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Sample records for blood hematopoietic progenitor

  1. Regulatory functions of TRAIL in hematopoietic progenitors: human umbilical cord blood and murine bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, K; Stein, J; Pearl-Yafe, M; Kaplan, O; Yaniv, I; Askenasy, N

    2010-07-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) signaling pathway has selective toxicity to malignant cells. The TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5 are expressed at low levels in human umbilical cord blood cells (3-15%) and are upregulated by incubation with the cognate ligand, triggering apoptosis in 70-80% of receptor-positive cells (P<0.001). Apoptosis is not induced in hematopoietic progenitors, as determined from sustained severe combined immunodeficiency reconstituting potential and clonogenic activity. Furthermore, elimination of dead cells after incubation with TRAIL for 72 h results in a threefold enrichment in myeloid progenitors. Exposure to TRAIL in semisolid cultures showed synergistic activity of DR4 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in recruiting lineage-negative (lin(-)) and CD34(+) progenitors and in promoting the formation of large colonies. In murine bone marrow, approximately 30% of lin(-) cells express TRAIL-R2 (the only murine receptor), and the receptor is upregulated after transplantation in cycling and differentiating donor cells that home to the host marrow. However, this receptor is almost ubiquitously expressed in the most primitive (lin(-)SCA-1(+)c-kit(+)) progenitors, and stimulates the clonogenic activity of lin(-) cells (P<0.001), suggesting a tropic function after transplantation. It is concluded that TRAIL does not trigger apoptosis in hematopoietic progenitors, and upregulation of its cognate receptors under stress conditions mediates tropic signaling that supports recovery from hypoplasia.

  2. A Novel Population of Mesenchymal Progenitors with Hematopoietic Potential Originated from CD14- Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

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    Gang Hu, Peng Liu, Jie Feng, Yan Jin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemopoietic system derived progenitor cells with mesenchymal features have been identified including CD14+ monocyte-derived progenitors. However, it is unclear whether there are mesenchyme derived progenitors with hematopoietic potential. Herein, we identified a novel CD14- cell-derived population with both mesenchymal and hematopoietic features in rat peripheral blood, and this cell population is different from the CD14+ monocyte-derived progenitors but designated peripheral blood multipotential mesenchymal progenitors (PBMMPs. Phenotype analysis demonstrated expression of mesenchymal markers in PBMMPs including BMPRs, Endoglin/CD105, Fibronectin (Fn, Vimentin (Vim, Collagen (Col I/II/III along with hematopoietic marker CD34. CD14+ cell-derived population shared the same characteristics with CFs. In mixed culture of CD14+ and CD14- cells, PBMMPs were a predominant component and expressed CD29high, CD73high, CD34high, CD45low and CD90. Except for the value of mixed T lymphocytes and CD14+ cell-derived population, hematopoietic characters of cultured PBMMPs were indicated by CD14-/CD34+/CD45-/CD90+. The mesenchymal origin was further confirmed by comparing PBMMPs with bone marrow stromal cells. Finally, we transplanted PBMMPs into a skin wound model, and results showed the specific potential of PBMMPs in not only extracellular matrix secretion but epidermal regeneration. This study provides evidence that peripheral blood contains common hematopoietic-mesenchymal progenitors from both hematopoietic and mesenchymal lineages, and CD34+ mesenchymal progenitors are a possible alternative source of epidermal cells in wound healing.

  3. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

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    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells.

  4. Sox7-sustained expression alters the balance between proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors at the onset of blood specification.

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    Gandillet, Arnaud; Serrano, Alicia G; Pearson, Stella; Lie-A-Ling, Michael; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie

    2009-11-26

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation of precursors at the onset of hematopoiesis specification are poorly understood. By using a global gene expression profiling approach during the course of embryonic stem cell differentiation, we identified Sox7 as a potential candidate gene involved in the regulation of blood lineage formation from the mesoderm germ layer. In the present study, we show that Sox7 is transiently expressed in mesodermal precursors as they undergo specification to the hematopoietic program. Sox7 knockdown in vitro significantly decreases the formation of both primitive erythroid and definitive hematopoietic progenitors as well as endothelial progenitors. In contrast, Sox7-sustained expression in the earliest committed hematopoietic precursors promotes the maintenance of their multipotent and self-renewing status. Removal of this differentiation block driven by Sox7-enforced expression leads to the efficient differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors to all erythroid and myeloid lineages. This study identifies Sox7 as a novel and important player in the molecular regulation of the first committed blood precursors. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that the mere sustained expression of Sox7 is sufficient to completely alter the balance between proliferation and differentiation at the onset of hematopoiesis.

  5. Functional expression of CD95/Fas Antigen and Bcl-2 on Cord blood Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马艳萍; 邹萍

    2002-01-01

    The cell-surface expression and functional status of the CD95/Fas antigen on primitive hematopoietic progenitors isolated from human cord blood (CB) were studied. The CD34+ cells freshly isolated from CB displayed low CD95 expression. The combinations of cytokines such as SCF+FL could up-regulate the expression of CD95 in vitro culture and tumor necrosis factor-e (TNF-α) and interon-γ (IFN-γ) further increased the CD95 expression induced by positive cytokines. The functional status of CD95-mediated apoptosis were analyzed by incubation of CD34+CB cells in the presence of anti-CD95 monoclonal antibodies (McAbs). The effects of anti-CD95 McAbs were measured by viable cell counting, flow cytometry, LTIC and CFU-C assays. A decrease of viable cells, CFUC and LTIC numbers were observed in the presence of anti-CD95 McAbs and TNF-α or IFN-γ.However, growth factor deprivation or the early-acting cytokine such as SCF and FL cross-linking to CD95 caused low apoptosis of CD34+ cells. The correlation of increased intracytoplasmic levels of bcl2 and the presence of CD95 on fresh CB CD34+ cells suggested that bcl-2 might be involved in protecting against CD95-mediated apoptosis of CB CD34+ cells.

  6. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    for the physiologic and pathophysiologic events of differentiation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors into lymphoid and myeloid stem cells, subsequently immune and inflammatory cells. These processes include transmigration, relocation, differentiation, and maturation of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. (Blood......Ab blocked these functions of gammaIP-10 and Mig but not of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. gamma IP-10-induced and Mig-induced up-regulation of integrins (CD49a and CD49b) was found to play a crucial role in adhesion of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. Moreover, gamma IP-10 and Mig...

  7. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

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    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A., E-mail: rschulz@nd.edu

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  8. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, enhances human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem/primitive progenitor cell expansion and promotes multi-lineage hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation has emerged as promising therapy, but is challenged by scarcity of stem cells. Eltrombopag is a non-peptide, thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonist, which selectively activates c-Mpl in humans and chimpanzees. We investigated eltrombopag’s effects on human UCB hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) expansion, and its effects on hematopoiesis in vivo. Eltrombopag selectively augmented the expansion of human CD45+, CD34+, ...

  9. A defined, feeder-free, serum-free system to generate in vitro hematopoietic progenitors and differentiated blood cells from hESCs and hiPSCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Salvagiotto

    Full Text Available Human ESC and iPSC are an attractive source of cells of high quantity and purity to be used to elucidate early human development processes, for drug discovery, and in clinical cell therapy applications. To efficiently differentiate pluripotent cells into a pure population of hematopoietic progenitors we have developed a new 2-dimensional, defined and highly efficient protocol that avoids the use of feeder cells, serum or embryoid body formation. Here we showed that a single matrix protein in combination with growth factors and a hypoxic environment is sufficient to generate from pluripotent cells hematopoietic progenitors capable of differentiating further in mature cell types of different lineages of the blood system. We tested the differentiation method using hESCs and 9 iPSC lines generated from different tissues. These data indicate the robustness of the protocol providing a valuable tool for the generation of clinical-grade hematopoietic cells from pluripotent cells.

  10. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ursula; M; Gehling; Marc; Willems; Kathleen; Schlagner; Ralf; A; Benndorf; Maura; Dandri; Jrg; Petersen; Martina; Sterneck; Joerg-Matthias; Pollok; Dieter; K; Hossfeld; Xavier; Rogiers

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To test the hypothesis that liver cirrhosis is associated with mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. METHODS:Peripheral blood samples from 72 patients with liver cirrhosis of varying etiology were analyzed by flow cytometry.Identified progenitor cell subsets were immunoselected and used for functional assays in vitro. Plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1(SDF-1) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.RESULTS:Progenitor cells with a CD133 + /CD45 + CD14 + phenotype we...

  11. Distinct Sources of Hematopoietic Progenitors Emerge before HSCs and Provide Functional Blood Cells in the Mammalian Embryo

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    Kathleen E. McGrath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic potential arises in mammalian embryos before adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. At embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5, we show the first murine definitive erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs have an immunophenotype distinct from primitive hematopoietic progenitors, maturing megakaryocytes and macrophages, and rare B cell potential. EMPs emerge in the yolk sac with erythroid and broad myeloid, but not lymphoid, potential. EMPs migrate to the fetal liver and rapidly differentiate, including production of circulating neutrophils by E11.5. Although the surface markers, transcription factors, and lineage potential associated with EMPs overlap with those found in adult definitive hematopoiesis, they are present in unique combinations or proportions that result in a specialized definitive embryonic progenitor. Furthermore, we find that embryonic stem cell (ESC-derived hematopoiesis recapitulates early yolk sac hematopoiesis, including primitive, EMP, and rare B cell potential. EMPs do not have long-term potential when transplanted in immunocompromised adults, but they can provide transient adult-like RBC reconstitution.

  12. Hematopoietic progenitor migration to the adult thymus

    OpenAIRE

    Zlotoff, Daniel A.; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2011-01-01

    While most hematopoietic lineages develop in the bone marrow (BM), T cells uniquely complete their development in the specialized environment of the thymus. Hematopoietic stem cells with long-term self-renewal capacity are not present in the thymus. As a result, continuous T cell development requires that BM-derived progenitors be imported into the thymus throughout adult life. The process of thymic homing begins with the mobilization of progenitors out of the bone marrow, continues with thei...

  13. Concise review: ex vivo expansion of cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells: basic principles, experimental approaches, and impact in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Guzmán, Patricia; Fernández-Sánchez, Verónica; Mayani, Hector

    2013-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) play key roles in the production of mature blood cells and in the biology and clinical outcomes of hematopoietic transplants. The numbers of these cells, however, are extremely low, particularly in umbilical cord blood (UCB); thus, ex vivo expansion of human UCB-derived HSCs and HPCs has become a priority in the biomedical field. Expansion of progenitor cells can be achieved by culturing such cells in the presence of different combinations of recombinant stimulatory cytokines; in contrast, expansion of actual HSCs has proved to be more difficult because, in addition to needing recombinant cytokines, HSCs seem to deeply depend on the presence of stromal cells and/or elements that promote the activation of particular self-renewal signaling pathways. Hence, there is still controversy regarding the optimal culture conditions that should be used to achieve this. To date, UCB transplants using ex vivo-expanded cells have already been performed for the treatment of different hematological disorders, and although results are still far from being optimal, the advances are encouraging. Recent studies suggest that HSCs may also give rise to nonhematopoietic cells, such as neural, cardiac, mesenchymal, and muscle cells. Such plasticity and the possibility of producing nonhematopoietic cells at the clinical scale could bring new alternatives for the treatment of neural, metabolic, orthopedic, cardiac, and neoplastic disorders. Once standardized, ex vivo expansion of human HSCs/HPCs will surely have a positive impact in regenerative medicine.

  14. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from peripheral blood CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors of a 31 year old healthy woman

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    Amornrat Tangprasittipap

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The MUi019-A human induced pluripotent stem cell line was generated from peripheral blood CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors of a healthy woman using a non-integrative reprogramming method. Episomal vectors carrying reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, L-MYC, LIN28, and shRNA of TP53 and EBNA-1 were delivered using electroporation. The iPSC line can be used as a control in studying disease mechanisms. Furthermore, gene editing approaches can be used to introduce specific mutations into the MUi019-A to model disease while the cell type affected by the disease is inaccessible.

  15. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplantation - a literature review

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    Marco Aurélio Salvino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous support of hematopoietic progenitor cells is an effective strategy to treat various hematologic neoplasms, such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells are the main source of support for autologous transplants, and collection of an adequate number of hematopoietic progenitor cells is a critical step in the autologous transplant procedure. Traditional strategies, based on the use of growth factors with or without chemotherapy, have limitations even when remobilizations are performed. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is the most widely used agent for progenitor cell mobilization. The association of plerixafor, a C-X-C Chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4 inhibitor, to granulocyte colony stimulating factor generates rapid mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A literature review was performed of randomized studies comparing different mobilization schemes in the treatment of multiple myeloma and lymphomas to analyze their limitations and effectiveness in hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplant. This analysis showed that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte colony stimulating factor is well tolerated and results in a greater proportion of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas or multiple myeloma reaching optimal CD34+ cell collections with a smaller number of apheresis compared the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor alone.

  16. Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood as support for ex vivo expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and for chondrogenic differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN-FUWANG; LI-JUANWANG; YI-FANWU; YINGXIANG; CHUN-GANGXIE; BING-BINGJIA; JENNYHARRINGTON; IANK.MCNIECE

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPC) ar pluripotent, being the precursors for marrow stroma, bone, cartilage, muscle and connective tissues. Although the presence of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in umbilical cord blood (UCB) is well known, that of MSPC has been not fully evaluated. Design and Methods. In this study, we examined the immunophenotype, the supporting function in relation to exvivo expansion of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells and the chondrogenic differentiation of cultured cells with characteristics of MSPC from UCB. When UCB nucleated cells were isolated and 107 cells cultured in IMDM with 20% fetal bovine serum, the mean number of adherent fibroblastlike colonies was 3.5±0.7/106 monuclear cells. Results. UCB-derived MSPC could be expanded for at least 15 passages. In their undifferentiated state, UCB-derived MSPC were CD 13+, CD29+, CD90+, CD105+, CD166+, SH2+,SH3+, SH4+, CD45-, CD34-, and CD14-; they produced stem cell factor, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α.UCB-derived MSPC cultured in chondrogenic media differentiated into chondrogenic cells. UCB-derived MSPC supported the proliferation and differentiation of CD34+ cells from UCB in vitro. Interpretation and Conclusions. UCB-derived MSPC have the potential to support ex vivo expansion of HSPC and chondrogenic differentiation. UCB should not be regarded as medical waste. It can serve as an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells and may provide a unique source of fetal cells for cellular and gene therapy.

  17. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

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    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials.

  18. Eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, enhances human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem/primitive progenitor cell expansion and promotes multi-lineage hematopoiesis.

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    Sun, Hongliang; Tsai, Ying; Nowak, Irena; Liesveld, Jane; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2012-09-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation has emerged as a promising therapy, but it is challenged by scarcity of stem cells. Eltrombopag is a non-peptide, thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonist, which selectively activates c-Mpl in humans and chimpanzees. We investigated eltrombopag's effects on human UCB hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) expansion, and its effects on hematopoiesis in vivo. Eltrombopag selectively augmented the expansion of human CD45+, CD34+, and CD41+ cells in bone marrow compartment without effects on mouse bone marrow cells in the NOD/SCID mice xenotransplant model. Consequently, eltrombopag increased peripheral human platelets and white blood cells. We further examined effects in the STAT and AKT signaling pathways in serum-free cultures. Eltrombopag expanded human CD34+ CD38-, CD34+, and CD41+ cells. Both eltrombopag and recombinant human TPO (rhTPO) induced phosphorylation of STAT5 of CD34+ CD41-, CD34- CD41+, and CD34- CD41- cells. rhTPO preferentially induced pSTAT3, pAKT, and more pSTAT5 in CD34- C41+ cells, while eltrombopag had no effects on pSTAT3. In conclusion, eltrombopag enhanced expansion of HSCs/HPCs of human UCB in vivo and in vitro, and promoted multi-lineage hematopoiesis through the expansion of bone marrow HSCs/HPCs of human UCB in vivo. Eltrombopag differed somewhat from rhTPO in the signal transduction pathways by favoring earlier HSC/HPC populations.

  19. Interactions of monocyte subpopulations generated from cord blood CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors with tumor cells: assessment of antitumor potential.

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    Stec, Malgorzata; Baran, Jaroslaw; Szatanek, Rafal; Mytar, Bozenna; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Gozdzik, Jolanta; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2012-11-01

    Monocytes and their subsets (CD14(++)CD16(+) and CD14(+)CD16(-)) generated from cord blood CD34(+) progenitor cells were used for determination of their capacity to interact with tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The studies in vitro included adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, cytotoxicity, production of toxic mediators: reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates (ROI and RNI, respectively), and finally their effect on transplantable human tumor growth in nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice. The CD14(++)CD16(+) subset exhibited an increased adherence to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and cytotoxicity toward tumor cells in vitro. CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes showed a higher production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates after stimulation with tumor cells, and more pronounced inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. The results revealed significant differences in the behavior of CD14(++)CD16(+) and CD14(+)CD16(-) monocyte subsets toward tumor cells, thus providing further evidence that CD34(+) cell-derived monocytes differ in this respect from blood monocytes. The protocol for generation of monocytes with antitumor reactivity described here may be useful to obtain monocytes from CD34(+) progenitor cells of cancer patients. This might offer a basis for a novel approach for various forms of cellular immunotherapy of cancer.

  20. Eicosanoid regulation of hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem and progenitor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, J; Pelus, L M

    2010-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a potentially curative treatment for numerous hematological malignancies. The transplant procedure as performed today takes advantage of HSC trafficking; either egress of HSC from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, that is, mobilization, for acquisition of the hematopoietic graft, and/or trafficking of HSC from the peripheral blood to bone marrow niches in the recipient patient, that is HSC homing. Numerous studies, many of which are reviewed herein, have defined hematopoietic regulatory mechanisms mediated by the 20-carbon lipid family of eicosanoids, and recent evidence strongly supports a role for eicosanoids in regulation of hematopoietic trafficking, adding a new role whereby eicosanoids regulate hematopoiesis. Short-term exposure of HSC to the eicosanoid prostaglandin E(2) increases CXCR4 receptor expression, migration and in vivo homing of HSC. In contrast, cannabinoids reduce hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) CXCR4 expression and induce HPC mobilization when administered in vivo. Leukotrienes have been shown to alter CD34(+) cell adhesion, migration and regulate HSC proliferation, suggesting that eicosanoids have both opposing and complimentary roles in the regulation of hematopoiesis. As numerous FDA approved compounds regulate eicosanoid signaling or biosynthesis, the utility of eicosanoid-based therapeutic strategies to improve hematopoietic transplantation can be rapidly evaluated.

  1. Stable Delivery of CCR5-Directed shRNA into Human Primary Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells via a Lentiviral Vector

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    Shimizu, Saki; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to achieve suppression of a specific gene expression and therefore it has tremendous potential for gene therapy applications. A number of vector systems have been developed to express short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to produce siRNAs within mammalian T-cells, primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in animal model systems. Among these, vectors based on lentivirus backbones have significantly transformed our ability to transfer shRNAs into nondividing cells, such as HSPC, resulting in high transduction efficiencies. However, delivery and long-term expression of shRNAs should be carefully optimized for efficient knock down of target gene without causing cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Here, we describe our protocols for the development of shRNA against a major HIV co-receptor/chemokine receptor CCR5 and the use of lentiviral vectors for stable shRNA delivery and expression in primary human PBMC and HSPC. PMID:26472455

  2. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

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    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  3. Increased Proportion of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Population in Cord Blood of Neonates Born to Mothers with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadarits, Orsolya; Zóka, András; Barna, Gábor; Al-Aissa, Zahra; Rosta, Klára; Rigó, János; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Somogyi, Anikó

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) population in the cord blood of neonates born to mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a hypothesis generating pilot study, due to that, neonatal polycythemia may be the consequence of GDM pregnancy. Forty-five pregnant women with GDM (last trimester mean HbA1C = 33.9 mmol/mol) and 42 (nondiabetic) control pregnant women were enrolled after their routine 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between the 24th and 28th gestational week (with expected differences in their mean routine clinical characteristics: plasma glucose at OGTT: 0′ = 5.07 vs. 4.62 mM, 120′ = 8.9 vs. 5.76 mM, age = 35.07 vs. 31.66 years, prepregnancy body mass index = 27.9 vs. 23.9 kg/m2, GDM vs. control, respectively) on a voluntary basis after signing the informed consent. EDTA-treated cord blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry and the software Kaluza1.2 using CD45 and CD34-specific fluorescent antibodies to identify the HSPC population (CD34+ cells within the CD45dim blast gate). The proportion of CD34+CD45dim HSPCs among the nucleated cells was significantly (P < 0.05, statistical power = 60.8%) higher in the cord blood samples of neonates born to mothers with GDM (median 0.38%) compared to neonates born to nondiabetic mothers (median 0.32%) and according to treatment types (P < 0.05) median: control 0.32%, GDM-diet only 0.37%, GDM-on insulin 0.45%; control versus GDM on insulin (P < 0.05). The increased proportion of circulating CD34+CD45dim cells in the cord blood may possibly be related to altered fetal stem cell mobilization in GDM pregnancy, yet these results should be interpreted only as preliminary due to the small sample sizes. PMID:26494027

  4. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

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    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  5. Cryopreservation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells for therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Suzanne M; Austin, Eric; Armitage, Sue

    2007-01-01

    To date, more than 25,000 hematopoietic transplants have been carried out across Europe for hematological disorders, the majority being for hematological malignancies. At least 70% of these are autologous transplants, the remaining 30% being allogeneic, which are sourced from related (70% of the allogeneic) or unrelated donors. Peripheral blood mobilized with granulocyte colony stimulating factor is the major source of stem cells for transplantation, being used in approx 95% of autologous transplants and in approx 65% of allogeneic transplants. Other cell sources used for transplantation are bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. One crucial advance in the treatment of these disorders has been the development of the ability to cryopreserve hematopoietic stem cells for future transplantation. For bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood, the majority of cryopreserved harvests come from autologous collections that are stored prior to a planned infusion following further treatment of the patient or at the time of a subsequent relapse. Other autologous harvests are stored as backup or "rainy day" harvests, the former specifically being intended to rescue patients who develop graft failure following an allogeneic transplant or who may require this transplant at a later date. Allogeneic bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood are less often cryopreserved than autologous harvests. This is in contrast to umbilical cord blood that may be banked for directed or sibling (related) hematopoietic stem cell transplants, for allogeneic unrelated donations, and for autologous donations. Allogeneic unrelated donations are of particular use for providing a source of hematopoietic stem cells for ethnic minorities, patients with rare human leukocyte antigen types, or where the patient urgently requires a transplant and cannot wait for the weeks to months required to prepare a bone marrow donor. There are currently more than 200,000 banked umbilical cord blood units registered with

  6. Interleukin-1 regulates hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    OpenAIRE

    Orelio, Claudia; Peeters, Marian; Haak, Esther; van der Horn, Karin; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is know...

  7. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  8. Isolation and culture of human hematopoietic progenitors for studies of dendritic cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of distinct dendritic cell (DC) function and differentiation pathways is important in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. This includes infectious and neoplastic diseases, vaccination and immunotherapy, allograft rejection, and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Isolation and culture of human hematopoietic progenitor cells provide a valuable model for studies on DC biology and may help uncover new means to manipulate DC differentiation and function in therapeutic settings. Here, a detailed protocol for the isolation of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from human cord blood is described. The isolated cell population consists of approximately 85% CD34+ CD45+ hematopoietic progenitor cells that in response to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) plus tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expand and differentiate into CD11c+ HLA-DR+ DC-expressing CD1a.

  9. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplantation – a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvino, Marco Aurélio; Ruiz, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    The use of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous support of hematopoietic progenitor cells is an effective strategy to treat various hematologic neoplasms, such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells are the main source of support for autologous transplants, and collection of an adequate number of hematopoietic progenitor cells is a critical step in the autologous transplant procedure. Traditional strategies, based on the use of growth factors with or without chemotherapy, have limitations even when remobilizations are performed. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is the most widely used agent for progenitor cell mobilization. The association of plerixafor, a C-X-C Chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) inhibitor, to granulocyte colony stimulating factor generates rapid mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A literature review was performed of randomized studies comparing different mobilization schemes in the treatment of multiple myeloma and lymphomas to analyze their limitations and effectiveness in hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplant. This analysis showed that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte colony stimulating factor is well tolerated and results in a greater proportion of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas or multiple myeloma reaching optimal CD34+ cell collections with a smaller number of apheresis compared the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor alone. PMID:26969772

  10. Effect of endothelial progenitor cell on hematopoietic reconstitution in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    化静

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) on hematopoietic reconsititution in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) mouse model.Methods Allo-HSCT mouse model was established with condition of BU/CY,in which C57BL/6 (H-2b) and BABL/c (H-2d) mice were used

  11. Brief Report: Efficient Generation of Hematopoietic Precursors and Progenitors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Parker, Aaron S.; Moraghebi, Roksana; Lutz, Margaret K.; Firth, Amy L.; Brennand, Kristen J.; Berggren, W. Travis; Raya, Angel; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Gage, Fred H.; Verma, Inder M.

    2012-01-01

    By mimicking embryonic development of the hematopoietic system, we have developed an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of hematopoietic lineages and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Factors such as cytokines, extra cellular matrix components, and small molecules as well as the temporal association and concentration of these factors were tested on seven different human ESC and iPSC lines. We report the differentiation of up to 84% human CD45+ cells (average 41% ± 16%, from seven pluripotent lines) from the differentiation culture, including significant numbers of primitive CD45+/CD341 and CD45+/CD341/CD38− hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, the numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells generated, as measured by colony forming unit assays, were comparable to numbers obtained from fresh umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell isolates on a per CD45+ cell basis. Our approach demonstrates highly efficient generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors with among the highest efficiencies reported to date (CD45+/CD341) using a single standardized differentiation protocol on several human ESC and iPSC lines. Our data add to the cumulating evidence for the existence of an in vitro derived precursor to the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) with limited engrafting ability in transplanted mice but with multipotent hematopoietic potential. Because this protocol efficiently expands the preblood precursors and hematopoietic progenitors, it is ideal for testing novel factors for the generation and expansion of definitive HSCs with long-term repopulating ability. PMID:21544903

  12. Brief report: efficient generation of hematopoietic precursors and progenitors from human pluripotent stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Parker, Aaron S; Moraghebi, Roksana; Lutz, Margaret K; Firth, Amy L; Brennand, Kristen J; Berggren, W Travis; Raya, Angel; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Gage, Fred H; Verma, Inder M

    2011-07-01

    By mimicking embryonic development of the hematopoietic system, we have developed an optimized in vitro differentiation protocol for the generation of precursors of hematopoietic lineages and primitive hematopoietic cells from human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Factors such as cytokines, extra cellular matrix components, and small molecules as well as the temporal association and concentration of these factors were tested on seven different human ESC and iPSC lines. We report the differentiation of up to 84% human CD45+ cells (average 41% ± 16%, from seven pluripotent lines) from the differentiation culture, including significant numbers of primitive CD45+/CD34+ and CD45+/CD34+/CD38- hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, the numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells generated, as measured by colony forming unit assays, were comparable to numbers obtained from fresh umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell isolates on a per CD45+ cell basis. Our approach demonstrates highly efficient generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors with among the highest efficiencies reported to date (CD45+/CD34+) using a single standardized differentiation protocol on several human ESC and iPSC lines. Our data add to the cumulating evidence for the existence of an in vitro derived precursor to the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) with limited engrafting ability in transplanted mice but with multipotent hematopoietic potential. Because this protocol efficiently expands the preblood precursors and hematopoietic progenitors, it is ideal for testing novel factors for the generation and expansion of definitive HSCs with long-term repopulating ability.

  13. Development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Wang, Fen; Wu, Mengyao; Wang, Zack Z

    2015-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), provide a new cell source for regenerative medicine, disease modeling, drug discovery, and preclinical toxicity screening. Understanding of the onset and the sequential process of hematopoietic cells from differentiated hPSCs will enable the achievement of personalized medicine and provide an in vitro platform for studying of human hematopoietic development and disease. During embryogenesis, hemogenic endothelial cells, a specified subset of endothelial cells in embryonic endothelium, are the primary source of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this review, we discuss current status in the generation of multipotent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from hPSCs via hemogenic endothelial cells. We also review the achievements in direct reprogramming from non-hematopoietic cells to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Further characterization of hematopoietic differentiation in hPSCs will improve our understanding of blood development and expedite the development of hPSC-derived blood products for therapeutic purpose.

  14. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, among other ligands; (b the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases.

  15. CD133+人脐血造血祖细胞的干性维持培养及鉴定%Long-term culture and identification of CD133 + hematopoietic progenitor cells from human umbilical cord blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小金; 陈芳; 陆滟霞; 杨慧; 彭璠莉; 袁理; 刘国炳; 李学农

    2012-01-01

    Objective To isolate CD133+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from human umbilical cord blood and optimize the culture condition for maintaining their stem cell characteristics. Methods CD133+ hematopoietic progenitor cells were isolated from human umbilical cord blood using magnetic cell sorting system, and the cells were detected by flow cytometry. Four methods were used for culturing cells. After 8 weeks' culture, cytomorphology, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence assay were used to identify the characteristics of the stem cells. Results Over 80% of CD133 * hematopoietic progenitor cells were isolated from human umbilical cord blood using magnetic cell sorting system. The cells were effectively expanded using optimized serum-free medium after 8 weeks of cell culture, whereas the cells in other media differentiated into adherent cells in a poor state. Conclusion The optimized serum-free medium allows effective expansion of CD133+ hematopoietic progenitor cells that maintain stem cell characteristics after a long-term culture.%目的 从人脐带血中分选出CD133+造血祖细胞,并进行长时间干性维持培养.方法 通过免疫磁珠法分选出人脐带血中的CD133+造血祖细胞,经流式细胞仪检测免疫磁珠分选后的CD133+造血祖细胞.采用五种方法扩增培养该细胞,8周后,再通过细胞形态学、流式细胞术、免疫细胞化学和免疫荧光对细胞进行干性鉴定,探索最佳干性维持培养方法.结果 通过免疫磁珠法可以从人脐带血中分选出80%以上的CD133+造血祖细胞.采用优化的无血清培养基培养8周之后,CD133+造血祖细胞可得到有效扩增.而其他的培养基会使CD133+造血祖细胞由半悬浮细胞分化为梭形贴壁细胞,并且细胞状态欠佳.结论 利用免疫磁珠法分选出的CD133+造血祖细胞,采用优化的无血清培养基能够有效扩增该细胞,并可长期有效的维持其干性.

  16. Fas transduces dual apoptotic and trophic signals in hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Stein, Jerry; Yolcu, Esma S; Farkas, Daniel L; Shirwan, Haval; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2007-12-01

    Stem cells and progenitors are often required to realize their differentiation potential in hostile microenvironments. The Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) interaction is a major effector pathway of apoptosis, which negatively regulates the expansion of differentiated hematopoietic cells. The involvement of this molecular interaction in the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is not well understood. In the murine syngeneic transplant setting, both Fas and FasL are acutely upregulated in bone marrow-homed donor cells; however, the Fas(+) cells are largely insensitive to FasL-induced apoptosis. In heterogeneous populations of lineage-negative (lin(-)) bone marrow cells and progenitors isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation, trimerization of the Fas receptor enhanced the clonogenic activity. Inhibition of caspases 3 and 8 did not affect the trophic signals mediated by Fas, yet it efficiently blocked the apoptotic pathways. Fas-mediated tropism appears to be of physiological significance, as pre-exposure of donor cells to FasL improved the radioprotective qualities of hematopoietic progenitors, resulting in superior survival of myeloablated hosts. Under these conditions, the activity of long-term reconstituting cells was not affected, as determined in sequential secondary and tertiary transplants. Dual caspase-independent tropic and caspase-dependent apoptotic signaling place the Fas receptor at an important junction of activation and death. This regulatory mechanism of hematopoietic homeostasis activates progenitors to promote the recovery from aplasia and converts into a negative regulator in distal stages of cell differentiation. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  17. Recombinant human thrombopoietin in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor enhances mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells, increases peripheral blood platelet concentration, and accelerates hematopoietic recovery following high-dose chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somlo, G; Sniecinski, I; ter Veer, A; Longmate, J; Knutson, G; Vuk-Pavlovic, S; Bhatia, R; Chow, W; Leong, L; Morgan, R; Margolin, K; Raschko, J; Shibata, S; Tetef, M; Yen, Y; Forman, S; Jones, D; Ashby, M; Fyfe, G; Hellmann, S; Doroshow, J H

    1999-05-01

    Lineage-specific growth factors mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) and accelerate hematopoietic recovery after high-dose chemotherapy. Recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) may further increase the progenitor-cell content and regenerating potential of PBPC products. We evaluated the safety and activity of rhTPO as a PBPC mobilizer in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in 29 breast cancer patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy followed by PBPC reinfusion. Initially, patients received escalating single doses of rhTPO intravenously (IV) at 0.6, 1.2, or 2.4 micrograms/kg, on day 1. Subsequent patients received rhTPO 0.6 or 0.3 micrograms/kg on days -3, -1, and 1, or 0.6 micrograms/kg on days -1 and 1. G-CSF, 5 micrograms/kg IV or subcutaneously (SC) twice daily, was started on day 3 and continued through aphereses. Twenty comparable, concurrently and identically treated patients (who were eligible and would have been treated on protocol but for the lack of study opening) mobilized with G-CSF alone served as comparisons. CD34(+) cell yields were substantially higher with the first apheresis following rhTPO and G-CSF versus G-CSF alone: 4.1 x 10(6)/kg (range, 1.3 to 17.6) versus 0.8 x 10(6)/ kg (range, 0.3 to 4.2), P =.0003. The targeted minimum yield of 3 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg was procured following a single apheresis procedure in 61% of the rhTPO and G-CSF-mobilized group versus 10% of G-CSF-mobilized patients (P =.001). In rhTPO and G-CSF mobilized patients, granulocyte (day 8 v 9, P =.0001) and platelet recovery (day 9 v 10, P =.07) were accelerated, and fewer erythrocyte (3 v 4, P =.02) and platelet (4 v 5, P =.02) transfusions were needed compared with G-CSF-mobilized patients. Peripheral blood platelet counts, following rhTPO and G-CSF, were increased by greater than 100% and the platelet content of PBPC products by 60% to 110% on the first and second days of aphereses (P rhTPO at 0.6 microgram/kg. rhTPO is

  18. Ex vivo expansion of human peripheral blood progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabannon, C; Herrera-Rodriguez, D; Bardin, F; Mouren, M; Novakovitch, G; Blaise, D; Maraninchi, D; Mannoni, P

    1995-01-01

    Culture of human hematopoietic progenitors on a large scale could lead to several clinical applications within the near future, including the production of differentiated and functional cells, the increase in the number of early progenitors, especially stem cells, with such use as gene transfer, or the improvement of grafts used to limit the hematological toxicity associated with high-dose chemotherapy. In this case, one can still distinguish different objectives: improvement of grafts that contain low numbers of progenitors because of prior chemotherapies or because of marrow involvement for example, and qualitative changes in the graft content that would allow to envision the disappearance, or the further reduction, in the duration of absolute neutropenia that follows delivery of high dose chemotherapy ("nadir rescue"), despite substitution of mobilized blood cells to marrow cells and the in vivo use of hematopoietic growth factors. Additional advantages may be related to tumor purging in autologous expanded cells, and to the change in the ratio between hematopoietic progenitors and immunocompetent cells in allogeneic expanded populations. Therefore it appears that in vitro expansion currently raises two types of questions: the first ones are related to the definition of clinical or biological endpoints to be achieved, the second ones are related to "bioengineering", and deal with the efficiency and safety of progenitor cell cultures to be used for clinical applications. We here present preliminary results preparing future pilot clinical studies with ex vivo cultured human hematopoietic cells.

  19. Interleukin-1 regulates Hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia); M. Peeters (Marian); E. Haak (Esther); K. van der Horn (Karin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are

  20. Controle de esterilidade de produtos de células progenitoras hematopoéticas do sangue periférico Sterility control of hematopoietic progenitor cells from peripheral blood products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor D. Almeida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A taxa de contaminação microbiana dos produtos de células progenitoras hematopoéticas do sangue periférico é baixa. Neste estudo pesquisou-se a prevalência de hemoculturas positivas em células progenitoras hematopoéticas do sangue periférico (CPHSP no Serviço de Hemoterapia do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Do total de 618 coletas realizadas no período de 2000 a 2007, 26 (4,2% apresentaram contaminação por bactérias. O Staphylococcus coagulase-negativo foi predominantemente isolado nas hemoculturas. A antibioticoterapia pré e pós-infusão foi estabelecida de acordo com o microorganismo e seu antibiograma, sendo que, em cinco das doze infusões contaminadas realizadas, não foram administrados antimicrobianos profilaticamente. Episódios febris foram observados em sete pacientes (58%, enquanto cinco (42% não apresentaram febre. Das doze infusões contaminadas realizadas, seis (50% apresentaram hemocultura pós-descongelamento positivas, enquanto as restantes (50% foram negativas. Isto se deve às propriedades bactericidas do DMSO, de células fagocitose-ativas e de temperaturas muito baixas atingidas na criopreservação. Autores têm relatado sucesso neste procedimento após a infusão desses produtos contaminados com o mínimo de consequências clínicas.The rate of microbial contamination of hematopoietic progenitor cell products from peripheral blood is low. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of positive blood cultures of hematopoietic progenitor cells from peripheral blood in a hemotherapy service. Of a total of 618 samples taken during the period from 2000 to 2007, 26 (4.2% were contaminated by bacteria. Staphylococcus coagulase-negative was the predominant bacterium isolated in blood cultures. Pre- and post-infusion antibiotic therapy was established depending on the microorganism and antibiogram, whereas in five out of twelve contaminated infusions, no antibiotics were administered prophylactically

  1. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Aparecida de Brito Eid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G- CSF for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 µg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 - patients who received a single daily dose of 10 µg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 - patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results: Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3% for Group 10 and 36 (24.7% for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1-7 leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59 were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1-3 and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95. A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001. Conclusions: To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed.

  2. Vasculogenic and hematopoietic cellular progenitors are scattered within the prenatal mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Madej, Maria; Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Ruminski, Sławomir; Flaht-Zabost, Aleksandra; Czarnowska, Elzbieta; Gula, Grzegorz; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota M; Ratajska, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Vasculogenesis and hematopoiesis are co-localized in the embryonic body, but precise phenotypes of the cells contributing to these processes are not defined. The aim of this study was to characterize phenotypic profiles and location of putative vasculogenic and hematopoietic cellular progenitors in the embryonic mouse heart. Confocal microscopy, as well as ultrastructural and stereomicroscopic analyses, was performed on immunohistochemical whole-mount-stained or sectioned hearts at stages 11.5-14 dpc. A FASC analysis was conducted to quantify putative vasculogenic and hematopoietic cells. We found subepicardial blood islands in the form of foci of accumulation of cells belonging to erythroblastic and megakaryocytic lineages at various stages of maturation, exhibiting phenotypes: GATA2(+)/CD41(+), GATA2(-)/CD41(+), GATA2(+)/CD71(-), GATA2(-)/CD71(+), Fli1(+)/CD71(+), Fli1(-)/CD71(+), with a majority of cells expressing the Ter119 antigen, but none of them expressing Flk1. The subepicardium and the outflow tract endothelium were recognized to be the areas where progenitor cells were scattered or adjoining the endothelial cells. These progenitor cells were characterized as possessing the following antigens: CD45(+)/Fli1(+), CD41(+)/Flk1(+), Flk1(+)/Fli1(+). A FACS analysis demonstrated that the CD41/Flk1 double-positive population of cells constituted 2.68% of total cell population isolated from 12.5 dpc hearts. Vessels and tubules were positive for CD31, Flk1, Fli1, Tie2, including blood islands endothelia. The endocardial wall endothelia were found to function as an anchoring apparatus for megakaryocytes releasing platelets into the cardiac cavities. Phenotypic characteristics of vasculogenic (Flk1(+)/Fli1(+)) and hematopoietic (GATA2(+)/CD71(+), CD41(+)/GATA2(+)) progenitors, as well as the putative hemogenic endothelium (Flk1(+)/CD41(+)) in embryonic mouse hearts, have been presented. Cardiac blood islands, the subepicardium and endothelium of the outflow tract

  3. PRDM11 is dispensable for the maintenance and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoren, Lina A; Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T;

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC)(1) supply organisms with life-long output of mature blood cells. To do so, the HSC pool size has to be maintained by HSC self-renewing divisions. PRDM3 and PRDM16 have been documented to regulate HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function. We found Prdm11 to have...... similar expression patterns in the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) compartments as Prdm3 and Prdm16. Therefore, we undertook experiments to test if PRDM11 regulates HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function by investigating the Prdm11(-/-) mice. Our data shows that phenotypic HSPCs...... are intact in bone marrow (BM) of one-year-old Prdm11(-/-) mice. In addition, Prdm11(-/-) mice were able to fully regenerate the hematopoietic system upon BM transplantation (BMT) into lethally irradiated mice with a mild drop in lymphoid output only. Taken together, this suggests that PRDM11, in contrast...

  4. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells from cord blood in coculture with mesenchymal stroma cells from amnion, chorion, Wharton's jelly, amniotic fluid, cord blood, and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Caroline; Strobel, Julian; Zingsem, Jürgen; Richter, Richard H; Goecke, Tamme W; Beckmann, Matthias W; Eckstein, Reinhold; Weisbach, Volker

    2013-12-01

    In most cases, the amount of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in a single cord blood (CB) unit is not sufficient for allogenic transplantation of adults. Therefore, two CB units are usually required. The ex vivo expansion of HSPCs from CB in coculture with mesenchymal stroma cells (MSCs) might be an alternative. It was investigated, whether bone marrow-derived MSCs, which have to be obtained in an invasive procedure, introduce a further donor and increases the risk of transmissible infectious diseases for the patient can be replaced by MSCs from amnion, chorion, Wharton's jelly, amniotic fluid, and CB, which can be isolated from placental tissue which is readily available when CB is sampled. In a two-step ex vivo coculture mononuclear cells from cryopreserved CB were cultured with different MSC-feederlayers in a medium supplemented with cytokines (stem cell factor, thrombopoietin [TPO], and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor). Expansion rates were analyzed as well, by long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) and colony-forming unit (CFU) assays, as by measuring CD34(+)- and CD45(+)-cells. Due to the comparably low number of 5×10(2) to 1×10(4) CD34(+)-cells per cm(2) MSC-monolayer, we observed comparably high expansion rates from 80 to 391,000 for CFU, 70 to 313,000 for CD34(+)-, and 200 to 352,000 for CD45(+)-cells. Expansion of LTC-IC was partly observed. Compared to the literature, we found a better expansion rate of CD34(+)-cells with MSCs from all different sources. This is probably due to the comparably low number of 5×10(2) to 1×10 CD34(+)-cells per cm(2) MSC-monolayer we used. Comparably, high expansion rates were observed from 80 to 391,000 for CFUs, 70 to 313,000 for CD34(+)-, and 200 to 352,000 for CD45(+)-cells. However, the expansion of CD34(+)-cells was significantly more effective with MSCs from bone marrow compared to MSCs from amnion, chorion, and Wharton's jelly. The comparison of MSCs from bone marrow with MSCs from CB and

  5. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  6. Functional evaluation of circulating hematopoietic progenitors in Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timeus, Fabio; Crescenzio, Nicoletta; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Doria, Alessandra; Vallero, Stefano; Foglia, Luiselda; Pagliano, Sara; Rossi, Cesare; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ramenghi, Ugo; Fagioli, Franca; Cordero di Montezemolo, Luca; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista

    2013-08-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by short stature, multiple dysmorphisms and congenital heart defects. A myeloproliferative disorder (NS/MPD), resembling juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), is occasionally diagnosed in infants with NS. In the present study, we performed a functional evaluation of the circulating hematopoietic progenitors in a series of NS, NS/MPD and JMML patients. The different functional patterns were compared with the aim to identify a possible NS subgroup worthy of stringent hematological follow-up for an increased risk of MPD development. We studied 27 NS and 5 JMML patients fulfilling EWOG-MDS criteria. The more frequent molecular defects observed in NS were mutations in the PTPN11 and SOS genes. The absolute count of monocytes, circulating CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, their apoptotic rate and the number of circulating CFU-GMs cultured in the presence of decreasing concentrations or in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were evaluated. All JMML patients showed monocytosis>1,000/µl. Ten out of the 27 NS patients showed monocytosis>1,000/µl, which included the 3 NS/MPD patients. In JMML patients, circulating CD34+ cells were significantly increased (median, 109.8/µl; range, 44-232) with a low rate of apoptosis (median, 2.1%; range, 0.4-12.1%), and circulating CFU-GMs were hyper-responsive to GM-CSF. NS/MPD patients showed the same flow cytometric pattern as the JMML patients (median, CD34+ cells/µl, 205.7; range, 58-1374; median apoptotic rate, 1.4%; range, 0.2-2.4%) and their circulating CFU-GMs were hyper-responsive to GM-CSF. These functional alterations appeared 10 months before the typical clinical manifestations in 1 NS/MPD patient. In NS, the CD34+ absolute cell count and circulating CFU-GMs showed a normal pattern (median CD34+ cells/µl, 4.9; range, 1.3-17.5), whereas the CD34+ cell apoptotic rate was significantly decreased in comparison with the

  7. Biological features and transplantation of human fetal blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells%人胎儿血造血干/祖细胞的生物学特性及其移植实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖颖晖; 赖永榕; 卢玉英; 莫武宁

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently the hematopoietic stem cells can be obtained from bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood, so it is expected to search a new source of stem cells in order to satisfy the clinical transplantation needs. From the 5th week of pregnancy, the blood sinusoid system develops completely in liver, and then hematopoietic stem cells can move with blood flow. OBJECTIVE: To observe the biological features of human fetal blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HS/PCs), and their transplantation into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency disease (NOD/ SCID) mice. DESIGN: Control trial. SETTING: Department of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University. MATERIALS:①Cell resource: Twenty-one fetal blood samples were from dead fetus [gestational age of 18-29 weeks, mean (24.2±3.2) weeks] and twenty-one full-term cord blood samples were provided from the Department of Obstetrics, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between October 2002 and February 2003, with the consent of their relatives.②Experimental animal: Twelve NOD/SCID female mice of 6-7 weeks old were bred in sterility and super-clean operation board. METHODS: Flow cytometer was used to assess cell surface markers of HS/PCs including CD34, CD38, HLA-DR and CD90 in 21 human fetal blood samples, and their expressions were compared with 21 human cord blood samples. Moreover, human fetal blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) were transplanted into 6 NOD/SCID mice irradiated sublethally. After 5 weeks, human leukocytic content was also detected in bone marrow of mice with flow cytometer while human Cart-1 gene in recipients' bone marrow was sensed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Expressions of HS/PCs surface markers in fetal blood and cord blood. ②Implantation of fetal blood cells into NOD/SCID mice.RESULTS: ①The percentage of CD34+ cells in fetal blood was significantly higher than that of full-term cord blood

  8. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo "purging" strategy with oncolytic Myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy.

  9. Human Placenta Is a Potent Hematopoietic Niche Containing Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells throughout Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Robin (Catherine); K. Bollerot (Karine); S.C. Mendes (Sandra); E. Haak (Esther); M. Crisan (Mihaela); F. Cerisoli (Francesco); I. Lauw (Ivoune); P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); M. Vermeulen (Mark); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); R. van der Linden (Reinier); P. Imanirad (Parisa); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); H. Nawaz-Yousaf (Humaira); N. Papazian (Natalie); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); T. Cupedo (Tom); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this emerg

  10. Low antigenicity of hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from human ES cells

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    Eun-Mi Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eun-Mi Kim1, Nicholas Zavazava1,21Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; 2Immunology Graduate Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USAAbstract: Human embryonic stem (hES cells are essential for improved understanding of diseases and our ability to probe new therapies for use in humans. Currently, bone marrow cells and cord blood cells are used for transplantation into patients with hematopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiencies and in some cases for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, due to the high immunogenicity of these hematopoietic cells, toxic regimens of drugs are required for preconditioning and prevention of rejection. Here, we investigated the efficiency of deriving hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs from the hES cell line H13, after co-culturing with the murine stromal cell line OP9. We show that HPCs derived from the H13 ES cells poorly express major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and no detectable class II antigens (HLA-DR. These characteristics make hES cell-derived hematopoietic cells (HPCs ideal candidates for transplantation across MHC barriers under minimal immunosuppression.Keywords: human embryonic stem cells, H13, hematopoiesis, OP9 stromal cells, immunogenicity

  11. Effect of human cytomegalovirus on proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells of cord blood%人类巨细胞病毒感染对脐血造血祖细胞增殖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文君; 金润铭; 付晓冬; 刘斌; 郭渠莲; 邓正华

    2006-01-01

    the possible mechanism. Methods Twenty cord blood specimens were collected from the umbilical vein of normal full-term neonates delivered spontaneously. This study consisted of five groups: 3 Infection groups in which 0.1 mL 103, 104 and 105 plague forming unit (PFU) HCMV-AD169 virus solution was added to the culture system, an Inactivated control group in which the equal volume of inactivated virus solution was added, and a Blank control group ( normal progenitor cells culture system without HCMV virus infection). Colony forming unit-assay was applied to detect the effects of HCMV-AD169 strain on the colony formation, inhibition rate and colony-maintaining duration of CFU- GM, CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-Mix and CFU-Mk of cord blood. PCR technique was used to demonstrate the existence of HCMV-DNA in the colony cells of cultured CFU-GM, CFU-E, CFU-Mix and CFU-Mk. Results HCMV-AD169 ( 103 PFU) in low concentration had inhibition effects on colony formation of the CFU-Mix and CFU-MK ( P < 0. 05 ), whereas 105 PFU and 104 PFU HCMV-AD169 lead to decreased colonies in CFU-GM, CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-Mix and CFU-MK compared with the Blank control and the Inactivated control groups (P < 0. 05). The suppression effect of HCMV on the colony formation was dosedependant. The colony-maintaining duration of the CFU-GM, CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-Mix and CFU-Mk in the 105 PFU and 104 PFU HCMV infection groups was significantly shorter than that in the two control groups ( P < 0. 01 ). The low concentration of HCMV-AD169 ( 103 PFU) infection resulted in a shortened colony-maintaining duration of the CFU-Mix and CFU-Mk (P < 0.01 ) , but had no effects on the colony-maintaining duration of CFU-GM, CFU-E and BFU-E. PCR amplification demonstrated the existence of HCMV-AD169 DNA in the colony cells of the three Infection groups.Conclusions HCMV-AD169 strain can infect hematopoietic progenitors of cord blood and inhibit the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors, associated with anemia, neutropenia

  12. Bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells infiltrate allogeneic and syngeneic transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Z; Enjoji, K; Tigges, J C; Toxavidis, V; Tchipashivili, V; Gong, W; Strom, T B; Koulmanda, M

    2014-12-01

    Lineage (CD3e, CD11b, GR1, B220 and Ly-76) negative hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infiltrate islet allografts within 24 h posttransplantation. In fact, lineage(negative) Sca-1(+) cKit(+) ("LSK") cells, a classic signature for HSCs, were also detected among these graft infiltrating cells. Lineage negative graft infiltrating cells are functionally multi-potential as determined by a standard competitive bone marrow transplant (BMT) assay. By 3 months post-BMT, both CD45.1 congenic, lineage negative HSCs/HPCs and classic "LSK" HSCs purified from islet allograft infiltrating cells, differentiate and repopulate multiple mature blood cell phenotypes in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and thymus of CD45.2 hosts. Interestingly, "LSK" HSCs also rapidly infiltrate syngeneic islet transplants as well as allogeneic cardiac transplants and sham surgery sites. It seems likely that an inflammatory response, not an adaptive immune response to allo-antigen, is responsible for the rapid infiltration of islet and cardiac transplants by biologically active HSCs/HPCs. The pattern of hematopoietic differentiation obtained from graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs, cells that are recovered from inflammatory sites, as noted in the competitive BMT assay, is not precisely the same as that of intramedullary HSCs. This does not refute the obvious multi-lineage potential of graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs.

  13. Expanded Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reselected for High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Demonstrate Islet Regenerative Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Bell, Gillian I; Sherman, Stephen E; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Hess, David A

    2016-04-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) purified for high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(hi) ) stimulate islet regeneration after transplantation into mice with streptozotocin-induced β cell deletion. However, ALDH(hi) cells represent a rare progenitor subset and widespread use of UCB ALDH(hi) cells to stimulate islet regeneration will require progenitor cell expansion without loss of islet regenerative functions. Here we demonstrate that prospectively purified UCB ALDH(hi) cells expand efficiently under serum-free, xeno-free conditions with minimal growth factor supplementation. Consistent with the concept that ALDH-activity is decreased as progenitor cells differentiate, kinetic analyses over 9 days revealed the frequency of ALDH(hi) cells diminished as culture time progressed such that total ALDH(hi) cell number was maximal (increased 3-fold) at day 6. Subsequently, day 6 expanded cells (bulk cells) were sorted after culture to reselect differentiated progeny with low ALDH-activity (ALDH(lo) subset) from less differentiated progeny with high ALDH-activity (ALDH(hi) subset). The ALDH(hi) subset retained primitive cell surface marker coexpression (32.0% ± 7.0% CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, 37.0% ± 6.9% CD34(+) /CD133(+) cells), and demonstrated increased hematopoietic colony forming cell function compared with the ALDH(lo) subset. Notably, bulk cells or ALDH(lo) cells did not possess the functional capacity to lower hyperglycemia after transplantation into streptozotocin-treated NOD/SCID mice. However, transplantation of the repurified ALDH(hi) subset significantly reduced hyperglycemia, improved glucose tolerance, and increased islet-associated cell proliferation and capillary formation. Thus, expansion and delivery of reselected UCB cells that retain high ALDH-activity after short-term culture represents an improved strategy for the development of cellular therapies to enhance islet regeneration in situ.

  14. Estradiol increases hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells independent of its actions on bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illing, Anett; Liu, Peng; Ostermay, Susanne; Schilling, Arndt; de Haan, Gerald; Krust, Andree; Amling, Michael; Chambon, Pierre; Schinke, Thorsten; Tuckermann, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells reside in vascular and endosteal niches in the bone marrow. Factors affecting bone remodeling were reported to influence numbers and mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells. We therefore analyzed the effects of estradiol acting anabolic on bone integrity. Her

  15. Role of reactive oxygen species in the radiation response of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, which are present in small numbers in hematopoietic tissues, can differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages and self-renew to maintain their undifferentiated phenotype. HSPCs are extremely sensitive to oxidative stressors such as anti-cancer agents, radiation, and the extensive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The quiescence and stemness of HSPCs are maintained by the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, ROS, and energy homeostasis in a special microenvironment called the stem cell niche. The present study evaluated the relationship between the production of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial function during the proliferation and differentiation of X-irradiated CD34(+ cells prepared from human placental/umbilical cord blood HSPCs. Highly purified CD34(+ HSPCs exposed to X-rays were cultured in liquid and semi-solid medium supplemented with hematopoietic cytokines. X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs treated with hematopoietic cytokines, which promote their proliferation and differentiation, exhibited dramatically suppressed cell growth and clonogenic potential. The amount of intracellular ROS in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs was significantly higher than that in non-irradiated cells during the culture period. However, neither the intracellular mitochondrial content nor the mitochondrial superoxide production was elevated in X-irradiated CD34(+ HSPCs compared with non-irradiated cells. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX expression was observed immediately following exposure to 4 Gy of X-rays and gradually decreased during the culture period. This study reveals that X-irradiation can increase persistent intracellular ROS in human CD34(+ HSPCs, which may not result from mitochondrial ROS due to mitochondrial dysfunction, and indicates that substantial DNA double-strand breakage can critically reduce the stem cell function.

  16. Imatinib and nilotinib inhibit hematopoietic progenitor cell growth, but do not prevent adhesion, migration and engraftment of human cord blood CD34+ cells.

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    Ludovic Belle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The availability of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs has considerably changed the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive leukemia. The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib is also known to inhibit the tyrosine kinase of the stem cell factor receptor, c-Kit. Nilotinib is 30 times more potent than imatinib towards BCR-ABL in vitro. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or gastrointestinal stromal tumors have shown that therapeutic doses of nilotinib deliver drug levels similar to those of imatinib. The aim of this study was to compare the inhibitory effects of imatinib and nilotinib on proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration and engraftment capacities of human cord blood CD34(+ cells. DESIGN AND METHODS: After a 48-hour cell culture with or without TKIs, CFC, LTC-IC, migration, adhesion and cell cycle analysis were performed. In a second time, the impact of these TKIs on engraftment was assessed in a xenotransplantation model using NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ (null mice. RESULTS: TKIs did not affect LTC-IC frequencies despite in vitro inhibition of CFC formation due to inhibition of CD34(+ cell cycle entry. Adhesion of CD34(+ cells to retronectin was reduced in the presence of either imatinib or nilotinib but only at high concentrations. Migration through a SDF-1α gradient was not changed by cell culture in the presence of TKIs. Finally, bone marrow cellularity and human chimerism were not affected by daily doses of imatinib and nilotinib in a xenogenic transplantation model. No significant difference was seen between TKIs given the equivalent affinity of imatinib and nilotinib for KIT. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that combining non-myeloablative conditioning regimen with TKIs starting the day of the transplantation could be safe.

  17. Histone acetyltransferase cofactor Trrap is essential for maintaining the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, Joanna I; Oser, Gabriela; Shukla, Vivek; Sawan, Carla; Murr, Rabih; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Trumpp, Andreas; Herceg, Zdenko

    2009-11-15

    The pool of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which provide life-long reconstitution of all hematopoietic lineages, is tightly controlled and regulated by self-renewal and apoptosis. Histone modifiers and chromatin states are believed to govern establishment, maintenance, and propagation of distinct patterns of gene expression in stem cells, however the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we identified a role for the histone acetytransferase cofactor Trrap in the maintenance of hematopietic stem/progenitor cells. Conditional deletion of the Trrap gene in mice resulted in ablation of bone marrow and increased lethality. This was due to the depletion of early hematopoietic progenitors, including hematopoietic stem cells, via a cell-autonomous mechanism. Analysis of purified bone marrow progenitors revealed that these defects are associated with induction of p53-independent apoptosis and deregulation of Myc transcription factors. Together, this study has identified a critical role for Trrap in the mechanism that maintains hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic system, and underscores the importance of Trrap and histone modifications in tissue homeostasis.

  18. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

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    Anuradha Tarafdar

    Full Text Available The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  19. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, Anuradha; Dobbin, Edwina; Corrigan, Pamela; Freeburn, Robin; Wheadon, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP) formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  20. Correction of the sickle cell disease mutation in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Megan D.; Cost, Gregory J.; Mendel, Matthew C.; Romero, Zulema; Kaufman, Michael L.; Joglekar, Alok V.; Ho, Michelle; Lumaquin, Dianne; Gray, David; Lill, Georgia R.; Cooper, Aaron R.; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Senadheera, Shantha; Zhu, Allen; Liu, Pei-Qi; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Wilber, Andrew; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Reik, Andreas; Hollis, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by a single point mutation in the seventh codon of the β-globin gene. Site-specific correction of the sickle mutation in hematopoietic stem cells would allow for permanent production of normal red blood cells. Using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed to flank the sickle mutation, we demonstrate efficient targeted cleavage at the β-globin locus with minimal off-target modification. By codelivering a homologous donor template (either an integrase-defective lentiviral vector or a DNA oligonucleotide), high levels of gene modification were achieved in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Modified cells maintained their ability to engraft NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull mice and to produce cells from multiple lineages, although with a reduction in the modification levels relative to the in vitro samples. Importantly, ZFN-driven gene correction in CD34+ cells from the bone marrow of patients with SCD resulted in the production of wild-type hemoglobin tetramers. PMID:25733580

  1. Assessment of human multi-potent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell potential using a single in vitro screening system.

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    Julien Calvo

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells are responsible for the generation of the entire blood system through life. This characteristic relies on their ability to self renew and on their multi-potentiality. Thus quantification of the number of hematopoietic stem cells in a given cell population requires to show both properties in the studied cell populations. Although xenografts models that support human hematopoietic stem cells have been described, such in vivo experimental systems remain restrictive for high throughput screening purposes for example. In this work we developed a conditional tetracycline inducible system controlling the expression of the human NOTCH ligand Delta-like 1 in the murine stromal MS5 cells. We cultured hematopoietic immature cells enriched in progenitor/stem cells in contact with MS5 cells that conditionally express Delta-like 1, in conditions designed to generate multipotential lineage differentiation. We show that upon induction or repression of DL1 expression during co-culture, human immature CD34(+CD38(-/low(CD45RA(-CD90(+ cells can express their B, T, NK, granulo/monocytic and erythroid potentials in a single well, and at the single cell level. We also document the interference of low NOTCH activation with human B and myelo/erythroid lymphoid differentiation. This system represents a novel tool to precisely quantify human hematopoietic immature cells with both lymphoid and myeloid potentials.

  2. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 expands hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and improves hematopoiesis in Fanconi anemia mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Deater, Matthew; Schubert, Kathryn; Marquez-Loza, Laura; Pelz, Carl; Sinclair, David A; Grompe, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome. The current treatment options are suboptimal and do not prevent the eventual onset of aplastic anemia requiring bone marrow transplantation. We previously showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant and an activator of the protein deacetylase Sirt1, enhanced hematopoiesis in Fancd2 mutant mice and improved the impaired stem cell quiescence observed in this disease. Given that Sirt1 is important for the function of hematopoietic stem cells, we hypothesized that Sirt1 activation may improve hematopoiesis. Indeed, Fancd2(-/-) mice and wild-type mice treated with the selective Sirt1 activator SRT3025 had increased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, platelets and white blood cells. SRT3025 was also protective against acetaldehyde-induced hematopoietic damage. Unlike resveratrol, however, SRT3025 did not affect stem cell quiescence, suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conditional deletion of Sirt1 in hematopoietic cells did not abrogate the beneficial effects of SRT3025, indicating that the drug did not act by directly stimulating Sirt1 in stem cells, but must be acting indirectly via extra-hematopoietic effects. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis revealed the down-regulation of Egr1-p21 expression, providing a potential mechanism for improved hematopoiesis. Overall, our data indicate that SRT3025 or related compounds may be beneficial in Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

  3. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 expands hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and improves hematopoiesis in Fanconi anemia mice

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    Qing-Shuo Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome. The current treatment options are suboptimal and do not prevent the eventual onset of aplastic anemia requiring bone marrow transplantation. We previously showed that resveratrol, an antioxidant and an activator of the protein deacetylase Sirt1, enhanced hematopoiesis in Fancd2 mutant mice and improved the impaired stem cell quiescence observed in this disease. Given that Sirt1 is important for the function of hematopoietic stem cells, we hypothesized that Sirt1 activation may improve hematopoiesis. Indeed, Fancd2−/− mice and wild-type mice treated with the selective Sirt1 activator SRT3025 had increased numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, platelets and white blood cells. SRT3025 was also protective against acetaldehyde-induced hematopoietic damage. Unlike resveratrol, however, SRT3025 did not affect stem cell quiescence, suggesting distinct mechanisms of action. Conditional deletion of Sirt1 in hematopoietic cells did not abrogate the beneficial effects of SRT3025, indicating that the drug did not act by directly stimulating Sirt1 in stem cells, but must be acting indirectly via extra-hematopoietic effects. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis revealed the down-regulation of Egr1–p21 expression, providing a potential mechanism for improved hematopoiesis. Overall, our data indicate that SRT3025 or related compounds may be beneficial in Fanconi anemia and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

  4. Two distinct steps of immigration of hematopoietic progenitors into the early thymus anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, M; Kawamoto, H; Katsura, Y; Amagai, T

    2001-09-01

    Thymic epithelial cells, which create a three-dimensionally organized meshwork structure peculiar to the thymus, develop from simple epithelia of the third pharyngeal pouch and cleft during organogenesis. We comparatively investigated the thymus anlages of normal and nude mice by immunohistochemical analysis with regard to epithelial organization and distribution of hematopoietic progenitor cells at early stages of organogenesis. Our results show that development of the mouse thymus anlage at early stages can be subdivided into at least two stages by the differences in epithelial organization, i.e. stratified epithelial stage on embryonic day (Ed) 11 and clustered epithelial stage on Ed12. At the former stage, hematopoietic progenitor cells are accumulated in the mesenchymal layer of the thymus anlage, and at the latter stage progenitor cells enter the epithelial cluster and proliferate. In nude mice, hematopoietic progenitor cells are found in the mesenchymal layer on Ed11.5, but they are not observed among epithelial cells on Ed12, even though epithelial cells form a cluster structure. The present results suggest that aberrant development of the nude mouse thymus anlage occurs at the clustered epithelial stage and that epithelial cells of the nude anlage lack the ability to induce the entrance of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the epithelial cluster.

  5. Three chemokine receptors cooperatively regulate homing of hematopoietic progenitors to the embryonic mouse thymus

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón, Lesly; Boehm, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The thymus lacks self-renewing hematopoietic cells, and thymopoiesis fails rapidly when the migration of progenitor cells to the thymus ceases. Hence, the process of thymus homing is an essential step for T-cell development and cellular immunity. Despite decades of research, the molecular details of thymus homing have not been elucidated fully. Here, we show that chemotaxis is the key mechanism regulating thymus homing in the mouse embryo. We determined the number of early thymic progenitors ...

  6. Effects of Simian Betaretrovirus Serotype 1 (SRV1) Infection on the Differentiation of Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells (CD34+) Derived from Bone Marrow of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Nestor A; Todd, Patricia A; Yee, JoAnn; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral blood cytopenias, particularly persistent anemia and neutropenia, are commonly associated with simian betaretrovirus infection of Asian monkeys of the genus Macaca. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying these hematologic abnormalities are not well understood. The current study investigated the in vitro tropism of simian betaretrovirus (SRV) for both hematopoietic progenitor (CD34+) and stromal cells obtained from rhesus macaque bone marrow and assessed the effects of infection on hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation in vitro. After in vitro exposure, SRV proviral DNA could be demonstrated by real-time PCR in cells and the reverse transcriptase assay in supernatants from SRV-exposed progenitor-associated stroma, but not in differentiated colonies derived from SRV-exposed progenitors. Furthermore, in vitro exposure involving cell–cell contact of uninfected CD34+ progenitor cells with SRV-infected stromal cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction in granulocyte–macrophage colony formation in absence of detectable SRV-infection of progenitor cells. Reduction in colony formation occurred in a ‘dose-dependent’ fashion with increasing contact time. No effects on erythroid lineages and RBC differentiation were noted. Our results suggest that hematologic abnormalities observed during SRV disease (natural or experimental) of rhesus macaques may not result from direct effects of viral infection of progenitor cell populations, but rather be (at least in part) a consequence of SRV infection of supportive bone marrow stroma with secondary effects on differentiation of associated progenitor cells. PMID:22330653

  7. Wnt3a nanodisks promote ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lalefar, Nahal R.; Witkowski, Andrzej; Simonsen, Jens Bæk;

    2016-01-01

    -elutes with ND. In signaling assays, Wnt3a ND induced β-catenin stabilization in mouse fibroblasts as well as hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Prolonged exposure of HSPC to Wnt3a ND stimulated proliferation and expansion of Lin- Sca-1+ c-Kit+ cells. Surprisingly, ND lacking Wnt3a contributed...

  8. The combination of valproic acid and lithium delays hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, Marta A.; Bystrykh, Leonid; van den Boom, Vincent; Olthof, Sandra; Ausema, Albertina; Ritsema, Martha; Huls, Gerwin; de Haan, Gerald; van Os, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge on the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) self-renewal and differentiation, in vitro control of stem cell fate decisions has been difficult. The ability to inhibit HSPC commitment in culture may be of benefit to cell therapy protocols. Small molecule

  9. Knockdown of HSPA9 induces TP53-dependent apoptosis in human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tuoen; Krysiak, Kilannin; Shirai, Cara Lunn; Kim, Sanghyun; Shao, Jin; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are the most common adult myeloid blood cancers in the US. Patients have increased apoptosis in their bone marrow cells leading to low peripheral blood counts. The full complement of gene mutations that contribute to increased apoptosis in MDS remains unknown. Up to 25% of MDS patients harbor and acquired interstitial deletion on the long arm of chromosome 5 [del(5q)], creating haploinsufficiency for a large set of genes including HSPA9. Knockdown of HSPA9 in primary human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells significantly inhibits growth and increases apoptosis. We show here that HSPA9 knockdown is associated with increased TP53 expression and activity, resulting in increased expression of target genes BAX and p21. HSPA9 protein interacts with TP53 in CD34+ cells and knockdown of HSPA9 increases nuclear TP53 levels, providing a possible mechanism for regulation of TP53 by HSPA9 haploinsufficiency in hematopoietic cells. Concurrent knockdown of TP53 and HSPA9 rescued the increased apoptosis observed in CD34+ cells following knockdown of HSPA9. Reduction of HSPA9 below 50% results in severe inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that del(5q) cells may be preferentially sensitive to further reductions of HSPA9 below 50%, thus providing a genetic vulnerability to del(5q) cells. Treatment of bone marrow cells with MKT-077, an HSPA9 inhibitor, induced apoptosis in a higher percentage of cells from MDS patients with del(5q) compared to non-del(5q) MDS patients and normal donor cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that reduced levels of HSPA9 may contribute to TP53 activation and increased apoptosis observed in del(5q)-associated MDS.

  10. Sumoylation is tumor-suppressive and confers proliferative quiescence to hematopoietic progenitors in Drosophila melanogaster larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E. Kalamarz

    2011-12-01

    How cell-intrinsic regulation of the cell cycle and the extrinsic influence of the niche converge to provide proliferative quiescence, safeguard tissue integrity, and provide avenues to stop stem cells from giving rise to tumors is a major challenge in gene therapy and tissue engineering. We explore this question in sumoylation-deficient mutants of Drosophila. In wild type third instar larval lymph glands, a group of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells acquires quiescence; a multicellular niche supports their undifferentiated state. However, how proliferative quiescence is instilled in this population is not understood. We show that Ubc9 protein is nuclear in this population. Loss of the SUMO-activating E1 enzyme, Aos1/Uba2, the conjugating E2 enzyme, Ubc9, or the E3 SUMO ligase, PIAS, results in a failure of progenitors to quiesce; progenitors become hyperplastic, misdifferentiate, and develop into microtumors that eventually detach from the dorsal vessel. Significantly, dysplasia and lethality of Ubc9 mutants are rescued when Ubc9wt is provided specifically in the progenitor populations, but not when it is provided in the niche or in the differentiated cortex. While normal progenitors express high levels of the Drosophila cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 homolog, Dacapo, the corresponding overgrown mutant population exhibits a marked reduction in Dacapo. Forced expression of either Dacapo or human p21 in progenitors shrinks this population. The selective expression of either protein in mutant progenitor cells, but not in other hematopoietic populations, limits overgrowth, blocks tumorogenesis, and restores organ integrity. We discuss an essential and complex role for sumoylation in preserving the hematopoietic progenitor states for stress response and in the context of normal development of the fly.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor receptors support murine hematopoietic progenitor function in the early stages of engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl-Yafe, Michal; Mizrahi, Keren; Stein, Jerry; Yolcu, Esma S; Kaplan, Ofer; Shirwan, Haval; Yaniv, Isaac; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family receptors/ligands are important participants in hematopoietic homeostasis, in particular as essential negative expansion regulators of differentiated clones. As a prominent injury cytokine, TNF-alpha has been traditionally considered to suppress donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function after transplantation. We monitored the involvement of TNF receptors (TNF-R) 1 and 2 in murine hematopoietic cell engraftment and their inter-relationship with Fas. Transplantation of lineage-negative (lin(-)) bone marrow cells (BMC) from TNF receptor-deficient mice into wild-type recipients showed defective early engraftment and loss of durable hematopoietic contribution upon recovery of host hematopoiesis. Consistently, cells deficient in TNF receptors had reduced competitive capacity as compared to wild-type progenitors. The TNF receptors were acutely upregulated in bone marrow (BM)-homed donor cells (wild-type) early after transplantation, being expressed in 60%-75% of the donor cells after 6 days. Both TNF receptors were detected in fast cycling, early differentiating progenitors, and were ubiquitously expressed in the most primitive progenitors with long-term reconstituting potential (lin(-)c-kit(+) stem cell antigen (SCA)-1(+)). BM-homed donor cells were insensitive to apoptosis induced by TNF-alpha and Fas-ligand and their combination, despite reciprocal inductive cross talk between the TNF and Fas receptors. The engraftment supporting effect of TNF-alpha is attributed to stimulation of progenitors through TNF-R1, which involves activation of the caspase cascade. This stimulatory effect was not observed for TNF-R2, and this receptor did not assume redundant stimulatory function in TNFR1-deficient cells. It is concluded that TNF-alpha plays a tropic role early after transplantation, which is essential to successful progenitor engraftment.

  12. Knockdown of HPRT for selection of genetically modified human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Choudhary

    Full Text Available The inability to obtain sufficient numbers of transduced cells remains a limitation in gene therapy. One strategy to address this limitation is in vivo pharmacologic selection of transduced cells. We have previously shown that knockdown of HPRT using lentiviral delivered shRNA facilitates efficient selection of transduced murine hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC using 6-thioguanine (6TG. Herein, we now extend these studies to human HPC. We tested multiple shRNA constructs in human derived cell lines and identified the optimal shRNA sequence for knockdown of HPRT and 6TG resistance. We then tested this vector in human umbilical cord blood derived HPC in vitro and in NOD/SCID recipients. Knockdown of HPRT effectively provided resistance to 6TG in vitro. 6TG treatment of mice resulted in increased percentages of transduced human CD45(+ cells in the peripheral blood and in the spleen in particular, in both myeloid and lymphoid compartments. 6TG treatment of secondary recipients resulted in higher percentages of transduced human cells in the bone marrow, confirming selection from the progeny of long-term repopulating HPCs. However, the extent of selection of cells in the bone marrow at the doses of 6TG tested and the toxicity of higher doses, suggest that this strategy may be limited to selection of more committed progenitor cells. Together, these data suggest that human HPC can be programmed to be resistant to purine analogs, but that HPRT knockdown/6TG-based selection may not be robust enough for in vivo selection.

  13. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Haytham [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Galal, Omima [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Abdelrahim, Eman [Department of Medical Histology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Ono, Yusuke [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Mostafa, Emtethal [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Li, Tao-Sheng, E-mail: litaoshe@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit{sup +} stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms.

  14. Imaging Macrophage and Hematopoietic Progenitor Proliferation in Atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu-Xiang; Calcagno, Claudia; Binderup, Tina

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Local plaque macrophage proliferation and monocyte production in hematopoietic organs promote progression of atherosclerosis. Therefore, noninvasive imaging of proliferation could serve as a biomarker and monitor therapeutic intervention. OBJECTIVE: To explore (18)F-FLT positron emission...... tomography-computed tomography imaging of cell proliferation in atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography-computed tomography was performed in mice, rabbits, and humans with atherosclerosis. In apolipoprotein E knock out mice, increased (18)F-FLT signal was observed...... with atherosclerosis, (18)F-FLT signal significantly increased in the inflamed carotid artery and in the aorta. CONCLUSIONS: (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography imaging may serve as an imaging biomarker for cell proliferation in plaque and hematopoietic activity in individuals with atherosclerosis....

  15. Intestinal dysbiosis and allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Raghunathan, Vikram M.; Sheng, Iris; Lim, Seah H.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is a diverse and dynamic ecosystem that is increasingly understood to play a vital role in human health. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients undergo prolonged exposure to antimicrobials, chemotherapeutic agents, and immunosuppressants, resulting in profound shifts in the gut microbiome. A growing body of research has revealed the ways in which these microbiologic shifts shape immune modulation, affecting susceptibility to infections and graft-versus-host di...

  16. DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications Are the Molecular Lock in Lentivirally Transduced Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ching Ngai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable introduction of a functional gene in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs has appeared to be an alternative approach to correct genetically linked blood diseases. However, it is still unclear whether lentiviral vector (LV is subjected to gene silencing in HPCs. Here, we show that LV carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene driven by cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter was subjected to transgene silencing after transduction into HPCs. This phenomenon was not due to the deletion of proviral copy number. Study using DNA demethylating agent and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor showed that the drugs could either prevent or reverse the silencing effect. Using sodium bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay, we demonstrated that DNA methylation occurred soon after LV transduction. At the highest level of gene expression, CMV promoter was acetylated and was in a euchromatin state, while GFP reporter gene was acetylated but was strangely in a heterochromatin state. When the expression declined, CMV promoter underwent transition from acetylated and euchromatic state to a heterochromatic state, while the GFP reporter gene was in deacetylated and heterochromatic state. With these, we verify that DNA methylation and dynamic histone modifications lead to transgene silencing in HPCs transduced with LV.

  17. Cdc42 inhibitor ML141 enhances G-CSF-induced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Song, Xuguang; Ma, Sha; Wang, Xue; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Huanxin; Wu, Qingyun; Zhao, Kai; Cao, Jiang; Qiao, Jianlin; Sun, Xiaoshen; Li, Depeng; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhengyu; Xu, Kailin

    2015-01-01

    G-CSF is the most often used agent in clinical hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization. However, in about 10 % of patients, G-CSF does not efficiently mobilize HSPC in clinically sufficient amounts. Cdc42 activity is involved in HSPC mobilization. In the present study, we explore the impact of Cdc42 inhibitor ML141 on G-CSF-mediated HSPC mobilization in mice. We found that the use of ML141 alone only triggered modest HSPC mobilization effect in mice. However, combination of G-CSF and ML141 significantly promoted HPSC counts and colony forming units in peripheral blood, as compared to mice treated with G-CSF alone. ML141 did not significantly alter the levels of SDF-1 and MMP-9 in the bone marrow, when used alone or in combination with G-CSF. We also found that G-CSF administration significantly increases the level of GTP-bound Cdc42, but does not alter the expression of Cdc42 in the bone marrow. Our data indicate that the Cdc42 signal is a negative regulator in G-CSF-mediated HSPC mobilization, and that inhibition of the Cdc42 signal efficiently improves mobilization efficiency. These findings may provide a new strategy for efficient HSPC mobilization, especially in patients with poor G-CSF response.

  18. Different Motile Behaviors of Human Hematopoietic Stem versus Progenitor Cells at the Osteoblastic Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Foster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in our understanding of interactions between mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and their niche, little is known about communication between human HSCs and the microenvironment. Using a xenotransplantation model and intravital imaging, we demonstrate that human HSCs display distinct motile behaviors to their hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC counterparts, and the same pattern can be found between mouse HSCs and HPCs. HSCs become significantly less motile after transplantation, while progenitor cells remain motile. We show that human HSCs take longer to find their niche than previously expected and suggest that the niche be defined as the position where HSCs stop moving. Intravital imaging is the only technique to determine where in the bone marrow stem cells stop moving, and future analyses should focus on the environment surrounding the HSC at this point.

  19. Use of laboratory tests to guide initiation of autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell collection by apheresis: results from the multicenter hematopoietic progenitor cell collection by Apheresis Laboratory Trigger Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, Robert S; Padmanabhan, Anand; Kim, Haewon C; Anderson, Christina; Sugrue, Michele W; Linenberger, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Limited literature describes the value of laboratory "triggers" to guide collection of peripheral blood (PB) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) by apheresis [HPC(A)]. We used a web-based survey to determine which parameters are used to initiate autologous HPC(A) collection in adult and pediatric patients and to identify common practice patterns. Members of the AABB Cellular Therapy Product Collection and Clinical Practices Subsection and the American Society for Apheresis HPC Donor Subcommittee drafted and developed relevant survey questions. A web link to the survey was distributed by electronic newsletter or email. Responses from 67 programs that perform autologous HPC(A) collections, including academic medical centers (n = 46), blood centers (n = 10), community hospitals (n = 5), and a variety of other medical institutions (n = 6), were analyzed. Ninety-three percent (62/67) of programs used a laboratory parameter to initiate HPC(A) collection. In both adult (40/54, 74%) and pediatric (29/38, 76%) patients, the PB CD34+ cell count was the most common parameter used to initiate HPC(A) collection. The median PB CD34+ trigger value was 10/μL for both patient populations. Among centers routinely using the PB CD34+ cell count to initiate apheresis, 51% (22/43) first sent the test before the patient presented for collection. Although more than 90% of centers used a laboratory test to trigger apheresis in cytokine-mobilized (44/48) or chemomobilized patients (50/53), only 57% (30/53) used a laboratory trigger if the patient was mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor plus plerixafor. Forty-two percent (21/50) of programs that routinely measured the PB CD34+ count before collection and discontinued further HPC(A) collection based on product CD34+ cell yield also stopped if the PB CD34+ value before apheresis was considered too low to proceed. Most programs use the PB CD34+ cell count to trigger autologous HPC(A) collection. Some centers also use this

  20. Circulating hematopoietic progenitors and CD34+ cells predicted successful hematopoietic stem cell harvest in myeloma and lymphoma patients: experiences from a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu JT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jui-Ting Yu,1,2,* Shao-Bin Cheng,3,* Youngsen Yang,1 Kuang-Hsi Chang,4 Wen-Li Hwang,1 Chieh-Lin Jerry Teng,1,5,6 1Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 2Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Tungs' Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, 3Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, 4Department of Medical Research and Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 5Department of Life Science, Tunghai University, 6School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have shown that the numbers of both circulating hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC and CD34+ cell are positively correlated with CD34+ cell harvest yield. However, the minimal numbers of both circulating HPCs and CD34+ cells required for performing an efficient hematopoietic stem cell (HSC harvest in lymphoma and myeloma patients have not been defined in our institution. Patients and methods: Medical records of 50 lymphoma and myeloma patients undergoing peripheral blood HSC harvest in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The minimal and optimal HSC harvest yield required for the treatment was considered to be ≥2×106 CD34+ cells/kg and ≥5×106 CD34+ cells/kg, respectively. Results: The minimally required or optimal HSC yield obtained was not influenced by age (≥60 years, sex, underlying malignancies, disease status, multiple rounds of chemotherapy, or history of radiotherapy. The numbers of both circulating HPC and CD34+ cell were higher in patients with minimally required HSC yields (P=0.000 for HPC and P=0.000 for CD34+ cell and also in patients with optimal HSC yields (P=0.011 for HPC and P=0.006 for CD34+ cell. The cell count cutoff for obtaining minimally required HSC harvest was determined to be 20/mm3 for HPCs and 10/mm3 for CD34+ cells. Furthermore, the cell count cutoff for obtaining

  1. TNF-α has tropic rather than apoptotic activity in human hematopoietic progenitors: involvement of TNF receptor-1 and caspase-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Keren; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Kaplan, Offer; Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been suggested to exert detrimental effects on hematopoietic progenitor function that might limit the success of transplants. In this study, we assessed the influences of TNF-α and its two cognate receptors on the function of fresh umbilical cord blood (UCB) and cryopreserved mobilized peripheral blood (mPB). CD34(+) progenitors from both sources are less susceptible to spontaneous apoptosis than lineage-committed cells and are not induced into apoptosis by TNF-α. Consequently, the activity of UCB-derived severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) reconstituting cells and long-term culture-initiating cells is unaffected by this cytokine. On the contrary, transient exposure of cells from both sources to TNF-α stimulates the activity of myeloid progenitors, which persists in vivo in UCB cell transplants. Progenitor stimulation is selectively mediated by TNF-R1 and involves activation of caspase-8, without redundant activity of TNF-R2. Despite significant differences between fresh UCB cells and cryopreserved mPB cells in susceptibility to apoptosis and time to activation, TNF-α is primarily involved in tropic signaling in hematopoietic progenitors from both sources. Cytokine-mediated tropism cautions against TNF-α neutralization under conditions of stress hematopoiesis and may be particularly beneficial in overcoming the limitations of UCB cell transplants.

  2. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  3. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in HIV/AIDS and immune reconstitution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jielin Zhang; Clyde S Crumpacker

    2010-01-01

    @@ The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).HIV-1 infects human immune cells,specifically CD4+ lymphocytes, which leads to AIDS and undermines reconstitution of immunity. The unique challenges of HIV/AIDS have triggered multidisciplinary investigators to study the virology of the pathogen and the biology of the host cells, especially the interactions of HIV-1 with T-lymphocytes,macrophages, and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) [1-8].

  4. Relationship between spontaneous γH2AX foci formation and progenitor functions in circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells among atomic-bomb survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Misumi, Munechika; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Imai, Kazue; Ohishi, Waka; Nakachi, Kei; Weng, Nan-ping; Young, Lauren F.; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated DNA damage in hematopoietic stem cells is a primary mechanism of aging-associated dysfunction in human hematopoiesis. About 70 years ago, atomic-bomb (A-bomb) radiation induced DNA damage and functional decreases in the hematopoietic system of A-bomb survivors in a radiation dose-dependent manner. The peripheral blood cell populations then recovered to a normal range, but accompanying cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells still remain that bear molecular changes possibly caused by past radiation exposure and aging. In the present study, we evaluated radiation-related changes in the frequency of phosphorylated (Ser-139) H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation in circulating CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34 + Lin−) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) among 226Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. An association between the frequency of γH2AX foci formation in HSPCs and the radiation dose was observed, but the γH2AX foci frequency was not significantly elevated by past radiation. We found a negative correlation between the frequency of γH2AX foci formation and the length of granulocyte telomeres. A negative interaction effect between the radiation dose and the frequency of γH2AX foci was suggested in a proportion of a subset of HSPCs as assessed by the cobblestone area-forming cell assay (CAFC), indicating that the self-renewability of HSPCs may decrease in survivors who were exposed to a higher radiation dose and who had more DNA damage in their HSPCs. Thus, although many years after radiation exposure and with advancing age, the effect of DNA damage on the self-renewability of HSPCs may be modified by A-bomb radiation exposure. PMID:27169377

  5. Expression and function of P2 receptors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenli; Wang, Lina; Zheng, Guoguang

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotides have unambiguously emerged as a family of mediators of intercellular communication, which bind to a class of plasma membrane receptors, P2 receptors, to trigger intercellular signaling. P2 receptors can be further divided into P2X and P2Y subfamilies based on structure and function. Different hematopoietic cells express diverse spectrums of P2 receptors at different levels, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) exerts different effects on HSPCs, regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and chemotaxis, release of cytokines or lysosomal constituents, and generation of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The relationship between abnormal P2 receptor function and human diseases attracts more and more attention. This review summarizes the expression and function of P2 receptors in HSPCs and the relationship to hematopoietic diseases.

  6. TNFα as a Physiological Regulator of Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells:Increase of Early Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in TNFR55--/-mice in vivo and Potent Inhibition of Progenitor Cell Proliferation by TNFα in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangY; HaradaA; BluuethmannH; WangJ.B; NakaoS

    1995-01-01

    Murine lineage marker (Lin)--Sca-1+c-kit+and Lin-Sca-1-c-kit+ cens represent the primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC)and coommitted hematopoietic progenitor cells(HPC),respectively. The number of Lin-Sca-1+c-kit+HSCs in bone marrow was significantly increased (2.9folds) in tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-receptor-55(TNF-R55)-deficient mice compared with that of wildtype ones without marked change in cellularity of bone marrow.

  7. Zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Clyde; Su, Tammy; Lau, Ryan P; Shah, Arpit; Laurie, Payton C; Avalos, Brenda; Aggio, Julian; Harris, Elena; Traver, David; Stachura, David L

    2015-12-01

    Forward genetic screens in zebrafish have been used to identify genes essential for the generation of primitive blood and the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but have not elucidated the genes essential for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and differentiation because of the lack of methodologies to functionally assess these processes. We previously described techniques used to test the developmental potential of HSPCs by culturing them on zebrafish kidney stromal (ZKS) cells, derived from the main site of hematopoiesis in the adult teleost. Here we describe an additional primary stromal cell line we refer to as zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells, derived from tissue surrounding the embryonic dorsal aorta, the site of HSC emergence in developing fish. ZEST cells encouraged HSPC differentiation toward the myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid pathways when assessed by morphologic and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. Additionally, ZEST cells significantly expanded the number of cultured HSPCs in vitro, indicating that these stromal cells are supportive of both HSPC proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Examination of ZEST cells indicates that they express numerous cytokines and Notch ligands and possess endothelial characteristics. Further characterization of ZEST cells should prove to be invaluable in understanding the complex signaling cascades instigated by the embryonic hematopoietic niche required to expand and differentiate HSPCs. Elucidating these processes and identifying possibilities for the modulation of these molecular pathways should allow the in vitro expansion of HSPCs for a multitude of therapeutic uses.

  8. Reconstruction of hematopoietic inductive microenvironment after transplantation of VCAM-1-modified human umbilical cord blood stromal cells.

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    Yao Liu

    Full Text Available The hematopoietic inductive microenvironment (HIM is where hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells grow and develop. Hematopoietic stromal cells were the key components of the HIM. In our previous study, we had successfully cultured and isolated human cord blood-derived stromal cells (HUCBSCs and demonstrated that they could secret hemopoietic growth factors such as GM-CSF, TPO, and SCF. However, it is still controversial whether HUCBSCs can be used for reconstruction of HIM. In this study, we first established a co-culture system of HUCBSCs and cord blood CD34(+ cells and then determined that using HUCBSCs as the adherent layer had significantly more newly formed colonies of each hematopoietic lineage than the control group, indicating that HUCBSCs had the ability to promote the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells. Furthermore, the number of colonies was significantly higher in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs, suggesting that the ability of HUCBSCs in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells was further enhanced after having been modified with VCAM-1. Next, HUCBSCs were infused into a radiation-damaged animal model, in which the recovery of hematopoiesis was observed. The results demonstrate that the transplanted HUCBSCs were "homed in" to bone marrow and played roles in promoting the recovery of irradiation-induced hematopoietic damage and repairing HIM. Compared with the control group, the HUCBSC group had significantly superior effectiveness in terms of the recovery time for hemogram and myelogram, CFU-F, CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Meg. Such differences were even more significant in VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs group. We suggest that HUCBSCs are able to restore the functions of HIM and promote the recovery of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. VCAM-1 plays an important role in supporting the repair of HIM damage.

  9. An optimization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell isolation for scientific and clinical purposes by the application of a new parameter determining the hematopoietic graft efficacy.

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    Baumert, B; Grymuła, K; Pietruszka, D; Kotowski, M; Mielczarek, M; Dziedziejko, V; Hałasa, M; Czerny, B; Walczak, M; Machaliński, B

    2008-01-01

    The transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) is an established lifesaving therapy. Bone marrow (BM), harvested from heparinized cadaveric organ donors, peripheral blood (PB) and cord blood (CB), are important sources of hematopoietic stem cells. HSPCs, which are used for transplantation purposes, are routinely evaluated in terms of number of mononuclear cells (MNCs), CD34+ MNCs count and viability. The efficacy of grafting is determined additionally in clonogenic tests in vitro. These tests deliver important information about the number of HSPCs and their proliferative potential. Unfortunately, they do not give a possibility to evaluate the functional HSPC chemotactic reactivity in the SDF-1 gradient, which is probably the key phenomenon for HSPC homing after transplantation procedure. Thus, the aim of our study was to optimize HSPC isolation according to their chemotactic reactivity in SDF-1 gradient. Using multiparameter cell sorter (FACS Aria, BD) we examined the HSPCs attracted by SDF-1 on a single cell level. The population of cells which participated in the chemotactic process was highly enriched in CXCR4+lin-AC133+CD45+ cells (referred as hematopoietic stem cells) and to our surprise in CXCR4+lin-AC133+CD45- cells (referred as pluripotent stem cells) in quantitative amounts. Since reactivity of HSPCs may depend on various factors involved in the protocol of their isolation and short-term storage, we tested the most commonly used anticoagulants (ACD, CPDA-1, EDTA and Heparin) and culture media (DME, IMDM, RPMI). HSPCs, harvested from CB, PB and BM, were subsequently investigated for clonogenic growth of CFU-GM in methylcellulose cultures and for the level of apoptosis by employing annexin V staining. Evaluating clonogenic potential, ability of chemotactic reactivity in SDF-1 gradient and intensification of apoptosis of HSPC as the most safe anticoagulant and medium were selected. This study has proved that chemotactic reactivity of

  10. An optimization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell isolation for scientific and clinical purposes by the application of a new parameter determining the hematopoietic graft efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Walczak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC is an established lifesaving therapy. Bone marrow (BM, harvested from heparinized cadaveric organ donors, peripheral blood (PB and cord blood (CB, are important sources of hematopoietic stem cells. HSPCs, which are used for transplantation purposes, are routinely evaluated in terms of number of mononuclear cells (MNCs, CD34+ MNCs count and viability. The efficacy of grafting is determined additionally in clonogenic tests in vitro. These tests deliver important information about the number of HSPCs and their proliferative potential. Unfortunately, they do not give a possibility to evaluate the functional HSPC chemotactic reactivity in the SDF-1 gradient, which is probably the key phenomenon for HSPC homing after transplantation procedure. Thus, the aim of our study was to optimize HSPC isolation according to their chemotactic reactivity in SDF-1 gradient. Using multiparameter cell sorter (FACS Aria, BD we examined the HSPCs attracted by SDF-1 on a single cell level. The population of cells which participated in the chemotactic process was highly enriched in CXCR4+lin-AC133+CD45+ cells (referred as hematopoietic stem cells and to our surprise in CXCR4+lin-AC133+CD45- cells (referred as pluripotent stem cells in quantitative amounts. Since reactivity of HSPCs may depend on various factors involved in the protocol of their isolation and short-term storage, we tested the most commonly used anticoagulants (ACD, CPDA-1, EDTA and Heparin and culture media (DME, IMDM, RPMI. HSPCs, harvested from CB, PB and BM, were subsequently investigated for clonogenic growth of CFU-GM in methylcellulose cultures and for the level of apoptosis by employing annexin V staining. Evaluating clonogenic potential, ability of chemotactic reactivity in SDF-1 gradient and intensification of apoptosis of HSPC as the most safe anticoagulant and medium were selected. This study has proved that chemotactic

  11. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

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    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-04

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles.

  12. Distribution of dystrophin- and utrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC/UAPC) in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

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    Teniente-De Alba, Carmen; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Vivanco-Calixto, Raúl; Galván, Iván J; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Cerecedo, Doris

    2011-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are defined by their cardinal properties, such as sustained proliferation, multilineage differentiation, and self-renewal, which give rise to a hierarchy of progenitor populations with more restricted potential lineage, ultimately leading to the production of all types of mature blood cells. HSC are anchored by cell adhesion molecules to their specific microenvironment, thus regulating their cell cycle, while cell migration is essentially required for seeding the HSC of the fetal bone marrow (BM) during development as well as in adult BM homeostasis. The dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) is a large group of membrane-associated proteins linking the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and exhibiting scaffolding, adhesion, and signaling roles in muscle and non-muscle cells including mature blood cells. Because adhesion and migration are mechanisms that influence the fate of the HSC, we explored the presence and the feasible role of DAPC. In this study, we characterized the pattern expression by immunoblot technique and, by confocal microscopy analysis, the cellular distribution of dystrophin and utrophin gene products, and the dystrophin-associated proteins (α-, β-dystroglycan, α-syntrophin, α-dystrobrevin) in relation to actin filaments in freshly isolated CD34+ cells from umbilical cord blood. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the presence of Dp71d/Dp71Δ110m ∼DAPC and Up400/Up140∼DAPC. The subcellular distribution of the two DAPC in actin-based structures suggests their dynamic participation in adhesion and cell migration. In addition, the particular protein pattern expression found in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells might be indicative of their feasible participation during differentiation.

  13. Estimating the number of hematopoietic or lymphoid stem cells giving rise to clonal chromosome aberrations in blood T lymphocytes.

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    Nakano, M; Kodama, Y; Ohtaki, K; Itoh, M; Awa, A A; Cologne, J; Kusunoki, Y; Nakamura, N

    2004-03-01

    Quantifying the proliferative capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells in humans is important for bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Obtaining appropriate data is difficult, however, because the experimental tools are limited. We hypothesized that tracking clonal descendants originating from hematopoietic stem cells would be possible if we used clonal chromosome aberrations as unique tags of individual hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Using FISH, we screened 500 blood T lymphocytes from each of 513 atomic bomb survivors and detected 96 clones composed of at least three cells with identical aberrations. The number of clones was inversely related to their population size, which we interpreted to mean that the progenitor cells were heterogeneous in the number of progeny that they could produce. The absolute number of progenitor cells contributing to the formation of the observed clones was estimated as about two in an unexposed individual. Further, scrutiny of ten clones revealed that lymphocyte clones could originate roughly equally from hematopoietic stem cells or from mature T lymphocytes, thereby suggesting that the estimated two progenitor cells are shared as one hematopoietic stem cell and one mature T cell. Our model predicts that one out of ten people bears a non- aberrant clone comprising >10% of the total lymphocytes, which indicates that clonal expansions are common and probably are not health-threatening.

  14. Differential Reponses of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells to mTOR Inhibition

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    Aimin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway has been observed in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, targeting of the mTOR pathway is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment and several mTOR inhibitors, including AZD8055 (AZD, a novel dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor, are currently in clinical trials. Although bone marrow (BM suppression is one of the primary side effects of anticancer drugs, it is not known if pharmacological inhibition of dual mTORC1/2 affects BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs function and plasticity. Here we report that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 by AZD or its analogue (KU-63794 depletes mouse BM Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ cells in cultures via the induction of apoptotic cell death. Subsequent colony-forming unit (CFU assays revealed that inhibition of mTORC1/2 suppresses the clonogenic function of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, we found that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 markedly inhibits the growth of day-14 cobblestone area-forming cells (CAFCs but enhances the generation of day-35 CAFCs. Given the fact that day-14 and day-35 CAFCs are functional surrogates of HPCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, respectively, these results suggest that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 may have distinct effects on HPCs versus HSCs.

  15. Sleeping Beauty-Mediated Drug Resistance Gene Transfer in Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

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    Hyland, Kendra A.; Olson, Erik R.; McIvor, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system can insert sequences into mammalian chromosomes, supporting long-term expression of both reporter and therapeutic genes. Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are an ideal therapeutic gene transfer target as they are used in therapy for a variety of hematologic and metabolic conditions. As successful SB-mediated gene transfer into human CD34+ HPCs has been reported by several laboratories, we sought to extend these studies to the introduction of a therapeutic gene conferring resistance to methotrexate (MTX), potentially providing a chemoprotective effect after engraftment. SB-mediated transposition of hematopoietic progenitors, using a transposon encoding an L22Y variant dihydrofolate reductase fused to green fluorescent protein, conferred resistance to methotrexate and dipyridamole, a nucleoside transport inhibitor that tightens MTX selection conditions, as assessed by in vitro hematopoietic colony formation. Transposition of individual transgenes was confirmed by sequence analysis of transposon–chromosome junctions recovered by linear amplification-mediated PCR. These studies demonstrate the potential of SB-mediated transposition of HPCs for expression of drug resistance genes for selective and chemoprotective applications. PMID:26176276

  16. Pre-malignant lymphoid cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Human malignancies progress through a multistep process that includes the development of critical somatic mutations over the clinical course. Recent novel findings have indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into multilineage hematopoietic cells, are an important cellular target for the accumulation of critical somatic mutations in hematological malignancies and play a central role in myeloid malignancy development. In contrast to myeloid malignancies, mature lymphoid malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are thought to originate directly from differentiated mature lymphocytes; however, recent compelling data have shown that primitive HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid malignancies. Several representative mutations of hematological malignancies have been identified within the HSCs of CLL and lymphoma patients, indicating that the self-renewing long-lived fraction of HSCs can serve as a reservoir for the development of oncogenic events. Novel mice models have been established as human mature lymphoma models, in which specific oncogenic events target the HSCs and immature progenitor cells. These data collectively suggest that HSCs can be the cellular target involved in the accumulation of oncogenic events in the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid and myeloid malignancies.

  17. Standard sub-thermoneutral caging temperature influences radiosensitivity of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

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    Benjamin J Povinelli

    Full Text Available The production of new blood cells relies on a hierarchical network of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs. To maintain lifelong hematopoiesis, HSPCs must be protected from ionizing radiation or other cytotoxic agents. For many years, murine models have been a valuable source of information regarding factors that either enhance or reduce the survival of HSPCs after exposure of marrow to ionizing radiation. In a recent series of studies, however, it has become clear that housing-related factors such as the cool room temperature required for laboratory mice can exert a surprising influence on the outcome of experiments. Here we report that the mild, but chronic cold-stress endured by mice housed under these conditions exerts a protective effect on HSPCs after both non-lethal and lethal doses of total body irradiation (TBI. Alleviation of this cold-stress by housing mice at a thermoneutral temperature (30°C resulted in significantly greater baseline radiosensitivity to a lethal dose of TBI with more HSPCs from mice housed at thermoneutral temperature undergoing apoptosis following non-lethal TBI. Cold-stressed mice have elevated levels of norepinephrine, a key molecule of the sympathetic nervous system that binds to β-adrenergic receptors. We show that blocking this signaling pathway in vivo through use of the β-blocker propanolol completely mitigates the protective effect of cold-stress on HSPC apoptosis. Collectively this study demonstrates that chronic stress endured by the standard housing conditions of laboratory mice increases the resistance of HSPCs to TBI-induced apoptosis through a mechanism that depends upon β-adrenergic signaling. Since β-blockers are commonly prescribed to a wide variety of patients, this information could be important when predicting the clinical impact of HSPC sensitivity to TBI.

  18. Identification of a novel population of human cord blood cells with hematopoietic and chondrocytic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen E JAY; Anne ROULEAU; T Michael UNDERHILL; Mickie BHATIA

    2004-01-01

    With the exception of mature erythrocytes, cells within the human hematopoietic system are characterized by the cell surface expression of the pan-leukocyte receptor CD45. Here, we identify a novel subset among mononuclear cord blood cells depleted of lineage commitment markers (Lin-) that are devoid of CD45 expression. Surprisingly, functional examination of Lin-CD45- cells also lacking cell surface CD34 revealed they were capable of multipotential hematopoietic progenitor capacity. Co-culture with mouse embryonic limb bud cells demonstrated that Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were capable of contributing to cartilage nodules and differentiating into human chondrocytes. BMP-4, a mesodermal factor known to promote chondrogenesis, significantly augmented Lin-CD45-CD34- differentiation into chondrocytes.Moreover, unlike CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells, Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were unable to proliferate or survive in liquid cultures, whereas single Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were able to chimerize the inner cell mass (ICM) of murine blastocysts and proliferate in this embryonic environment. Our study identifies a novel population of Lin-CD45-CD34-cells capable of commitment into both hematopoietic and chondrocytic lineages, suggesting that human cord blood may provide a more ubiquitous source of tissue with broader developmental potential than previously appreciated.

  19. Identification of Multipotent Progenitors that Emerge Prior to Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Embryonic Development

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    Matthew A. Inlay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis in the embryo proceeds in a series of waves, with primitive erythroid-biased waves succeeded by definitive waves, within which the properties of hematopoietic stem cells (multilineage potential, self-renewal, and engraftability gradually arise. Whereas self-renewal and engraftability have previously been examined in the embryo, multipotency has not been thoroughly addressed, especially at the single-cell level or within well-defined populations. To identify when and where clonal multilineage potential arises during embryogenesis, we developed a single-cell multipotency assay. We find that, during the initiation of definitive hematopoiesis in the embryo, a defined population of multipotent, engraftable progenitors emerges that is much more abundant within the yolk sac (YS than the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM or fetal liver. These experiments indicate that multipotent cells appear in concert within both the YS and AGM and strongly implicate YS-derived progenitors as contributors to definitive hematopoiesis.

  20. Inducing effects of macrophage stimulating protein on the expansion of early hematopoietic progenitor cells in liquid culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Li-xia; HUANG Yan-hong; CHENG La-mei; LEI Jun; WANG Qi-ru

    2007-01-01

    Background Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP) is produced by human bone marrow endothelial cells. In this study,we sought to observe its effects on inducing the expansion of early hematopoietic progenitor cells which were cultured in a liquid culture system in the presence of the combination of stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin 3 (IL-3), interleukin 6 (IL-6), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), erythropoietin (EPO) (Cys) and MSP or of Cys and bone marrow endothelial cell conditioned medium (EC-CM).Methods Human bone marrow CD34+ cells were separated and cultured in a liquid culture system for 6 days.Granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (CFU-GM) and colony forming unit-granulocyte, erythrocyte, macrophage,megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM) were employed to assay the effects of different treatment on the proliferation of hematopoeitic stem/progenitor cells. The nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductive test and hoechest 33258 staining were employed to reflect the differentiation and apoptosis of the cells respectively.Results MSP inhibited the proliferation of CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM in semi-solid culture and the inhibitory effect on CFU-GEMM was stronger than on CFU-GM. MSP inhibited the differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells induced by hematopoietic stimulators. Bone marrow (BM) CFU-GEMM was 2.3-fold or 1.7-fold increase or significantly decreased in either Cys+EC-CM, Cys+MSP or Cys compared with 0 hour control in liquid culture system after 6 days.Conclusion MSP, a hematopoietic inhibitor, inhibits the differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells induced by hematopoietic stimulators and makes the early hematopoietic progenitor cells expand in a liquid culture system.

  1. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells From Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

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    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-11-07

    : Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting.

  2. Mouse lung contains endothelial progenitors with high capacity to form blood and lymphatic vessels

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    Barleon Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs have been successfully isolated from whole bone marrow, blood and the walls of conduit vessels. They can, therefore, be classified into circulating and resident progenitor cells. The differentiation capacity of resident lung endothelial progenitor cells from mouse has not been evaluated. Results In an attempt to isolate differentiated mature endothelial cells from mouse lung we found that the lung contains EPCs with a high vasculogenic capacity and capability of de novo vasculogenesis for blood and lymph vessels. Mouse lung microvascular endothelial cells (MLMVECs were isolated by selection of CD31+ cells. Whereas the majority of the CD31+ cells did not divide, some scattered cells started to proliferate giving rise to large colonies (> 3000 cells/colony. These highly dividing cells possess the capacity to integrate into various types of vessels including blood and lymph vessels unveiling the existence of local microvascular endothelial progenitor cells (LMEPCs in adult mouse lung. EPCs could be amplified > passage 30 and still expressed panendothelial markers as well as the progenitor cell antigens, but not antigens for immune cells and hematopoietic stem cells. A high percentage of these cells are also positive for Lyve1, Prox1, podoplanin and VEGFR-3 indicating that a considerabe fraction of the cells are committed to develop lymphatic endothelium. Clonogenic highly proliferating cells from limiting dilution assays were also bipotent. Combined in vitro and in vivo spheroid and matrigel assays revealed that these EPCs exhibit vasculogenic capacity by forming functional blood and lymph vessels. Conclusion The lung contains large numbers of EPCs that display commitment for both types of vessels, suggesting that lung blood and lymphatic endothelial cells are derived from a single progenitor cell.

  3. Autophagy Proteins ATG5 and ATG7 Are Essential for the Maintenance of Human CD34(+) Hematopoietic Stem-Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Puerto, Maria Catalina; Folkerts, Hendrik; Wierenga, Albertus T J; Schepers, Koen; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Coffer, Paul J; Vellenga, Edo

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves sequestration and lysosomal degradation of cytosolic components such as damaged organelles and misfolded proteins. While autophagy can be considered to be a general cellular housekeeping process, it has become clear that it may also play cell type-dependent functional roles. In this study, we analyzed the functional importance of autophagy in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), and how this is regulated during differentiation. Western blot-based analysis of LC3-II and p62 levels, as well as flow cytometry-based autophagic vesicle quantification, demonstrated that umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) /CD38(-) immature hematopoietic progenitors show a higher autophagic flux than CD34(+) /CD38(+) progenitors and more differentiated myeloid and erythroid cells. This high autophagic flux was critical for maintaining stem and progenitor function since knockdown of autophagy genes ATG5 or ATG7 resulted in reduced HSPC frequencies in vitro as well as in vivo. The reduction in HSPCs was not due to impaired differentiation, but at least in part due to reduced cell cycle progression and increased apoptosis. This is accompanied by increased expression of p53, proapoptotic genes BAX and PUMA, and the cell cycle inhibitor p21, as well as increased levels of cleaved caspase-3 and reactive oxygen species. Taken together, our data demonstrate that autophagy is an important regulatory mechanism for human HSCs and their progeny, reducing cellular stress and promoting survival. Stem Cells 2016;34:1651-1663.

  4. Genomic editing of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells using zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Krymskaya, Ludmila; Wang, Jianbin; Henley, Jill; Rao, Anitha; Cao, Lan-Feng; Tran, Chy-Anh; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Gardner, Agnes; Gonzalez, Nancy; Kim, Kenneth; Liu, Pei-Qi; Hofer, Ursula; Lopez, Evan; Gregory, Philip D; Liu, Qing; Holmes, Michael C; Cannon, Paula M; Zaia, John A; DiGiusto, David L

    2013-06-01

    The HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 is a validated target for HIV/AIDS therapy. The apparent elimination of HIV-1 in a patient treated with an allogeneic stem cell transplant homozygous for a naturally occurring CCR5 deletion mutation (CCR5(Δ32/Δ32)) supports the concept that a single dose of HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells can provide disease protection. Given the low frequency of naturally occurring CCR5(Δ32/Δ32) donors, we reasoned that engineered autologous CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) could be used for AIDS therapy. We evaluated disruption of CCR5 gene expression in HSPCs isolated from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-mobilized adult blood using a recombinant adenoviral vector encoding a CCR5-specific pair of zinc finger nucleases (CCR5-ZFN). Our results demonstrate that CCR5-ZFN RNA and protein expression from the adenoviral vector is enhanced by pretreatment of HSPC with protein kinase C (PKC) activators resulting in >25% CCR5 gene disruption and that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway is responsible for this activity. Importantly, using an optimized dose of PKC activator and adenoviral vector we could generate CCR5-modified HSPCs which engraft in a humanized mouse model (albeit at a reduced level) and support multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data establish the basis for improved approaches exploiting adenoviral vector delivery in the modification of HSPCs.

  5. Deregulation of vital mitotic kinase-phosphatase signaling in hematopoietic stem/progenitor compartment leads to cellular catastrophe in experimental aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Ritam; Chattopadhyay, Sukalpa; Law, Sujata

    2016-11-01

    Aplastic anemia, the paradigm of bone marrow failure, is characterized by pancytopenic peripheral blood and hypoplastic bone marrow. Among various etiologies, inappropriate use of DNA alkylating drugs like cyclophosphamide and busulfan often causes the manifestation of the dreadful disease. Cell cycle impairment in marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor compartment together with cellular apoptosis has been recognized as culpable factors behind aplastic pathophysiologies. However, the intricate molecular mechanisms remain unrevealed till date. In the present study, we have dealt with the mechanistic intervention of the disease by peripheral blood hemogram, bone marrow histopathology, cytopathology, hematopoietic kinetic study, scanning electron microscopy, DNA damage assessment and flowcytometric analysis of cellular proliferation and apoptosis in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) rich marrow compartment using busulfan and cyclophosphamidemediated mouse model. To unveil the molecular mechanisms behind aplastic pathophysiology, we further investigated the role of some crucial mitotic and apoptotic regulators like Protein kinase-B (PKB), Gsk-3β, Cyclin-D1, PP2A, Cdc25c, Plk-1, Aurora kinase-A, Chk-1 regarding the hematopoietic catastrophe. Our observations revealed that the alteration of PKB-GSK-3β axis, Plk-1, and Aurora kinase-A expressions in HSPC compartment due to DNA damage response was associated with the proliferative impairment and apoptosis during aplastic anemia. The study established the correlation between the accumulation of DNA damage and alteration of the mentioned molecules in aplastic HSPCs that lead to the hematopoietic catastrophe. We anticipate that our findings will be beneficial for developing better therapeutic strategies for the dreadful disease concerned.

  6. A neutralizing anti-TGF-beta1 antibody promotes proliferation of CD34+Thy-1+ peripheral blood progenitors and increases the number of transduced progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, A M; Bagnis, C; Galindo, R; Chabannon, C; Mannoni, P

    1998-05-01

    The subset of blood cells that expresses both CD34 and Thy1 (CD90) cell surface molecules is enriched in hematopoietic stem cell activity and can be obtained from the peripheral blood of cancer patients after mobilization by chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Because transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent inhibitor of hematopoietic progenitor proliferation and differentiation, in this study we analyzed the impact of neutralizing TGF-beta1 activity during culture and retroviral transduction of CD34+Thy1+ cells. When purified CD34+Thy1+ cells were cultured in the presence of a neutralizing antibody against TGF-beta1, the percentage of cycling cells, proliferation, and absolute number of clonogenic progenitors were increased in comparison to the cultures performed without the addition of antibody. Antibody-mediated neutralization of TGF-beta1 during retroviral transduction performed by coculture of CD34+Thy1+ cells with a MFG-S-nlsLacZ retroviral vector-producing cell line did not affect the percentage of transduced progenitors as assessed by direct X-Gal staining of colonies in clonogenic assays. However, due to the better expansion of CD34+Thy1+ cells in the presence of anti-TGF-beta1, the absolute number of transduced progenitors recovered at the end of the culture was increased.

  7. Reticular dysgenesis–associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  8. Catalase inhibits ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Luo, Hongmei; Vanek, Kenneth N; LaRue, Amanda C; Schulte, Bradley A; Wang, Gavin Y

    2015-06-01

    Hematologic toxicity is a major cause of mortality in radiation emergency scenarios and a primary side effect concern in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Therefore, there is a critical need for the development of novel and more effective approaches to manage this side effect. Catalase is a potent antioxidant enzyme that coverts hydrogen peroxide into hydrogen and water. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of catalase as a protectant against ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results revealed that catalase treatment markedly inhibits IR-induced apoptosis in murine hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Subsequent colony-forming cell and cobble-stone area-forming cell assays showed that catalase-treated HSPCs can not only survive irradiation-induced apoptosis but also have higher clonogenic capacity, compared with vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, transplantation of catalase-treated irradiated HSPCs results in high levels of multi-lineage and long-term engraftments, whereas vehicle-treated irradiated HSPCs exhibit very limited hematopoiesis reconstituting capacity. Mechanistically, catalase treatment attenuates IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and inhibits reactive oxygen species. Unexpectedly, we found that the radioprotective effect of catalase is associated with activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 abolishes the protective activity of catalase, suggesting that catalase may protect HSPCs against IR-induced toxicity via promoting STAT3 activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which catalase inhibits IR-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in HSPCs.

  9. Ex vivo expansions and transplantations of mouse bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金福; 吴亦凡; HARRINTONGJenny; McNIECEIanK.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effects of co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on expansion of hematopoietic tem/progenitor cells and the capacities of rapid neutrophil engraftment and hematopoietic reconstitution of the expanded ells, we expanded mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD34+/c-kit+ cells from mouse bone marrow and transplanted the expanded cells into the irradiated mice. MNCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow and CD34+/c-kit+ cells were selected from MNCs by using MoFlo Cell Sorter. MNCs and CD34+/c-kit+ cells were co-cultured with mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under a two-step expansion. The expanded cells were then transplanted into sublethally irradiated BDF 1 mice. Results showed that the co-culture with MSCs resulted in expansions of median total nucleated cells, CD34+ cells, GM-CFC and HPP-CFC respectively by 10.8-, 4.8-, 65.9- and 38.8-fold for the mononuclear cell culture, and respectively by 76.1-, 2.9-, 71.7- and 51.8-fold for the CD34+/c-kit+ cell culture. The expanded cells could rapidly engraft in the sublethally irradiated mice and reconstitute their hematopoiesis. Co-cultures with MSCs in conjunction with two-step expansion increased expansions of total nucleated cells, GM-CFC and HPP-CFC, which led us to conclude MSCs may create favorable environment for expansions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The availability of increased numbers of expanded ceils by the co-culture with MSCs may result in more rapid engraftment ofneutrophils following infusion to transplant recipients.

  10. Ex vivo expansions and transplantations of mouse bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin-fu(王金福); WU Yi-fan(吴亦凡); HARRINTONG Jenny; McNIECE Ian K.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effects of co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on expansion of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and the capacities of rapid neutrophil engraftment and hematopoietic reconstitution of the expanded cells, we expanded mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD34+/c-kit+ cells from mouse bone marrow and transplanted the expanded cells into the irradiated mice. MNCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow and CD34+/c-kit+ cells were selected from MNCs by using MoFlo Cell Sorter. MNCs and CD34+/c-kit+ cells were co-cultured with mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under a two-step expansion. The expanded cells were then transplanted into sublethally irradiated BDF1 mice. Results showed that the co-culture with MSCs resulted in expansions of median total nucleated cells,CD34+ cells, GM-CFC and HPP-CFC respectively by 10.8-, 4.8-, 65.9- and 38.8-fold for the mononuclear cell culture, and respectively by 76.1-, 2.9-, 71.7- and 51.8-fold for the CD34+/c-kit+ cell culture. The expanded cells could rapidly engraft in the sublethally irradiated mice and reconstitute their hematopoiesis. Co-cultures with MSCs in conjunction with two-step expansion increased expansions of total nucleated cells, GM-CFC and HPP-CFC, which led us to conclude MSCs may create favorable environment for expansions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The availability of increased numbers of expanded cells by the co-culture with MSCs may result in more rapid engraftment ofneutrophils following infusion to transplant recipients.

  11. It Is All in the Blood: The Multifaceted Contribution of Circulating Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Paolo Fadini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a worldwide growing disease and represents a huge social and healthcare problem owing to the burden of its complications. Micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications arise from excess damage through well-known biochemical pathways. Interestingly, microangiopathy hits the bone marrow (BM microenvironment with features similar to retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. The BM represents a reservoir of progenitor cells for multiple lineages, not limited to the hematopoietic system and including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and osteogenic cells. All these multiple progenitor cell lineages are profoundly altered in the setting of diabetes in humans and animal models. Reduction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs along with excess smooth muscle progenitor (SMP and osteoprogenitor cells creates an imbalance that promote the development of micro- and macroangiopathy. Finally, an excess generation of BM-derived fusogenic cells has been found to contribute to diabetic complications in animal models. Taken together, a growing amount of literature attributes to circulating progenitor cells a multi-faceted role in the pathophysiology of DM, setting a novel scenario that puts BM and the blood at the centre of the stage.

  12. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-08

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  13. Loss of Ercc1 Results in a Time- and Dose-Dependent Reduction of Proliferating Early Hematopoietic Progenitors

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    Judith H. E. Verhagen-Oldenampsen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The endonuclease complex Ercc1/Xpf is involved in interstrand crosslink repair and functions downstream of the Fanconi pathway. Loss of Ercc1 causes hematopoietic defects similar to those seen in Fanconi Anemia. Ercc1−/− mice die 3-4 weeks after birth, which prevents long-term follow up of the hematopoietic compartment. We used alternative Ercc1 mouse models to examine the effect of low or absent Ercc1 activity on hematopoiesis. Tie2-Cre-driven deletion of a floxed Ercc1 allele was efficient (>80% in fetal liver hematopoietic cells. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs with a deleted allele were maintained in mice up to 1 year of age when harboring a wt allele, but were progressively outcompeted when the deleted allele was combined with a knockout allele. Mice with a minimal Ercc1 activity expressed by 1 or 2 hypomorphic Ercc1 alleles have an extended life expectancy, which allows analysis of HSPCs at 10 and 20 weeks of age. The HSPC compartment was affected in all Ercc1-deficient models. Actively proliferating multipotent progenitors were most affected as were myeloid and erythroid clonogenic progenitors. In conclusion, lack of Ercc1 results in a severe competitive disadvantage of HSPCs and is most deleterious in proliferating progenitor cells.

  14. The combined influence of substrate elasticity and ligand density on the viability and biophysical properties of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji S; Harley, Brendan A C

    2012-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity to give rise to all blood and immune cells in the body. HSCs are housed in a specialized microenvironment known as the stem cell niche, which provides intrinsic and extrinsic signals to regulate HSC fate: quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization, homing, and apoptosis. These niches provide a complex, three dimensional (3D) microenvironment consisting of cells, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and ECM-bound or soluble biomolecules that provides cellular, structural, and molecular signals that regulate HSC fate decisions. In this study, we examined the decoupled effects of substrate elasticity, construct dimensionality, and ligand concentration on the biophysical properties of primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) using homologous series of two and three dimensional microenvironments. Microenvironments were chosen to span the range of biophysical environments presented physiologically within the bone marrow, ranging from soft marrow and adipose tissue (cell membranes (1-3 kPa), to developing osteoid (>30 kPa). We additionally investigated the influence of collagen ligand density on HSPC biophysical parameters and compared these behaviors to those observed in HSPCs grown in culture on stiff glass substrates. This work suggests the potential for substrate stiffness and ligand density to directly affect the biophysical properties of primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells at the single cell level and that these parameters may be critical design criteria for the development of artificial HSC niches.

  15. Generation of functional platelets from human embryonic stem cells in vitro via ES-sacs, VEGF-promoted structures that concentrate hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Naoya; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Usui, Joichi; Tsukui, Hiroko; Sawaguchi, Akira; Hiroyama, Takashi; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2008-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) could potentially represent an alternative source for blood transfusion therapies and a promising tool for studying the ontogeny of hematopoiesis. When we cultured hESCs on either C3H10T1/2 or OP-9 cells to facilitate hematopoiesis, we found that exogenous administration of vascular endothelial growth factor promoted the emergence of sac-like structures, which we named embryonic stem cell-derived sacs (ES-sacs). These ES-sacs consisted of multiple cysts demarcated by cellular monolayers that retained some of the properties of endothelial cells. The spherical cells inside ES-sacs expressed primarily CD34, along with VE-cadherin, CD31, CD41a, and CD45, and were able to form hematopoietic colonies in semisolid culture and to differentiate into mature megakaryocytes by day 24 in the presence of thrombopoietin. Apparently, ES-sacs provide a suitable environment for hematopoietic progenitors. Relatively large numbers of mature megakaryocytes could be induced from the hematopoietic progenitors within ES-sacs, which were then able to release platelets that displayed integrin alpha IIb beta 3 activation and spreading in response to ADP or thrombin. This novel protocol thus provides a means of generating platelets from hESCs, which could serve as the basis for efficient production of platelets for clinical transfusion and studies of thrombopoiesis.

  16. Cocaine exposure impairs multilineage hematopoiesis of human hematopoietic progenitor cells mediated by the sigma-1 receptor [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Christopher C; Schwartz, Brandon H; Dixit, Dhaval; Zack, Jerome A; Vatakis, Dimitrios N

    2015-03-02

    Prenatal exposure to cocaine is a significant source of fetal and neonatal developmental defects. While cocaine associated neurological and cardiac pathologies are well-documented, it is apparent that cocaine use has far more diverse physiological effects. It is known that in some cell types, the sigma-1 receptor mediates many of cocaine's cellular effects. Here we present a novel and concise investigation into the mechanism that underlies cocaine associated hematopoietic pathology. Indeed, this is the first examination of the effects of cocaine on hematopoiesis. We show that cocaine impairs multilineage hematopoiesis from human progenitors from multiple donors and tissue types. We go on to present the first demonstration of the expression of the sigma-1 receptor in human CD34 + human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these cocaine-induced hematopoietic defects can be reversed through sigma-1 receptor blockade.

  17. Stroma-conditioned media improve expansion of human primitive hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breems, D A; Blokland, E A; Ploemacher, R E

    1997-01-01

    It has been reported that stroma-dependent cultures support proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In order to investigate the effect of soluble stromal factors, we developed short-term serum-low liquid cultures in which the effect of stroma-conditioned media (SCM) from the murine FBMD-1, and human L87/4 and L88/5 cell lines was studied on the maintenance and expansion of various human HSC subsets in CD34-positive selected mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from autologous transplants of lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients. The human cobblestone area forming cell (CAFC) assay was employed to determine the frequencies of both the CAFC weeks 2 to 4 as tentative indicators of progenitor and transiently repopulating HSC, and the more primitive CAFC weeks 6 to 8 as indicators of long-term repopulating HSC. In 7-day liquid cultures containing interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF) and IL-6, we recovered 3.0-fold more colony-forming cells (CFC) and 1.7- to 1.9-fold more CAFC weeks 2 and 4. The absolute number of primitive CAFC weeks 6 and 8 were only maintained (1.1- to 1.4-fold) in these liquid cultures. This modest expansion was significantly improved by the addition of SCM from the FBMD-1, L87/4 or L88/5 cell lines. Output CFC numbers were 6.8-, 5.8- and 9.9-fold higher, respectively, than the input values, while absolute CAFC week 2 to 4 numbers were 4.5-, 10.2- and 10.2-fold expanded, respectively. The addition of SCM also improved expansion of the more primitive CAFC week 6 to 8 stem cell subsets by 2.2-, 4.5- and 4.9-fold, respectively. The addition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), IL-1beta, IL-11 or macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha to cultures containing IL-3, SCF and IL-6 could not explain the SCM effect and in all these combinations SCM addition further increased the recovery of HSC subsets. Similarly, addition of anti-cytokine antibodies (ie alpha-G-CSF, alpha-GM-CSF, alpha

  18. Development of a vascular niche platform for expansion of repopulating human cord blood stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jason M; Gars, Eric J; James, Daylon J; Nolan, Daniel J; Scandura, Joseph M; Rafii, Shahin

    2012-08-09

    Transplantation of ex vivo expanded human umbilical cord blood cells (hCB) only partially enhances the hematopoietic recovery after myelosuppressive therapy. Incubation of hCB with optimal combinations of cytokines and niche cells, such as endothelial cells (ECs), could augment the efficiency of hCB expansion. We have devised an approach to cultivate primary human ECs (hECs) in serum-free culture conditions. We demonstrate that coculture of CD34(+) hCB in direct cellular contact with hECs and minimal concentrations of thrombopoietin/Kit-ligand/Flt3-ligand resulted in a 400-fold expansion of total hematopoietic cells, 150-fold expansion of CD45(+)CD34(+) progenitor cells, and 23-fold expansion of CD45(+) Lin(-)CD34(hi+)CD45RA(-)CD49f(+) stem and progenitor cells over a 12-day period. Compared with cytokines alone, coculture of hCB with hECs permitted greater expansion of cells capable of multilineage engraftment and serial transplantation, hallmarks of long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells. Therefore, hECs establish a cellular platform for expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and treatment of hematologic disorders.

  19. Delivery of Genome Editing Reagents to Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Megan D; Romero, Zulema; Cost, Gregory J; Mendel, Matthew; Holmes, Michael; Kohn, Donald B

    2016-02-03

    This unit describes the protocol for the delivery of reagents for targeted genome editing to CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Specifically, this unit focuses on the process of thawing and pre-stimulating CD34(+) HSPCs, as well as the details of their electroporation with in vitro-transcribed mRNA-encoding site-specific nucleases [in this case zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs)]. In addition, discussed is delivery of a gene editing donor template in the form of an oligonucleotide or integrase-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV). Finally, an analysis of cell survival following treatment and downstream culture conditions are presented. While optimization steps might be needed for each specific application with respect to nuclease and donor template amount, adherence to this protocol will serve as an excellent starting point for this further work.

  20. Stage-specific roles for CXCR4 signaling in murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in the process of bone marrow repopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chen-Yi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Okabe, Motohito; Suzuki, Sachie; Maeyama, Yoshihiro; Iimura, Yasuaki; Onodera, Masafumi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nojima, Masanori; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation has proven beneficial for various intractable diseases, but it remains unclear how hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) home to the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, initiate hematopoietic reconstitution, and maintain life-long hematopoiesis. The use of newly elucidated molecular determinants for overall HSPC engraftment should benefit patients. Here, we report that modification of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (Cxcr4) signaling in murine HSPCs does not significantly affect initial homing/lodging events, but leads to alteration in subsequent BM repopulation kinetics, with observations confirmed by both gain- and loss-of-function approaches. By using C-terminal truncated Cxcr4 as a gain-of-function effector, we demonstrated that signal augmentation likely led to favorable in vivo repopulation of primitive cell populations in BM. These improved features were correlated with enhanced seeding efficiencies in stromal cell cocultures and altered ligand-mediated phosphorylation kinetics of extracellular signal-regulated kinases observed in Cxcr4 signal-augmented HSPCs in vitro. Unexpectedly, however, sustained signal enhancement even with wild-type Cxcr4 overexpression resulted in impaired peripheral blood (PB) reconstitution, most likely by preventing release of donor hematopoietic cells from the marrow environment. We thus conclude that timely regulation of Cxcr4/CXCR4 signaling is key in providing donor HSPCs with enhanced repopulation potential following transplantation, whilst preserving the ability to release HSPC progeny into PB for improved transplantation outcomes.

  1. Transmembrane Inhibitor of RICTOR/mTORC2 in Hematopoietic Progenitors

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    Dongjun Lee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Central to cellular proliferative, survival, and metabolic responses is the serine/threonine kinase mTOR, which is activated in many human cancers. mTOR is present in distinct complexes that are either modulated by AKT (mTORC1 or are upstream and regulatory of it (mTORC2. Governance of mTORC2 activity is poorly understood. Here, we report a transmembrane molecule in hematopoietic progenitor cells that physically interacts with and inhibits RICTOR, an essential component of mTORC2. Upstream of mTORC2 (UT2 negatively regulates mTORC2 enzymatic activity, reducing AKTS473, PKCα, and NDRG1 phosphorylation and increasing FOXO transcriptional activity in an mTORC2-dependent manner. Modulating UT2 levels altered animal survival in a T cell acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL model that is known to be mTORC2 sensitive. These studies identify an inhibitory component upstream of mTORC2 in hematopoietic cells that can reduce mortality from NOTCH-induced T-ALL. A transmembrane inhibitor of mTORC2 may provide an attractive target to affect this critical cell regulatory pathway.

  2. Bacterial c-di-GMP affects hematopoietic stem/progenitors and their niches through STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Chiharu I; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Karigane, Daiki; Haeno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Sato, Taku; Ohteki, Toshiaki; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Barber, Glen N; Kurokawa, Mineo; Suda, Toshio; Takubo, Keiyo

    2015-04-01

    Upon systemic bacterial infection, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to the periphery in order to supply a sufficient number of immune cells. Although pathogen-associated molecular patterns reportedly mediate HSPC activation, how HSPCs detect pathogen invasion in vivo remains elusive. Bacteria use the second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) for a variety of activities. Here, we report that c-di-GMP comprehensively regulated both HSPCs and their niche cells through an innate immune sensor, STING, thereby inducing entry into the cell cycle and mobilization of HSPCs while decreasing the number and repopulation capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, we show that type I interferon acted as a downstream target of c-di-GMP to inhibit HSPC expansion in the spleen, while transforming growth factor-β was required for c-di-GMP-dependent splenic HSPC expansion. Our results define machinery underlying the dynamic regulation of HSPCs and their niches during bacterial infection through c-di-GMP/STING signaling.

  3. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  4. Extended flow cytometry characterization of normal bone marrow progenitor cells by simultaneous detection of aldehyde dehydrogenase and early hematopoietic antigens: implication for erythroid differentiation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascariello Caterina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cytosolic enzyme highly expressed in hematopoietic precursors from cord blood and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood, as well as in bone marrow from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. As regards human normal bone marrow, detailed characterization of ALDH+ cells has been addressed by one single study (Gentry et al, 2007. The goal of our work was to provide new information about the dissection of normal bone marrow progenitor cells based upon the simultaneous detection by flow cytometry of ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens, with particular attention to the expression of ALDH on erythroid precursors. To this aim, we used three kinds of approach: i multidimensional analytical flow cytometry, detecting ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens in normal bone marrow; ii fluorescence activated cell sorting of distinct subpopulations of progenitor cells, followed by in vitro induction of erythroid differentiation; iii detection of ALDH+ cellular subsets in bone marrow from pure red cell aplasia patients. Results In normal bone marrow, we identified three populations of cells, namely ALDH+CD34+, ALDH-CD34+ and ALDH+CD34- (median percentages were 0.52, 0.53 and 0.57, respectively. As compared to ALDH-CD34+ cells, ALDH+CD34+ cells expressed the phenotypic profile of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells, with brighter expression of CD117 and CD133, accompanied by lower display of CD38 and CD45RA. Of interest, ALDH+CD34- population disclosed a straightforward erythroid commitment, on the basis of three orders of evidences. First of all, ALDH+CD34- cells showed a CD71bright, CD105+, CD45- phenotype. Secondly, induction of differentiation experiments evidenced a clear-cut expression of glycophorin A (CD235a. Finally, ALDH+CD34- precursors were not detectable in patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA. Conclusion Our study, comparing surface antigen expression of

  5. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  6. 人巨细胞病毒感染致造血祖细胞增殖抑制与更昔洛韦的影响%Inhibitory effect of ganciclovir on proliferation of cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells after infection of human cytomegalovirus in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文君; 刘斌; 郭渠莲; 付晓冬; 邓正华

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinically, in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can be associated with delayed platelet engraftment, phenotypically abnormal peripheral blood leukocytes, and graft rejection, possibly through a direct viral effect on hematopoietic progenitor cells after HCMV infection. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the inhibitory effect of ganciclovir (GCV) on proliferation of colony forming unit (CFU) granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM), CFU-erythroid (CFU-E), CFU T-lymphocyte (CFU-TL), CFU-multipotential (CFU-Mix) and CFU-megakaryocyte (CFU-Mk) progenitor cells of cord blood (CB) and the protective effects on them. DESIGN: Contrast observational study.SETTING: Department of Molecular Biology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 20 cord blood (CB) samples (with 10 mL for each sample) from fetal umbilical vein of normal term spontaneous delivery neonates were provided by the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College. All the patients were informed and agreed with the experiment.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Department of Molecular Biology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College from June 2004 to December 2006. Colony forming unit-assay was applied to observe the suppression effect of HCMV-AD169 strain on CFU-GM, CFU-E, CFU-TL, CFU-Mix and CFU-Mk of CB with the presence of GCV. The techniques of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence quantification PCR were used to demonstrate the existence of HCMV-AD169 DNA in the colony cells of cultured CFU-GM, CFU-E, CFU-TL, CFU-Mix and CFU-Mk. Normal progenitor cells culture system was regarded as blank control group; normal progenitor cells culture system with inactivated HCMV fluid as inactivated (IV) control group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① The number and maintaining duration of colonies of cultured progenitor cells were counted by using a light inverted phase

  7. Correction of glucocerebrosidase deficiency after retroviral-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic progenitor cells from patients with Gaucher disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.; Correll, P.H.; Perry, L.K.; Brady, R.O.; Karlsson, S. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Retroviral gene transfer has been used successfully to correct the glucocerebrosidase (GCase) deficiency in primary hematopoietic cells from patients with Gaucher disease. For this model of somatic gene therapy, the authors developed a high-titer, amphotropic retroviral vector designated NTG in which the human GCase gene was driven by the mutant polyoma virus enhancer/herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene (tk) promoter (Py{sup +}/Htk). NTG normalized GCase activity in transduced Gaucher fibroblasts and efficiently infected human monocytic and erythroleukemic cell lines. RNA blot-hybridization (Northern blot) analysis of these hemaptopoietic cell lines showed unexpectedly high-level expression from the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat (Mo-MLV LTR) and levels of Py{sup +}/Htk enhancer/promoter-initiated human GCase RNA that approximated endogenous GCase RNA levels. Furthermore, NTG efficiently infected human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Detection of the provirus in approximately one-third of NTG-infected progenitor colonies that had not been selected in G418-containing medium indicates that relative resistance to G418 underestimated the actual gene transfer efficiency. Northern blot analysis of NTG-infected, progenitor-derived cells showed expression from both the Mo-MLV LTR and the Py{sup +}/Htk enhancer/promoter. NTG-transduced hematopoietic progenitor cells from patients with Gaucher disease generated progeny in which GCase activity has been normalized.

  8. ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA stimulate human hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation into eosinophils: the role of nuclear factor-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano-Almendras, Carmen P.; Essaghir, Ahmed; Schoemans, Hélène; Varis, Inci; Noël, Laura A.; Velghe, Amélie I.; Latinne, Dominique; Knoops, Laurent; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    Background ETV6-PDGFRB (also called TEL-PDGFRB) and FIP1L1-PDGFRA are receptor-tyrosine kinase fusion genes that cause chronic myeloid malignancies associated with hypereosinophilia. The aim of this work was to gain insight into the mechanisms whereby fusion genes affect human hematopoietic cells and in particular the eosinophil lineage. Design and Methods We introduced ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA into human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood. Results Cells transduced with these oncogenes formed hematopoietic colonies even in the absence of cytokines. Both oncogenes also stimulated the proliferation of cells in liquid culture and their differentiation into eosinophils. This model thus recapitulated key features of the myeloid neoplasms induced by ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA. We next showed that both fusion genes activated the transcription factors STAT1, STAT3, STAT5 and nuclear factor-κB. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibition blocked nuclear factor-κB activation in transduced progenitor cells and patients’ cells. Nuclear factor-κB was also activated in the human FIP1L1-PDGFRA-positive leukemia cell line EOL1, the proliferation of which was blocked by borte-zomib and the IκB kinase inhibitor BMS-345541. A mutant IκB that prevents nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB inhibited cell growth and the expression of eosinophil markers, such as the interleukin-5 receptor and eosinophil peroxidase, in progenitors transduced with ETV6-PDGFRB. In addition, several potential regulators of this process, including HES6, MYC and FOXO3 were identified using expression microarrays. Conclusions We show that human CD34+ cells expressing PDGFR fusion oncogenes proliferate autonomously and differentiate towards the eosinophil lineage in a process that requires nuclear factor-κB. These results suggest new treatment possibilities for imatinib-resistant myeloid neoplasms associated with PDGFR mutations. PMID:22271894

  9. Genomic Editing of the HIV-1 Coreceptor CCR5 in Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 is a validated target for HIV/AIDS therapy. The apparent elimination of HIV-1 in a patient treated with an allogeneic stem cell transplant homozygous for a naturally occurring CCR5 deletion mutation (CCR5Δ32/Δ32) supports the concept that a single dose of HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells can provide disease protection. Given the low frequency of naturally occurring CCR5Δ32/Δ32 donors, we reasoned that engineered autologous CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor ce...

  10. Resistance of hematopoietic progenitors to Fas-mediated apoptosis is actively sustained by NFκB with a characteristic transcriptional signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Keren; Kagan, Sivan; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Zipori, Dov; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-03-15

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a good source of hematopoietic progenitors with increasing implementation in the clinical transplant setting. This study evaluates the molecular mechanisms of progenitor resistance to apoptosis triggered by Fas cross-linking. CD34(+) and lineage-negative progenitors survive short-term ex vivo incubation and are not induced into apoptosis by Fas cross-linking. Furthermore, brief exposure of UCB cells to Fas-ligand for 24-48 h does not impair quantitative severe combine immune deficiency (SCID) reconstitution activity and appears to foster myelomonocyte reconstitution. The transcriptome of Fas receptor-positive CD34(+) cells that survived an apoptotic challenge showed significant transcriptional upregulation of caspase-8, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene-1 (MALT1), HtrA2, and GSK3β in addition to higher levels of c-FLICE inhibitory protein (FLIP), Bcl-2, and cytosolic inhibitor of apoptosis protein (cIAP) in all Fas-positive cells. Most prominent is the transcriptional upregulation of several key components the NFκB1 pathway including the membrane receptors TGF-β, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and TCR, the associated factor TNF receptor-associated factor-6 (TRAF6), and the converting enzymes TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), and α-catalytic subunit of IκB kinase (IKKα), that promote activation and nuclear translocation of this transcription factor. These data indicate that hematopoietic progenitors are not insensitive to apoptosis but are actively shielded from the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. This may occur through inherent transcriptional upregulation of the entire NFκB pathway in the presence of competent apoptotic signaling.

  11. E2F4 modulates differentiation and gene expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells during commitment to the lymphoid lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enos, Megan E; Bancos, Simona A; Bushnell, Timothy; Crispe, Ian N

    2008-03-15

    The E2F4 protein is involved in gene repression and cell cycle exit, and also has poorly understood effects in differentiation. We analyzed the impact of E2F4 deficiency on early steps in mouse hematopoietic development, and found defects in early hematopoietic progenitor cells that were propagated through common lymphoid precursors to the B and T lineages. In contrast, the defects in erythromyeloid precursor cells were self-correcting over time. This suggests that E2F4 is important in early stages of commitment to the lymphoid lineage. The E2F4-deficient progenitor cells showed reduced expression of several key lymphoid-lineage genes, and overexpression of two erythromyeloid lineage genes. However, we did not detect effects on cell proliferation. These findings emphasize the significance of E2F4 in controlling gene expression and cell fate.

  12. Expression of MALT1 oncogene in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells recapitulates the pathogenesis of human lymphoma in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; González, Marcos; Cobaleda, César; Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MALT1 gene are hallmarks of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. To date, targeting these translocations to mouse B cells has failed to reproduce human disease. Here, we induced MALT1 expression in mouse Sca1(+)Lin(-) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which showed NF-κB activation and early lymphoid priming, being selectively skewed toward B-cell differentiation. These cells accumulated in extranodal tissues and gave rise to clonal tum...

  13. Gene Editing of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells: Promise and Potential Hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyung-Rok; Natanson, Hannah; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2016-08-02

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have great therapeutic potential because of their ability to both self-renew and differentiate. It has been proposed that, given their unique properties, a small number of genetically modified HSPCs could accomplish lifelong, corrective reconstitution of the entire hematopoietic system in patients with various hematologic disorders. Scientists have demonstrated that gene addition therapies-targeted to HSPCs and using integrating retroviral vectors-possess clear clinical benefits in multiple diseases, among them immunodeficiencies, storage disorders, and hemoglobinopathies. Scientists attempting to develop clinically relevant gene therapy protocols have, however, encountered a number of unexpected hurdles because of their incomplete knowledge of target cells, genomic control, and gene transfer technologies. Targeted gene-editing technologies using engineered nucleases such as ZFN, TALEN, and/or CRISPR/Cas9 RGEN show great clinical promise, allowing for the site-specific correction of disease-causing mutations-a process with important applications in autosomal dominant or dominant-negative genetic disorders. The relative simplicity of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, in particular, has sparked an exponential increase in the scientific community's interest in and use of these gene-editing technologies. In this minireview, we discuss the specific applications of gene-editing technologies in human HSPCs, as informed by prior experience with gene addition strategies. HSPCs are desirable but challenging targets; the specific mechanisms these cells evolved to protect themselves from DNA damage render them potentially more susceptible to oncogenesis, especially given their ability to self-renew and their long-term proliferative potential. We further review scientists' experience with gene-editing technologies to date, focusing on strategies to move these techniques toward implementation in safe and effective clinical trials.

  14. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration After Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in a Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, Jonathan [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krueger, Sarah A.; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Torma, John T.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian [Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Madlambayan, Gerard J., E-mail: madlamba@oakland.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the recruitment of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within tumor microenvironment after radiation therapy (RT) in a murine, heterotopic tumor model. Methods and Materials: Lewis lung carcinoma tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice and irradiated with 30 Gy given as 2 fractions over 2 days. Tumors were imaged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measured daily with digital calipers. The HSPC and myelomonocytic cell content was assessed via immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. Functionality of tumor-associated HSPCs was verified in vitro using colony-forming cell assays and in vivo by rescuing lethally irradiated C57BL/6 recipients. Results: Irradiation significantly reduced tumor volumes and tumor regrowth rates compared with nonirradiated controls. The number of CD133{sup +} HSPCs present in irradiated tumors was higher than in nonirradiated tumors during all stages of regrowth. CD11b{sup +} counts were similar. PET/CT imaging and growth rate analysis based on standardized uptake value indicated that HSPC recruitment directly correlated to the extent of regrowth and intratumor cell activity after irradiation. The BM-derived tumor-associated HSPCs successfully formed hematopoietic colonies and engrafted irradiated mice. Finally, targeted treatment with a small animal radiation research platform demonstrated localized HSPC recruitment to defined tumor subsites exposed to radiation. Conclusions: Hypofractionated irradiation resulted in a pronounced and targeted recruitment of BM-derived HSPCs, possibly as a mechanism to promote tumor regrowth. These data indicate for the first time that radiation therapy regulates HSPC content within regrowing tumors.

  15. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M; Howard, Jonathan M; Contreras, Jorge R; Fernando, Thilini R; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina; Sanford, Jeremy R; Rao, Dinesh S

    2016-04-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease.

  16. Background and future considerations for human cord blood hematopoietic cell transplantation, including economic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, Hal E; Farag, Sherif

    2013-12-01

    Cord blood (CB) has been used since 1988 as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. CB has both advantages and disadvantages when compared with other tissue sources of HSCs such as bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood, which are also being used in the setting of HCT. This short review focuses on some historical information, as well as current efforts that are being assessed to enhance the efficacy of CB HCT. Also of importance are the costs of CB, and the feasibility and economics of using such to be identified, and newly confirmed improvements worldwide for the greatest number of patients. In this context, simple methods that would not necessarily entail the need for selected cell-processing facilities to ex vivo expand or improve the CB graft's functional activity may be of interest, with one such possibility being the use of an orally active inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidylpeptidase 4, alone or in combination with other new and innovative approaches for improving HSC engraftment and in vivo repopulating capability of CB.

  17. Expression of MALT1 oncogene in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells recapitulates the pathogenesis of human lymphoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Fontán, Lorena; Gonzalez-Herrero, Ines; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Segura, Victor; Aznar, M Angela; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I; Abollo-Jimenez, Fernando; Bertolo, Cristina; Peñuelas, Ivan; Garcia-Criado, Francisco J; García-Cenador, María B; Tousseyn, Thomas; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Garcia-Bragado, Federico; McPhail, Ellen D; Lossos, Izidore S; Du, Ming-Qing; Flores, Teresa; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M; Gonzalez, Marcos; Salar, Antonio; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Conde, Eulogio; Siebert, Reiner; Sagaert, Xavier; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2012-06-26

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MALT1 gene are hallmarks of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. To date, targeting these translocations to mouse B cells has failed to reproduce human disease. Here, we induced MALT1 expression in mouse Sca1(+)Lin(-) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which showed NF-κB activation and early lymphoid priming, being selectively skewed toward B-cell differentiation. These cells accumulated in extranodal tissues and gave rise to clonal tumors recapitulating the principal clinical, biological, and molecular genetic features of MALT lymphoma. Deletion of p53 gene accelerated tumor onset and induced transformation of MALT lymphoma to activated B-cell diffuse large-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). Treatment of MALT1-induced lymphomas with a specific inhibitor of MALT1 proteolytic activity decreased cell viability, indicating that endogenous Malt1 signaling was required for tumor cell survival. Our study shows that human-like lymphomas can be modeled in mice by targeting MALT1 expression to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, demonstrating the oncogenic role of MALT1 in lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, this work establishes a molecular link between MALT lymphoma and ABC-DLBCL, and provides mouse models to test MALT1 inhibitors. Finally, our results suggest that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of human mature B-cell lymphomas.

  18. Murine hematopoietic progenitor cells produce IL-6 in response to IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E; Salachas, F; Lemoine, F M; Arnould, A; Machavoine, F; Ploemacher, R E; Dy, M

    1995-04-01

    Similarly to interleukin-3 (IL-3), IgE is capable of inducing IL-6 production by murine bone marrow cells (BMC). IgE responder cells do not belong to the mature bone marrow compartment but coenrich with hematopoietic progenitors in the low-density fraction of a discontinuous Ficoll gradient. A significant enhancement of IL-6 production is observed after a 4-hour stimulation, reaching a maximum between 24 and 48 hours and is preceded by increased mRNA expression. The effect of IgE on IL-6 production is not mediated by IL-3 since it is not modified by anti-IL-3 antibodies. Upon a 4-hour exposure to IgE or IL-3, a similar percentage of progenitor-enriched BMC expresses IL-6 mRNA (3.9 and 5.4%, respectively, as determined by in situ hybridization), which is not further increased by a combination of both stimuli. IgE and IL-3 responder cells also cannot be distinguished on the basis of size, internal structure, and rhodamine (Rh) retention. The BMC sorted in the most fluorescent Rhbright subset (approximately 0.2% of total BMC) produce 30- to 40-fold more IL-6 than unfractionated cells and are similarly enriched for CFU-cells (CFU-C). The most primitive cells concentrated in the Rhdull fraction do not express this biological activity. The sorted Rhbright population does not contain mature mast cells/basophils or monocytes, and IL-6 is not produced in response to Fc epsilon RI cross-linkage after presensitization with IgE.

  19. Development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells, in vitro, supported by ectopic human HOXB4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilat, Sandra; Carotta, Sebastian; Klump, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells can recapitulate many aspects of hematopoiesis, in vitro, and can even generate cells capable of long-term multilineage repopulation after transplantation into recipient mice, when the homeodomain transcription factor HOXB4 is ectopically expressed. Thus, the ES-cell differentiation system is of great value for a detailed understanding of the process of blood formation. Furthermore, it is also promising for future application in hematopoietic cell and gene therapy. Since the arrival of techniques which allow the reprogramming of somatic cells back to an ES cell-like state, the generation of hematopoietic stem cells from patient-specific so-called induced pluripotent stem cells shows great promise for future therapeutic applications. In this chapter, we describe how to cultivate a certain feeder cell-independent mouse embryonic stem cell line, to manipulate these cells by retroviral gene transfer to ectopically express HOXB4, to differentiate these ES cells via embryoid body formation, and to selectively expand the arising, HOXB4-expressing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

  20. Stable transgene expression in primitive human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Teiko; Holt, Nathalia G; Hollis, Roger P; Ge, Shundi; Cannon, Paula M; Crooks, Gay M; Kohn, Donald B

    2009-12-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated integration has been shown to achieve long-term transgene expression in a wide range of host cells. In this study, we improved the SB transposon-mediated gene transfer system for transduction of human CD34(+) stem/progenitor cells by two approaches: (1) to increase the transposition efficacy, a hyperactive mutant of SB, HSB, was used; (2) to improve the expression of the SB transposase and the transgene cassette carried by the transposon, different viral and cellular promoters were evaluated. SB components were delivered in trans into the target cells by Nucleoporation. The SB transposon-mediated integration efficacy was assessed by integrated transgene (enhanced green fluorescent protein [eGFP]) expression both in vitro and in vivo. In purified human cord blood CD34(+) cells, HSB achieved long-term transgene expression in nearly 7-fold more cells than the original SB transposase. Significantly brighter levels of eGFP expression (5-fold) were achieved with the human elongation factor 1alpha (EF1-alpha) promoter in Jurkat human T cells, compared with that achieved with the modified myeloproliferative sarcoma virus long terminal repeat enhancer-promoter (MNDU3); in contrast, the MNDU3 promoter expressed eGFP at the highest level in K-562 myeloid cells. In human CD34(+) cord blood cells studied under conditions directing myeloid differentiation, the highest transgene integration and expression were achieved using the EF1-alpha promoter to express the SB transposase combined with the MNDU3 promoter to express the eGFP reporter. Stable transgene expression was achieved at levels up to 27% for more than 4 weeks of culture after improved gene transfer to CD34(+) cells (average, 17%; n = 4). In vivo studies evaluating engraftment and differentiation of the SB-modified human CD34(+) cells demonstrated that SB-modified human CD34(+) cells engrafted in NOD/SCID/gamma chain(null) (NSG) mice and differentiated into multilineage cell

  1. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  2. Transient loading of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells with polystyrene nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Sarah; Hadiwikarta, Wahyu Wijaya; Smisdom, Nick; Wathiong, Bart; Ameloot, Marcel; Nelissen, Inge; Hooyberghs, Jef

    2017-01-01

    CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) offer great opportunities to develop new treatments for numerous malignant and non-malignant diseases. Nanoparticle (NP)-based strategies can further enhance this potential, and therefore a thorough understanding of the loading behavior of HPCs towards NPs is essential for a successful application. The present study focusses on the interaction kinetics of 40 nm sized carboxylated polystyrene (PS) NPs with HPCs. Interestingly, a transient association of the NPs with HPCs is observed, reaching a maximum within 1 hour and declining afterwards. This behavior is not seen in dendritic cells (CD34-DCs) differentiated from HPCs, which display a monotonic increase in NP load. We demonstrate that this transient interaction requires an energy-dependent cellular process, suggesting active loading and release of NPs by HPCs. This novel observation offers a unique approach to transiently equip HPCs. A simple theoretical approach modeling the kinetics of NP loading and release is presented, contributing to a framework of describing this phenomenon. PMID:28138242

  3. Effect and it's mechanism of microgravity on biological characteristics of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells%微重力影响造血干/祖细胞生物学特性及其机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘竞争; 郑磊; 王前

    2008-01-01

    造血干/祖细胞具有自我更新、增殖及多向分化的功能,从而使机体维持正常的造血.机体在微重力环境下会出现外周血细胞数量和功能的改变,其中有多方面的原因,而在微重力环境下造血干/祖细胞生物学特性的改变是这一改变的主要因素.对微重力如何影响造血干/祖细胞的迁移、增殖及分化等生物学特性进行了综合评述.%Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells have the potential of self-renewal,proliferation and multidirectional differentiation,which maintain the normal haematopoiesis of bnmml body.Alterations in the number and function of mature blood cells in the peripheral blood commonly observed in humans exposed to microgravity (μ-g)are results of many reasons.The change of biological characteristic of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells is one of the important ressons.Migration,proliferation,and differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells under microgravity are summarized in this article.

  4. Differential sensitivity to JAK inhibitory drugs by isogenic human erythroblasts and hematopoietic progenitors generated from patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhaohui; Liu, Cyndi F; Lanikova, Lucie; Dowey, Sarah N; He, Chaoxia; Huang, Xiaosong; Brodsky, Robert A; Spivak, Jerry L; Prchal, Josef T; Cheng, Linzhao

    2014-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an unprecedented opportunity to establish novel disease models and accelerate drug development using distinct tissue target cells generated from isogenic iPSC lines with and without disease-causing mutations. To realize the potential of iPSCs in modeling acquired diseases which are usually heterogeneous, we have generated multiple iPSC lines including two lines that are JAK2-wild-type and four lines homozygous for JAK2-V617F somatic mutation from a single polycythemia vera (PV) patient blood. In vitro differentiation of the same patient-derived iPSC lines have demonstrated the differential contributions of their parental hematopoietic clones to the abnormal erythropoiesis including the formation of endogenous erythroid colonies. This iPSC approach thus may provide unique and valuable insights into the genetic events responsible for disease development. To examine the potential of iPSCs in drug testing, we generated isogenic hematopoietic progenitors and erythroblasts from the same iPSC lines derived from PV patients and normal donors. Their response to three clinical JAK inhibitors, INCB018424 (Ruxolitinib), TG101348 (SAR302503), and the more recent CYT387 was evaluated. All three drugs similarly inhibited erythropoiesis from normal and PV iPSC lines containing the wild-type JAK2 genotype, as well as those containing a homozygous or heterozygous JAK2-V617F activating mutation that showed increased erythropoiesis without a JAK inhibitor. However, the JAK inhibitors had less inhibitory effect on the self-renewal of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors. The iPSC-mediated disease modeling thus underlies the ineffectiveness of the current JAK inhibitors and provides a modeling system to develop better targeted therapies for the JAK2 mutated hematopoiesis.

  5. Autophagy as an ultrastructural marker of heavy metal toxicity in human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gioacchino, Mario [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)], E-mail: m.digioacchino@unich.it; Petrarca, Claudia; Perrone, Angela [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Farina, Massimo; Sabbioni, Enrico; Hartung, Thomas [Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Martino, Simone [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Esposito, Diana L. [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mariani-Costantini, Renato [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Stem cells are a key target of environmental toxicants, but little is known about their toxicological responses. We aimed at developing an in-vitro model based on adult human stem cells to identify biomarkers of heavy metal exposure. To this end we investigated the responses of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells to hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) and cadmium (Cd). Parallel cultures of CD34+ cells isolated from umbilical cord blood were exposed for 48 h to 0.1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd. Cultures treated with 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd showed marked cell loss. Ultrastructural analysis of surviving cells revealed prominent autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes, which is diagnostic of autophagy, associated with mitochondrial damage and replication, dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and chromatin condensation. Treated cells did not show the morphologic hallmarks of apoptosis. Treatment with 0.1 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd did not result in cell loss, but at the ultrastructural level cells showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum and evidence of mitochondrial damage. We conclude that autophagy is implicated in the response of human hematopoietic stem cells to toxic concentrations of Cr(VI) and Cd. Autophagy, which mediates cell survival and death under stress, deserves further evaluation to be established as biomarker of metal exposure.

  6. TGFβ inhibition enhances the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human ES cell-derived hemogenic endothelial cells using a stepwise strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengyan Wang; Liying Du; Yang Gao; Ming Yin; Mingxiao Ding; Hongkui Deng; Xuming Tang; Xiaomeng Sun; Zhenchuan Miao; Yaxin Lv; Yanlei Yang; Huidan Zhang; Pengbo Zhang; Yang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic hematopoiesis is a complex process.Elucidating the mechanism regulating hematopoietic differentiation from pluripotent stem cells would allow us to establish a strategy to efficiently generate hematopoietic cells.However,the mechanism governing the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)remains unknown.Here,on the basis of the emergence of CD43+ hematopoietic cells from hemogenic endothelial (HE) cells,we demonstrated that VEGF was essential and sufficient,and that bFGF was synergistic with VEGF to specify the HE cells and the subsequent transition into CD43+ hematopoietic cells.Significantly,we identified TGFβ as a novel signal to regulate hematopoietic development,as the TGFβ inhibitor SB 431542 significantly promoted the transition from HE cells into CD43+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) during hESC differentiation.By defining these critical signaling factors during hematopoietic differentiation,we can efficiently generate HPCs from hESCs.Our strategy could offer an in vitro model to study early human hematopoietic development.

  7. Lineage-related cytotoxicity and clonogenic profile of 1,4-benzoquinone-exposed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Paik Wah [Biomedical Science Programme, School of Diagnostic & Applied Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Abdul Muda Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan (Malaysia); Toxicology Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey, E-mail: zyantey@ukm.edu.my [Biomedical Science Programme, School of Diagnostic & Applied Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Abdul Muda Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan (Malaysia); Toxicology Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chan, Kok Meng [Environmental Health and Industrial Safety Programme, School of Diagnostic & Applied Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Abdul Muda Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan (Malaysia); Toxicology Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Inayat-Hussain, Salmaan Hussain [Environmental Health and Industrial Safety Programme, School of Diagnostic & Applied Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Abdul Muda Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan (Malaysia); Rajab, Nor Fadilah [Biomedical Science Programme, School of Diagnostic & Applied Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Abdul Muda Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan (Malaysia); Toxicology Laboratory, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are sensitive targets for benzene-induced hematotoxicity and leukemogenesis. The impact of benzene exposure on the complex microenvironment of HSCs and HPCs remains elusive. This study aims to investigate the mechanism linking benzene exposure to targeting HSCs and HPCs using phenotypic and clonogenic analyses. Mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were exposed ex vivo to the benzene metabolite, 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ), for 24 h. Expression of cellular surface antigens for HSC (Sca-1), myeloid (Gr-1, CD11b), and lymphoid (CD45, CD3e) populations were confirmed by flow cytometry. The clonogenicity of cells was studied using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay for multilineage (CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM) and single-lineage (CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-G, and CFU-M) progenitors. 1,4-BQ demonstrated concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in mouse BM cells. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased (p < 0.05) following 1,4-BQ exposure. Exposure to 1,4-BQ showed no significant effect on CD3e{sup +} cells but reduced the total counts of Sca-1{sup +}, CD11b{sup +}, Gr-1{sup +}, and CD45{sup +} cells at 7 and 12 μM (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the CFU assay showed reduced (p < 0.05) clonogenicity in 1,4-BQ-treated cells. 1,4-BQ induced CFU-dependent cytotoxicity by significantly inhibiting colony growth for CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-G, and CFU-M starting at a low concentration of exposure (5 μM); whereas for the CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM, the inhibition of colony growth was remarkable only at 7 and 12 μM of 1,4-BQ, respectively. Taken together, 1,4-BQ caused lineage-related cytotoxicity in mouse HPCs, demonstrating greater toxicity in single-lineage progenitors than in those of multi-lineage. - Highlights: • We examine 1,4-BQ toxicity targeting mouse hematopoietic cell lineages. • 1,4-BQ induces concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in bone marrow (BM) cells. • 1,4-BQ shows lineage-related toxicity on hematopoietic stem and

  8. Characterizing the lymphopoietic kinetics and features of hematopoietic progenitors contained in the adult murine liver in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Jiang

    Full Text Available The appearance of donor-derived lymphocytes in liver transplant patients suggests that adult livers may contain cells capable of lymphopoiesis. However, only a few published studies have addressed the lymphopoietic capacity of adult liver cells, and its kinetics and features remain unclear. Herein, we investigated the lymphopoietic capacity of adult liver mononuclear cells (MNCs and purified liver hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs in vivo. Similar to bone-marrow transplantation (BMT, transplantation of liver MNCs alone was able to rescue survival of lethally irradiated mice. In terms of kinetics, liver MNC-derived myeloid lineage cells reconstituted more slowly than those from BMT. Liver MNC-derived lymphocyte lineage cells in the blood, spleen and BM also reconstituted more slowly than BMT, but lymphocytes in the liver recovered at a similar rate. Interestingly, liver MNCs predominantly gave rise to CD3(+CD19(- T cells in both irradiated WT and non-irradiated lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1(-/-Il2rg(-/- recipients. To define the lymphopoietic potential of various cell populations within liver MNCs, we transplanted purified lineage-negative (Lin(- liver HPCs into recipient mice. Unlike total liver MNCs, liver HPCs reconstituted T and B cells in similar frequencies to BMT. We further determined that the predominance of T cells observed after transplanting total liver MNCs likely originated from mature T cells, as purified donor liver T cells proliferated in the recipients and gave rise to CD8(+ T cells. Thus, the capacity of donor adult liver cells to reconstitute lymphocytes in recipients derives from both HPCs and mature T cells contained in the liver MNC population.

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Expansionin Rotating Wall Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionClinical trials have demonstrated that ex vivo expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors offer great promise in reconstituting in vivo hematopoiesis in patients who have undergone intensive chemotherapy. It is therefore necessary to develop a clinical-scale culture system to provide the expanded HSCs and progenitors. Static culture systems such as T-flasks and gas-permeable blood bags are the most widely used culture devices for expanding hematopoietic cells. But they reveal sev...

  10. Preservation of differentiation and clonogenic potential of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during lyophilization and ambient storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya S Buchanan

    Full Text Available Progenitor cell therapies show great promise, but their potential for clinical applications requires improved storage and transportation. Desiccated cells stored at ambient temperature would provide economic and practical advantages over approaches employing cell freezing and subzero temperature storage. The objectives of this study were to assess a method for loading the stabilizing sugar, trehalose, into hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HPC and to evaluate the effects of subsequent freeze-drying and storage at ambient temperature on differentiation and clonogenic potential. HPC were isolated from human umbilical cord blood and loaded with trehalose using an endogenous cell surface receptor, termed P2Z. Solution containing trehalose-loaded HPC was placed into vials, which were transferred to a tray freeze-dryer and removed during each step of the freeze-drying process to assess differentiation and clonogenic potential. Control groups for these experiments were freshly isolated HPC. Control cells formed 1450+/-230 CFU-GM, 430+/-140 BFU-E, and 50+/-40 CFU-GEMM per 50 microL. Compared to the values for the control cells, there was no statistical difference observed for cells removed at the end of the freezing step or at the end of primary drying. There was a gradual decrease in the number of CFU-GM and BFU-E for cells removed at different temperatures during secondary drying; however, there were no significant differences in the number of CFU-GEMM. To determine storage stability of lyophilized HPC, cells were stored for 4 weeks at 25 degrees C in the dark. Cells reconstituted immediately after lyophilization produced 580+/-90 CFU-GM ( approximately 40%, relative to unprocessed controls p<0.0001, 170+/-70 BFU-E (approximately 40%, p<0.0001, and 41+/-22 CFU-GEMM (approximately 82%, p = 0.4171, and cells reconstituted after 28 days at room temperature produced 513+/-170 CFU-GM (approximately 35%, relative to unprocessed controls, p<0

  11. Hematopoietic progenitor cell counting for prediction of the yield of peripheral blood stem cell in mobilization and harvest%外周血造血祖细胞检测对外周血干细胞动员采集的预测意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏征; 王志梅; 庄静丽; 李锋; 程韵枫; 邹善华

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过血细胞分析仪检测外周血造血祖细胞(HPC)含量,探寻一种快速预测采集物干细胞含量、判断外周血造血干细胞采集时机的手段,并评价其应用意义.方法 对27例化疗联合粒细胞集落刺激因子(G-CSF)进行外周血造血干细胞动员采集者及17例单用G-CSF动员的采集者,利用血细胞分析仪检测外周血HPC计数,血液治疗和移植工程国际组织(ISHAGE)法检测外周血及采集物CD34+细胞计数,并进行相关回归分析.对外周血HPC计数预测采集物CD34+含量进行受试者工作曲线(ROC)分析.结果 无论化疗组或非化疗组,外周血HPC计数与CD34+计数均具有线性相关性(r=0.711,P=0.000及r=0.656,P=0.004).化疗组外周血CD34+计数=-0.829+0.648×外周血HPC计数;非化疗组外周血CD34+细胞计数=45.033+0.460×外周血HPC计数.化疗组患者外周血HPC计数与采集物CD34+细胞量呈线性相关(r=0.602,P=0.001),采集物CD34+计数=1.106+0.046×外周血HPC计数.以HPC≥85/μl预测采集物CD34+计数≥5×106/kg的灵敏度为78%,特异度为82%.结论 在自体干细胞移植动员患者中,外周血HPC计数可部分替代外周血CD34+计数预测采集效果,HPC≥85/μl为较好的预测阈值.%Objective To evaluate a method of fast detection of the hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) in peripheral blood samples and explore for an appropriate cutoff value in prediction of adequate CD34+ cell in apheresis concentrate.Methods Peripheral blood samples and apheresis concentrate samples were collected from 27 auto-PBSCT patients receiving chemotherapy plus G-CSF mobilization (chemo group) and 17 patients receiving G-CSF alone (non-chemo group).CD34+ cell counts were determined by flow cytometry according to ISHAGE guideline and HPC counts were detected using Sysmex XE-2100 automatic hemocyte analyzer.The correlation between HPC and CD34+ cell counts in peripheral blood samples and apheresis concentrates were analyzed

  12. Intracellular Immunization of Human Fetal Cord Blood Stem/Progenitor Cells with a Ribozyme Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mang; Leavitt, Mark C.; Maruyama, Midori; Yamada, Osamu; Young, Dennis; Ho, Anthony D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1995-01-01

    Successful treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection may ultimately require targeting of hematopoietic stem cells. Here we used retroviral vectors carrying the ribozyme gene to transduce CD34^+ cells from human fetal cord blood. Transduction and ribozyme expression had no apparent adverse effect on cell differentiation and/or proliferation. The macrophage-like cells, differentiated from the stem/progenitor cells in vitro, expressed the ribozyme gene and resisted infection by a macrophage tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1. These results suggest the feasibility of stem cell gene therapy for human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alpharetroviral Integration in Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Moiani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer vectors derived from gamma-retroviruses or lentiviruses are currently used for the gene therapy of genetic or acquired diseases. Retroviral vectors display a non-random integration pattern in the human genome, targeting either regulatory regions (gamma-retroviruses or the transcribed portion of expressed genes (lentiviruses, and have the potential to deregulate gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. A recently developed alternative vector system derives from the avian sarcoma-leukosis alpha-retrovirus (ASLV and shows favorable safety features compared to both gamma-retroviral and lentiviral vectors in preclinical models. We performed a high-throughput analysis of the integration pattern of self-inactivating (SIN alpha-retroviral vectors in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs and compared it to previously reported gamma-retroviral and lentiviral vectors integration profiles obtained in the same experimental setting. Compared to gamma-retroviral and lentiviral vectors, the SIN-ASLV vector maintains a preference for open chromatin regions, but shows no bias for transcriptional regulatory elements or transcription units, as defined by genomic annotations and epigenetic markers (H3K4me1 and H3K4me3 histone modifications. Importantly, SIN-ASLV integrations do not cluster in hot spots and target potentially dangerous genomic loci, such as the EVI2A/B, RUNX1 and LMO2 proto-oncogenes at a virtually random frequency. These characteristics predict a safer profile for ASLV-derived vectors for clinical applications.

  14. Bcl11b mutations identified in murine lymphomas increase the proliferation rate of hematopoietic progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderkvist Peter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The telomeric region of mouse chromosome 12 has previously shown frequent allelic loss in murine lymphoma. The Bcl11b gene has been identified and suggested as a candidate tumor suppressor gene within this region. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether Bcl11b is mutated in lymphomas with allelic loss, and whether the mutations we detected conferred any effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods Mouse lymphomas induced by 1,3-butadiene or 2',3'-dideoxycytidine were analysed for mutations in the Bcl11b gene using single strand conformation analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Effects on cell proliferation by the detected mutations were studied by expressing wild-type and mutant Bcl11b in the cytokine-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line FDC-P1, lacking endogenous Bcl11b expression. Results Missense and frameshift (FS mutations were identified in 7 of 47 tumors (15%. Interestingly, all mutations were found between amino acids 778–844 which encode the three C-terminal DNA-binding zinc fingers. In FDC-P1 cells, wild-type Bcl11b suppressed cell proliferation, whereas the mutated versions (S778N, K828T, Y844C and FS823 enhanced proliferation several-fold. Conclusion The genetic alterations detected in this study suggest that the three C-terminal zinc fingers of Bcl11b are important for the DNA-binding. Cell proliferation was suppressed by overexpression of wild-type Bcl11b but enhanced by mutant Bcl11b, indicating that these mutations may be an important contributing factor to lymphomagenesis in a subset of tumors.

  15. Optimizing outcomes following allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation in AML: the role of hypomethylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Massimo; Fedele, Roberta; Moscato, Tiziana; Ronco, Francesca

    2013-07-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a key pathological mechanism in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and provides rationale for the clinical development of hypomethylating agents (HMAs) for the treatment of these diseases. One HMA, azacitidine (Vidaza®, Celgene Corp.), has demonstrated improved survival versus conventional care regimens in patients with intermediate-2/high-risk MDS and AML (20-30% blasts) and has a favorable tolerability profile. Emerging evidence indicates that azacitidine can have an immunomodulatory effect by, for example, increasing functional regulatory T-cell (Treg) numbers and killer-cell-immunoglobulin-like receptor expression. Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (allo HPCT) is the only potentially curative treatment approach in patients with advanced MDS or AML. Unfortunately, allo HPCT in these settings is limited because most patients are ineligible due to age/comorbidities, or are at a high risk of treatment failure due to disease relapse. Recent studies have shown that azacitidine after allo HPCT increases Treg numbers while inducing a cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell response, suggesting a potential mechanism for augmenting the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect without increasing graft-versushost- disease (GVHD). In patients at a high risk of relapse following allo HPCT, pre-emptive azacitidine may help prevent/delay relapse. For patients who have relapsed following allo HPCT, azacitidine may be a salvage therapy option, either as monotherapy or in combination with donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI). In this mini-review, we discuss these emerging clinical data for HMAs in the post-allo HPCT regimens and highlight the possible future role of azacitidine in this setting.

  16. Function of Jam-B/Jam-C interaction in homing and mobilization of human and mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Bardin, Florence; Frontera, Vincent; Bidaut, Ghislain; Obrados, Elodie; Adams, Ralf H; Chabannon, Christian; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2014-04-01

    The junctional adhesion molecules Jam-b and Jam-c interact together at interendothelial junctions and have been involved in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, and leukocyte migration. More recently, Jam-c has been found to be expressed by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) in mouse. Conversely, we have reported that Jam-b is present on bone marrow stromal cells and that Jam-b-deficient mice have defects in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell pool. In this study, we have addressed whether interaction between Jam-b and Jam-c participates to HSPC mobilization or hematopoietic reconstitution after irradiation. We show that a blocking monoclonal antibody directed against Jam-c inhibits hematopoietic reconstitution, progenitor homing to the bone marrow, and induces HSPC mobilization in a Jam-b dependent manner. In the latter setting, antibody treatment over a period of 3 days does not alter hematopoietic differentiation nor induce leukocytosis. Results are translated to human hematopoietic system in which a functional adhesive interaction between JAM-B and JAM-C is found between human HSPC and mesenchymal stem cells. Such an interaction does not occur between HSPC and human endothelial cells or osteoblasts. It is further shown that anti-JAM-C blocking antibody interferes with CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor homing in mouse bone marrow suggesting that monoclonal antibodies inhibiting JAM-B/JAM-C interaction may represent valuable therapeutic tools to improve stem cell mobilization protocols.

  17. Rumba and Haus3 are essential factors for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during zebrafish hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Linsen; Xu, Jin; Li, Xiuling; Ma, Ning; Liu, Yanmei; Peng, Jinrong; Osato, Motomi; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zilong

    2011-02-01

    The hallmark of vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis is the establishment of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) pool during embryogenesis. This process involves a defined ontogenic switching of HSPCs in successive hematopoietic compartments and is evolutionarily conserved from teleost fish to human. In zebrafish, HSPCs originate from the ventral wall of the dorsal aorta (VDA), from which they subsequently mobilize to an intermediate hematopoietic site known as the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT) and finally colonize the kidney for adult hematopoiesis. Despite substantial understanding of the ontogeny of HSPCs, the molecular basis governing migration, colonization and maintenance of HSPCs remains to be explored fully. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two zebrafish mutants, rumba(hkz1) and samba(hkz2), that are defective in generating definitive hematopoiesis. We find that HSPC initiation in the VDA and subsequent homing to the CHT are not affected in these two mutants. However, the further development of HSPCs in the CHT is compromised in both mutants. Positional cloning reveals that Rumba is a novel nuclear C2H2 zinc-finger factor with unknown function and samba encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein that is homologous to human augmin complex subunit 3 (HAUS3). Furthermore, we show that these two factors independently regulate cell cycle progression of HSPCs and are cell autonomously required for HPSC development in the CHT. Our study identifies Rumba and Haus3 as two essential regulators of HSPC maintenance during zebrafish fetal hematopoiesis.

  18. Engraftment and lineage potential of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised following short-term culture in the presence of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Angel; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Tran, Chy-Anh; Vu, Hieu; Epps, Elizabeth W; Chung, Janet; Gonzalez, Nancy; Blanchard, Suzette; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for HIV/AIDS is a promising alternative to lifelong antiretroviral therapy. One of the limitations of this approach is the number and quality of stem cells available for transplant following in vitro manipulations associated with stem cell isolation and genetic modification. The development of methods to increase the number of autologous, gene-modified stem cells available for transplantation would overcome this barrier. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) from adult growth factor-mobilized peripheral blood were cultured in the presence of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist (AhRA) previously shown to expand HSPC from umbilical cord blood. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of the hematopoietic potential of minimally cultured (MC-HSPC) or expanded HSPC (Exp-HSPC) was performed using an immunodeficient mouse model of transplantation. Our results demonstrate robust, multilineage engraftment of both MC-HSPC and Exp-HSPC although estimates of expansion based on stem cell phenotype were not supported by a corresponding increase in in vivo engrafting units. Bone marrow of animals transplanted with either MC-HSPC or Exp-HSPC contained secondary engrafting cells verifying the presence of primitive stem cells in both populations. However, the frequency of in vivo engrafting units among the more primitive CD34+/CD90+ HSPC population was significantly lower in Exp-HSPC compared with MC-HSPC. Exp-HSPC also produced fewer lymphoid progeny and more myeloid progeny than MC-HSPC. These results reveal that in vitro culture of adult HSPC in AhRA maintains but does not increase the number of in vivo engrafting cells and that HSPC expanded in vitro contain defects in lymphopoiesis as assessed in this model system. Further investigation is required before implementation of this approach in the clinical setting.

  19. Human peripheral blood-born hematosphere as a niche for hematopoietic stem cell expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Hur; Eun Ju Lee; Hyun-Jai Cho; Hyun-Jae Kang; Byung-Hee Oh; Young-Bae Park; Hyo-Soo Kim; Jonghanne Park; Sang Eun Lee; Chang-Hwan Yoon; Jae Hee Jang; Ji Min Yang; Tae-Kyu Lee; Jae-Il Choi; Han-Mo Yang

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from the adult peripheral blood has been widely used in the treatment of various hematological diseases [1].However,the small number of circulating HSPC is the major limitation and necessitates additional interventions such as G-CSF mobilization and leukapheresis.There have been several attempts to overcome the limitation with ex vivo expansion of HSPC.These strategies are largely based on supplementation of one or more "stem cell niche components"such as supporting-cells,growth factors,extracellular matrix (ECM) or physicochemical microenvironment in the bone marrow [2].Spheroid culture methods of stem ceils from different tissues have been successfully used for expansion of cardiac and neural stem cells.These spheres sensitize target stem cells to growth factors and provide sufficient cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix contacts,mimicking the in vivo stem cell niche [3,4].Here we asked whether spheroid culture of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) would potentiate the expansion of circulating blood HSPC.

  20. Detection of the Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Marker CD133 during Angiogenesis in Three-Dimensional Collagen Gel Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumi Akita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We detected the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell marker CD133 using immunogold labeling during angiogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen gel culture. CD133-positive cells were present in capillary tubes newly formed from aortic explants in vitro. The CD133-positive cell population had the capacity to form capillary tubes. Lovastatin strongly inhibited cell migration from aortic explants and caused the degradation of the capillary tubes. The present study provides insight into the function of CD133 during angiogenesis as well as an explanation for the antiangiogenic effect of statins.

  1. Effective Action Distance of Co-Culture between Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells and Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells%脐血造血干/祖细胞与脂肪干细胞共培养的作用距离研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋克东; 崔占峰; 刘天庆; 武爽; 郭文华; 郝永杰; 方美云; 石芳鑫; 朱丽丽; 马学虎

    2011-01-01

    设计了一种细胞间距可调的transwell共培养方法,以研究脐带血来源的造血干/祖细胞(HS/PCs)和人脂肪干细胞(human-adipose derived stem cells,h-ADSCs)体外共培养时细胞间作用距离对造血干细胞扩增能力和脂肪干细胞在共培养后干细胞特性的影响.采用不同规格的砂纸打磨孔板的上壁面,经高精度游标卡尺测量,使两种细胞之间的有效接触间距为10~450 μm不等.然后以h-ADSCs为基质细胞,分别考察HS/PCs和h-ADSCs在不同的作用距离下的共培养情况.其间每24小时对细胞进行计数,观察细胞形态.培养7天后对MNCs表面抗原CD34+、CFU-GM集落扩增倍数进行了检测;同时也对h-ADSCs表面抗原(CD13、CD29、CD34、CD44、CD45、CD73、CD105、CD166、HLA-DR)及其多向分化潜能(成骨、成软骨、成脂肪)进行分析以鉴定其干细胞性能.结果表明,通过transwell共培养,细胞之间在作用距离为350μm时HS/PCs的扩增效果最好,其中造血MNCs扩增了15.1±0.2倍,CD34+扩增了5.0±0.1倍;扩增的h-ADSCs表达CD29、CD44、CD166,而不表达CD34、CD45,且在适当诱导条件下可以向成骨细胞、软骨细胞、脂肪细胞分化.%In order to investigate the effects of in vitro co-culture distance between umbilical cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HS/PCs) and human adipose derived stem cells (h-ADSCs) on the expansion of HS/PCs and the stem cell properties of h-ADSCs, a novel transwell co-culture protocol in which the distance between the two culture chambers could be adjusted was designed. Sand papers with different specifications were utilized to adjust the cellular action distance between two kinds of cells mentioned above in the range of 10 to 450 μrn which was measured by a high-precision vernier caliper. Then the HS/PCs were cultured in the modified transwell supported by ADSCs for 7 days. The total cell number was counted by using a hemacytometer and the cell morphology

  2. Inactivation of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3 is essential for PKB-mediated survival of hematopoietic progenitor cells by kit ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, Maria; Karlsson, Richard; Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation of phosphatidylinos......OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation...... of hematopoietic progenitors. Because forkhead proteins are involved in controlling apoptosis and cell-cycle progression, this may be one important mechanism by which survival of hematopoietic progenitors is mediated....

  3. The in vivo study of myeloprotection by GST-π gene transfected human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xingsheng; Yu Chenghao; Kong Yawei; Jiang Jie; Dong Ruiying; Cui Baoxia; Wang Lijie; Jiang Sen

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence of GST-π gene transfer into human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells on their drug resistance against anti-tumor drugs in vivo.Methods:GST-π gene transfection into human cord blood CD34+ cells was carried out using a retrovirus vector PLJ-GST-π with the aid of fibronectin.Successful gene transfer was confirmed by in vitro colony assay and RT-PCR.GST-π gene transduced human cord blood CD34+ cells were then engrafted into 4-week-old total body irradiated NOD/Scid mice and carboplatin was intraperitoneally administered sequentially at 4 weeks interval 4 weeks after engraftment.Results:Peripheral blood(PB) WBC was significantly higher in GST-π mice than control mice after 2 course of carboplatin.Retroviral GST-π expression in bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells of recipient mice was detected by RT-PCR 16 weeks after Xenotransplantation.Conclusion:The transfection of GST-π gene could confer,to some extent,resistance to cord blood stem cells against carboplatin in vivo.

  4. Apheresis techniques for collection of peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moog, Rainer

    2004-12-01

    The combination of effective mobilisation protocols and efficient use of apheresis machines has caused peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) transplantation to grow rapidly. The development of apheresis technology has improved over the years. Today PBSC procedures have changed towards systems to minimise operator interaction and to reduce the collection of undesired cells such as polymorphonuclear cells and platelets using functionally closed, sterile environments for PBSC collection in keeping with Good Manufacturing Practice guidelines. Blood cell separators with continuous flow technique allow the processing of more blood than intermittent flow devices resulting in higher PBSC yields. Large volume leukapheresis with the processing of 3-4-fold donor's/patient's blood volume can increase the number of collected progenitor cells. Therefore, intermittent flow cell separators are indicated if only single vein access is available. Anticoagulant induced hypocalcaemia is an often observed side effect in long lasting PBPC harvesting and monitoring of electrolytes should be performed especially at the end of the apheresis procedure to supplement low levels of potassium, calcium or magnesium. Refinement and improvement of collection techniques continue to add to the armamentarium of current approaches for cancer and non-malignant conditions and will enable future strategies.

  5. Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Express Several Functional Sex Hormone Receptors—Novel Evidence for a Potential Developmental Link Between Hematopoiesis and Primordial Germ Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Borkowska, Sylwia; Suszynska, Ewa; Suszynska, Malwina; Poniewierska-Baran, Agata; Maj, Magda; Pedziwiatr, Daniel; Adamiak, Mateusz; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Kakar, Sham S.; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) share several markers with the germline, a connection supported by reports that prolactin, androgens, and estrogens stimulate hematopoiesis. To address this issue more directly, we tested the expression of receptors for pituitary-derived hormones, such as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), on purified murine bone marrow (BM) cells enriched for HSPCs and tested the functionality of these receptors in ex vivo signal transduction studies and in vitro clonogenic assays. We also tested whether administration of pituitary- and gonad-derived sex hormones (SexHs) increases incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) into HSPCs and expansion of hematopoietic clonogenic progenitors in mice and promotes recovery of blood counts in sublethally irradiated animals. We report for the first time that HSPCs express functional FSH and LH receptors and that both proliferate in vivo and in vitro in response to stimulation by pituitary SexHs. Furthermore, based on our observations that at least some of CD45− very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) may become specified into CD45+ HSPCs, we also evaluated the expression of pituitary and gonadal SexHs receptors on these cells and tested whether these quiescent cells may expand in vivo in response to SexHs administration. We found that VSELs express SexHs receptors and respond in vivo to SexHs stimulation, as evidenced by BrdU accumulation. Since at least some VSELs share several markers characteristic of migrating primordial germ cells and can be specified into HSPCs, this observation sheds new light on the BM stem cell hierarchy. PMID:25607657

  6. Worse outcome and more chronic GVHD with peripheral blood progenitor cells than bone marrow in HLA-matched sibling donor transplants for young patients with severe acquired aplastic anemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrezenmeier, H.; Passweg, J.R.; Marsh, J.C.; Bacigalupo, A.; Bredeson, C.N.; Bullorsky, E.; Camitta, B.M.; Champlin, R.E.; Gale, R.P.; Fuhrer, M.; Klein, J.P.; Locasciulli, A.; Oneto, R.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Socie, G.; Eapen, M.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the outcome of 692 patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) receiving transplants from HLA-matched siblings. A total of 134 grafts were peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) grafts, and 558 were bone marrow (BM) grafts. Rates of hematopoietic recovery and grades 2 to 4 chronic graft-

  7. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Daniela, E-mail: d.kraft@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia, E-mail: s.ritter@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Physics Department, Technical University Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Seifried, Erhard, E-mail: e.seifried@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Fournier, Claudia, E-mail: c.fournier@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonn, Torsten, E-mail: t.tonn@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Med. Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institute for Transfusion Medicine Dresden, German Red Cross Blood Donation Service North-East, Blasewitzer Straße 68/70, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34{sup +} cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and

  8. A Method to Study the Epigenetic Chromatin States of Rare Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells; MiniChIP–Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishaupt Holger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic chromatin structure is a fundamental property of gene transcriptional regulation, and has emerged as a critical modulator of physiological processes during cellular differentiation and development. Analysis of chromatin structure using molecular biology and biochemical assays in rare somatic stem and progenitor cells is key for understanding these processes but poses a great challenge because of their reliance on millions of cells. Through the development of a miniaturized genome-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation method (miniChIP–chip, we have documented the genome-wide chromatin states of low abundant populations that comprise hematopoietic stem cells and immediate progeny residing in murine bone marrow. In this report, we describe the miniChIP methodology that can be used for increasing an understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function. Application of this method will reveal the contribution of dynamic chromatin structure in regulating the function of other somatic stem cell populations, and how this process becomes perturbed in pathological conditions. Additional file 1 Click here for file

  9. The Rac GTPase effector p21-activated kinase is essential for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell migration and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrance, Adrienne M; De Vita, Serena; Radu, Maria; Reddy, Pavankumar N G; McGuinness, Meaghan K; Harris, Chad E; Mathieu, Ronald; Lane, Steven W; Kosoff, Rachelle; Milsom, Michael D; Chernoff, Jonathan; Williams, David A

    2013-03-28

    The p21-activated kinases (Paks) are serine/threonine kinases that are major effectors of the Rho guanosine 5'\\x{2011}triphosphatase, Rac, and Cdc42. Rac and Cdc42 are known regulators of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) function, however, a direct role for Paks in HSPCs has yet to be elucidated. Lin(-)Sca1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK) cells from wild-type mice were transduced with retrovirus expressing Pak inhibitory domain (PID), a well-characterized inhibitor of Pak activation. Defects in marrow homing and in vitro cell migration, assembly of the actin cytoskeleton, proliferation, and survival were associated with engraftment failure of PID-LSK. The PID-LSK demonstrated decreased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas constitutive activation of ERK in these cells led to rescue of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation in vitro and partial rescue of Pak-deficient HSPC homing and engraftment in vivo. Using conditional knock-out mice, we demonstrate that among group A Paks, Pak2(-/-) HSPC show reduced homing to the bone marrow and altered cell shape similar to PID-LSK cells in vitro and are completely defective in HSPC engraftment. These data demonstrate that Pak proteins are key components of multiple engraftment-associated HSPC functions and play a direct role in activation of ERK in HSPCs, and that Pak2 is specifically essential for HSPC engraftment.

  10. Efficient Ex Vivo Engineering and Expansion of Highly Purified Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Populations for Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Zonari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo gene therapy based on CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs has shown promising results in clinical trials, but genetic engineering to high levels and in large scale remains challenging. We devised a sorting strategy that captures more than 90% of HSC activity in less than 10% of mobilized peripheral blood (mPB CD34+ cells, and modeled a transplantation protocol based on highly purified, genetically engineered HSCs co-infused with uncultured progenitor cells. Prostaglandin E2 stimulation allowed near-complete transduction of HSCs with lentiviral vectors during a culture time of less than 38 hr, mitigating the negative impact of standard culture on progenitor cell function. Exploiting the pyrimidoindole derivative UM171, we show that transduced mPB CD34+CD38− cells with repopulating potential could be expanded ex vivo. Implementing these findings in clinical gene therapy protocols will improve the efficacy, safety, and sustainability of gene therapy and generate new opportunities in the field of gene editing.

  11. MicroRNAs and Metabolites in Serum Change after Chemotherapy: Impact on Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Edgar; Morin-Kensicki, Elizabeth; Goecke, Tamme W.; Bosio, Andreas; Rath, Björn; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Bissels, Ute; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic regeneration after high dose chemotherapy necessitates activation of the stem cell pool. There is evidence that serum taken after chemotherapy comprises factors stimulating proliferation and self-renewal of CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) – however, the nature of these feedback signals is yet unclear. Here, we addressed the question if specific microRNAs (miRNAs) or metabolites are affected after high dose chemotherapy. Serum taken from the same patients before and after chemotherapy was supplemented for in vitro cultivation of HSPCs. Serum taken after chemotherapy significantly enhanced HSPC proliferation, better maintained a CD34+ immunophenotype, and stimulated colony forming units. Microarray analysis revealed that 23 miRNAs changed in serum after chemotherapy – particularly, miRNA-320c and miRNA-1275 were down-regulated whereas miRNA-3663-3p was up-regulated. miRNA-320c was exemplarily inhibited by an antagomiR, which seemed to increase proliferation. Metabolomic profiling demonstrated that 44 metabolites were less abundant, whereas three (including 2-hydroxybutyrate and taurocholenate sulphate) increased in serum upon chemotherapy. Nine of these metabolites were subsequently tested for effects on HSPCs in vitro, but none of them exerted a clear concentration dependent effect on proliferation, immunophenotype and colony forming unit formation. Taken together, serum profiles of miRNAs and metabolites changed after chemotherapy. Rather than individually, these factors may act in concert to recruit HSPCs into action for hematopoietic regeneration. PMID:26024523

  12. MicroRNAs and Metabolites in Serum Change after Chemotherapy: Impact on Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Walenda

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic regeneration after high dose chemotherapy necessitates activation of the stem cell pool. There is evidence that serum taken after chemotherapy comprises factors stimulating proliferation and self-renewal of CD34(+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs--however, the nature of these feedback signals is yet unclear. Here, we addressed the question if specific microRNAs (miRNAs or metabolites are affected after high dose chemotherapy. Serum taken from the same patients before and after chemotherapy was supplemented for in vitro cultivation of HSPCs. Serum taken after chemotherapy significantly enhanced HSPC proliferation, better maintained a CD34(+ immunophenotype, and stimulated colony forming units. Microarray analysis revealed that 23 miRNAs changed in serum after chemotherapy--particularly, miRNA-320c and miRNA-1275 were down-regulated whereas miRNA-3663-3p was up-regulated. miRNA-320c was exemplarily inhibited by an antagomiR, which seemed to increase proliferation. Metabolomic profiling demonstrated that 44 metabolites were less abundant, whereas three (including 2-hydroxybutyrate and taurocholenate sulphate increased in serum upon chemotherapy. Nine of these metabolites were subsequently tested for effects on HSPCs in vitro, but none of them exerted a clear concentration dependent effect on proliferation, immunophenotype and colony forming unit formation. Taken together, serum profiles of miRNAs and metabolites changed after chemotherapy. Rather than individually, these factors may act in concert to recruit HSPCs into action for hematopoietic regeneration.

  13. Loss of Pcgf5 Affects Global H2A Monoubiquitination but Not the Function of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Si

    Full Text Available Polycomb-group RING finger proteins (Pcgf1-Pcgf6 are components of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1-related complexes that catalyze monoubiquitination of histone H2A at lysine 119 (H2AK119ub1, an epigenetic mark associated with repression of genes. Pcgf5 has been characterized as a component of PRC1.5, one of the non-canonical PRC1, consisting of Ring1a/b, Rybp/Yaf2 and Auts2. However, the biological functions of Pcgf5 have not yet been identified. Here we analyzed the impact of the deletion of Pcgf5 specifically in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs. Pcgf5 is expressed preferentially in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and multipotent progenitors (MPPs compared with committed myeloid progenitors and differentiated cells. We transplanted bone marrow (BM cells from Rosa::Cre-ERT control and Cre-ERT;Pcgf5fl/fl mice into lethally irradiated recipient mice. At 4 weeks post-transplantation, we deleted Pcgf5 by injecting tamoxifen, however, no obvious changes in hematopoiesis were detected including the number of HSPCs during a long-term observation period following the deletion. Competitive BM repopulating assays revealed normal repopulating capacity of Pcgf5-deficient HSCs. Nevertheless, Pcgf5-deficient HSPCs showed a significant reduction in H2AK119ub1 levels compared with the control. ChIP-sequence analysis confirmed the reduction in H2AK119ub1 levels, but revealed no significant association of changes in H2AK119ub1 levels with gene expression levels. Our findings demonstrate that Pcgf5-containing PRC1 functions as a histone modifier in vivo, but its role in HSPCs is limited and can be compensated by other PRC1-related complexes in HSPCs.

  14. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Christian R.; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Vellenga, Edo; Coffer, Paul J.; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic sy

  15. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, C.R.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Vellenga, E.; Coffer, P.J.; Buitenhuis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic sy

  16. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled Receptor 5 marks short-term hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during mouse embryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Donghua; He, Xi C; Qian, Pengxu; Barker, Nick; Trainor, Paul A; Clevers, Hans; Liu, Huiwen; Li, Linheng

    2014-01-01

    Lgr5 is a marker for proliferating stem cells in adult intestine, stomach, and hair follicle. However, Lgr5 is not expressed in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Whether Lgr5 is expressed in the embryonic and fetal HSPCs that undergo rapid proliferation is unknown. Here we repor

  17. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy.

  18. Efficient removal of platelets from peripheral blood progenitor cell products using a novel micro-chip based acoustophoretic platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Dykes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive collection of platelets is an unwanted side effect in current centrifugation-based peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC apheresis. We investigated a novel microchip-based acoustophoresis technique, utilizing ultrasonic standing wave forces for the removal of platelets from PBPC products. By applying an acoustic standing wave field onto a continuously flowing cell suspension in a micro channel, cells can be separated from the surrounding media depending on their physical properties. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: PBPC samples were obtained from patients (n = 15 and healthy donors (n = 6 and sorted on an acoustophoresis-chip. The acoustic force was set to separate leukocytes from platelets into a target fraction and a waste fraction, respectively. The PBPC samples, the target and the waste fractions were analysed for cell recovery, purity and functionality. RESULTS: The median separation efficiency of leukocytes to the target fraction was 98% whereas platelets were effectively depleted by 89%. PBPC samples and corresponding target fractions were similar in the percentage of CD34+ hematopoetic progenitor/stem cells as well as leukocyte/lymphocyte subset distributions. Median viability was 98%, 98% and 97% in the PBPC samples, the target and the waste fractions, respectively. Results from hematopoietic progenitor cell assays indicated a preserved colony-forming ability post-sorting. Evaluation of platelet activation by P-selectin (CD62P expression revealed a significant increase of CD62P+ platelets in the target (19% and waste fractions (20%, respectively, compared to the PBPC input samples (9%. However, activation was lower when compared to stored blood bank platelet concentrates (48%. CONCLUSION: Acoustophoresis can be utilized to efficiently deplete PBPC samples of platelets, whilst preserving the target stem/progenitor cell and leukocyte cell populations, cell viability and progenitor cell colony-forming ability

  19. Post-thaw viability of cryopreserved hematopoietic progenitor cell grafts: does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrhovac, Radovan; Perić, Zinaida; Jurenec, Silvana; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Jelić-Puskarić, Biljana; Jaksić, Branimir

    2010-03-01

    Cell viability in peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) grafts and its influence on the clinical course following transplantation was evaluated in 81 consecutive transplantations (72 autologous, 9 allogeneic) performed in patients with hematological diseases. Viability of cells in PBPC grafts immediately upon collection was 98.6 +/- 3.5%, after addition of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) 73.3 +/- 21.8%, and post-thaw 65.2 +/- 16.1%. It did not differ significantly between patients with different diagnoses, gender, age, type of priming used, dose of G-CSF administered or number of CD34+ cells collected. However grafts stored for more than 60 days showed lower post-thaw viability compared to the ones thawed in the 60 days following cryopreservation (56.61 +/- 15.2% vs. 67.6 +/- 15.5%, p = 0.04). Post-thaw graft viability did not influence engraftment time, but there was a predisposition towards infectious complications in the post-transplant period in patients receiving grafts with lower percentage of viable cells. They developed febrile neutropenia more often (72.2% vs. 50% of patients, p = 0.05) and had more febrile days (2.4 +/- 2.6 vs. 1.5 +/- 2.3, p = 0.05) following transplantation. We have demonstrated that PBPC grafts are capable of long term engraftment regardless of the graft storage time or percentage of viable cells post-thaw, which confirms the robustness of CD34+ cells during the freeze/thaw procedures carried out in daily clinical practice. Granulocyte concentration in PBPC grafts could have an influence on infectious complications following transplantation and needs to be further investigated on a larger number of patients.

  20. Fancd2 and p21 function independently in maintaining the size of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell pool in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Watanabe-Smith, Kevin; Schubert, Kathryn; Major, Angela; Sheehan, Andrea M; Marquez-Loza, Laura; Newell, Amy E Hanlon; Benedetti, Eric; Joseph, Eric; Olson, Susan; Grompe, Markus

    2013-09-01

    Fanconi anemia patients suffer from progressive bone marrow failure. An overactive p53 response to DNA damage contributes to the progressive elimination of Fanconi anemia hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), and hence presents a potential target for therapeutic intervention. To investigate whether the cell cycle regulatory protein p21 is the primary mediator of the p53-dependent stem cell loss, p21/Fancd2 double-knockout mice were generated. Surprisingly double mutant mice displayed even more severe loss of HSPCs than Fancd2(-/-) single mutants. p21 deletion did not rescue the abnormal cell cycle profile and had no impact on the long-term repopulating potential of Fancd2(-/-) bone marrow cells. Collectively, our data indicate that p21 has an indispensable role in maintaining a normal HSPC pool and suggest that other p53-targeted factors, not p21, mediate the progressive elimination of HSPC in Fanconi anemia.

  1. Imaging approaches to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Nadir; Stein, Jerry; Farkas, Daniel L

    2007-01-01

    Cell tracking in vivo continues to provide significant insights into hematopoietic cell function and donor cell engraftment after transplantation. The combination of proliferation tracking dyes and induced expression of reporters with advanced imaging modalities has led to better understanding of qualitative and quantitative aspects of hematopoietic cells' homing, seeding and engraftment. Currently, there is no single technique that allows in vivo tracking of cells with molecular resolution, thus several techniques need to be combined. Recent developments promise better implementation of non-invasive imaging modalities to study functional and molecular characteristics of stem cells.

  2. Nucleofection, an efficient nonviral method to transfer genes into human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levetzow, G. von; Spanholtz, J.; Beckmann, J.; Fischer, J.; Kogler, G.; Wernet, P.; Punzel, M.; Giebel, B.

    2006-01-01

    The targeted manipulation of the genetic program of single cells as well as of complete organisms has strongly enhanced our understanding of cellular and developmental processes and should also help to increase our knowledge of primary human stem cells, e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), within

  3. Dlk1 is a negative regulator of emerging hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Mirshekar-Syahkal (Bahar); E. Haak (Esther); G.M. Kimber (Gillian); K. van Leusden (Kevin); K. Harvey (Kirsten); R.A. O'Rourke; J. Laborda (Jorge); S.R. Bauer (Steven); M.F.T.R. de Bruijn (Marella F.T.R); A. Ferguson-Smith (Anne); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); K. Ottersbach (Katrin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe first mouse adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region at embryonic day (E) 10.5. Their numbers in this region increase thereafter and begin to decline at E12.5, thus pointing to the possible existence of both positive and negative regula

  4. Longitudinal Analysis of DNA Methylation in CD34+ Hematopoietic Progenitors in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Yan Fung; Micklem, Chris N; Taguchi, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a disorder of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that is often treated with DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) inhibitors (5-azacytidine [AZA], 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine), suggesting a role for DNA methylation in disease progression. How DNMT inhibition retards disease pr...

  5. Hypoxia/hypercapnia-induced adaptation maintains functional capacity of cord blood stem and progenitor cells at 4°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaski, Marija; Negroni, Luc; Kovacevic-Filipovic, Milica; Guibert, Christelle; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Chevaleyre, Jean; Duchez, Pascale; Lafarge, Xavier; Praloran, Vincent; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2014-12-01

    We analyzed the effect of exposure to hypoxic/hypercapnic (HH) gas mixture (5% O2 /9% CO2 ) on the maintenance of functional cord blood CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in severe hypothermia (4°C) employing the physiological and proteomic approaches. Ten-day exposure to HH maintained the Day 0 (D-0) level of hematopoietic stem cells as detected in vivo on the basis of hematopoietic repopulation of immunodeficient mice-short-term scid repopulating cells (SRC). Conversely, in the atmospheric air (20% O2 /0.05% CO2 ), usual condition used for cell storage at 4°C, stem cell activity was significantly decreased. Also, HH doubled the survival of CD34(+) cells and committed progenitors (CFCs) with respect to the atmospheric air (60% vs. 30%, respectively). Improved cell maintenance in HH was associated with higher proportion of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive cells. Cell-protective effects are associated with an improved maintenance of the plasma and mitochondrial membrane potential and with a conversion to the glycolytic energetic state. We also showed that HH decreased apoptosis, despite a sustained ROS production and a drop of ATP amount per viable cell. The proteomic study revealed that the global protein content was better preserved in HH. This analysis identified: (i) proteins sensitive or insensitive to hypothermia irrespective of the gas phase, and (ii) proteins related to the HH cell-protective effect. Among them are some protein families known to be implicated in the prolonged survival of hibernating animals in hypothermia. These findings suggest a way to optimize short-term cell conservation without freezing.

  6. Lhx2 expression promotes self-renewal of a distinct multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cell in embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Dahl

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms regulating the expansion of the hematopoietic system including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in the fetal liver during embryonic development are largely unknown. The LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 is a candidate regulator of fetal hematopoiesis since it is expressed in the fetal liver and Lhx2(-/- mice die in utero due to severe anemia. Moreover, expression of Lhx2 in embryonic stem (ES cell-derived embryoid bodies (EBs can lead to the generation of HSC-like cell lines. To further define the role of this transcription factor in hematopoietic regulation, we generated ES cell lines that enabled tet-inducible expression of Lhx2. Using this approach we observed that Lhx2 expression synergises with specific signalling pathways, resulting in increased frequency of colony forming cells in developing EB cells. The increase in growth factor-responsive progenitor cells directly correlates to the efficiency in generating HSC-like cell lines, suggesting that Lhx2 expression induce self-renewal of a distinct multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cell in EBs. Signalling via the c-kit tyrosine kinase receptor and the gp130 signal transducer by IL-6 is necessary and sufficient for the Lhx2 induced self-renewal. While inducing self-renewal of multipotential progenitor cells, expression of Lhx2 inhibited proliferation of primitive erythroid precursor cells and interfered with early ES cell commitment, indicating striking lineage specificity of this effect.

  7. Endocannabinoids are expressed in bone marrow stromal niches and play a role in interactions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with the bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuxian; Zagozdzon, Radoslaw; Jorda, Meritxell Alberich; Parmar, Kalindi; Fu, Yigong; Williams, John S; Wood, Jodi Anne T; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Banu, Naheed; Avraham, Shalom; Groopman, Jerome E; Avraham, Hava Karsenty

    2010-11-12

    Endocannabinoids are lipid signaling molecules that act via G-coupled receptors, CB(1) and CB(2). The endocannabinoid system is capable of activation of distinct signaling pathways on demand in response to pathogenic events or stimuli, hereby enhancing cell survival and promoting tissue repair. However, the role of endocannabinoids in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and their interaction with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) niches is not known. HSPCs are maintained in the quiescent state in bone marrow (BM) niches by intrinsic and extrinsic signaling. We report that HSPCs express the CB(1) receptors and that BM stromal cells secrete endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) (35 pg/10(7) cells), and 2-AG (75.2 ng/10(7) cells). In response to the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), elevated levels of AEA (75.6 pg/10(7) cells) and 2-AG (98.8 ng/10(7) cells) were secreted from BM stromal cells, resulting in migration and trafficking of HSPCs from the BM niches to the peripheral blood. Furthermore, administration of exogenous cannabinoid CB(1) agonists in vivo induced chemotaxis, migration, and mobilization of human and murine HSPCs. Cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice Cnr1(-/-) showed a decrease in side population (SP) cells, whereas fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)(-/-) mice, which have elevated levels of AEA, yielded increased colony formation as compared with WT mice. In addition, G-CSF-induced mobilization in vivo was modulated by endocannabinoids and was inhibited by specific cannabinoid antagonists as well as impaired in cannabinoid receptor knock-out mice Cnr1(-/-), as compared with WT mice. Thus, we propose a novel function of the endocannabinoid system, as a regulator of HSPC interactions with their BM niches, where endocannabinoids are expressed in HSC niches and under stress conditions, endocannabinoid expression levels are enhanced to induce HSPC migration for proper hematopoiesis.

  8. The balance of positive and negative effects of TGF-β signaling regulates the development of hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hao; Xie, Yin-Liang; Gao, Yong-Xing; Cheng, Tao; Wang, Zack Z

    2013-10-15

    Derived from mesoderm precursors, hemangioblasts are bipotential common progenitors of hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. The regulatory events controlling hematopoietic and endothelial lineage specification are largely unknown, especially in humans. In this study, we establish a serum-free and feeder-free system with a high-efficient embryoid body (EB) generation to investigate the signals that direct differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Consistent with previous studies, the CD34(+)CD31(+)VE-cadherin(+) (VEC(+)) cells derived from hPSCs contain hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors. In the presence of hematopoietic and endothelial growth factors, some of CD34(+)CD31(+)VEC(+) cells give rise to blast colony-forming cells (BL-CFCs), which have been used to characterize bipotential hemangioblasts. We found that the level of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) 1 protein is increased during hPSC differentiation, and that TGF-β signaling has the double-edged effect on hematopoietic and endothelial lineage differentiation in hPSCs. An addition of TGF-β to hPSC differentiation before mesoderm induction promotes the development of mesoderm and the generation of CD34(+)CD31(+)VEC(+) cells. An addition of TGF-β inhibitor, SB431542, before mesoderm induction downregulates the expression of mesodermal markers and reduces the number of CD34(+)CD31(+)VEC(+) progenitor cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β signaling after mesoderm induction increases CD34(+)CD31(+)VEC(+) progenitors and BL-CFCs. These data provide evidence that a balance of positive and negative effects of TGF-β signaling at the appropriate timing is critical, and potential means to improve hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis from hPSCs.

  9. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Peripheral Blood of Cardiac Catheterization Personnel

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    Soheir Korraa1, Tawfik M.S.1, Mohamed Maher 2 and Amr Zaher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the rejuvenation capacity among cardiac catheterization technicians occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Subjects and methods: The individual annual collective dose information was measured by thermoluminscent personal dosimeters (TLD for those technicians and found to be ranging between 2.16 and 8.44 mSv/y. Venous blood samples were obtained from 30 cardiac catheterization technicians exposed to X-ray during fluoroscopy procedures at the National Heart Institute in Embaba. The control group involved 25 persons not exposed to ionizing radiation and not working in hospitals in addition to 20 persons not exposed to ionizing radiation and working in hospitals. Blood samples were assayed for total and differential blood counts, micronucleus formation (FMN plasma stromal derived growth factor-1α (SDF-1 α and cell phenotype of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, whose surface markers were identified as the CD34, CD133 and kinase domain receptors (KDR. Results: SDF-1α (2650± 270 vs. 2170 ± 430 pg/ml and FMN (19.9 ± 5.5 vs. 2.8 ± 1.4/1000 cells were significantly higher among cardiac catheterization staff compared to those of the controls respectively. Similarly, EPCs: CD34 (53 ± 3.9 vs. 48 ± 8.5/105 mononuclear cells, CD133 (62.4 ± 4.8 vs. 54.2 ± 10.6 /105 mononuclear cells KDR (52.7 ± 10.6 vs.43.5± 8.2 /105 mononuclear cells were also significantly higher among cardiac catheterization staff compared to the values of controls respectively. Smoking seemed to have a positive effect on the FMN and SDF-1 but had a negative effect on EPCs. It was found that among cardiac catheterization staff, the numbers of circulating progenitor cells had increased and accordingly there was an increased capacity for tissue repair. Conclusion: In conclusion, the present work shows that occupational exposure to radiation, well within permissible levels, leaves a genetic mark on the

  10. Effects of growth hormone therapeutic supplementation on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in children with growth hormone deficiency: focus on proliferation and differentiation capabilities.

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    Kawa, M P; Stecewicz, I; Piecyk, K; Pius-Sadowska, E; Paczkowska, E; Rogińska, D; Sobuś, A; Łuczkowska, K; Gawrych, E; Petriczko, E; Walczak, M; Machaliński, B

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the direct effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy (GH-RT) on hematopoiesis in children with GH deficiency (GHD) with the special emphasis on proliferation and cell cycle regulation. Peripheral blood (PB) was collected from sixty control individuals and forty GHD children before GH-RT and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-RT to measure hematological parameters and isolate CD34(+)-enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Selected parameters of PB were analyzed by hematological analyzer. Moreover, collected HPCs were used to analyze GH receptor (GHR) and IGF1 expression, clonogenicity, and cell cycle activity. Finally, global gene expression profile of collected HPCs was analyzed using genome-wide RNA microarrays. GHD resulted in a decrease in several hematological parameters related to RBCs and significantly diminished clonogenicity of erythroid progenies. In contrast, GH-RT stimulated increases in clonogenic growth of erythroid lineage and RBC counts as well as significant up-regulation of cell cycle-propagating genes, including MAP2K1, cyclins D1/E1, PCNA, and IGF1. Likewise, GH-RT significantly modified GHR expression in isolated HPCs and augmented systemic IGF1 levels. Global gene expression analysis revealed significantly higher expression of genes associated with cell cycle, proliferation, and differentiation in HPCs from GH-treated subjects. (i) GH-RT significantly augments cell cycle progression in HPCs and increases clonogenicity of erythroid progenitors; (ii) GHR expression in HPCs is modulated by GH status; (iii) molecular mechanisms by which GH influences hematopoiesis might provide a basis for designing therapeutic interventions for hematological complications related to GHD.

  11. Neuropeptide Y Induces Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization by Regulating Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Activity Through Y1 Receptor in Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Hee; Lee, Jong Kil; Kim, Namoh; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Schuchman, Edward H; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization is an essential homeostatic process regulated by the interaction of cellular and molecular components in bone marrow niches. It has been shown by others that neurotransmitters released from the sympathetic nervous system regulate HSPC egress from bone marrow to peripheral blood. In this study, we investigate the functional role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on this process. NPY deficient mice had significantly impaired HSPC mobilization due to increased expression of HSPC maintenance factors by reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in bone marrow. Pharmacological or endogenous elevation of NPY led to decrease of HSPC maintenance factors expression by activating MMP-9 in osteoblasts, resulting in HSPC mobilization. Mice in which the Y1 receptor was deleted in osteoblasts did not exhibit HSPC mobilization by NPY. Furthermore, NPY treatment in ovariectomized mice caused reduction of bone loss due to HSPC mobilization. These results suggest a new role of NPY on HSPC mobilization, as well as the potential therapeutic application of this neuropeptide for stem cell-based therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:2145-2156.

  12. Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Mobilization with “Just-in-Time” Plerixafor Approach is a Cost Effective Alternative to Routine Plerixafor Use

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor results in superior CD34+ cell yield, when compared to mobilization with G-CSF alone in patients with myeloma and lymphoma. However, plerixafor-based approaches are associated with high costs. To circumvent this, several institutions use a so-called “just-in-time” plerixafor (JIT-P) approach, where plerixafor is only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF...

  13. Multi-colony stimulating activity of interleukin 5 (IL-5) on hematopoietic progenitors from transgenic mice that express IL-5 receptor alpha subunit constitutively

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The interleukin 3 (IL-3), IL-5, and granulocyte/macrophage colony- stimulating factor receptors consist of a cytokine-specific alpha subunit and the common beta subunit. Whereas IL-3 stimulates various lineages of hematopoietic cells, including multipotential progenitors, IL-5 acts mainly as an eosinophil lineage-specific factor. To investigate whether the lineage specificity of IL-5 is due to restricted expression of the IL-5 receptor alpha subunit (IL-5R alpha), we generated transgenic mice...

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 is essential for transplantable mouse bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvarsson, Camilla; Eliasson, Pernilla

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that hypoxic areas in the bone marrow are crucial for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by supporting a quiescent state of cell cycle and regulating the transplantation capacity of long-term (LT)-HSCs. In addition, HSCs seem to express a metabolic profile of energy production away from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in favor of glycolysis. At oxygen deprivation, hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is known to induce glycolytic enzymes as well as suppressing mitochondrial energy production by inducing pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (Pdk1) in most cell types. It has not been established whether PDK1 is essential for HSC function and mediates hypoxia-adapting functions in HSCs. While the Pdk gene family contains four members (Pdk1-4), it was recently shown that Pdk2 and Pdk4 have an important role in regulating LT-HSCs. Principle findings Here we demonstrate that PDK1 activity is crucial for transplantable HSC function. Whereas Pdkl, Pdk2, and Pdk3 transcripts were expressed at higher levels in different subtypes of HSCs compared to differentiated cells, we could not detect any major differences in expression between LT-HSCs and more short-term HSCs and multipotent progenitors. When studying HIF-1α-mediated regulation of Pdk activity in vitro, Pdk1 was the most robust target regulated by hypoxia, whereas Pdk2, Pdk3, and Pdk4 were not affected. Contrary, genetic ablation in a cre-inducible Hif-1α knockout mouse did not support a link between HIF-1α and Pdk1. Silencing of Pdk1 by shRNA lentiviral gene transfer partially impaired progenitor colony formation in vitro and had a strong negative effect on both long-term and short-term engraftment in mice. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that PDK1 has broad effects in hematopoiesis and is a critical factor for engraftment of both HSCs and multipotent progenitors upon transplantation to recipient mice. While Pdk1 was a robust hypoxia-inducible gene

  15. Integrating extrinsic and intrinsic cues into a minimal model of lineage commitment for hematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Palani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoregulation of transcription factors and cross-antagonism between lineage-specific transcription factors are a recurrent theme in cell differentiation. An equally prevalent event that is frequently overlooked in lineage commitment models is the upregulation of lineage-specific receptors, often through lineage-specific transcription factors. Here, we use a minimal model that combines cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic elements of regulation in order to understand how both instructive and stochastic events can inform cell commitment decisions in hematopoiesis. Our results suggest that cytokine-mediated positive receptor feedback can induce a "switch-like" response to external stimuli during multilineage differentiation by providing robustness to both bipotent and committed states while protecting progenitors from noise-induced differentiation or decommitment. Our model provides support to both the instructive and stochastic theories of commitment: cell fates are ultimately driven by lineage-specific transcription factors, but cytokine signaling can strongly bias lineage commitment by regulating these inherently noisy cell-fate decisions with complex, pertinent behaviors such as ligand-mediated ultrasensitivity and robust multistability. The simulations further suggest that the kinetics of differentiation to a mature cell state can depend on the starting progenitor state as well as on the route of commitment that is chosen. Lastly, our model shows good agreement with lineage-specific receptor expression kinetics from microarray experiments and provides a computational framework that can integrate both classical and alternative commitment paths in hematopoiesis that have been observed experimentally.

  16. PUMA promotes apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitors driving leukemic progression in a mouse model of myelodysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirguis, A A; Slape, C I; Failla, L M; Saw, J; Tremblay, C S; Powell, D R; Rossello, F; Wei, A; Strasser, A; Curtis, D J

    2016-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis with resultant cytopenias. Increased apoptosis and aberrantly functioning progenitors are thought to contribute to this phenotype. As is the case for other malignancies, overcoming apoptosis is believed to be important in progression toward acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using the NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) transgenic mouse model of MDS, we previously reported that overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2, blocked apoptosis and improved cytopenias, paradoxically, delaying leukemic progression. To further understand this surprising result, we examined the role of p53 and its pro-apoptotic effectors, PUMA and NOXA in NHD13 mice. The absence of p53 or PUMA but not NOXA reduced apoptosis and expanded the numbers of MDS-repopulating cells. Despite a similar effect on apoptosis and cell numbers, the absence of p53 and PUMA had diametrically opposed effects on progression to AML: absence of p53 accelerated leukemic progression, while absence of PUMA significantly delayed progression. This may be explained in part by differences in cellular responses to DNA damage. The absence of p53 led to higher levels of γ-H2AX (indicative of persistent DNA lesions) while PUMA-deficient NHD13 progenitors resolved DNA lesions in a manner comparable to wild-type cells. These results suggest that targeting PUMA may improve the cytopenias of MDS without a detrimental effect on leukemic progression thus warranting further investigation.

  17. Non-Lethal Ionizing Radiation Promotes Aging-Like Phenotypic Changes of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Humanized Mice.

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    Changshan Wang

    Full Text Available Precise understanding of radiation effects is critical to develop new modalities for the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced damage. We previously reported that non-lethal doses of X-ray irradiation induce DNA damage in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs reconstituted in NOD/Shi-scid IL2rγnull (NOG immunodeficient mice and severely compromise their repopulating capacity. In this study, we analyzed in detail the functional changes in human HSPCs in NOG mice following non-lethal radiation. We transplanted cord blood CD34+ HSPCs into NOG mice. At 12 weeks post-transplantation, the recipients were irradiated with 0, 0.5, or 1.0 Gy. At 2 weeks post-irradiation, human CD34+ HSPCs recovered from the primary recipient mice were transplanted into secondary recipients. CD34+ HSPCs from irradiated mice showed severely impaired reconstitution capacity in the secondary recipient mice. Of interest, non-lethal radiation compromised contribution of HSPCs to the peripheral blood cells, particularly to CD19+ B lymphocytes, which resulted in myeloid-biased repopulation. Co-culture of limiting numbers of CD34+ HSPCs with stromal cells revealed that the frequency of B cell-producing CD34+ HSPCs at 2 weeks post-irradiation was reduced more than 10-fold. Furthermore, the key B-cell regulator genes such as IL-7R and EBF1 were downregulated in HSPCs upon 0.5 Gy irradiation. Given that compromised repopulating capacity and myeloid-biased differentiation are representative phenotypes of aged HSCs, our findings indicate that non-lethal ionizing radiation is one of the critical external stresses that promote aging of human HSPCs in the bone marrow niche.

  18. MN1–Fli1 oncofusion transforms murine hematopoietic progenitor cells into acute megakaryoblastic leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenge, D V; Felipe-Fumero, E; Angenendt, L; Schliemann, C; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, L H; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Arteaga, M-F; Mikesch, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Long-term outcome of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) patients without Down's syndrome remains poor. Founding mutations and chimeric oncogenes characterize various AMKL subtypes. However, for around one third of all cases the underlying mechanisms of AMKL leukemogenesis are still largely unknown. Recently, an in-frame fusion of meningeoma 1–friend leukemia virus integration 1 (MN1–Fli1) gene was detected in a child with AMKL. We intended to investigate the potential role of this oncofusion in leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. Strikingly, expression of MN1–Fli1 in murine hematopoietic progenitor cells was sufficient to induce leukemic transformation generating immature myeloid cells with cytomorphology and expression of surface markers typical for AMKL. Systematic structure function analyses revealed FLS and 3′ETS domains of Fli1 as decisive domains for the AMKL phenotype. Our data highlight an important role of MN1–Fli1 in AMKL leukemogenesis and provide a basis for research assessing the value of this oncofusion as a future diagnostic marker and/or therapeutic target in AMKL patients. PMID:26690545

  19. Clinical-scale cultures of cord blood CD34(+) cells to amplify committed progenitors and maintain stem cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Zoran; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski, Marija; Lafarge, Xavier; Dazey, Bernard; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Mazurier, Frédéric; Boiron, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We developed a clinical-scale cord blood (CB) cell ex vivo procedure to enable an extensive expansion of committed progenitors--colony-forming cells (CFCs) without impairing very primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). CD34(++) cells, selected from previously cryopreserved and thawed CB units, were cultured in two steps (diluted 1:4 after 6 days) in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) (100 ng/ml each), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (10 ng/ml) in HP01 serum-free medium. HSC activity was evaluated in a serial transplantation assay, by detection of human cells (CD45, CD33, CD19 and CFC of human origin) in bone marrow (BM) of primary and secondary recipient NOD/SCID mice 6-8 weeks after transplantation. A wide amplification of total cells (∼350-fold), CD34(+) cells (∼100-fold), and CFC (∼130-fold) without impairing the HSC activity was obtained. The activity of a particular HSC subpopulation (SRC(CFC)) was even enhanced.Thus, an extensive ex vivo expansion of CFCs is feasible without impairing the activity of HSCs. This result was enabled by associating antioxidant power of medium with an appropriate cytokine cocktail (i.e., mimicking physiologic effects of a weak oxygenation in hematopoietic environment).

  20. Residual expression of the reprogramming factors prevents differentiation of iPSC generated from human fibroblasts and cord blood CD34+ progenitors.

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    Verónica Ramos-Mejía

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC have been generated from different tissues, with the age of the donor, tissue source and specific cell type influencing the reprogramming process. Reprogramming hematopoietic progenitors to hiPSC may provide a very useful cellular system for modelling blood diseases. We report the generation and complete characterization of hiPSCs from human neonatal fibroblasts and cord blood (CB-derived CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors using a single polycistronic lentiviral vector containing an excisable cassette encoding the four reprogramming factors Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-myc (OKSM. The ectopic expression of OKSM was fully silenced upon reprogramming in some hiPSC clones and was not reactivated upon differentiation, whereas other hiPSC clones failed to silence the transgene expression, independently of the cell type/tissue origin. When hiPSC were induced to differentiate towards hematopoietic and neural lineages those hiPSC which had silenced OKSM ectopic expression displayed good hematopoietic and early neuroectoderm differentiation potential. In contrast, those hiPSC which failed to switch off OKSM expression were unable to differentiate towards either lineage, suggesting that the residual expression of the reprogramming factors functions as a developmental brake impairing hiPSC differentiation. Successful adenovirus-based Cre-mediated excision of the provirus OKSM cassette in CB-derived CD34+ hiPSC with residual transgene expression resulted in transgene-free hiPSC clones with significantly improved differentiation capacity. Overall, our findings confirm that residual expression of reprogramming factors impairs hiPSC differentiation.

  1. Erythropoietic Potential of CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Human Cord Blood and G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood

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    Honglian Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell (RBC supply for transfusion has been severely constrained by the limited availability of donor blood and the emergence of infection and contamination issues. Alternatively, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human organs have been increasingly considered as safe and effective blood source. Several methods have been studied to obtain mature RBCs from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells via in vitro culture. Among them, human cord blood (CB and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult peripheral blood (mPB are common adult stem cells used for allogeneic transplantation. Our present study focuses on comparing CB- and mPB-derived stem cells in differentiation from CD34+ cells into mature RBCs. By using CD34+ cells from cord blood and G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood, we showed in vitro RBC generation of artificial red blood cells. Our results demonstrate that CB- and mPB-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells have similar characteristics when cultured under the same conditions, but differ considerably with respect to expression levels of various genes and hemoglobin development. This study is the first to compare the characteristics of CB- and mPB-derived erythrocytes. The results support the idea that CB and mPB, despite some similarities, possess different erythropoietic potentials in in vitro culture systems.

  2. Black hairy tongue associated with allo peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yi; ZOU Ping; LI Qiu-bai; YOU Yong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Tongue lesions resulting from mucositis are a frequent complication of high-dose chemotherapy and irradiation. They are very common in patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and tongue lesions due to other causes have also been reported. Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a special tongue lesion, not rare in the population with tobacco abuse, but so far it has not been reported after allo peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-PBHST). Here we presented a patient who developed BHT after allo-PBHST and discussed the factors that may cause this condition.

  3. [Gene transfer in human hematopoietic stem cells isolated from peripheral blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoni, P

    1996-01-01

    To insert a new genetic information by gene transfer into haemopoietic stem cells would result in expression of the transgene in progenitors and progeny of cell blood lineages. If successfull, such an approach would open interesting prospectives in the field of experimental research and in the possibility to treat genetic defects affecting blood lineages such as immune deficiencies (ADA, SCID, AIDS) or enzymes defects. Moreover progenitors could be engineered to become more resistant to chemotherapy or oncogenic process. Many parameters and technical problems are still involved in this issue, including identification, isolation and selection of the most primitive progenitors, and search for the most efficient vectors to insert new genes into the target cells. So far retroviral vectors have been shown to be the most effective but search for better vectors are still underway. Peripheral blood stem cells isolated from patients stimulated by cytokines and/or chemotherapy appear interesting target cells for genetic manipulations aimed to correct an acquired or genetic defect.

  4. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Nagai, Mami [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Roeder, Robert G. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Asano, Shigetaka [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Ito, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: itomi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  5. Engineering HIV-1-resistant T-cells from short-hairpin RNA-expressing hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in humanized BLT mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene-Errol E Ringpis

    Full Text Available Down-regulation of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 holds significant potential for long-term protection against HIV-1 in patients. Using the humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (hu-BLT mouse model which allows investigation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC transplant and immune system reconstitution as well as HIV-1 infection, we previously demonstrated stable inhibition of CCR5 expression in systemic lymphoid tissues via transplantation of HSPCs genetically modified by lentiviral vector transduction to express short hairpin RNA (shRNA. However, CCR5 down-regulation will not be effective against existing CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 and emergence of resistant viral strains. As such, combination approaches targeting additional steps in the virus lifecycle are required. We screened a panel of previously published shRNAs targeting highly conserved regions and identified a potent shRNA targeting the R-region of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR. Here, we report that human CD4(+ T-cells derived from transplanted HSPC engineered to co-express shRNAs targeting CCR5 and HIV-1 LTR are resistant to CCR5- and CXCR4- tropic HIV-1-mediated depletion in vivo. Transduction with the combination vector suppressed CXCR4- and CCR5- tropic viral replication in cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. No obvious cytotoxicity or interferon response was observed. Transplantation of combination vector-transduced HSPC into hu-BLT mice resulted in efficient engraftment and subsequent stable gene marking and CCR5 down-regulation in human CD4(+ T-cells within peripheral blood and systemic lymphoid tissues, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue, a major site of robust viral replication, for over twelve weeks. CXCR4- and CCR5- tropic HIV-1 infection was effectively inhibited in hu-BLT mouse spleen-derived human CD4(+ T-cells ex vivo. Furthermore, levels of gene-marked CD4(+ T-cells in peripheral blood increased despite systemic infection with either

  6. Thrombopoietin mobilizes CD34+ cell subsets into peripheral blood and expands multilineage progenitors in bone marrow of cancer patients with normal hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, L J; Luens, K M; Estrada, M F; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R; Cohen, R L; Ashby, M A; Vadhan-Raj, S

    1998-03-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO), the primary regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis, also mediates biologic effects in vitro on hematopoietic cells more primitive than those committed to the megakaryocyte (MK) lineage. To assess the spectrum of hematopoietic effects of recombinant human (rh)TPO in vivo, we evaluated its proliferative effect on bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells, its maturation effect on BM MKs, and its mobilizing effect on peripheral blood (PB) progenitor cells during a phase I clinical laboratory investigation in which rhTPO was administered to cancer patients with normal hematopoiesis. Twelve patients received a single dose of rhTPO (0.3, 0.6, 1.2, or 2.4 microg/kg of body weight) prior to chemotherapy. BM and PB samples from these patients were analyzed 1 to 2 days before (baseline) and 7 days after rhTPO administration. At higher doses (1.2-2.4 microg/kg), rhTPO produced increased concentrations of primitive CD34+Thy-1+Lin-cells (mean 2.1-fold), CD34+mpl+ cells (mean 5.2-fold), CD34+CD41+CD14- promegakaryoblasts (mean 2.9-fold), and myeloerythroid colony-forming cells (mean threefold) in BM. No significant increases in the frequency of BM colony-forming unit (CFU)-MK were observed. Elevated numbers of both immature (2N-8N) and more mature (64N and 128N) CD41+ MKs were detected in BM, with modal ploidy remaining at 16N. Higher doses of rhTPO (1.2-2.4 microg/kg) also induced increased concentrations of CD34+ cell subsets in PB, including both primitive CD34+Thy-1+Lin- (mean 8.8-fold) and MK lineage-committed CD34+CD41+CD14- cells (mean 14.6-fold) as well as various myeloerythroid colony-forming cells (mean 3.6- to 5.5-fold). These results demonstrate that rhTPO given as a single dose not only promotes proliferation and maturation of cells of the MK lineage, but also expands the pool of BM primitive hematopoietic cells. In addition, rhTPO induces mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors into peripheral circulation. The extent to which such multilineage effects on

  7. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R W M; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  8. Blood and immune cell engineering: Cytoskeletal contractility and nuclear rheology impact cell lineage and localization: Biophysical regulation of hematopoietic differentiation and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Won; Discher, Dennis E

    2015-06-01

    Clinical success with human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation establishes a paradigm for regenerative therapies with other types of stem cells. However, it remains generally challenging to therapeutically treat tissues after engineering of stem cells in vitro. Recent studies suggest that stem and progenitor cells sense physical features of their niches. Here, we review biophysical contributions to lineage decisions, maturation, and trafficking of blood and immune cells. Polarized cellular contractility and nuclear rheology are separately shown to be functional markers of a hematopoietic hierarchy that predict the ability of a lineage to traffic in and out of the bone marrow niche. These biophysical determinants are regulated by a set of structural molecules, including cytoplasmic myosin-II and nuclear lamins, which themselves are modulated by a diverse range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Small molecules that target these mechanobiological circuits, along with novel bioengineering methods, could prove broadly useful in programming blood and immune cells for therapies ranging from blood transfusions to immune attack of tumors.

  9. Combination of low O(2) concentration and mesenchymal stromal cells during culture of cord blood CD34(+) cells improves the maintenance and proliferative capacity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Mohammad; Vlaski, Marija; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Lafarge, Xavier; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Praloran, Vincent; Brunet De La Grange, Philippe; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2012-06-01

    The physiological approach suggests that an environment associating the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and low O(2) concentration would be most favorable for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in course of ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic grafts. To test this hypothesis, we performed a co-culture of cord blood CD34(+) cells with or without MSC in presence of cytokines for 10 days at 20%, 5%, and 1.5% O(2) and assessed the impact on total cells, CD34(+) cells, committed progenitors (colony-forming cells-CFC) and stem cells activity (pre-CFC and Scid repopulating cells-SRC). Not surprisingly, the expansion of total cells, CD34(+) cells, and CFC was higher in co-culture and at 20% O(2) compared to simple culture and low O(2) concentrations, respectively. However, co-culture at low O(2) concentrations provided CD34(+) cell and CFC amplification similar to classical culture at 20% O(2) . Interestingly, low O(2) concentrations ensured a better pre-CFC and SRC preservation/expansion in co-culture. Indeed, SRC activity in co-culture at 1.5% O(2) was higher than in freshly isolated CD34(+) cells. Interleukin-6 production by MSC at physiologically low O(2) concentrations might be one of the factors mediating this effect. Our data demonstrate that association of co-culture and low O(2) concentration not only induces sufficient expansion of committed progenitors (with respect to the classical culture), but also ensures a better maintenance/expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), pointing to the oxygenation as a physiological regulatory factor but also as a cell engineering tool.

  10. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyo Eun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do-Sun, E-mail: dslmd@kumc.or.kr [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  11. Molecular Characterization of the Interactions between Vascular Selectins and Glycoprotein Ligands on Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Abusamra, Dina

    2016-12-01

    The human bone marrow vasculature constitutively expresses both E-selectin and P-selectin where they interact with the cell-surface glycan moiety, sialyl Lewis x, on circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step. Although several E-selectin glycoprotein ligands (E-selLs) have been identified, the importance of each E-selL on human HSPCs is debatable and requires additional methodologies to advance their specific involvement. The first objective was to fill the knowledge gap in the in vitro characterization of the mechanisms used by selectins to mediate the initial step in the HSPCs homing by developing a real time immunoprecipitation-based assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip. This novel assay bypass the difficulties of purifying ligands, enables the use of natively glycosylated forms of selectin ligands from any model cell of interest and study its binding affinities under flow. We provide the first comprehensive quantitative binding kinetics of two well-documented ligands, CD44 and PSGL-1, with E-selectin. Both ligands bind monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and off-rates while they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow on- and off-rates with the on-rate, but not the off-rate, is dependent on salt concentration. Thus, suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast-on and -off binding to capture the circulating cells out of shear-flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to slow rolling significantly. The second objective is to fully identify and characterize E/P-selectin ligand candidates expressed on CD34+ HSPCs which cause enhanced migration after intravenous transplantation compared to their CD34- counterparts. CD34 is widely recognized marker of human HSPCs but its natural ligand and function on these cells remain elusive. Proteomics identified CD34 as an E-selL candidate on human HSPCs, whose binding to E

  12. [Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with unrelated cord blood: report of three cases from the Chilean cord blood bank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Francisco; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás; Bertin, Pablo; Pizarro, Isabel; Carmona, Amanda; Guilof, Alejandro; Rojas, Iván; Oyarzún, Enrique

    2013-08-01

    Public cord blood banks are a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients with hematological diseases who lack a family donor and need allogeneic transplantation. In June 2007 we started a cord blood bank with units donated in three maternity wards in Santiago, Chile. We report the first three transplants done with cord blood units form this bank. Cord blood units were obtained by intrauterine collection at delivery. They were depleted of plasma and red cells and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tests for total nucleated cells, CD34 cell content, viral serology, bacterial cultures and HLA A, B and DRB1 were done. Six hundred cord blood units were stored by March 2012. Three patients received allogeneic transplant with cord blood from our bank, two with high risk lymphoblastic leukemia and one with severe congenital anemia. They received conditioning regimens according to their disease and usual supportive care for unrelated donor transplantation until full hematopoietic and immune reconstitution was achieved. The three patients had early engraftment of neutrophils and platelets. The child corrected his anemia and the leukemia patients remain in complete remission. The post-transplant course was complicated with Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and BK virus infection. Two patients are fully functional 24 and 33 months after transplant, the third is still receiving immunosuppression.

  13. Repression of p53-target gene Bbc3/PUMA by MYSM1 is essential for the survival of hematopoietic multipotent progenitors and contributes to stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, J I; Petrov, J C; Langlais, D; Robert, F; Cencic, R; Shen, S; Pelletier, J; Gros, P; Nijnik, A

    2016-05-01

    p53 is a central mediator of cellular stress responses, and its precise regulation is essential for the normal progression of hematopoiesis. MYSM1 is an epigenetic regulator essential for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function, hematopoietic progenitor survival, and lymphocyte development. We recently demonstrated that all developmental and hematopoietic phenotypes of Mysm1 deficiency are p53-mediated and rescued in the Mysm1(-/-)p53(-/-) mouse model. However, the mechanisms triggering p53 activation in Mysm1(-/-) HSPCs, and the pathways downstream of p53 driving different aspects of the Mysm1(-/-) phenotype remain unknown. Here we show the transcriptional activation of p53 stress responses in Mysm1(-/-) HSPCs. Mechanistically, we find that the MYSM1 protein associates with p53 and colocalizes to promoters of classical p53-target genes Bbc3/PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) and Cdkn1a/p21. Furthermore, it antagonizes their p53-driven expression by modulating local histone modifications (H3K27ac and H3K4me3) and p53 recruitment. Using double-knockout mouse models, we establish that PUMA, but not p21, is an important mediator of p53-driven Mysm1(-/-) hematopoietic dysfunction. Specifically, Mysm1(-/-)Puma(-/-) mice show full rescue of multipotent progenitor (MPP) viability, partial rescue of HSC quiescence and function, but persistent lymphopenia. Through transcriptome analysis of Mysm1(-/-)Puma(-/-) MPPs, we demonstrate strong upregulation of other p53-induced mediators of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. The full viability of Mysm1(-/-)Puma(-/-) MPPs, despite strong upregulation of many other pro-apoptotic mediators, establishes PUMA as the essential non-redundant effector of p53-induced MPP apoptosis. Furthermore, we identify potential mediators of p53-dependent but PUMA-independent Mysm1(-/-)hematopoietic deficiency phenotypes. Overall, our study provides novel insight into the cell-type-specific roles of p53 and its downstream

  14. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4±7.40 yo preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5±4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87±0.41, 0.63±0.66, 99.00±2.60, and 3.22±3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22±5.68 versus 26.8±7.93, p<0.001 during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  15. Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation: the 20-year experience in the Rome Cord Blood Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screnci, Maria; Murgi, Emilia; Valle, Veronica; Tamburini, Anna; Pellegrini, Maria Grazia; Strano, Sabrina; Corona, Francesca; Ambrogi, Eleonora Barbacci; Girelli, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) represents a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients lacking a suitably matched and readily available related or unrelated stem cell donor. As UCB transplantation from compatible sibling provides good results in children therefore directed sibling UCB collection and banking is indicated in family who already have a child with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Particularly, related UCB collection is recommended when the patients urgently need a transplantation. To provide access to all patients in need, we developed a "Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation". Here we report results of this project started 20years ago. To date, in this study a total of 194 families were enrolled, a total of 204 UCB samples were successfully collected and 15 pediatric patients have been transplanted. Recently, some authors have suggested novel role for UCB other than in the transplantation setting. Therefore, future studies in the immunotherapy and regenerative medicine areas could expand indication for sibling directed UCB collection.

  16. Hematopoietic-supportive effect of (2S, 3R)-ent-catechin on marrow-depressed mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yi-hong; WANG Dong-xiao; LIU Ping; CHEN Ruo-yun; CHEN Meng-li; CHENG Liu-fang; YIN Jian-fen; CHEN Gui-yun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Hematopoiesis is an active process of cell proliferation, differentiation and release. It is the process during which hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) proliferate and differentiate to mature blood cells under the effect of hemetopoietic growth factors (HGFs) in certain hematopoietic microenvironment. HSCs are sources of hematopoiesis of a body that can self-renew, differentiate to blood cells of every lineage and maintain the constancy of them. As the major tissue of hematopoiesis bone marrow is filled with all kinds of blood cells in various developmental stages. Under the normal conditions, the ordered proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells/hematopoietic progenitor cells (HSC/HPC) depend on the regulation of cytokine network.

  17. Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Mobilization with “Just-in-Time” Plerixafor Approach is a Cost Effective Alternative to Routine Plerixafor Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Lauren; Cumpston, Aaron; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Wen, Sijin; Luo, Jin; Leadmon, Sonia; Watkins, Kathy; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi; Kanate, Abraham S.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor results in superior CD34+ cell yield, when compared to mobilization with G-CSF alone in patients with myeloma and lymphoma. However, plerixafor-based approaches are associated with high costs. To circumvent this, several institutions use a so-called “just-in-time” plerixafor (JIT-P) approach, where plerixafor is only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. Whether such a JIT-P approach is cost effective has not been confirmed to date. We present here, results of 136 patients with myeloma or lymphoma who underwent mobilization with two different approaches of plerixafor utilization. Between Jan 2010-Oct 2012 (n=76) patients uniformly received mobilization with G-CSF and plerixafor (routine G+P cohort). To reduce mobilization costs, between Nov 2012-Jun 2014 (n=60) patients were mobilized with JIT-P where plerixafor was only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. Patients in routine G+P group had a higher median peak peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (62 vs. 29 cells/μL, p<0.001) and a higher median day 1 CD34+ cell yield (2.9 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg vs. 2.1 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg, p=0.001). The median total CD34+ cell collection was also higher in routine G+P group (5.8 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg vs. 4.5 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg, p=0.007). In the JIT-P group 40% (n=24) completed adequate HPC collection without plerixafor. There was no difference in mobilization failure rates. The mean number of plerixafor doses utilized in JIT-P was lower (1.3 vs. 2.1, p=0.0002). The mean estimated cost in the routine G+P group was higher than that in the JIT-P group (USD 27,513 vs. USD 23,597, p=0.01). Our analysis demonstrates that mobilization with a JIT-P approach is a safe, effective and cost efficient strategy for HPC collection. PMID:26475754

  18. Parvovirus B19 promoter at map unit 6 confers autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to adeno-associated virus 2 in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X S; Yoder, M C; Zhou, S Z; Srivastava, A

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic human parvovirus B19 is an autonomously replicating virus with a remarkable tropism for human erythroid progenitor cells. Although the target cell specificity for B19 infection has been suggested to be mediated by the erythrocyte P-antigen receptor (globoside), a number of nonerythroid cells that express this receptor are nonpermissive for B19 replication. To directly test the role of expression from the B19 promoter at map unit 6 (B19p6) in the erythroid cell specificity of B19, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), in which the authentic AAV promoter at map unit 5 (AAVp5) was replaced by the B19p6 promoter. Although the wild-type (wt) AAV requires a helper virus for its optimal replication, we hypothesized that inserting the B19p6 promoter in a recombinant AAV would permit autonomous viral replication, but only in erythroid progenitor cells. In this report, we provide evidence that the B19p6 promoter is necessary and sufficient to impart autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to AAV in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Thus, expression from the B19p6 promoter plays an important role in post-P-antigen receptor erythroid-cell specificity of parvovirus B19. The AAV-B19 hybrid vector system may also prove to be useful in potential gene therapy of human hemoglobinopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618912

  19. Impact of mobilized blood progenitor cell quality determined by the CFU-GM/CD34+ ratio on rapid engraftment after blood stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, S Q; Abboud, C N; Brennan, J K; Ifthikharuddin, J J; Nichols, D; Liesveld, J L

    2002-01-01

    To find a parameter to predict the quality of collected mobilized CD34+ blood as hemopoietic reconstituting cells, the ratio of CFU-GM to CD34+ cells was examined. One hundred six consecutive patients who underwent blood stem cell transplantation at the University of Rochester from 01/01/99 to 12/31/99 were examined retrospectively for the number of days to reach an absolute neutrophil count of 500 or 1000 cells/microl and an absolute platelet count of 20,000 or 50,000 cells/microl without transfusion support as measures of engraftment. Linear regression analyses were conducted to determine factors influencing engraftment. The number of CD34+ cells/kg and CFU-GM/kg correlated highly with the number of nucleated blood cells/kg. In this population, in which 90% of patients received >2 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg, neither the number of CD34+ cells/kg nor the number of CFU-GM/kg correlated with the time to engraftment as judged by neutrophil or platelet levels. In contrast, the lower the ratio of CFU-GM to CD34+ cells, the more rapid the reconstitution of platelets to 20,000/microl (P = 0.03) and 50,000/microl (P = 0.02). Thus, a lower ratio of the CFU-GM/CD34+ appended to reflect a greater number of hematopoietic reconstituting cells in the blood cell collection. The CFU-GM/CD34+ ratio is an apparent predictor of earlier platelet engraftment, suggesting that the ratio reflects the engraftment potential of mobilized donor progenitor cells.

  20. Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of adequacy of hematopoietic stem cell collection for autologous transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combariza, Juan F.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to carry out an autologous transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells should be mobilized to peripheral blood and later collected by apheresis. The CD34+ cell count is a tool to establish the optimal time to begin the apheresis procedure. Objective: To evaluate the association between peripheral blood CD34+ cell count and the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Materials and methods: A predictive test evaluation study was carried out to establish the usefulness of peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of successful stem cell collection in patients that will receive an autologous transplantation. Results: 77 patients were included (median age: 49 years; range: 5-66. The predominant baseline diagnosis was lymphoma (53.2 %. The percentage of patients with successful harvest of hematopoietic stem cells was proportional to the number of CD34+cells in peripheral blood at the end of the mobilization procedure. We propose that more than 15 CD34+cells/μL must be present in order to achieve an adequate collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Conclusion: Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count is a useful tool to predict the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells.

  1. Flow cytometric analysis of hemetopoietic progenitor cells in peripheral blood stem cell harvest from patients with CD34 positive acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, T; Matsuda, I; Oguri, M; Amaya, H; Kiyosaki, M; Hamada, A; Tamaki, S; Tashiro, E; Kudo, Y; Taniguchi, O; Nakamura, T; Tomoyasu, S

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed CD34 positive cells in peripheral blood stem cell harvest (PBSCH) using flow cytometry. PBSCH from CD34 positive acute myelogeous leukemia (AML-M2) patient contained 1.87% CD34 positive cells, of which 1.21% was represented by MRD.PBSCH from CD34 positive acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) patient contained 3.14% CD34 positive cells, of which 0.11% was accounted for by minimal residual disease (MRD). If PBSCH from CD34 positive acute leukemia patient is analyzed for CD34 monoclonal antibody alone, the presence of CD34 positive MRD may escape attention so that CD34 positive hematopoietic progenitor cells may be overestimated. To avoid this risk, it is necessary to analyze PBSCH using both CD34 monoclonal antibody and characteristic markers of leukemia cells that were found pre-treatment.

  2. Expansion in bioreactors of human progenitor populations from cord blood and mobilized peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zant, G; Rummel, S A; Koller, M R; Larson, D B; Drubachevsky, I; Palsson, M; Emerson, S G

    1994-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) and mobilized peripheral blood (MPB) provide an alternate source to bone marrow for transplantation. Expansion in vitro of stem/progenitor cell populations from these sources may provide adult-sized grafts otherwise not attainable because of the limited cell numbers available in the case of UCB or because of numerous rounds of apheresis required for sufficient MPB cells. We asked whether continuous perfusion culture could be employed in ex vivo expansion to produce clinically relevant numbers of stem/progenitor cells from these sources. To evaluate MPB, 1-10 million leukocytes, from patients who had received either granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or cyclophosphamide and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), were inoculated into bioreactors, with or without irradiated, allogeneic stroma. The growth factor combination in the perfusion medium consisted of interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), GM-CSF and erythropoietin (Epo). Under the best conditions tested, total cell numbers, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM), and long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) populations were expanded by about 50-, 80-, and 20-fold, respectively, over 14 days. At low cell inocula (1 million), the presence of stroma enhanced the expansion of total cells and CFU-GM but not of LTC-IC. When SCF was not included in the medium, both total cells and CFU-GM expanded to a much lesser extent, but again the expansion of LTC-IC was not affected. At the higher cell inoculum (10 million), expansions of total cells and CFU-GM were equivalent with or without stroma. To evaluate UCB, cells were placed into bioreactors with or without irradiated, allogeneic stroma, and the bioreactors were perfused with medium containing the four standard growth factors. After 6-14 days, in several independent experiments, 20-24 million cells were harvested from bioreactors perfused with SCF-containing medium, irrespective of the

  3. Deletion of the LTR enhancer/promoter has no impact on the integration profile of MLV vectors in human hematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Moiani

    Full Text Available Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived gamma-retroviral vectors integrate preferentially near transcriptional regulatory regions in the human genome, and are associated with a significant risk of insertional gene deregulation. Self-inactivating (SIN vectors carry a deletion of the U3 enhancer and promoter in the long terminal repeat (LTR, and show reduced genotoxicity in pre-clinical assays. We report a high-definition analysis of the integration preferences of a SIN MLV vector compared to a wild-type-LTR MLV vector in the genome of CD34(+ human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs. We sequenced 13,011 unique SIN-MLV integration sites and compared them to 32,574 previously generated MLV sites in human HSPCs. The SIN-MLV vector recapitulates the integration pattern observed for MLV, with the characteristic clustering of integrations around enhancer and promoter regions associated to H3K4me3 and H3K4me1 histone modifications, specialized chromatin configurations (presence of the H2A.Z histone variant and binding of RNA Pol II. SIN-MLV and MLV integration clusters and hot spots overlap in most cases and are generated at a comparable frequency, indicating that the reduced genotoxicity of SIN-MLV vectors in hematopoietic cells is not due to a modified integration profile.

  4. Bone marrow failure in Fanconi anemia is triggered by an exacerbated p53/p21 DNA damage response that impairs hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccaldi, Raphael; Parmar, Kalindi; Mouly, Enguerran; Delord, Marc; Kim, Jung Min; Regairaz, Marie; Pla, Marika; Vasquez, Nadia; Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Pondarre, Corinne; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Gluckman, Eliane; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Leblanc, Thierry; Larghero, Jérôme; Grompe, Markus; Socié, Gérard; D'Andrea, Alan D; Soulier, Jean

    2012-07-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA repair deficiency syndrome. FA patients undergo progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) during childhood, which frequently requires allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The pathogenesis of this BMF has been elusive to date. Here we found that FA patients exhibit a profound defect in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) that is present before the onset of clinical BMF. In response to replicative stress and unresolved DNA damage, p53 is hyperactivated in FA cells and triggers a late p21(Cdkn1a)-dependent G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest. Knockdown of p53 rescued the HSPC defects observed in several in vitro and in vivo models, including human FA or FA-like cells. Taken together, our results identify an exacerbated p53/p21 "physiological" response to cellular stress and DNA damage accumulation as a central mechanism for progressive HSPC elimination in FA patients, and have implications for clinical care.

  5. Delayed massive immune hemolysis mediated by minor ABO incompatibility after allogeneic peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Salmon, Jean; Michaux, S.; Hermanne, J. P.; Baudoux, Etienne; Gerard, Christiane; Sondag, Danièle; Fillet, Georges; Beguin, Yves

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow transplantation with minor ABO incompatibility may be followed by moderate delayed hemolysis of the recipient's red cells by donor-derived ABO antibodies. This reaction may be more severe after transplantation of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs). CASE REPORT: A 16-year-old boy underwent an allogeneic PBPC transplant from his HLA-mismatched mother as treatment for acute myeloblastic leukemia that had proved resistant to induction chemotherapy. Transfusion of th...

  6. Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Lineage Commitment in Myeloid Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Franziska; Arkin, Ya'ara; Giladi, Amir;

    2015-01-01

    Within the bone marrow, stem cells differentiate and give rise to diverse blood cell types and functions. Currently, hematopoietic progenitors are defined using surface markers combined with functional assays that are not directly linked with in vivo differentiation potential or gene regulatory m...

  7. In Vivo Deletion of the Cebpa +37 kb Enhancer Markedly Reduces Cebpa mRNA in Myeloid Progenitors but Not in Non-Hematopoietic Tissues to Impair Granulopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Guo

    Full Text Available The murine Cebpa gene contains a +37 kb, evolutionarily conserved 440 bp enhancer that directs high-level expression to myeloid progenitors in transgenic mice. The enhancer is bound and activated by Runx1, Scl, GATA2, C/EBPα, c-Myb, Pu.1, and additional Ets factors in myeloid cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated replacement of the wild-type enhancer with a variant mutant in its seven Ets sites leads to 20-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in the 32Dcl3 myeloid cell line. To determine the effect of deleting the enhancer in vivo, we now characterize C57BL/6 mice in which loxP sites flank a 688 bp DNA segment containing the enhancer. CMV-Cre mediated germline deletion resulted in diminution of the expected number of viable Enh(f/f;CMV-Cre offspring, with 28-fold reduction in marrow Cebpa mRNA but normal levels in liver, lung, adipose, intestine, muscle, and kidney. Cre-transduction of lineage-negative marrow cells in vitro reduced Cebpa mRNA 12-fold, with impairment of granulocytic maturation, morphologic blast accumulation, and IL-3 dependent myeloid colony replating for >12 generations. Exposure of Enh(f/f;Mx1-Cre mice to pIpC led to 14-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in GMP or CMP, 30-fold reduction in LSK, and <2-fold reduction in the LSK/SLAM subset. FACS analysis of marrow from these mice revealed 10-fold reduced neutrophils, 3-fold decreased GMP, and 3-fold increased LSK cells. Progenitor cell cycle progression was mildly impaired. Granulocyte and B lymphoid colony forming units were reduced while monocytic and erythroid colonies were increased, with reduced Pu.1 and Gfi1 and increased Egr1 and Klf4 in GMP. Finally, competitive transplantation indicated preservation of functional long-term hematopoietic stem cells upon enhancer deletion and confirmed marrow-intrinsic impairment of granulopoiesis and B cell generation with LSK and monocyte lineage expansion. These findings demonstrate a critical role for the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer for hematopoietic

  8. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  9. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells support culture expansion of long-term culture-initiating cells from cord blood CD34+ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YiZhanga; ChangdongLi; XiaoxiaJiang; ShuangxiZhang; YingWu; BingLiu; PeihsienTang; NingMao

    2005-01-01

    Objective. Allogeneic transplantation with umbilical cord blood (UCB) in adult recipients is limited mainly by a low CD34+ cell dose. To overcome this shortcoming, human placenta as a novel source of human mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) was incorporated in an attempt to expand CD34+ ceils from UCB in vitro.Materials and Methods. Human placenta MPC was isolated and characterized by morphologic,immunophenotypical, and functional analysis. UCB CD34+ cells were expanded by coculturewith placeutal MPC. Suitable aliquots of cells were used to monitor cell production, elonogenie activity, and tong-term culture-initiating culture (LTC-IC) output. Finally, the immunoregulatory effect of placental MPC was evaluated by T-cell proliferation assay.Results. In its undifferentiated state, placental MPC displayed fibroblastoid morphology; was CD73, CD105, CD29, CD44, HLA-ABC, and CD166 positive; produced fibronectin, laminin,and vimentin; but was negative for CD14, CD31, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR, and α-smooth muscle actin. Functionally, it could be induced into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes.In vitro expansion of UCB hematopoietic cells, when cocultured with placental MPC in the presence of eytokines, was significantly enhanced: CD34+ cells by 14.89±2.32 fold; colonyforming cell (CFC) by 36.73±5.79 told; and LTC-IC by 7.43±2.66 fold. Moreover, placental MPC could suppress T-cell proliferation induced by cellular stimuli.Conclusion. These results strongly suggest that human placental MPC may be a suitable feeder layer for expansion of hematopoietic progenitors from UCB in vitro.

  10. Frozen cord blood hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into higher numbers of functional natural killer cells in vitro than mobilized hematopoietic stem cells or freshly isolated cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Luevano

    Full Text Available Adoptive natural killer (NK cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34(+ being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34(+ and frozen PBCD34(+ to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34(+ cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34(+ cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34(+ and PBCD34(+ expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34(+-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-γ and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34(+-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34(+ for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34(+, without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC.

  11. Frozen cord blood hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into higher numbers of functional natural killer cells in vitro than mobilized hematopoietic stem cells or freshly isolated cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano, Martha; Domogala, Anna; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Derniame, Sophie; Escobedo-Cousin, Michelle; Querol, Sergio; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB) and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34(+)) being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34(+)) and frozen PBCD34(+) to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34(+) cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34(+) cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34(+) and PBCD34(+) expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34(+)-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-γ and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34(+)-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34(+) for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34(+), without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC.

  12. Soluble factor cross-talk between human bone marrow-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells enhances in vitro CFU-F and CFU-O growth and reveals heterogeneity in the mesenchymal progenitor cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksh, Dolores; Davies, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    The homeostatic adult bone marrow (BM) is a complex tissue wherein physical and biochemical interactions serve to maintain a balance between the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. To focus on soluble factor interactions occurring between mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells, a serum-free adhesion-independent culture system was developed that allows manipulation of the growth of both mesenchymal and hematopoietic human BM-derived progenitors and the balance between these compartments. Factorial experiments demonstrated a role for stem cell factor (SCF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3) in the concomitant growth of hematopoietic (CD45+) and nonhematopoietic (CD45-) cells, as well as their derivatives. Kinetic tracking of IL-3alpha receptor (CD123) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression on a sorted CD45- cell population revealed the emergence of CD45-CD123+ cells capable of osteogenesis. Of the total fibroblast colony-forming units (CFU-Fs) and osteoblast colony-forming units (CFU-O), approximately 24% of CFU-Fs and about 22% of CFU-Os were recovered from this population. Cell-sorting experiments demonstrated that the CD45+ cell population secreted soluble factors that positively affect the survival and proliferation of CFU-Fs and CFU-Os generated from the CD45- cells. Together, our results provide insight into the intercellular cytokine network between hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells and provide a strategy to mutually culture both mesenchymal and hematopoietic cells in a defined scalable bioprocess.

  13. Interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels of cord blood plasma in term neonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ AIM: Umbilical cord blood plasma contain higher hematopoietic stimulatory activities than adult peripheral blood plasma. IL-3 is regarded as multilineage hematopoietic growth factor that acts on primitive pluripotential stem cells and progenitor cells of every lineage except T and B-lymphoid lineage.

  14. Biosimilar Filgrastim in Autologous Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization and Post-Transplant Hematologic Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Francesco; Mengarelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To date, two kinds of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factors (G-CSF) have been approved for autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSCs) mobilization and posttransplant hematologic recovery after high-dose chemotherapy: filgrastim (originator and biosimilar) and lenograstim. Biosimilar filgrastim has been approved on the basis of comparable efficacy and safety in clinical studies where it has been used as chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia prophylaxis, but no specific pre-registration studies have been published in the transplant setting. Hence, there is still general skepticism about the role of biosimilar G-CSFs in this setting of patients. This review of biochemical, pre-clinical and clinical data suggests significant comparability of biosimilar filgrastim with both originator filgrastim and lenograstim in autologous PBSCs mobilization and post-autograft hematologic recovery.

  15. [The comparative characteristics of antibacterial properties of the peptides of the active site of GM-CSF, and substances delivered from supernatants of hematopoietic progenitor CD34+45- cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurochka, A V; Zurochka, V A; Kostolomova, E G; Dobrynina, M A; Sykhoveĭ, Iu G; Gritsenko, V A

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of synthetic peptides of the active site of GM-CSF and supernatants of CD34+45- hematopoietic progenitor cells has been investigated GM-CSF peptides and cell supernatants were found to possess pronounced antibacterial activity, at that a combination of these substances has a more pronounced activity in comparison with the single substances. Possible mechanisms of the identified effects of synthetic peptides and substances from the supernatants of CD34+5- cells are discussed.

  16. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of docetaxel combined with melphalan and carboplatin, with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell support, in patients with advanced refractory malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Yago; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Bearman, Scott I; McSweeney, Peter A; Cagnoni, Pablo J; Matthes, Steve; Gustafson, Dan; Long, Michael; Barón, Anna E; Jones, Roy B

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the maximal tolerated dose (MTD), extramedullary toxicities, and pharmacokinetics of docetaxel combined with high-dose melphalan and carboplatin with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell support. Fifty-nine patients with advanced refractory malignancy (32 breast cancer, 10 non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 6 germ cell tumors, 4 Hodgkin disease, 4 ovarian cancer, 2 sarcoma, and 1 unknown primary adenocarcinoma) with a median of 3 prior chemotherapy regimens and a median of 3 organs involved were enrolled. Treatment included docetaxel (150-550 mg/m2 infused over 2 hours on day -6), melphalan (150-165 mg/m2 infused over 15 minutes from day -5 to -3), and carboplatin (1000-1300 mg/m2 as a 72-hour continuous infusion from day -5). Five patients died from direct regimen-related organ toxicity (2 capillary leak syndrome, 2 enterocolitis, and 1 hepatic toxicity), and 1 additional patient died from pulmonary aspergillosis. The docetaxel MTD was defined as 400 mg/m 2 , combined with melphalan (150 mg/m2 ) and carboplatin (1000 mg/m2 ). The MTD cohort was expanded to enroll a total of 26 patients, 1 of whom died from toxic enterocolitis. The remaining 25 patients presented the following extramedullary toxicity profile, which was manageable and largely reversible: stomatitis, myoarthralgias, peripheral neuropathy, gastrointestinal and cutaneous toxicities, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Docetaxel exhibited linear pharmacokinetics in the dose range tested (150-550 mg/m2 ). Pharmacodynamic correlations were noted between the docetaxel area under the curve and peripheral neuropathy or stomatitis. The response rate among 38 patients with measurable disease was 95%, with 47% complete responses. At a median follow-up of 26 months (range, 7-72 months), the 3-year event-free survival and overall survival were 26% and 36%, respectively. In conclusion, a 4-fold dose escalation of docetaxel, combined with melphalan and

  17. α-Tocopherol induces hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell expansion and ERK1/2-mediated differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira-Pedro, Amanda; Barbosa, Christiano M V; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Lungato, Lisandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Moraes, Andrea Aparecida F S; Miranda, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Ferreira, Alice Teixeira

    2011-12-01

    Tocopherols promote or inhibit growth in different cell types. In the hematopoietic system, the radioprotective property of tocopherols is thought to act through the expansion of primitive hematopoietic cells. However, the mechanisms activated by tocopherols and which HPs are affected remain poorly understood. To better address these questions, mice were treated with α-tocopherol, and its effects were investigated in the BM microenvironment. α-Tocopherol induced increased proliferation in HSC/HP cells, leading to BM hyperplasia. In addition, differentiation to the granulocytic/monocytic lineage was enhanced by α-tocopherol treatment. α-Tocopherol treatment resulted in decreased basal phosphorylation of ERK1/2, PKC, and STAT-5 in HSC/HP cells. In contrast, α-tocopherol enhanced ERK1/2 activation in response to IL-3 stimulation in HSC/HP cells without altering the expression of IL-3Rs. Moreover, α-tocopherol-induced differentiation and ERK1/2 activation were abolished in mice pretreated with a MEK inhibitor (PD98059); however, pretreatment with PD98059 did not reduce the α-tocopherol-mediated increase in HSC/HP cells but instead, further enhanced their proliferation. Therefore, α-tocopherol induces expansion of HSC/HP cells by a nonidentified intracellular pathway and granulocytic/monocytic differentiation through ERK1/2 activation.

  18. Determination of hematopoietic stem cells in peripheral blood by an automated hematology analyzer (SE-9000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, K; Yamane, T; Hino, M; Tatsumi, N

    1998-12-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of an automated hematology analyzer (SE-9000) for the identification and counting of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). The samples tested were from 14 patients with hematological malignancies. Peripheral blood samples were collected from the subjects before and after a course of chemotherapy. From the leukapheresis sample, CD34+ cells, assumed to be hematopoietic stem cells, were obtained with an immunomagnetic cell separator. The CD34+ cells obtained accumulated in the gate corresponding to low recurrent frequencies of the automated hematology analyzer. This gate shows results of the 'immature information' (IMI) channel. Software for detection of only the cells that accumulated in this gate was therefore developed. With this trial program, the regression coefficient between the percentage of leukocytes from the blood samples that were CD34+ and the percentage of such leukocytes that appeared on the IMI channel was 0.79. With this analyzer, the number of PBSC could be counted in about 80 s. The identification and counting of cells picked up by the IMI channel should be clinically useful for the monitoring of changes in PBSC after chemotherapy for mobilization.

  19. Prevention of pure red cell aplasia after major or bidirectional ABO blood group incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation by pretransplant reduction of host anti-donor isoagglutinins

    OpenAIRE

    Stussi, G.; Halter, J; Bucheli, E; Valli, P V; Seebach, L; Gmür, J; Gratwohl, A; Passweg, J. R.; Seebach, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent anti-donor isoagglutinins after major ABO blood group incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may cause delayed red blood cell engraftment and post-transplant pure red cell aplasia. DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated the effect of pretransplant anti-donor isoagglutinin reduction by in vivo absorption and/or plasmapheresis on the incidence of pure red cell aplasia and the time to red blood cell engraftment in 153 hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient...

  20. Emerging uses for pediatric hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domen, Jos; Gandy, Kimberly; Dalal, Jignesh

    2012-04-01

    Many new therapies are emerging that use hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. In this review, we focus on five promising emerging trends that are altering stem cell usage in pediatrics: (i) The use of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, autologous or allogeneic, in the treatment of autoimmune disorders is one. (ii) The use of cord blood transplantation in patients with inherited metabolic disorders such as Hurler syndrome shows great benefit, even more so than replacement enzyme therapy. (iii) Experience with the delivery of gene therapy through stem cells is increasing, redefining the potential and limitations of this therapy. (iv) It has recently been shown that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can be cured by the use of selected stem cells. (v) Finally, it has long been postulated that HSC-transplantation can be used to induce tolerance in solid-organ transplant recipients. A new approach to tolerance induction using myeloid progenitor cells will be described.

  1. 利用诱导性多能干细胞技术体外扩增造血干/祖细胞的初步研究%In vitro expansion hematopoietic/progenitor stem cells by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万兰; 李学家; 文玉华; 杨慧芝; 李玉洁; 林燕蕊

    2015-01-01

    目的 利用诱导性多能干细胞技术体外扩增造血干/祖细胞.方法 利用非整合型载体,将四个转录因子:Sox2、Klf4、Oct4和c-Myc导入脐血来源的造血干/祖细胞(CD34+细胞)重编程获得诱导性多能干细胞(iPSCs),再利用与小鼠骨髓基质细胞OP9共培养法将其定向分化成CD34+造血干/祖细胞.借助iPSCs可以在体外无限传代、大量扩增的特点,实现体外保存及大量扩增造血干/祖细胞的目的.结果 脐血CD34+细胞可以在体外重编程为非整合型iPSCs,并能够高效定向分化成为CD34+细胞,其分化效率比胚胎干细胞(ESCs)有显著提高.结论 利用诱导性多能干细胞技术体外大量扩增脐血造血干/祖细胞是一个可行的方案,具有良好的应用前景.%Objective Expansion hematopoietic/progenitor stem cells by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells which induced from human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.Methods Using episomal vectors of Sox2,Klf4,Oct4 and c-Myc to generate induced pluripotent stem cells from cord blood hematopoietic stem cells,we established integration-free iPSCs.And then we induced these cells differentiated into hematopoietic cells based on OP9 cells system in vitro.Result By examining CD34 positive cells,we found compared human ES cell line with cord blood sourced iPS cells could be differentiated into hematopoietic cells more efficiently.Conclusion A highly efficient method for expansion hematopoietic stem cells in vitro is successfully established,which is useable in clinical study.

  2. Aging-like Phenotype and Defective Lineage Specification in SIRT1-Deleted Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Rimmelé

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs exhibit defective lineage specification that is thought to be central to increased incidence of myeloid malignancies and compromised immune competence in the elderly. Mechanisms underlying these age-related defects remain largely unknown. We show that the deacetylase Sirtuin (SIRT1 is required for homeostatic HSC maintenance. Differentiation of young SIRT1-deleted HSCs is skewed toward myeloid lineage associated with a significant decline in the lymphoid compartment, anemia, and altered expression of associated genes. Combined with HSC accumulation of damaged DNA and expression patterns of age-linked molecules, these have striking overlaps with aged HSCs. We further show that SIRT1 controls HSC homeostasis via the longevity transcription factor FOXO3. These findings suggest that SIRT1 is essential for HSC homeostasis and lineage specification. They also indicate that SIRT1 might contribute to delaying HSC aging.

  3. MGMT enrichment and second gene co-expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells using separate or dual-gene lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Justin C; Alberti, Michael O; Ismail, Mourad; Lingas, Karen T; Reese, Jane S; Gerson, Stanton L

    2015-01-22

    The DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) allows efficient in vivo enrichment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Thus, linking this selection strategy to therapeutic gene expression offers the potential to reconstitute diseased hematopoietic tissue with gene-corrected cells. However, different dual-gene expression vector strategies are limited by poor expression of one or both transgenes. To evaluate different co-expression strategies in the context of MGMT-mediated HSC enrichment, we compared selection and expression efficacies in cells cotransduced with separate single-gene MGMT and GFP lentivectors to those obtained with dual-gene vectors employing either encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A elements for co-expression strategies. Each strategy was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using equivalent multiplicities of infection (MOI) to transduce 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK)-enriched murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The highest dual-gene expression (MGMT(+)GFP(+)) percentages were obtained with the FMDV-2A dual-gene vector, but half of the resulting gene products existed as fusion proteins. Following selection, dual-gene expression percentages in single-gene vector cotransduced and dual-gene vector transduced populations were similar. Equivalent MGMT expression levels were obtained with each strategy, but GFP expression levels derived from the IRES dual-gene vector were significantly lower. In mice, vector-insertion averages were similar among cells enriched after dual-gene vectors and those cotransduced with single-gene vectors. These data demonstrate the limitations and advantages of each strategy in the context of MGMT-mediated selection, and may provide insights into vector design with respect to a particular therapeutic gene or hematologic defect.

  4. Development of patient-specific hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell grafts from pluripotent stem cells, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, H; Teichweyde, N; Meyer, C; Horn, P A

    2013-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for future applications in many areas of regenerative medicine. Their defining property of differentiation towards any of the three germ layers and all derivatives thereof, including somatic stem cells, explains the special interest of the biomedical community in this cell type. In this review, we focus on the current state of directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are especially interesting because they are the longest known and, thus, most intensively investigated somatic stem cells. They were the first stem cells successfully used for regenerative purposes in clinical human medicine, namely in bone marrow transplantation, and also the first stem cells to be genetically altered for the first successful gene therapy trial in humans. However, because of the technical difficulties associated with this rare type of cell, such as the current incapability of prospective isolation, in vitro expansion and gene repair by homologous recombination, there is great interest in using pluripotent stem cells, such as Embryonic Stem (ES-) cells, as a source for generating and genetically altering HSCs, ex vivo. This has been hampered by ethical concerns associated with the use of human ES-cells. However, since Shinya Yamanaka´s successful attempts to reprogram somatic cells of mice and men to an ES-cell like state, so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, this field of research has experienced a huge boost. In this brief review, we will reflect on the status quo of directed hematopoietic differentiation of human and mouse pluripotent stem cells.

  5. Self-renewal of single mouse hematopoietic stem cells is reduced by JAK2V617F without compromising progenitor cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David G; Li, Juan; Tanna, Hinal; Fink, Juergen; Kirschner, Kristina; Pask, Dean C; Silber, Yvonne; Hamilton, Tina L; Sneade, Rachel; Simons, Benjamin D; Green, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Recent descriptions of significant heterogeneity in normal stem cells and cancers have altered our understanding of tumorigenesis, emphasizing the need to understand how single stem cells are subverted to cause tumors. Human myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are thought to reflect transformation of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and the majority harbor an acquired V617F mutation in the JAK2 tyrosine kinase, making them a paradigm for studying the early stages of tumor establishment and progression. The consequences of activating tyrosine kinase mutations for stem and progenitor cell behavior are unclear. In this article, we identify a distinct cellular mechanism operative in stem cells. By using conditional knock-in mice, we show that the HSC defect resulting from expression of heterozygous human JAK2V617F is both quantitative (reduced HSC numbers) and qualitative (lineage biases and reduced self-renewal per HSC). The defect is intrinsic to individual HSCs and their progeny are skewed toward proliferation and differentiation as evidenced by single cell and transplantation assays. Aged JAK2V617F show a more pronounced defect as assessed by transplantation, but mice that transform reacquire competitive self-renewal ability. Quantitative analysis of HSC-derived clones was used to model the fate choices of normal and JAK2-mutant HSCs and indicates that JAK2V617F reduces self-renewal of individual HSCs but leaves progenitor expansion intact. This conclusion is supported by paired daughter cell analyses, which indicate that JAK2-mutant HSCs more often give rise to two differentiated daughter cells. Together these data suggest that acquisition of JAK2V617F alone is insufficient for clonal expansion and disease progression and causes eventual HSC exhaustion. Moreover, our results show that clonal expansion of progenitor cells provides a window in which collaborating mutations can accumulate to drive disease progression. Characterizing the mechanism(s) of JAK2V617F

  6. p190-B RhoGAP and intracellular cytokine signals balance hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinge, Ashwini; Xu, Juying; Javier, Jose; Mose, Eucabeth; Kumar, Sachin; Kapur, Reuben; Srour, Edward F.; Malik, Punam; Aronow, Bruce J.; Filippi, Marie-Dominique

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) fate choices remain ill-defined. Here, we show that a signalling network of p190-B RhoGAP-ROS-TGF-β-p38MAPK balances HSPC self-renewal and differentiation. Upon transplantation, HSPCs express high amounts of bioactive TGF-β1 protein, which is associated with high levels of p38MAPK activity and loss of HSC self-renewal in vivo. Elevated levels of bioactive TGF-β1 are associated with asymmetric fate choice in vitro in single HSPCs via p38MAPK activity and this is correlated with the asymmetric distribution of activated p38MAPK. In contrast, loss of p190-B, a RhoGTPase inhibitor, normalizes TGF-β levels and p38MAPK activity in HSPCs and is correlated with increased HSC self-renewal in vivo. Loss of p190-B also promotes symmetric retention of multi-lineage capacity in single HSPC myeloid cell cultures, further suggesting a link between p190-B-RhoGAP and non-canonical TGF-β signalling in HSPC differentiation. Thus, intracellular cytokine signalling may serve as ‘fate determinants' used by HSPCs to modulate their activity. PMID:28176763

  7. A novel protocol that allows short-term stem cell expansion of both committed and pluripotent hematopoietic progenitor cells suitable for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astori, G; Malangone, W; Adami, V; Risso, A; Dorotea, L; Falasca, E; Marini, L; Spizzo, R; Bigi, L; Sala, P; Tonutti, E; Biffoni, F; Rinaldi, C; Del Frate, G; Pittino, M; Degrassi, A

    2001-01-01

    To obtain long-term engraftment and hematopoiesis in myeloablated patients, the cell population used for hematopoietic reconstitution should include a sufficient number of early pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), along with committed cells from the various lineages. For this purpose, the small subset of CD34+ cells purified from different sources must be expanded ex vivo. Since cytokines may induce both proliferation and differentiation, expansion would provide a cell population comprising committed as well as uncommitted cells. Optimization of HSC expansion methods could be obtained by a combination of cytokines able to sustain renewal of pluripotent cells yet endowed with poor differentiation potential. We used variations of the combinations of cytokines described by Brugger et al. [W. Brugger, S. Heimfels, R. J. Berenson, R. Mertelsmann, and L. Kanz (1995) N. Engl. J. Med. 333, 283-287] and Piacibello et al. [W. Piacibello, F. Sanavio, L. Garetto, A. Severino, D. Bergandi, J. Ferrario, F. Fagioli, M. Berger, and M. Aglietta (1997) Blood 89, 2644-2653] to expand UCB CD34+ cells and monitored proliferation rate and phenotype after 14 days of culture. Several hematopoietic lineage-associated surface antigens were evaluated. Our data show that flt3L and thrombopoietin in combination with IL-3, while sustaining a high CD34+ proliferation rate, provide a relatively low enrichment in very early uncommitted CD34+/CD38- cells. Conversely, in the absence of IL-3, they are less effective in inducing proliferation yet significantly increase the number of CD34+/CD38- cells. A combination of the above protocols, applied simultaneously to aliquots of the same sample, would allow expansion of both committed and pluripotent HSC. This strategy may represent a significant improvement for clinical applications.

  8. Clinical significance of peripheral blood erythroblastosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyama, Susumu; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Nannya, Yasuhito; Ogawa, Seishi; Asano-Moki, Yuki; Ogawa, Natsu; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Kawazu, Masahito; Komeno, Yukiko; Imai, Yoichi; Hangaishi, Akira; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tsujino, Shiho; Aoki, Katsunori; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2004-12-01

    Erythroblasts (EBL) are normally not observed in peripheral blood, but may be found in patients suffering from a variety of severe diseases. The detection of EBL in peripheral blood has been shown to be associated with a poor prognosis. However, the clinical significance of peripheral erythroblastosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has not been evaluated. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 161 patients who underwent HSCT at our hospital from June 1995 to October 2001. EBL at any level were detected in 94% of the patients. Forty-four and 11 patients experienced erythroblastosis exceeding 200 and 1,000/ul, respectively. The erythroblast count was higher in patients who died than in the survivors (geometric mean value 184 vs. 100/ul, P=0.01). High-level erythroblastosis ( >1,000/ul) within 180 days after HSCT was associated with an extremely poor prognosis (median survival 22.5 days). Among the possible confounding factors, the use of total body irradiation (RR 2.35, 95% CI 1.22 - 4.54, P=0.011) and the disease status before transplantation (RR 2.51, 95% CI 1.15 - 5.49, P=0.021) were independent significant factors for erythroblastosis after HSCT. As for post-transplant events, a high EBL concentration was frequently preceded by graft-vs.-host disease, thrombotic microangiopathy, hypoxia, and hematological relapse.

  9. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  10. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-05-18

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Cord blood-derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. RESULTS HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. CONCLUSIONS HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers.

  11. New strategies in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: G-CSF-mobilized unprocessed whole blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Dräger

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC for rescue of bone marrow function after high-dose chemo-/radiotherapy is widely used in hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Mobilization of stem cells to the peripheral blood can be achieved by cytokine treatment of the patients. The main advantage of autologous PBSC transplantation over bone marrow transplantation is the faster recovery of neutrophil and platelet counts. The threshold number of PBSC required for adequate rescue of bone marrow is thought to be about 2 x 106 CD34+ cells/kg, if the stem cells are collected by leukapheresis and subsequently cryopreserved. We show that this critical number could be further reduced to as few as 0.2 x 106 cells/kg. In 30 patients with multiple myeloma and 25 patients with bad risk lymphoma 1 liter of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF-mobilized unprocessed whole blood (stored at 4oC for 1-3 days was used for transplantation. Compared to a historical control group, a significant reduction in the duration of neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and the length of hospital stay was documented. Furthermore, the effect of stem cell support was reflected by a lower need for platelet and red cell transfusions and a reduced antibiotic use. Considering the data as a whole, a cost saving of about 50% was achieved. To date, this easy to perform method of transplantation is only feasible following high-dose therapies that are completed within 72 h, since longer storage of unprocessed blood is accompanied by a substantial loss of progenitor cell function. Ongoing investigations include attempts to prolong storage times for whole blood

  12. Fli-1 overexpression in hematopoietic progenitors deregulates T cell development and induces pre-T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique F M A Smeets

    Full Text Available The Ets transcription factor Fli-1 is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic tissues and cells, including immature T cells, but the role of Fli-1 in T cell development has not been closely examined. To address this we retrovirally overexpressed Fli-1 in various in vitro and in vivo settings and analysed its effect on T cell development. We found that Fli-1 overexpression perturbed the DN to DP transition and inhibited CD4 development whilst enhancing CD8 development both in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, Fli-1 overexpression in vivo eventuated in development of pre-T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (pre-T LBL. Known Fli-1 target genes such as the pro-survival Bcl-2 family members were not found to be upregulated. In contrast, we found increased NOTCH1 expression in all Fli-1 T cells and detected Notch1 mutations in all tumours. These data show a novel function for Fli-1 in T cell development and leukaemogenesis and provide a new mouse model of pre-T LBL to identify treatment options that target the Fli-1 and Notch1 signalling pathways.

  13. ETS Transcription Factor ETV2/ER71/Etsrp in Hematopoietic and Vascular Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanas, S; Choi, K

    2016-01-01

    Effective establishment of the hematopoietic and vascular systems is prerequisite for successful embryogenesis. The ETS transcription factor Etv2 has proven to be essential for hematopoietic and vascular development. Etv2 expression marks the onset of the hematopoietic and vascular development and its deficiency leads to an absolute block in hematopoietic and vascular development. Etv2 is transiently expressed during development and is mainly expressed in testis in adults. Consistent with its expression pattern, Etv2 is transiently required for the generation of the optimal levels of the hemangiogenic cell population. Deletion of this gene after the hemangiogenic progenitor formation leads to normal hematopoietic and vascular development. Mechanistically, ETV2 induces the hemangiogenic program by activating blood and endothelial cell lineage specifying genes and enhancing VEGF signaling. Moreover, ETV2 establishes an ETS hierarchy by directly activating other Ets genes, which in the face of transient Etv2 expression, presumably maintain blood and endothelial cell program initiated by ETV2 through an ETS switching mechanism. Current studies suggest that the hemangiogenic progenitor population is exclusively sensitive to ETV2-dependent FLK1 signaling. Any perturbation in the ETV2, VEGF, and FLK1 balance causing insufficient hemangiogenic progenitor cell generation would lead to defects in hematopoietic and endothelial cell development.

  14. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thys, Ryan G., E-mail: rthys@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Lehman, Christine E., E-mail: clehman@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Pierce, Levi C.T., E-mail: Levipierce@gmail.com [Human Longevity, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Wang, Yuh-Hwa, E-mail: yw4b@virginia.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0733 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  15. Mobilization Characteristics and Strategies to Improve Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Collection in Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease and Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panch, Sandhya R.; Yau, Yu Ying; Kang, Elizabeth M.; De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.; Leitman, Susan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background G-CSF mobilized autologous hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) may be collected by apheresis of patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) for use in gene therapy trials. CD34+ cell mobilization has not been well characterized in such patients. Study Design and Methods We retrospectively evaluated CD34+ cell mobilization and collection in 73 consecutive CGD and SCID patients and in 99 age, weight and G-CSF dose-matched healthy allogeneic controls. Results In subjects aged ≤20 years, day 5 pre-apheresis circulating CD34+ counts were significantly lower in CGD and SCID than in controls; mean peak CD34+ cells 58, 64, and 87/uL, respectively, p=0.01. The SCIDs had lower CD34+ collection efficiency than CGDs and controls; mean efficiency 40%, 63% and 57%, respectively, p=0.003. In subjects >20 years, the CGDs had significantly lower CD34+ cell mobilization than controls; mean peak CD34+ cells 41 and 113/uL, respectively, p<0.0001. In a multivariate analysis, lower sedimentation rate (ESR) at mobilization was significantly correlated with better CD34+ cell mobilization, p=0.007. In SCIDs, CD34 collection efficiency was positively correlated with higher red cell indices (MCV: R2=0.77; MCH: R2=0.94; MCHC: R2=0.7, p<0.007) but not hemoglobin. Conclusions CGD and SCID populations are characterized by significantly less robust CD34+ HPC mobilization than healthy controls. The presence of active inflammation/infection as suggested by an elevated ESR may negatively impact mobilization. Among SCIDs, markedly reduced CD34 collection efficiencies were related to iron deficiency, wherein decreased red cell size and density may impair apheresis cell separation mechanics. PMID:25143186

  16. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Antagonist StemRegenin1 Improves In Vitro Generation of Highly Functional Natural Killer Cells from CD34(+) Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeven, Mieke W H; Thordardottir, Soley; Kohela, Arwa; Maas, Frans; Preijers, Frank; Jansen, Joop H; Blijlevens, Nicole M; Cany, Jeannette; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry

    2015-12-15

    Early natural killer (NK)-cell repopulation after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has been associated with reduced relapse rates without an increased risk of graft-versus-host disease, indicating that donor NK cells have specific antileukemic activity. Therefore, adoptive transfer of donor NK cells is an attractive strategy to reduce relapse rates after allo-SCT. Since NK cells of donor origin will not be rejected, multiple NK-cell infusions could be administered in this setting. However, isolation of high numbers of functional NK cells from transplant donors is challenging. Hence, we developed a cytokine-based ex vivo culture protocol to generate high numbers of functional NK cells from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). In this study, we demonstrate that addition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist StemRegenin1 (SR1) to our culture protocol potently enhances expansion of CD34(+) HSPCs and induces expression of NK-cell-associated transcription factors promoting NK-cell differentiation. As a result, high numbers of NK cells with an active phenotype can be generated using this culture protocol. These SR1-generated NK cells exert efficient cytolytic activity and interferon-γ production toward acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma cells. Importantly, we observed that NK-cell proliferation and function are not inhibited by cyclosporin A, an immunosuppressive drug often used after allo-SCT. These findings demonstrate that SR1 can be exploited to generate high numbers of functional NK cells from G-CSF-mobilized CD34(+) HSPCs, providing great promise for effective NK-cell-based immunotherapy after allo-SCT.

  17. Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Mobilization with Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide Chemotherapy versus Plerixafor-Based Strategies in Patients with Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Binod; Veltri, Lauren Westfall; Fenske, Timothy S; Eastwood, Daniel; Craig, Michael D; Cumpston, Aaron; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Esselman, Jean; Watkins, Kathy; Pasquini, Marcelo C; D'Souza, Anita; Hari, Parameswaran; Kanate, Abraham Sebastian; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Studies comparing the efficacy and safety of chemo-mobilization with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) ± rituximab with plerixafor-based approaches in lymphoma patients have not been performed. We analyzed hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization outcomes in lymphoma patients undergoing chemo-mobilization with ICE (n = 35) compared with either routine plerixafor (n = 30) or "just in time" (JIT) plerixafor-based mobilization (n = 33). Chemo-mobilization provided a significantly higher total CD34(+) cell yield (median collection, 5.35 × 10(6) cells/kg for ICE versus 3.15 × 10(6) cells/kg for routine plerixafor and 3.6 × 10(6) cells/kg for JIT plerixafor, P mobilization failures (inability to collect at least 2 × 10(6) cells/kg) in the chemo-mobilization group, whereas 5 patients (16.7%) in the routine plerixafor and 3 patients (9.1%) in JIT group had mobilization failure (P = .04). Mean time to neutrophil engraftment was faster in the chemo-mobilization group, 10.3 days (±1.2) compared with 12.1 days (±3.6) in the routine plerixafor group and 11.6 days (±3.0) in the JIT group (P mobilization group (34.3% versus 0 versus 3.2% versus 1, P mobilization was associated with significantly less mobilization cost (average cost $17,601.76 in ICE versus $28,963.05 in routine and $25,679.81 in JIT, P mobilization with ICE provides a higher total CD34(+) cell yield, lower rates of mobilization failure, faster engraftment, and lower cost compared to plerixafor-based approaches with comparable toxicity profile between the groups, except for higher transfusion requirements with chemo-mobilization.

  18. Junín virus infection of human hematopoietic progenitors impairs in vitro proplatelet formation and platelet release via a bystander effect involving type I IFN signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozner, Roberto G; Ure, Agustín E; Jaquenod de Giusti, Carolina; D'Atri, Lina P; Italiano, Joseph E; Torres, Oscar; Romanowski, Victor; Schattner, Mirta; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2010-04-15

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is an endemo-epidemic disease caused by Junín virus (JUNV), a member of the arenaviridae family. Although a recently introduced live attenuated vaccine has proven to be effective, AHF remains a potentially lethal infection. Like in other viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF), AHF patients present with fever and hemorrhagic complications. Although the causes of the bleeding are poorly understood, impaired hemostasis, endothelial cell dysfunction and low platelet counts have been described. Thrombocytopenia is a common feature in VHF syndromes, and it is a major sign for its diagnosis. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanism has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that thrombocytopenia results from a viral-triggered alteration of the megakaryo/thrombopoiesis process. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of JUNV on megakaryopoiesis using an in vitro model of human CD34+ cells stimulated with thrombopoietin. Our results showed that CD34+ cells are infected with JUNV in a restricted fashion. Infection was transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)-dependent and the surface expression of TfR1 was higher in infected cultures, suggesting a novel arenaviral dissemination strategy in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Although proliferation, survival, and commitment in JUNV-infected cultures were normal, viral infection impaired thrombopoiesis by decreasing in vitro proplatelet formation, platelet release, and P-selectin externalization via a bystander effect. The decrease in platelet release was also TfR1-dependent, mimicked by poly(I:C), and type I interferon (IFN alpha/beta) was implicated as a key paracrine mediator. Among the relevant molecules studied, only the transcription factor NF-E2 showed a moderate decrease in expression in megakaryocytes from either infected cultures or after type I IFN treatment. Moreover, type I IFN-treated megakaryocytes presented ultrastructural abnormalities resembling the reported thrombocytopenic NF-E2(-/-) mouse

  19. Analysis of glycoprotein E-selectin ligANDs on human and mouse marrow cells enriched for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen S.

    2011-06-09

    Although well recognized that expression of E-selectin on marrow microvessels mediates osteotropism of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), our knowledge regarding the cognate E-selectin ligand(s) on HSPCs is incomplete. Flow cytometry using E-selectin-Ig chimera (E-Ig) shows that human marrow cells enriched for HSPCs (CD34+ cells) display greater E-selectin binding than those obtained from mouse (lin-/Sca-1+/c-kit+ [LSK] cells). To define the relevant glycoprotein E-selectin ligands, lysates from human CD34+ and KG1a cells and from mouse LSK cells were immunoprecipitated using E-Ig and resolved byWestern blot using E-Ig. In both human and mouse cells, E-selectin ligand reactivity was observed at ∼ 120- to 130-kDa region, which contained two E-selectin ligands, the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- 1 glycoform "CLA," and CD43. Human, but not mouse, cells displayed a prominent ∼ 100-kDa band, exclusively comprising the CD44 glycoform "HCELL."E-Ig reactivity was most prominent on CLA in mouse cells and on HCELL in human cells. To further assess HCELL\\'s contribution to E-selectin adherence, complementary studies were performed to silence (via CD44 siRNA) or enforce its expression (via exoglycosylation). Under physiologic shear conditions, CD44/HCELL-silenced human cells showed striking decreases (> 50%) in E-selectin binding. Conversely, enforced HCELL expression of LSK cells profoundly increased E-selectin adherence, yielding > 3-fold more marrow homing in vivo. These data define the key glycoprotein E-selectin ligands of human and mouse HSPCs, unveiling critical species-intrinsic differences in both the identity and activity of these structures. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Role of SDF-1 (CXCL12) in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells traffic into the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis induced by G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendt, Mayela; Cardier, Jose E

    2015-12-01

    The stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) plays an essential role in the homing of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to bone marrow (BM). It is not known whether SDF-1 may also regulate the homing of HSPCs to the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Here, we investigated the possible role of SDF-1 in attracting HSPCs to the liver during experimental EMH induced by the hematopoietic mobilizers G-CSF, AMD3100 and phenylhydrazine (PHZ). Mice treated with G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ showed a significant increase in the expression of SDF-1 in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) microenvironments. Liver from mice treated with the hematopoietic mobilizers showed HSPCs located adjacent to the LSEC microenvironments, expressing high levels of SDF-1. An inverse relationship was found between the hepatic SDF-1 levels and those in the BM. In vitro, LSEC monolayers induced the migration of HSPCs, and this effect was significantly reduced by AMD3100. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence showing that SDF-1 expressed by LSEC can be a major player in the recruitment of HSPCs to the liver during EMH induced by hematopoietic mobilizers.

  1. Homing of circulating blood endothelial progenitor cells after myocardial infarction is mediated by Akt-SDF-1-signal pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵岚

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expressions of protein kinase B(Akt) and stromal cell-derived factor-1(SDF-1) and their relations with circulating blood endothelial progenitor cell homing after myocardial infarction(MI). Methods MI was induced in the

  2. Genetically engineered blood pharming: generation of HLA-universal platelets derived from CD34+ progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Constança; Blaszczyk, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Blood pharming is a recently designed concept to enable in vitro production of blood cells that are safe, effective and readily available. This approach represents an alternative to blood donation and may contribute to overcome the shortage of blood products. However, the high variability of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci remains a major hurdle to the application of off-the-shelf blood products. Refractoriness to platelet (PLT) transfusion caused by alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens constitutes a relevant clinical problem. Thus, it would be desirable to generate PLT units devoid of HLA antigens. To reduce the immunogenicity of cell-based therapeutics, we have permanently reduced HLA class I expression using an RNA interference strategy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the generation of HLA class I-silenced (HLA-universal) PLTs from CD34+ progenitor cells using an shRNA targeting β2-microglobulin transcripts is feasible. CD34+ progenitor cells derived from G-CSF mobilised donors were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding for the β2-microglobulin-specific shRNA and differentiated into PLTs using a liquid culture system. The functionality of HLA-silenced PLTs and their ability to escape HLA antibody-mediated cytotoxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Platelet activation in response to ADP and thrombin were assessed in vitro. The immune-evasion capability of HLA-universal megakaryocytes (MKs) and PLTs was tested in lymphocytotoxicity assays using anti-HLA antibodies. To assess the functionality of HLA-universal PLTs in vivo, HLA-silenced MKs were infused into NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) mice with or without anti-HLA antibodies. PLT generation was evaluated by flow cytometry using anti-CD42a and CD61 antibodies. HLA-universal PLTs demonstrated to be functionally similar to blood-derived PLTs. Lymphocytotoxicity assays showed that HLA-silencing efficiently protects MKs against HLA antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. 80

  3. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

  4. Differentiation of smooth muscle progenitor cells in peripheral blood and its application in tissue engineered blood vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang-zhe XIE; Ning-tao FANG; Shui LIU; Ping ZHOU; Yi ZHANG; Song-mei WANG; Hong-yang GAO; Luan-feng PAN

    2008-01-01

    Background: A major shortcoming in tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) is the lack of healthy and easily attainable smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Smooth muscle progenitor cells (SPCs), especially from peripheral blood, may offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineering involving a less invasive harvesting technique. Methods: SPCs were isolated from 5-ml fresh rat peripheral blood by density-gradient centrifugation and cultured for 3 weeks in endothelial growth medium-2-MV (EGM-2-MV) medium containing platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF BB). Before seeded on the synthesized scaffold, SPC-derived smooth muscle outgrowth cell (SOC) phenotypes were assessed by immuno-fluorescent staining, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The cells were seeded onto the silk fibroin-modified poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (SF-PHBHHx) scaffolds by 6×104 cells/cm'2 and cultured under the static con-dition for 3 weeks. The growth and proliferation of the seeded cells on the scaffold were analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Results: SOCs displayed specific "hill and valley" morphology, expressed the specific markers of the SMC lineage: protein, and extracellular matrix components elastin and matrix Gla protein (MGP), as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After seeded on the SF-PHBHHx scaffold, the cells showed excellent metabolic activity and proliferation. Conclusion: SPCs isolated from peripheral blood can be differentiated into the SMCs in vitro and have an impressive growth potential in the biodegradable synthesized scaffold. Thus, SPCs may be a promising cell source for constructing TEBVs.

  5. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Poay; Sian; Sabrina; Lee; Kian; Keong; Poh

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adult endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs) are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and are capable of forming new blood vessels through a process of vas-culogenesis. There are studies which report correlations between circulating EPCs and cardiovascular risk fac-tors. There are also studies on how pharmacotherapies may influence levels of circulating EPCs. In this review, we discuss the potential role of endothelial progenitor cells as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, we look at the interaction between cardio-vascular pharmacotherapies and endothelial progenitor cells. We also discuss how EPCs can be used directly and indirectly as a therapeutic agent. Finally, we evalu-ate the challenges facing EPC research and how these may be overcome.

  6. Collection of peripheral progenitor cells: a comparison between Amicus and Cobe-Spectra blood cell separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Gaspare; Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Palombi, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Ballatore, Giovanna; Postorino, Massimiliano; Tendas, Andrea; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Isacchi, Giancarlo; Amadori, Sergio

    2004-04-01

    The authors compared the efficiency of two different blood cell separators (Amicus and Cobe-Spectra) in collecting peripheral blood progenitor cells for autologous or homologous transplantation. A total number of 129 procedures were performed, 36 with Spectra, 93 with Amicus. There was no difference between Spectra and Amicus efficiencies for CD34+ cell collection (46.685% vs 46.235%; p=n.s) but the platelet efficiencies were 17.31% and 12.54% respectively (p=0.04) and, if autologous and allogeneic collections were considered separately, a marked difference resulted in allogeneic platelet efficiency between 6 Spectra and 23 Amicus procedures (26.83% vs 8.68%, p=0.0004). The authors were able to demonstrate that in 70 Amicus autologous collections there was a different platelet efficiency, if peripheral count was considered: 12 procedures performed with a platelet count > 100 x 10(9)/l had a very low efficiency (6.86%), but this value increased if platelet count lowered (13.02% if between 100 and 50 x 10(9)/l, 22.63% if between 50 and 0 x 10(9)/l, 23 and 35 procedures respectively). The study is preliminary and the number of collections is little, but the overall data suggest that Spectra (AutoPBSC, V 6.0) and Amicus separators have the same efficiency for collecting CD34+ cells while Amicus procedures have a very low platelet contamination, especially with donors.

  7. Endothelial progenitor cell differentiation using cryopreserved, umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-ho JANG; Hugh C KIM; Sun-kyung KIM; Jeong-eun CHOI; Young-jin KIM; Hyun-woo LEE; Seok-yun KANG; Joon-seong PARK; Jin-hyuk CHOI; Ho-yeong LIM

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the endothelial differentiation potentiality of umbilical cord blood (UCB), we induced the differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC)from cryopreserved UCB-derived mononuclear cells (MNC). Methods: MNC from cryopreserved UCB and peripheral blood (PB) were cultured in M199 medium with endothelial cell growth supplements for 14 d. EPC were characterized by RT-PCR,flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry analysis. The proliferation of differen-tiated EPC was studied by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTI') assay, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentra-tion was measured using an ELISA kit. Characteristics of UCB-derived EPC were compared with those of PB-derived EPC. Results: A number of round-shaped cells were loosely attached to the bottom after 24 h culture, and numerous spindle-shaped cells began to appear from the round-shaped ones on d 7. Those cells expressed endothelial markers such as, Fit-1/VEGFR-1, ecNOS, VE-cadherin, yon Willebrand factor, and secreted VEGF. The patterns of endothelial markers of EPC from PB and UCB did not show striking differences. The results of the prolifera-tion and secretion of VEGF were also similar. Conclusion: We successfully cul-tured UCB cells stored at -196 ℃ into cells with the quality of endothelial cells.Those EPC could be used for angiogenic therapeutics by activating adjacent endothelial cells and enhancing angiogenesis.

  8. Cord blood-circulating endothelial progenitors for treatment of vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, M; Vanneaux, V; Delmau, C; Gluckman, E; Rodde-Astier, I; Larghero, J; Uzan, G

    2011-04-01

    Adult peripheral blood (PB) endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are produced in the bone marrow and are able to integrate vascular structures in sites of neoangiogenesis. EPCs thus represent a potential therapeutic tool for ischaemic diseases. However, use of autologous EPCs in cell therapy is limited by their rarity in adult PB. Cord blood (CB) contains more EPCs than PB, and they are functional after expansion. They form primary colonies that give rise to secondary colonies, each yielding more than 10(7) cells after few passages. The number of endothelial cells obtained from one unit of CB is compatible with potential clinical application. EPC colonies can be securely produced, expanded and cryopreserved in close culture devices and endothelial cells produced in these conditions are functional as shown in different in vitro and in vivo assays. As CB EPC-derived endothelial cells would be allogeneic to patients, it would be of interest to prepare them from ready-existing CB banks. We show that not all frozen CB units from a CB bank are able to generate EPC colonies in culture, and when they do so, number of colonies is lower than that obtained with fresh CB units. However, endothelial cells derived from frozen CB have the same phenotypical and functional properties than those derived from fresh CB. This indicates that CB cryopreservation should be improved to preserve integrity of stem cells other than haematopoietic ones. Feasibility of using CB for clinical applications will be validated in porcine models of ischaemia.

  9. Mdm2 is required for survival of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitors via dampening of ROS-induced p53 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdm2 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. p53(515C) (encoding p53R172P) is a hypomorphic allele of p53 that rescues the embryonic lethality of Mdm2(-/-) mice. Mdm2(-/-) p53(515C/515C) mice, however, die by postnatal day 13 resulting from hematopoietic failure. Hematopoietic st...

  10. Regulated expression of CXCR4 constitutive active mutants revealed the up-modulated chemotaxis and up-regulation of genes crucial for CXCR4 mediated homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available SDF-1/CXCR4 axis plays a principle role in the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, a process that defines cells ability to reach and seed recipient bone marrow niche following their intravenous infusion. However, the proper functioning of CXCR4 downstream signaling depends upon consistent optimal expression of both SDF-1 ligand and its receptor CXCR4, which in turn is variable and regulated by several factors. The constitutive active mutants of CXCR4 (N119A and N119S being able to induce autonomous downstream signaling, overcome the limitation of ligand-receptor interaction for induction of CXCR4 signaling. Therefore, we intended to explore their potential in chemotaxis; a key cellular process which crucially regulates cells homing to bone marrow. In present study, Tet-on inducible gene expression vector system was used for doxycycline inducible regulated transgene expression of CXCR4 active mutants in hematopoietic stem progenitor cell line K-562. Both of these mutants revealed significantly enhanced chemotaxis to SDF-1 gradient as compared to wild type. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of these genetically engineered cells as assessed by microarray analysis revealed the up-regulation of group of genes that are known to play a crucial role in CXCR4 mediated cells homing and engraftment. Hence, this study suggest the potential prospects of CXCR4 active mutants in research and development aimed to improve the efficiency of cells in the mechanism of homing and engraftment process.

  11. Activation and crosstalk between TNF family receptors in umbilical cord blood cells is not responsible for loss of engraftment capacity following culture

    OpenAIRE

    Mizrahi, Keren; Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a rich source of hematopoietic progenitors for transplantation. Murine and human progenitors are insensitive to apoptotic signaling mediated by the TNF family receptors, however extension of culture over 48 hours is accompanied by severe deterioration in engraftment and hematopoietic reconstituting capacity. In this study we assessed crosstalk between the Fas, TNF and TRAIL receptors, and questioned whether it contributes to increased mortality and decreased acti...

  12. Identification and purification of human erythroid progenitor cells by monoclonal antibody to the transferrin receptor (TU 67).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F; Griffin, J D; Sabbath, K D; Oster, W; Wernet, P; Mertelsmann, R

    1988-04-01

    Anti-TU 67 is a murine monoclonal antibody that recognizes the transferrin receptor. With respect to hematopoietic cells TU 67 is expressed by human multipotent colony-forming cells (CFU-Mix), erythroid progenitor cells (BFU-E and CFU-E) and a fraction of granulocyte/monocyte colony forming cells, but is not expressed by mature hematopoietic cells including erythrocytes, platelets, lymphocytes, and peripheral blood myeloid cells. The TU 67-positive fraction of normal bone marrow, separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) or immune rosettes, contained 87% of the erythroid progenitor cells. Erythroid progenitor cells were enriched up to 50-fold by using a combination of monoclonal antibodies to deplete mature hematopoietic cells, followed by positive selection of BFU-E and CFU-E by TU 67 antibody.

  13. Loss of IKKβ but Not NF-κB p65 Skews Differentiation towards Myeloid over Erythroid Commitment and Increases Myeloid Progenitor Self-Renewal and Functional Long-Term Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    Full Text Available NF-κB is an important regulator of both differentiation and function of lineage-committed hematopoietic cells. Targeted deletion of IκB kinase (IKK β results in altered cytokine signaling and marked neutrophilia. To investigate the role of IKKβ in regulation of hematopoiesis, we employed Mx1-Cre mediated IKKβ conditional knockout mice. As previously reported, deletion of IKKβ in hematopoietic cells results in neutrophilia, and we now also noted decreased monocytes and modest anemia. Granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs accumulated markedly in bone marrow of IKKβ deleted mice whereas the proportion and number of megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors (MEP decreased. Accordingly, we found a significantly reduced frequency of proerythroblasts and basophilic and polychromatic erythroblasts, and IKKβ-deficient bone marrow cells yielded a significantly decreased number of BFU-E compared to wild type. These changes are associated with elevated expression of C/EBPα, Gfi1, and PU.1 and diminished Gata1, Klf1, and SCL/Tal1 in IKKβ deficient Lineage-Sca1+c-Kit+ (LSK cells. In contrast, no effect on erythropoiesis or expression of lineage-related transcription factors was found in marrow lacking NF-κB p65. Bone marrow from IKKβ knockout mice has elevated numbers of phenotypic long and short term hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. A similar increase was observed when IKKβ was deleted after marrow transplantation into a wild type host, indicating cell autonomous expansion. Myeloid progenitors from IKKβ- but not p65-deleted mice demonstrate increased serial replating in colony-forming assays, indicating increased cell autonomous self-renewal capacity. In addition, in a competitive repopulation assay deletion of IKKβ resulted in a stable advantage of bone marrow derived from IKKβ knockout mice. In summary, loss of IKKβ resulted in significant effects on hematopoiesis not seen upon NF-κB p65 deletion. These include increased myeloid and reduced

  14. [A Nude Mouse Model for Human Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jiongcai; Liu, Hongyu; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Chongli; Zhang, Zhimei

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the hematopoietic potentiality and the migration and homing routine of separated as well as cryopreserved umbilical cord blood hematopoietic cells, the BALB/cnu(+) mice were used to establish a murine model. This can prepare for the clinical transplantation and the establishment of a large-scale cord blood bank. The result indicated that the hydroxyethyl starch (HES) sedimentation and DMSO step-by-step cryopreservation procedure resulted in only less losses of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also unharmful to the hematopietic potentiality. We can found evidence for successful transplantation in each mouse which received (1.0 - 2.0) x 10(7) separated or cryopresered hematopoietic cells from cord blood, which lasted for about fifty days. The results demonstrated that (1) HES sedimentation and DMSO cryopreservation procedure can keep the hematopoietic potentiality of cord blood, and so can be used to clinical transplantation or establishment of a cord blood bank; (2) Rich hematopoietic stem cells in human cord blood can cross the xenogenetic barriers and successfully engraft mice; (3) The hematopoietic cells migrated among bone marrow, liver, spleen, lung and kidney in the mice and homed to bone marrow by the end. Cryopreservation may influence the adhesion molecule on the hematopoietic cells and the homing behaviour, but not influence their hematopoietic potentiality.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells promote a primitive phenotype CD34+c-kit+ in human cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells during ex vivo expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pardo, Viviana M; Vernot, Jean Paul

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) and exogenously added cytokines on the proliferation, primitive cell subpopulation maintenance (including the c-kit+ marker) and clonogenic capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). BM-MSC were collected from volunteer donors, isolated and characterized. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) samples were collected from healthy full-term deliveries. UCB-CD34+ cells were cultured in the presence or absence of BM-MSC and/or cytokines for 3 and 7 days. CD34+ cell proliferation was evaluated using the CSFE method and cell phenotype was determined by CD34, c-kit, CD33, CD38, HLA-DR, cyCD22 and cyCD3 detection. Cell clonogenic ability was also assessed. Exogenously added SCF, TPO and FLT3L increased CD34+ cell proliferation in the presence or absence of BM-MSC, but with concomitant cell differentiation. Without any added cytokines, BM-MSC are able to increase the percentage of primitive progenitors as evaluated by c-kit expression and CFU-GEMM increase. Interestingly, this latter effect was dependent on both cell-cell interactions and secreted factors. A 7-day co-culture period will be optimal for obtaining an increased primitive HSC level. Including c-kit as a marker for primitive phenotype evaluation has shown the relevance of BM-MSC and their secreted factors on UCB-HSC stemness function. This effect could be dissociated from that of the addition of exogenous cytokines, which induced cellular differentiation instead.

  16. Changes of Number and Function of Late Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Peripheral Blood of COPD Patients Combined with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Hongmei; Liu, Jianxin; Sheng, Chunfeng; Zhang, Linlin; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-06-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the changes of number and function of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in peripheral blood of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients combined with pulmonary hypertension. Subjects and Methods The study enrolled 120 cases including 40 non-COPD and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients (non-COPD group), 40 COPD non-PAH patients (COPD group), and 40 COPD patients combined with PAH (COPD + PAH group). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation, cultured for 21 days, and then identified as late endothelial progenitor cells. The cell colonies were counted. MTT assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and human fibronectin plates were used to measure the proliferation, migration, and adhesion functions of the late endothelial progenitor cells, respectively. Results Compared with non-COPD and COPD groups, the number of peripheral blood late EPCs in COPD + PAH group was significantly reduced, and the proliferation, adhesion, and migration capacities were significantly lowered; the differences were statistically significant (p number and function of late EPCs decreased with the increase of pulmonary artery pressure (p number of late EPCs in COPD patients combined with pulmonary hypertension was reduced, which implies the impaired cell functions. The changes of number and function were negatively correlated with the severity of pulmonary hypertension.

  17. 2013 report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR): current uses and outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplants for blood and bone marrow disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Marcelo; Wang, Zhiwei; Horowitz, Mary M; Gale, Robert Peter

    2013-01-01

    Data reported herein indicate increasing use of hematopoietic cell transplants for persons with blood and bone marrow disorders. Recent trends include increasing use of alternative donors including human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched unrelated persons and HLA-matched umbilical cord blood cells, increasing use of blood cell rather than bone marrow grafts, and increasing use of reduced-intensity pretransplant conditioning regimens. Many of these shifts are driven by logistical considerations such as the need for donors in persons without an HLA-identical sibling or expanding use of allotransplants to older persons. Many changes in transplant practices are not supported by results of large randomized trials. More data are needed to critically-assess the impact of these changes.

  18. Negative selection by apoptosis enriches progenitors in naïve and expanded human umbilical cord blood grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, K; Ash, S; Peled, T; Yaniv, I; Stein, J; Askenasy, N

    2014-07-01

    The influence of TNF-α and Fas-ligand (FasL) on viability and function was evaluated in fresh- and expanded-umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells. CD34(+) progenitors and T cells display outstanding survival, whereas ~30% and >50% B lymphocytes and myeloid cells undergo spontaneous apoptosis within 24 and 48 h, respectively. Although the impact of exposure to toxic doses of FasL and TNF-α was undetectable in measurements of apoptosis; removal of dead cells after 2 days of incubation with the ligands revealed a twofold increase in frequency of colony-forming cells (CFU). The sensitivity of progenitors to apoptosis was also unaffected by Fas cross-linking following TNF-induced upregulation of the receptor, increasing CFU frequency without impairing SCID repopulating cell (SRC) activity. Most significant enrichment in CD34(+) progenitors and corresponding increase in CFU frequency were observed when FasL was applied during the final week of ex vivo expansion under the influence of nicotinamide, without impairing SRC activity. These data emphasize differential sensitivities of UCB progenitors and lineage-positive cells to apoptotic signaling mediated by the Fas and TNF receptors, which might be useful in improving the efficiency of ex vivo expansion and improving UCB cell engraftment.

  19. A comparison of umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor and mononuclear cell transplantation for the treatment of acute hindlimb ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lower limb ischemia is a common peripheral artery disease whose treatment presents many difficulties. Stem cell transplantation is considered a novel and promising method of treating this disease. Umbilical cord blood (UCB is rich in stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. However, historically, banked umbilical cord blood has been used mainly to treat blood-related diseases. Therefore, this study compared the efficacy of umbilical cord bloodderived mononuclear cells (UCB-MNCs with EPC transplantation for the treatment of acute hindlimb ischemia (ALI in mouse models. MNCs were isolated from UCB by Ficoll gradient centrifugation, after which the EPCs were sorted based on CD34+ and CD133+ markers and cultured according to a previously published protocol. To induce ALI, mice were immuno-suppressed using busulfan (BU and cyclophosphamide (CY, after which the femoral arteries were burned. Induction of ALI in the immune suppressed mice was confirmed by the grade of tissue damage, pedal frequency in water, tissue edema, changes in histology, total white blood cell count, and white blood cell composition. Model mice were injected with a dose of MNCs or EPCs and un-treated control mice were injected with phosphate buffered saline. The efficiency of treatment was evaluated by comparing the grade of tissue damage between the three groups of mice. Mice aged 6 and ndash;12 months were suitable for ALI, with 100% of mice exhibiting ischemia from grade I 10%, grade III 50%, grade IV 40%. For all ALI mice, a gradual increase in pedal frequency in water, increased tissue edema, necrosis of muscle tissue, and loss of hindlimb function were observed after 20 days. Transplanted MNCs and EPCs significantly improved hindlimb ischemia compared with control treatment. Moreover, EPC transplantation significantly improved hindlimb ischemia compared with MNC transplantation. Following

  20. Is there any reason to prefer cord blood instead of adult donors for hematopoietic stem cell transplants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral eBeksac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As cord blood (CB enables rapid access and tolerance to HLA mismatches, number of unrelated cord blood transplants have reached 30 000. Such transplant activity has been the result of international accreditation programs maintaining highly qualified CBUs reaching more than 600 000 CBUs stored worldwide. Efforts to increase stem cell content or engraftment rate of the graft by ex vivo expansion, modulation by molecules such as fucose, Prostaglandin E2 derivative, complement, CD26 inhibitors or CXCR4/CXCL12 axis have been able to accelerate engraftment speed and rate. Furthermore introduction of reduced intensity conditioning protocols, better HLA matching and recognition of the importance of HLA-C have improved CBT success by decreasing Transplant Related Mortality (TRM. Cord blood progenitor/stem cell content has been compared with adult stem cells revealing higher long-term repopulating capacity compared to BM-MSC and less oncogenic potential than Induced Progenitor Stem Cells. This chapter summarizes the advantage and disadvantages of CB compared to adult stem cells within the context of stem cell biology and transplantation.

  1. Late-occurring chromosome aberrations and global DNA methylation in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells of CBA/CaJ mice exposed to silicon ({sup 28}Si) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy, E-mail: kanokporn.rithidech@stonybrookmedicine.edu [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Honikel, Louise M. [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Reungpathanaphong, Paiboon [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Department of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, Faculty of Sciences, Kasetsart University, Chatuchuck, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Tungjai, Montree [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Center of Excellence for Molecular Imaging, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Jangiam, Witawat [Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8691 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Burapha University, Chonburi 20131 (Thailand); Whorton, Elbert B. [StatCom, PO Box 3041, Galveston, TX 77551 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Late-occurring chromosome aberrations were found in HSPCs of exposed CBA/CaJ mice. • A dose-dependent reduction in the level of global 5hmC was detected in HSPCs. • There is a link between reduced global 5hmC levels and genomic instability in vivo. • The level of global 5hmC is a better marker of radiation exposure than that of 5mC. - Abstract: Although myeloid leukemia (ML) is one of the major health concerns from exposure to space radiation, the risk prediction for developing ML is unsatisfactory. To increase the reliability of predicting ML risk, a much improved understanding of space radiation-induced changes in the target cells, i.e. hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), is important. We focused on the in vivo induction of late-occurring damage in HSPCs of mice exposed to {sup 28}Si ions since such damage is associated with radiation-induced genomic instability (a key event of carcinogenesis). We gave adult male CBA/CaJ mice, known to be sensitive to radiation-induced ML, a whole-body exposure (2 fractionated exposures, 15 days apart, that totaled each selected dose, delivered at the dose-rate of 1 cGy/min) to various doses of 300 MeV/n {sup 28}Si ions, i.e. 0 (sham controls), 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 Gy. At 6 months post-irradiation, we collected bone marrow cells from each mouse (five mice per treatment-group) for obtaining the myeloid-lineage of HSPC-derived clones for analyses. We measured the frequencies of late-occurring chromosome aberrations (CAs), using the genome-wide multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization method. The measurement of CAs was coupled with the characterization of the global DNA methylation patterns, i.e. 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). A dose-dependent increase in the frequencies of CAs was detected (Analysis of Variance or ANOVA, p < 0.01), indicating the induction of genomic instability after exposure of mice to 300 MeV/n {sup 28}Si ions. Slight increases in the levels of 5m

  2. Proteomic Profiling of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells after a Whole Body Exposure of CBA/CaJ Mice to Titanium (48Ti Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokporn Noy Rithidech

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid leukemia (ML is one of the major health concerns from exposure to radiation. However, the risk assessment for developing ML after exposure to space radiation remains uncertain. To reduce the uncertainty in risk prediction for ML, a much increased understanding of space radiation-induced changes in the target cells, i.e., hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, is critically important. We used the label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQMS proteomic approach to determine the expression of protein in HSPC-derived myeloid colonies obtained at an early time-point (one week and a late time-point (six months after an acute whole body exposure of CBA/CaJ mice to a total dose of 0, 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 Gy of heavy-ion titanium (48Ti ions, which are the important component of radiation found in the space environment. Mice exposed to 0 Gy of 48Ti ions served as non-irradiated sham controls. There were five mice per treatment groups at each harvest time. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP was used to assign a probability of a particular protein being in the sample. A proof-of-concept based Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used to characterize the functions, pathways, and networks of the identified proteins. Alterations of expression levels of proteins detected in samples collected at one week (wk post-irradiation reflects acute effects of exposure to 48Ti ions, while those detected in samples collected at six months (mos post-irradiation represent protein expression profiles involved in the induction of late-occurring damage (normally referred to as genomic instability. Our results obtained by using the IPA analyses indicate a wide array of signaling pathways involved in response to 1 GeV/n 48Ti ions at both harvest times. Our data also demonstrate that the patterns of protein expression profiles are dose and time dependent. The majority of proteins with altered expression levels are involved in cell cycle control, cellular growth and

  3. MiR-24 is required for hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of miRNA, miR-24, in mouse hematopoietic progenitors increases monocytic/ granulocytic differentiation and inhibits B cell development. To determine if endogenous miR-24 is required for hematopoiesis, we antagonized miR-24 in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs and performed in vitro differentiations. Suppression of miR-24 resulted in an inability to produce blood and hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs from ESCs. The phenotype is not a general defect in mesoderm production since we observe production of nascent mesoderm as well as mesoderm derived cardiac muscle and endothelial cells. Results from blast colony forming cell (BL-CFC assays demonstrate that miR-24 is not required for generation of the hemangioblast, the mesoderm progenitor that gives rise to blood and endothelial cells. However, expression of the transcription factors Runx1 and Scl is greatly reduced, suggesting an impaired ability of the hemangioblast to differentiate. Lastly, we observed that known miR-24 target, Trib3, is upregulated in the miR-24 antagonized embryoid bodies (EBs. Overexpression of Trib3 alone in ESCs was able to decrease HPC production, though not as great as seen with miR-24 knockdown. These results demonstrate an essential role for miR-24 in the hematopoietic differentiation of ESCs. Although many miRNAs have been implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis, this is the first miRNA observed to be required for the specification of mammalian blood progenitors from early mesoderm.

  4. Blood and marrow transplant clinical trials network toxicity committee consensus summary: thrombotic microangiopathy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vincent T; Cutler, Corey; Carter, Shelly; Martin, Paul; Adams, Roberta; Horowitz, Mary; Ferrara, James; Soiffer, Robert; Giralt, Sergio

    2005-08-01

    The syndrome of microangiopathic hemolysis associated with renal failure, neurologic impairment, or both is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This entity is often called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), yet it is clear that the pathophysiology of transplant-associated HUS/TTP is different from that of classic HUS or TTP. Furthermore, the incidence of this syndrome varies from 0.5% to 76% in different transplant series, primarily because of the lack of a uniform definition. The toxicity committee of the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network has reviewed the current literature on transplant-related HUS/TTP and recommends that it be henceforth renamed posttransplantation thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). An operational definition for TMA based on the presence of microangiopathic hemolysis and renal and/or neurologic dysfunction is proposed. The primary intervention after diagnosis of TMA should be withdrawal of calcineurin inhibitors. Plasma exchange, although frequently used in this condition, has not been proven to be effective. In the absence of definitive trials, plasma exchange cannot be considered a standard of care for TMA. It is hoped that these positions will improve the identification and reporting of this devastating complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and facilitate future clinical studies for its prevention and treatment.

  5. Hypoxia and HIFs in regulating the development of the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanirad, Parisa; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2013-12-01

    Many physiologic processes during the early stages of mammalian ontogeny, particularly placental and vascular development, take place in the low oxygen environment of the uterus. Organogenesis is affected by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors that are sensors of hypoxia. In response to hypoxia, HIFs activate downstream target genes - growth and metabolism factors. During hematopoietic system ontogeny, blood cells and hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells are respectively generated from mesodermal precursors, hemangioblasts, and from a specialized subset of endothelial cells that are hemogenic. Since HIFs are known to play a central role in vascular development, and hematopoietic system development occurs in parallel to that of the vascular system, several studies have examined the role of HIFs in hematopoietic development. The response to hypoxia has been examined in early and mid-gestation mouse embryos through genetic deletion of HIF subunits. We review here the data showing that hematopoietic tissues of the embryo are hypoxic and express HIFs and HIF downstream targets, and that HIFs regulate the development and function of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells.

  6. Omega 3 fatty acids reduce myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow of mice and promote progenitor cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sollars Vincent E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Omega 3 fatty acids have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and promote differentiation in various cell types. The processes of cell survival, expansion, and differentiation are of key importance in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We investigated the role of omega 3 fatty acids in controlling the frequency of various myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Increased progenitor cell frequency and blocked differentiation are characteristics of hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage, such as myeloproliferative diseases and myeloid leukemias. Results We found that increasing the proportion of omega 3 fatty acids relative to the proportion of omega 6 fatty acids in the diet caused increased differentiation and reduced the frequency of myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Furthermore, this had no adverse effect on peripheral white blood cell counts. Conclusion Our results indicate that omega 3 fatty acids impact hematopoietic differentiation by reducing myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow and promoting progenitor cell differentiation. Further exploration of this discovery could lead to the use of omega 3 fatty acids as a therapeutic option for patients that have various disorders of hematopoiesis.

  7. Recombinant human thrombopoietin augments mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells for autologous transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Charles; Anderlini, Paolo; Herzig, Roger; Christiansen, Neal; Somlo, George; Bensinger, William; Fay, Joseph; Lynch, Joseph P; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Ashby, Mark; Benyunes, Mark C; Jones, Dennie V; Yang, Timothy A; Miller, Langdon L; Weaver, Charles

    2003-06-01

    This study assessed the ability of various schedules of recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) to enhance mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) in 134 patients with cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous PBPC transplantation. Patients received the study drug on days 1, 3, and 5 before initiation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) 10 microg/kg/day on day 5 and pheresis starting on day 9. Randomly assigned treatments on days 1, 3, and 5 were: group 1 (n=27) placebo, placebo, rhTPO 1.5 microg/kg; group 2 (n=27) rhTPO 1.5 microg/kg, placebo, placebo; groups 3 (n=28) and 4 (n=22) rhTPO 0.5 microg/kg on all 3 treatment days; and group 5 (n=30) placebo on all 3 treatment days. After high-dose chemotherapy and PBPC transplantation, groups 1 through 4 received rhTPO 1.5 microg/kg days 0, +2, +4, and +6 with either G-CSF 5 microg/kg/day (groups 1-3) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor 250 microg/m(2)/day (group 4). Group 5 received placebo plus G-CSF 5 microg/kg/day. The addition of rhTPO to G-CSF increased median CD34+ cell yield/pheresis in cohorts in which rhTPO was started before day 5, with higher yields in groups 2 (2.67 x 10(6)/kg) and groups 3 and 4 (3.10 x 10(6)/kg) than in group 1 (1.86 x 10(6)/kg) or group 5 (1.65 x 10(6)/kg) (P=.006 across groups). Comparing rhTPO to placebo, higher percentages of patients achieved the minimum yield of CD34+ > or =2 x 10(6)/kg (92% v 75%; P=.050) as well as the target yield of CD34+ > or =5 x 10(6)/kg (73% v 46%; P= .041). rhTPO-treated patients required fewer phereses to achieve minimum (P= .011) and target (P= .015) CD34+ cell values. rhTPO given after transplantation did not speed platelet recovery. No neutralizing antibodies were observed. We conclude that rhTPO can safely enhance mobilization of PBPC, reduce the number of leukapheresis, and allow more patients to meet minimal cell yield requirements to receive high-dose chemotherapy with PBPC

  8. Hematopoietic stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Roi; Weissman, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2008-10-01

    The etiology of the age-associated pathophysiological changes of the hematopoietic system including the onset of anemia, diminished adaptive immune competence, and myelogenous disease development are underwritten by the loss of normal homeostatic control. As tissue and organ homeostasis in adults is primarily mediated by the activity of stem and progenitor cells, it has been suggested that the imbalances accompanying aging of the hematopoietic system may stem from alterations in the prevalence and/or functional capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors. In this review, we examine evidence implicating a role for stem cells in the aging of the hematopoietic system, and focus on the mechanisms suggested to contribute to stem cell aging.

  9. Nonredundant and locus-specific gene repression functions of PRC1 paralog family members in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boom, Vincent; Rozenveld-Geugien, Marjan; Bonardi, Francesco; Malanga, Donatella; van Gosliga, Djoke; Heyink, Anne Margriet; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Morrone, Giovanni; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) protein BMI1 is a key factor in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and leukemic stem cell self-renewal and functions in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). In humans, each of the 5 subunits of PRC1 has paralog family members of which many reside in

  10. STUDIES ON THE HYPERTHERMIC SENSITIVITY OF THE MURINE HEMATOPOIETIC STEM-CELL COMPARTMENT .1. HEAT-EFFECTS ON CLONOGENIC STEM-CELLS AND PROGENITORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERENGA, PK; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    The heat sensitivity at 42 degrees, 43 degrees and 44 degrees C of various hematopoietic subsets in murine bone marrow (MRA, CFU-S-12, CFU-S-8, CFU-GM, BFU-E and CFU-E) was investigated in order to determine whether there is a relationship between heat sensitivity and the position of cells within th

  11. CFU-Mk content of immunoselected CD34+ peripheral blood progenitor cells, evaluated with an adapted serum-free methylcellulose assay, is predictive of platelet lineage reconstitution in children with solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiret, N; Kanold, J; Fouassier, M; Bons, J M; Halle, P; Rapatel, C; Berger, J; Pireyre, P; Blanzat, V; Travade, P; Bonhomme, J; Demeocq, F; Berger, M G

    2000-08-01

    Immunoselected CD34+ peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation is now frequently used to support autologous hematopoiesis after myeloablative therapy, its feasability having been proved by several groups. However, we and others observed delayed platelet recovery. We hypothesized that immunoselection processing might induce selective loss of megakaryocyte progenitors, or a decrease in their proliferation. We used a colony-forming units megakaryocyte (CFU-Mk) assay to evaluate these consequences and predict platelet recovery in patients. In CD34+ PBPCs from 10 children with solid tumors, we observed no selective loss in CFU-Mk numbers during immunoselection processing and no impairment of clonogenicity. The CFU-Mk yield (59.2 +/- 11.3%) was at least similar to the CD34+ yield (44.2 +/- 3.8%). We assessed the predictive value of CFU-Mk numbers infused for recovery of platelet lineage. We found an inverse correlation between the time taken to reach a platelet count greater than 50 x 10(9)/L and only the CFU-Mk dose (r = -0.71; p = 0.022) among the different type of progenitors, including colony-forming units granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM), burst-forming units erythrocyte (BFU-E) and colony-forming units-mixed (CFU-Mix). These findings suggest that CFU-Mk number could be used as sole predictive functional parameter for platelet reconstitution in children after immunoselection of CD34+ cells, in particular for low CD34+ cell dose, and thus as an indicator for initial quality of hematopoietic cells before in vitro expansion.

  12. Characterization of transcriptional networks in blood stem and progenitor cells using high-throughput single-cell gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moignard, Victoria; Macaulay, Iain C; Swiers, Gemma; Buettner, Florian; Schütte, Judith; Calero-Nieto, Fernando J; Kinston, Sarah; Joshi, Anagha; Hannah, Rebecca; Theis, Fabian J; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; de Bruijn, Marella F; Göttgens, Berthold

    2013-04-01

    Cellular decision-making is mediated by a complex interplay of external stimuli with the intracellular environment, in particular transcription factor regulatory networks. Here we have determined the expression of a network of 18 key haematopoietic transcription factors in 597 single primary blood stem and progenitor cells isolated from mouse bone marrow. We demonstrate that different stem/progenitor populations are characterized by distinctive transcription factor expression states, and through comprehensive bioinformatic analysis reveal positively and negatively correlated transcription factor pairings, including previously unrecognized relationships between Gata2, Gfi1 and Gfi1b. Validation using transcriptional and transgenic assays confirmed direct regulatory interactions consistent with a regulatory triad in immature blood stem cells, where Gata2 may function to modulate cross-inhibition between Gfi1 and Gfi1b. Single-cell expression profiling therefore identifies network states and allows reconstruction of network hierarchies involved in controlling stem cell fate choices, and provides a blueprint for studying both normal development and human disease.

  13. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation in Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Alters Cell Function and Pathway-Specific Gene Modulation Reflecting Changes in Cellular Trafficking and MigrationS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Casado, Fanny L.; Singh, Kameshwar P.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor belonging to the Per-ARNT-Sim family of proteins. These proteins sense molecules and stimuli from the cellular/tissue environment and initiate signaling cascades to elicit appropriate cellular responses. Recent literature reports suggest an important function of AhR in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) biology. However, the molecular mechanisms by which AhR signaling regulates HSC functions are unknown. In previous studies, we and othe...

  14. Collagen-Coated Polytetrafluoroethane Membrane Inserts Enhances Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cord Blood Multi-Lineage Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Samir; Søballe, Kjeld; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael;

    Background: Articular chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the favoured cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Umbilical cord blood has proven an alternative source of MSCs and moreover they may be more potent chondroprogenitor cells than bonemarrow...... MSCs. Purpose / Aim of Study: Multilineage progenitor cells (MLPCs) are clonal cord blood-derived MSCs and may therefore provide a cell source with more reproducible outcomes compared to heterogeneous primary MSC cultures. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the chondrogenic potency of MLPCs...... in standard micromass pellet system, layered on calcium polyphosphate (CPP), and on semi-permeable polytetrafluoroethane membranes with and without collagen type I, II or IV pre-coating. Findings / Results: The MPLC cell line used in this study possessed poor chondrogenic potency overall, but membrane...

  15. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Expansion in Rotating Wall Vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang LIU; Tian-Qing LIU; Xiu-Bo FAN; Dan GE; Zhan-Feng CUI; Xue-Hu MA

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Clinical trials have demonstrated that ex vivo expanded hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors offer great promise in reconstituting in vivo hematopoiesis in patients who have undergone intensive chemotherapy.It is therefore necessary to develop a clinical-scale culture system to provide the expanded HSCs and progenitors.Static culture systems such as T-flasks and gas-permeable blood bags are the most widely used culture devices for expanding hematopoietic cells. But they reveal several inherent limitations: ineffective mixing, lack of control options for dissolved oxygen and pH and difficulty in continuous feeding, which restricts the usefulness of static systems. Several advanced bioreactors have been used in the field of HSCs expansion. But hematopoietic cells are extremely sensitive to shear, so cells in bioreactors such as stirred and perfusion culture systems may suffer physical damage. This problem will be improved by applying the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor in clinic because of its low shear and unique structure. In this research, cord blood (CB) HSCs were expanded by means of a cell-dilution feeding protocol in RWV.

  16. Optimization of SCF feeding regimen for ex vivo expansion of cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2012-12-15

    Stem cell factor (SCF) plays important roles in ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In this study, the effects of dose and feeding time of SCF on ex vivo expansion of CD34(+) cells were investigated in serum-free medium supplemented with a cytokine cocktail composed of SCF, thrombopoietin (TPO) and flt3-ligand (FL). Among the four tested doses (0, 5, 50 and 500ng/mL), a SCF dose of 50ng/mL was demonstrated to be most favorable for ex vivo expansion of CD34(+) cells, which resulted in 34.22±10.80 and 8.89±1.25 folds of expansion regarding total cells and CD34(+) cells, respectively. Meanwhile, the specific growth rate of cells, the consumption rate of SCF and the percentage of CD34(+)c-kit(+) cells during the 21-day culture process were analyzed. The results indicated that initial 4-day period was a critical stage for SCF functioning on CD34(+) cells during ex vivo expansion. Based on this, a modified SCF feeding regimen was proposed, in which SCF (50ng/mL) was only supplemented on day 0 in the cytokine cocktail and cells were then fed with TPO and FL till the end of culture. It was found that this SCF feeding regimen could expand CD34(+) cells efficiently, thus providing a cost-effect expansion protocol for HSCs.

  17. 乐卡地平治疗老年高血压及其对循环造血祖细胞的作用%Effect of Lecarnidipine on hypertension and circulation hematopoietic progenitor cells in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈培晓; 汪海娅

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨乐卡地平治疗老年高血压患者的疗效和对外周血造血祖细胞数量的影响.方法 入选上海交通大学医学院附属仁济医院老年科2014年1-12月门诊就诊的高血压患者61例,数字抽签随机分为乐卡地平组32例,服用盐酸乐卡地平5~10 mg/d;对照组29例,降压药物根据患者情况采用噻嗪类利尿剂和(或)β受体阻滞剂,观察12周,目标血压为< 140/90 mmHg(1mmHg=0.133 kPa).用药前后检测患者血脂、血糖、肝肾功能及红细胞沉降率等实验室检查指标,采用流式细胞分析的方法检测外周造血祖细胞数量(以外周血CD34+ CD45dim细胞的数量外周血100 000个单核细胞的百分比进行计数). 结果 乐卡地平组用药后血压下降,患者血压均达标.血压下降幅度对照组与乐卡地平组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).乐卡地平治疗12周后CD34+ CD45dim细胞数升高(0.022±0.003)%与(0.034±0.028)% (P<0.05);与对照组比较,乐卡地平组CD34+ CD45dim细胞数量有上升趋势,但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).以CD34+ CD45dim数量为自变量,行多元逐步线性回归分析结果显示,收缩压与CD34+ CD45dim细胞数量呈负相关(B=-1.794,t=-23.04,P<0.01). 结论 老年高血压患者外周血祖细胞数量与收缩压呈负相关.乐卡地平增加外周血祖细胞数量,且不依赖于其降压作用.%Objective To investigate the effect of Lecarnidipine on hypertension and circulation hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) count in elderly patients.Methods A total of 61 elderly patients with hypertension were selected in Renji Hospital geriatric hypertension clinic from January 2014 to August 2014.Patients were randomly divided into two groups:Lercanidipine treatment group (n=32,Lercanidipine hydrochloride 5-10 mg/day),the control group (n=29,thiazide diuretics and / or beta blockers according to patient's condition).Patients were observed for 12 weeks,and the target blood pressure

  18. Growth factor-activated stem cell circuits and stromal signals cooperatively accelerate non-integrated iPSC reprogramming of human myeloid progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Soon Park

    Full Text Available Nonviral conversion of skin or blood cells into clinically useful human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC occurs in only rare fractions (~0.001%-0.5% of donor cells transfected with non-integrating reprogramming factors. Pluripotency induction of developmentally immature stem-progenitors is generally more efficient than differentiated somatic cell targets. However, the nature of augmented progenitor reprogramming remains obscure, and its potential has not been fully explored for improving the extremely slow pace of non-integrated reprogramming. Here, we report highly optimized four-factor reprogramming of lineage-committed cord blood (CB myeloid progenitors with bulk efficiencies of ~50% in purified episome-expressing cells. Lineage-committed CD33(+CD45(+CD34(- myeloid cells and not primitive hematopoietic stem-progenitors were the main targets of a rapid and nearly complete non-integrated reprogramming. The efficient conversion of mature myeloid populations into NANOG(+TRA-1-81(+ hiPSC was mediated by synergies between hematopoietic growth factor (GF, stromal activation signals, and episomal Yamanaka factor expression. Using a modular bioinformatics approach, we demonstrated that efficient myeloid reprogramming correlated not to increased proliferation or endogenous Core factor expressions, but to poised expression of GF-activated transcriptional circuits that commonly regulate plasticity in both hematopoietic progenitors and embryonic stem cells (ESC. Factor-driven conversion of myeloid progenitors to a high-fidelity pluripotent state was further accelerated by soluble and contact-dependent stromal signals that included an implied and unexpected role for Toll receptor-NFκB signaling. These data provide a paradigm for understanding the augmented reprogramming capacity of somatic progenitors, and reveal that efficient induced pluripotency in other cell types may also require extrinsic activation of a molecular framework that commonly

  19. Direct Conversion of Fibroblasts to Megakaryocyte Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Pulecio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current sources of platelets for transfusion are insufficient and associated with risk of alloimmunization and blood-borne infection. These limitations could be addressed by the generation of autologous megakaryocytes (MKs derived in vitro from somatic cells with the ability to engraft and differentiate in vivo. Here, we show that overexpression of a defined set of six transcription factors efficiently converts mouse and human fibroblasts into MK-like progenitors. The transdifferentiated cells are CD41+, display polylobulated nuclei, have ploidies higher than 4N, form MK colonies, and give rise to platelets in vitro. Moreover, transplantation of MK-like murine progenitor cells into NSG mice results in successful engraftment and further maturation in vivo. Similar results are obtained using disease-corrected fibroblasts from Fanconi anemia patients. Our results combined demonstrate that functional MK progenitors with clinical potential can be obtained in vitro, circumventing the use of hematopoietic progenitors or pluripotent stem cells.

  20. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation,; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  1. The exodus subfamily of CC chemokines inhibits the proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromas, R; Cripe, L; Hangoc, G; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E

    2000-02-15

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue and play important roles in disease processes. Among the biologic activities of chemokines is inhibition of proliferation of normal hematopoietic progenitors. However, chemokines that inhibit normal progenitors rarely inhibit proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We and others recently cloned a subfamily of CC chemokines that share similar amino-terminal peptide sequences and a remarkable ability to chemoattract T cells. These chemokines, Exodus-1/LARC/MIP-3alpha, Exodus-2/SLC/6Ckine/TCA4, and Exodus-3/CKbeta11/MIP-3beta, were found to inhibit proliferation of normal human marrow progenitors. The study described here found that these chemokines also inhibited the proliferation of progenitors in every sample of marrow from patients with CML that was tested. This demonstration of consistent inhibition of CML progenitor proliferation makes the 3 Exodus chemokines unique among chemokines. (Blood. 2000;95:1506-1508)

  2. Effect of Reishi polysaccharides on human stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wong, Chi-Huey; Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi

    2010-12-15

    The polysaccharide fraction of Ganoderma lucidum (F3) was found to benefit our health in many ways by influencing the activity of tissue stem/progenitor cells. In this study, F3 was found to promote the adipose tissue MSCs' aggregation and chondrosphere formation, with the increase of CAM (N-CAM, I-CAM) expressions and autokine (BMP-2, IL-11, and aggrecan) secretions, in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay. In a stem cell expansion culture, it possesses the thrombopoietin (TPO) and GM-CSF like functions to enhance the survival/renewal abilities of primitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs). F3 was found to promote the dendrite growth of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the expression of cell adhesion molecules in the formation of immature dendritic cells (DC). On the other hand, F3 exhibited inhibitory effects on blood endothelial progenitor (EPC) colony formation, with concomitant reduction of cell surface endoglin (CD105) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) marker expressions, in the presence of angiogenic factors. A further cytokine array analysis revealed that F3 indeed inhibited the angiogenin synthesis and enhanced IL-1, MCP-1, MIP-1, RANTES, and GRO productions in the blood EPC derivation culture. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the polysaccharide fraction of G. lucidum F3 exhibits cytokine and chemokine like functions which are beneficial to human tissue stem/progenitor cells by modulating their CAM expressions and biological activities. These findings provide us a better the observation that F3 glycopolysaccharides indeed possesses anti-angiogenic and immune-modulating functions and promotes hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homing for better human tissue protection, reducing disease progression and health.

  3. Evidence that platelet-derived microvesicles may transfer platelet-specific immunoreactive antigens to the surface of endothelial cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem/ progenitor cells--implication for the pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Z Ratajczak

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis and tissue damage that accompanies destruction of platelets in immune thrombocytopenias (IT is still not understood very well and in addition to platelets, other cells (e.g. endothelial cells, CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitors may also become affected. Based on our previous work that platelet antigens (e.g., CD41 may be transferred by platelet-derived microvesicles (PMV to the surface of other cells, we asked if platelet derived-antigens, especially those that are involved in the formation of anti-platelet antibodies in IT (e.g., against antigen HPA 1 a could be also transferred by similar mechanism. To address this issue normal human CD34+ cells, human umbilical vein-endothelial cells (HUVEC and monocytic cell line THP-1 were incubated with PMV derived from HPA1a+ donors. We noticed that the HPA1a antigen is highly expressed on PMV-derived from the HPAla positive platelets and is transferred in PMV-dependent manner to the surface of CD34+ cells, HUVEC and monocytic THP-1 cells. These cells covered with HPA1a positive PMV but not by PMV derived from HPAla negative platelets reacted with anti-HPA1a antibodies derived from the alloimmunized pregnant women. More importantly, human hematopoietic cells that were preincubated with HPA1a+ PMV and subsequently exposed to anti-HPA 1 a serum and human NK cells, become subject to elimination by antibody dependent cell cytotoxicity ADCC. Thus, we postulate that PMV-dependent transfer of antigens may playing an important role in "expanding" the population of target cells that may be affected by anti-platelet antibodies and explain several pathologies that accompany IT (e.g. damage of endothelium, cytopenias.

  4. A Novel Molecular and Functional Stemness Signature Assessing Human Cord Blood-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cell Immaturity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriane Guillevic

    Full Text Available Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs, a distinct population of Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs progeny, display phenotypic and functional characteristics of endothelial cells while retaining features of stem/progenitor cells. Cord blood-derived ECFCs (CB-ECFCs have a high clonogenic and proliferative potentials and they can acquire different endothelial phenotypes, this requiring some plasticity. These properties provide angiogenic and vascular repair capabilities to CB-ECFCs for ischemic cell therapies. However, the degree of immaturity retained by EPCs is still confused and poorly defined. Consequently, to better characterize CB-ECFC stemness, we quantified their clonogenic potential and demonstrated that they were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs more efficiently and rapidly than adult endothelial cells. Moreover, we analyzed the transcriptional profile of a broad gene panel known to be related to stem cells. We showed that, unlike mature endothelial cells, CB-ECFCs expressed genes involved in the maintenance of embryonic stem cell properties such as DNMT3B, GDF3 or SOX2. Thus, these results provide further evidence and tools to appreciate EPC-derived cell stemness. Moreover this novel stem cell transcriptional signature of ECFCs could help better characterizing and ranging EPCs according to their immaturity profile.

  5. Histone Deacetylase (HDAC Inhibitors Down-Regulate Endothelial Lineage Commitment of Umbilical Cord Blood Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia Maniu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To test the involvement of histone deacetylases (HDACs activity in endothelial lineage progression, we investigated the effects of HDAC inhibitors on endothelial progenitors cells (EPCs derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB. Adherent EPCs, that expressed the endothelial marker proteins (PCAM-1, CD105, CD133, and VEGFR2 revealed by flow cytometry were treated with three HDAC inhibitors: Butyrate (BuA, Trichostatin A (TSA, and Valproic acid (VPA. RT-PCR assay showed that HDAC inhibitors down-regulated the expression of endothelial genes such as VE-cadherin, CD133, CXCR4 and Tie-2. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis illustrated that HDAC inhibitors selectively reduce the expression of VEGFR2, CD117, VE-cadherin, and ICAM-1, whereas the expression of CD34 and CD45 remained unchanged, demonstrating that HDAC is involved in endothelial differentiation of progenitor cells. Real-Time PCR demonstrated that TSA down-regulated telomerase activity probably via suppression of hTERT expression, suggesting that HDAC inhibitor decreased cell proliferation. Cell motility was also decreased after treatment with HDAC inhibitors as shown by wound-healing assay. The balance of acethylation/deacethylation kept in control by the activity of HAT (histone acetyltransferases/HDAC enzymes play an important role in differentiation of stem cells by regulating proliferation and endothelial lineage commitment.

  6. Low oxygen tension favored expansion and hematopoietic reconstitution of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells expanded from human cord blood-derived CD34(+) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyan; Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Fan, Jinli; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor that regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in both in vivo hematopoietic microenvironment and ex vivo culture system. Although the effect of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion of HSCs was extensively studied, there were no clear descriptions on physiological function and gene expression analysis of HSCs under different oxygen tensions. In this study, the effects of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion characteristics of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD34(+) cells are evaluated. Moreover, the physiological function of expanded CD34(+) cells was assessed by secondary expansion ability ex vivo and hematopoietic reconstitution ability in vivo. Also, genetic profiling was applied to analyze the expression of genes related to cell function. It was found that low oxygen tension favored expansion of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells. Additionally, CD34(+) cells expanded under low oxygen tension showed better secondary expansion ability and reconstitution ability than those under atmospheric oxygen concentration. Finally, the genetic profiling of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells cultured under low oxygen tension was more akin to freshly isolated cells. These results collectively demonstrate that low oxygen tension was able to better maintain both self-renewal and hematopoietic reconstitution potential and may lay an experimental basis for clinical transplantation of HSCs.

  7. Gene expression profiling of human erythroid progenitors by micro-serial analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, Naohito; Hirokawa, Makoto; Aiba, Namiko; Ichikawa, Yoshikazu; Fujishima, Masumi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Miura, Ikuo; Sawada, Ken-ichi

    2004-10-01

    We compared the expression profiles of highly purified human CD34+ cells and erythroid progenitor cells by micro-serial analysis of gene expression (microSAGE). Human CD34+ cells were purified from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized blood stem cells, and erythroid progenitors were obtained by cultivating these cells in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin 3, and erythropoietin. Our 10,202 SAGE tags allowed us to identify 1354 different transcripts appearing more than once. Erythroid progenitor cells showed increased expression of LRBA, EEF1A1, HSPCA, PILRB, RANBP1, NACA, and SMURF. Overexpression of HSPCA was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. MicroSAGE revealed an unexpected preferential expression of several genes in erythroid progenitor cells in addition to the known functional genes, including hemoglobins. Our results provide reference data for future studies of gene expression in various hematopoietic disorders, including myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia.

  8. csrnp1a is necessary for the development of primitive hematopoiesis progenitors in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Espina

    Full Text Available The CSRNP (cystein-serine-rich nuclear protein transcription factors are conserved from Drosophila to human. Functional studies in mice, through knockout for each of their paralogs, have resulted insufficient to elucidate the function of this family of proteins in vertebrate development. Previously, we described the function of the zebrafish ortholog, Csnrp1/Axud1, showing its essential role in the survival and proliferation of cephalic progenitors. To extend our understanding of this family, we have studied the function of its paralog csrnp1a. Our results show that csrnp1a is expressed from 0 hpf, until larval stages, particularly in cephalic territories and in the intermediate cell mass (ICM. Using morpholinos in wild type and transgenic lines we observed that Csrnp1a knockdown generates a mild reduction in head size and a depletion of blood cells in circulation. This was combined with in situ hybridizations to analyze the expression of different mesodermal and primitive hematopoiesis markers. Morphant embryos have impaired blood formation without disruption of mesoderm specification, angiogenesis or heart development. The reduction of circulating blood cells occurs at the hematopoietic progenitor level, affecting both the erythroid and myeloid lineages. In addition, cell proliferation was also altered in hematopoietic anterior sites, specifically in spi1 expression domain. These and previous observations suggest an important role of Csnrps transcription factors in progenitor biology, both in the neural and hematopoietic linages.

  9. A method for enriching myeloid (CFU-GM) and erythroid (BFU-E) progenitor cells from human cord blood by accessory cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowton, L A; Ma, D D

    1992-10-01

    Human cord blood provides a convenient alternative to bone marrow as a rich source of hemopoietic progenitor cells. This study reports a simple means for enriching a cord blood progenitor cell population by accessory cell depletion. Two methods of monocyte depletion were tested. A Cytodex 3 microcarrier system using collagen coated dextran beads was compared to the more commonly used method of plastic plate adhesion. The method of plastic plate adhesion gave a significantly higher cell recovery. T cell depletion using a recently characterized rat monoclonal antibody which fixes human complement was also investigated. A combined method of monocyte depletion by plate adhesion and T cell depletion resulted in the removal of > 96% of monocytes and > 98% of T cells. This led to a significant enrichment of myeloid (CFU-GM) and erythroid (BFU-E) colony growth. Such enriched progenitor cell populations provide a useful starting population for any study on hemopoiesis.

  10. Patient condition affects the collection of peripheral blood progenitors after priming with recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabannon, C; Le Coroller, A G; Faucher, C; Novakovitch, G; Blaise, D; Moatti, J P; Maraninchi, D; Mannoni, P

    1995-06-01

    A total of 258 aphereses were performed in 79 patients with nonmyeloid malignancies after mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). Apheresis products were examined for viable mononuclear cell (VMC), CD34+ cell, and clonogenic cell contents. The number of progenitors in aphereses differs in subgroups of patients with different diagnoses. However, the number of CD34+ or clonogenic cells is dependent on age and amount of chemotherapy delivered to patients before collection rather than on the nature of the disease itself. In addition, the actual dose of rhG-CSF used to mobilize PBSC and the number of VMC in aphereses influenced the clonogenicity of CD34+ cells, although the daily dose of rhG-CSF seems to play little role on the number of clonogenic cells in each individual apheresis product. CD34+ cell and CFU-C (or CFU-GM) numbers are related parameters, and the relation can be described as linear. However, the linear relation varies in different patient groups, and most of the linearity is induced by the highest sets of values. We conclude that mobilization with low doses of rhG-CSF alone is feasible and that the probability of collecting a high number of peripheral blood progenitors is increased in young patients undergoing apheresis early in the course of the disease. Although the relationship between CD34+ cells and CFUs can be described as linear in well-defined situations, its relevance may be limited because it is not a universal finding.

  11. Clinical observation of factors in the efficacy of blood component transfusion in patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

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    Xi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors affecting the efficacy of platelet and red blood cell (RBC transfusion in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT have not been studied extensively. We aimed to evaluate platelet and RBC transfusion efficacy by measuring the platelet corrected count increment and the hemoglobin increment, respectively, 24 h after transfusion in 105 patients who received HSCT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using retrospective analysis, we studied whether factors, including gender, time of transplantation, the compatibility of ABO group between HSC donors and recipients, and autologous or allogenic transplantation, influence the efficacy of blood component transfusion. We found that the infection rate of HSCT patients positively correlated with the transfusion amount, and the length of stay in the laminar flow room was associated with transfusion. We found that platelet transfusion performed during HSCT showed significantly better efficacy than that performed before HSCT. The effect of platelet transfusion in auto-transplantation was significantly better than that in allo-transplantation. The efficacy of RBC transfusion during HSCT was significantly lower than that performed before HSCT. The efficacy of RBC transfusion in auto-transplantation was significantly higher than that in allo-transplantation. Allo-transplantation patients who received HSCs from compatible ABO groups showed significantly higher efficacy during both platelet and RBC transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the efficacy of platelet and RBC transfusions does not correlate with the gender of patients, while it significantly correlates with the time of transplantation, type of transplantation, and ABO compatibility between HSC donors and recipients. During HSCT, the infection rate of patients positively correlates with the transfusion amount of RBCs and platelets. The total volume of RBC units transfused positively correlates with the length of

  12. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplant, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, S; Garderet, L; Durie, B

    2015-01-01

    not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation...... convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop...... autologous HCT in patients with MM relapsing after primary therapy comparing it to "best non-HCT" therapy. The expert committee also underscored the importance of collecting enough hematopoietic stem cells to perform 2 transplantations early in the course of the disease. Regarding allogeneic HCT, the expert...

  13. The costs of peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion mobilised by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor following high dose melphalan as compared with conventional therapy in multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Uyl-de Groot (Carin); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); A.A.P.M. van Riet (A. A P M); F.F.H. Rutten (Frans)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a retrospective study, we calculated the treatment costs of 26 patients, who received either high dose melphalan combined with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; filgrastim)(n=7) or without G-CSF (n=11) or alternatively, peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion (PBPC) mo

  14. Induction of hematopoietic and endothelial cell program orchestrated by ETS transcription factor ER71/ETV2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Li, Daofeng; Yu, Yik Yeung Lawrence; Kang, Inyoung; Cha, Min-Ji; Kim, Ju Young; Park, Changwon; Watson, Dennis K; Wang, Ting; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-05-01

    The ETS factor ETV2 (aka ER71) is essential for the generation of the blood and vascular system, as ETV2 deficiency leads to a complete block in blood and endothelial cell formation and embryonic lethality in the mouse. However, the ETV2-mediated gene regulatory network and signaling governing hematopoietic and endothelial cell development are poorly understood. Here, we map ETV2 global binding sites and carry out in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and germ line and conditional knockout mouse studies to uncover mechanisms involved in the hemangiogenic fate commitment from mesoderm. We show that ETV2 binds to enhancers that specify hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineages. We find that the hemangiogenic progenitor population in the developing embryo can be identified as FLK1(high)PDGFRα(-). Notably, these hemangiogenic progenitors are exclusively sensitive to ETV2-dependent FLK1 signaling. Importantly, ETV2 turns on other Ets genes, thereby establishing an ETS hierarchy. Consequently, the hematopoietic and endothelial cell program initiated by ETV2 is maintained partly by other ETS factors through an ETS switching mechanism. These findings highlight the critical role that transient ETV2 expression plays in the regulation of hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineage specification and stability.

  15. Mitophagy in hematopoietic stem cells: the case for exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Aashish; Kundu, Mondira

    2013-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are inherently quiescent and self-renewing, yet can differentiate and commit to multiple blood cell types. Intracellular mitochondrial content is dynamic, and there is an increase in mitochondrial content during differentiation and lineage commitment in HSCs. HSCs reside in a hypoxic niche within the bone marrow and rely heavily on glycolysis, while differentiated and committed progenitors rely on oxidative phosphorylation. Increased oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation and commitment is not only due to increased mitochondrial content but also due to changes in mitochondrial cytosolic distribution and efficiency. These changes in the intracellular mitochondrial landscape contribute signals toward regulating differentiation and commitment. Thus, a functional relationship exists between the mitochondria in HSCs and the state of the HSCs (i.e., stemness vs. differentiated). This review focuses on how autophagy-mediated mitochondrial clearance (i.e., mitophagy) may affect HSC mitochondrial content, thereby influencing the fate of HSCs and maintenance of hematopoietic homeostasis.

  16. Study on the induction and differentiation of megakaryocyte progenitor cell derived from umbilical cord blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琳

    2014-01-01

    Objective To build a protocol of separation and induction of megakaryocytes derived from cord blood mononuclear cells.Methods Red blood cells were precipitated by hydroxyethyl starch(HES).Mononuclear cells were obtained by density gradient centrifugation with Ficoll.The inducing efficiencies of megakaryocytes using different cytokine cocktails and culture media were analyzed.Results The best choice for erythrocyte sedimenta-

  17. S phase entry of neural progenitor cells correlates with increased blood flow in the young subventricular zone.

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    Benjamin Lacar

    Full Text Available The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ contains proliferating neural progenitor cells in close proximity to blood vessels. Insults and drug treatments acutely stimulate cell proliferation in the SVZ, which was assessed by labeling cells entering S phase. Although G1-to-S progression is metabolically demanding on a minute-to-hour time scale, it remains unknown whether increased SVZ cell proliferation is accompanied by a local hemodynamic response. This neurovascular coupling provides energy substrates to active neuronal assemblies. Transcardial dye perfusion revealed the presence of capillaries throughout the SVZ that constrict upon applications of the thromboxane A(2 receptor agonist U-46119 in acute brain slice preparations. We then monitored in vivo blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry via a microprobe located either in the SVZ or a mature network. U-46119 injections into the lateral ventricle decreased blood flow in the SVZ and the striatum, which are near the ventricle. A 1-hour ventricular injection of epidermal and basic fibroblast growth factor (EGF and bFGF significantly increased the percentage of Sox2 transcription factor-positive cells in S phase 1.5 hours post-injection. This increase was accompanied by a sustained rise in blood flow in the SVZ but not in the striatum. Direct growth factor injections into the cortex did not alter local blood flow, ruling out direct effects on capillaries. These findings suggest that an acute increase in the number of G1-to-S cycling SVZ cells is accompanied by neurometabolic-vascular coupling, which may provide energy and nutrient for cell cycle progression.

  18. Effect of low-dose methylprednisolone on peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells and its significance in rats after brain injury

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    Bin ZHANG

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of low-dose methylprednisolone(MP treatment after traumatic brain injury(TBI in rats on the number of peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs and injury area of the brain.Methods One hundred and fifty-four adult male Wistar rats were involved in the present study,and they were randomly divided into normal control group(n=18,TBI control group(n=38,MP control group(n=30,MP+TBI group(n=30 and TBI+MP group(n=38.The TBI model was reproduced by fluid percussion injury(FPI.MP(5mg/kg was intraperitoneally administered once a day for 4 days.Peripheral venous blood samples were taken on day 1,3,7 and 14,and the counts of EPCs were determined by flow cytometry.The rats were sacrificed on day 1 and 3,brain edema was estimated by dry-wet weight method,and the blood-brain barrier(BBB permeability was determined by Evans-blue extravasation.Results The counts of peripheral blood EPCs were significantly higher in MP control group,MP+TBI group and TBI+MP group on day 1,3 and 7 than that in normal control and TBI control group,and it returned to the level of normal control group on day 14.The BBB permeability was improved and brain edema alleviated in MP+TBI and TBI+MP group on day 3.Conclusion The administration of low-dose MP may increase the count of peripheral blood EPCs in rats,decrease BBB damage,and alleviate brain edema.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of treatment efficacy of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell-differentiated cardiac pro-genitor cells in a myocardial injury mouse model

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    Truc Le-Buu Pham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, stem cell therapy has been investigated as a strategy to prevent or reverse damage to heart tissue. Although the results of cell transplantation in animal models and patients with myocardial ischemia are promising, the selection of the appropriate cell type remains an issue that requires consideration. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of cardiac progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia. The cardiac progenitor cells used for transplantation were differentiated from umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells. Animal models injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS and healthy mice were used as controls. Cell grafting was assessed by changes in blood pressure and histological evaluation. After 14 days of transplantation, the results demonstrated that the blood pressure of transplanted mice was stable, similar to healthy mice, whereas it fluctuated in PBS-injected mice. Histological analysis showed that heart tissue had regenerated in transplanted mice, but remained damaged in PBS-injected mice. Furthermore, trichrome staining revealed that the transplanted mice did not generate significant amount of scar tissue compared with PBS-injected control mice. In addition, the cardiac progenitor cells managed to survive and integrate with local cells in cell-injected heart tissue 14 days after transplantation. Most importantly, the transplanted cells did not exhibit tumorigenesis. In conclusion, cardiac progenitor cell transplantation produced a positive effect in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia. [Biomed Res Ther 2015; 2(12.000: 435-445

  20. Clinical-scale expansion of CD34(+) cord blood cells amplifies committed progenitors and rapid scid repopulation cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamayor-Genescà, Alba; Pla, Arnau; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Pujals-Fonts, Noèlia; Marín-Gallén, Sílvia; Caminal, Marta; Pujol-Autonell, Irma; Carrascal, Jorge; Vives-Pi, Marta; Garcia, Joan; Vives, Joaquim

    2017-03-25

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation is associated with long periods of aplastic anaemia. This undesirable situation is due to the low cell dose available per unit of UCB and the immaturity of its progenitors. To overcome this, we present a cell culture strategy aimed at the expansion of the CD34(+) population and the generation of granulocyte lineage-committed progenitors. Two culture products were produced after either 6 or 14days of in vitro expansion, and their characteristics compared to non-expanded UCB CD34(+) controls in terms of phenotype, colony-forming activity and multilineage repopulation potential in NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null) mice. Both expanded cell products maintained rapid SCID repopulation activity similar to the non-expanded control, but 14-day cultured cells showed impaired long term SCID repopulation activity. The process was successfully scaled up to clinically relevant doses of 89×10(6) CD34(+) cells committed to the granulocytic lineage and 3.9×10(9) neutrophil precursors in different maturation stages. Cell yields and biological properties presented by the cell product obtained after 14days in culture were superior and therefore this is proposed as the preferred production setup in a new type of dual transplant strategy to reduce aplastic periods, producing a transient repopulation before the definitive engraftment of the non-cultured UCB unit. Importantly, human telomerase reverse transcriptase activity was undetectable, c-myc expression levels were low and no genetic abnormalities were found, as determined by G-banding karyotype, further confirming the safety of the expanded product.

  1. Day 100 Peripheral Blood Absolute Lymphocyte/Monocyte Ratio and Survival in Classical Hodgkin's Lymphoma Postautologous Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Luis F. Porrata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Day 100 prognostic factors of postautologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (APBHSCT to predict clinical outcome in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL patients have not been evaluated. Thus, we studied if the day 100 peripheral blood absolute lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (Day 100 ALC/AMC affects clinical outcomes by landmark analysis from day 100 post-APBHSCT. Only cHL patients achieving a complete remission at day 100 post-APBHSCT were studied. From 2000 to 2010, 131 cHL consecutive patients qualified for the study. The median followup from day 100 was 4.1 years (range: 0.2–12.3 years. Patients with a Day 100 ALC/AMC ≥ 1.3 experienced superior overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS compared with Day 100 ALC/AMC < 1.3 (from day 100: OS, median not reached versus 2.8 years; 5 years OS rates of 93% (95% CI, 83%–97% versus 35% (95% CI, 19%–51%, resp., P<0.0001; from day 100: PFS, median not reached versus 1.2 years; 5 years PFS rates of 79% (95% CI, 69%–86% versus 27% (95% CI, 14%–45%, resp., P<0.0001. Day ALC/AMC ratio was an independent predictor for OS and PFS. Thus, Day 100 ALC/AMC ratio is a simple biomarker that can help to assess clinical outcomes from day 100 post-APBHSCT in cHL patients.

  2. Erythropoietin-enhanced endothelial progenitor cell recruitment in peripheral blood and renal vessels during experimental acute kidney injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakiroglu, Figen; Enders-Comberg, Sora Maria; Pagel, Horst; Rohwedel, Jürgen; Lehnert, Hendrik; Kramer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Beneficial effects of erythropoietin (EPO) have been reported in acute kidney injury (AKI) when administered prior to induction of AKI. We studied the effects of EPO administration on renal function shortly after ischemic AKI. For this purpose, rats were subjected to renal ischemia for 30 min and EPO was administered at a concentration of 500 U/kg either i.v. as a single shot directly after ischemia or with an additional i.p. dose until 3 days after surgery. The results were compared with AKI rats without EPO application and a sham-operated group. Renal function was assessed by measurement of serum biochemical markers, histological grading, and using an isolated perfused kidney (IPK) model. Furthermore, we performed flow cytometry to analyze the concentration of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the peripheral blood and renal vessels. Following EPO application, there was only a statistically non-significant tendency of serum creatinine and urea to improve, particularly after daily EPO application. Renal vascular resistance and the renal perfusion rate were not significantly altered. In the histological analysis, acute tubular necrosis was only marginally ameliorated following EPO administration. In summary, we could not demonstrate a significant improvement in renal function when EPO was applied after AKI. Interestingly, however, EPO treatment resulted in a highly significant increase in CD133- and CD34-positive EPC both in the peripheral blood and renal vessels.

  3. Comparison of the Fenwal Amicus and Fresenius Com.Tec cell separators for autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Fevzi; Kocyigit, Ismail; Ozturk, Ahmet; Kaynar, Leylagul; Sari, Ismail; Oztekin, Mehmet; Solmaz, Musa; Eser, Bulent; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2007-04-01

    Peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) are commonly used as a stem cell source for autologous transplantation. This study was undertaken to evaluate blood cell separators with respect to separation results and content of the harvest. Forty autologous PBPC collections in patients with hematological malignancies were performed with either the Amicus or the COM.TEC cell separators. The median product volume was lower with the Amicus compared to the COM.TEC (125 mL vs. 300 mL; p COM.TEC (3.0 x 10(6) vs. 4.1 x 10(6); p = 0.129). There was a statistically higher mean volume of ACD used in collections on the Amicus compared to the COM.TEC (1040 +/- 241 mL vs. 868 +/- 176 mL; p = 0.019). There was a statistical difference in platelet (PLT) contamination of the products between the Amicus and the COM.TEC (0.3 x 10(11) vs. 1.1 x 10(11); p COM.TEC compared to the Amicus instruments (18.5% vs. 9.5%; p = 0.028). In conclusion, both instruments collected PBPCs efficiently. However, Amicus has the advantage of lower PLT contamination in the product, and less decrease in PB platelet count with lower product volume in autologous setting.

  4. Combined intermittent hypoxia and surface muscle electrostimulation as a method to increase peripheral blood progenitor cell concentration

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    Azqueta Carmen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our goal was to determine whether short-term intermittent hypoxia exposure, at a level well tolerated by healthy humans and previously shown by our group to increase EPO and erythropoiesis, could mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and increase their presence in peripheral circulation. Methods Four healthy male subjects were subjected to three different protocols: one with only a hypoxic stimulus (OH, another with a hypoxic stimulus plus muscle electrostimulation (HME and the third with only muscle electrostimulation (OME. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia exposure consisted of only three sessions of three hours at barometric pressure 540 hPa (equivalent to an altitude of 5000 m for three consecutive days, whereas muscular electrostimulation was performed in two separate periods of 25 min in each session. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein on three consecutive days immediately before the experiment and 24 h, 48 h, 4 days and 7 days after the last day of hypoxic exposure. Results There was a clear increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after combined hypobaric hypoxia and muscular electrostimulation. This response was not observed after the isolated application of the same stimuli. Conclusion Our results open a new application field for hypobaric systems as a way to increase efficiency in peripheral HSC collection.

  5. Hematopoietic Lineage Transcriptome Stability and Representation in PAXgeneTM Collected Peripheral Blood Utilising SPIA Single-Stranded cDNA Probes for Microarray

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    Laura Kennedy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood as a surrogate tissue for transcriptome profiling holds great promise for the discovery of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers, particularly when target tissues of disease are not readily available. To maximize the reliability of gene expression data generated from clinical blood samples, both the sample collection and the microarray probe generation methods should be optimized to provide stabilized, reproducible and representative gene expression profiles faithfully representing the transcriptional profiles of the constituent blood cell types present in the circulation. Given the increasing innovation in this field in recent years, we investigated a combination of methodological advances in both RNA stabilisation and microarray probe generation with the goal of achieving robust, reliable and representative transcriptional profiles from whole blood. To assess the whole blood profiles, the transcriptomes of purified blood cell types were measured and compared with the global transcriptomes measured in whole blood. The results demonstrate that a combination of PAXgeneTM RNA stabilising technology and single-stranded cDNA probe generation afforded by the NuGEN Ovation RNA amplification system V2TM enables an approach that yields faithful representation of specific hematopoietic cell lineage transcriptomes in whole blood without the necessity for prior sample fractionation, cell enrichment or globin reduction. Storage stability assessments of the PAXgeneTM blood samples also advocate a short, fixed room temperature storage time for all PAXgeneTM blood samples collected for the purposes of global transcriptional profiling in clinical studies.

  6. Defining Molecular Phenotypes of Mesenchymal and hematopoietic Stem Cells derived from Peripheral blood of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia patients for regenerative stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potdar, Pd; Subedi, Rp

    2011-01-01

    Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) is a clonal myeloid disorder affecting all age groups, characterized by accumulation of immature blast cells in bone marrow and in peripheral blood. Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation is a present treatment for cure of ALL patients, which is very expensive, invasive process and may have possibility of transplantation of malignant stem cells to patients. In the present study, we hypothesized to isolate large number of normal Mesenchymal & Hematopoietic stem cells from peripheral blood of ALL patients, which will be further characterized for their normal phenotypes by using specific molecular stem cell markers. This is the first study, which defines the existing phenotypes of isolated MSCs and HSCs from peripheral blood of ALL patients. We have established three cell lines in which two were Mesenchymal stem cells designated as MSCALL and MSCnsALL and one was suspension cell line designated as HSCALL. The HSCALL cell line was developed from the lymphocyte like cells secreted by MSCALL cells. Our study also showed that MSCALL from peripheral blood of ALL patient secreted hematopoietic stem cells in vitro culture. We have characterized all three-cell lines by 14 specific stem cell molecular markers. It was found that both MSC cell lines expressed CD105, CD13, and CD73 with mixed expression of CD34 and CD45 at early passage whereas, HSCALL cell line expressed prominent feature of hematopoietic stem cells such as CD34 and CD45 with mild expression of CD105 and CD13. All three-cell lines expressed LIF, OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, IL6, and DAPK. These cells mildly expressed COX2 and did not express BCR-ABL. Overall it was shown that isolated MSCs and HSCs can be use as a model system to study the mechanism of leukemia at stem cell level and their use in stem cell regeneration therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

  7. Principles of bone marrow processing and progenitor cell/mononuclear cell concentrate collection in a continuous flow blood cell separation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, J P; Rondón, G; Huh, Y O; Lauppe, M J; Champlin, R E; Deisseroth, A B

    1995-08-01

    The application of continuous flow apheresis technology to processing bone marrow for collection of the mononuclear progenitor cell population appears to follow the same principles as collection of mononuclear cells from peripheral blood. Unlike peripheral blood, however, where mobilization of cells from extravascular sites during the procedures contributes significantly to the final cell yield, the entire quantity of progenitor cells available for recovery from marrow is present in the original marrow when it is pooled. The process then becomes one of attempting optimal recovery of the cells of interest while excluding contaminating erythrocytes and cells of the myeloid series. This study reports the development of a protocol for recovery of MNC, CD33+, CD34+, and CD34+/DR- cells from harvested marrow for autologous and allogeneic transplants using a continuous flow blood cell separator, the variables influencing the recovery of the cells of interest and the clinical response to infusion of the processed cells.

  8. SIMPL enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-α dependent p65-MED1 complex formation is required for mammalian hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function.

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    Weina Zhao

    Full Text Available Significant insight into the signaling pathways leading to activation of the Rel transcription factor family, collectively termed NF-κB, has been gained. Less well understood is how subsets of NF-κB-dependent genes are regulated in a signal specific manner. The SIMPL protein (signaling molecule that interacts with mouse pelle-like kinase is required for full Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα induced NF-κB activity. We show that SIMPL is required for steady-state hematopoiesis and the expression of a subset of TNFα induced genes whose products regulate hematopoietic cell activity. To gain insight into the mechanism through which SIMPL modulates gene expression we focused on the Tnf gene, an immune response regulator required for steady-state hematopoiesis. In response to TNFα SIMPL localizes to the Tnf gene promoter where it modulates the initiation of Tnf gene transcription. SIMPL binding partners identified by mass spectrometry include proteins involved in transcription and the interaction between SIMPL and MED1 was characterized in more detail. In response to TNFα, SIMPL is found in p65-MED1 complexes where SIMPL enhances p65/MED1/SIMPL complex formation. Together our results indicate that SIMPL functions as a TNFα-dependent p65 co-activator by facilitating the recruitment of MED1 to p65 containing transcriptional complexes to control the expression of a subset of TNFα-induced genes.

  9. Mobilization of Neural Precursors in the Circulating Blood of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Buck DW (1997) AC133, a novel marker for human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Blood 90:5002-5012. Zanotti C, Chiarini M, Serana F, Capra R...Chiarini M, Serana F, Capra R, Rottoli M, Rovaris M, Cavaletti G, Clerici R, Rezzonico M, Caimi L, Imberti L (2011) Opposite effects of interferon

  10. In vitro large scale production of human mature red blood cells from hematopoietic stem cells by coculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiafei; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Ruoyong; Wang, Yunfang; Nan, Xue; He, Lijuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Pei, Xuetao

    2013-01-01

    In vitro models of human erythropoiesis are useful in studying the mechanisms of erythroid differentiation in normal and pathological conditions. Here we describe an erythroid liquid culture system starting from cord blood derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs were cultured for more than 50 days in erythroid differentiation conditions and resulted in a more than 10(9)-fold expansion within 50 days under optimal conditions. Homogeneous erythroid cells were characterized by cell morphology, flow cytometry, and hematopoietic colony assays. Furthermore, terminal erythroid maturation was improved by cosculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells. Cocultured erythroid cells underwent multiple maturation events, including decrease in size, increase in glycophorin A expression, and nuclear condensation. This process resulted in extrusion of the pycnotic nuclei in up to 80% of the cells. Importantly, they possessed the capacity to express the adult definitive β -globin chain upon further maturation. We also show that the oxygen equilibrium curves of the cord blood-differentiated red blood cells (RBCs) are comparable to normal RBCs. The large number and purity of erythroid cells and RBCs produced from cord blood make this method useful for fundamental research in erythroid development, and they also provide a basis for future production of available RBCs for transfusion.

  11. Normal hematopoietic stem cell function in mice with enforced expression of the Hippo signaling effector YAP1.

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    Lina Jansson

    Full Text Available The Hippo pathway has recently been implicated in the regulation of organ size and stem cells in multiple tissues. The transcriptional cofactor yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1 is the most downstream effector of Hippo signaling and is functionally repressed by the upstream components of the pathway. Overexpression of YAP1 stimulates proliferation of stem and progenitor cells in many tissues, consistent with inhibition of Hippo signaling. To study the role of Hippo signaling in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, we created a transgenic model with inducible YAP1 expression exclusively within the hematopoietic system. Following 3 months induction, examination of blood and bone marrow in the induced mice revealed no changes in the distribution of the hematopoietic lineages compared to control mice. Moreover, the progenitor cell compartment was unaltered as determined by colony forming assays and immunophenotyping. To address whether YAP1 affects the quantity and function of HSCs we performed competitive transplantation experiments. We show that ectopic YAP1 expression does not influence HSC function neither during steady state nor in situations of hematopoietic stress. This is in sharp contrast to effects seen on stem- and progenitor cells in other organs and suggests highly tissue specific functions of the Hippo pathway in regulation of stem cells.

  12. Lin- CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ cells in human blood constitute a rare population of mast cell progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Malinovschi, Andrei; Öhrvik, Helena; Sandelin, Martin; Janson, Christer; Alving, Kjell; Hallgren, Jenny

    2016-01-28

    Mast cells are rare tissue-resident immune cells that are involved in allergic reactions, and their numbers are increased in the lungs of asthmatics. Murine lung mast cells arise from committed bone marrow-derived progenitors that enter the blood circulation, migrate through the pulmonary endothelium, and mature in the tissue. In humans, mast cells can be cultured from multipotent CD34(+) progenitor cells. However, a population of distinct precursor cells that give rise to mast cells has remained undiscovered. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) progenitor cells, which represented only 0.0053% of the isolated blood cells in healthy individuals. These cells expressed integrin β7 and developed a mast cell-like phenotype, although with a slow cell division capacity in vitro. Isolated Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells had an immature mast cell-like appearance and expressed high levels of many mast cell-related genes as compared with human blood basophils in whole-transcriptome microarray analyses. Furthermore, serglycin, tryptase, and carboxypeptidase A messenger RNA transcripts were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Altogether, we propose that the Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells are closely related to human tissue mast cells and likely constitute an immediate precursor population, which can give rise to predominantly mast cells. Furthermore, asthmatics with reduced lung function had a higher frequency of Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood mast cell progenitors than asthmatics with normal lung function.

  13. Intra-hematopoietic cell fusion as a source of somatic variation in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Amy M; Grompe, Markus; Kurre, Peter

    2012-06-15

    Cell fusion plays a well-recognized, physiological role during development. Bone-marrow-derived hematopoietic cells have been shown to fuse with non-hematopoietic cells in a wide variety of tissues. Some organs appear to resolve the changes in ploidy status, generating functional and mitotically-competent events. However, cell fusion exclusively involving hematopoietic cells has not been reported. Indeed, genomic copy number variation in highly replicative hematopoietic cells is widely considered a hallmark of malignant transformation. Here we show that cell fusion occurs between cells of the hematopoietic system under injury as well as non-injury conditions. Experiments reveal the acquisition of genetic markers in fusion products, their tractable maintenance during hematopoietic differentiation and long-term persistence after serial transplantation. Fusion events were identified in clonogenic progenitors as well as differentiated myeloid and lymphoid cells. These observations provide a new experimental model for the study of non-pathogenic somatic diversity in the hematopoietic system.

  14. Incidence of human herpes virus-6 and human cytomegalovirus infections in donated bone marrow and umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad-Behbahani A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the incidence of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections that are potentially transmitted to haematopoietic stem cells (HSC transplant recipients via bone marrow (BM or umbilical cord blood (UCB. Bone marrow progenitor cells were collected from 30 allogenic BM donors. UCB HSC were collected from 34 subjects. The extracted DNA was then processed using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR technique. HCMV and HHV-6 serological status were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Nested PCR identified HCMV in 22 (73% of 30 samples of BM progenitor cells but in only eight (23.5% of 34 samples of UBC HSC ( P = 0.001. HHV-6 DNA was detected in 11 (36.6% of 30 BM progenitor cells and in only one (2.9% of 34 UBC cells ( P = 0.002. Both HHV-6 and HCMV infections were determined in nine (26.5% of 34 bone marrow samples. The results indicate that, the risk of HCMV and HHV-6 via BM progenitor cells is higher than transmission by UCB cells ( P= 0.04.

  15. Disruption of SF3B1 results in deregulated expression and splicing of key genes and pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshad, H; Pellagatti, A; Fernandez-Mercado, M; Yip, B H; Malcovati, L; Attwood, M; Przychodzen, B; Sahgal, N; Kanapin, A A; Lockstone, H; Scifo, L; Vandenberghe, P; Papaemmanuil, E; Smith, C W J; Campbell, P J; Ogawa, S; Maciejewski, J P; Cazzola, M; Savage, K I; Boultwood, J

    2015-05-01

    The splicing factor SF3B1 is the most commonly mutated gene in the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), particularly in patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). We investigated the functional effects of SF3B1 disruption in myeloid cell lines: SF3B1 knockdown resulted in growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and impaired erythroid differentiation and deregulation of many genes and pathways, including cell cycle regulation and RNA processing. MDS is a disorder of the hematopoietic stem cell and we thus studied the transcriptome of CD34(+) cells from MDS patients with SF3B1 mutations using RNA sequencing. Genes significantly differentially expressed at the transcript and/or exon level in SF3B1 mutant compared with wild-type cases include genes that are involved in MDS pathogenesis (ASXL1 and CBL), iron homeostasis and mitochondrial metabolism (ALAS2, ABCB7 and SLC25A37) and RNA splicing/processing (PRPF8 and HNRNPD). Many genes regulated by a DNA damage-induced BRCA1-BCLAF1-SF3B1 protein complex showed differential expression/splicing in SF3B1 mutant cases. This is the first study to determine the target genes of SF3B1 mutation in MDS CD34(+) cells. Our data indicate that SF3B1 has a critical role in MDS by affecting the expression and splicing of genes involved in specific cellular processes/pathways, many of which are relevant to the known RARS pathophysiology, suggesting a causal link.

  16. Microbial contamination of peripheral blood and bone marrow hematopoietic cell products and environmental contamination in a stem cell bank: a single-center report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowska-Skrzypczak, M; Bembnista, E; Kubiak, A; Matuszak, P; Schneider, A; Komarnicki, M

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) derived from peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) are frequently used for autologous and allogenic transplantations. Establishing quality control at appropriate steps of the stem cell preparation process is crucial for a successful transplantation. Microbial contamination of haematopoietic stem cells is rare but could cause a potentially mortal complication of a stem cells transplantation. We investigated the microbiological contamination of PB (291 donations) and BM (39 donations) products. Microbial cultures of 330 donations between January 2012 and June 2013 were retrospectively analyzed after the collection and preparation steps. The microbiological analysis was performed with an automated system. Hematopoietic stem cells were processed in a closed system. Additionally, in this report the environment of the working areas of stem cell preparation was monitored. We analyzed microbial contamination of the air in a class I laminar air flow clean bench at the time of preparation and in the laboratory once per month. We reported 9 (2.73%) contaminated HSC products. The most frequent bacteria isolated from PB and BM products were Bacillus species. Coagulase-negative staphylococci and Micrococcus species were the most frequent micro-organisms detected in the air microbial control. Microbial control results are necessary for the safety of hematopoietic stem cell products transplantation. Microbial control of hematopoietic stem cell products enables an early contamination detection and allows for knowledgeable decision making concerning either discarding the contaminated product or introducing an efficient antibiotic therapy. Each step of cell processing may cause a bacterial contamination. A minimum of manipulation steps is crucial for increasing the microbial purity of the transplant material. Also, the air contamination control is essential to ensure the highest quality standards of HSC products preparation.

  17. Effect of ionizing radiation on hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells: Role of apoptosis and potential therapeutic significance of anti-apoptotic treatments; Effet des rayonnements ionisants sur les cellules souches et progeniteurs hematopoietiques : place de l'apoptose et interet therapeutique potentiel des traitements antiapoptotiques

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    Drouet, M.; Mourcin, F.; Grenier, N.; Mayol, J.F.; Leroux, V. [Unite de Radiohematologie experimentale, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France); Sotto, J.J. [Inst. Albert Bonniot, La Tronche (France); Herodin, F. [Unite de Radiohematologie experimentale, Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche CEDEX (France)

    2002-07-01

    Bone marrow aplasia observed following ionizing radiation exposure (Total Body Irradiation; gamma dose range: 2-10 Gy) is a result, in particular, of the radiation-induced (RI) apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We have previously shown in a baboon model of mobilized peripheral blood CD34{sup +} cell irradiation in vitro that RI apoptosis in HSPC was an early event, mostly occurring within the first 24 hours, which involves the CD95 Fas pathway. Apoptosis may be significantly reduced with a combination of 4 cytokines (4F): Stem Cell Factor (SCF), FLT-3 Ligand (FL), thrombopoietin (TPO), and interleukin-3 (IL-3), each at 50 ng{center_dot}mL{sup -1} (15% survival versus <3% untreated cells, 24 h post-irradiation at 2.5 Gy). In this study we show that addition of TNF-{alpha}(800 IU/ml) induces an increase in 4F efficacy in terms of cell survival 24 h after incubation (26% survival after 24 h irradiation exposure at 2.5 Gy) and amplification (k) of CD34{sup +} cells after 6 days in a serum free culture medium (SFM) (k{sub CD34{sup +}} = 4.3 and 6.3 respectively for 4F and successive 4F + TNF-{alpha}/4F treatments). In addition, the 4F combination allows culture on pre-established allogenic irradiated stromal cells in vitro at 4 Gy (k{sub CD34{sup +}} = 4.5). Overall this study suggests (i) the potential therapeutic interest for an early administration of anti-apoptotic cytokines with or without hematopoiesis inhibitors (emergency cytokine therapy) and (ii) the feasibility in the accidentally irradiated individual, of autologous cell therapy based on ex vivo expansion in order to perform autograft of residual HSPC collected after the accident. (author)

  18. Comprehensive population-based genome sequencing provides insight into hematopoietic regulatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Michael H.; Nandakumar, Satish K.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Zekavat, Seyedeh M.; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Salem, Rany M.; Chiarle, Roberto; Mitt, Mario; Kals, Mart; Pärn, Kalle; Fischer, Krista; Milani, Lili; Mägi, Reedik; Palta, Priit; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Metspalu, Andres; Lander, Eric S.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Esko, Tõnu; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variants affecting hematopoiesis can influence commonly measured blood cell traits. To identify factors that affect hematopoiesis, we performed association studies for blood cell traits in the population-based Estonian Biobank using high-coverage whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in 2,284 samples and SNP genotyping in an additional 14,904 samples. Using up to 7,134 samples with available phenotype data, our analyses identified 17 associations across 14 blood cell traits. Integration of WGS-based fine-mapping and complementary epigenomic datasets provided evidence for causal mechanisms at several loci, including at a previously undiscovered basophil count-associated locus near the master hematopoietic transcription factor CEBPA. The fine-mapped variant at this basophil count association near CEBPA overlapped an enhancer active in common myeloid progenitors and influenced its activity. In situ perturbation of this enhancer by CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells demonstrated that it is necessary for and specifically regulates CEBPA expression during basophil differentiation. We additionally identified basophil count-associated variation at another more pleiotropic myeloid enhancer near GATA2, highlighting regulatory mechanisms for ordered expression of master hematopoietic regulators during lineage specification. Our study illustrates how population-based genetic studies can provide key insights into poorly understood cell differentiation processes of considerable physiologic relevance. PMID:28031487

  19. Angiopoietin-like 5 and IGFBP2 stimulate ex vivo expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Iizuka, Satoru; Huynh, HoangDinh; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the basis of bone marrow transplantation and are attractive target cells for hematopoietic gene therapy, but these important clinical applications have been severely hampered by difficulties in ex vivo expansion of HSCs. In particular, the use of cord blood for adult transplantation is greatly limited by the number of HSCs. Previously we identified angiopoietin-like proteins and IGF-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) as new hormones that, together with other factors, can expand mouse bone marrow HSCs in culture. Here, we measure the activity of multipotent human severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-repopulating cells (SRCs) by transplantation into the nonobese diabetic SCID (NOD/SCID) mice; secondary transplantation was performed to evaluate the self-renewal potential of SRCs. A serum-free medium containing SCF, TPO, and FGF-1 or Flt3-L cannot significantly support expansion of the SRCs present in human cord blood CD133+ cells. Addition of either angiopoietin-like 5 or IGF-binding protein 2 to the cultures led to a sizable expansion of HSC numbers, as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation. A serum-free culture containing SCF, TPO, FGF-1, angiopoietin-like 5, and IGFBP2 supports an approximately 20-fold net expansion of repopulating human cord blood HSCs, a number potentially applicable to several clinical processes including HSC transplantation.

  20. The Effects of Smoking on Levels of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Microparticles in the Blood of Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarrez, Fariborz; Antoniewicz, Lukasz; Bosson, Jenny A.; Kuhl, Jeanette; Pisetsky, David S.; Lundbäck, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking, both active and passive, is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease. To assess the impact of brief smoking on the vasculature, we determined levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating microparticles (MPs) following the smoking of one cigarette by young, healthy intermittent smokers. Materials and Methods 12 healthy volunteers were randomized to either smoking or not smoking in a crossover fashion. Blood sampling was performed at baseline, 1, 4 and 24 hours following smoking/not smoking. The numbers of EPCs and MPs were determined by flow cytometry. MPs were measured from platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells. Moreover, MPs were also labelled with anti-HMGB1 and SYTO 13 to assess the content of nuclear molecules. Results Active smoking of one cigarette caused an immediate and significant increase in the numbers of circulating EPCs and MPs of platelet-, endothelial- and leukocyte origin. Levels of MPs containing nuclear molecules were increased, of which the majority were positive for CD41 and CD45 (platelet- and leukocyte origin). CD144 (VE-cadherin) or HMGB1 release did not significantly change during active smoking. Conclusion Brief active smoking of one cigarette generated an acute release of EPC and MPs, of which the latter contained nuclear matter. Together, these results demonstrate acute effects of cigarette smoke on endothelial, platelet and leukocyte function as well as injury to the vascular wall. PMID:24587320

  1. The effects of smoking on levels of endothelial progenitor cells and microparticles in the blood of healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Mobarrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking, both active and passive, is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease. To assess the impact of brief smoking on the vasculature, we determined levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and circulating microparticles (MPs following the smoking of one cigarette by young, healthy intermittent smokers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 12 healthy volunteers were randomized to either smoking or not smoking in a crossover fashion. Blood sampling was performed at baseline, 1, 4 and 24 hours following smoking/not smoking. The numbers of EPCs and MPs were determined by flow cytometry. MPs were measured from platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells. Moreover, MPs were also labelled with anti-HMGB1 and SYTO 13 to assess the content of nuclear molecules. RESULTS: Active smoking of one cigarette caused an immediate and significant increase in the numbers of circulating EPCs and MPs of platelet-, endothelial- and leukocyte origin. Levels of MPs containing nuclear molecules were increased, of which the majority were positive for CD41 and CD45 (platelet- and leukocyte origin. CD144 (VE-cadherin or HMGB1 release did not significantly change during active smoking. CONCLUSION: Brief active smoking of one cigarette generated an acute release of EPC and MPs, of which the latter contained nuclear matter. Together, these results demonstrate acute effects of cigarette smoke on endothelial, platelet and leukocyte function as well as injury to the vascular wall.

  2. Neuroprotective Effects of Transplanted Mesenchymal Stromal Cells-derived Human Umbilical Cord Blood Neural Progenitor Cells in EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Rafieemehr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of transplanted human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells (UCB-MSC derived neural progenitor cell (MDNPC in EAE, an experimental model of MS. To initiate neuronal differentiation of UCB-MSCs, the pre-induction medium was removed and replaced with induction media containing retinoic acid, b FGF, h EGF, NGF, IBMX and ascorbic acid for one week. The expression of neural genes was examined in comparison to control group by real-time PCR assay. Then, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE was induced using myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, 35-55 peptides in 24 C57BL/6 mice. After induction, the mice were divided in four groups (n=6 as follows: healthy, PBS, UCB-MSCs and MDNPC, respectively. At the end of the study, disease status in all the groups was analyzed using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining of brain sections. We found that UCB-MSCs exhibit neuronal differentiation potential in vitro and transplanted MDNPC lowered clinical score and reduced CNS leukocyte infiltration compared to untreated mice. Our results showed that MDNPC from UCB may be a proper candidate for regenerative therapy in MS and other neurodegenerative diseases. 

  3. Fetal stromal niches enhance human embryonic stem cell-derived hematopoietic differentiation and globin switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, King Yiu; Fong, Benny Shu Pan; Tsang, Kam Sze; Lau, Tze Kin; Ng, Pak Cheung; Lam, Audrey Carmen; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Wang, Chi Chiu; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Li, Chi Kong; Li, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis during mammalian embryonic development has been perceived as a migratory phenomenon, from the yolk sac blood island to the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, fetal liver (FL), and subsequently, the fetal bone marrow. In this study, we investigated the effects of primary stromal cells from fetal hematopoietic niches and their conditioned media (CM), applied singly or in sequential orders, on induction of human embryonic stem cells, H1, H9, and H14 lines, to hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrated that stromal support of FL, AGM + FL, and AGM + FL + fetal bone marrow significantly increased the proliferation of embryoid bodies (EB) at day 18 of hematopoietic induction in the presence of thrombopoietin, stem cell factor, and Flt-3 ligand. AGM + FL also increased hematopoietic colony-forming unit (CFU) formation. CM did not enhance EB proliferation but CM of FL and AGM + FL significantly increased the density of total CFU and early erythroid (burst-forming unit) progenitors. Increased commitment to the hematopoietic lineage was demonstrated by enhanced expressions of CD45, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-globins in CFU at day 32, compared with EB at day 18. CM of FL significantly increased these globin expressions, indicating enhanced switches from embryonic to fetal and adult erythropoiesis. Over 50% and 10% of cells derived from CFU expressed CD45 and beta-globin proteins, respectively. Expressions of hematopoietic regulatory genes (Bmi-1, β-Catenin, Hox B4, GATA-1) were increased in EB or CFU cultures supported by FL or sequential CM. Our study has provided a strategy for derivation of hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem cells under the influence of primary hematopoietic niches and CM, particularly the FL.

  4. Acute iritis induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor used for mobilization in a volunteer unrelated peripheral blood progenitor cell donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkali, T; Volin, L; Sirén, M K; Ruutu, T

    1996-03-01

    We describe a volunteer unrelated peripheral blood progenitor cell donor with previously diagnosed dermatitis herpetiformis in whom the administration of G-CSF for the mobilization of precursor cells induced acute iritis. G-CSF has been administered to healthy people with minimal side-effects but when used in patients with autoimmune disorders worsening of symptoms or new manifestations may be a potential concern.

  5. Lack of autophagy in the hematopoietic system leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell function and dysregulated myeloid proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Monika; Watson, Alexander Scarth; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2011-09-01

    The regulated lysosomal degradation pathway of autophagy prevents cellular damage and thus protects from malignant transformation. Autophagy is also required for the maturation of various hematopoietic lineages, namely the erythroid and lymphoid ones, yet its role in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remained unexplored. While normal HSCs sustain life-long hematopoiesis, malignant transformation of HSCs or early progenitors leads to leukemia. Mechanisms protecting HSCs from cellular damage are therefore essential to prevent hematopoietic malignancies. By conditionally deleting the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in the hematopoietic system, we found that autophagy is required for the maintenance of true HSCs and therefore also of downstream hematopoietic progenitors. Loss of autophagy in HSCs leads to the expansion of a progenitor cell population in the bone marrow, giving rise to a severe, invasive myeloproliferation, which strongly resembles human acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  6. Activation and crosstalk between TNF family receptors in umbilical cord blood cells is not responsible for loss of engraftment capacity following culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Keren; Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a rich source of hematopoietic progenitors for transplantation. Murine and human progenitors are insensitive to apoptotic signaling mediated by the TNF family receptors, however extension of culture over 48 hours is accompanied by severe deterioration in engraftment and hematopoietic reconstituting capacity. In this study we assessed crosstalk between the Fas, TNF and TRAIL receptors, and questioned whether it contributes to increased mortality and decreased activity of UCB progenitors following extended ex vivo culture for 72 hours. The well-characterized TNF-induced expression of Fas is mediated by both TNF receptors, yet the TNF receptors determine survival rather than Fas: superior viability of TNF-R1 progenitors. Additional cross talk includes upregulation of TRAIL-R1 by Fas-ligand, mediated both by fast cycling and inductive crosstalk. These inductive interactions are not accompanied by concomitant sensitization of progenitors to receptor-mediated apoptosis during extended culture, but rather decreased fractional apoptosis in expanded progenitor subsets expressing the receptors. TRAIL upregulates both TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, accompanied by commensurate susceptibility to spontaneous apoptosis. The current data reveal inductive crosstalk between TNF family receptors, which are largely dissociated from the sensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors to apoptosis. Activation of Fas, TNF and TRAIL receptors and excessive apoptosis are not responsible for loss of engraftment and impaired reconstituting activity of UCB progenitors following extended culture.

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  11. Hematopoietic Processes in Eosinophilic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Brittany M; Sehmi, Roma

    2017-01-24

    Airway eosinophilia is a hallmark of allergic asthma and understanding mechanisms that promote increases in lung eosinophil numbers is important for effective pharmaco-therapeutic development. It has become evident that expansion of hemopoietic compartments in the bone marrow promotes differentiation and trafficking of mature eosinophils to the airways. Hematopoietic progenitor cells egress the bone marrow and home to the lungs, where in-situ differentiative processes within the tissue provide an ongoing source of pro-inflammatory cells. In addition, hematopoietic progenitor cells in the airways can respond to locally-derived alarmins, to produce a panoply of cytokines thereby themselves acting as effector pro-inflammatory cells that potentiate type 2 responses in eosinophilic asthma. In this review, we will provide evidence for these findings and discuss novel targets for modulating eosinophilopoietic processes, migration and effector function of precursor cells.

  12. Human cord blood progenitors with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity improve vascular density in a model of acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creer Michael H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human stem cells from adult sources have been shown to contribute to the regeneration of muscle, liver, heart, and vasculature. The mechanisms by which this is accomplished are, however, still not well understood. We tested the engraftment and regenerative potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived ALDHhiLin-, and ALDHloLin- cells following transplantation to NOD/SCID or NOD/SCID β2m null mice with experimentally induced acute myocardial infarction. We used combined nanoparticle labeling and whole organ fluorescent imaging to detect human cells in multiple organs 48 hours post transplantation. Engraftment and regenerative effects of cell treatment were assessed four weeks post transplantation. We found that ALDHhiLin- stem cells specifically located to the site of injury 48 hours post transplantation and engrafted the infarcted heart at higher frequencies than ALDHloLin- committed progenitor cells four weeks post transplantation. We found no donor derived cardiomyocytes and few endothelial cells of donor origin. Cell treatment was not associated with any detectable functional improvement at the four week endpoint. There was, however, a significant increase in vascular density in the central infarct zone of ALDHhiLin- cell-treated mice, as compared to PBS and ALDHloLin- cell-treated mice. Conclusions Our data indicate that adult human stem cells do not become a significant part of the regenerating tissue, but rapidly home to and persist only temporarily at the site of hypoxic injury to exert trophic effects on tissue repair thereby enhancing vascular recovery.

  13. Biochemical measurements on single erythroid progenitor cells shed light on the combinatorial regulation of red blood cell production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijia; Akbarian, Vahe; Audet, Julie

    2013-02-02

    Adult bone marrow (BM) erythrocyte colony-forming units (CFU-Es) are important cellular targets for the treatment of anemia and also for the manufacture of red blood cells (RBCs) ex vivo. We obtained quantitative biochemical measurements from single and small numbers of CFU-Es by isolating and analyzing c-Kit(+)CD71(high)Ter119(-) cells from adult mouse BM and this allowed us to identify two mechanisms that can be manipulated to increase RBC production. As expected, maximum RBC output was obtained when CFU-Es were stimulated with a combination of Stem Cell Factor (SCF) and Erythropoietin (EPO) mainly because SCF supports a transient CFU-E expansion and EPO promotes the survival and terminal differentiation of erythroid progenitors. However, we found that one of the main factors limiting the output in RBCs was that EPO induces a downregulation of c-Kit expression which limits the transient expansion of CFU-Es. In the presence of SCF, the EPO-mediated downregulation of c-Kit on CFU-Es is delayed but still significant. Moreover, treatment of CFU-Es with 1-Naphthyl PP1 could partially inhibit the downregulation of c-Kit induced by EPO, suggesting that this process is dependent on a Src family kinase, v-Src and/or c-Fyn. We also found that CFU-E survival and proliferation was dependent on the level of time-integrated extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in these cells, all of which could be significantly increased when SCF and EPO were combined with mouse fetal liver-derived factors. Taken together, these results suggest two novel molecular strategies to increase RBC production and regeneration.

  14. Effects of aspirin on number,activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase of endothelial progenitor cells from peripheral blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tu-gang CHEN; Jun-zhu CHEN; Xu-dong XIE

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether aspirin has an influence on endothelial progenitor cells (EPC).Methods:Total mononuclear cells (MNC) were isolated from peripheral blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation,then cells were plated on fibronectin-coated culture dishes.After 7 d of culture,attached cells were stimulated with aspirin (to achieve final concentrations of 1,2,5,and 10 mmol/L) for 3,6,12,and 24 h.EPC were characterized as adherent cells that were double positive for 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine low density lipoprotein (DiLDL) uptake and lectin binding by direct fluorescent staining.EPC proliferation and migration were assayed using a 3- (4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl) -2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and a modified Boyden chamber assay.respectively.An EPC adhesion assay was performed by replating the EPC on fibronectin-coated dishes,and then adherent cells were counted.In vitro vasculogenesis activity was assayed by using an in vitro vasculogenesis kit. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was assayed by Westem blotting.Results:Incubation of isolated human MNC with aspirin decreased the number of EPC.Aspirin also decreased the proliferative,migratory,adhesive,and in vitro Vasculogenesis capacity of EPC,and also their iNOS levels in a concentration-and time-dependent manner.Conclusion:Aspirin decreases (1) the number of EPC; (2) the proliferative,migratory,adhesive and in vitro vasculogenesis capacities of EPC;and (3) iNOS levels in EPC.

  15. Scl binds to primed enhancers in mesoderm to regulate hematopoietic and cardiac fate divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Org, Tõnis; Duan, Dan; Ferrari, Roberto; Montel-Hagen, Amelie; Van Handel, Ben; Kerényi, Marc A; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pellegrini, Matteo; Orkin, Stuart H; Kurdistani, Siavash K; Mikkola, Hanna Ka

    2015-03-12

    Scl/Tal1 confers hemogenic competence and prevents ectopic cardiomyogenesis in embryonic endothelium by unknown mechanisms. We discovered that Scl binds to hematopoietic and cardiac enhancers that become epigenetically primed in multipotent cardiovascular mesoderm, to regulate the divergence of hematopoietic and cardiac lineages. Scl does not act as a pioneer factor but rather exploits a pre-established epigenetic landscape. As the blood lineage emerges, Scl binding and active epigenetic modifications are sustained in hematopoietic enhancers, whereas cardiac enhancers are decommissioned by removal of active epigenetic marks. Our data suggest that, rather than recruiting corepressors to enhancers, Scl prevents ectopic cardiogenesis by occupying enhancers that cardiac factors, such as Gata4 and Hand1, use for gene activation. Although hematopoietic Gata factors bind with Scl to both activated and repressed genes, they are dispensable for cardiac repression, but necessary for activating genes that enable hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development. These results suggest that a unique subset of enhancers in lineage-specific genes that are accessible for regulators of opposing fates during the time of the fate decision provide a platform where the divergence of mutually exclusive fates is orchestrated.

  16. Two new routes to make blood: Hematopoietic specification from pluripotent cell lines versus reprogramming of somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singbrant, Sofie; van Galen, Peter; Lucas, Daniel; Challen, Grant; Rossi, Derrick J; Daley, George Q

    2015-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to treat hematologic disorders is routinely used in the clinic. However, HSC therapy is hindered by the requirements of finding human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched donors and attaining sufficient numbers of long-term HSCs in the graft. Therefore, ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSCs remains one of the "holy grails" of hematology. Without the ability to maintain and expand human HSCs in vitro, two complementary approaches involving cellular reprogramming to generate transplantable HSCs have emerged. Reprogrammed HSCs represent a potentially inexhaustible supply of autologous tissue. On March 18th, 2015, Dr. George Q. Daley and Dr. Derrick J. Rossi, two pioneers in the field, presented and discussed their most recent research on these topics in a webinar organized by the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH). Here, we summarize these seminars and discuss the possibilities and challenges in the field of hematopoietic specification.

  17. Use of thrombopoietin in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, James L; Rondon, Gabriela; Donato, Michele L; Anderlini, Paolo; Korbling, Martin; Ippoliti, Cindy; Benyunes, Mark; Miller, Langdon L; LaTemple, Denise; Jones, Denny; Ashby, Mark; Hellmann, Sue; Durett, April; Lauppe, Jo; Geisler, Deborah; Khouri, Issa F; Giralt, Sergio A; Andersson, Borje; Ueno, Naoto T; Champlin, Richard

    2002-01-01

    This phase I/II dose-escalation study examined the safety and efficacy of recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for postchemotherapy mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) in patients with advanced breast cancer. Patients received cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin (CVP) followed by G-CSF (6 microg/kg twice a day) and rhTPO (0.6, 1.2, 2.4, or 3.6 microg/kg as a single dose on day 5 or as 3 doses on days 5, 7, and 9 after chemotherapy). PBPCs were collected by daily leukapheresis when the postnadir white blood cell count reached > or = 2 x 10(9)/L; leukapheresis was continued until acquisition of a target dose of > or = 5 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Mobilized PBPCs were transplanted into patients after additional high-dose chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and thiotepa (CBT). Comparisons were made with contemporaneously treated, nonrandomized, control patients who received the same chemotherapy regimens and G-CSF support but who did not receive rhTPO. Of 32 evaluable patients receiving rhTPO and G-CSF after CVP, 91% required only 1 leukapheresis to achieve a target PBPC graft; by contrast, only 69% of 36 of the control patients achieved the target graft with just 1 leukapheresis (P = .026). A median of 26.7 x 10(6) CD34 cells/kg per leukapheresis was obtained from the rhTPO-treated patients compared with 11.5 x 10(6) cells/kg per leukapheresis from the controls (P = .09). Higher rhTPO doses appeared to yield more CD34+ cells. When PBPCs were infused after high-dose CBT chemotherapy, the median times to return of an absolute neutrophil count of 0.5 x 10(9)/L and a platelet count of 20 x 10(9)/L were 15 and 16 days, respectively; these values did not differ from those in the control group (15 days for both neutrophil and platelets). No patient developed anti-TPO antibodies. These results indicate that rhTPO safely and effectively augments the number of PBPCs mobilized with

  18. High Incidence of Afebrile Bloodstream Infection Detected by Surveillance Blood Culture in Patients on Corticosteroid Therapy after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Kazuaki; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Akahoshi, Yu; Nakano, Hirofumi; Harada, Naonori; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Nakasone, Hideki; Kikuchi, Misato; Yamazaki, Rie; Kanda, Junya; Kako, Shinichi; Tanihara, Aki; Nishida, Junji; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-02-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSI) are still important complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Patients who are receiving corticosteroid therapy can develop BSI without fever. The utility of surveillance blood cultures in these situations is controversial. We retrospectively analyzed 74 patients who received a corticosteroid consisting of ≥.5 mg/kg prednisolone or equivalent after allo-SCT. In principle, we performed surveillance blood culture weekly for these patients. Sixteen patients (21.6%) developed definite BSI. In a multivariate analysis, a myeloablative conditioning regimen, high-risk disease status at allo-SCT, and the presence of a central venous catheter at the initiation of corticosteroid therapy were identified as independent significant risk factors for the development of definite BSI. At the first definite BSI episode, 7 patients (46.7%) were afebrile and diagnosed by surveillance blood culture. However, 6 of these 7 afebrile patients showed various signs that could be attributed to infection at the time of positive blood culture. In conclusion, patients receiving corticosteroid therapy after allo-SCT frequently develop afebrile BSI. Although surveillance blood culture might be beneficial in these situations, it also seems important to not miss the signs of BSI, even when patients are afebrile.

  19. Hematopoietic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011370 The efficacy and safety of second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for post-transplant hematologic malignancies relapse. CHEN Yuhong(陳育紅),et al.Instit Hematol,People’s Hosp,Peking Univ,Beijing 100044. Abstract:Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the relapsed hematologic malignancies.Methods The data of 25 relapsed patients received the second allogeneic transplantation as a salvage therapy

  20. Effect of human cytomegalovirus on proliferation of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors and intervention study in vitro%人巨细胞病毒对脐血多向祖细胞体外生长的影响及干预研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹平; 刘斌; 刘文君; 郭渠莲; 胡晓

    2005-01-01

    [Objective] To investigate the effect of human cytomegalovims(HCMV) on proliferation of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors (CFU-Mix) with the presence of membranous milkvetch root (MMR) in vitro.[Methods] Colony forming unit-assay was applied to observe the effect of HCMV-AD169 strain on CFU-Mix of cord blood(CB). The techniques of PCR and fluorescence quantification PCR were used to demonstrate the existence of HCMV-DNA in the cells of cultured CFU-Mix. The suppression effect of HCMV on CFU-Mix was intervened in by adding MMR in 10-1HCMV group. [Results] The numbers of GFU-Mix colonies in HCMV-infected groups decreased significantly compared with that of control groups, and showed a decrease tendency with the increase of HCMV consentration. The suppression effect showed a dose-dependent fashion: The higher the HCMV consentration was, the more the colonies decreased. The peak of CFU-Mix (d10~12) was not significantly different between control groups and infection groups, but the duration of CFU-Mix in infected groups was significantly shorter than that in control groups. The numbers of GFU-Mix colonies increased significantly in 10-1 HCMV group with the presence of MMR. (4) HGMV-DNA was positively detected in the colony cells of virally infected groups by PGR, while negative in the control groups. HGMV-AD169 DNA copies decreased obviously by fluorescence quantification PGR in 10-1HCMV group with the presence of MMR. [Conclusions] HCMV-AD169 strain inhibites the differentiation and proliferation of multipotential hematopoietie progenitors. HCMV may cause the suppression of hematopoiesis by direct infection of hematopoietic progenitors, which may be the main reason of HCMV infection associating with anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The growth of multipotential hematopoietie progenitors after HCMV-AD169infection is promoted by MMR, which suggests that MMR has an effect of anti-HCMV in vitro.%目的探讨人巨细胞病毒(HCMV)对脐血多向造血

  1. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Magnusson

    Full Text Available Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+ characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  2. Mechanical unloading of bone in microgravity reduces mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Blaber

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical loading of mammalian tissues is a potent promoter of tissue growth and regeneration, whilst unloading in microgravity can cause reduced tissue regeneration, possibly through effects on stem cell tissue progenitors. To test the specific hypothesis that mechanical unloading alters differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell lineages, we studied cellular and molecular aspects of how bone marrow in the mouse proximal femur responds to unloading in microgravity. Trabecular and cortical endosteal bone surfaces in the femoral head underwent significant bone resorption in microgravity, enlarging the marrow cavity. Cells isolated from the femoral head marrow compartment showed significant down-regulation of gene expression markers for early mesenchymal and hematopoietic differentiation, including FUT1(−6.72, CSF2(−3.30, CD90(−3.33, PTPRC(−2.79, and GDF15(−2.45, but not stem cell markers, such as SOX2. At the cellular level, in situ histological analysis revealed decreased megakaryocyte numbers whilst erythrocytes were increased 2.33 fold. Furthermore, erythrocytes displayed elevated fucosylation and clustering adjacent to sinuses forming the marrow–blood barrier, possibly providing a mechanistic basis for explaining spaceflight anemia. Culture of isolated bone marrow cells immediately after microgravity exposure increased the marrow progenitor's potential for mesenchymal differentiation into in-vitro mineralized bone nodules, and hematopoietic differentiation into osteoclasts, suggesting an accumulation of undifferentiated progenitors during exposure to microgravity. These results support the idea that mechanical unloading of mammalian tissues in microgravity is a strong inhibitor of tissue growth and regeneration mechanisms, acting at the level of early mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

  3. Effect of matrix composition on differentiation of nestin-positive neural progenitors from circulation into neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Anumol; Krishnan, Lissy K.

    2010-06-01

    The human peripheral blood mononuclear cell has a mixture of progenitor cells with potential to differentiate into a wide range of lineages. The ability of hematopoietic tissue-derived adult stem cells to differentiate into neural progenitor cells offers an alternative to embryonic stem cells as a viable source for cell transplantation therapies to cure neurodegenerative diseases. This approach could lead to the use of autologous progenitors from blood circulation; however, due to the limited numbers available, in vitro cell expansion may be indispensable. In addition, for successful transplantation there is the requirement of a delivery matrix on which cells can survive and differentiate. In this context we carried out this study to identify a suitable biodegradable matrix on which progenitor cells can home, multiply and differentiate. We designed different compositions of the biomimetic matrix containing fibrin, fibronectin, gelatin, growth factors, laminin and hyaluronic acid. The attached cells expressed proliferation markers in initial periods of culture and between days 6 and 9 in culture they differentiated into neurons and/or astrocytes. The differentiation of progenitors into neurons and asterocyte on the composed matrix was established by morphological and immunochemical analysis. Flow cytometric analysis of cells in culture was employed to track development of neurons which expressed an early marker β-tubulin3 and a terminal marker microtubule-associated protein-2 at a later culture period. In vitro experiments indicate that a highly specific niche consisting of various components of the extracellular matrix, including hyaluronic acid, promote cell homing, survival and differentiation.

  4. Grain and bean lysates improve function of endothelial progenitor cells from human peripheral blood: involvement of the endogenous antioxidant defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lucchesi

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress contributes to the functional impairment of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, the pivotal players in the servicing of the endothelial cell lining. Several evidences suggest that decreasing oxidative stress by natural compounds with antioxidant properties may improve EPCs bioactivity. Here, we investigated the effects of Lisosan G (LG, a Triticum Sativum grain powder, and Lady Joy (LJ, a bean lysate, on function of EPCs exposed to oxidative stress. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and plated on fibronectin-coated culture dishes; adherent cells, identified as early EPCs, were pre-treated with different concentrations of LG and LJ and incubated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Viability, senescence, adhesion, ROS production and antioxidant enzymes gene expression were evaluated. Lysate-mediated Nrf-2 (nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2/ARE (antioxidant response element activation, a modulator of oxidative stress, was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Lady Joy 0.35-0.7 mg/ml increases EPCs viability; pre-treatment with either LG 0.7 mg/ml and LJ 0.35-0.7 mg/ml protect EPCs viability against H2O2-induced injury. LG 0.7 and LJ 0.35-0.7 mg/ml improve EPCs adhesion; pre-treatment with either LG 0.35 and 0.7 mg/ml or LJ 0.35, 0.7 and 1.4 mg/ml preserve adhesiveness of EPCs exposed to H2O2. Senescence is attenuated in EPCs incubated with lysates 0.35 mg/ml. After exposure to H2O2, LG pre-treated cells show a lower senescence than untreated EPCs. Lysates significantly decrease H2O2-induced ROS generation. Both lysates increase glutathione peroxidase-1 and superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2 expression; upon H2O2 exposure, pre-treatment with LJ allows higher SOD-2 expression. Heme oxigenase-1 increases in EPCs pre-treated with LG even upon H2O2 exposure. Finally, incubation with LG 0.7 mg/ml results in Nrf-2 translocation into the nucleus both at baseline and after the oxidative challenge. Our data suggest a

  5. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long...

  6. Patterns of recovery phase infection after autologous blood progenitor cell transplantation in patients with malignancies. The Gruppo Italiano di Studio per la Manipolazione Cellulare in Ematologia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, D; Iacone, A; Pierelli, L; Bonfini, T

    1995-06-01

    Recovery phase infection patterns in 55 patients who had undergone autologous blood progenitor cell transplantation (ABPCT) were evaluated retrospectively. The results were compared to those obtained in a group of 41 patients who received autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Fever related to documented or suspected infection developed in 38 of 55 patients in the ABPCT group and in 37 of 41 in the ABMT group (p 0.05). However, fewer acquired systemic fungal infections (1/55 vs. 5/41, p < 0.05) as well as fewer days of antibiotic usage were observed in the ABPCT group.

  7. Common molecular pathways involved in human CD133+/CD34+ progenitor cell expansion and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vêncio Ricardo Z

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the molecular mechanism underlying expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is critical to extend current therapeutic applications and to understand how its deregulation relates to leukemia. The characterization of genes commonly relevant to stem/progenitor cell expansion and tumor development should facilitate the identification of novel therapeutic targets in cancer. Methods CD34+/CD133+ progenitor cells were purified from human umbilical cord blood and expanded in vitro. Correlated molecular changes were analyzed by gene expression profiling using microarrays covering up to 55,000 transcripts. Genes regulated during progenitor cell expansion were identified and functionally classified. Aberrant expression of such genes in cancer was indicated by in silico SAGE. Differential expression of selected genes was assessed by real-time PCR in hematopoietic cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients and healthy individuals. Results Several genes and signaling pathways not previously associated with ex vivo expansion of CD133+/CD34+ cells were identified, most of which associated with cancer. Regulation of MEK/ERK and Hedgehog signaling genes in addition to numerous proto-oncogenes was detected during conditions of enhanced progenitor cell expansion. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed down-regulation of several newly described cancer-associated genes in CD133+/CD34+ cells, including DOCK4 and SPARCL1 tumor suppressors, and parallel results were verified when comparing their expression in cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients Conclusion Our findings reveal potential molecular targets for oncogenic transformation in CD133+/CD34+ cells and strengthen the link between deregulation of stem/progenitor cell expansion and the malignant process.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation activity worldwide in 2012 and a SWOT analysis of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Group including the global survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwieser, D; Baldomero, H; Szer, J; Gratwohl, M; Aljurf, M; Atsuta, Y; Bouzas, L F; Confer, D; Greinix, H; Horowitz, M; Iida, M; Lipton, J; Mohty, M; Novitzky, N; Nunez, J; Passweg, J; Pasquini, M C; Kodera, Y; Apperley, J; Seber, A; Gratwohl, A

    2016-06-01

    Data on 68 146 hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) (53% autologous and 47% allogeneic) gathered by 1566 teams from 77 countries and reported through their regional transplant organizations were analyzed by main indication, donor type and stem cell source for the year 2012. With transplant rates ranging from 0.1 to 1001 per 10 million inhabitants, more HSCTs were registered from unrelated 16 433 donors than related 15 493 donors. Grafts were collected from peripheral blood (66%), bone marrow (24%; mainly non-malignant disorders) and cord blood (10%). Compared with 2006, an increase of 46% total (57% allogeneic and 38% autologous) was observed. Growth was due to an increase in reporting teams (18%) and median transplant activity/team (from 38 to 48 HSCTs/team). An increase of 167% was noted in mismatched/haploidentical family HSCT. A Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT) analysis revealed the global perspective of WBMT to be its major strength and identified potential to be the key professional body for patients and authorities. The limited data collection remains its major weakness and threat. In conclusion, global HSCT grows over the years without plateauing (allogeneic>autologous) and at different rates in the four World Health Organization regions. Major increases were observed in allogeneic, haploidentical HSCT and, to a lesser extent, in cord blood transplantation.

  9. Effects of Serum from Aplastic Anemia patients on the Expression of Cyclin D3 Isoform in Umbilical Cord Blood CD34+ Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡凯; 谭细友; 刘文励; 孙汉英; 周剑锋; 李春蕊; 刘丹; 何莉; 孙岚

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The pathogenesis of aplastic anemia (AA) was explored and the effects of AA serum on the expression of crucial cyclin D isoform (cyclin D3) in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were observed. The CD34+ cells were isolated from the cord blood with MIDIMACS Semi-solid methylcellulose culture technique was used to measure the formation of CFUGM;The expression level of cyclin D3 was assayed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western-blot after the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were incubated in AA serum. The results showed that the AA serum could inhibit the formation of CFU-GM and down regulate the expression level of the cyclin D3 at the mRNA and protein level respectively. In conclusion, the AA serum could inhibit the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells and down regulate level of cyclin D3, which might be one mechanism of hematopoiesis inhibition in AA.

  10. Embryonic vasculogenesis and hematopoietic specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasculogenesis is the process by which blood vessels are formed de novo. In mammals, vasculogenesis occurs in parallel with hematopoiesis, the formation of blood cells. Thus, it is debated whether vascular endothelial cells and blood cells are derived from a common progenitor. Whether or not this is...

  11. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem....../progenitor cells (HSPCs, Lin(neg)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) or myeloid committed precursors (Lin(neg)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5,000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical...

  12. TGF-β inhibitors stimulate red blood cell production by enhancing self-renewal of BFU-E erythroid progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaofei; Lee, Hsiang-Ying; da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Zhang, Cheng; Lu, Yi-Fen; Li, Dandan; Feng, Yuxiong; Ezike, Jideofor; Elmes, Russell R; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Cahan, Patrick; Li, Hu; Daley, George Q; Lodish, Harvey F

    2016-12-08

    Burst-forming unit erythroid progenitors (BFU-Es) are so named based on their ability to generate in methylcellulose culture large colonies of erythroid cells that consist of "bursts" of smaller erythroid colonies derived from the later colony-forming unit erythroid progenitor erythropoietin (Epo)-dependent progenitors. "Early" BFU-E cells forming large BFU-E colonies presumably have higher capacities for self-renewal than do "late" BFU-Es forming small colonies, but the mechanism underlying this heterogeneity remains unknown. We show that the type III transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor (TβRIII) is a marker that distinguishes early and late BFU-Es. Transient elevation of TβRIII expression promotes TGF-β signaling during the early BFU-E to late BFU-E transition. Blocking TGF-β signaling using a receptor kinase inhibitor increases early BFU-E cell self-renewal and total erythroblast production, suggesting the usefulness of this type of drug in treating Epo-unresponsive anemias.

  13. Value of surveillance blood culture for early diagnosis of occult bacteremia in patients on corticosteroid therapy following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizuka, A; Kami, M; Kanda, Y; Murashige, N; Kishi, Y; Hamaki, T; Kim, S-W; Hori, A; Kojima, R; Mori, S-I; Tanosaki, R; Gomi, H; Takaue, Y

    2005-03-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a significant complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Corticosteroids mask inflammatory responses, delaying the initiation of antibiotics. We reviewed medical records of 69 allo-SCT patients who had been on >0.5 mg/kg prednisolone to investigate the efficacy of weekly surveillance blood cultures. A total of 36 patients (52%) had positive cultures, 25 definitive BSI and 11 probable BSI. Pathogens in definitive BSI were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=7), S. aureus (n=4), Entrococcus faecalis (n=3), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=5), Acenitobacter lwoffii (n=4), and others (n=10). The median interval from the initiation of corticosteroids to the first positive cultures was 24 days (range, 1-70). At the first positive cultures, 15 patients with definitive BSI were afebrile. Four of them remained afebrile throughout the period of positive surveillance cultures. Patients with afebrile BSI tended to be older (P=0.063), and had in-dwelling central venous catheters less frequently than febrile patients (P<0.0001). Bloodstream pathogens were directly responsible for death in two patients with afebrile BSI. This study demonstrates that cortisosteroid frequently masks inflammatory reactions in allo-SCT recipients given conrticosteroids, and that surveillance blood culture is only diagnostic clue for 'occult' BSI.

  14. Oncostatin M maintains the hematopoietic microenvironment in the bone marrow by modulating adipogenesis and osteogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumi Sato

    Full Text Available The bone marrow (BM is an essential organ for hematopoiesis in adult, in which proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC is orchestrated by various stromal cells. Alterations of BM hematopoietic environment lead to various hematopoietic disorders as exemplified by the linking of fatty marrow with increased adipogenesis to anemia or pancytopenia. Therefore, the composition of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC-derived cells in the BM could be crucial for proper hematopoiesis, but the mechanisms underlying the MSC differentiation for hematopoiesis remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that Oncostatin M (OSM knock out mice exhibited pancytopenia advancing fatty marrow with age. OSM strongly inhibited adipogenesis from BM MSC in vitro, whereas it enhanced their osteogenesis but suppressed the terminal differentiation. Intriguingly, OSM allowed the MSC-derived cells to support the ex vivo expansion of HSPC effectively as feeder cells. Furthermore, the administration of OSM in lethally irradiated wild-type mice blocked fatty marrow and enhanced the recovery of HSPC number in the BM and peripheral blood cells after engraftment of HSPC. Collectively, OSM plays multiple critical roles in the maintenance and development of the hematopoietic microenvironment in the BM at a steady state as well as after injury.

  15. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in murine hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, J W; MacGregor, G R; Wager-Smith, K; Fletcher, F A; Moore, K A; Hawkins, D; Villalon, D; Chang, S M; Caskey, C T

    1988-01-01

    Multiple replication-defective retrovirus vectors were tested for their ability to transfer and express human adenosine deaminase in vitro and in vivo in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model. High-titer virus production was obtained from vectors by using both a retrovirus long terminal repeat promoter and internal transcriptional units with human c-fos and herpes virus thymidine kinase promoters. After infection of primary murine bone marrow with one of these vectors, human adenosine deaminase was detected in 60 to 85% of spleen colony-forming units and in the blood of 14 of 14 syngeneic marrow transplant recipients. This system offers the opportunity to assess methods for increasing efficiency of gene transfer, for regulation of expression of foreign genes in hematopoietic progenitors, and for long-term measurement of the stability of expression in these cells. Images PMID:3072474

  16. Ongoing graft-versus-host disease is a risk factor for azoospermia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a survey of the Late Effects Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovó, Alicia; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Chiodi, Sandra; Spinelli, Simonetta; Salooja, Nina; Sucak, Gülsan; Hunter, Ann; Kim, Tan Swee; Socié, Gérard; van Lint, Maria Teresa; Passweg, Jakob R; Arat, Mutlu; Badoglio, Manuela; Tichelli, André

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the degree of spermatogenesis defects in sperm analysis in long-term male survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in order to identify the risk factors related to potential infertility after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and to provide data on longitudinal sperm recovery after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here, the Late Effects Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation reports data of sperm analysis from 224 males who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Median time between transplantation and sperm analysis was 63 months (8-275 months). At last sperm analysis, presence of any degree of spermatozoa was reported in 70 (31%) and complete azoospermia in 154 (69%) patients. In multivariate analysis, being conditioned with total body irradiation (RR 7.1; 95% CI: 3.4-14.8) and age over 25 years at transplantation (RR 2.4; 95% CI: 1.09-5.2) were significantly associated with higher risk for azoospermia. In patients not conditioned with total body irradiation, ongoing chronic graft-versus-host disease is the main adverse factor for sperm recovery (RR of 3.11; 95% CI: 1.02-9.47; P=0.045). Already established risk factors, such as total body irradiation and age older than 25 years at hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, were seen to be the most relevant adverse risk factor for sperm production after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Furthermore, for the first time, ongoing graft-versus-host disease has been shown to be the most relevant adverse factor for sperm recovery, particularly in patients conditioned without total body irradiation. We also introduce a useful scoring system to predict the probability of male long-term survivors' azoospermia.

  17. Procedure for action in the donation of umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera Gómez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are candidates for donation and transplantation in certain diseases, such as treatment of choice. Stem cells from umbilical cord blood are of particular interest as a gift, for many reasons. It should be noted that the umbilical cord blood is a single, limited source of hematopoietic progenitor cells, and the eventual success of a transplant, cellular viability and retained sample are critical, so the extraction process transport and cryopreservation must be performed under strict quality control criteria. Objective: To describe the procedure extacción umbilical cord blood to be carried out in units of delivery, to ensure quality results.

  18. Targeted expansion and regulation of genetically modified cord blood stem/progenitor cells in vitro%靶基因调控的脐血干/祖细胞体外长期扩增与调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵声明; 彭明婷; 顾惜春; 常乃柏

    2008-01-01

    cause dimerization of JAK2 so as to activate signal conduction in cells. In addition, the vector included green fluorescence protein reporter gene, which was regarded as a label to detect proliferation. MiniMACS magnetic separation apparatus was used to purify and separate cord blood CD34+ cells. While, retrovirus supernatant including JAK2 was used to transfer cord blood CD34+ cells. After transduction, CD34+ cells were cultured with stem cell factor (SCF), Flt3 ligand, TPO and IL-6 and divided into control group (not adding AP20187) and experimental group (AP20187).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Flow cytometer was used to detect percentage of green fluorescence protein reporter gene in the CD34+ cells and to determine gene transferring rate. ② Colony culture results of cord blood stem/progenitor cells after amplification. ③ Nude mice were given subcutaneous injection of ten-week cultured cord blood CD34+ cells at costa and neoplasia was observed after 30 days. RESULTS: ① Plentiful amplification of CD34+ cells was observed in both experimental group and control group. With the culture time passing by, positive rate of gel-filtered platelet of amplified CD34+ cells in the experimental group was gradually increased based on the basic level and more than 95% in the 11th week; however, positive rate of green fluorescence protein reporter gene in the control group was gradually decreased below the basic level and disappeared finally. ② Transgenic CD34+ cells in the experimental group still could generate brust forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E), colony-forming units granulocute/monocyte (CFU-GM) and multipotential hematopoietic progenitors (CFU-Mix); especially, CFU-GM was the main cell in hemopoietic progenitor cell (HPC). ③ Nude mice did not have neoplasia. CONCLUSION: Human cord blood CD34+ cells of transferring JAK2 genes may cooperate with other cytokines to amplify cord blood stem/progenitor cells in vitro for long. Therefore, this is potentially valuable for stem

  19. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  20. Success of an International Learning Health Care System in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Clinical Case Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Pere; Burns, Linda J; Litzow, Mark R; Juckett, Mark B; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lee, Stephanie J; Devlin, Sean M; Costa, Luciano J; Khan, Shakila; King, Andrea; Klein, Andreas; Krishnan, Amrita; Malone, Adriana; Mir, Muhammad A; Moravec, Carina; Selby, George; Roy, Vivek; Cochran, Melissa; Stricherz, Melisa K; Westmoreland, Michael D; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Wood, William A

    2016-03-01

    The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) Clinical Case Forum (CCF) was launched in 2014 as an online secure tool to enhance interaction and communication among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) professionals worldwide through the discussion of challenging clinical care issues. After 14 months, we reviewed clinical and demographical data of cases posted in the CCF from January 29, 2014 to March 18, 2015. A total of 137 cases were posted during the study period. Ninety-two cases (67%) were allogeneic HCT, 29 (21%) were autologous HCT, and in 16 (12%), the type of transplantation (autologous versus allogeneic) was still under consideration. The diseases most frequently discussed included non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; n = 30, 22%), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 23, 17%), and multiple myeloma (MM; n = 20, 15%). When compared with the US transplantation activity reported by the US Department of Health and Human Services, NHL and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases were over-represented in the CCF, whereas MM was under-represented (P < .001). A total of 259 topics were addressed in the CCF with a median of 2 topics/case (range, 1 to 6). Particularly common topics included whether transplantation was indicated (n = 57, 41%), conditioning regimen choice (n = 44, 32%), and post-HCT complications after day 100 (n = 43, 31%). The ASBMT CCF is a successful tool for collaborative discussion of complex cases in the HCT community worldwide and may allow identification of areas of controversy or unmet need from clinical, educational and research perspectives.

  1. Monitoring of hematopoietic chimerism after transplantation for pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome: real-time or conventional short tandem repeat PCR in peripheral blood or bone marrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willasch, Andre M; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Shayegi, Nona; Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Zabel, Marion; Lang, Peter; Kremens, Bernhard; Meisel, Roland; Strahm, Brigitte; Rossig, Claudia; Gruhn, Bernd; Klingebiel, Thomas; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Bader, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been proposed as a highly sensitive method for monitoring hematopoietic chimerism and may serve as a surrogate marker for the detection of minimal residual disease minimal residual disease in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), until specific methods of detection become available. Because a systematic comparison of the clinical utility of qPCR with the gold standard short tandem repeat (STR)-PCR has not been reported, we retrospectively measured chimerism by qPCR in 54 children transplanted for MDS in a previous study. Results obtained by STR-PCR in the initial study served as comparison. Because the detection limit of qPCR was sufficiently low to detect an autologous background, we defined the sample as mixed chimera if the proportion of recipient-derived cells exceeded .5%. The true positive rates were 100% versus 80% (qPCR versus STR-PCR, not significant), and mixed chimerism in most cases was detected earlier by qPCR than by STR-PCR (median, 31 days) when chimerism was quantified concurrently in peripheral blood and bone marrow. Both methods revealed a substantial rate of false positives (22.7% versus 13.6%, not significant), indicating the importance of serial testing of chimerism to monitor its progression. Finally, we propose criteria for monitoring chimerism in pediatric MDS with regard to the subtypes, specimens, PCR method, and timing of sampling.

  2. [Prophylactic effect of CsA, MTX, MMF combined with ATG on GVHD in patients underwent unrelated peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Gao, Chun-Ji; Da, Wan-Ming; Yu, Li; Wu, Xiao-Xiong; Li, Hong-Hua; Ma, Jian; Cao, Yong-Bin

    2010-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the prophylactic effect of CsA, MTX and MMF combined with ATG on graft versus host disease (GVHD) after unrelated donor peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (URD-PBHSCT). 33 patients underwent URD-PBHSCT with unrelated donor of HLA matched or 1 locus mismatched. The clinical data of all cases were retrospectively analyzed. URD-PBHSCT recipients received cyclosporin A+short term MTX+mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)+antithymocyte globulin to prevent GVHD (URD-ATG group), while 13 out of 33 patients were given additionally anti-CD25 antibody (URD-ATG+CD25 group). The results showed that engraftment was successfully achieved in 100% of all patients. In URD-ATG+CD25 group and URD-ATG group, the incidence of aGVHD were 23.07% and 45%, the incidence of cGVHD were 0 and 47.4% respectively. The latter was significantly higher than the former (pMMF+ATG as the prophylaxis of GVHD for UDR-PBSCT is effective. Reducing the dose of ATG may be good for patient in progression status.

  3. Hemopoietic progenitor cell identification in fetal and adult blood Célula progenitora hamatopoética - identificação em sangue fetal e de adulto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixa Müller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemopoietic progenitor cells give rise to all cellular elements of the blood and are of importance as a potential source of cells used for correction of various pathological conditions. The main objective of this study was to identify and quantitative hemopoietic progenitor cell in antenatal fetal blood, in cord blood at the time of delivery and in adult blood, using monoclonal antibodies to surface markers and flow cytometry. CD34+ cells, most of them probably representing progenitor cells, were detected in prenatal fetal blood as early as the 17th week of gestation. The proportion of these cells showed a tendency to decrease as the pregnancy progressed. Within the population of CD34+ cells, a relatively low proportion (less than 1% were negative for the surface marker CD33 or HLA-Dr, indicating a population of primitive stem cells, i.e., progenitor cells no committed to a specific lineage. On the contrary, another group coexpressed CD33 or HLA-Dr, being more mature progenitor cells already committed to differentiate along a specific lineage. The percentage of CD34+ obtained in blood of adult patients after mobilization with chemotherapeutic agents and growth factors showed an average value of 2.7± 3.1%. The percentage of CD34+ in the apheresis products of various patients varied from 0.58 to 1.48. In some cases the cells were reinfused in the patient with good results. Our findings are in agreement with previous studies suggesting that CD34+ stem cells is a heterogeneous population, with each subset having variable degree o commitment to differentiate toward a specific cell lineage.As células progenitoras hematopoéticas são as responsáveis pela produção de todos os elementos do sangue e são as potenciais fontes de células usadas para o tratamento de várias condições patológicas. O principal objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar e quantificar as células progenitoras hematopoiéticas no sangue fetal do período pré-natal, no

  4. 辐射损伤导致造血干/祖细胞衰老的机理研究%Mechanism of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell aging induced by radiation damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琛; 孙可; 耿珊; 刘典锋; 张先平; 刘俊; 徐春燕; 王建伟; 王亚平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanism underlying the aging of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/ HPC) induced by radiation stress. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were divided randomly into radiation group and control group. The radiation group were treated with total 6.5 Gy X-ray radiation for 24 h; the control group received the same treatment except radiation. Thereafter, Sca-1+ HSC/HPC were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) from bone marrow of all the mice. The distributions of cell cycle were tested by flow cytometry. The percentage of aging cells was detected by SA-β-Gal staining. The potentials of self-renewal and multi-differentiation were measured by CFU-Mix assay. DNA damages of Sca-1+ HSC/HPC were analyzed by single cell gel electrophoresis technique (SCGE). The expressions of senescence-associated genes pl6INK4a, pl9Arf, p53, p2Cip1/Waf1 mRNA were detected by RT-PCR. Western blotting was performed to analyze the expressions of p16INK4a and p21Cip1/Waf1 proteins. Results The purity of Sca-1+ HSC/HPC reached 94% after MACS. Compared with control group cells, after radiation, the number of Sca-1+ HSC/HPC per femur and CFU-Mix sharply decreased (P<0.05), Sca-1+ HSC/HPC apparently showed G1 arrest and elevated percentage of SA-β-Gal positive cells (P<0.05), cell trailing had a prolonged time, and the expressions of senescence-associated genes (p16INK4a, p19Art, p53, p21Cip1/Waf1) and relevant proteins (p16INK4a, p21Cip1/Waf1) were up-regulated significantly (P<0.05). Conclusion DNA damage and senescence-associated biological changes of Sca-1+ HSC/HPC can be achieved by X-ray radiation, which may be involved in p16INK4a-Rb and p19Arf-p53-p21Cip1/Waf1 signal pathways.%目的 探讨辐射损伤导致骨髓造血干/祖细胞(HSC/HPC)衰老的可能机制.方法 雄性C57BL/6J小鼠随机分为辐照组和假辐照组,辐照组小鼠经6.5 Gy的X射线全身一次性辐照,假辐照组小鼠处理同辐照组,但不辐照.辐照后24 h免疫

  5. Decrease in immune activation in HIV-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy correlates with the function of hematopoietic progenitor cells and the number of naive CD4+ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Ersbøll, A K;

    2000-01-01

    determined. During the study period, the naive CD4+ count and the cloning efficiency increased significantly. Immune activation was found in HIV-infected patients and decreased during HAART. The level of immune activation correlated negatively with both the naive CD4+ count and the function of progenitor...... cells. A negative correlation was found between apoptosis and the naive CD4+ count. Alterations in cytokine production during HAART or correlation between cytokine production and the naive CD4+ count or the cloning efficiency of progenitor cells were not detected. In conclusion, immune activation in HIV...

  6. Hematopoietic reconstitution on the prognosis of hematological malignancies after allogenceic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the impact of the time to hematopoietic reconstitution on the prognosis of hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT) . Methods 173 patients with hematological malignancies treated with allo-HSCT (excluding umbilical cord blood transplantation)

  7. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Giralt; L. Garderet (Laurent); B.G.M. Durie (Brian); G. Cook (Gordon); G. Gahrton (Gösta); B. Bruno (Benedetto); P. Hari (Paremesweran); H.M. Lokhorst (Henk); P.L. McCarthy (Philip); A. Krishnan (Amrita); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); H. Goldschmidt (Harmut); S. Jagannath (Sundar); B. Barlogie (Bart); M.V. Mateos; P. Gimsing (Peter); O. Sezer; J. Mikhael (Joseph); J. Lu (Jin); M.A. Dimopoulos (Meletios); R.N. Mazumder (Ramendra N.); A. Palumbo (Antonio); R. Abonour (Rafat); K. Anderson (Kenneth); M. Attal (Michel); J. Blade; J. Bird (Jenny); M. Cavo (Michele); R.L. Comenzo; J. de la Rubia (Javier); H. Einsele (Hermann); R. Garcia-Sanz (Ramon); J. Hillengass (Jens); S. Holstein (Sarah); H.E. Johnsen (Hans); D. Joshua; G. Koehne (Guenther); S. Kumar (Shaji); R. Kyle (Robert); X. Leleu; S. Lonial (Sagar); H. Ludwig (Heinz); H. Nahi (Hareth); A. Nooka (Anil); R.Z. Orlowski (Robert); S.V. Rajkumar (Vincent); A. Reiman (Anthony); P.G. Richardson (Paul Gerard); E. Riva (Eloisa); J. San Miguel (Jesús); I. Turreson (Ingemar); S. Usmani (Saad); D. Vesole (David); W. Bensinger; M. Qazilbash (Muzaffer); Y. Efebera (Yvonne); M. Mohty (Mohamad); C. Gasparreto (Christina); J. Gajewski (James); C.F. LeMaistre (Charles F.); C. Bredeson (Chris); P. Moreau; M. Pasquini (Marcelo); N. Kroeger (Nicolaus); E.A. Stadtmauer (Edward)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn contrast to the upfront setting in which the role of high-dose therapy with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as consolidation of a first remission in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is well established, the role of high-dose therapy with autologous or allogeneic

  8. Maturation of blood vessels by haematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells: involvement of apelin/APJ and angiopoietin/Tie2 interactions in vessel caliber size regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Nobuyuki; Kidoya, Hiroyasu

    2009-06-01

    Apelin is a recently-isolated bioactive peptide from bovine gastric extract. The gene encodes a protein of 77 amino acids, which can generate two active polypeptides, long (42-77) and short (65-77). Both peptides ligate and activate APJ, a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Although an essential role for the apelin/APJ system in blood vessel formation has been reported in Xenopus, its precise function in mammals is unclear. Blood vessel tube formation is accomplished by two main mechanisms: 1) single cell hollowing, in which a lumen forms within the cytoplasm of a single endothelial cell (EC), and 2) cord hollowing in which a luminal cavity is created de novo between ECs in a thin cylindrical cord. Molecular control of either single cell or cord hollowing has not been precisely determined. Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) has been reported to induce enlargement of blood vessels. Apelin is produced from ECs upon activation of Tie2, a cognate receptor of Ang1, expressed on ECs. It has been suggested that apelin induces cord hollowing by promoting proliferation and aggregation/assembly of ECs. During angiogenesis, haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells (HPCs) are frequently observed in the perivascular region. They produce Ang1 and induce migration of ECs, resulting in a fine vascular network. Moreover, HSCs/HPCs can induce apelin production from ECs. Therefore, this review article posits that HSCs/HPCs regulate caliber size of blood vessels via apelin/APJ and Angiopoietin/Tie2 interactions.

  9. Hematopoietic specification from human pluripotent stem cells: current advances and challenges toward de novo generation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slukvin, Igor I

    2013-12-12

    Significant advances in cellular reprogramming technologies and hematopoietic differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have already enabled the routine production of multiple lineages of blood cells in vitro and opened novel opportunities to study hematopoietic development, model genetic blood diseases, and manufacture immunologically matched cells for transfusion and cancer immunotherapy. However, the generation of hematopoietic cells with robust and sustained multilineage engraftment has not been achieved. Here, we highlight the recent advances in understanding the molecular and cellular pathways leading to blood development from hPSCs and discuss potential approaches that can be taken to facilitate the development of technologies for de novo production of hematopoietic stem cells.

  10. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, M; van Os, R; Velders, GA; Hagoort, H; Heegaard, PMH; Lindley, IJD; Willemze, R; Fibbe, WE

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory

  11. Improvement of Thymopoiesis after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation by Cytokines: Translational studies in experimental animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-J. Wils (Evert-Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAllogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AlloHSCT) is a powerful treatment modality that is frequently applied as part of treatment of hematological malignancies, aplastic anemia and inborn errors of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A major drawback of alloHSCT is the treatment

  12. Fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment resulted in a failure of cord blood endothelial progenitor cell adaptation against chronic hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, U Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has long-term health consequences, and fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment increases cardiovascular risk for her adult offspring. Some part of this could be related to their endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Understanding the vessel-forming ability of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB)-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) against pathological stress such as GDM response to hypoxia could generate new therapeutic strategies. This study aims to investigate the role of chronic hypoxia in EPCs functional and vessel-forming ability in GDM subjects. Each ECFC was expressed in endothelial and pro-angiogenic specific markers, namely endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), platelet (PECAM-1) endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, vascular endothelial-cadherin CdH5 (Ca-dependent cell adhesion molecule), vascular endothelial growth factor A, (VEGFA) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Chronic hypoxia did not affect CdH5, but PECAM1 MRNA expressions were increased in control and GDM subjects. Control hypoxic and GDM normoxic VEGFA MRNA expressions and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α) protein expressions were significantly increased in HUCB ECFCs. GDM resulted in most failure of HUCB ECFC adaptation and eNOS protein expressions against chronic hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia resulted in an overall decline in HUCB ECFCs’ proliferative ability due to reduction of clonogenic capacity and diminished vessel formation. Furthermore, GDM also resulted in most failure of cord blood ECFC adaptation against chronic hypoxic environment. PMID:25565870

  13. Expansive effects of aorta-gonad-mesonephros-derived stromal cells on hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jin-rong; LIU Wen-li; ZHOU Yu-feng; ZHOU Jian-feng; SUN Han-ying; LUO Li; ZHANG Heng; XU Hui-zhen

    2005-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood and immune cells and are used in clinical transplantation protocols to treat a wide variety of refractory diseases, but the amplification of HSCs has been difficult to achieve in vitro. In the present study, the expansive effects of aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region derived stromal cells on HSCs were explored, attempting to improve the efficiency of HSC transplantation in clinical practice.Methods The murine stromal cells were isolated from the AGM region of 12 days postcoitum (dpc) murine embryos and bone marrow(BM)of 6 weeks old mice, respectively. After identification with flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry, the stromal cells were co-cultured with ESCs-derived, cytokines-induced HSCs. The maintenance and expansion of ESCs-derived HSCs were evaluated by detecting the population of CD34+ and CD34+Sca-1+cells with flow cytometry and the blast colony-forming cells (BL-CFCs), high proliferative potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFCs) by using semi-solid medium colonial culture. Finally, the homing and hematopoietic reconstruction abilities of HSCs were evaluated using a murine model of HSC transplantation in vivo.Results AGM and BM-derived stromal cells were morphologically and phenotypically similar, and had the features of stromal cells. When co-cultured with AGM or BM stromal cells, more primitive progenitor cells (HPP-CFCs ) could be detected in ESCs derived hematopoietic precursor cells, but BL-CFC's expansion could be detected only when co-cultured with AGM-derived stromal cells. The population of CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were expanded 3 times,but no significant expansion in the population of CD34+Sca-1+ cells was noted when co-cultured with BM stromal cells. While both CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and CD34+Sca-1+ cells were expanded 4 to 5 times respectively when co-cultured with AGM stromal cells. AGM region-derived stromal cells, like BM-derived stromal

  14. Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide and Tacrolimus-Mycophenolate Mofetil Combination Prevents Graft-versus-Host Disease in Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation from HLA-Matched Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Caravelli, Daniela; Gallo, Susanna; Coha, Valentina; D'Ambrosio, Lorenzo; Vassallo, Elena; Fizzotti, Marco; Nesi, Francesca; Gioeni, Luisa; Berger, Massimo; Polo, Alessandra; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Becco, Paolo; Giraudo, Lidia; Mangioni, Monica; Sangiolo, Dario; Grignani, Giovanni; Rota-Scalabrini, Delia; Sottile, Antonino; Fagioli, Franca; Aglietta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) remains the only curative therapy for many hematologic malignancies but it is limited by high nonrelapse mortality (NRM), primarily from unpredictable control of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recently, post-transplant cyclophosphamide demonstrated improved GVHD control in allogeneic bone marrow HCT. Here we explore cyclophosphamide in allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (alloPBSCT). Patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies received alloPBSCT from HLA-matched unrelated/related donors. GVHD prophylaxis included combination post-HCT cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg (days +3 and +4) and tacrolimus/mofetil mycophenolate (T/MMF) (day +5 forward). The primary objective was the cumulative incidence of acute and chronic GVHD. Between March 2011 and May 2015, 35 consecutive patients received the proposed regimen. MMF was stopped in all patients at day +28; the median discontinuation of tacrolimus was day +113. Acute and chronic GVHD cumulative incidences were 17% and 7%, respectively, with no grade IV GVHD events, only 2 patients requiring chronic GVHD immunosuppression control, and no deaths from GVHD. Two-year NRM, overall survival, event-free survival, and chronic GVHD event-free survival rates were 3%, 77%, 54%, and 49%, respectively. The graft-versus-tumor effect was maintained as 5 of 15 patients (33%) who received HCT with evidence of disease experienced further disease response. A post-transplant cyclophosphamide + T/MMF combination strategy effectively prevented acute and chronic GVHD after alloPBSCT from HLA-matched donors and achieved an unprecedented low NRM without losing efficacy in disease control or impaired development of the graft-versus-tumor effect. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02300571.

  15. Effect of Deep Space Radiation on Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalota, Anna; Bennett, Paula; Swider, Cezary R.; Sutherland, Betsy M.; Gewirtz, Alan M.

    Astronaut flight crews on long-term missions in deep space will be exposed to a unique radiation environment as a result of exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). This environment consists predominantly of high energy protons, helium and high charge, high energy (HZE) atomic nuclei from iron predominantly, but all other elements as well. The effect of such particles, alone, or in combination, on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) has not been well studied but is clearly of interest since blood forming cells are known to be sensitive to radiation, and irreversible damage to these cells could quickly compromise a mission due to loss of marrow function. To better understand the effects of GCR and SPE on human stem/progenitor cell function, we have exposed partially purified CD34+ normal human marrow cells to protons, radioactive Fe, and Ti, alone, and in combination at varying doses up to 70cGy, and down to 1, 2, and 4 particle hits per nucleus. We then examined the effects of these radiations on HSPC function, as assessed by the ability to form CFU-GEMM, and LTCIC colonies in semi-solid culture medium. At the highest doses (50 and 70cGy), all radiation types tested significantly diminished the ability of CD34+ cells to form such colonies. The number of CFU-GEMM in irradiated samples was 70-90

  16. Biodistribution of (137)Cs in a mouse model of chronic contamination by ingestion and effects on the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Louiba, Sonia; Faure, Marie-Cécile; Tourlonias, Elie; Stefani, Johanna; Siffert, Baptiste; Paquet, François; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this work was to define the possible occurrence of hematological changes during the course of a chronic ingestion of (137)Cs. A mouse model was used, with ingestion through drinking water with a cesium concentration of 20 kBq l(-1). Ingestion started in parent animals before mating, and (137)Cs intake and its effect on the hematopoietic system was studied in offspring at various ages between birth and 20 weeks. (137)Cs content was measured in various organs, indicating that (137)Cs was distributed throughout the organism including lympho-hematopoietic organs, i.e., femurs, spleen and thymus. However, we did not observe any effect on the hematopoietic system, whatever the parameter used. In fact, blood cell counts, mononuclear cell counts and progenitor frequency in bone marrow and spleen, and Flt3-ligand, Erythropoietin, G-CSF and SDF-1 concentration in plasma remained unchanged when compared to control animals. Moreover, phenotypic analysis did not show any change in the proportions of bone marrow cell populations. These results indicate that, although (137)Cs was found in all organs implicated in the hematopoietic system, this did not induce any changes in bone marrow function.

  17. High-Throughput siRNA Screening to Reveal GATA-2 Upstream Transcriptional Mechanisms in Hematopoietic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Saito

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew and differentiate into all blood cell types. The transcription factor GATA-2 is expressed in both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and is essential for cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Recently, evidence from studies of aplastic anemia, MonoMAC syndrome, and lung cancer has demonstrated a mechanistic link between GATA-2 and human pathophysiology. GATA-2-dependent disease processes have been extensively analyzed; however, the transcriptional mechanisms upstream of GATA-2 remain less understood. Here, we conducted high-throughput small-interfering-RNA (siRNA library screening and showed that YN-1, a human erythroleukemia cell line, expressed high levels of GATA-2 following the activation of the hematopoietic-specific 1S promoter. As transient luciferase reporter assay in YN-1 cells revealed the highest promoter activity in the 1S promoter fused with GATA-2 intronic enhancer (+9.9 kb/1S; therefore, we established a cell line capable of stably expressing +9.9 kb/1S-Luciferase. Subsequently, we screened 995 transcription factor genes and revealed that CITED2 acts as a GATA-2 activator in human hematopoietic cells. These results provide novel insights into and further identify the regulatory mechanism of GATA-2.

  18. Ubiquitous expression of MAKORIN-2 in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells and its growth promoting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Yiu Lee

    Full Text Available Makorin-2 (MKRN2 is a highly conserved protein and yet its functions are largely unknown. We investigated the expression levels of MKRN2 and RAF1 in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells, and leukemia cell lines. We also attempted to delineate the role of MKRN2 in umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem/progenitor cells and K562 cell line by over-expression and inhibition of MKRN2 through lentivirus transduction and shRNA nucleofection, respectively. Our results provided the first evidence on the ubiquitous expression of MKRN2 in normal hematopoietic cells, embryonic stem cell lines, primary leukemia and leukemic cell lines of myeloid, lymphoid, erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages. The expression levels of MKRN2 were generally higher in primary leukemia samples compared with those in age-matched normal BM cells. In all leukemia subtypes, there was no significant correlation between expression levels of MKRN2 and RAF1. sh-MKRN2-silenced CD34+ cells had a significantly lower proliferation capacity and decreased levels of the early stem/progenitor subpopulation (CFU-GEMM compared with control cultures. Over-expression of MKRN2 in K562 cells increased cell proliferation. Our results indicated possible roles of MKRN2 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

  19. 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol Promotes Recovery of Immature Hematopoietic Cells Following Myelosuppressive Radiation and Synergizes With Thrombopoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts-Kaya, Fatima S.F.; Visser, Trudi P.; Arshad, Shazia [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Frincke, James; Stickney, Dwight R.; Reading, Chris L. [Harbor Therapeutics, Inc, San Diego, California (United States); Wagemaker, Gerard, E-mail: g.wagemaker@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol (5-AED) stimulates recovery of hematopoiesis after exposure to radiation. To elucidate its cellular targets, the effects of 5-AED alone and in combination with (pegylated) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and thrombopoietin (TPO) on immature hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated following total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were exposed to radiation delivered as a single or as a fractionated dose, and recovery of bone marrow progenitors and peripheral blood parameters was assessed. Results: BALB/c mice treated with 5-AED displayed accelerated multilineage blood cell recovery and elevated bone marrow (BM) cellularity and numbers of progenitor cells. The spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) assay, representing the life-saving short-term repopulating cells in BM of irradiated donor mice revealed that combined treatment with 5-AED plus TPO resulted in a 20.1-fold increase in CFU-S relative to that of placebo controls, and a 3.7 and 3.1-fold increase in comparison to 5-AED and TPO, whereas no effect was seen of Peg-G-CSF with or without 5-AED. Contrary to TPO, 5-AED also stimulated reconstitution of the more immature marrow repopulating (MRA) cells. Conclusions: 5-AED potently counteracts the hematopoietic effects of radiation-induced myelosuppression and promotes multilineage reconstitution by stimulating immature bone marrow cells in a pattern distinct from, but synergistic with TPO.

  20. Elderly patients (66-70 years) with acute leukemia or high-risk MDS who, underwent allogenic transplant of peripheral hematopoietic progenitors after reduced-intensity conditioning. | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ad alte dosi nella profilassi della GVHD in pazienti anziani (66-70 anni), affetti da leucemia acuta o miel...matopoietic progenitors after reduced-intensity conditioning. Pazienti anziani (66-70 anni), affetti da leucemia...erwent allogenic transplant. Pazienti anziani (66-70 anni), affetti da leucemia acuta o mielodisplasia ad al... sfavorevole o intermedia – cariotipo normale con alterazioni molecolari sfavorevoli – fallimento del 1° ciclo d’induzione – leucemia

  1. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  2. CD34 expression on long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells changes during developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, S; Ebihara, Y; Xu, M; Ishii, T; Sugiyama, D; Yoshino, H; Ueda, T; Manabe, A; Tanaka, R; Ikeda, Y; Nakahata, T; Tsuji, K

    2001-01-15

    The CD34 antigen serves as an important marker for primitive hematopoietic cells in therapeutic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and gene therapy, but it has remained an open question as to whether or not most HSC express CD34. Using a competitive long-term reconstitution assay, the results of this study confirm developmental changes in CD34 expression on murine HSC. In fetuses and neonates, CD34 was expressed on Lin(-)c-Kit(+) long-term repopulating HSC of bone marrow (BM), liver, and spleen. However, CD34 expression on HSC decreased with aging, and in mice older than 10 weeks, HSC were most enriched in the Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) marrow cell fraction. A second transplantation was performed from primary recipients who were transplanted with neonatal Lin(-)c-Kit(+) CD34(high) HSC marrow. Although donor-type HSC resided in CD34-expressing cell fraction in BM cells of the first recipients 4 weeks after the first transplantation, the stem cell activity had shifted to Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) cells after 16 weeks, indicating that adult Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD34(-) HSC are the progeny of neonatal CD34-expresssing HSC. Assays for colony-forming cells showed that hematopoietic progenitor cells, unlike HSC, continue to express CD34 throughout murine development. The present findings are important because the clinical application of HSC can be extended, in particular as related to CD34-enriched HSC and umbilical cord blood HSC.

  3. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Perea-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells.

  4. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Monguió-Tortajada, Marta; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Borràs, Francesc E.; Roura, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ) was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells. PMID:25861626

  5. Geminin deletion increases the number of fetal hematopoietic stem cells by affecting the expression of key transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitros, Dimitris; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Kotantaki, Panoraia; Potocnik, Alexandre J; Bähr-Ivacevic, Tomi; Benes, Vladimir; Lygerou, Zoi; Kioussis, Dimitris; Taraviras, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Balancing stem cell self-renewal and initiation of lineage specification programs is essential for the development and homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. We have specifically ablated geminin in the developing murine hematopoietic system and observed profound defects in the generation of mature blood cells, leading to embryonic lethality. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) accumulated in the fetal liver following geminin ablation, while committed progenitors were reduced. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis identified key HSC transcription factors as being upregulated upon geminin deletion, revealing a gene network linked with geminin that controls fetal hematopoiesis. In order to obtain mechanistic insight into the ability of geminin to regulate transcription, we examined Hoxa9 as an example of a key gene in definitive hematopoiesis. We demonstrate that in human K562 cells geminin is associated with HOXA9 regulatory elements and its absence increases HOXA9 transcription similarly to that observed in vivo. Moreover, silencing geminin reduced recruitment of the PRC2 component SUZ12 to the HOXA9 locus and resulted in an increase in RNA polymerase II recruitment and H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), whereas the repressive marks H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 were reduced. The chromatin landscape was also modified at the regulatory regions of HOXA10 and GATA1. K562 cells showed a reduced ability to differentiate to erythrocytes and megakaryocytes upon geminin silencing. Our data suggest that geminin is indispensable for fetal hematopoiesis and regulates the generation of a physiological pool of stem and progenitor cells in the fetal hematopoietic system.

  6. Radiation induces progenitor cell death, microglia activation, and blood-brain barrier damage in the juvenile rat cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Boström, Martina; Ek, C. Joakim; Li, Tao; Xie, Cuicui; Xu, Yiran; Sun, Yanyan; Blomgren, Klas; Zhu, Changlian

    2017-01-01

    Posterior fossa tumors are the most common childhood intracranial tumors, and radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments. However, irradiation induces long-term adverse effects that can have significant negative impacts on the patient’s quality of life. The purpose of this study was to characterize irradiation-induced cellular and molecular changes in the cerebellum. We found that irradiation-induced cell death occurred mainly in the external germinal layer (EGL) of the juvenile rat cerebellum. The number of proliferating cells in the EGL decreased, and 82.9% of them died within 24 h after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiation induced oxidative stress, microglia accumulation, and inflammation in the cerebellum. Interestingly, blood-brain barrier damage and blood flow reduction was considerably more pronounced in the cerebellum compared to other brain regions. The cerebellar volume decreased by 39% and the migration of proliferating cells to the internal granule layer decreased by 87.5% at 16 weeks after irradiation. In the light of recent studies demonstrating that the cerebellum is important not only for motor functions, but also for cognition, and since treatment of posterior fossa tumors in children typically results in debilitating cognitive deficits, this differential susceptibility of the cerebellum to irradiation should be taken into consideration for future protective strategies. PMID:28382975

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with acute leukemia: similar outcomes in recipients of umbilical cord blood versus marrow or peripheral blood stem cells from related or unrelated donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Sang Yi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : This study compared outcomes in children with acute leukemia who underwent transplantations with umbilical cord blood (UCB, bone marrow, or peripheral blood stem cells from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched related donor (MRD or an unrelated donor (URD. Methods : This retrospective study included consecutive acute leukemia patients who underwent their first allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT at Samsung Medical Center between 2005 and 2010. Patients received stem cells from MRD (n=33, URD (n=46, or UCB (n=41. Results : Neutrophil and platelet recovery were significantly longer after HSCT with UCB than with MRD or URD (P&lt;0.01 for both. In multivariate analysis using the MRD group as a reference, the URD group had a significantly higher risk of grade III to IV acute graft-versushost disease (GVHD; relative risk [RR], 15.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 186.2; P=0.03 and extensive chronic GVHD (RR, 6.9; 95% CI, 1.9 to 25.2; P&lt;0.01. For all 3 donor types, 5-year event-free survival (EFS and overall survival were similar. Extensive chronic GVHD was associated with fewer relapses (RR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.6; P&lt;0.01. Multivariate analysis showed that lower EFS was associated with advanced disease at transplantation (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.3 to 7.8; P&lt;0.01 and total body irradiation (RR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.0 to 4.3; P=0.04. Conclusion : Survival after UCB transplantation was similar to survival after MRD and URD transplantation. For patients lacking an HLA matched donor, the use of UCB is a suitable alternative.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cells in neonates: any differences between very preterm and term neonates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Wisgrill

    Full Text Available In the last decades, human full-term cord blood was extensively investigated as a potential source of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs. Despite the growing interest of regenerative therapies in preterm neonates, only little is known about the biological function of HSPCs from early preterm neonates under different perinatal conditions. Therefore, we investigated the concentration, the clonogenic capacity and the influence of obstetric/perinatal complications and maternal history on HSPC subsets in preterm and term cord blood.CD34+ HSPC subsets in UCB of 30 preterm and 30 term infants were evaluated by flow cytometry. Clonogenic assays suitable for detection of the proliferative potential of HSPCs were conducted. Furthermore, we analyzed the clonogenic potential of isolated HSPCs according to the stem cell marker CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity.Preterm cord blood contained a significantly higher concentration of circulating CD34+ HSPCs, especially primitive progenitors, than term cord blood. The clonogenic capacity of HSPCs was enhanced in preterm cord blood. Using univariate analysis, the number and clonogenic potential of circulating UCB HSPCs was influenced by gestational age, birth weight and maternal age. Multivariate analysis showed that main factors that significantly influenced the HSPC count were maternal age, gestational age and white blood cell count. Further, only gestational age significantly influenced the clonogenic potential of UCB HSPCs. Finally, isolated CD34+/CD133+, CD34+/CD133- and ALDH(high HSPC obtained from preterm cord blood showed a significantly higher clonogenic potential compared to term cord blood.We demonstrate that preterm cord blood exhibits a higher HSPC concentration and increased clonogenic capacity compared to term neonates. These data may imply an emerging use of HSPCs in autologous stem cell therapy in preterm neonates.

  9. Repercussion of Megakaryocyte-Specific Gata1 Loss on Megakaryopoiesis and the Hematopoietic Precursor Compartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Meinders

    Full Text Available During hematopoiesis, transcriptional programs are essential for the commitment and differentiation of progenitors into the different blood lineages. GATA1 is a transcription factor expressed in several hematopoietic lineages and essential for proper erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Megakaryocyte-specific genes, such as GP1BA, are known to be directly regulated by GATA1. Mutations in GATA1 can lead to dyserythropoietic anemia and pseudo gray-platelet syndrome. Selective loss of Gata1 expression in adult mice results in macrothrombocytopenia with platelet dysfunction, characterized by an excess of immature megakaryocytes. To specifically analyze the impact of Gata1 loss in mature committed megakaryocytes, we generated Gata1-Lox|Pf4-Cre mice (Gata1cKOMK. Consistent with previous findings, Gata1cKOMK mice are macrothrombocytopenic with platelet dysfunction. Supporting this notion we demonstrate that Gata1 regulates directly the transcription of Syk, a tyrosine kinase that functions downstream of Clec2 and GPVI receptors in megakaryocytes and platelets. Furthermore, we show that Gata1cKOMK mice display an additional aberrant megakaryocyte differentiation stage. Interestingly, these mice present a misbalance of the multipotent progenitor compartment and the erythroid lineage, which translates into compensatory stress erythropoiesis and splenomegaly. Despite the severe thrombocytopenia, Gata1cKOMK mice display a mild reduction of TPO plasma levels, and Gata1cKOMK megakaryocytes show a mild increase in Pf4 mRNA levels; such a misbalance might be behind the general hematopoietic defects observed, affecting locally normal TPO and Pf4 levels at hematopoietic stem cell niches.

  10. C/EBPα Is Required for Long-Term Self-Renewal and Lineage Priming of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and for the Maintenance of Epigenetic Configurations in Multipotent Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasemann, Marie S; Lauridsen, Felicia K B; Waage, Johannes;

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and act through their ability to bind DNA and impact on gene transcription. Their functions are interpreted in the complex landscape of chromatin, but current knowledge on how this is achieved is very limited. C....../EBPα is an important transcriptional regulator of hematopoiesis, but its potential functions in HSCs have remained elusive. Here we report that C/EBPα serves to protect adult HSCs from apoptosis and to maintain their quiescent state. Consequently, deletion of Cebpa is associated with loss of self-renewal and HSC...... as a priming factor at the HSC level where it actively promotes myeloid differentiation and counteracts lymphoid lineage choice. Taken together, our results show that C/EBPα is a key regulator of HSC biology, which influences the epigenetic landscape of HSCs in order to balance different cell fate options....

  11. Ex vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Farahbakhshian (Elnaz)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a complex cellular differentiation process resulting in the formation of all blood cell types. In this process, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside at the top of the hematopoiesis hierarchy and have the capacity to differentiate into all blood cell lineages (multipote

  12. To stay or to leave: Stem cells and progenitor cells navigating the S1P gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew; Hsu; Jen-Fu; Lee; Daniel; E; Cramer; Menq-Jer; Lee

    2011-01-01

    Most hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in bone marrow (BM), but a small amount of HSPCs have been found to circulate between BM and tissues through blood and lymph. Several lines of evidence suggest that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) gradient triggers HSPC egression to blood circulation after mobilization from BM stem cell niches. Stem cells also visit certain tissues. After a temporary 36 h short stay in local tissues, HSPCs go to lymph in response to S1P gradient between lymph and tissue and eventually enter the blood circulation. S1P also has a role in the guidance of the primitive HSPCs homing to BM in vivo, as S1P analogue FTY720 treatment can improve HSPC BM homing and engraftment. In stress conditions, various stem cells or progenitor cells can be attracted to local injured tissues and participate in local tissue cell differentiation and tissue rebuilding through modulation the expression level of S1P1, S1P2 or S1P3 receptors. Hence, S1P is important for stem cells circulation in blood system to accomplish its role in body surveillance and injury recovery.

  13. Placenta as a source of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dzierzak, Elaine; Robin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The placenta is a large, highly vascularised hematopoietic tissue that functions during the embryonic and foetal development of eutherian mammals. Although recognised as the interface tissue important in the exchange of oxygen, nutrients and waste products between the foetus and mother, the placenta has increasingly become a focus of research concerning the ontogeny of the blood system. Here, we describe recent data showing the intrinsic hematopoietic potential and appearance of hematopoietic...

  14. Induction of embryonic stem cells to hematopoietic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to get hematopoietic cells from embryonic stem (ES) cells and to study development mechanisms of hematopoietic cells, the method of inducing embryonic stem cells to hematopoietic cells was explored by differenciating mouse ES cells and human embryonic cells in three stages. The differentiated cells were identified by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and Wright's staining. The results showed that embryoid bodies (EBs) could form when ES cells were cultured in the medium with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). However, cytokines, such as stem cell factor (SCF), thrombopoietin (TPO), interleukin-3 (IL-3), interleukin-6 (IL-6), erythropoietin (EPO) and granular colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), were not helpful for forming EBs. SCF, TPO and embryonic cell conditional medium were useful for the differentiation of mouse EBs to hematopoietic progenitors. Eighty-six percent of these cells were CD34+ after 6-d culture. Hematopoietic progenitors differentiated to B lymphocytes when they were cocultured with primary bone marrow stroma cells in the DMEM medium with SCF and IL-6. 14 d later, most of the cells were CD34-CD38+. Wright's staining and immunohistochemistry showed that 80% of these cells were plasma-like morphologically and immunoglubolin positive. The study of hematopoietic cells from human embryonic cells showed that human embryonic cell differentiation was very similar to that of mouse ES cells. They could form EBs in the first stage and the CD34 positive cells account for about 48.5% in the second stage.

  15. High-dose cyclophosphamide followed by autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation improves the salvage treatment for persistent or sensitive relapsed malignant lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldissera R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Trials have demonstrated that high-dose escalation followed by autologous transplantation can promote better long-term survival as salvage treatment in malignant lymphomas. The aim of the present nonrandomized clinical trial was to demonstrate the role of high-dose cyclophosphamide (HDCY in reducing tumor burden and also to determine the effectiveness of HDCY followed by etoposide (VP-16 and methotrexate (MTX in Hodgkin's disease plus high-dose therapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC transplantation as salvage treatment. From 1998 to 2000, 33 patients with a median age of 33 years (13-65 affected by aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL (60.6% or persistent or relapsed Hodgkin's disease (39.4% were enrolled and treated using high dose escalation (HDCY + HDVP-16 plus HDMTX in Hodgkin's disease followed by autologous PBPC transplantation. On an "intention to treat" basis, 33 patients with malignant lymphomas were evaluated. The overall median follow-up was 400 days (40-1233. Thirty-one patients underwent autografting and received a median of 6.19 x 10(6/kg (1.07-29.3 CD34+ cells. Patients who were chemosensitive to HDCY (N = 22 and patients who were chemoresistant (N = 11 presented an overall survival of 96 and 15%, respectively (P<0.0001. Overall survival was 92% for chemosensitive patients and 0% for patients who were still chemoresistant before transplantation (P<0.0001. Toxicity-related mortality was 12% (four patients, related to HDCY in two cases and to transplant in the other two. HDCY + HDVP-16 plus HDMTX in only Hodgkin's disease followed by autologous PBPC proved to be effective and safe as salvage treatment for chemosensitive patients affected by aggressive NHL and Hodgkin's disease, with acceptable mortality rates related to sequential treatment.

  16. Human XCR1+ dendritic cells derived in vitro from CD34+ progenitors closely resemble blood dendritic cells, including their adjuvant responsiveness, contrary to monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sreekumar; Ollion, Vincent; Colletti, Nicholas; Chelbi, Rabie; Montanana-Sanchis, Frédéric; Liu, Hong; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Sanchez, Cindy; Savoret, Juliette; Perrot, Ivan; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Fossum, Even; Bechlian, Didier; Chabannon, Christian; Bogen, Bjarne; Asselin-Paturel, Carine; Shaw, Michael; Soos, Timothy; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny; Dalod, Marc

    2014-08-15

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) have been used in the clinic with moderately encouraging results. Mouse XCR1(+) DC excel at cross-presentation, can be targeted in vivo to induce protective immunity, and share characteristics with XCR1(+) human DC. Assessment of the immunoactivation potential of XCR1(+) human DC is hindered by their paucity in vivo and by their lack of a well-defined in vitro counterpart. We report in this study a protocol generating both XCR1(+) and XCR1(-) human DC in CD34(+) progenitor cultures (CD34-DC). Gene expression profiling, phenotypic characterization, and functional studies demonstrated that XCR1(-) CD34-DC are similar to canonical MoDC, whereas XCR1(+) CD34-DC resemble XCR1(+) blood DC (bDC). XCR1(+) DC were strongly activated by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid but not LPS, and conversely for MoDC. XCR1(+) DC and MoDC expressed strikingly different patterns of molecules involved in inflammation and in cross-talk with NK or T cells. XCR1(+) CD34-DC but not MoDC efficiently cross-presented a cell-associated Ag upon stimulation by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or R848, likewise to what was reported for XCR1(+) bDC. Hence, it is feasible to generate high numbers of bona fide XCR1(+) human DC in vitro as a model to decipher the functions of XCR1(+) bDC and as a potential source of XCR1(+) DC for clinical use.

  17. HEMATOPOIETIC SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    15.1 Erythrocyte and erythrocyte function2003123 Clinical analysis of 185 patients with poly-cythemia vera. BAI Jie (白洁), et al. Instit Hematol Blood Dis Hosp, CAMS and PUMC, Tianjin 300020. Chin J Hematol 2002; 23(11): 578 - 580.Objective:To understand the clinical feature and natural course of polycythemia vera ( PV). Methods: The

  18. Current Knowledge and Priorities for Future Research in Late Effects after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes: Consensus Statement from the Second Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium International Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Andrew C; Mehta, Parinda A; Vlachos, Adrianna; Savage, Sharon A; Bresters, Dorine; Tolar, Jakub; Boulad, Farid; Dalle, Jean Hugues; Bonfim, Carmem; de la Fuente, Josu; Duncan, Christine N; Baker, K Scott; Pulsipher, Michael A; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Wagner, John E; Alter, Blanche P

    2017-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC), and Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) are 3 of the most common inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS), in which the hematologic manifestations can be cured with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Later in life, these patients face a variety of medical conditions, which may be a manifestation of underlying disease or due to pre-HCT therapy, the HCT, or a combination of all these elements. Very limited long-term follow-up data exist in these populations, with FA the only IBMFS that has specific published data. During the international consensus conference sponsored by the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium entitled "Late Effects Screening and Recommendations following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT) for Immune Deficiency and Nonmalignant Hematologic Disease" held in Minneapolis, Minnesota in May of 2016, a half-day session was focused specifically on the unmet needs for these patients with IBMFS. A multidisciplinary group of experts discussed what is currently known, outlined an agenda for future research, and laid out long-term follow-up guidelines based on a combination of evidence in the literature as well as expert opinion. This article addresses the state of science in that area as well as consensus regarding the agenda for future research, with specific screening guidelines to follow in the next article from this group.

  19. A Comparative Reference Study for the Validation of HLA-Matching Algorithms in the Search for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donors and Cord Blood Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-15

    HLA ISSN 2059-2302 A comparative reference study for the validation of HLA-matching algorithms in the search for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell...stem cell transplantation; human leukocyte antigen; immunogenetics; matching algorithm ; patient–donor matching Correspondence Werner Bochtler Zentrales...leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matching algorithms is a prerequi- site for the correct and efficient identification of optimal unrelated donors for patients

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  7. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Genetic deletion of JAM-C reveals a role in myeloid progenitor generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetor, Asja; McBride, Jacqueline M; Chiu, Henry; Rangell, Linda; Cabote, Lorena; Lee, Wyne P; Cupp, James; Danilenko, Dimitry M; Fong, Sherman

    2009-02-26

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the capacity to self-renew and continuously differentiate into all blood cell lineages throughout life. At each branching point during differentiation, interactions with the environment are key in the generation of daughter cells with distinct fates. Here, we examined the role of the cell adhesion molecule JAM-C, a protein known to mediate cellular polarity during spermatogenesis, in hematopoiesis. We show that murine JAM-C is highly expressed on HSCs in the bone marrow (BM). Expression correlates with self-renewal, the highest being on long-term repopulating HSCs, and decreases with differentiation, which is maintained longest among myeloid committed progenitors. Inclusion of JAM-C as a sole marker on lineage-negative BM cells yields HSC enrichments and long-term multilineage reconstitution when transferred to lethally irradiated mice. Analysis of Jam-C-deficient mice showed that two-thirds die within 48 hours after birth. In the surviving animals, loss of Jam-C leads to an increase in myeloid progenitors and granulocytes in the BM. Stem cells and myeloid cells from fetal liver are normal in number and homing to the BM. These results provide evidence that JAM-C defines HSCs in the BM and that JAM-C plays a role in controlling myeloid progenitor generation in the BM.

  1. The ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and lymphoid commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bryan; Boccalatte, Francesco; Moran-Crusio, Kelly; Wolf, Elmar; Wang, Jingjing; Kayembe, Clarisse; Lazaris, Charalampos; Yu, Xiaofeng; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Lasorella, Anna; Aifantis, Iannis

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dormant in the bone marrow and can be activated in response to diverse stresses to replenish all blood cell types. Here we identify the ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 as a crucial regulator of HSC functions via its post-translational control of N-myc. We found Huwe1 to be essential for HSC self-renewal, quiescence and lymphoid fate specification. Using a novel fluorescent fusion allele (MycnM), we observed that N-myc expression was restricted to the most immature, multipotent stem and progenitor populations. N-myc was upregulated in response to stress or upon loss of Huwe1, leading to increased proliferation and stem cell exhaustion. Mycn depletion reversed most of these phenotypes in vivo, suggesting that the attenuation of N-myc by Huwe1 is essential to reestablish homeostasis following stress. PMID:27668798

  2. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44(-/-) mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells.

  3. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-07-01

    Gene therapy nowadays constitutes a safe and efficient treatment for a number of monogenic diseases affecting the hematopoietic system. Risks of insertional mutagenesis derived from the use of integrative vectors cannot, however, be completely excluded. Therefore, gene targeting has been proposed as a safer alternative, since the insertion of the herapeutic gene is driven to a specific locus in the genome. Gene targeting approaches are based on the use of specific nucleases which generate double strand breaks (DSBs) in a specific site of the genome,markedly enhancing the efficacy of homologous recombination (HR) with donor constructs harboring the gene of interest flanked by the corresponding homology arms. In this study we have optimized the conditions to target human lymphoblastic cell lines (LCLs) and also hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from healthy donors, with the final aim of correcting by gene editing the hematopoietic progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia subtype A (FA-A) patients. In particular, we have established a robust method to target both LCLs and HSCs in a safe harbor site in the genome, the AAVS1 locus. Our approach is based on the transduction of these cells with integrase-defective lentiviral vectors carrying a donor with the gene of interest, followed by the nucleofection of these cells with zinc finger nucleases used as mRNA. Using a control donor vector carrying the GFP reporter gene we have obtained, on average, 9.43% gene targeting efficiency in cord blood CD34+ cells from healthy donors. Moreover, we confirmed that gene targeting was also efficient in HSCs with long term and multipotent repopulation capacity, as demonstrated by transplants into immunodeficient mice. To improve the gene targeting efficiency, we investigated the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles, which were shown to improve the transduction efficiency of integrase-defective and competent lentiviral vectors in HSCs. This increment, however, did not lead to a higher gene

  4. MiRNAs and piRNAs from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell extracellular vesicles induce cell survival and inhibit cell differentiation of cord blood hematopoietic stem cells: a new insight in transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Luciana; Trino, Stefania; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Simeon, Vittorio; Calice, Giovanni; Raimondo, Stefania; Podestà, Marina; Santodirocco, Michele; Di Mauro, Lazzaro; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Morano, Annalisa; Frassoni, Francesco; Cilloni, Daniela; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC),