companies whose first half 1992 income fell 47% from the prior year. Special charges, generally related to asset writedowns, accounted for most of the almost $560 million in losses posted by about the third of the group. Nerco Oil and Gas Inc., Vancouver, Wash., alone accounted for almost half that total with charges related to an asset writedown of $238 million in the first quarter. Despite the poor first half performance, the outlook is bright for sharply improved group earnings in the second half, assuming reasonably healthy oil and gas prices and increased production resulting from acquisitions and in response to those prices

  17. Muscle function loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve injury, or brain damage ( stroke or other brain injury) The loss of muscle function after these types of events can be severe. Often it will not completely return, even with treatment. Paralysis can be temporary or permanent. It can affect ...

  18. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whether imbalances in this system cause high blood pressure. Blood Vessel Structure and Function Changes in the structure ... can affect blood pressure. Genetic Causes of High Blood Pressure Much of the understanding of the body systems ...

  19. Controlling your high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that is healthy for you. Checking Your Blood Pressure Your blood pressure can be measured at many places, including: ... Alternative Names Controlling hypertension Images Taking your blood pressure at home Blood pressure check Low sodium diet References American Diabetes ...

  20. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also known as blood vessels and capillaries. The pressure --- blood pressure --- is the result of two forces. The ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  1. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much alcohol. Signs and Symptoms of High Blood Pressure High blood pressure usually has no warning signs or symptoms , ... they are at high risk for high blood pressure . Blood Pressure Levels Normal systolic: less than 120 mmHg ...

  2. Laboratory and Genetic Assessment of Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Kiss, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Over 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the US. Between 200 to 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. This amount represents approximately 25% of the average iron stores in men and almost 75% of the iron stores in women. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion, especially in frequent blood donors (e. g., more than 2 times per year). In large epidemiologic s...

  3. Magnesium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones ( Addison disease ) Loss of kidney function ( chronic renal failure ) Loss of body fluids ( dehydration ) Diabetic ketoacidosis, a ... protein in the urine in a pregnant woman ( preeclampsia ) Inflammation of the lining of the large intestine ...

  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Wellness Lives Here Drive to Stop Diabetes Awareness Programs Hispanic Heritage Month African American Programs Latino ... device. Living W/ Diabetes: April is Limb Loss Awareness Month - 2016-04-limb-loss.html Living W/ ...

  5. Development of a new test for the global fibrinolytic capacity in whole blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, D.C.; Hoegee-de Nobel, E.; Jie, A.F.H.; Atsma, D.E.; Schalij, M.J.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The development of global tests for the fibrinolytic capacity in blood is hampered by the low base-line fibrinolytic activity in blood, by the involvement of both plasmatic components and blood cells in the fibrinolytic system and by the loss of fibrinolytic activity as a result of the a

  6. Knowledge and Development. Reshaping Library and Information Services for the World of Tomorrow. A Festschrift for Bjorn Tell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Stephan, Ed.; Willers, Uno, Ed.

    This compilation of essays and papers in French and English written in tribute to Bjorn Tell, covers various aspects of library and information services from an international perspective, including university libraries, librarianship, research, technology, reference, and organization of information. Articles focus on Berzelius, father of…

  7. A TELL English Course to Meet the Needs of a Multilevel BA in ELT Group: What Was Wrong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Fierro, María del Carmen; Delgado Alvarado, Natanael

    2015-01-01

    A Technology Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) course was designed to meet the needs of a multilevel first-semester group of students of the BA in English Language Teaching (ELT) taught at the School of Languages of the Juarez University of the State of Durango (ELE-UJED), Mexico. Amongst the relevant needs, students were to reach a CEFR B1.1…

  8. 20 CFR 416.988 - Your responsibility to tell us of events that may change your disability or blindness status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... may change your disability or blindness status. 416.988 Section 416.988 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... Disability and Blindness Continuing Or Stopping Disability Or Blindness § 416.988 Your responsibility to tell us of events that may change your disability or blindness status. If you are entitled to...

  9. The Relationship of Child Maltreatment and Self-Capacities with Distress when Telling One's Story of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesh, Oxana Gronskaya; Classen, Catherine C.; Field, Nigel; Kraemer, Helena C.; Spiegel, David

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of telling one's story of childhood sexual abuse and its relationship with the survivor's self-capacities and history of other child maltreatment. The baseline data were collected from 134 female CSA survivors who were participating in a large intervention study. Participants were given 10 minutes to describe their…

  10. "Why Will You Say That I Am Mad?" Using Poe's "Tell-Tale Heart" as a Composition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Laura Raidonis

    1998-01-01

    Describes an exercise for basic writers which encompasses reading, listening, and writing. Finds that Edgar Allan Poe's "Tell-Tale Heart" has an effective vocabulary, a first-person conversational tone for the "mad" voice, and a second-person direct address that makes it easy to follow. Notes that inexperienced readers can follow the plot. (PA)

  11. A Study on the Necessity of Introducing Teaching-Plan-Telling into Physical Education Undergraduates' Courses in Normal Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guodong

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation target of physical education major in normal universities is mainly physical teachers' qualification in basic education. Training of teaching-plan-telling on students of sports teaching major in normal universities has significant meaning to enhance the quality of students in a comprehensive way, realize the target of professional…

  12. Can We Tell Winners and Losers Apart? : Social and Cultural Effects on Facial Expressions of Children and Adults in Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mui, Hoi Ching; Goudbeek, Martijn; Swerts, Marc; Freitas-magalhães, A

    2015-01-01

    Can we tell winners and losers apart, on the basis of their facial expressions? In this chapter, we investigate the effects of social and cultural factors on expressions associated with winning and losing in games. Eight-year-olds and adults, who were either Dutch or Chinese, played games alone or w

  13. Manifest Meanings: The Selling (Not Telling) of American Indian History and the Case of "The Black Horse Ledger"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gercken, Becca

    2010-01-01

    What is the value or perceived necessity--for an Indian or for a white man--of changing Northern Cheyenne history? How are a reader's conclusions affected by her perception of the race of the person altering that history? Why is it acceptable to sell but not tell American Indian history? An examination of the visual and discursive rhetoric of "The…

  14. 32 CFR 37.900 - May I tell a participant that information in financial and programmatic reports will not be...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... at 32 CFR 286.12(d). (b) If the participant also provides information in the course of a competition... CFR 286.23(h) (and any DoD Component supplementary procedures) to determine whether it is privileged... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I tell a participant that information...

  15. 49 CFR 40.135 - What does the MRO tell the employee at the beginning of the verification interview?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the interview. (c) You must explain that, if further medical evaluation is needed for the verification... beginning of the verification interview? 40.135 Section 40.135 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... verification interview? (a) As the MRO, you must tell the employee that the laboratory has determined that...

  16. Alternative Procedures for Reducing Allogeneic Blood Transfusion in Elective Orthopedic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, Kathrin; Theusinger, Oliver M.; Nuernberg, Johannes; Werner, Clément M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative blood loss is a major problem in elective orthopedic surgery. Allogeneic transfusion is the standard treatment for perioperative blood loss resulting in low postoperative hemoglobin, but it has a number of well-recognized risks, complications, and costs. Alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion include preoperative autologous donation and intraoperative salvage with postoperative autotransfusion. Orthopedic surgeons are often unaware of the different pre- and intraoperative ...

  17. Pressure passive cerebral blood flow and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in experimental fetal asphyxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, H C; Lassen, N A; Tweed, W A;

    1979-01-01

    mean arterial blood pressure in the fetuses by blood withdrawal or infusion in this state, CBF was measured at different perfusion pressures (mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) minus central venous pressure (CVP)). A passive flow/pressure relationship--loss of autoregulation--was found, with hyperemia...... reaching CBF values up to 6 times normal at normal MABP of about 60 to 70 mmHg, and severe ischemia reaching CBF values close to zero in large cortical areas at MABP of 30 mmHg. CVP remained essentially unchanged at 10--15 mmHg. The severe and prolonged asphyxia rendered the blood-brain barrier leaky to...

  18. Weight-Loss Surgery for Adults with Diabetes or Prediabetes Who Are at the Lower Levels of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about how much weight-loss surgery, diet and exercise, and medicine lower weight and blood sugar? The chart below ... about how much weight-loss surgery, diet and exercise, and diabetes medicines lower weight and blood sugar after 1 year. ...

  19. THE STUDY OF DEFERRED BLOOD DONORS AT TERTIARY LEVEL HOSPITAL BASED BLOOD BANK OF SOUTH GUJARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre - donation donor screening is must for the safety of the blood donor and recipient. Deferrals lead to loss of precious whole blood donors and blood units available for transfusion purposes. AIM: T o record and document the current rate and reasons for donor deferral in our tertiary care hospital based blood bank to modify recruitment strategy for blood donors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study was conducted by retrospective data analysis of whole blood donors ( V oluntary/ R eplacement , arrived for donating bloo d at blood bank and in outdoor camps , during the period 1 st July 2010 to 30 th June 2014. The donor selection was done by pre - donation screening tests like questionnaire followed by physical examination and haemoglobin estimation. National guidelines were used for selection and deferral of donors. The deferred donor’s data was analyzed statistically. RESULT: Out of 34380 blood donors who came to donate blood, 31049 (89 . 63 %, out of which 97 . 51 % voluntary donors were eligible for d onation and 3331 (10 . 37% blood donors were deferred. The deferral rate among male population 7 . 47% and female population 42 . 09% were observed. Odds ratio for deferral in female donors was 8 . 99, implying thereby that chance of deferral in females is nearly 9 times higher as compared to males. The five leading causes for male donor deferral were low haemoglobin, hypertension, medication, and malaria & alcohol intake in last 48 hours & for the female donor deferral were low haemoglobin, menstruation, medication, low weight & hypotension. CONCLUSIONS: Studying the frequency and the different causes of donor deferral will help to identify sections of the population which could be targeted for increasing and retaining of the existing pool of voluntary blood donors and also to guide and provide the necessary essential database for the policy design and programme implementation at local, regional, and national level.

  20. Scientific Story Telling & Social Media The role of social media in effectively communicating science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkhuis, D.; Peart, L.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific discourse generally takes place in appropriate journals, using the language and conventions of science. That's fine, as long as the discourse remains in scientific circles. It is only outside those circles that the rules and techniques of engaging social media tools gain importance. A young generation of scientists are eager to share their experiences by using social media, but is this effective? And how can we better integrate all outreach & media channels to engage general audiences? How can Facebook, Twitter, Skype and YouTube be used as synergy tools in scientific story telling? Case: during IODP Expedtion 342 (June-July 2012) onboard the scientific drillship JOIDES Resolution an onboard educator and videographer worked non-stop fort two months on an integrated outreach plan that tried and tested the limits of all social media tools available to interact with an international public while at sea. The results are spectacular!

  1. The demons of science what they can and cannot tell us about our world

    CERN Document Server

    Weinert, Friedel

    2016-01-01

    This book is the first all-encompassing exploration of the role of demons in philosophical and scientific thought experiments. In Part I, the author explains the importance of thought experiments in science and philosophy. Part II considers Laplace’s Demon, whose claim is that the world is completely deterministic. Part III introduces Maxwell’s Demon, who - by contrast - experiences a world that is probabilistic and indeterministic. Part IV explores Nietzsche’s thesis of the cyclic and eternal recurrence of events. In each case a number of philosophical consequences regarding determinism and indeterminism, the arrows of time, the nature of the mind and free will are said to follow from the Demons’s worldviews. The book investigates what these Demons - and others - can and cannot tell us about our world. .

  2. When Video Games Tell Stories: A Model of Video Game Narrative Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Arnaldo Picucci

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study a model is proposed offering a comprehensive categorization of video game narrative structures intended as the methods and techniques used by game designers and allowed by the medium to deliver the story content throughout the gameplay in collaboration with the players. A case is first made for the presence of narrative in video games and its growth of importance as a central component in game design. An in-depth analysis ensues focusing on how games tell stories, guided by the criteria of linearity/nonlinearity, interactivity and randomness. Light is shed upon the fundamental architectures through which stories are told as well as the essential boundaries posed by the close link between narrative and game AI.

  3. What mirror self-recognition can tell us about aspects of self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilhab, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    approach to self-awareness in nonhuman primates. The ability to direct behaviour to previously unseen parts of the body such as the inside of the mouth, or grooming the eye by aid of mirrors has been interpreted as recognition of self and evidence of a self-concept. Three decades of research has revealed......-recognition as an index of self-awareness is challenged by alternative explanations, raising doubt about some assumptions behind mirror self-recognition. To evaluate the significance of the test in discussions of the concept of self this paper presents and analyses some major arguments raised on the mirror task.......Biology and Philosophy Vol. 19(no.1):111-126. 2004 Short description: What does the capacity to recognize self by mirrors tell about self-consciousness? Abstract: Research on mirror self-recognition where animals are observed for mirror-guided self-directed behaviour has predominated the empirical...

  4. Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann;

    Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities? Mads Albertsen1, Aaron M. Saunders1, Kåre L. Nielsen1 and Per H. Nielsen1 1 Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Presenting Author: Mads...... Albertsen Keywords: Metagenomics; Accumulibacter; Micro-diversity; Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Introduction Metagenomics, or environmental genomics, provides comprehensive information about the entire microbial community of a certain ecosystem, e.g. a wastewater treatment plant. So far......, metagenomic analyses have been hampered by high costs and high level of expertise needed to conduct the investigations, but it is changing now with development of new technologies allowing analyses of billions of DNA sequences (deep-sequencing) and user-friendly pipelines for analyses of the huge data sets...

  5. A Story-Telling Approach for a Software Engineering Course Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2009-01-01

    Advanced programming and software engineering techniques are challenging to learn due to their inherent complexity. However, to the average student they are even more challenging because they have never experienced the context in which the techniques are appropriate. For instance, why learn design...... patterns to increase maintainability when student exercises are never maintained? In this paper, we outline the contextual problems that software engineering teaching has to deal with and present a story telling approach for course design as a remedy. We outline the stories that over the last five years...... have structured lecturing and mandatory exercises for our advanced programming/software engineering course, and present benefits, liabilities, and experiences with the approach comparing it to the normal, topic structured, course design....

  6. CineGlobe Film Festival, Wednesday programme with Science Story Telling Hackathon and Oculus Rift

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Besides the short-film competitions, the second day of 2015 CineGlobe included a Soirée Oculus Rift with the public launch of the “Storytelling Science” Hackathon. CineGlobe and Festival Tous Ecrans joined forces to launch the “Storytelling Science” hackathon, in collaboration with Tribeca Film Institute and LIFT Conference. The keynote speech was given by renowned filmmaker and transmedia creator Michel Reihlac, who spoke about the role of interactive and immersive storytelling techniques in cinematic narrative. By placing the viewer in the center of the story, these new technologies are profoundly changing the way we tell stories. Michel Reilhac designs innovative story based experiences, using digital platforms (cinema, tv, mobile, tablets, …) and real life events. His creative approach to storytelling ambitions to offer viewers/ participants a unique opportunity for an immersive, participatory and interactive experience. During the evening, Oculus Rift virtual reality headsets were available to...

  7. Thermoluminescence Dating Of Pottery Objects From Tell Al-Husn, Northern Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasswneh, S.; al-Muheisen, Z.; Abd-Allah, R.

    During the excavation works adopted in 2008 by Yarmouk University team, with the support of the Jordanian Department of Antiquities at Tell al-Husn archaeological site located in northern Jordan, a considerable collection of pottery objects and shards were found. Dating these pottery objects was very important to reveal the historical and archaeological aspects of this significant site in northern Jordan. Thermoluminescence (TL) techniques is one of the most accurate and absolute method for dating pottery. An appropriate collection of pottery shards was collected and prepared for measurement using this technique. It shown that pottery objects are dated back around to 3400 to 3700 years BP (Late Bronze Age). This age is consistent with that estimated by archaeological (typology) studies.

  8. WHY CANT WE LEARN FROM OUR MISTAKES LEARN THE LESSON TELL THE STORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tell the story well and people can learn from the lesson. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and its contractors are pursuing environmental remediation at the Hanford Site. This endeavor has been underway for a number of years, both at Hanford and at other sites across the DOE complex. Independently, the occurrence of two fatalities on two Sites at opposite ends of the country within two weeks raised the question, ''What is going on in the Field?'' Corporate EM management communicated directly with Field Office Managers to answer the question. As a result of this intense interest and focused communication, EM identified four areas that need additional exploration. One of those is, ''EM's ability to learn from its mistakes.'' The need to cultivate the ability to learn from our mistakes is not unique to DOE. A quick review of EM Lessons Learned reports shows that most of the reports in the EM system originate at the sites with the largest budgets doing the most work. Not surprising. A second look, however, reveals that many reports are repetitive, that many people might consider many reports trivial, and that reports on some of the more significant events sometimes take a long time to get distributed across the DOE Complex. Spot checks of event reports revealed frequent identification of symptoms rather than root causes. With a high percentage of identified root causes in the questionable category, it is highly unlikely that the real root causes of many events are being corrected, thus leading to recurrences of events. To learn the lesson from an event, people need to be aware of the root causes of the event. Someone has to tell a story the reader can learn from, i.e., include all the information needed to understand what happened and why it happened. Most importantly, they need to understand the lesson to be learned

  9. Loss of Heterozygosity

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Molecular Profiling Initiative, NCI *This method was successful in our lab using prostate tissue and for our specific objectives. Investigators must be aware that they will need to tailor the following protocol for their own research objectives and tissue under study*. This method is used to detect genomic DNA deletions in tumor cells. For a more detailed discussion of applying this approach to microdissected samples, see [Allelic Loss Studies](http://cgap-mf.nih.gov/ProstateE...

  10. Valuing Catastrophic Citrus Losses

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Damian C.; Kilmer, Richard L.; Moss, Charles B.; Schmitz, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Courts are often required to estimate changes in welfare to agricultural operations from catastrophic events. For example, courts must assign damages in lawsuits, such as with pesticide drift cases, or determine "just compensation" when the government takes private land for public use, as with the removal of dairy farms from environmentally sensitive land or destruction of canker-contaminated citrus trees. In economics, the traditional method of quantifying producer losses is estimating chang...

  11. Decisions under unpredictable losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmed

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental test of the descriptive adequacy of the extit{restated diversification principle} is presented. The principle postulates that risk-averse utility maximizers will pool risks for their mutual benefit, even if information is missing about the probabilities of losses. It is enough for people to assume that they face equal risks when they pool risks. The results of the experiment support the principle.

  12. Muscle Loss in Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić, Marina; Šoić Vranić, Tamara; Arbanas, Juraj; Cvijanović, Olga; Bajek, Snježana

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and endurance. The aim of this study was to determinate age related changes in human muscles with different function and location in the body (vastus lateralis muscle and intercostal internus muscle). Our results suggest that age related muscle atrophy affect both human skeletal muscles. Also, the results showed the increase in percentage of muscle fibers with high oxidative activity during aging.

  13. Model 1: Blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because most radiopharmaceuticals are introduced into the body via the vascular system and may remain in the circulation for prolonged periods of time, it is useful to have a model of the blood as an aid in the estimation of radiation dose. It is extremely difficult to devise a precise blood model; the geometry is complex and distribution of blood may vary with position, physiological state and disease process. Estimates of blood volume distribution vary among investigators. Furthermore, the regional hematocrit varies throughout the body, thus affecting distribution of the labeled material according to whether it is attached to cellular elements or in the plasma. The size of the blood pool volumes range from the heart to the capillaries. Variable amounts of non-penetrating radiation contributions to organs depend on the volume of blood in the various sized vessels and the energy of the electrons which may penetrate into tissue from the blood vessel. The present model represents an advance in that it takes into account to some extent the distribution of significant blood pools in the body. Further refinement of the macro-geometry is possible with data which can now be obtained from modern radionuclide imaging equipment. A more difficult problem is definging the micro-geometry relative to the distribution of blood in capillaries and sinusoids, and their relationship to one another

  14. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy ...

  15. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin ...

  16. ADT fast losses MD

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Dehning, B; Redaelli, S; Salvachua Ferrando, BM; Sapinski, M; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Valuch, D

    2013-01-01

    The fast beam losses in the order of 1 ms are expected to be a potential major luminosity limitation for higher beam energies after the LHC long shutdown (LS1). Therefore a Quench Test is planned in the winter 2013 to estimate the quench limit in this timescale and revise the current models. This experiment was devoted to determination the LHC Transverse Damper (ADT) as a system for fast losses induction. A non-standard operation of the ADT was used to develop the beam oscillation instead of suppressing them. The sign flip method had allowed us to create the fast losses within several LHC turns at 450 GeV during the previous test (26th March 2012). Thus, the ADT could be potentially used for the studies of the UFO ("Unidentied Falling Object") impact on the cold magnets. Verification of the system capability and investigations of the disturbed beam properties were the main objectives of this MD. During the experiment, the pilot bunches of proton beam were excited independently in the horizontal and vertical ...

  17. [Patient blood management: Does the approach also make sense in children?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenmeier, Eva; Goeters, Christiane; Becke, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Patient blood management describes an interdisciplinary concept which aims at rational and adequate use of blood products accompanied by strategies to prevent and treat anemia, to reduce blood loss and to use alternatives to blood transfusion. While patient blood management has been widely implemented in adult medicine, concepts for such measures in the care of children are rare. The basic principles of preoperative evaluation, optimization of blood volume, perioperative minimizing of blood loss and a differentiated use of blood products are effective both in adults and children. There are differences in the physiology of hemoglobin and cardiovascular systems, particularly in the first year of life. It can be difficult to determine impending anemic hypoxia in children, so that indication for transfusion based on standardized hemoglobin threshold values should always be supported by an individual risk-benefit analysis based on clinical assessment. PMID:27213600

  18. Distributed beam loss monitor based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, Yu; Emanov, F. A.; Petrenko, A. V.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses a distributed beam loss monitor which is based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber and which has been installed at the VEPP-5 Injection Complex at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The principle of the device operation consists in detecting the Cherenkov radiation generated in an optical fiber by relativistic charged particles that are produced in an electromagnetic shower when highly relativistic beam particles (electrons or positrons) hit the accelerator vacuum chamber wall. Our experiments used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to detect the Cherenkov light. Knowing when the PMT signal arrives tells us where the beam loss occurs. Using a 20-m-long optical fiber allowed a detector spatial resolution of 3 m. The way to improve the resolution is to optimize the monitor working conditions and optical fiber and PMT parameters, potentially leading to a resolution of as fine as 0.5 m according to our estimates.

  19. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  20. Give blood at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    ACCIDENTS and ILLNESSES don’t take a break! DO SOMETHING AMAZING - GIVE BLOOD! IT’S IN ALL OUR INTERESTS. 30 July 2008 from 9.30 a.m. to 4 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT NOVAE First floor - Salle des Pas Perdus After you have given blood, you are invited to partake of refreshments kindly offered by NOVAE.