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Sample records for blood flow velocity

  1. Venous flow velocity, venous volume and arterial blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship of arterial blood flow and venous volume to venous flow velocity was studied in normal subjects. The effects of current modes of treatment in venous thrombosis and of a vasodilator drug on venous flow velocity were also investigated. Total calf flow and venous volume were measured by venous occlusion plethysmography while venous flow axial velocity was determined by the transit time of 131I albumin from calf to inguinal region. Local intravenous epinephrine administration induced venoconstriction and increased venous flow velocity. Intra-arterial isoproterenol and angiotensin increased and decreased arterial flow, respectively, with no change in venous flow velocity or volume, but local heat increased arterial flow and venous flow velocity with no change in venous volume. Local cold, despite venoconstriction, decreased venous flow velocity accompanied by decreased arterial flow. Intravenous heparin did not affect venous flow velocity. Intravenous but not oral nylidrin increased venous flow velocity. Therefore venous flow velocity can be significantly increased by venoconstriction, by large increases in arterial flow (local heat), and by a parenteral vasodilator drug. These experiments indicate that there is a basis for applying heat but not cold in the prevention and treatment of venous thrombosis

  2. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwetsloot, C.P.; Caekebeke, J.F.V.; Jansen, J.C.; Odink, J.; Ferrari, M.D. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands))

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Surfactant bolus instillation: effects of different doses on blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocities

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, M.; Segerer, Hugo; Kiessling, C.; Obladen, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen preterm infants suffering from respiratory distress syndrome were randomly allocated to receive either high-dose (200 mg/kg) or low-dose (100 mg/kg) surfactant treatment. Retreatments were done with the low dose. Blood pressure, blood gases and cerebral blood flow velocities were determined before and after 24 bolus instillations. With the high dose mean blood pressure and mean cerebral blood flow velocity dropped significantly. With the low dose only mean cerebral blood flow velocity...

  5. Data adaptive estimation of transversal blood flow velocities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirnia, E.; Jakobsson, A.; Gudmundson, E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    The examination of blood flow inside the body may yield important information about vascular anomalies, such as possible indications of, for example, stenosis. Current Medical ultrasound systems suffer from only allowing for measuring the blood flow velocity along the direction of irradiation...

  6. Cerebral blood flow velocity changes after rapid administration of surfactant.

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, F.; Whitelaw, A; D. Wertheim; Silverman, M

    1991-01-01

    A computer linked Doppler system was used to make continuous measurements of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) from the middle cerebral artery, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) from the umbilical artery, and heart rate before, during, and for 20 minutes after the endotracheal administration of 200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant in 10 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Within two minutes of surfactant administration, there was a median fall of 6 mm Hg (15%) fall in MAP and 36...

  7. Interpretation of Doppler blood flow velocity waveforms using neural networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Baykal, N; Reggia, J. A.; Yalabik, N.; Erkmen, A.; Beksac, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    Doppler umbilical artery blood flow velocity waveform measurement is used in perinatal surveillance for the evaluation of pregnancy status. There is an ongoing debate on the predictive value of Doppler measurements concerning the critical effect of the selection of parameters for the evaluation of Doppler output. In this paper, we describe how neural network methods can be used both to discover relevant classification features and subsequently to classify patients. Classification accuracy var...

  8. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a fully...... functioning synthetic aperture scanner can be made...

  9. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a fully functioning synthetic aperture scanner can be made

  10. Changes in cerebral artery blood flow velocity after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    OpenAIRE

    Kempley, S T; Gamsu, H R

    1994-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound was used to measure blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery of six premature infants with posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus, before and after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, on 23 occasions. There was a significant increase in mean blood flow velocity after the drainage procedures (+5.6 cm/s, 95% confidence interval +2.9 to +8.3 cm/s), which was accompanied by a decrease in velocity waveform pulsatility. CSF pressure also fell significantly. In pat...

  11. Principal-component-analysis-based estimation of blood flow velocities using optical coherence tomography intensity signals

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Nishant; Vakoc, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    The intensity signal in optical coherence tomography contains information about the translational velocity of scatterers, and can be used to quantify blood flow. We apply principal component analysis to efficiently extract this information. We also study use of nonuniform temporal sampling of the intensity signal to increase the range of quantifiable flow velocities. We demonstrate this technique in simulation, phantom and in vivo blood flow measurements, and highlight its potential to enable...

  12. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T; Schmidt, J F; Secher, N H; Wildschiødtz, Gordon; Holm, S; Lassen, N A

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow...... velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise...

  13. Maximum Likelihood Blood Velocity Estimator Incorporating Properties of Flow Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    has been compared to the cross-correlation (CC) estimator and the previously developed maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). The results show that the CMLE can handle a larger velocity search range and is capable of estimating even low velocity levels from tissue motion. The CC and the MLE produce...... incorrect velocity estimates due to the multiple peaks, when the velocity search range is increased above the maximum detectable velocity. The root-mean square error (RMS) on the velocity estimates for the simulated data is on the order of 7 cm/s (14%) for the CMLE, and it is comparable to the RMS for the...... CC and the MLE. When the velocity search range is set to twice the limit of the CC and the MLE, the number of incorrect velocity estimates are 0, 19.1, and 7.2% for the CMLE, CC, and MLE, respectively. The ability to handle a larger search range and estimating low velocity levels was confirmed on in...

  14. Recent advances in blood flow vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Udesen, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    A number of methods for ultrasound vector velocity imaging are presented in the paper. The transverse oscillation (TO) method can estimate the velocity transverse to the ultrasound beam by introducing a lateral oscillation in the received ultrasound field. The approach has been thoroughly investi...

  15. Retinal blood flow velocity in patients with active uveitis using the retinal function imager

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xing; Kedhar Sanjay; Bhoomibunchoo Chavakij

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest a link between macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity (RBFV).The effects of inflammation in the retinal blood vessels are not clearly understood.We want to evaluate the differences in retinal blood flow velocities of patients with active uveitis and healthy controls using the retinal function imager (RFI)and determine the correlation between retinal blood flow veiocity and central macular thickness in uveitis patients.Methods Twenty-eight eyes of 24 patients with active anterior uveitis and 51 eyes of 51 normal control subjects were enrolled.Retinal blood flow velocities evaluated by RFI and central macular thickness evaluated by optical coherence tomography (SLO-OCT) were obtained.Differences among the groups were assessed using Stata statistical software.Results Ten eyes had uveitic cystoid macular edema (CME).Median (first quartile,third quartile) venous velocity for uveitic eyes with CME,uveitic eyes without CME,and controls were 2.09 (1.92,2.44),2.64 (2.32,2.86),and 2.82 (2.39,3.53) mm/s respectively.Median (first and quartile) arterial velocity for uveitic eyes with CME,uveitic eyes without CME,and controls were 3.79 (3.61,4.09),3.46 (2.86,4.12),and 3.93 (3.35,4.65) mm/s.Uveitic eyes with CME had significantly lower venous velocity than controls (P=0.044).There was a strong linear relationship between venous velocity and central retinal thickness (P=-0.007).Conclusions Retinal venous velocities were significantly decreased in eyes with uveitic CME relative to controls.Decreased venous velocity was correlated with increased central retinal thickness in uveitic eyes.

  16. Partial pharmacologic blockade shows sympathetic connection between blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilz, Max J; Wang, Ruihao; Marthol, Harald; Liu, Mao; Tillmann, Alexandra; Riss, Stephan; Hauck, Paulina; Hösl, Katharina M; Wasmeier, Gerald; Stemper, Brigitte; Köhrmann, Martin

    2016-06-15

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) dampens transfer of blood pressure (BP)-fluctuations onto cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV). Thus, CBFV-oscillations precede BP-oscillations. The phase angle (PA) between sympathetically mediated low-frequency (LF: 0.03-0.15Hz) BP- and CBFV-oscillations is a measure of CA quality. To evaluate whether PA depends on sympathetic modulation, we assessed PA-changes upon sympathetic stimulation with and without pharmacologic sympathetic blockade. In 10 healthy, young men, we monitored mean BP and CBFV before and during 120-second cold pressor stimulation (CPS) of one foot (0°C ice-water). We calculated mean values, standard deviations and sympathetic LF-powers of all signals, and PAs between LF-BP- and LF-CBFV-oscillations. We repeated measurements after ingestion of the adrenoceptor-blocker carvedilol (25mg). We compared parameters before and during CPS, without and after carvedilol (analysis of variance, post-hoc t-tests, significance: p<0.05). Without carvedilol, CPS increased BP, CBFV, BP-LF- and CBFV-LF-powers, and shortened PA. Carvedilol decreased resting BP, CBFV, BP-LF- and CBFV-LF-powers, while PAs remained unchanged. During CPS, BPs, CBFVs, BP-LF- and CBFV-LF-powers were lower, while PAs were longer with than without carvedilol. With carvedilol, CPS no longer shortened resting PA. Sympathetic activation shortens PA. Partial adrenoceptor blockade abolishes this PA-shortening. Thus, PA-measurements provide a subtle marker of sympathetic influences on CA and might refine CA evaluation. PMID:27206903

  17. Influence of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on headache and cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couturier, EGM; Laman, DM; vanDuijn, MAJ; vanDuijn, H

    1997-01-01

    Caffeine consumption may cause headache, particularly migraine. Its withdrawal also produces headaches and may be related to weekend migraine attacks. Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) has shown changes in cerebral blood flow velocities (BFV) during and between attacks of migraine. In order to e

  18. Noninvasive transthoracic and transesophageal Doppler echocardiographic measurements of human coronary blood flow velocity: In vitro flow phantom validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, E R

    2010-01-01

    Coronary angiography is limited in assessing the hemodynamic significance of a coronary lesion or the state of the coronary microcirculation. Noninvasive transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal (TEE) Doppler echocardiography have been used to measure coronary blood flow velocity and coronary flow reserve and thus the physiology of the coronary vasculature (normal, stable or unstable lesions). A fundamental, in vitro validation of these methods with a tissue and blood mimicking flow phantom has not been reported. Accordingly, Bland-Altman 95% confidence levels for precision (repeated measures) and accuracy (comparison with time collection) were determined for both TTE and TEE measurements of simulated coronary diastolic blood velocities in 2 mm and 4 mm vessels at the normal in vivo depths of 40 mm and 60 mm. The Doppler angle was set at 45 degrees and flow velocities were varied within a normal in vivo range of 0- 150 cm/s. Confidence levels for precisions and accuracies were similar between TTE and TEE and ranged from ± 6 cm/s to ± 13 cm/s or approximately 10-15% over the range of the measured velocities. These in vitro results in a controlled flow phantom suggest that technically adequate TTE and TEE can be used to reliably measure epicardial coronary conduit artery blood flow velocities. PMID:21096876

  19. Cerebral blood flow velocities after subarachnoid haemorrhage in relation to the amount of blood clots in the initial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 72 patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) the relationship between the amount of subarachnoid blood clots detected by initial cranial computed tomography (CCT) up to 48 hours after bleeding and the later development of vasospasm, established by blood flow velocity measurement with transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) was investigated. The serial Doppler examinations started within the first 72 hours after SAH and were carried out every second day up to three weeks. Each Doppler recording was accompanied by a neurological examination. Patients classified as Hunt and Hess grade V were excluded from the study. All patients with remarkable brain oedema in CCT or with intracranial pressure above 25 mmHg were also excluded. Because of the well known agedependence of vasospasm after SAH, two age groups were formed. A statistically significant correlation (p > 0.05) between blood flow velocities and blood load after SAH was not found. The mean age of the investigated 72 individuals was 48.9 years (14 up to 76 years). 47 patients were younger than 56 years. Linear regression analysis indicated a correlation with a quite low significance level (r = 0.350, p 0.05) between these two variables could be established in the 25 patients older than 55 years. In a second step an intra-individual comparison of side-to-side differences in TCD and CCT was made. There were no significant differences in blood flow velocities between subjects with or without side-to-side differences in cisternal blood load. It is concluded that the amount of blood visible on initial CCT after SAH is not a powerful predictor of cerebral blood flow velocities measured by TCD. (author)

  20. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo;

    2008-01-01

    In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold...... immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response....

  1. On Ultrasonic MTI Measurement of Velocity Profiles in Blood-Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn A.J. Angelsen

    1981-04-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical analysis of Doppler frequency estimators proposed to be used in ultrasonic MTI measurements of velocity profiles in blood flow, is given. The estimators give an output in form of a single analogue voltage and the relation of the output to the Doppler spectrum is discussed. Three new estimators are also proposed. All estimators work fairly well for narrow-band Doppler spectra, but errors are found when broad-band spectra are present.

  2. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging using ultrasound: In-vivo examples of complex blood flow in the vascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik;

    2008-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood motion are restricted by a relatively low frame rate and angle dependent velocity estimates. The Plane Wave Excitation (PWE) method has been proposed to solve these limitations. The frame rate can be increased, and the 2-D...... speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. The flow patterns of six bifurcations and two veins were investigated in-vivo. It was shown: 1) that a stable vortex in the carotid bulb was present opposed to other examined bifurcations, 2) that retrograde flow was present in the...

  3. Development of a laser speckle imaging system for measuring relative blood flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael S. D.; Packulak, Ernie F.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2006-09-01

    Determining the viability of damaged or surgically reconstructed tissue is critical in most plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures. Information about tissue blood flow in the region in question can make this determination much easier. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is one technique that could potentially aid in making this determination. LSI is a non-contact full-field imaging technique with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Tissue is illuminated with diffuse red laser light and the spatial and/or temporal statistics of the resulting speckle pattern can be used to calculate relative flow velocities. We have developed a LSI system that produces relative velocity blood flow images. Bench tests of the system indicate that it may be used to distinguish between normal, decreased, and increased blood flow states of a human finger. The system has also been used to take some initial laboratory measurements using an animal model - an epigastric free flap on a rat. Preliminary results indicate that the method may be used to distinguish states of venous or arterial occlusion from unoccluded states of the skin flap. While further experimentation is necessary, these initial results indicate that LSI could be a useful aid to the plastic surgeon for assessing tissue viability.

  4. Biviscous blood flow and a new method for velocity profile adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Carlos; Reyes, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we describe our proposal of a new numerical procedure for the adjusting of the velocity profile of body fluids with two viscosities. We have focused on the relevant case of the human blood and we have selected a particular model, the biviscous blood model, with the purpose of proving the convenience of our method. We start by describing the convenience of the biviscous stress equation as a model for the blood constitutive equation, then we solve it in the particular case of a stationary flow and use this solutions as the basis of our numerical procedure, which is described afterwards. Then, we present its implementation for analyzing in vivo measurements and exhibit its pertinence. Finally, we explain the design of a programmatic code of an automatic routine which is capable of applying our method and therefore could be used as the basis of an automatic implementation in new diagnosis software within a measurement device.

  5. Optimal velocity encoding during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of velocity encoding on measurement of brain blood flow and blood volume of inflow and outflow using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. A single two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography slice was applied perpendicular to the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery at C2 level. For each subject, the velocity encoding was set from 30 to 90 cm/s with an interval of 10 cm/s for a total of seven settings. Various velocity encodings greatly affected blood flow volume, maximal blood flow velocity and mean blood flow velocity in the internal carotid artery, but did not significantly affect vertebral arteries and jugular veins. When velocity encoding was 60-80 cm/s, the inflow blood volume was 655 ± 118 mL/min, and the outflow volume was 506 ± 186 mL/min. The ratio of outflow/inflow was steady at 0.78-0.83, and there was no aliasing in any of the images. These findings suggest that velocity encodings of 60-80 cm/s should be selected during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography.

  6. Assessment of fluctuating velocities in disturbed cardiovascular blood flow : in vivo feasibility of generalized phase-contrast MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Engvall, Jan; Bolger, Ann F.; Ebbers, Tino

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of generalized phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) for the noninvasive assessment of fluctuating velocities in cardiovascular blood flow. Materials and Methods Multidimensional PC-MRI was used in a generalized manner to map mean flow velocities and intravoxel velocity standard deviation (IVSD) values in one healthy aorta and in three patients with different cardiovascular diseases. The acquired data were used to assess the kinetic energy of b...

  7. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity and blood flow during exercise and muscle ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Perko, M; Hanel, B; Schroeder, T V; Secher, N H

    1992-01-01

    Changes in middle cerebral artery flow velocity (Vmean), measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound, were used to determine whether increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or brain activation enhance cerebral perfusion during exercise. We also evaluated the role of "central command......," mechanoreceptors, and/or muscle "metaboreceptors" on cerebral perfusion. Ten healthy subjects performed two levels of dynamic exercise corresponding to a heart rate of 110 (range 89-134) and 148 (129-170) beats/min, respectively, and exhaustive one-legged static knee extension. Measurements were continued during 2......-2.5 min of muscle ischemia. MAP increased similarly during static [114 (102-133) mmHg] and heavy dynamic exercise [121 (104-136) mmHg] and increased during muscle ischemia after dynamic exercise. During heavy dynamic exercise, Vmean increased 24% (10-47%; P less than 0.01) over approximately 3 min despite...

  8. Development of dual micro-PIV system for simultaneous velocity measurements: optical arrangement techniques and application to blood flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood rheological characteristics can significantly vary with the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) in plasma. Moreover, RBCs show a complicated behavior in micro vessels. Thus, the determination of either plasma or blood cell velocity distribution has been the primary objective in blood flow analysis. However, the conditions during blood flow analyses are different from the actual physiological conditions, wherein the motion of the two distinct blood phases simultaneously occurs. In this study, we used an in vitro micro-particle image velocimetry, which is a reliable velocity field measurement technique, to evaluate the velocity distribution of plasma and blood cells simultaneously. Blood flow through a rectangular microchannel was determined using special optical filter arrangements and by assuming two different hematocrit values. Using the proposed technique, the averaged parabolic velocity profiles for the RBCs and plasma were successfully obtained and compared. The developed simultaneous measurement technique can be used to predict blood cell and plasma behaviors simultaneously with high accuracy under given clinical conditions. (paper)

  9. Changes in mean cerebral blood flow velocity during cognitive task-induced cerebral fatigue in high performance fighter pilots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongsheng Chen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have demonstrated that sustained cognitive tasks can induce cognitive fatigue and that the mean cerebral blood flow velocity changes in some cerebral regions during cerebral fatigue. OBJECTIVE: To dynamically monitor the changes in mean cerebral blood flow velocity in different brain regions of high performance fighter pilots during mental arithmetic tasks and consecutive performance tasks. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present neurophysiological trial, based on controlled observation, was performed at the Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Institute of Aviation Medicine, Air Force of China between January 2003 and December 2005. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five males, high performance fighter pilots, averaging (27.6 ± 2.5) years, were recruited for this study. METHODS: The mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery, and posterior cerebral artery of subjects was dynamically tested using transcranial Doppler during 5- hour mental arithmetic tasks and during 5- hour consecutive performance tasks. The neurobehavioral ability index was analyzed throughout each trial according to the number of correct responses, false responses, and lost responses. Simultaneously, cerebral cognitive fatigue-induced lethargy was assessed by the Stanford Sleepiness Scale. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery, and posterior cerebral artery; neurobehavioral ability index of mental arithmetic and consecutive performance tasks; Stanford Sleepiness Scale scores. RESULTS: During mental arithmetic tasks, the mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery increased during hour 2 and decreased after hour 4. There was no significant change in mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery. During hour 4, cerebral cognitive fatigue was observed and, simultaneously, Stanford Sleepiness

  10. PREDICTION OF BLOOD FLOW VELOCITY AND LEAFLET DEFORMATION VIA 2D MITRAL VALVE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.H. Mohd Adib

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the mitral valve, regional variations in structure and material properties combine to affect the biomechanics of the entire valve. From previous studies, we know that the mitral valve leaflet tissue is highly extensible. A two-dimensional model of the mitral valve was generated using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE mesh. A simple approximation of the heart geometry was used and the valve dimensions were based on actual measurements made. Valve opening and closure was simulated using contact equations. The objective of this study was to investigate and predict flow and leaflet phenomena via a simple 2D mitral valve model based on the critical parameter of blood. Two stages of mitral valves analysis were investigated: the systolic and diastolic stages. The results show a linear correlation between the mitral valve leaflet rigidity and the volume of backflow. Additionally, the simulation predicted mitral valve leaflet displacement during closure, which agreed with the results of our previous data analysis and the results for blood flow velocity during systole condition through the mitral valve outlet, as reported in the medical literature. In conclusion, these computational techniques are very useful in the study of both degenerative valve disease and failure of prostheses and will be further developed to investigate heart valve failure and subsequent surgical repair.

  11. Skin cooling maintains cerebral blood flow velocity and orthostatic tolerance during tilting in heated humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Zhang, Rong; Witkowski, Sarah; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is reduced in the heat-stressed human. The purpose of this project was to identify whether skin-surface cooling improves orthostatic tolerance. Nine subjects were exposed to 10 min of 60 degrees head-up tilting in each of four conditions: normothermia (NT-tilt), heat stress (HT-tilt), normothermia plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (NT-tilt(cool)), and heat stress plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (HT-tilt(cool)). Heating and cooling were accomplished by perfusing 46 and 15 degrees C water, respectively, though a tube-lined suit worn by each subject. During HT-tilt, four of nine subjects developed presyncopal symptoms resulting in the termination of the tilt test. In contrast, no subject experienced presyncopal symptoms during NT-tilt, NT-tilt(cool), or HT-tilt(cool). During the HT-tilt procedure, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) decreased. However, during HT-tilt(cool), MAP, total peripheral resistance, and CBFV were significantly greater relative to HT-tilt (all P skin-surface cooling prevents the fall in CBFV during upright tilting and improves orthostatic tolerance, presumably via maintenance of MAP. Hence, skin-surface cooling may be a potent countermeasure to protect against orthostatic intolerance observed in heat-stressed humans.

  12. Red blood cell velocity measurements of complete capillary in finger nail-fold using optical flow estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Chieh; Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2009-12-01

    A new approach for the measurement of the red blood cell (RBC) velocity from capillary video by using optical flow estimation has been developed. An image registration function based on mutual information was used for stabilizing images in order to cope with slight finger movement during video acquisition. After image alignment, a skeleton extraction algorithm implemented by thinning was followed which enabled tracking blood flow entirely in arteriolar and venular limbs, and the curved segment as well. Optical flow and cross-correlation approaches were applied individually for velocity estimation of twelve microcirculation videos acquired independently from three healthy volunteers. The RBC velocity of 12 vessels at three given measurement sites (arteriolar, curve and venular sites) in a 45-second period of occlusion-release condition of vessel were examined. There were four stages of flow conditions: resting (T(1)), pre-occlusion (T(2)), post-occlusion (T(3)) and release (T(4)). The results from both approaches revealed that the velocity difference among the three sites were not significant. The pattern of distribution of RBC velocity was also reported. The correlation coefficient (r) of the velocity calculated using optical flow and cross-correlation in four stages of blood flow conditions and the overall correlation were: 1-window: r(T1)=0.68, r(T2)=0.67, r(T3)=0.92, r(T4)=0.88 and r(All)=0.79; 2-window: r(T1)=0.84, r(T2)=0.88, r(T3)=0.87, r(T4)=0.93 and r(All)=0.88. The averaged velocity results showed no significant differences between optical flow and 2-window cross-correlation in all flow conditions. Optical flow estimation is not only independent to the direction of flow, but also able to calculate the intensity displacement of all pixels. The proposed velocity measurement system has been shown to provide complete velocity information for the whole vessel limb which demonstrates the advantage of measuring blood flow at the level of microcirculation more

  13. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschinger, Gerold C.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  14. Ocular blood flow velocity in primary open angle glaucoma - A tropical african population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odunlami Olufemi Adeyinka

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The outcomes of this study indicate that ocular blood flow alterations including reductions in PSV and EDV and increase in RI of the OA and CRA are present in black-skinned Africans with POAG.

  15. Regional differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity response to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddersen, Berend; Neupane, Pritam; Thanbichler, Florian; Hadolt, Irmgard; Sattelmeyer, Vera; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Waanders, Robb; Noachtar, Soheyl; Ausserer, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) may appear above 2,500 m altitude, if the time allowed for acclimatization is insufficient. As the mechanisms underlying brain adaptation to the hypobaric hypoxic environment are not fully understood, a prospective study was performed investigating neurophysiological changes by means of near infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalograpy (EEG), and transcranial doppler sonography at 100, 3,440 and 5,050 m above sea level in the Khumbu Himal, Nepal. Fourteen of the 26 mountaineers reaching 5,050 m altitude developed symptoms of AMS between 3,440 and 5,050 m altitude (Lake-Louise Score ⩾3). Their EEG frontal beta activity and occipital alpha activity increased between 100 and 3,440 m altitude, i.e., before symptoms appeared. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) increased in all mountaineers between 100 and 3,440 m altitude. During further ascent to 5,050 altitude, mountaineers with AMS developed a further increase in CBFV in the MCA, whereas in all mountaineers CBFV decreased continuously with increasing altitude in the posterior cerebral arteries. These results indicate that hypobaric hypoxia causes different regional changes in CBFV despite similar electrophysiological changes. PMID:26082017

  16. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins

    OpenAIRE

    Aschinger, Gerold C.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Rainer A. Leitgeb; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; René M. Werkmeister

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an...

  17. The effect of the prior flow velocity on the structural organization of aggregated erythrocytes in the quiescent blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribush, Alexander; Meyerstein, Dan; Meyerstein, Naomi

    2011-02-01

    Usually, investigations of erythrocyte aggregation at rest are focused on effects of the strength of erythrocyte-erythrocyte attractive interactions and the volume fraction of the cells, whereas the role of prior flow velocity has not been thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study is to fill this gap. The main conclusions extracted from time records of the complex admittance of blood are as follows: (1) Dispersion of blood in a prior flow into discrete aggregates increases the mesh size of network, which, as has been recently shown, is formed in the quiescent blood. (2) If the energy of the flow field is sufficient to prevent the formation of face-to-side intercellular links, so that the dispersed phase consists of linear rouleaux, changes in the mesh size correlate positively with the length of rouleaux. (3) At slower prior flow velocities, the cells are combined into branched aggregates. As the degree of branching increases, the effect becomes less important. (4) The effects of the length of linear rouleaux and the degree of branching of ramified aggregates on the mesh size are qualitatively similar for suspensions with different aggregating media. (5) Erythrocytes suspended in strongly aggregating media form at low flow conditions a network-like structure. In this case, unlike high and moderate prior flow regimes, the mesh size of RBC network at rest is less than that formed after the stoppage of completely dispersed blood. PMID:21036560

  18. The influence of transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) on human cerebral blood flow velocities

    OpenAIRE

    ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Elting, Jan-Willem J.; Fidler, Vaclav; Staal, Michiel J

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been shown that transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) reduces sympathetic tone. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has proven qualities to improve coronary, peripheral, and cerebral blood circulation. Therefore, we postulate that TENS and SCS affect the autonomic nervous system in analogous ways. In this line of thought, cervical application of TENS might be a useful and simple adjunct in the treatment of cerebrovascular disease by improving cerebral blood flow. Exper...

  19. Blood flow velocity in the Popliteal Vein using Transverse Oscillation Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechsgaard, Thor; Lindskov Hansen, Kristoffer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Holbek, Simon; Lönn, Lars; Strandberg, Charlotte; Bækgaard, Niels; Bachmann Nielsen, Michael; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    the veins of the lower limbs. Four volunteers were recruited for the study. A standardized flow was provoked with a cuff compression-decompression system placed around the lower leg. The average peak velocity in the popliteal vein of the four volunteers was 151.5 cm/s for SDUS and 105.9 cm/s for TOUS...

  20. MR velocity mapping measurement of renal artery blood flow in patients with impaired kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, M; Petersen, L.J.; Stahlberg, F;

    1996-01-01

    . MR velocity mapping was performed in both renal arteries using an ECG-triggered gradient echo pulse sequence previously validated in normal volunteers. Effective renal plasma flow was calculated from the clearance rate of PAH during constant infusion and the split of renal function was evaluated by...

  1. Cerebral blood flow velocities are reduced during attacks of unilateral migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J

    1995-01-01

    It has been disputed whether or not large intracranial arteries are dilated during migraine attacks. In order to answer this question the present transcranial Doppler study focused on side-to-side differences of middle cerebral artery blood velocity during unilateral attacks of migraine without...... aura in 25 patients. Blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery was lower on the headache side (59 cm/s) than on the non-headache side (65 cm/s) during the migraine attack. No such difference was found outside of attack (65 cm/s both sides). The difference (headache side minus non-headache side) was...... on average -6.1 cm/s during attack compared to -0.4 cm/s outside of attack (p = 0.01). Assuming that rCBF is unchanged during attacks of migraine without aura, our results suggest a 9% increase in middle cerebral artery lumen (cross-sectional area) on the affected side during unilateral attacks of...

  2. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow, but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP. In this study our aim was to correlate average peak coronary flow velocity (APV to CPP during mechanical CCs. Methods In a closed chest porcine model, cardiac arrest was established through electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in eleven pigs. After one minute, mechanical chest compressions were initiated and then maintained for 10 minutes upon which the pigs were defibrillated. Measurements of coronary blood flow in the left anterior descending artery were made at baseline and during VF with a catheter based Doppler flow fire measuring APV. Furthermore measurements of central (thoracic venous and arterial pressures were also made in order to calculate the theoretical CPP. Results Average peak coronary flow velocity was significantly higher compared to baseline during mechanical chests compressions and this was observed during the entire period of mechanical chest compressions (12 - 39% above baseline. The APV slowly declined during the 10 min period of mechanical chest compressions, but was still higher than baseline at the end of mechanical chest compressions. CPP was simultaneously maintained at > 20 mmHg during the 10 minute episode of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Our study showed good correlation between CPP and APV which was highly significant, during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs in a closed chest porcine model. In addition APV was even higher during mechanical CCs compared to baseline. Mechanical

  3. Simultaneous mapping of temporally-resolved blood flow velocity and oxygenation in femoral artery and vein during reactive hyperemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langham Michael C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-occlusive hyperemia is often used as a paradigm to evaluate vascular reactivity, for example by measuring post-ischemic flow-mediated dilation, arterial blood flow or temporally resolved venous blood oxygenation (HbO2. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of a simultaneous measurement of blood flow and HbO2 in the femoral circulation as part of a single procedure. Methods A multi-echo GRE pulse sequence was designed and implemented to collect velocity-encoded projections in addition to full-image echoes for field mapping as a means to quantify intravascular magnetic susceptibility. The method's feasibility was evaluated at 3T in a small pilot study involving two groups of healthy subjects (mean ages 26 ± 1.6 and 59 ± 7.3 years, N = 7 and 5, respectively in terms of six parameters characterizing the time-course of reactive hyperemia and their sensitivity to differentiate age effects. The reproducibility was assessed on two of the seven young healthy subjects with three repeated measurements. Results The physiological parameters agree with those obtained with current methods that quantify either velocity or HbO2 alone. Of the six measures of vascular reactivity, one from each group was significantly different in the two subject groups (p Conclusion The proposed method is able quantify multiple parameters that may lead to more detailed assessment of peripheral vascular reactivity in a single cuff paradigm rather than in separate procedures as required previously, thereby improving measurement efficiency and patient comfort.

  4. A comparison of two methods to measure coronary flow reserve in the setting of coronary angioplasty: intracoronary blood flow velocity measurements with a Doppler catheter, and digital subtraction cineangiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); F. Zijlstra (Felix); G-J. Laarman (GertJan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); K.J. Beatt (Kevin); J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIntracoronary blood flow velocity measurements with a Doppler balloon catheter and the radiographic assessment of myocardial perfusion with contrast media, before and after the intracoronary administration of papaverine, have previously been used to investigate regional coronary flow res

  5. Voluntary suppression of hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation mitigates the reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Ikebe, Yusuke; Fujii, Naoto; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-04-15

    Hyperthermia during prolonged exercise leads to hyperventilation, which can reduce arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 ) and, in turn, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and thermoregulatory response. We investigated 1) whether humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise and 2) the effects of voluntary breathing control on PaCO2 , CBF, sweating, and skin blood flow. Twelve male subjects performed two exercise trials at 50% of peak oxygen uptake in the heat (37°C, 50% relative humidity) for up to 60 min. Throughout the exercise, subjects breathed normally (normal-breathing trial) or they tried to control their minute ventilation (respiratory frequency was timed with a metronome, and target tidal volumes were displayed on a monitor) to the level reached after 5 min of exercise (controlled-breathing trial). Plotting ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses against esophageal temperature (Tes) showed that minute ventilation increased linearly with rising Tes during normal breathing, whereas controlled breathing attenuated the increased ventilation (increase in minute ventilation from the onset of controlled breathing: 7.4 vs. 1.6 l/min at +1.1°C Tes; P blood flow velocity (MCAV) with rising Tes, but controlled breathing attenuated those reductions (estimated PaCO2 -3.4 vs. -0.8 mmHg; MCAV -10.4 vs. -3.9 cm/s at +1.1°C Tes; P = 0.002 and 0.011, respectively). Controlled breathing had no significant effect on chest sweating or forearm vascular conductance (P = 0.67 and 0.91, respectively). Our results indicate that humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise, and this suppression mitigates changes in PaCO2 and CBF. PMID:25632021

  6. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo;

    2008-01-01

    velocity (CBFV) was measured together with ventilatory parameters and heart rate before, during, and after immersion. RESULTS: Within seconds after immersion in ice-water, heart rate increased significantly from 95 +/- 8 to 126 +/- 7 bpm (mean +/- SEM). Immersion was associated with an elevation...

  7. Ultrasound systems for blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners can be used both for displayinggray-scale images of the anatomy and for visualizing theblood flow dynamically in the body.The systems can interrogate the flow at a single position in the bodyand there find the velocity distribution over time. They can also show adynamic...... color image of velocity at up to 20 to 60 frames a second. Both measurements are performedby repeatedly pulsing in the same direction and then usethe correlation from pulse to pulse to determine the velocity.The paper gives a simple model for the interactionbetween the ultrasound and the moving blood...

  8. Comparison of blood velocity measurements between ultrasound Doppler and accelerated phase-contrast MR angiography in small arteries with disturbed flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Jingfeng; Johnson, Kevin; Wieben, Oliver; Zagzebski, James [Medical Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States); Strother, Charles; Consigny, Dan [Radiology Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States); Baker, Sara, E-mail: jjiang2@wisc.edu [School of Ultrasound, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States)

    2011-03-21

    Ultrasound Doppler (UD) velocity measurements are commonly used to quantify blood flow velocities in vivo. The aim of our work was to investigate the accuracy of in vivo spectral Doppler measurements of velocity waveforms. Waveforms were derived from spectral Doppler signals and corrected for intrinsic spectral broadening errors by applying a previously published algorithm. The method was tested in a canine aneurysm model by determining velocities in small arteries (3-4 mm diameter) near the aneurysm where there was moderately disturbed flow. Doppler results were compared to velocity measurements in the same arteries acquired with a rapid volumetric phase contrast MR angiography technique named phase contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction magnetic resonance angiography (PC-VIPR MRA). After correcting for intrinsic spectral broadening, there was a high degree of correlation between velocities obtained by the real-time UD and the accelerated PC-MRA technique. The peak systolic velocity yielded a linear correlation coefficient of r = 0.83, end diastolic velocity resulted in r = 0.81, and temporally averaged mean velocity resulted in r = 0.76. The overall velocity waveforms obtained by the two techniques were also highly correlated (r = 0.89 {+-} 0.06). There were, however, only weak correlations for the pulsatility index (PI: 0.25) and resistive index (RI: 0.14) derived from the two techniques. Results demonstrate that to avoid overestimations of peak systolic velocities, the results for UD must be carefully corrected to compensate for errors caused by intrinsic spectral broadening.

  9. A Highly Similar Mathematical Model for Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Qi; Wang, Jisheng; Xiang, Hu; Ge, Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity(CBFV) is an important parameter for study of cerebral hemodynamics. However, a simple and highly similar mathematical model has not yet been established for analyzing CBFV. To alleviate this issue, through TCD examination in 100 geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease (46 males and 54 females), we established a representative eighth-order Fourier function Vx(t) that simulates the CBFV. The measured TCD waveforms were compared to those derived from Vx(t), an illustrative Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was employed to determine the validity. The results showed that the TCD waves could been reconstructed for patients with different CBFVs by implementing their variable heart rates and the formulated maximum/minimum of Vx(t). Comparisons between derived and measured TCD waveforms suggest that the two waveforms are very similar. The results confirm that CBFV can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function. This function Vx(t) can be used extensively for a prospective study of cerebral hemodynamics in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease.

  10. Combined vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging for improved imaging of complex blood flow in the carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Dahl, Torbjørn; Torp, Hans; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    Color flow imaging and pulsed wave (PW) Doppler are important diagnostic tools in the examination of patients with carotid artery disease. However, measurement of the true peak systolic velocity is dependent on sample volume placement and the operator's ability to provide an educated guess of the flow direction. Using plane wave transmissions and a duplex imaging scheme, we present an all-in-one modality that provides both vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging from one acquisition, in addition to separate B-mode images of sufficient quality. The vector Doppler information was used to provide automatically calibrated (angle-corrected) PW Doppler spectra at every image point. It was demonstrated that the combined information can be used to generate spatial maps of the peak systolic velocity, highlighting regions of high velocity and the extent of the stenotic region, which could be used to automate work flow as well as improve the accuracy of measurement of true peak systolic velocity. The modality was tested in a small group (N = 12) of patients with carotid artery disease. PW Doppler, vector velocity and B-mode images could successfully be obtained from a single recording for all patients with a body mass index ranging from 21 to 31 and a carotid depth ranging from 16 to 28 mm. PMID:24785436

  11. A segmented K-space velocity mapping protocol for quantification of renal artery blood flow during breath-holding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Cortsen, M; Söndergaard, L;

    1995-01-01

    segmented k-space technique, in which the entire data acquisition can be made within a breath-hold by the sampling of several phase-encoding lines within a small time window during each heart cycle. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of a segmented k-space velocity mapping protocol for...... renal artery flow determination. The protocol uses 16 phase-encoding lines per heart beat during 16 heart cycles and gives a temporal velocity resolution of 160 msec. Comparison with a conventional ECG-triggered velocity mapping protocol was made in phantoms as well as in volunteers. In our study, both...

  12. Flow imaging with phase velocity encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied blood flow quantitation by MR phase velocity encoding (PVE) under steady-flow conditions on in vitro models. Different flow conditions that might cause signal loss were studied: high velocities, velocity gradients, and turbulence. Results showed the failure of the PVE technique in the presence of highly turbulent flows. On the other hand, PVE could measure accurately flows for which radial and circumferential turbulence intensity did not exceed 8 cm/sec when a 1-mm scan resolution is used. The authors concluded that turbulence disturbed the spatial encoding of proton position and therefore induced signal loss

  13. The effect of adding CO2 to hypoxic inspired gas on cerebral blood flow velocity and breathing during incremental exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Lin Fan

    Full Text Available Hypoxia increases the ventilatory response to exercise, which leads to hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia and subsequent reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF. We studied the effects of adding CO2 to a hypoxic inspired gas on CBF during heavy exercise in an altitude naïve population. We hypothesized that augmented inspired CO2 and hypoxia would exert synergistic effects on increasing CBF during exercise, which would improve exercise capacity compared to hypocapnic hypoxia. We also examined the responsiveness of CO2 and O2 chemoreception on the regulation ventilation ([Formula: see text]E during incremental exercise. We measured middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv; index of CBF, [Formula: see text]E, end-tidal PCO2, respiratory compensation threshold (RC and ventilatory response to exercise ([Formula: see text]E slope in ten healthy men during incremental cycling to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.10 with and without augmenting the fraction of inspired CO2 (FICO2. During exercise in normoxia, augmenting FICO2 elevated MCAv throughout exercise and lowered both RC onset and[Formula: see text]E slope below RC (P0.05. The [Formula: see text]E slope above RC was unchanged with either hypoxia or augmented FICO2 (P>0.05. We found augmenting FICO2 increased CBF during sub-maximal exercise in normoxia, but not in hypoxia, indicating that the 'normal' cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia is blunted during exercise in hypoxia, possibly due to an exhaustion of cerebral vasodilatory reserve. This finding may explain the lack of improvement of exercise capacity in hypoxia with augmented CO2. Our data further indicate that, during exercise below RC, chemoreception is responsive, while above RC the ventilatory response to CO2 is blunted.

  14. Estimation of blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    Ultrasound systems are especially useful in estimating blood velocities in the human body because they are noninvasive and can display an estimate in real time. This book offers a comprehensive treatment of this relatively new, important technology. The book begins with an introduction to...... ultrasound, flow physics, and the circulatory system. Next, the interaction of ultrasound with blood is discussed. The special contribution of the book lies in the remaining chapters, which offer a lucid, thorough description of continuous and pulsed wave systems, the latest systems for doing color flow...

  15. Relative pressure estimation from velocity measurements in blood flows: state-of-the-art and new approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoglio, Cristobal; Núñez, Rodolfo; Galarce, Felipe; Nordsletten, David; Osses, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The pressure gradient across stenotic blood vessels is an important clinical index for diagnosis of the pathological severity of the cardiovascular disease. While the clinical gold standard for its measurement is invasive catheterization, Phase-Contrast MR-imaging has emerged as a promising tool for enabling a non-invasive quantification of the relative pressures, by linking the (highly spatially resolved) velocity measurements with the relative pressure via the Navier-Stokes equations. In th...

  16. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Henrik; Madsen Hardig Bjarne; Steen Stig; Sjoberg Trygve; Harnek Jan; Olivecrona Goran K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs) have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow), but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the cor...

  17. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during rowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Niels Henry; Pott, F; Knudsen, L.;

    1997-01-01

    original,arterial blood pressure,central venous pressure,cerebral blood flow, exercise, transcranial Doppler......original,arterial blood pressure,central venous pressure,cerebral blood flow, exercise, transcranial Doppler...

  18. The influence of hyperoxia on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (CBFVMCA) in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbitsch, Christian; Lorenz, Ingo H; Hörmann, Christoph; Hinteregger, Martin; Löckinger, Alexander; Moser, Patrizia L; Kremser, Christian; Schocke, Michael; Felber, Stephan; Pfeiffer, Karl P; Benzer, Arnulf

    2002-09-01

    Conflicting results reported on the effects of hyperoxia on cerebral hemodynamics have been attributed mainly to methodical and species differences. In the present study contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) perfusion measurement was used to analyze the influence of hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 1.0) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in awake, normoventilating volunteers (n = 19). Furthermore, the experiment was repeated in 20 volunteers for transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) measurement of cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (CBFV(MCA)). When compared to normoxia (FiO2 = 0.21), hyperoxia heterogeneously influenced rCBV (4.95 +/- 0.02 to 12.87 +/- 0.08 mL/100g (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 4.50 +/- 0.02 to 13.09 +/- 0.09 mL/100g (FiO2 = 1.0). In contrast, hyperoxia diminished rCBF in all regions (68.08 +/- 0.38 to 199.58 +/- 1.58 mL/100g/min (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 58.63 +/- 0.32 to 175.16 +/- 1.51 mL/100g/min (FiO2 = 1.0)) except in parietal and left frontal gray matter. CBFV(MCA) remained unchanged regardless of the inspired oxygen fraction (62 +/- 9 cm/s (FiO2 = 0.21) vs. 64 +/- 8 cm/s (FiO2 = 1.0)). Finding CBFV(MCA) unchanged during hyperoxia is consistent with the present study's unchanged rCBF in parietal and left frontal gray matter. In these fronto-parietal regions predominantly fed by the middle cerebral artery, the vasoconstrictor effect of oxygen was probably counteracted by increased perfusion of foci of neuronal activity controlling general behavior and arousal. PMID:12413599

  19. A lumped model for blood flow and pressure in the systemic arteries based on an approximate velocity profile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberts, Wouter; Bosboom, E Marielle H; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2009-01-01

    Previously, by assuming a viscous dominated flow in the boundary layer and an inertia dominated flow in the vessel core, a velocity profile function for a 1D-wave propagation model was derived. Because the time dependent shape of the velocity profile in this boundary layer model depends on the size of the inviscid core and the boundary layer, and thus on the Womersley number, it differs along the arterial tree. In this study we evaluated a lumped model for a vessel segment in which the element configuration is based on physical phenomena described by the boundary layer model and for which all parameters have a physically based quantitative value dependent on the Womersley numbers. The proposed electrical analog consists of a Womersley number dependent resistor and an inductor arranged in parallel, representing the flow impedence in respectively the vessel core and the boundary layer, in series with a second resistor. After incorporating a capacitor representing the vessel compliance in this rigid tube model, the element configuration resembles the configuration of the four-element windkessel model. For arbitrary Womersley numbers the relative impedence of Womersley theory is approximated with high accuracy. In the limits for small and large Womersley numbers the relative impedences of the proposed lumped model correspond exactly to Womersley theory. PMID:19292506

  20. Tissue motion in blood velocity estimation and its simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt;

    1998-01-01

    Determination of blood velocities for color flow mapping systems involves both stationary echo cancelling and velocity estimation. Often the stationary echo cancelling filter is the limiting factor in color flow mapping and the optimization and further development of this filter is crucial to the...

  1. The phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil has no effect on cerebral blood flow or blood velocity, but nevertheless induces headache in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Jacobsen, Torsten Bjørn; Olesen, Jes

    2002-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are important hemodynamic regulators in many tissues. Glyceryl trinitrate markedly dilates large cerebral arteries and increases cGMP. Here, the authors study the effect of sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of cGMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase 5 on cerebral hemodynamics and...... headache induction. Ten healthy subjects were included in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study where placebo or sildenafil 100 mg (highest therapeutic dose) were administered on two separate days. Blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (Vmca) was recorded by transcranial Doppler, and...... repeatedly. Headache responses and tenderness of pericranial muscles were scored verbally. Sildenafil caused no significant changes in rCBFmca, Vmca, or in temporal or radial artery diameter, but heart rate increased and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly compared to placebo. Despite the lack...

  2. Is the measurement of inferior thyroid artery blood flow velocity by color-flow Doppler ultrasonography useful for differential diagnosis between gestational transient thyrotoxicosis and Graves' disease? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayid Shafi Zuhur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the role of peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity and resistance indices of both the right and left inferior thyroid arteries measured by color-flow Doppler ultrasonography for a differential diagnosis between gestational transient thyrotoxicosis and Graves' disease during pregnancy. METHODS: The right and left inferior thyroid artery-peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity and resistance indices of 96 patients with thyrotoxicosis (41 with gestational transient thyrotoxicosis, 31 age-matched pregnant patients with Graves' disease and 24 age- and sex-matched non-pregnant patients with Graves' disease and 25 ageand sex-matched healthy euthyroid subjects were assessed with color-flow Doppler ultrasonography. RESULTS: The right and left inferior thyroid artery-peak systolic and end-diastolic velocities in patients with gestational transient thyrotoxicosis were found to be significantly lower than those of pregnant patients with Graves' disease and higher than those of healthy euthyroid subjects. However, the right and left inferior thyroid artery peak systolic and end-diastolic velocities in pregnant patients with Graves' disease were significantly lower than those of non-pregnant patients with Graves' disease. The right and left inferior thyroid artery peak systolic and end-diastolic velocities were positively correlated with TSH-receptor antibody levels. We found an overlap between the inferior thyroid artery-blood flow velocities in a considerable number of patients with gestational transient thyrotoxicosis and pregnant patients with Graves' disease. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the measurement of inferior thyroid artery-blood flow velocities with colorflow Doppler ultrasonography does not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be recommended as an initial diagnostic test for a differential diagnosis between gestational transient thyrotoxicosis and Graves' disease during pregnancy.

  3. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  4. Dogs with hearth diseases causing turbulent high-velocity blood flow have changes in patelet function and von Willebrand factor multimer distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Falk, Bo Torkel; Haubro, Lotte; Pedersen, Lotte Gam; Pedersen, Henrik Duelund

    2005-01-01

    echocardiography were performed in all dogs. PFA100 closure times (the ability of platelets to occlude a hole in a membrane at high shear rates), platelet activation markers (plasma thromboxane B2 concentration, platelet surface P-selectin expression), platelet aggregation (in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma......The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate platelet function using in vitro tests based on both high and low shear rates and von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimeric composition in dogs with cardiac disease and turbulent high-velocity blood flow. Client-owned asymptomatic, untreated...... with 3 different agonists), and vWf multimers were analyzed. Cavaliers with moderate to severe MR and dogs with SAS had longer closure times and a lower percentage of the largest vWf multimers than did controls. Maximal aggregation responses were unchanged in dogs with SAS but enhaned in Cavaliers with...

  5. Assessment value of blood flow velocity and resistance index detection by transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound on effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Bin Fan

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the assessment value of blood flow velocity and resistance index detection by transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound on effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.Methods:A total of 78 cases of ovarian cancer patients receiving treatment in our hospital from September 2012 to May 2014 were included for study, all patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and before and after treatment, transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound (TVCDU) was used to record resistance index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI), the expression levels of serum tumor markers, illness-related indicators and apoptosis-related factors in circulating blood were detected, and the correlation between TVCDU monitoring indexes and ovarian cancer-related indicators was further analyzed.Results: PI value (1.13±0.12) and RI value (0.65±0.05) of ovarian cancer patients after treatment were significantly higher than PI value (0.72±0.06) and RI value (0.32±0.03) of ovarian cancer patients before treatment; serum HE4, CA153, CA125 and毬-HCG levels of ovarian cancer patients after treatment were lower than those before treatment; serum MSLN, CCL-18, FS, CL and Hpa levels of ovarian cancer patients after treatment were lower than those before treatment; after ovarian cancer patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ADM, HIF-1毩, PCNA and bcl-2 gene expression levels were lower than those before treatment; RI and PI values of ovarian cancer patients were inversely proportional to the expression levels of HE4, CA153, CA125,毬-HCG, MSLN, CCL-18, FS, CL, Hpa, ADM, HIF-1毩, PCNA and bcl-2. Conclusion:Blood flow velocity and resistance index detection by transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound can be used as a highly efficient means to evaluate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer, and it has positive significance in judging disease severity, guiding treatment and other aspects.

  6. ROLE OF COLOUR DOPPLER: CEREBRAL AND UMBILICAL ARTERIAL BLOOD FLOW VELOCITY IN NORMAL AND GROWTH RESTRICTED PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Patange; Neha

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Doppler velocimetry is a rapid noninvasive test that provides valuable information about haemodynamic situation of the foetus and is an efficient diagnostic test of foetal jeopardy which helps in timely intervention and management of high risk pregnancy for better perinatal outcome. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate middle cerebral artery and umbilical arterial velocity waveforms and their various indices during third trimester of pregnancy. METHODOLOGY: Prospective st...

  7. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper;

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation....... Using a correlation search can also yield the direction, and the full velocity vector is thereby found. An examples from a flow rig is shown....

  8. Ecografia transfontanelar com fluxo a cores em recém-nascidos prematuros Intracranial blood flow velocities evaluated by color doppler (duplex in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cardoso de Assis

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinarmos, evolutivamente, a medida da velocidade do fluxo sangüíneo nas artérias intracranianas, em recém-nascidos prematuros (RNP normais e com hemorragia intracerebral, avaliamos - no período de junho de 1994 a março de 1999 - 73 recém-nascidos prematuros. A idade gestacional variou de 28 a 36 semanas e o peso ao nascimento variou de 720g a 2530g. O diagnóstico da hemorragia intracerebral foi realizado utilizando-se a ecografia transfontanelar (EGT. Para avaliação seqüencial da medida da velocidade do fluxo sangüíneo nas artérias intracranianas os 73 foram submetidos a EGT, com Doppler pulsátil, no 3º, 7º, 30º e 90º dias de vida. Após obtermos os valores numéricos destas velocidades determinamos o indice de resistência (IR. Ao analisarmos os valores do IR, comparando-se os 2 grupos de RNP, concluimos que os valores do IR são sempre mais elevados nos RNP normais (RNP-N que nos RNP com hemorragia intracerebral (RNP-HIC; que tanto no grupo de RNP normais quanto no grupo de RNP com hemorragia intracerebral os valores do IR decrescem significativamente com o acréscimo da idade dos neonatos. Analisando-se ainda, comparativamente, os valores do IR nos RNP com hemorragia intracerebral, em seus diversos graus, observamos não haver, evolutivamente, diferença estatisticamente significante. Analisando-se também , comparativamente, os valores do IR nos RNP com hemorragia intracerebral localizada no hemisfério cerebral direito ou esquerdo concluimos não haver diferença estatisticamente significante entre os valores do IR obtidos das artérias localizadas no hemisfério cerebral acometido comparados aos valores do IR obtidos do hemisfério cerebral não afetado.In order to ascertain the blood flow velocities in the intracranial arteries we evaluated 73 preterm neonates during a period ranging from June 1994 to March 1999. These preterm infants were divided in two separate groups, 18 healthy and 55 with

  9. ROLE OF COLOUR DOPPLER: CEREBRAL AND UMBILICAL ARTERIAL BLOOD FLOW VELOCITY IN NORMAL AND GROWTH RESTRICTED PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patange

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Doppler velocimetry is a rapid noninvasive test that provides valuable information about haemodynamic situation of the foetus and is an efficient diagnostic test of foetal jeopardy which helps in timely intervention and management of high risk pregnancy for better perinatal outcome. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate middle cerebral artery and umbilical arterial velocity waveforms and their various indices during third trimester of pregnancy. METHODOLOGY: Prospective study including 50 women with normal singleton pregnancy and 50 women with intrauterine growth restricted pregnancy booked for regular antenatal checkups in our hospital. RESULTS: Foetal biometery i. e. EFW(estimated foetal weight , BPD (bi parietal diameter, HC(head circumference, AC(abdominal circumference and FL( femur length all the values were significantly reduced in IUGR pregnancy. Mean amniotic fluid index was significantly reduced for IUGR pregnancy. Umbilical artery indices were significantly raised in IUGR pregnancy. Mean Pulsatility index (PI for study group was 1.03±0.22 as compared to control group of 0.87±0.17, P value being < 0.0003. Mean Resistance index (RI for study group was 0.65±0.14 as compared to 0.58±0.06 for control group, P value being 0.0015. Mean Systolic diastolic ratio (S/D for study group was 2.96±0.78 as compared to 2.43±0.32 for control group, P value being < 0.0001. Reduced mean middle cerebral artery indices in IUGR pregnancy. Cerebro umbilical ratio was significantly reduced in study group. AEDV was present in 12% of women in study group and REDV in 8% women of study group. IUGR pregnancies deliver early as in comparison to normal pregnancies. Significant numbers of babies having IUGR were delivery by LSCS. Mean birth weight is significantly reduced in control for study group. Similarly, significant number of babies in IUGR pregnancies requires NICU admission .Significant number of patients in study group has associated PIH. CONCLUSIONS

  10. Regulation of pulpal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulation of blood flow of the dental pulp was investigated in dogs and rats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. Pulpal blood flow was altered by variations of local and systemic hemodynamics. Macrocirculatory blood flow (ml/min/100 g) in the dental pulp was measured with both the 133Xe washout and the 15-microns radioisotope-labeled microsphere injection methods on the canine teeth of dogs, to provide a comparison of the two methods in the same tooth. Microcirculatory studies were conducted in the rat incisor tooth with microscopic determination of the vascular pattern, RBC velocity, and intravascular volumetric flow distribution. Pulpal resistance vessels have alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors. Activation of alpha-receptors by intra-arterial injection of norepinephrine (NE) caused both a reduction in macrocirculatory Qp in dogs and decreases in arteriolar and venular diameters and intravascular volumetric flow (Qi) in rats. These responses were blocked by the alpha-antagonist PBZ. Activation of beta-receptors by intra-arterial injection of isoproterenal (ISO) caused a paradoxical reduction of Qp in dogs. In rats, ISO caused a transient increase in arteriolar Qi followed by a flow reduction; arteriolar dilation was accompanied by venular constriction. These macrocirculatory and microcirculatory responses to ISO were blocked by the alpha-antagonist propranolol

  11. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schemes...... parallel to the skin surface. Angling the transducer will often disturb the flow, and new techniques for finding transverse velocities are needed. The various approaches for determining transverse velocities will be explained. This includes techniques using two-dimensional correlation (speckle tracking...

  12. Effects of adenosine and adenosine A2A receptor agonist on motor nerve conduction velocity and nerve blood flow in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sokindra; Arun, K H S; Kaul, Chaman L; Sharma, Shyam S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of chronic administration of adenosine and CGS 21680 hydrochloride (adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist) on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), nerve blood flow (NBF) and histology of sciatic nerve in animal model of diabetic neuropathy. Adenosinergic agents were administered for 2 weeks after 6 weeks of streptozotocin-induced (50 mg/kg i.p.) diabetes in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Significant reduction in sciatic MNCV and NBF were observed after 8 weeks in diabetic animals in comparison with control (non diabetic) rats. Adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved sciatic MNCV and NBF in diabetic rats. The protective effect of adenosine on MNCV and NBF was completely reversed by theophylline (50 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, suggesting that the adenosine effect was mediated via adenosinergic receptors. CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved NBF; however, MNCV was not significantly improved in diabetic rats. At a dose of 1 mg/kg, neither MNCV nor NBF was improved by CGS 21680 in diabetic rats. ZM 241385 (adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist) prevented the effect of CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Histological changes observed in sciatic nerve were partially improved by the adenosinergic agents in diabetic rats. Results of the present study, suggest the potential of adenosinergic agents in the therapy of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:15829161

  13. Blood Flow Multiscale Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; Mijović, Budimir; Nikolić, Tatjana

    2007-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease is one of most frequent cause deaths in modern society. The objective of this work is analyse the effect of dynamic vascular geometry (curvature, torsion,bifurcation) and pulsatile blood nature on secondary flow, wall shear stress and platelet deposition. The problem was examined as multi-scale physical phenomena using perturbation analysis and numerical modelling. The secondary flow determined as influence pulsatile pressure, vascular tube time-dependen...

  14. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T;

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA...

  15. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR) can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking complements and provides incremental information compared to particle

  16. Adaptive blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of data-adaptive spectral estimation techniques for blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound. Current commercial systems are based on the averaged periodogram, which requires a large observation window to give sufficient spectral resolution. Herein, we propose...

  17. 男大学生体成分与脑血流速度相关性研究%The Research on the Relationship Between Body Composition and Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Male College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚宝元

    2012-01-01

    探讨身体成分与脑血流速度(Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity,CBFV)的关系,以便揭示体脂对CBFV的影响。方法:以10名男大学生为实验对象,应用经颅多普勒技术检测了其安静时的大脑中动脉血流速度和采用In Body身体成份分析仪测试了其身体成分,然后对CBFV和身体进行了相关分析。结果:大脑中动脉收缩期峰速度(Vp)、舒张期末峰速度(Vd)和平均峰速度(Vm)分别与其体脂、体脂百分数和体重指数(BMI)呈显著负相关;而大脑中动脉的搏动指数(PI)分别与体脂百分数和BMI呈显著正相关。结论:体脂对CBFV有显著的负面影响,体脂增多,CBFV降低。%By investigating the relationship between body composition and cerebral blood flow velocity, the effect of body fat on cerebral blood flow velocity was evaluated. Methods: The middle cerebral artery blood velocity was evaluated by Using CBS - II transcranial Doppler at rest in ten male college students, and their body composition was assessed by using In Body body Composi- tion analyser at rest. Correlation of body composition to the middle cerebral artery blood velocity was analysed. Results : Vp, Vd and Vm of MCA were negatively related to body fat,body fat percentage and BMI respectively. PI of MCA was positively related to body fat, body fat and BMI percentage, respectively. Conclusion: Our study implies boy fat has significant and negative effect on cerebral blood flow velocity. Cerebral blood flow velocity will reduce when body fat increases.

  18. Doppler blood flow indicator

    OpenAIRE

    Byrtus, David

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor´s thesis deals with basis of ultra-acoustics. The project presents basic information about Doppler effect. It describes the methods of processing and analyzing of velocity and direction of blood at doppler’s systems with modulated and unmodulated carrier wave. The project presents the system design of non-directional doppler indicator with unmodulated carrier wave for 8 MHz frequency, generating intensity of ultrasound 100 mW/cm2 and diameter D-shaped transmitting transducer 8 m...

  19. Local aggregation characteristics of microscale blood flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Sherwood, Joseph M.; Dusting, Jonathan; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-11-01

    Erythrocyte aggregation (EA) is an important aspect of microvascular flows affecting blood flow and viscosity. Microscale blood flows have been studied extensively in recent years using computational and microfluidic based approaches. However, the relationship between the local structural characteristics of blood and the velocity field has not been quantified. We report simultaneous measurements of the local velocity, aggregation and haematocrit distributions of human erythrocytes flowing in a microchannel. EA was induced using Dextran and flows were imaged using brightfield microscopy. Local aggregation characteristics were investigated using statistical and edge-detection image processing techniques while velocity profiles were obtained using PIV algorithms. Aggregation intensity was found to strongly correlate with local variations in velocity in both the central and wall regions of the channel. The edge detection method showed that near the side wall large aggregates are associated with high local velocities and low local shear rates. In the central region large aggregates occurred in regions of low velocity and high erythrocyte concentration. The results demonstrate the combined effect of haematocrit and velocity distributions on local aggregation characteristics.

  20. Axial velocity in decaying swirl flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algifri, A. H.; Bhardwaj, R. K.; Rao, Y. V. N.

    1988-09-01

    Experiments were carried out on turbulent swirling flow with variable initial swirl at different flow rates to study the effect of swirl on axial velocity. A correlation was made between the defect in the swirling flow axial velocity and the swirl number which locally defines the swirl intensity. An expression which can be used to predict the axial velocity distribution of turbulent swirling flow in a pipe is presented.

  1. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Håkan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Methods Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Results Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Conclusion Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking

  2. Is the measurement of inferior thyroid artery blood flow velocity by color-flow Doppler ultrasonography useful for differential diagnosis between gestational transient thyrotoxicosis and Graves' disease? A prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Sayid Shafi Zuhur; Alper Özel; Selvinaz Velet; Mehmet Sait Buğdacı; Esra Çil; Yüksel Altuntas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the role of peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity and resistance indices of both the right and left inferior thyroid arteries measured by color-flow Doppler ultrasonography for a differential diagnosis between gestational transient thyrotoxicosis and Graves' disease during pregnancy. METHODS: The right and left inferior thyroid artery-peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity and resistance indices of 96 patients with thyrotoxicosis (41 with gestational t...

  3. Computation of flow pressure fields from magnetic resonance velocity mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G Z; Kilner, P J; Wood, N B; Underwood, S R; Firmin, D N

    1996-10-01

    Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping has unrivalled capacities for acquiring in vivo multi-directional blood flow information. In this study, the authors set out to derive both spatial and temporal components of acceleration, and hence differences of pressure in a flow field using cine magnetic resonance velocity data. An efficient numerical algorithm based on the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible Newtonian fluid was used. The computational approach was validated with in vitro flow phantoms. This work aims to contribute to a better understanding of cardiovascular dynamics and to serve as a basis for investigating pulsatile pressure/flow relationships associated with normal and impaired cardiovascular function. PMID:8892202

  4. Effect of flow velocity on crack initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests are traditionally used to understand the influence of material composition, heat treatment, temperature and environmental variables on stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation. However, fluid flow rate has not been investigated as a parameter that could affect SCC initiation until recently. These studies have exhibited longer time to failure under high flow conditions indicating delayed crack initiation. Because these experiments have been performed in highly oxygenated water, no correlation has been established between the influence of flow velocity on the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) and the time to failure of tensile test specimens. The interrelationship between the fluid flow velocity, ECP and the time to failure is of great interest to the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) applications primarily because of the previous observations that the ECP of Type 304 stainless steel increases with fluid flow velocity. This paper describes an attempt that has been made to understand the interrelationship between fluid flow velocity, ECP and the time for crack initiation in high temperature high purity water simulating both the BWR chemistry and the component flow velocity conditions. The range of flow velocities employed in the present study was 0.002 to 2 ft/s. The studies indicate that while high flow velocities can increase ECP there is a delayed effect on crack initiation

  5. Cross correlation for debris flow velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arattano, M.

    2003-04-01

    The velocity of debris-flows cannot be easily measured through the classic techniques employed in hydraulics. In hydraulics velocity measurements are made through the use of current meters, through methods that appeal to the principle of critical flow (weirs, Venturi flumes, Parshall flumes etc.) or that make use of chemical tracers. Debris-flow fronts contain large boulders and their tails, which are certainly more fluid, remain charged with pebble-sized fragments. This impedes the use of current meters, weirs and flumes that would be damaged or destroyed by the passage of the flow. Thus debris flow velocity measurements require the use of remote sensors. A pair of ultrasonic sensors placed at a known distance from each other along the torrent have been used as a method to obtain mean front velocity of debris-flows. Also seismic and acoustic sensors have been employed to measure debris-flow front velocity and discharge in the same manner. However these methods require the presence of a well identifiable and defined main front in the debris flow wave. In fact the time lag between the recordings of the front of the wave at two consecutive stations allows an estimation of its mean velocity. When the front is not present cross correlation may help in identifying the mean velocity of the flow. This has been proved using the field data recorded through seismic and ultrasonic sensors in a small instrumented catchment on the Italian Alps.

  6. Refinement of turbulent flow velocity characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Bryanskaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic laws of Prandtl semi-empirical turbulence theory were analyzed in the article. It was shown, that the Prandtl – Nikuradse logarithmic distribution of velocities are not strictly universal. The change of the first and second turbulence constants was analyzed on the basis of experimental data of I. Nikuradse. The logarithmic velocity profiles for smooth and rough pipes have been transformed. A united velocity logarithmic profile for flows in pipes, appropriate for any rate of hydraulic resistance was received. A more precise, consistent with the resistance laws, description of the kinematic structure of the flow with varying parameters of the velocity profiles was set. It was shown that the position of the average velocity point for the flow in pipe remained constant when the parameters of the velocity profile changed.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of vector flow and spectral velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per;

    line covering the vessel diameter. A commercial ultrasound scanner (ProFocus 2202, BK Medical, Denmark) and a 7.6 MHz linear transducer was used (8670, BK Medical). The mean vector blood flow angle estimations were calculated {52(18);55(23);60(16)}°. For comparison the fixed angles for spectral...... estimation were obtained {52;56;52}°. The mean vector velocity estimates at PS {76(15);95(17);77(16)}cm/s and at end diastole (ED) {17(6);18(6);24(6)}cm/s were calculated. For comparison spectral velocity estimates at PS {77;110;76}cm/s and ED {18;18;20}cm/s were obtained. The mean vector angle estimates......Spectral estimation is considered as the golden standard in ultrasound velocity estimation. For spectral velocity estimation the blood flow angle is set by the ultrasound operator. Vector flow provides temporal and spatial estimates of the blood flow angle and velocity. A comparison of vector flow...

  8. Gastric mucosal blood flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertechnetate clearance (C/sub Tc/) by the stomach before and after betazole stimulation was compared to regional measurements of gastric blood flow utilizing nuclide (Chromium-51 and Cerium-141)-labeled microspheres in five piglets. Pertechnetate clearance closely correlated (correlation coefficient 0.926) with mucosal blood flow in the gastric corpus measured by the microsphere technique. Betazole increased blood flow in the corpus region by 100 percent but did not alter this relationship. Except in one experiment, microsphere blood flow valves in the antrum and fundus were unchanged by betazole and did not significantly correlate with pertechnetate clearance. Pertechnetate clearance appears to be a reliable method of determining gastric mucosal blood flow in experimental animals and may be considered as a noninvasive method for measuring such flow in humans. (U.S.)

  9. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and plasma catecholamines during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pott, F; Jensen, K; Hansen, H;

    1996-01-01

    . Vmean increased by 31 +/- 3% and 48 +/- 4%, respectively, and this was significantly higher compared to handgrip (P < 0.05). During maximal cycling, plasma adrenaline increased from 0.21 +/- 0.04 nmol L-1 at rest to 4.18 +/- 1.46 nmol L-1, and noradrenaline increased from 0.79 +/- 0.08 to 12.70 +/- 1......During dynamic exercise, mean blood velocity (Vmean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) demonstrates a graded increase to work rate and reflects regional cerebral blood flow. At a high work rate, however, vasoactive levels of plasma catecholamines could mediate vasoconstriction of the MCA and...... thereby elevate Vmean at a given volume flow. To evaluate transcranial Doppler-determined Vmean at high plasma catecholamine levels, seven elite cyclists performed a maximal performance test on a bicycle ergometer. Results were compared with those elicited during five incremental exercise bouts and during...

  10. Local Control of Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Organ blood flow is determined by perfusion pressure and vasomotor tone in the resistance vessels of the organ. Local factors that regulate vasomotor tone include myogenic and metabolic autoregulation, flow-mediated and conducted responses, and vasoactive substances released from red blood cells. The relative importance of each of these factors…

  11. VELOCITY PROFILES OF TURBULENT OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dianchang; WANG Xingkui; YU Mingzhong; LI Danxun

    2001-01-01

    The log-law and the wake law of velocity profile for open channel flows are discussed and compared in this paper. Experimental data from eight sources are used to verify the velocity distribution models.The effect of bed level on the velocity profile is analyzed. A formula to calculate the maximum velocity is proposed. In the region of y <δm , the velocity profile approximately follows the log-law. For the region of y >δm , the effect of the aspect ratio is considered. A new velocity profile model on the basis of log-law that can unify all of the hydraulic bed roughness is presented.

  12. Turbulent velocity spectra in superfluid flows

    CERN Document Server

    Salort, J; Castaing, B; Chabaud, B; Daviaud, F; Didelot, T; Diribarne, P; Dubrulle, B; Gagne, Y; Gauthier, F; Girard, A; Hébral, B; Rousset, B; Thibault, P; Roche, P -E; 10.1063/1.3504375

    2012-01-01

    We present velocity spectra measured in three cryogenic liquid 4He steady flows: grid and wake flows in a pressurized wind tunnel capable of achieving mean velocities up to 5 m/s at temperatures above and below the superfluid transition, down to 1.7 K, and a "chunk" turbulence flow at 1.55 K, capable of sustaining mean superfluid velocities up to 1.3 m/s. Depending on the flows, the stagnation pressure probes used for anemometry are resolving from one to two decades of the inertial regime of the turbulent cascade. We do not find any evidence that the second order statistics of turbulence below the superfluid transition differ from the ones of classical turbulence, above the transition.

  13. CONCENTRATION AND VELOCITY OF DEBRIS FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangjun FEI; Peng CUI; Yong LI

    2002-01-01

    Debris flows in nature generally fall into three groups distinct in their grain composition: water-stone flow,or sub-viscous debris flow,dominated by coarse grains; muddy flow,dominated by fine grains;and viscous debris flow composed of grains in large range. Liquid-phase velocity and sedimentary delivery resistance of sub-viscous debris flow have been discussed based on the composition characters of sub-and high-viscous debris flows. It is revealed that the presence of fine grains plays a vital role in affecting resistance and average velocity,particularly when the volume fraction of grains in the flow is relatively high,i.e. Sv > 0.45. Grain-size distribution of viscous debris flow is characterized by a bimodal curve,which explains the properties like high density and low resistance gradient of debris flows. A calculation formula is finally put forward,which has to some extent overcome locality limits and achieved a good agreement with the field observations of debris flows in Southwest China.

  14. Blood flow in the choriocapillaris

    OpenAIRE

    Zouache, M. A.; Eames, I; Luthert, P J

    2015-01-01

    The choriocapillaris is a capillary bed located in a thin layer adjacent to the outer retina and is part of the oxygen delivery system to the photoreceptors of the eye. The blood flow is approximately planar and is serviced by microvessels, which join the choriocapillaris through inlets perpendicular to its plane. Capillaries are densely organised and separated by avascular septal posts, which direct the blood flow. The capillary bed is composed of a juxtaposition of tessellating vascular uni...

  15. Hyperhomocysteinemia decreases bone blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Tyagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neetu Tyagi*, Thomas P Vacek*, John T Fleming, Jonathan C Vacek, Suresh C TyagiDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA *These authors have equal authorshipAbstract: Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy, known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, are associated with osteoporosis. A decrease in bone blood flow is a potential cause of compromised bone mechanical properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that HHcy decreases bone blood flow and biomechanical properties. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague–Dawley rats were treated with Hcy (0.67 g/L in drinking water for 8 weeks. Age-matched rats served as controls. At the end of the treatment period, the rats were anesthetized. Blood samples were collected from experimental or control rats. Biochemical turnover markers (body weight, Hcy, vitamin B12, and folate were measured. Systolic blood pressure was measured from the right carotid artery. Tibia blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flow probe. The results indicated that Hcy levels were significantly higher in the Hcy-treated group than in control rats, whereas vitamin B12 levels were lower in the Hcy-treated group compared with control rats. There was no significant difference in folate concentration and blood pressure in Hcy-treated versus control rats. The tibial blood flow index of the control group was significantly higher (0.78 ± 0.09 flow unit compared with the Hcy-treated group (0.51 ± 0.09. The tibial mass was 1.1 ± 0.1 g in the control group and 0.9 ± 0.1 in the Hcy-treated group. The tibia bone density was unchanged in Hcy-treated rats. These results suggest that Hcy causes a reduction in bone blood flow, which contributes to compromised bone biomechanical properties.Keywords: homocysteine, tibia, bone density

  16. SPECT of brain blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological observation of the brain became possible by CT and various informations on vascularity and damages in brain blood barrier (BBB) became obtainable by the combined use of contrast medium. Then the appearance of MRI had enabled to discriminate the cortex and the medula of the brain and to perform MR angiography. However, it was still difficult to observe the cerebral tissue in detail. Recently, nuclear medical procedures have been developed and applied to diagnosis. SPECT images attributable to the distribution of γ-ray from a tracer, which monitors the blood flow and various metabolisms. Thus, investigations of cerebral functions including blood flow metabolism and neural transmission etc. became possible by the technique. Here, SPECT by Xe-133 clearance and 99mTc HMPAO methods were reviewed. For Xe-133 method, subjects positioned in SPECT instrument underwent bolus inhalation of Xe-133, 1850 Mbq followed by washout respiration of room air. During these treatment, cerebral projection and determination of the concentration of Xe-133 CO2 in the expired air were continuously carried out. And the blood flow level per pixel was estimated from SPECT images and the end-tidal Xe-133 concentration curve. This method was thought to be the most excellent method for the determination of local blood flow in respect of accuracy and reproducibility. The tracer distribution expressed the functional level of the stagnant state of blood flow. SPECT provides useful informations to investigate the physiological functions and pathology in the brain. (M.N.)

  17. Vortex shedding flow meter performance at high flow velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegwarth, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In some of the ducts of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), the maximum liquid oxygen flow velocities approach 10 times those at which liquid flow measurements are normally made. The hydrogen gas flow velocities in other ducts exceed the maximum for gas flow measurement by more than a factor of 3. The results presented here show from water flow tests that vortex shedding flow meters of the appropriate design can measure water flow to velocities in excess of 55 m/s, which is a Reynolds number of about 2 million. Air flow tests have shown that the same meter can measure flow to a Reynolds number of at least 22 million. Vortex shedding meters were installed in two of the SSME ducts and tested with water flow. Narrow spectrum lines were obtained and the meter output frequencies were proportional to flow to + or - 0.5% or better over the test range with no flow conditioning, even though the ducts had multiple bends preceeding the meter location. Meters with the shedding elements only partially spanning the pipe and some meters with ring shaped shedding elements were also tested.

  18. New blood flow radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our program for research into the causes of mental disorders such as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness and senile dementia has led us to the development of a new radiopharmaceutical agent, IDNNA (4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine). A series of some 15 different 131I labeled molecules with various substitutions on the amine were synthesized and tested, and the uptake of the 131I labeled conpounds in rats was measured. The dimethyl amine (IDNNA) had the best brain uptake and brain/blood ratio. When injected into a dog and scanned with a whole-body scanner, the uptake in the brain could be clearly seen and quantified. Plasma sampling at the same time showed that the maximum brain/blood ratio of 8.7 occurred at 8 min after injection, and the concentration in brain remained high for at least 15 min. Labeling is achieved by reacting 131ICl and the precursor, 2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethyl amphetamine, in glacial acetic acid; the reaction is complete in less than one minute

  19. Arterial secondary blood flow patterns visualized with vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Hansen, Jens Munk;

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the first quantification and visualisation of secondary flow patterns with vector flow ultrasound. The first commercial implementation of the vector flow method Transverse Oscillation was used to obtain in-vivo, 2D vector fields in real-time. The hypothesis of this study...... was that the rotational direction is constant within each artery. Three data sets of 10 seconds were obtained from three main arteries in healthy volunteers. For each data set the rotational flow patterns were identified during the diastole. Each data set contains a 2D vector field over time and with the vector angles...... and velocity magnitudes the blood flow patterns were visualised with streamlines in Matlab (Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA). The rotational flow was quantified by the angular frequency for each cardiac cycle, and the mean rotational frequencies and standard deviations were calculated for the abdominal aorta f-1...

  20. On the flow dependency of the electrical conductivity of blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoetink, AE; Faes, TJC; Visser, KR; Heethaar, RM

    2004-01-01

    Experiments presented in the literature show that the electrical conductivity of flowing blood depends on flow velocity. The aim of this study is to extend the Maxwell-Fricke theory, developed for a dilute suspension of ellipsoidal particles in an electrolyte, to explain this flow dependency of the

  1. Cerebral blood-flow tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Henriksen, L; Holm, S;

    1983-01-01

    Tomographic maps of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) were obtained with xenon-133 and with isopropyl-amphetamine-iodine-123 (IMP) in 11 subjects: one normal, two tumor cases, and eight cerebrovascular cases. A highly sensitive four-face, rapidly rotating, single-photon emission tomograph was used...... sampling, and with low radiation exposure to patient and personnel. On the other hand, IMP gives an image of slightly higher resolution. It also introduces a new class of iodinated brain-seeking compounds allowing, perhaps, imaging of other functions more important than mere blood flow....

  2. STARE velocities: 2. Evening westward electron flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Four evening events and one morning event of joint EISCAT/STARE observations during ~22h are considered and the differences between observed STARE line-of-sight (l-o-s velocities and EISCAT electron drift velocities projected onto the STARE beams are studied. We demonstrate that the double-pulse technique, which is currently in use in the STARE routine data handling, typically underestimates the true phase velocity as inferred from the multi-pulse STARE data. We show that the STARE velocities are persistently smaller (1.5–2 times than the EISCAT velocities, even for the multi-pulse data. The effect seems to be more pronounced in the evening sector when the Finland radar observes at large flow angles. We evaluate the performance of the ion-acoustic approach (IAA, Nielsen and Schlegel, 1985 and the off-orthogonal fluid approach (OOFA, Uspensky et al., 2003 techniques to predict the true electron drift velocity for the base event of 12 February 1999. The IAA technique predicts the convection reasonably well for enhanced flows of >~1000m/s, but not so well for slower ones. By considering the EISCAT N(h profiles, we derive the effective aspect angle and effective altitude of backscatter, and use this information for application of the OOFA technique. We demonstrate that the OOFA predictions for the base event are superior over the IAA predictions and thus, we confirm that OOFA predicts the electron velocities reasonably well in the evening sector, in addition to the morning sector, as concluded by Uspensky et al. (2003. To check how "robust" the OOFA model is and how successful it is for convection estimates without the EISCAT support, we analysed three additional evening events and one additional morning event for which information on N(h profiles was intentionally ignored. By accepting the mean STARE/EISCAT velocity ratio of 0.55 and the mean azimuth rotation of 9° (derived for the basic event, we show that the OOFA performs

  3. High frame-rate blood vector velocity imaging using plane waves: simulations and preliminary experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, J.; Gran, F.; Hansen, K.L.;

    2008-01-01

    blood flow approximately followed the vessel wall, and that maximum velocity was approximately 1 m/s, which is a normal value for a healthy person. To further evaluate the method, the test person was scanned with magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. The volume flow derived from the MR scanning was......Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color images of blood velocity are limited by a relatively low frame-rate and are restricted to give velocity estimates along the ultrasound beam direction only. To circumvent these limitations, the method presented in this paper uses 3 techniques: 1...... program, and performance of the method was investigated when a virtual blood vessel was scanned by a linear array transducer. An improved parameter set for the method was identified from the parameter study, and a flow rig measurement was performed using the same improved setup as in the simulations...

  4. Retinal hemodynamic oxygen reactivity assessed by perfusion velocity, blood oximetry and vessel diameter measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klefter, Oliver Niels; Lauritsen, Anne Øberg; Larsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the oxygen reactivity of a fundus photographic method of measuring macular perfusion velocity and to integrate macular perfusion velocities with measurements of retinal vessel diameters and blood oxygen saturation. METHODS: Sixteen eyes in 16 healthy volunteers were studied at two...... perfusion velocities, short-term ICCs were 0.79-0.82 and long-term ICCs were 0.06-0.11. Intersession increases in blood glucose were associated with reductions in perfusion velocities (arterial p = 0.0067; venous p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Oxygen reactivity testing supported that motion-contrast velocimetry is...... a valid method for assessing macular perfusion. Results were consistent with previous observations of hyperoxic blood flow reduction using blue field entoptic and laser Doppler velocimetry. Retinal perfusion seemed to be regulated around individual set points according to blood glucose levels...

  5. Erythrocyte aggregation in flowing blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the issue of whether nonionic contrast media (CM) promote thrombosis by the formation of large, irregular red blood cell aggregates with videomicroscopy and a flow chamber, red blood cell aggregates adjacent to an endothelial cell monolayer were imaged at 17 sec-1 in dilute suspensions (hematocrit, --8) at 370C in plasma with 20% CM by non-red blood cell volume. All aggregates were rouleaux (<100 μm) readily dispersed at higher shear rates. Aggregate length in eight experiments was increased 11% by ioxaglate (320 mg of iodine per milliliter), decreased 58% by diatrizoate (370 mg of iodine per milliliter) but reduced similarly (16%) by iohexol (350 mg of iodine per milliliter) and saline. Iohexol did not enhance platelet aggregation on injured monolayers

  6. High Frame-Rate Blood Vector Velocity Imaging Using Plane Waves: Simulations and Preliminary Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov;

    2008-01-01

    . Finally, the common carotid artery of a healthy male was scanned with a scan sequence that satisfies the limits set by the Food and Drug Administration. Vector velocity images were obtained with a frame-rate of 100 Hz where 40 speckle images are used for each vector velocity image. It was found that the...... blood flow approximately followed the vessel wall, and that maximum velocity was approximately 1 m/s, which is a normal value for a healthy person. To further evaluate the method, the test person was scanned with magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. The volume flow derived from the MR scanning was...

  7. Slip Velocities in Mixture Vertical Pipe Flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobota, J.; Vlasák, Pavel; Petryka, L.; Zych, M.

    Vol. 10. Sczecin: The International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers, 2013, s. 221-224. ISBN 978-1-880653-92-0. ISSN 1946-0066. [The Tenth (2013) ISOPE Ocean Mining & Gas Hydrates Symposium. Szczecin (PL), 22.09.2013-26.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Grant ostatní: Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Poland(PL) 7553/B/T02/2011/40; InterOceanMetal(CZ) 501-4.1.2/1-11 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : slip velocities * vertical flow * mixtures * radioisotope * pipeline Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  8. Slip Velocities in Mixture Vertical Pipe Flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobota, J.; Vlasák, Pavel; Petryka, L.; Zych, M.

    Vol. 10. Sczecin : The International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers, 2013, s. 221-224. ISBN 978-1-880653-92-0. ISSN 1946-0066. [The Tenth (2013) ISOPE Ocean Mining & Gas Hydrates Symposium. Szczecin (PL), 22.09.2013-26.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Grant ostatní: Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Poland(PL) 7553/B/T02/2011/40; InterOceanMetal(CZ) 501-4.1.2/1-11 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : slip velocities * vertical flow * mixtures * radioisotope * pipeline Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  9. Ocular Blood Flow Autoregulation Mechanisms and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main function of ocular blood flow is to supply sufficient oxygen and nutrients to the eye. Local blood vessels resistance regulates overall blood distribution to the eye and can vary rapidly over time depending on ocular need. Under normal conditions, the relation between blood flow and perfusion pressure in the eye is autoregulated. Basically, autoregulation is a capacity to maintain a relatively constant level of blood flow in the presence of changes in ocular perfusion pressure and varied metabolic demand. In addition, ocular blood flow dysregulation has been demonstrated as an independent risk factor to many ocular diseases. For instance, ocular perfusion pressure plays key role in the progression of retinopathy such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this review, different direct and indirect techniques to measure ocular blood flow and the effect of myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms on ocular blood flow are discussed. Moreover, ocular blood flow regulation in ocular disease will be described.

  10. Effects of magnetic field and Hall current to the blood velocity and LDL transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, I.; Naser, N.; Talib, A. H.; Mahali, S.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic field and Hall current effects have been considered on blood velocity and concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). It is important to observe those effects to the flowing blood in a stenosed artery. The analysis from the obtained results may be useful to some clinical procedures, such as MRI, where the radiologists may have more information in the investigations before cardiac operations could be done. In this study, the uniform magnetic field and Hall current are applied to the Newtonian blood flow through an artery having a cosine-shaped stenosis. The governing equations are coupled with mass transfer and solved employing a finite difference Marker and Cell (MAC) method with an appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The graphical results of velocity profiles and LDL concentration are presented in this paper and the results show that the velocity increases and concentration decreases as Hall parameter increased.

  11. Range/velocity limitations for time-domain blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    The traditional range/velocity limitation for blood velocity estimation systems using ultrasound is elucidated. It is stated that the equation is a property of the estimator used, not the actual physical measurement situation, as higher velocities can be estimated by the time domain cross......-correlation approach. It is demonstrated that the time domain technique under certain measurement conditions will yield unsatisfactory results, when trying to estimate high velocities. Various methods to avoid these artifacts using temporal and spatial clustering techniques are suggested. The improvement in...

  12. Hall effect in electrolyte flow measurements: introduction to blood flow measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwast, Maciej; Piatkiewicz, Wojciech

    2012-06-01

    The Hall effect has been applied to electrolyte flow measurement. It has been proven that Hall voltage does not depend on electrolyte concentration; however, there is a linear relationship between Hall voltage and flow velocity. Obtained results for electrolyte allow us to suppose that Hall effect can be used to determine blood flow. Research on blood will be conducted as the next step. PMID:22145845

  13. One dimensional blood flow in a planetocentric orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis

    2012-05-01

    All life on earth is accustomed to the presence of gravity. When gravity is altered, biological processes can go awry. It is of great importance to ensure safety during a spaceflight. Long term exposure to microgravity can trigger detrimental physiological responses in the human body. Fluid redistribution coupled with fluid loss is one of the effects. In particular, in microgravity blood volume is shifted towards the thorax and head. Sympathetic nervous system-induced vasoconstriction is needed to maintain arterial pressure, while venoconstriction limits venous pooling of blood prevents further reductions in venous return of blood to the heart. In this paper, we modify an existing one dimensional blood flow model with the inclusion of the hydrostatic pressure gradient that further depends on the gravitational field modified by the oblateness and rotation of the Earth. We find that the velocity of the blood flow VB is inversely proportional to the blood specific volume d, also proportional to the oblateness harmonic coefficient J2, the angular velocity of the Earth ωE, and finally proportional to an arbitrary constant c. For c = -0.39073 and ξH = -0.5 mmHg, all orbits result to less blood flow velocities than that calculated on the surface of the Earth. From all considered orbits, elliptical polar orbit of eccentricity e = 0.2 exhibit the largest flow velocity VB = 1.031 m/s, followed by the orbits of inclination i = 45°and 0°. The Earth's oblateness and its rotation contribute a 0.7% difference to the blood flow velocity.

  14. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  15. 2-D blood vector velocity estimation using a phase shift estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    In this PhD thesis a method for 2-D blood velocity estimation called \\textit{the transverse oscillation method} (TO) is investigated. The thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part the basic principles in conventional 1-D flow estimation are described, and the state of the art for 2-D...... velocity estimation is discussed. The TO method is introduced, and the basic theory behind the method is explained. This includes the creation of the acoustic fields, beamforming, echo-canceling and the velocity estimator. In the second part of the thesis the eight papers produced during this PhD project...... are presented. Here the TO method is tested both in simulations using the Field II program and in flow phantom experiments using the RASMUS scanner. Both simulations and flow phantom experiments indicate that the TO method can estimate the 2-D vector velocity with an acceptable low bias and standard...

  16. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging: Simulations and Preliminary In Vivo Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov;

    2007-01-01

    I Background: Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood velocity are limited by a relatively low frame rate and are restricted to only give velocity estimates along the ultrasound beam direction. To circumvent these limitations, we propose a method where the frame...... tested with a 5.5 MHz linear array transducer scanning a flow phantom. This was done first with the Field II ultrasound simulation program. Standard deviation and bias of the velocity estimates were evaluated when six parameters were changed around an initial point. The conclusions drawn from the...... vector velocity images were acquired with a frame rate of 100 Hz. The derived volume flow estimates were compared with MR angiography, and a deviation of 9 $\\%$ was found....

  17. Mathematical Model of Blood Flow in Small Blood Vessel in the Presence of Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Bali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for blood flow in the small blood vessel in the presence of magnetic field is presented in this paper. We have modeled the two phase model for the blood flow consists of a central core of suspended erythrocytes and cell-free layer surrounding the core. The system of differential equations has been solved analytically. We have obtained the result for velocity, flow rate and effective viscosity in presence of peripheral layer and magnetic field .All the result has been obtained and discussed through graphs.

  18. Velocity Inversion In Cylindrical Couette Gas Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate a power-law probability distribution function to describe the mean free path of rarefied gas molecules in non-planar geometries. A new curvature-dependent model is derived by taking into account the boundary-limiting effects on the molecular mean free path for surfaces with both convex and concave curvatures. In comparison to a planar wall, we find that the mean free path for a convex surface is higher at the wall and exhibits a sharper gradient within the Knudsen layer. In contrast, a concave wall exhibits a lower mean free path near the surface and the gradients in the Knudsen layer are shallower. The Navier-Stokes constitutive relations and velocity-slip boundary conditions are modified based on a power-law scaling to describe the mean free path, in accordance with the kinetic theory of gases, i.e. transport properties can be described in terms of the mean free path. Velocity profiles for isothermal cylindrical Couette flow are obtained using the power-law model. We demonstrate that our model is more accurate than the classical slip solution, especially in the transition regime, and we are able to capture important non-linear trends associated with the non-equilibrium physics of the Knudsen layer. In addition, we establish a new criterion for the critical accommodation coefficient that leads to the non-intuitive phenomena of velocity-inversion. Our results are compared with conventional hydrodynamic models and direct simulation Monte Carlo data. The power-law model predicts that the critical accommodation coefficient is significantly lower than that calculated using the classical slip solution and is in good agreement with available DSMC data. Our proposed constitutive scaling for non-planar surfaces is based on simple physical arguments and can be readily implemented in conventional fluid dynamics codes for arbitrary geometric configurations.

  19. Measurement of flow velocity by magnetic resonance imaging using 2D phase contrast technique. Estimation of oblique flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyzed the effects of the obliqueness of flow on the accuracy of measuring flow velocity by means of the 2D phase contrast MR technique. A constant flow phantom consisting of a pump, a polyethylene tube and a flow meter was assembled. A commercial 1.5 Tesla MR imager was used to perform flow velocity measurements. The phase contrast technique was used to estimate the flow velocity of saline through the phantom. The effects of changes in obliqueness of flow to the plane of imaging were studied. The obliqueness had a significant effect that was more pronounced with increasing section thickness. An increase in the obliqueness angle caused underestimation of the average and maximum velocities. The obliqueness was found to be an important parameter affecting the estimation with the 2D phase contrast MR technique. The application of MR to flow velocity measurement was first described by Singer. Various pulse sequences have been proposed to evaluate the flow velocity by MR. The two main classes of techniques are the time-of-flight method and the phase contrast method. The time-of-flight technique derives its contrast from the flow-related enhancement of inflowing blood. The phase contrast method, on the other hand, is based on applying balanced gradient pulses, and derives its contrast by detecting spin phase differences as blood moves across a magnetic field gradient. The phase contrast technique is not only a simple subtraction of phase images on a pixel by pixel basis but a complex difference of phase obtained with a known different flow encoding gradient. Phase images are collected using balanced gradient pulses to produce a phase shift for moving spins. The difference in phase is directly proportional to the flow velocity of the spins within the corresponding voxels. The phase contrast technique is generally better than the time-of-flight technique for quantitative measurement of flow velocity in cardiovascular an cerebrospinal abnormalities. Advantages

  20. An Iterative Adaptive Approach for Blood Velocity Estimation Using Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Stoica, Petre

    This paper proposes a novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation technique for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The technique makes no assumption on the sampling pattern of the slow-time or the fast-time samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B...

  1. Inner ocular blood flow responses to an acute decrease in blood pressure in resting humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whether inner ocular vessels have an autoregulatory response to acute fluctuations in blood pressure is unclear. We tried to examine the validity of acute hypotension elicited by thigh-cuff release as to assess the dynamic autoregulation in the ocular circulation. Blood flow velocity in the superior nasal and inferior temporal retinal arterioles, and in the retinal and choroidal vasculature were measured with the aid of laser speckle flowgraphy before and immediately after an acute decrease in blood pressure in 20 healthy subjects. Acute hypotension was induced by a rapid release of bilateral thigh occlusion cuffs that had been inflated to 220 mmHg for 2 min. The ratio of the relative change in retinal and choroidal blood flow velocity to the relative change in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was calculated. Immediately after cuff release, the MAP and blood flows in the all ocular target vessels decreased significantly from the baseline values obtained before thigh-cuff release. The ratio of the relative change in inner ocular blood flow velocity to that in the MAP exceeded 1% / %mmHg. An explicit dynamic autoregulation in inner ocular vessels cannot be demonstrated in response to an acute hypotension induced by the thigh-cuff release technique. (paper)

  2. Effect of blood flow parameters on flow patterns at arterial bifurcations--studies in models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, D W

    1990-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are found primarily at arterial bends and bifurcations. Flow disturbances at these anatomic sites play a major role in atherogenesis. How hemodynamic factors such as vessel geometry, the pulsatile nature of blood flow, vessel wall elasticity and the non-Newtonian flow behavior of blood influence the flow field at these sites must be clarified. We have performed fundamental studies using a birefringent solution in a simplified rigid 90 degree T-bifurcation and pulsatile flow. The velocity distribution was measured with a laser Doppler anemometer. Flow in an elastic abdominal aorta model has been visualized using magnetic resonance imaging. In both flow studies, zones with negative velocity were found. These model measurements demonstrate that no flow parameter can be neglected. Further detailed studies are necessary to examine the interaction between fluid dynamic and cellular surface properties. PMID:2404201

  3. Spiral blood flow in aorta-renal bifurcation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-07-01

    The presence of a spiral arterial blood flow pattern in humans has been widely accepted. It is believed that this spiral component of the blood flow alters arterial haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of spiral flow on haemodynamic changes in aorta-renal bifurcations. In this regard, a computational fluid dynamics analysis of pulsatile blood flow was performed in two idealised models of aorta-renal bifurcations with and without flow diverter. The results show that the spirality effect causes a substantial variation in blood velocity distribution, while causing only slight changes in fluid shear stress patterns. The dominant observed effect of spiral flow is on turbulent kinetic energy and flow recirculation zones. As spiral flow intensity increases, the rate of turbulent kinetic energy production decreases, reducing the region of potential damage to red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, the recirculation zones which form on the cranial sides of the aorta and renal artery shrink in size in the presence of spirality effect; this may lower the rate of atherosclerosis development and progression in the aorta-renal bifurcation. These results indicate that the spiral nature of blood flow has atheroprotective effects in renal arteries and should be taken into consideration in analyses of the aorta and renal arteries. PMID:26414530

  4. Feasibility of patient specific aortic blood flow CFD simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Johan; Gårdhagen, Roland; Heiberg, Einar; Ebbers, Tino; Loyd, Dan; Länne, Toste; Karlsson, Matts

    2006-01-01

    Patient specific modelling of the blood flow through the human aorta is performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Velocity patterns are compared between computer simulations and measurements. The workflow includes several steps: MRI measurement to obtain both geometry and velocity, an automatic levelset segmentation followed by meshing of the geometrical model and CFD setup to perform the simulations follwed by the actual simulations. The computational results agree well with the measured data. PMID:17354898

  5. Flow of red blood cells in capillary networks

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Ana; Teixeira, Lúcia; Leble, Vladimir; Lima, R.; Ribeiro, António E.; Dias, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the flow of red blood cells through a column packed with soda lime glass spheres with diameter of 337.5 micron (pore diameter 150 micron). The ratio between the average velocity of the RBCs and the average velocity of the carrying fluid (physiological saline) was close to 0.9. The RBCs migrated faster through the column than the carrying fluid mainly due to a hydrodynamic chromatographic effect.

  6. Cutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disappearance rate of 133Xe was studied in 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, using an epicutaneous labeling technique in involved skin lesions or normal-appearing skin of the proximal extensor site of the forearm. Control experiments were performed in 10 normal subjects. Calculations of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF) in psoriatic skin lesions were performed using a tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for 133Xe, lambda c,pso, of 1.2 ml/100 g/min. lambda c,pso was estimated after the relative content of water, lipids, and proteins had been analyzed in psoriatic skin biopsies of 6 patients with untreated psoriasis. The mean relative content of water was markedly reduced to 23.5 +/- 1.5% (SEM), and lipids and proteins were markedly increased to 2.5 +/- 0.7% and 74.0 +/- 2.2, respectively, compared to previously published data for normal skin (water 72.5%, lipids 1%, proteins 26.5%). Mean CBF in untreated psoriatic skin was 63.5 +/- 9.0 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than the mean CBF in 10 normal subjects, 6.3 +/- 0.5 ml/100 g/min (p much less than 0.0001). Mean CBF in normal-appearing skin in patients with psoriasis was 11.0 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than CBF in normal subjects (p less than 0.0002)

  7. Examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Nielsen, Kristian R.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    vector is superimposed on a B-mode image showing the tissue structures. The volume flow is found for case 1) and when compared with MRI from the literature, a bias of approximately ~20% is found. The maximum flow velocities within the carotid artery is found to be 0.8 m/s, which is normal for a healthy...... vortex is seen in all of the three acquired cardiac cycles....

  8. Bone blood flow and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo;

    2012-01-01

    femoral bone at rest and during one leg intermittent isometric exercise with increasing exercise intensities. In nine men, blood flow in femur was determined at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise, and two other physiological perturbations: moderate systemic hypoxia (14 O(2) ) at rest and during...... contralateral leg. In conclusion, resting femoral bone blood flow increases by physical exercise, but appears to level off with increasing exercise intensities. Moreover, while moderate systemic hypoxia does not change bone blood flow at rest or during exercise, intra-arterially administered adenosine during......Human bone blood flow and metabolism during physical exercise remains poorly characterised. In the present study we measured femoral bone blood flow and glucose uptake in young healthy subjects by positron emission tomography in three separate protocols. In six women, blood flow was measured in...

  9. Effect of flow discharge and median grain size on mean flow velocity under overland flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, M.; Sterk, G.; Seeger, K.M.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2012-01-01

    Precise estimation of mean flow velocity (U-mean) is imperative for accurate prediction of hydrographs and sediment yield. For overland flow, U-mean is normally estimated by multiplying the dye or salt based velocity measurement with a correction factor (alpha). A wide range of correction factors is

  10. Assessment of maternal cerebral blood flow in patients with preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Systemic vasoconstrktion in preeclamptic patients increases vascular resistance, and is manifested by increased arterial blood flow velocity. The aim of the study is to evaluate if there is a change of Doppler indices in maternal medial cerbral artery (MCA in severe preeclampsia due to: 1 severity of clinical symptoms, 2 the beginning of eclamptic attack and 3 the application of anticonvidsive therapy. Material and methods A prospective clinical study included 92 pregnant women, gestational age 28-36 weeks. They were divided into three groups: normotensive (n=30, mild preeclampsia (n=33, and severe preeclampsia (n=29. We investigated maternal cerebral circulation by assessing the MCA. We registrated: pulsatility index (Pi, resistance index (Ri, Systolic/diastolic ratio (S/D, and the maximum systolic, end diastolic and medium velocity. Patients with severe preeclampsia were divided into two subgroups: subgroup 1 included patients without symptoms of threatening eclampsia (n=18; 62.06%; while subgroup 2 included those with symptoms of preeclampsia (n=11; 37.94%. All patients with severe preeclampsia were treated with magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, and cerebral blood flow was measured before and after the treatment. Statistical analysis was done by oneway ANOVA, Student t-test and t-paired sample test. The difference was considered to be significant if p < 0.05. Results Significantly increased Pi, Ri and all velocities were established in the group of patients with severe preeclampsia compared with the other two groups. In the group with severe preeclamsia we registrated significantly increased values of all velocities (patients with signs of threatening eclampsia. After MgSO4 treatment in patients with severe preeclampsia significantly decreased values of Pi, Ri, S/D ratio and all velocities were registered. Discussion In the studied group of patients with severe preclampsia we found increased velocity values, Pi and Ri, especially in

  11. Influence of posture on hepatic blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic blood flow was measured in 28 patients in supine and prone positions using the 133Xe-inhalation washout method. Even though the reactions in individual patients were considerably different, a man blood flow of 60.9 ml/100 g/min was unaltered in both positions. This constancy of hepatic blood flow values is valid for patients without liver disease with chronic hepatitis, and with liver cirrhosis. (orig.)

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured via xenon133 inhalation technique in 23 patients with schizophrenia and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. The mean blood flow to both hemispheres was found to be lower for the patients. The patients and their controls did not differ on interhemispheric differences in blood flow. There were no differences in rCBF between medicated and unmedicated, subchronic and chronic, and paranoid and nonparanoid patients. Hallucinations were associated with reduced blood flow to several postcentral regions

  13. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo; Vauhkonen, Marko

    2016-06-28

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185961

  14. The effect of ventricular assist devices on cerebral blood flow and blood pressure fractality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological signals often exhibit self-similar or fractal scaling characteristics which may reflect intrinsic adaptability to their underlying physiological system. This study analysed fractal dynamics of cerebral blood flow in patients supported with ventricular assist devices (VAD) to ascertain if sustained modifications of blood pressure waveform affect cerebral blood flow fractality. Simultaneous recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity using transcranial Doppler were obtained from five cardiogenic shock patients supported by VAD, five matched control patients and five healthy subjects. Computation of a fractal scaling exponent (α) at the low-frequency time scale by detrended fluctuation analysis showed that cerebral blood flow velocity exhibited 1/f fractal scaling in both patient groups (α = 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.97 ± 0.12, respectively) as well as in the healthy subjects (α = 0.86 ± 0.07). In contrast, fluctuation in blood pressure was similar to non-fractal white noise in both patient groups (α = 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.52 ± 0.09, respectively) but exhibited 1/f scaling in the healthy subjects (α = 0.87 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 compared with the patient groups). The preservation of fractality in cerebral blood flow of VAD patients suggests that normal cardiac pulsation and central perfusion pressure changes are not the integral sources of cerebral blood flow fractality and that intrinsic vascular properties such as cerebral autoregulation may be involved. However, there is a clear difference in the fractal scaling properties of arterial blood pressure between the cardiogenic shock patients and the healthy subjects

  15. Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wesley B.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Busch, David R.; Mesquita, Rickson C.; Greenberg, Joel H.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-03-01

    The modified Beer-Lambert law is among the most widely used approaches for analysis of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) reflectance signals for measurements of tissue blood volume and oxygenation. Briefly, the modified Beer-Lambert paradigm is a scheme to derive changes in tissue optical properties based on continuous-wave (CW) diffuse optical intensity measurements. In its simplest form, the scheme relates differential changes in light transmission (in any geometry) to differential changes in tissue absorption. Here we extend this paradigm to the measurement of tissue blood flow by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). In the new approach, differential changes of the intensity temporal auto-correlation function at a single delay-time are related to differential changes in blood flow. The key theoretical results for measurement of blood flow changes in any tissue geometry are derived, and we demonstrate the new method to monitor cerebral blood flow in a pig under conditions wherein the semi-infinite geometry approximation is fairly good. Specifically, the drug dinitrophenol was injected in the pig to induce a gradual 200% increase in cerebral blood flow, as measured with MRI velocity flow mapping and by DCS. The modified Beer-Lambert law for flow accurately recovered these flow changes using only a single delay-time in the intensity auto-correlation function curve. The scheme offers increased DCS measurement speed of blood flow. Further, the same techniques using the modified Beer-Lambert law to filter out superficial tissue effects in NIRS measurements of deep tissues can be applied to the DCS modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow monitoring of deep tissues.

  16. The postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is not explained by PaCO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Secher, N H; Roos, C M; Pott, F; Madsen, P L; van Lieshout, J J

    2006-01-01

    In the normocapnic range, middle cerebral artery mean velocity (MCA Vmean) changes approximately 3.5% per mmHg carbon-dioxide tension in arterial blood (PaCO2) and a decrease in PaCO2 will reduce the cerebral blood flow by vasoconstriction (the CO2 reactivity of the brain). When standing up MCA...

  17. Effects of ischemia on capillary density and flow velocity in nailfolds of human toes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, D; Schwartz, R; Hyde, G

    1985-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate reactive hyperemia in the capillary network of human skin in terms of the flow per capillary and the density of flow-active capillaries. Seventeen male subjects 20 to 40 years of age were seated with their right foot placed on the stage of a Leitz epi-ilumination microscope such that the nailfold capillary field in their large toes could be viewed. These vessels were video taped while flow velocity in the right posterior tibial artery was recorded via Doppler ultrasound at rest, then following a 45-sec period of arterial occlusion to the foot. Subsequent to experimentation flow velocity in single nailfold capillaries was measured via video densitometry and the number of flow-active capillaries in the field of view were counted. Following the release of arterial occlusion arterial flow velocity increased 142% above rest, the velocity in single capillaries increased by 54%, and the density of flow-active capillaries, as identified by the presence of red cells, decreased by 37%. The fact that capillary flow velocity increased to a lesser degree than arterial velocity during reactive hyperemia vis-a-vis a decrease in the number of flow-active capillaries indicates that ischemia to the foot elicits a smaller dilatory effect in vascular elements controlling blood flow to the superficial cutaneous region of the toe as compared to other regional vascular networks. PMID:4021840

  18. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  19. Time-resolved volumetric MRI blood flow: a Doppler ultrasound perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, Roy; Oliván Bescós, Javier; Nagel, Eike; Vilanova, Anna

    2014-03-01

    Hemodynamic information is increasingly inspected to assess cardiovascular disease. Abnormal blood-flow patterns include high-speed jet flow and regurgitant flow. Such pathological blood-flow patterns are nowadays mostly inspected by means of color Doppler ultrasound imaging. To date, Doppler ultrasound has been the prevailing modality for blood-flow analysis, providing non-invasive and cost-effective blood-flow imaging. Since recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly employed to measure time-resolved blood-flow data. Albeit more expensive, MRI enables volumetric velocity encoding, providing true vector-valued data with less noise. Domain experts in the field of ultrasound and MRI have extensive experience in the interpretation of blood-flow information, although they employ different analysis techniques. We devise a visualization framework that extends on common Doppler ultrasound visualizations, exploiting the added value of MRI velocity data, and aiming for synergy between the domain experts. Our framework enables experts to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the current renditions of their imaging data. Furthermore, it facilitates the transition from conventional Doppler ultrasound images to present-day high-dimensional velocity fields. To this end, we present a virtual probe that enables direct exploration of MRI-acquired blood-flow velocity data using user-friendly interactions. Based on the probe, Doppler ultrasound inspired visualizations convey both in-plane and through-plane blood-flow velocities. In a compound view, these two-dimensional visualizations are linked to state-of-the-art three-dimensional blood-flow visualizations. Additionally, we introduce a novel volume rendering of the blood-flow velocity data that emphasizes anomalous blood-flow patterns. The visualization framework was evaluated by domain experts, and we present their feedback.

  20. Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linkis, P; Jørgensen, L G; Olesen, H L;

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(1): 12-16, 1995.--Anterior (ACA) and middle (MCA) cerebral artery mean flow velocities (Vmean) and pulsatility indexes were determined using transcranial Doppler in 14 subjects during dynamic exercise afte...

  1. Laminar blood flow in stenotic microchannels

    OpenAIRE

    Calejo, Joana A. C.; Garcia, Valdemar; Fernandes, Carla S.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, Newtonian and non-Newtonian laminar blood flow in rectangular microchannels with symmetric and asymmetric atheroma were numerically studied. It was observed that the impact of symmetry of the atheroma is almost negligible and the non-Newtonian properties of blood leads to higher pressure drops and wall shear stresses than the ones obtained for Newtonian flows.

  2. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banik, Nilanjan [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sikivie, Pierre [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  3. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behavior of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the big flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  4. Clutter filtering issues in speckle tracking for two-dimensional blood velocity estimation: a potential solution based on compounded imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Søvik Alnes, Solveig; Swillens, Abigaïl; Segers, Patrick; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    Clutter filtering issues remains a major limitation in multi-dimensional blood velocity estimation. In this work we investigate how compounded plane wave imaging can be used to minimize clutter filtering issues when using speckle tracking for two-dimensional velocity estimation. By using a dual scan angle approach one can ensure a sufficient beam-to-flow angle for most imaging scenarios. Segmentation algorithms based on the estimated power and mean axial velocity were used to determine whethe...

  5. Effect of multi-velocity-difference in traffic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mo Ye-Liu; He Hong-Di; Xue Yu; Shi Wei; Lu Wei-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    Based on the optimal velocity models, an extended model is proposed, in which multi-velocity-difference ahead is taken into consideration. The damping effect of the multi-velocity-difference ahead has been investigated by means of analytical and numerical methods. Results indicate that the multi-velocity-difference leads to the enhancement of stability of traffic flow, suppression of the emergence of traffic jamming, and reduction of the energy consumption.

  6. Subcutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneously recorded disappearance rates of 133xe from subcutaneous adipose tissue in the crus were studied in 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris using atraumatic labeling of the tissue in lesional skin (LS) areas and symmetrical, nonlesional skin (NLS) areas. Control experiments were performed bilaterally in 10 younger, healthy subjects. The subcutaneous washout rate constant was significantly higher in LS, 0.79 +/- 0.05 min-1 x 10(2) compared to the washout rate constant of NLS, 0.56 +/- 0.07 min-1. 10(2), or the washout rate constant in the normal subjects, 0.46 +/- 0.17 min-1 x 10(2). The mean washout rate constant in NLS was 25% higher than the mean washout rate constant in the normal subjects. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Differences in the washout rate constants might be due to abnormal subcutaneous tissue-to-blood partition (lambda) in the LS--and therefore not reflecting the real differences in the subcutaneous blood flow (SBF). The lambda for 133Xe was therefore measured--using a double isotope washout method (133Xe and [131I]antipyrine)--in symmetrical sites of the lateral crus in LS and NLS of 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and in 10 legs of normal subjects. In LS the lambda was 4.52 +/- 1.67 ml/g, which was not statistically different from that of NLS, 5.25 +/- 2.19 ml/g, nor from that of normal subcutaneous tissue, 4.98 +/- 1.04 ml/g. Calculations of the SBF using the obtained lambda values gave a significantly higher SBF in LS, 3.57 +/- 0.23 ml/100 g/min, compared to SBF in the NLS, 2.94 +/- 0.37 ml/100 g/min. There was no statistically significant difference between SBF in NLS and SBF in the normal subjects. The increased SBF in LS of psoriatics might be a secondary phenomenon to an increased heat loss in the lesional skin

  7. The Physics of Coronary Blood Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zamir, M

    2005-01-01

    Coronary blood flow is blood flow to the heart for its own metabolic needs. In the most common form of heart disease there is a disruption in this flow because of obstructive disease in the vessels that carry the flow. The subject of coronary blood flow is therefore associated mostly with the pathophysiology of this disease, rarely with dynamics or physics. Yet, the system responsible for coronary blood flow, namely the "coronary circulation," is a highly sophisticated dynamical system in which the dynamics and physics of the flow are as important as the integrity of the conducting vessels. While an obstruction in the conducting vessels is a fairly obvious and clearly visible cause of disruption in coronary blood flow, any discord in the complex dynamics of the system can cause an equally grave, though less conspicuous, disruption in the flow. This book is devoted specifically to the dynamics and physics of coronary blood flow. While relevance to the clinical and pathophysiological issues is clearly maintaine...

  8. The mean velocity profile of near-wall turbulent flow

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2014-01-01

    The issue of analytical derivation of the mean velocity profile in a near-wall turbulent flow is revisited in the context of a two-dimensional channel flow. An approach based on the use of dispersion relations for the flow velocity is developed. It is shown that for an incompressible flow conserving vorticity, there exists a decomposition of the velocity field into rotational and potential components, such that the restriction of the former to an arbitrary cross-section of the channel is a fu...

  9. High-resolution in-situ LDV monitoring system for measuring velocity distribution in blood vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Abe, Shotaro; Ishida, Hiroki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Takada, Yogo; Teranishi, Tsunenobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    We herein describe a cross-sectional multiple-point laser Doppler velocimetry (CS-MLDV) system for monitoring blood vessels that are sutured and connected during an operation. In order to observe the condition of a blood vessel during an operation, the previously developed linear MLDV (L-MLDV) system can realize velocity distribution imaging of the carotid artery in a living mouse by means of traverse laser light. We subsequently developed a CS-MLDV system, which can measure the instantaneous two-dimensional (2D) flow velocity, by upgrading the optical components and signal processing used in L-MLDV. The validity of the CS-MLDV results was verified through comparison with the results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The results of the CFD analysis were similar to the experimental results obtained under the same flow field condition. Moreover, an instantaneous 2D velocity distribution can be obtained even for the case of flowing blood. Finally, we carried out in-vivo measurement in a mesenteric vessel of a mouse in order to demonstrate the potential of the CS-MLDV for use in surgery.

  10. In vitro validation of volumetric blood flow measurement using Doppler flow wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, R; Kaufmann, P A; Jiang, Z; Attenhofer, C; Linka, A; Mandinov, L

    2000-10-01

    Determination of any volumetric blood flow requires assessment of mean blood flow velocity and vessel cross-sectional area. For evaluation of coronary blood flow and flow reserve, however, assessment of average peak velocity alone is widely used, but changes in velocity profile and vessel area are not taken into account. We studied the feasibility of a new method for calculation of volumetric blood flow by Doppler power using a Doppler flow wire. An in vitro model with serially connected silicone tubes of known lumen diameters (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 mm) and pulsatile blood flow ranging from 10 to 200 mL/min was used. A Doppler flow wire was connected to a commercially available Doppler system (FloMap(R), Cardiometrics) for online calculation of the zeroth (M(0)) and the first (M(1)) Doppler moment, as well as mean flow velocity (V(m)). Two different groups of sample volumes (at different gate depths) were used: 1. two proximal sample volumes lying completely within the vessel were required to evaluate the effect of scattering and attenuation on Doppler power, and 2. distal sample volumes intersecting completely the vessel lumen to assess the vessel cross-sectional area. Area (using M(0)) and V(m) (using M(1)/M(0)) obtained from the distal gates were corrected for scattering and attenuation by the data obtained from the proximal gates, allowing calculation of absolute volumetric flow. These results were compared to the respective time collected flow. Correlation between time collected and Doppler-derived flow measurements was 0.98 (p measurements in each individual tube. The mean paired flow difference between the two techniques was 1.5 +/- 9.0 mL/min (ns). Direct volumetric blood flow measurement from received Doppler power using a Doppler flow wire system is feasible. This technique may potentially be of great clinical value because it allows an accurate assessment of coronary flow and flow reserve with a commercially available flow wire system. PMID

  11. Analysis on Velocity Characteristics of Cavitation Flow Around Hydrofoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang-bin; LIU Shu-yan; WANG Guo-yu; ZHANG Bo; ZHANG Min-di

    2010-01-01

    The time-averaged velocity distributions in flows around a hydronautics hydrofoil were measured by using a digit-al particle image velocimeter (DPIV) system. The results show that the velocity distribution in the whole flow field depends on the development of cavitation structures with the decreasing of cavitation number. The high-fluctuation region with lower velocity relates to the cavitation area. The lowest velocity distribution in the cavity core becomes more uniform, and its in-fluence becomes smaller gradually as moving to downstream. The main-stream velocity distribution is even, then fluctuate and even at last. In the supercavitation stage, the fluid velocity in the cavitation region, corresponding to the front of the hydrofoil's suction surface, has a distribution close to the main stream, while the fluid velocity in other cavitation area is lower.

  12. Blood flow autoregulation in pedicled flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian T; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Elberg, Jens J

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical work on the blood perfusion in skin and muscle flaps has suggested that some degree of blood flow autoregulation exists in such flaps. An autoregulatory mechanism would enable the flap to protect itself from changes in the perfusion pressure. The purpose of the present study...... was to evaluate if, and to what extent, a tissue flap could compensate a reduction in blood flow due to an acute constriction of the feed artery. Further, we wanted to examine the possible role of smooth muscle L-type calcium channels in the autoregulatory mechanism by pharmacological intervention...... with the L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine and the vasodilator papaverine. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pedicled flaps were raised in pigs. Flow in the pedicle was reduced by constriction of the feed artery (n=34). A transit time flow probe measured the effect on blood flow continuously. Following...

  13. Ozone Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone therapy is currently being used in the treatment of ischemic disorders, but the underlying mechanisms that result in successful treatment are not well known. This study assesses the effect of ozone therapy on the blood flow in the middle cerebral and common carotid arteries. Seven subjects were recruited for the therapy that was performed by transfusing ozone-enriched autologous blood on 3 alternate days over 1 week. Blood flow quantification in the common carotid artery (n = 14 was performed using color Doppler. Systolic and diastolic velocities in the middle cerebral artery (n = 14 were estimated using transcranial Doppler. Ultrasound assessments were conducted at the following three time points: 1 basal (before ozone therapy, 2 after session #3 and 3 1 week after session #3. The common carotid blood flow had increased by 75% in relation to the baseline after session #3 (P < 0.001 and by 29% 1 week later (P = 0.039. In the middle cerebral artery, the systolic velocity had increased by 22% after session #3 (P = 0.001 and by 15% 1 week later (P = 0.035, whereas the diastolic velocity had increased by 33% after session #3 (P < 0.001 and by 18% 1 week later (P = 0.023. This preliminary Doppler study supports the clinical experience of achieving improvement by using ozone therapy in peripheral ischemic syndromes. Its potential use as a complementary treatment in cerebral low perfusion syndromes merits further clinical evaluation.

  14. Micro-PIV quantification of capillary blood flow redistribution caused by laser-assisted vascular occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Stiukhina, Elena S.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    We propose μPIV-based technique for quantitative assessment of blood flow redistribution in microcirculatory networks. Our approach is based on per-segment averaging of measured quantities so we can avoid most of problems that are typical for point-wise measurements. The key point of our technique is the digital processing algorithms of recorded data that include: capillary network axial line construction; interrogation regions centering; blood flow velocity local estimate using PIV approach; blood flow velocity calculation by means of averaging over entire vessel segment; the calculation of blood volume flow rate map. We illustrate the application of developed technique with in vivo measurements and blood flow velocity map reconstruction for chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryo, in which the local vascular occlusion was produced using continuous wave laser light irradiation..

  15. The Hysteresis and Shear Velocity in Unsteady Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokcen Bombar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The shear velocity is an important parameter in characterizing the shear at the boundary in open channels and there exist methods to estimate the shear velocity in steady flows, but the application and comparison of these methods to non-uniform unsteady flows is limited. In this study, three artificial triangular-shaped hydrographs were generated where the base flow is non-uniform with fine sand bed and the shear velocity was obtained by the methods, u*SV by using the Saint-Venant equations, u*L by using the procedure given by Clauser Method, u*P by using the parabolic law, u*UN by using the momentum equation assuming the slope of energy grade line is equal to bed slope and u*avg by using the average velocity equation are used in this study. The stream-wise components of velocity time series and the velocity profiles were obtained by means of an acoustic Doppler velocity meter. The variation of the shear velocity and the constant for the parabolic law with time is discussed. It is concluded that the shear velocities found by the parabolic law and the average velocity equation can be used interchangeably. Furthermore a hysteresis intensity parameter is proposed in order to examine the depth variation of hysteretic behavior of depth variation both with point velocity and average velocity. It is revealed that the more the unsteady the hydrograph the more the hysteresis both in terms of point velocity and cross-sectional mean velocity.

  16. Real gas flows with high velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Lunev, Vladimir V

    2009-01-01

    Gasdynamic Model and Equations Outline of the Gasdynamic Model Basic Equations and Postulates Equations of State Kinetic Theory Second Law of Thermodynamics Speed of Sound Integral Equations of Motion Kinematics of Fluid Media Differential Equations of Gasdynamics Rheological Model Initial and Boundary Conditions Similarity and Modeling in Gasdynamics Euler Equations Navier-Stokes Equations Turbulent Flows Viscous and Inviscid Flow Models Inviscid Gasdynamics Stream Function, Potential,

  17. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  18. Frequency encoding in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Donald J; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, Alexey N;

    2005-01-01

    With a model of renal blood flow regulation, we examined consequences of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) coupling to the myogenic mechanism via voltage-gated Ca channels. The model reproduces the characteristic oscillations of the two mechanisms and predicts frequency and amplitude modulation of...... the myogenic oscillation by TGF. Analysis by wavelet transforms of single-nephron blood flow confirms that both amplitude and frequency of the myogenic oscillation are modulated by TGF. We developed a double-wavelet transform technique to estimate modulation frequency. Median value of the ratio of...... from one TGF cycle to the next. We used a blood pressure signal recorded by telemetry from a conscious rat as the input to the model. Blood pressure fluctuations induced variability in the modulation records similar to those found in the nephron blood flow results. Frequency and amplitude modulation...

  19. Measurement of bone blood flow in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone blood flow in sheep tibia has been estimated via the measurement of the perfusion limited clearance of 41Ar from the bone mineral matrix following fast neutron activation of 44Ca. Tibia blood flows were estimated for the intact sheep, and after the installation of an intramedullary pressure tap to elevate bone marrow pressure by saline infusion. The results indicate that normal blood flow in the tibia is in the range of 1.1 to 3.7 ml/100ml-min in the intact animal and at normal marrow pressure. With an elevated intramedullary pressure of approximately 100 mmHg, the bone blood flow measured varied around 0.5 to 1.1 ml/100ml-min. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Clinical relevance of intermittent tumour blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the goals of translational cancer research is to understand basic 'phenomena' so that tumour response to therapy can be improved. One such phenomenon is intermittent tumour blood flow. The impact of the transient hypoxia that results from decreased tumour blood flow is now beginning to be appreciated in preclinical systems, and also receiving some attention in clinical practise. Thus in this article we review the nature and frequency of microregional blood flow changes in preclinical and clinical tumours and examine the impact of those changes on response to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, the implications of non-constant blood flow for both the growth of the unperturbed tumour and the regrowth of surviving tumour clonogens during and after therapy are examined

  1. Ascending aortic blood flow dynamics following intense exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, R D; Sellers, W R

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast aortic blood flow kinetics during recovery from intense aerobic (maximal oxygen uptake test) and anaerobic (Wingate anaerobic power test) exercise. Fifteen healthy male subjects (VO2max = 56.1 +/- 5.8 mk/kg/min) participated in this study. Beat-to-beat peak aortic blood flow velocity (pkV) and acceleration (pkA) measurements were obtained by placing a 3.0 MHz continuous-wave ultrasonic transducer on the suprasternal notch at rest and during recovery (immediately post-exercise, 2.5 min, and 5.0 min) following the two exercise conditions. Peak velocity and acceleration significantly increased (p less than 0.01) from rest to immediately post-exercise and remained elevated throughout the 5-min recovery period. No differences were observed between the aerobic and anaerobic tests. Stroke distance significantly declined (p less than 0.01) immediately following exercise and progressively rose during the 5-min recovery period. The results indicate that: 1) aortic blood flow kinetics remained elevated during short-term recovery, and 2) intense aerobic and anaerobic exercise exhibit similar post-exercise aortic blood flow kinetics. PMID:2262232

  2. Volume Flow in Arteriovenous Fistulas Using Vector Velocity Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Lange, Theis; Heerwagen, Søren; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Rix, Marianne; Lönn, Lars; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2014-01-01

    Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis was measured using the angle-independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging and compared with flow measurements using the ultrasound dilution technique during dialysis. Using an UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev......, Denmark) with a linear transducer, 20 arteriovenous fistulas were scanned directly on the most superficial part of the fistula just before dialysis. Vector Flow Imaging volume flow was estimated with two different approaches, using the maximum and the average flow velocities detected in the fistula. Flow...

  3. Transcranial electrical stimulation on cerebral blood flow velocity of the average-meta-analysis of 8 randomized controlled trials%经颅电刺激对脑平均血流速度影响的meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔文瑞; 谭杰文; 刘河军

    2012-01-01

    Objection: Through meta analysis, to discuss the change of averaged blood flow rate in brain under transcranial electrical stimulation(TES). Method: The published pertinent literature home and abroad in the databases, such as MEDL1NE, EMBASE and CBMdisc were searched. The test group received drug treatment and TES in the mastoids of both side; The control group received drug treated randomized controlled trial. Two valuator collected data according to the search strategy mentioned above and intaked the standards. Comprehensive Meta Analysis V2.0 was used to analyze the averaged blood flow rate in brain. Result: Eight clinical randomized controlled trials, including 570 persons, were taken into this analysis. TES intervention caused increasing of blood flow rate of brain: arteria cerebri anterior OR=40.504(95%CI,4.399-372.918), arteria cerebri media OR=30.376(95% CI,7.123-129.539), arteria cerebri posterior OR=7.398(95% CI,4.909- 11.148), vertebral artery OR=14.085(95%CI,4.696-42.249) and basilar artery OR=15.543(95% CI.3.356-72.000). The increased efficient of averaged blood flow rate was about 40.5, 30.4, 7.4, 14.1 and 15.5 times to the control groups. Conclusion: The result of meta analysis indicate that TES can increase the blood flow rate and blood flow volume of each arterial in brain roundly and remarkably, maybe it can direct the use of physical factor treatment in clinic.%目的:通过meta分析,探讨经颅电刺激对大脑平均血流速度的影响.方法:通过MEDLINE、EMBASE和CBMdise等数据库检索国内外已发表相关文献.选择治疗组为药物治疗加双乳突部位经颅电刺激,对照组为药物治疗的随机对照试验.由2位评价者分别按上述检索策略收集资料,按纳入标准人选,采用Comprehensive Meta Analysis V2.0软件对大脑平均血流速度进行meta分析.结果:共有8个临床随机对照试验,包括570例受试者纳入分析.经颅电刺激干预使大脑前动脉OR=40.504(95%CI,4.399-372.918)

  4. Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Diagnostic for Reacting Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A diagnostic technique is proposed for measuring temperature and velocity simultaneously in a high temperature reacting flow for aiding research in propulsion. The...

  5. Mammary blood flow and nutrient uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Chantal; Trottier, N.L.; Dourmad, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Sow milk is the major source of nutrients for suckling piglets and taking into account the large litter sizes of our current sow genotypes, it is imperative to maximize nutrient use by the mammary gland. The amount of nutrients available to mammary tissue is dependent upon the concentrations of nutrients in blood and the rate of its flow to the lactating glands. Nutrient availability to the udder may be estimated by measuring mammary arteriovenous differences, and mammary blood flow can be me...

  6. Retinal blood flow in diabetic retinopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, V.; Rassam, S; NEWSOM, R.; Wiek, J; Kohner, E.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--(a) To report on the basic parameters of retinal blood flow in a population of diabetic patients with and without retinopathy and non-diabetic controls; (b) to formulate a haemodynamic model for the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy from this and other studies. DESIGN--Laser-Doppler velocimetry and computerised image analysis to determine retinal blood flow in a large cross sectional study. SETTING--Diabetic retinopathy outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS--24 non-diabetic controls and ...

  7. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson Hans-Uno

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law.

  8. Velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, S.; Lohse, D.; Sun, C.

    2014-01-01

    We derive the velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow for the general case of independently rotating cylinders. The theory is based on the Navier-Stokes equations in the appropriate (cylinder) geometry. In particular, we derive the axial and the angular velocity profiles as funct

  9. Measurement of gas flow velocities by laser-induced gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B.; Stampanoni-Panariello, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kozlov, A.D.N. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-08-01

    Time resolved light scattering from laser-induced electrostrictive gratings was used for the determination of flow velocities in air at room temperature. By measuring the velocity profile across the width of a slit nozzle we demonstrated the high spatial resolution (about 200 mm) of this novel technique. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  10. Measurement of LBE flow velocity profile by UDVP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Takeda, Yasushi; Obayashi, Hiroo; Tezuka, Masao; Sato, Hiroshi

    2006-09-01

    Measurements of liquid metal lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), flow velocity profile were realized in the spallation neutron source target model by the ultrasonic Doppler velocity profiler (UVDP) technique. So far, it has not been done well, because both of poor wetting property of LBE with stainless steels and poor performance of supersonic probes at high temperatures. The measurement was made for a return flow in the target model, which has coaxially arranged annular and tube channels, in the JAEA Lead Bismuth Loop-2 (JLBL-2). The surface treatment of LBE container was examined. It was found that the solder coating was effective to enhance an intensity of reflected ultrasonic wave. This treatment has been applied to the LBE loop, which was operated up to 150 °C. The electro magnetic pump generates LBE flow and the flow rate was measured by the electro magnetic flow meter. By changing the flow rate of LBE, velocity profiles in the target were measured. It was confirmed that the maximum velocity in the time-averaged velocity distribution on the target axis was proportional to the flow rate measured by the electro magnetic flow meter.

  11. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with 86RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory

  12. Velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We derive the velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow for the general case of independently rotating cylinders. The theory is based on the Navier-Stokes equations in the appropriate (cylinder) geometry. In particular, we derive the axial and the angular velocity profiles as functions of distance from the cylinder walls and find that both follow a logarithmic profile, with downwards-bending curvature corrections, which are more pronounced for the angular velocity profile as compared to the axial velocity profile, and which strongly increase with decreasing ratio $\\eta$ between inner and outer cylinder radius. In contrast, the azimuthal velocity does not follow a log-law. We then compare the angular and azimuthal velocity profiles with the recently measured profiles in the ultimate state of (very) large Taylor numbers. Though the {\\em qualitative} trends are the same -- down-bending for large wall distances and (properly shifted and non-dimensionalized) angular velocity profile $\\omega^+(r)$...

  13. Assessing efficiency of air flow velocity sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpov, E.F.; Basovskii, B.I.; Grinev, V.A.; Levchenko, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for remote control of the operation of conductimetric, thermal converter elements which is based on an analysis of the shape of the transient response of the thermal process passing through a thermal converter when there is an irregular reduction in the supply voltage. The informative parameters of the transient response of the thermal process (e.g. amplitude, cooling rate, duration) are described and graphs are presented showing the relationship between these parameters and the velocity of the air current (range from 1 to 10 m/s) for the most common type of thermal converter which takes the form of a bead with a diameter of 0.35 mm. The necessary calculations may be done with a small computer. 2 refs.

  14. Real-Time GPU Implementation of Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradway, David; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    Rapid estimation of blood velocity and visualization of complex flow patterns are important for clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound. This paper presents real-time processing for two-dimensional (2-D) vector flow imaging which utilizes an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit (GPU). In this work......, Open Computing Language (OpenCL) is used to estimate 2-D vector velocity flow in vivo in the carotid artery. Data are streamed live from a BK Medical 2202 Pro Focus UltraView Scanner to a workstation running a research interface software platform. Processing data from a 50 millisecond frame of a duplex...... vector flow acquisition takes 2.3 milliseconds seconds on an Advanced Micro Devices Radeon HD 7850 GPU card. The detected velocities are accurate to within the precision limit of the output format of the display routine. Because this tool was developed as a module external to the scanner’s built...

  15. Fluorescent beeswax for surface flow velocity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, S.; Tauro, F.; Petroselli, A.; Mocio, G.; Capocci, I.; Rapiti, E.; Rapiti, R.; Cipollari, G.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-12-01

    Watershed surface processes control downstream runoff phenomena, waste and pollutant diffusion, erosion mechanics, and sediment transport. A quantitative understanding of the flow physics is currently limited by the lack of effective tracing techniques suitable for basin-scale observations. More specifically, field experiments require environmentally resilient, non-invasive, and low cost measurement systems that can potentially operate in remotely-controlled or unmanned conditions. Traditional tracing methodologies are largely not capable to cope with extreme in-situ conditions, including practical logistic challenges as well as inherent flow complexity. Specifically, most of available technologies need physical sampling to estimate the tracer concentration and do not allow for continuous-time measurements. In addition, commonly used tracers, such as isotopes, dyes, and chemicals, are not directly applicable to monitor surface hillslope processes and large-scale microchannel networks due to elaborate detection processes and dispersion issues. In this context, the feasibility of using buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in natural water flows is investigated. Specifically, a novel fabrication methodology is designed to manufacture particles from natural beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. The fabrication procedure allows for adjusting the size of the particles from tens of microns up to a few millimeters and their density from positively to negatively-buoyant with respect to water. An array of experimental techniques is employed to conduct a thorough characterization of the fluorescence and morphology of the tracers. In addition, ad-hoc experiments are designed to assess the fluorescence response due to Ultra Violet (UV) exposure and thermal processes. Proof-of-concept laboratory analysis are conducted to illustrate the integration of the novel particle tracers in existing tracing methods for surface flow

  16. Estimation of vessel diameter and blood flow dynamics from laser speckle images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging is a rapidly developing method to study changes of blood velocity in the vascular networks. However, to assess blood flow and vascular responses it is crucial to measure vessel diameter in addition to blood velocity dynamics. We suggest an algorithm that allows for dynamical...... masking of a vessel position and measurements of it's diameter from laser speckle images. This approach demonstrates high reliability and stability....

  17. Estimation of vessel diameter and blood flow dynamics from laser speckle images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnov, Dmitry D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging is a rapidly developing method to study changes of blood velocity in the vascular networks. However, to assess blood flow and vascular responses it is crucial to measure vessel diameter in addition to blood velocity dynamics. We suggest an algorithm that allows for dynamical masking of a vessel position and measurements of it’s diameter from laser speckle images. This approach demonstrates high reliability and stability.

  18. Pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous blood vessels using a third grade non-Newtonian fluids model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh, Pooria

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the unsteady pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous arteries concerning the influence of externally imposed periodic body acceleration and a periodic pressure gradient are numerically simulated. Blood is taken into account as the third-grade non-Newtonian fluid. Besides the numerical solution, for small Womersley parameter (such as blood flow through arterioles and capillaries), the analytical perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear governing equations. Consequently, analytical expressions for the velocity profile, wall shear stress, and blood flow rate are obtained. Excellent agreement between the analytical and numerical predictions is evident. Also, the effects of body acceleration, magnetic field, third-grade non-Newtonian parameter, pressure gradient, and porosity on the flow behaviors are examined. Some important conclusions are that, when the Womersley parameter is low, viscous forces tend to dominate the flow, velocity profiles are parabolic in shape, and the center-line velocity oscillates in phase with the driving pressure gradient. In addition, by increasing the pressure gradient, the mean value of the velocity profile increases and the amplitude of the velocity remains constant. Also, when non-Newtonian effect increases, the amplitude of the velocity profile. PMID:26792174

  19. Holographic laser Doppler imaging of pulsatile blood flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bencteux, Jeffrey; Kostas, Thomas; Bayat, Sam; Atlan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We report on wide-field imaging of pulsatile motion induced by blood flow using heterodyne holographic interferometry on the thumb of a healthy volunteer, in real-time. Optical Doppler images were measured with green laser light by a frequency-shifted Mach-Zehnder interferometer in off-axis configuration. The recorded optical signal was linked to local instantaneous out-of-plane motion of the skin at velocities of a few hundreds of microns per second, and compared to blood pulse monitored by plethysmoraphy during an occlusion-reperfusion experiment.

  20. Blood Flow Imaging in Maternal and Fetal Arteries and Veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, S.; Urban, G.; Vergani, P.; Paidas, M. J.; Tortoli, P.

    Maternal and fetal blood circulation has been investigated for nearly a decade through ultrasound (US) techniques. Evaluation of the spectrogram related to a single sample volume has been proven valuable for the assessment of fetal well-being and for prediction of pregnancy complications. In this work, an alternative technique, called Multigate Spectral Doppler Analysis (MSDA), is proposed. In this approach, 128 sample volumes aligned along the same scan line are simultaneously investigated to detect the blood velocity profile with high resolution. Profiles obtained through MSDA reveal features not detectable with the standard US technique, thus representing a more accurate flow signature. Some preliminary illustrative results are reported here.

  1. Simple Radiowave-Based Method For Measuring Peripheral Blood Flow Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Project objective is to design small radio frequency based flow probes for the measurement of blood flow velocity in peripheral arteries such as the femoral artery and middle cerebral artery. The result will be the technological capability to measure peripheral blood flow rates and flow changes during various environmental stressors such as microgravity without contact to the individual being monitored. This technology may also lead to an easier method of detecting venous gas emboli during extravehicular activities.

  2. Prediction of Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome with Velocity Blood Pressure Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Chao Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is an important complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA. An >100% increase in middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAV after CEA is used to predict the cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS development, but the accuracy is limited. The increase in blood pressure (BP after surgery is a risk factor of CHS, but no study uses it to predict CHS. This study was to create a more precise parameter for prediction of CHS by combined the increase of MCAV and BP after CEA. Methods: Systolic MCAV measured by transcranial Doppler and systematic BP were recorded preoperatively; 30 min postoperatively. The new parameter velocity BP index (VBI was calculated from the postoperative increase ratios of MCAV and BP. The prediction powers of VBI and the increase ratio of MCAV (velocity ratio [VR] were compared for predicting CHS occurrence. Results: Totally, 6/185 cases suffered CHS. The best-fit cut-off point of 2.0 for VBI was identified, which had 83.3% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity, 62.5% positive predictive value and 99.4% negative predictive value for CHS development. This result is significantly better than VR (33.3%, 97.2%, 28.6% and 97.8%. The area under the curve (AUC of receiver operating characteristic: AUC VBI = 0.981, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.949-0.995; AUC VR = 0.935, 95% CI 0.890-0.966, P = 0.02. Conclusions: The new parameter VBI can more accurately predict patients at risk of CHS after CEA. This observation needs to be validated by larger studies.

  3. Conventional Point-Velocity Records and Surface Velocity Observations for Estimating High Flow Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity measurements using point-velocity meters are normally obtained by sampling one, two or three velocity points per vertical profile. During high floods their use is inhibited due to the difficulty of sampling in lower portions of the flow area. Nevertheless, the application of standard methods allows estimation of a parameter, α, which depends on the energy slope and the Manning roughness coefficient. During high floods, monitoring of velocity can be accomplished by sampling the maximum velocity, umax, only, which can be used to estimate the mean flow velocity, um, by applying the linear entropy relationship depending on the parameter, M, estimated on the basis of historical observed pairs (um, umax. In this context, this work attempts to analyze if a correlation between α and M holds, so that the monitoring for high flows can be addressed by exploiting information from standard methods. A methodology is proposed to estimate M from α, by coupling the “historical” information derived by standard methods, and “new” information from the measurement of umax surmised at later times. Results from four gauged river sites of different hydraulic and geometric characteristics have shown the robust estimation of M based on α.

  4. Continuous flow measurements using ultrasonic velocity meters - an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmann, Rick

    1995-01-01

    An article in the summer 1993 Newsletter described USGS work to continously monitor tidal flows in the delta using ultrasonic velocity meters.  This article updates progress since 1993, including new installations, results of data analysis, damage during this year's high flows, and the status of each site.

  5. Exact velocity of dispersive flow in the asymmetric avalanche process

    OpenAIRE

    Ivashkevich, E. V.; Povolotsky, A. M.; Priezzhev, V.B.

    2000-01-01

    Using the Bethe ansatz we obtain the exact solution for the one-dimensional asymmetric avalanche process. We evaluate the velocity of dispersive flow as a function of driving force and the density of particles. The obtained solution shows a dynamical transition from intermittent to continuous flow.

  6. Aortic blood flow subtraction: an alternative method for measuring total renal blood flow in conscious dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandgaard, N C F; Andersen, J L; Holstein-Rathlou, N-H;

    2002-01-01

    We have measured total renal blood flow (TRBF) as the difference between signals from ultrasound flow probes implanted around the aorta above and below the renal arteries. The repeatability of the method was investigated by repeated, continuous infusions of angiotensin II and endothelin-1 seven t...... of TRBF by aortic blood flow subtraction is a practical and reliable method that allows direct comparison of excretory function and renal blood flow from two kidneys. The method also allows direct comparison between TRBF and flow in the caudal aorta....

  7. Coded excitation and sub-band processing for blood velocity estmation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    signal can be divided into a number of narrow frequency bands. The blood velocity can be estimated in each of the bands and the velocity estimates can be averaged to form an improved estimate. Furthermore, since the excitation signal is broadband, no secondary B-mode sequence is required, and the frame......This paper investigates the use of broadband coded excitation and subband processing for blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound. In conventional blood velocity estimation a long (narrow-band) pulse is emitted and the blood velocity is estimated using an auto-correlation based approach...

  8. Spatial filtering of low velocity and thermal unbalanced flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method has been developed to realize measurements of coolant flow in the core of integrated Low Temperature Heating Reactor. The principle of measurement using spatial filtering to measure flow velocity is described. The space weight function for the thermocouple space filter is derived and analyzed. Under the assumption of that the temperature fluctuation is white noise, the characteristics of time-frequency-domain of the thermocouple space filter and effects of thermocouple time constant on them are analysed. A simplified theoretical model of measuring flow velocity by using thermocouple spatial filter is developed. The experiments and results on thermocouple space filter are given

  9. Validation of an optical flow algorithm to measure blood flow waveforms in arteries using dynamic digital x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, Kawal; Lambrou, Tryphon; Hawkes, David J.; Hamilton, George; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2000-06-01

    We have developed a weighted optical flow algorithm for the extraction of instantaneous blood velocity from dynamic digital x-ray images of blood vessels. We have carried out in- vitro validation of this technique. A pulsatile physiological blood flow circuit was constructed using sections of silicone tubing to simulate blood vessels with whole blood as the fluid. Instantaneous recording of flow from an electromagnetic flow meter (EMF) provided the gold standard measurement. Biplanar dynamic digital x-ray images of the blood vessel with injection of contrast medium were acquired at 25 fps using a PC frame capture card. Imaging of a Perspex calibration cube allowed 3D reconstruction of the vessel and determination of true dimensions. Blood flow waveforms were calculated off-line on a Sun workstation using the new algorithm. The correlation coefficient between instantaneous blood flow values obtained from the EMF and the x-ray method was r equals 0.871, n equals 1184, p less than 0.0001. The correlation coefficient for average blood flow was r equals 0.898, n equals 16, p less than 0.001. We have successfully demonstrated that our new algorithm can measure pulsatile blood flow in a vessel phantom. We aim to use this algorithm to measure blood flow clinically in patients undergoing vascular interventional procedures.

  10. Carbon film deposition from high velocity rarefied flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented study is based on the idea of the activation of a gas-precursor high velocity flow by hot wire. The wire forms the channel for flow before expansion to substrate. The construction allows change of the specific flow rate, velocity, composition and temperature of a gas mixture by studying the film synthesis in conditions from free molecular to continuum flow at velocities from hundreds to thousands of m/s. At a high pressure, the film has typical and unusual hexagonal incorporations for diamond tetragonal particles. Raman spectrum with the pronounced diamond peak is typical for diamond-like film. X-ray diffraction points in the presence of lonsdaleite. Conditions of deposition were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Collisions with hot surfaces and chemical transformations were taken into consideration as well

  11. In vivo analysis of physiological 3D blood flow of cerebral veins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchardt, Florian; Schroeder, Laure; Baeuerle, Jochen; Harloff, Andreas [University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Freiburg (Germany); Anastasopoulos, Constantin [University Medical Center, Department of Neuropaediatrics and Muscle Disorders, Freiburg (Germany); University Medical Centre, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine and McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States); Hennemuth, Anja; Drexl, Johann [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen (Germany); Valdueza, Jose M. [Neurological Center, Segeberger Kliniken, Bad Segeberg (Germany); Mader, Irina [University Medical Centre, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    To visualize and quantify physiological blood flow of intracranial veins in vivo using time-resolved, 3D phase-contrast MRI (4D flow MRI), and to test measurement accuracy. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent repeated ECG-triggered 4D flow MRI (3 Tesla, 32-channel head coil). Intracranial venous blood flow was analysed using dedicated software allowing for blood flow visualization and quantification in analysis planes at the superior sagittal, straight, and transverse sinuses. MRI was evaluated for intra- and inter-observer agreement and scan-rescan reproducibility. Measurements of the transverse sinuses were compared with transcranial two-dimensional duplex ultrasound. Visualization of 3D blood flow within cerebral sinuses was feasible in 100 % and within at least one deep cerebral vein in 87 % of the volunteers. Blood flow velocity/volume increased along the superior sagittal sinus and was lower in the left compared to the right transverse sinus. Intra- and inter-observer reliability and reproducibility of blood flow velocity (mean difference 0.01/0.02/0.02 m/s) and volume (mean difference 0.0002/-0.0003/0.00003 l/s) were good to excellent. High/low velocities were more pronounced (8 % overestimation/9 % underestimation) in MRI compared to ultrasound. Four-dimensional flow MRI reliably visualizes and quantifies three-dimensional cerebral venous blood flow in vivo and is promising for studies in patients with sinus thrombosis and related diseases. (orig.)

  12. In vivo determination of bone blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative measurement of bone blood flow is vital to understand the hemodynamics of bone systems especially in the study of asceptic bone necroses. These ''silent bends'' result from micro-emboli in femoral arterioles from small nitrogen bubbles released from lipids during a diver's ascent. A technique to determine bone blood flow in vivo has been developed by measuring the rate of inert gas washout of Ar-41 (t /sub 1/2/ = 1.83 h, E = 1293 keV) from the bone mineral matrix. Argon gas is formed in vivo by neutron activation of Ca-44 using 14.3 MeV neutrons, following the reaction Ca-44(n, α)Ar-41. The blood flow in the irradiated bone is determined by measuring the clearance rate of Ar-41 using gamma-ray spectroscopy. To date, measurements have been made on dead and living rats (weight 300g). The results indicated that in the no-flow situation the clearance rate is consistent with the physical half-life of Ar-41, while for the live rats the clearance rate for argon is dependent on the flow of blood in the bone. The observed clearance times correspond to flows greater than 3 ml of blood per 100 ml of argon distribution volume/min (F/pV), with the bone-blood partition coefficient for argon approximately one. In addition, measurements of the partitioning of argon and other gases with bone have been measured in order to understand blood-bone systems more fully

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy-six schizophrenic patients were examined by a Xe-133 inhalation method to determine regional cerebral blood flow. A decreased blood flow was observed in the frontal lobe, especially in the right inferior part. In a study on the relationship between disease subtypes and regional cerebral blood flow, negative symptoms were found more predominantly associated with dissolution type than delusion type. In the group of dissolution type, a decreased blood flow was observed in both the right inferior frontal lobe and the right upper hemisphere, in comparison to the group of delution type. Patients presenting with auditory hallucination had a significantly higher incidence of both negative and positive symptoms, as compared with those not presenting with it. In such patients, a significantly decreased blood flow was also seen in the left upper frontal lobe and the bilateral parietal lobe. Xe-133 inhalation method should assist in evaluating brain function in schizophrenic patients, thus leading to the likelihood of developing a new treatment modality. (N.K.)

  14. Regulation of blood flow by prostaglandins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Risum, N; Kjaer, M

    2004-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) belong to the family of prostanoids together with thromboxanes and are produced mainly from arachadonic acid by the enzyme cyclooxygenase. PGs are known to stimulate platelet aggregation, mediate inflammation and edema, play a role in bone metabolism and in biological...... adaptation of connective tissues e.g. tendon. This review covers the role of PG for mediating tissue blood flow at rest and during increases in metabolic demand such as exercise and reactive hyperaemia. There is strong evidence that PGs contribute to elevate blood flow at rest and during reactive hyperaemia...... in a variety of tissues. Their role for regulating the large increases in muscle blood flow during exercise is less clear which may be explained by redundant mechanisms. Several interactions are known to exist between specific vasodilator substances, and therefore PGs can act in synergy with other...

  15. Blood vector velocity estimation using an autocorrelation approach: In vivo Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Bachmann, Michael; Rue, Kristina;

    2005-01-01

    transverse oscillation (TO) method) based on an autocorrelation approach. The TO method makes use of a double oscillating pulse-echo field which is created by manipulating the receive apodization function. Two receive beams are beamformed, where the lateral distance between the two beams corresponds to a 90...... deg phase shift in the lateral direction. The TO method works at angles where conventional methods fails to estimate any blood movement, i.e. when the angle between the ultrasound beam and the velocity vector is approximately 90 deg. In this paper the first in-vivo color flow map (CFM) images are...

  16. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.;

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  17. Cosmic microwave background dipole, peculiar velocity and Hubble flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tomozawa, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    Two types of cosmology are discussed and their implications for the observed cmb (cosmic microwave background radiation) dipole are described. Theorems useful for understanding the cause for a cmb dipole are presented. Since the present peculiar velocity of the solar system relative to the GA (Great Attracter) cannot explain the observed cmb dipole, the author presents the possibility of Hubble flow of the GA as a cause in one case and a further peculiar velocity of the GA in the other case.

  18. Joint probability discrimination between stationary tissue and blood velocity signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    segments before and after echo-canceling, and (b) the amplitude variations between samples in consecutive RF-signals before and after echo-canceling. The statistical discriminator was obtained by computing the probability density functions (PDFs) for each feature through histogram analysis of data. The....... This study presents a new statistical discriminator. Investigation of the RF-signals reveals that features can be derived that distinguish the segments of the signal, which do an do not carry information on the blood flow. In this study 4 features, have been determined: (a) the energy content in the...... discrimination is performed by determining the joint probability of the features for the segment under investigation and choosing the segment type that is most likely. The method was tested on simulated data resembling RF-signals from the carotid artery....

  19. Use of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) angiography (PC-MRA) to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery. PC-MRA was performed in 16 volunteers with no ophthalmic abnormalities and measurement of blood flow based on the results was attempted. It was possible to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery using PC-MRA in all 16 volunteers. The mean (±1 standard deviation) velocity was 9.17±2.28 cm/second, peak systolic velocity was 16.69±3.33 cm/second, and end diastolic velocity was 3.69±2.44 cm/second. The resistivity index was 0.79±0.12, the pulsatility index was 1.49±0.41, and flow was 6.25±2.33 ml/minute. It was possible to identify the ophthalmic artery and a portion of the artery in which blood flow could be measured using MR imaging, a preliminary step to blood flow measurement using MR angiography. In addition to the velocity of blood flow in the ophthalmic artery, measurement of the amount of flow was possible with PC-MRA, which is one advantage of this method. (author)

  20. Gas flow velocity of the direct gas puff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas flow velocity of a piezo-valve used in the Large Helical Device has been measured in a test chamber of 3.6 m long. Various gasses of hydrogen, helium, methane, neon, nitrogen and argon are used in the experiment. In the direct gas puff configuration, where the gas flow directly reaches the target, the Mach number increases with the mass of the gas molecule and/or the primary pressure of the piezo-valve. The maximum Mach number of over 1.5 is obtained with the methane. In the normal gas puff configuration, where the injected gas suffers from reflection and/or absorption by materials, the gas flow velocity remains at sound velocity, even with the methane. (author)

  1. Implementation and characterization of phase-resolved Doppler optical coherence tomography method for flow velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongchalee, Pornthep; Palawong, Kunakorn; Meemon, Panomsak

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the system implementation and characterization of a Phase-Resolved Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography (PR-DOCT) is presented. The phase-resolved Doppler technique was implemented on a custom built Frequency Domain OCT (FD-OCT) that was recently developed at Suranaree University of Technology. Utilizing Doppler phase changed relation in a complex interference signal caused by moving samples, PR-DOCT can produce visualization and characterization of flow activity such as blood flow in biological samples. Here we report the performance of the implemented PR-DOCT system in term of the Velocity Dynamic Range (VDR), which is defined by the range from the minimum to the maximum detectable axial velocity. The minimum detectable velocity was quantified from a histogram distribution of phase difference between consecutive depth-scan signals when performing Doppler imaging of a stationary mirror. By applying a Gaussian curve fitting to the histogram, the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the fitted curve was measured to represent the detectable minimum flow velocity of the system. The maximum detectable velocity was limited by the phase wrapping of the Doppler signal, which is governed by the acquisition speed of the system. We demonstrate the 3D Doppler imaging and velocity measurement of feed flow phantom using 100% milk pumped through a microfluidic chip by using a syringe pump system.

  2. Influence of Gravity on Blood Volume and Flow Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, D.; Olszowka, A.; Bednarczyk, E.; Shykoff, B.; Farhi, L.

    1999-01-01

    increased and if there is edema in space. Anecdotal evidence suggests there may be cerebral edema early in flight. Cerebral artery velocity has been shown to be elevated in simulated microgravity. The elevated cerebral artery velocity during simulated microgravity may reflect vasoconstriction of the arteries and not increased cerebral blood flow. The purpose of our investigations was to evaluate the effects of alterations in simulated gravity (+/-), resulting in changes in cardiac output (+/-), and on the blood flow and volume distribution in the lung and brain of human subjects. The first hypothesis of these studies was that blood flow and volume would be affected by gravity, but their distribution in the lung would be independent of gravity and due to vasoactivity changing vascular resistance in lung vessels. The vasodilitation of the lung vasculature (lower resistance) along with increased "compliance" of the heart could account for the absence of increased central venous pressure in microgravity. Secondly, we postulate that cerebral blood velocity is increased in microgravity due to large artery vasoconstriction, but that cerebral blood flow would be reduced due to autoregulation.

  3. Deoxygenation Reduces Sickle Cell Blood Flow at Arterial Oxygen Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinran; Wood, David K; Higgins, John M

    2016-06-21

    The majority of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease is caused by vaso-occlusion: circulatory obstruction leading to tissue ischemia and infarction. The consequences of vaso-occlusion are seen clinically throughout the vascular tree, from the relatively high-oxygen and high-velocity cerebral arteries to the relatively low-oxygen and low-velocity postcapillary venules. Prevailing models of vaso-occlusion propose mechanisms that are relevant only to regions of low oxygen and low velocity, leaving a wide gap in our understanding of the most important pathologic process in sickle cell disease. Progress toward understanding vaso-occlusion is further challenged by the complexity of the multiple processes thought to be involved, including, but not limited to 1) deoxygenation-dependent hemoglobin polymerization leading to impaired rheology, 2) endothelial and leukocyte activation, and 3) altered cellular adhesion. Here, we chose to focus exclusively on deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes in an effort to quantify their contribution independent of the other processes that are likely involved in vivo. We take advantage of an experimental system that, to our knowledge, uniquely enables the study of pressure-driven blood flow in physiologic-sized tubes at physiologic hematocrit under controlled oxygenation conditions, while excluding the effects of endothelium, leukocyte activation, adhesion, inflammation, and coagulation. We find that deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes are sufficient to increase apparent viscosity significantly, slowing blood flow velocity at arterial oxygen tension even without additional contributions from inflammation, adhesion, and endothelial and leukocyte activation. We quantify the changes in apparent viscosity and define a set of functional regimes of sickle cell blood flow personalized for each patient that may be important in further dissecting mechanisms of in vivo vaso-occlusion as well as in assessing risk of patient

  4. Coded ultrasound for blood flow estimation using subband processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    coded signals are used to increase SNR, followed by sub-band processing. The received broadband signal, is filtered using a set of narrow-band filters. Estimating the velocity in each of the bands and averaging the results yields better performance compared to what would be possible when transmitting a......This paper further investigates the use of coded excitation for blood flow estimation in medical ultrasound. Traditional autocorrelation estimators use narrow-band excitation signals to provide sufficient signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and velocity estimation performance. In this paper, broadband...... excitation signal is broadband and has good spatial resolution after pulse compression. Two different codin-schemes are used in this paper, Barker codes and Golay codes. The performance of the codes for velocity estimation is compared to a conventional approach transmitting a narrow-band pulse. The study was...

  5. Laser Doppler microscopy of blood flows in fish embryos at different stages of ontogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, Natalia B.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Levenko, Borislav A.

    1995-02-01

    Laser Doppler microscopy is an efficient method of in vivo measurements of flow velocities in different biological objects. It is based on the registration of frequency shifts in light quasielastically scattered from particles moving in the flows. To study the embryonic development of the cardiac-vascular system in embryos of warm water fishes, embryos of Macropodus opercularis have been used. Doppler spectra from pulsatile blood flows in selected vessels and their changes in the process of ontogenesis have been registered. The recording of the successive spectra and their computer processing yield the varying dynamics of blood flows. Typical age dependencies of velocity patterns in the embryos are presented.

  6. Electromechanical Model of Blood Flow in Vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo Cap; Barbora Czippelova

    2008-01-01

    The present paper deals with some theoretical derivations connected with very efficient method of solution of hydrodynamic problems of blood flow in human cardiovascular system. The electromechanical analogy of liquid flow in a tube and electromagnetic wave propagating along an electric transmission line is discussed. We have derived a detailed circuit-like model of an elementary section of the elastic tube with viscose Newtonian liquid. The analogy harmonic current electrical cir...

  7. Electromechanical Model of Blood Flow in Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Cap

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with some theoretical derivations connected with very efficient method of solution of hydrodynamic problems of blood flow in human cardiovascular system. The electromechanical analogy of liquid flow in a tube and electromagnetic wave propagating along an electric transmission line is discussed. We have derived a detailed circuit-like model of an elementary section of the elastic tube with viscose Newtonian liquid. The analogy harmonic current electrical circuit has been designed

  8. Assessing the velocity of the groundwater flow in bedrock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) is studying the crystalline bedrock in Finland for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel from its two reactors in Olkiluoto. Preliminary site investigations for five areas were carried out during 1987-1992. One part of the investigation programme was three-dimensional groundwater flow modelling. The numerical site-specific flow simulations were based on the concept of an equivalent porous continuum. The results include hydraulic head distributions, average groundwater flow rate routes. In this study, a novel approach was developed to evaluate the velocities of the water particles flowing in the fractured bedrock. (17 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.)

  9. Impact of flow velocity on biochemical processes - a laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, A.; Roubinet, D.; Aquilina, L.; Bour, O.; Davy, P.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding and predicting hydraulic and chemical properties of natural environments are current crucial challenges. It requires considering hydraulic, chemical and biological processes and evaluating how hydrodynamic properties impact on biochemical reactions. In this context, an original laboratory experiment to study the impact of flow velocity on biochemical reactions along a one-dimensional flow streamline has been developed. Based on the example of nitrate reduction, nitrate-rich water passes through plastic tubes at several flow velocities (from 6.2 to 35 mm min-1), while nitrate concentration at the tube outlet is monitored for more than 500 h. This experimental setup allows assessing the biologically controlled reaction between a mobile electron acceptor (nitrate) and an electron donor (carbon) coming from an immobile phase (tube) that produces carbon during its degradation by microorganisms. It results in observing a dynamic of the nitrate transformation associated with biofilm development which is flow-velocity dependent. It is proposed that the main behaviors of the reaction rates are related to phases of biofilm development through a simple analytical model including assimilation. Experiment results and their interpretation demonstrate a significant impact of flow velocity on reaction performance and stability and highlight the relevance of dynamic experiments over static experiments for understanding biogeochemical processes.

  10. Holographic laser Doppler imaging of microvascular blood flow

    CERN Document Server

    Magnain, C; Boucneau, T; Simonutti, M; Ferezou, I; Rancillac, A; Vitalis, T; Sahel, J A; Paques, M; Atlan, M

    2014-01-01

    We report on local superficial blood flow monitoring in biological tissue from laser Doppler holographic imaging. In time averaging recording conditions, holography acts as a narrowband bandpass filter, which, combined with a frequency shifted reference beam, permits frequency selective imaging in the radiofrequency range. These Doppler images are acquired with an off axis Mach Zehnder interferometer. Microvascular hemodynamic components mapping is performed in the cerebral cortex of the mouse and the eye fundus of the rat with near-infrared laser light without any exogenous marker. These measures are made from a basic inverse method analysis of local first order optical fluctuation spectra at low radiofrequencies, from 0 Hz to 100 kHz. Local quadratic velocity is derived from Doppler broadenings induced by fluid flows, with elementary diffusing wave spectroscopy formalism in backscattering configuration. We demonstrate quadratic mean velocity assessment in the 0.1 to 10 millimeters per second range in vitro ...

  11. Vortex shedding flowmeters for liquids at high flow velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegwarth, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    A number of vortex shedding flowmeter designs for flow measurements in liquid oxygen ducts on the space shuttle main engines have been tested in a high head water flow test facility. The results have shown that a vortex shedding element or vane spanning the duct can give a linear response to an average flow velocity of 46 m/s (150 ft/s) in a 1 1/2 inch nominal (41 mm actual) diameter duct while a vane partially spanning the duct can give a linear response to velocities exceeding 55 m/s (180 ft/s). The maximum pressure drops across the flow sensing elements extrapolate to less than 0.7 MPa (100 psi) at 56 m/s (184 ft/s) for liquid oxygen. The test results indicate that the vanes probably cannot be scaled up with pipe size, at least not linearly.

  12. Effects of flow geometry on blood viscoelasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, George B; Henderson, Nancy M

    2006-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood are dominated by microstructures formed by red cells. The microstructures are of several types such as irregular aggregates, rouleaux, and layers of aligned cells. The dynamic deformability of the red cells, aggregation tendency, cell concentration, size of confining vessel and rate of flow are determining factors in the microstructure. Viscoelastic properties, viscosity and elasticity, relate to energy loss and storage in flowing blood while relaxation time and Weissenberg number play a role in assessing the importance of the elasticity relative to the viscosity. These effects are shown herein for flow in a large straight cylindrical tube, a small tube, and a porous medium. These cases approximate the geometries of the arterial system: large vessels, small vessels and vessels with many branches and bifurcations. In each case the viscosity, elasticity, relaxation time and Weissenberg number for normal human blood as well as blood with enhanced cell aggregation tendency and diminished cell deformability are given. In the smaller spaces of the microtubes and porous media, the diminished viscosity shows the possible influence of the Fåhraeus-Lindqvist effect and at high shear rates, the viscoelasticity of blood shows dilatancy. This is true for normal, aggregation enhanced and hardened cells. PMID:17148856

  13. MR blood velocity measurements in the pulmonary arteries with magnetic resonance imaging. Messung der Blutflussgeschwindigkeit in den Pulmonalarterien mit Hilfe der Magnetresonanztechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamroth, A.H.; Wacker, C.M.; Knopp, M.V.; Betsch, B.; Clorius, J.H.; Kaick, G. van (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Onkologische Diagnostik und Therapie); Schad, L.R. (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Biophysik und Medizinische Strahlenphysik); Gehling, U. (Thoraxklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Innere Medizin-Pneumologie)

    1992-04-01

    MR blood velocity measurements were performed by the RACE technique in a plane perpendicular to the flow of the pulmonary arteries. MR findings were correlated with those of perfusion scintigraphy, Doppler US and right heart catheter (thermodilution). The ratio of MR blood flow measurements of right and left pulmonary arteries correlated well with the results of perfusion scintigraphy (RPA to LPA) and Doppler. Poor correlation was found when comparing MR blood flow measurements with right heart catheter since absolute flow measurements can be superimposed by neighboring blood vessels in complex anatomic situations. (orig.).

  14. Simulations of Viscous Flow Fields of ASTM Assembly and the Effective Average Velocities of Flow Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; ZHANG Wei-min; CHEN Nai-lu; WANG Ming-hua; LI Lin-lin; Yuan Jian

    2004-01-01

    With the finite element analysis of viscous quenchant flow fields of the ASTM assembly, the effective average velocities of flow tubes are introduced in this paper. And through the results of experiments, the influences of quenchant velocities upon the whole cooling processes are discussed.

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow in aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, K; Larsen, B; Skinhøj, E;

    1978-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in 13 aphasic patients with left hemisphere lesions, using the intracarotid xenon 133 injection method and a 254-detector gamma camera system. The rCBF was measured during rest and during various function tests, including a simple speech test. In...

  16. Cerebral blood flow in acute mountain sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Wright, Anne; Lassen, N A;

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured using the radioactive xenon technique and were related to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). In 12 subjects, ascending from 150 to 3,475 m, CBF was 24% increased at 24 h [45.1 to 55.9 initial slope index (ISI) units] and 4% increased...

  17. Frequency encoding in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, D.J.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A.N.;

    2005-01-01

    With a model of renal blood flow regulation, we examined consequences of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) coupling to the myogenic mechanism via voltage-gated Ca channels. The model reproduces the characteristic oscillations of the two mechanisms and predicts frequency and amplitude modulation of ...

  18. Analytic expression for poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, M. [College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Narashino 275-8576 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    The poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime is calculated by improving the l = 1 approximation for the Fokker-Planck collision operator [M. Taguchi, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 1897 (1988)]. The obtained analytic expression for this flow, which can be used for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, agrees quite well with the recently calculated numerical results by Parker and Catto [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085011 (2012)] in the full range of aspect ratio.

  19. Xenon computed tomographic blood flow mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xenon CT flow information appears to be clinically useful in the diagnosis and management of a broad spectrum of clinical disorders. It also appears to be a useful tool for the experimental study of the cerebral circulation, with recent work also extending to application to the study of solid abdominal organs. The authors therefore found xenon CT CBF mapping to be a useful new blood flow methodology and are of the opinion that as CT technology improves, one will be able to obtain still better flow information with less accompanying radiation exposure and/or a reduction in the level of xenon inhalation required

  20. Transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound of ovarian artery blood flow in healthy women of reproductive age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To provide reference standard for physiological and pathological changes of ovarian blood flow. Methods: Color Doppler ultrasound of ovarian artery blood flow was performed on 50 healthy women of reproductive age. Ovarian artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), blood flow resistant index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), and systolic end diastolic ratio (S/D) were studied in the follicular, ovulation, luteal and luteal atrophy phases. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05) among the ovarian artery EDV, RI, PI, S/D of different groups except for the highest (P<0.05). Conclusion: There are cyclical ovarian artery blood flow changes in healthy women of reproductive age. There is close relation between the blood supply and the functional status of the ovaries. (authors)

  1. Heat Transfer Effects on Laminar Velocity Profiles in Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Robert; Jenkins, Thomas

    1998-11-01

    Heat Transfer Effects on Laminar Velocity Profiles in Pipe Flow. Robert L. Powell, Thomas P. Jenkins Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science University of California, Davis, CA 95616 Using laser Doppler velocimetry, we have measured the axial velocity profiles for steady, pressure driven, laminar flow of water in a circular tube. The flow was established in a one inch diameter seamless glass tube. The entry length prior to the measuring section was over one hundred diameters. Reynolds numbers in the range 500-2000 were used. Under conditions where the temperature difference between the fluid and the surroundings differed by as little as 0.2C, we found significant asymmetries in the velocity profiles. This asymmetry was most pronounced in the vertical plane. Varying the temperature difference moved the velocity maximum either above or below the centerline depending upon whether the fluid was warmer or cooler than the room. These results compare well to existing calculations. Using the available theory and our experiments it is possible to identify parameter ranges where non-ideal conditions(not parabolic velocity profiles) will be found. Supported by the EMSP Program of DOE.

  2. Cyclic variations of high-frequency ultrasonic backscattering from blood under pulsatile flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Chung

    2009-08-01

    It was shown previously that ultrasonic scattering from whole blood varies during the flow cycle under pulsatile flow both in vitro and in vivo. It has been postulated that the cyclic variations of the backscattering signal are associated with red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in flowing whole blood. To obtain a better understanding of the relationship between blood backscattering and RBC aggregation behavior for pulsatile flowing blood, the present study used high-frequency ultrasound to characterize blood properties. The backscattering signals from both whole blood and an RBC suspension at different peak flow velocities (from 10 to 30 cm/s) and hematocrits (20% and 40%) under pulsatile flow (stroke rate of 20 beats/min) were measured with 3 single-element transducers at frequencies of 10, 35, and 50 MHz in a mock flow loop. To avoid the frequency response problem of a Doppler flowmeter, the integrated backscatter (IB) and flow velocity as functions of time were calculated directly using RF signals from flowing blood. The experimental results showed that cyclic variations of the IB curve were clearly observed at a low flow velocity and a hematocrit of 40% when using 50 MHz ultrasound, and that these variations became weaker as the peak flow velocity increased. However, these cyclic variations were detected only at 10 cm/s when using 10 MHz ultrasound. These results demonstrate that a high flow velocity can stop the formation of rouleaux and that a high hematocrit can promote RBC aggregation to produce cyclic variations of the backscattering signal under pulsatile flow. In addition, slight cyclic variations of the IB curve for an RBC suspension were observed at 35 and 50 MHz. Furthermore, the peak of the IB curve from whole blood led the peak of the velocity waveform when using high-frequency ultrasound, which could be explained by the assumption that a rapid flow can promote RBC aggregation under pulsatile flow. Together, the experimental results showed that the

  3. Velocity and energy relaxation in two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Meyapin, Yannick; Gisclon, Marguerite

    2009-01-01

    In the present study we investigate analytically the process of velocity and energy relaxation in two-phase flows. We begin our exposition by considering the so-called six equations two-phase model [Ishii1975, Rovarch2006]. This model assumes each phase to possess its own velocity and energy variables. Despite recent advances, the six equations model remains computationally expensive for many practical applications. Moreover, its advection operator may be non-hyperbolic which poses additional theoretical difficulties to construct robust numerical schemes |Ghidaglia et al, 2001]. In order to simplify this system, we complete momentum and energy conservation equations by relaxation terms. When relaxation characteristic time tends to zero, velocities and energies are constrained to tend to common values for both phases. As a result, we obtain a simple two-phase model which was recently proposed for simulation of violent aerated flows [Dias et al, 2010]. The preservation of invariant regions and incompressible li...

  4. Modeling of blood flow in arterial trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anor, Tomer; Grinberg, Leopold; Baek, Hyoungsu; Madsen, Joseph R; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Karniadakis, George E

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computational methods and medical imaging techniques have enabled accurate simulations of subject-specific blood flows at the level of individual blood cell and in complex arterial networks. While in the past, we were limited to simulations with one arterial bifurcation, the current state-of-the-art is simulations of arterial networks consisting of hundreds of arteries. In this paper, we review the advances in methods for vascular flow simulations in large arterial trees. We discuss alternative approaches and validity of various assumptions often made to simplify the modeling. To highlight the similarities and discrepancies of data computed with different models, computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) and inexpensive one-dimensional (1D) flow simulations in very large arterial networks are employed. Finally, we discuss the possibilities, challenges, and limitations of the computational methods for predicting outcomes of therapeutic interventions for individual patients. PMID:20836052

  5. Development of Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Low Velocity Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging technique that relies on the photo-dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser induced fluorescence. Velocities are then obtained from time-of-flight calculations. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is relatively short (<50 µs), making it suited for high speed flows. Lifetime and radicals formation increases with temperature, which allows HTV to also probe low-velocity, high-temperature flows or reacting flows such as flames. The present work aims at extending the domain of applicability of HTV, particularly towards low-speed (<10 m/s) and moderate (<500 K) temperature flows. Results are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements recorded in identical conditions. Single shot and averaged velocity profiles are obtained in an air jet at room temperature. By modestly raising the temperature (100-200 degC) the OH production increases, resulting in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Use of nitrogen - a non-reactive gas with minimal collisional quenching - extends the OH species lifetime (to over 500 µs), which allows probing of slower flows or, alternately, increases the measurement precision at the expense of spatial resolution. Instantaneous velocity profiles are resolved in a 100degC nitrogen jet (maximum jet-center velocity of 6.5 m/s) with an uncertainty down to 0.10 m/s (1.5%) at 68% confidence level. MTV measurements are compared with particle image velocimetry and show agreement within 2%.

  6. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution

  7. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  8. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  9. CALF BLOOD-FLOW AND POSTURE - DOPPLER ULTRASOUND CALIBRATED BY PLETHYSMOGRAPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLEEUWEN, BE; LUBBERS, J; BARENDSEN, GJ; DEPATER, L

    1992-01-01

    A procedure was developed that enables measurement of rapid variations in calf blood flow during voluntary rhythmic contraction of the calf muscles in supine, sitting, and standing positions. During the exercise, maximum blood velocity is measured by Doppler ultrasound equipment in the popliteal art

  10. Multiscale three-point velocity increment correlation in turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-point velocity increment correlation function is proposed to represent the multiscale correlations in turbulent flows. The inertial–inertial correlation and the inertial–dissipative correlation are discussed due to their endogenetic properties in turbulence and their roles in large-eddy simulation. The zero-correlation points are then emphasized as equilibrium points between them. The credibility of this theoretical result is numerically verified in both isotropic and anisotropic flows. Results imply the universality of this zero-correlation scaling in different turbulent flows. This work is expected to be a dependable theoretical base for creating multiscale subgrid models in large-eddy simulation.

  11. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors. PMID:23958351

  12. Ocular Blood Flow and Normal Tension Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal tension glaucoma (NTG is known as a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and glaucomatous visual field loss, even though the intraocular pressure (IOP does not exceed the normal range. The pathophysiology of NTG remains largely undetermined. It is hypothesized that the abnormal ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. A number of evidences suggested that the vascular factors played a significant role in the development of NTG. In recent years, the new imaging techniques, fluorescein angiography, color Doppler imaging (CDI, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG, have been used to evaluate the ocular blood flow and blood vessels, and the impaired vascular autoregulation was found in patients with NTG. Previous studies showed that NTG was associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including migraine, Alzheimer’s disease, primary vascular dysregulation, and Flammer syndrome. The vascular factors were involved in these diseases. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal ocular blood flow in NTG are still not clear, but the risk factors for glaucomatous optic neuropathy likely included oxidative stress, vasospasm, and endothelial dysfunction.

  13. Transient Non-Newtonian Blood Flow under Magnetic Targeting Drug Delivery in an Aneurysm Blood Vessel with Porous Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohamadi, Haleh; Imani, Mohsen

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation deals with numerical solution of blood flow patterns through an aneurysm artery under the applied magnetic field. Transient extended Navier-Stokes, Brinkman, continuity, and heat conduction equations govern this phenomenon and unsteady pulsatile inlet velocity varies by human heart-beating frequency. Our simulation demonstrates applying 105 magnetic field intensity (MnF) to recirculate flow and increase fluid flux and maximum blood temperature by 62.5x and 3.5%, respectively, in the aneurysm region. It is also shown that the vessel's wall porosity plays an important role in magnetic targeting of drug delivery performance, as this parameter can noticeably change maximum blood temperature and pressure.

  14. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of that observed in LL, which supports the hypothesis that local ischemia stimulates the LBFR hypertrophic response. As the cuff did not compress the artery, the ischemia may have occurred

  15. Cerebral blood flow tomography with xenon-133

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured tomographically by inhalation of Xenon-133. The calculation is based on taking a sequence of tomograms during the wash-in and wash-out phase of the tracer. Due to the dynamic nature of the process, a highly sensitive and fast moving single photon emission...... other tracers for CBF tomography using SPECT is summarized with emphasis on the 99mTc chelates that freely pass the intact blood-brain barrier. The highly sensitive brain-dedicated SPECT systems described are a prerequisite for achieving high resolution tomograms with such tracers....

  16. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  17. Effect of TIPS placement on portal and splanchnic arterial blood flow in 4-dimensional flow MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Zoran [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Roessle, Martin; Schultheiss, Michael [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Gastroenterology, Freiburg (Germany); Euringer, Wulf; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Salem, Riad; Barker, Alex; Carr, James; Collins, Jeremy D. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To assess changes in portal and splanchnic arterial haemodynamics in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a non-invasive, non-contrast imaging technique. Eleven patients undergoing TIPS implantation were enrolled. K-t GRAPPA accelerated non-contrast 4D flow MRI of the liver vasculature was applied with acceleration factor R = 5 at 3Tesla. Flow analysis included three-dimensional (3D) blood flow visualization using time-resolved 3D particle traces and semi-quantitative flow pattern grading. Quantitative evaluation entailed peak velocities and net flows throughout the arterial and portal venous (PV) systems. MRI measurements were taken within 24 h before and 4 weeks after TIPS placement. Three-dimensional flow visualization with 4D flow MRI revealed good image quality with minor limitations in PV flow. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant increase in PV flow (562 ± 373 ml/min before vs. 1831 ± 965 ml/min after TIPS), in the hepatic artery (176 ± 132 ml/min vs. 354 ± 140 ml/min) and combined flow in splenic and superior mesenteric arteries (770 ml/min vs. 1064 ml/min). Shunt-flow assessment demonstrated stenoses in two patients confirmed and treated at TIPS revision. Four-dimensional flow MRI might have the potential to give new information about the effect of TIPS placement on hepatic perfusion. It may explain some unexpected findings in clinical observation studies. (orig.)

  18. Effect of TIPS placement on portal and splanchnic arterial blood flow in 4-dimensional flow MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess changes in portal and splanchnic arterial haemodynamics in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a non-invasive, non-contrast imaging technique. Eleven patients undergoing TIPS implantation were enrolled. K-t GRAPPA accelerated non-contrast 4D flow MRI of the liver vasculature was applied with acceleration factor R = 5 at 3Tesla. Flow analysis included three-dimensional (3D) blood flow visualization using time-resolved 3D particle traces and semi-quantitative flow pattern grading. Quantitative evaluation entailed peak velocities and net flows throughout the arterial and portal venous (PV) systems. MRI measurements were taken within 24 h before and 4 weeks after TIPS placement. Three-dimensional flow visualization with 4D flow MRI revealed good image quality with minor limitations in PV flow. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant increase in PV flow (562 ± 373 ml/min before vs. 1831 ± 965 ml/min after TIPS), in the hepatic artery (176 ± 132 ml/min vs. 354 ± 140 ml/min) and combined flow in splenic and superior mesenteric arteries (770 ml/min vs. 1064 ml/min). Shunt-flow assessment demonstrated stenoses in two patients confirmed and treated at TIPS revision. Four-dimensional flow MRI might have the potential to give new information about the effect of TIPS placement on hepatic perfusion. It may explain some unexpected findings in clinical observation studies. (orig.)

  19. Cutaneous blood flow rate in areas with and without arteriovenous anastomoses during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, M.; Sejrsen, Per

    Arteriovenous anastomoses, capillaries, cutaneous bllod flow rate, exercise, finger blood flow, skin blood flow......Arteriovenous anastomoses, capillaries, cutaneous bllod flow rate, exercise, finger blood flow, skin blood flow...

  20. Research status of fast flows and shocks in laboratory plasmas. Critical velocities in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outline of critical velocities in plasma is described. The critical velocities in plasma are different with the direction of flow. When the fast flow runs along the magnetic field, the critical velocity is sound velocity in order that the flow compresses. When plasma and neutral gas coexist, the critical ionization velocity (CIV) is defined by that the relative velocity of them cannot be more than the ionization potential. When flow runs perpendicularly to the magnetic field, the critical velocity is affected by the centrifugal force. If energy dissipation is produced by ionization, the critical ionization velocity is observed. The formation mechanisms of many kinds of critical velocities are described. (S.Y.)

  1. Thermistor based, low velocity isothermal, air flow sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The semiconductor thermistor technology is applied as a flow sensor to measure low isothermal air velocities (<2 ms−1). The sensor is subjected to heating and cooling cycles controlled by a multifunctional timer. In the heating stage, the alternating current of a main AC power supply source guarantees a uniform thermistor temperature distribution. The conditioning circuit assures an adequate increase of the sensors temperature and avoids the thermal disturbance of the flow. The power supply interruption reduces the consumption from the source and extends the sensors life time. In the cooling stage, the resistance variation of the flow sensor is recorded by the measuring chain. The resistive sensor parameters proposed vary significantly and feature a high sensitivity to the flow velocity. With the aid of a computer, the data transfer, storage and analysis provides a great advantage over the traditional local anemometer readings. The data acquisition chain has a good repeatability and low standard uncertainties. The proposed method measures isothermal air mean velocities from 0.1 ms−1 to 2 ms−1 with a standard uncertainty error less than 4%. (paper)

  2. Regional blood flow studies with radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodological approaches to blood flow analysis include (1) diffusible indicator methods, (2) clearance techniques and (3) nondiffusible indicator methods. In each case, accurate measurements of blood flow can be obtained by developing mathematical models which relate the time-dependent observation derived from following the fate of a radiotracer as a function of time to the physiological process itself. Application of these models to biological systems involves constraints and necessitates compromises which may affect the validity of the measurements. Nevertheless, when these techniques are carefully applied and adequately validated, they have provided critical physiological information about such organ systems as the brain and kidney and promise to provide diagnostic information in patients with suspected coronary and peripheral vascular disease

  3. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes. PMID:23764265

  4. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  5. Fourier analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities: MR imaging study. The Scandinavian Flow Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F; Stubgaard, M;

    1990-01-01

    An interleaved pseudocinematographic FLASH (fast low-angle shot) sequence with additional pulsed gradients for flow encoding was used to quantify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocities and CSF production. Flow-dependent phase information was obtained by subtracting two differently encoded phase...

  6. Blood flow-restricted exercise in space

    OpenAIRE

    Hackney, Kyle J; Everett, Meghan; Scott, Jessica M; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in chronic physiological adaptations including skeletal muscle atrophy, cardiovascular deconditioning, and bone demineralization. To attenuate the negative consequences of weightlessness during spaceflight missions, crewmembers perform moderate- to high-load resistance exercise in conjunction with aerobic (cycle and treadmill) exercise. Recent evidence from ground-based studies suggests that low-load blood flow-restricted (BFR) resistance exercise tr...

  7. Margination of leukocytes in blood flow through small tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, H L; Spain, S

    1984-03-01

    Leukocyte margination in the vessels of the microcirculation has been attributed to a flow-dependent interaction with red cells. To determine the extent of this effect, experiments with human blood were done in 100- to 180-micron tubes to detect changes in cell distribution as a function of hematocrit and flow rate. Using a flow visualization technique, the leukocyte concentration distribution was determined in 45% ghost cell suspensions. Migration of cells toward the wall was observed at centerline velocities greater than 1 mm sec-1 and increased with increasing flow rate. The effect was probably due to a more rapid inward migration of ghosts than leukocytes because of fluid inertia and cell density differences. Experiments were therefore carried out in whole blood at hematocrits from 20 to 60%, measuring the number concentration of leukocytes and erythrocytes within the tube, nt, and comparing it to that in the infusing reservoir, no, (Fahraeus effect). At mean tube shear rates G less than 100 sec-1, nt/no less than 1 for both leukocytes and erythrocytes showing net migration of cells away from the wall, although at nearly all hematocrits there was an enrichment of leukocytes relative to erythrocytes in the tubes. At G less than 50 sec-1, nt/no remained less than 1 for erythrocytes but increased to greater than 1 for leukocytes showing migration toward the wall, the increase being greatest at 20% hematocrit in the 100-micron tubes. The nature of the effect was revealed by cine films which showed that, as the flow rate decreased, erythrocytes formed rouleaux which migrated inward creating a core and displacing leukocytes to the periphery. In control experiments using washed blood cells in phosphate buffer-albumin, nt/no less than 1 for both leukocytes and erythrocytes at all G and hematocrits, and leukocytes were now distributed. Cine films of washed blood confirmed that, in the absence of rouleaux, no significant inward migration of erythrocytes occurred. PMID

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured at rest using the 133Xe inhalation technique in 40 DSM-III-diagnosed schizophrenics (22 males, 18 females: mean age 35.0 years, range 20-49 years) and 31 age-and sex-matched normal controls (16 males, 15 females: mean age 34.3 years, range 21-49 years). The absolute value (AV) and the percent value (PV) of the rCBF in schizophrenics were compared with those in controls. Correlations between rCBF and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores or the performance of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) were examined in schizophrenics. Schizophrenics showed significantly lower AVs in all brain regions examined and a significantly lower PV in the left superior frontal region than controls. The hyperfrontal rCBF distribution which was found in both hemispheres in controls, was absent in the left hemisphere in schizophrenics. In schizophrenics, superior frontal blood flows were significantly negatively correlated with the negative symptom scores of the BPRS but not with the total scores and the positive symptom scores of the BPRS. In schizophrenics, inferior frontal blood flows were significantly correlated with the number of sorting categories achieved. These results indicate that rCBF in schizophrenia is reduced in the whole brain and especially in the left superior frontal region. These findings suggest a frontal lobe dysfunction in schizophrenia. (author)

  9. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  10. Three Kinds of Velocity Structure Function in Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; JIANG Nan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the local multi-scale eddy structures in turbulent flows, we elucidate the essential difference between the real turbulent field with a finite Reynolds number and the Kolmogorov fully developed random field. The motion of fluid particles in the real turbulent field is not fully random. There exist multi-scale structures due to the effect of viscosity. Actually the movements of fluid particles in the turbulent field are restricted by such eddy structures. Furthermore, concept of the locally averaged velocity structure function is put forward to describe the relative strain distortion of two adjacent turbulent eddy structures at a certain scale. The time sequence of the longitudinal velocity component at different vertical locations in turbulent boundary layer has been elaborately measured by the constant temperature anemometry of model IFA-300 in a wind tunnel. The experiment proves that the locally averaged velocity structure function is in agreement with the wavelet-coefficient structure function.

  11. Effect of Rolling Massage on the Vortex Flow in Blood Vessels with Lattice Boltzmann Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hou Hui

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese Medical Massage, which is a nature therapy in eliminating many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on the cavity flows in blood vessel under the rolling manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that the vortex flows are fully disturbed by the rolling massage. The flow behavior depends on the rolling velocity and the rolling depth. Rolling massage has a better effect on the flows in the cavity than that of the flows in a planar blood vessel. The result is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the rolling techniques.

  12. Phase Resolved Angular Velocity Control of Cross Flow Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Cross flow turbines have a number of operational advantages for the conversion of kinetic energy in marine or fluvial currents, but they are often less efficient than axial flow devices. Here a control scheme is presented in which the angular velocity of a cross flow turbine with two straight blades is prescribed as a function of azimuthal blade position, altering the time-varying effective angle of attack. Flume experiments conducted with a scale model turbine show approximately an 80% increase in turbine efficiency versus optimal constant angular velocity and constant resistive torque control schemes. Torque, drag, and lateral forces on one- and two-bladed turbines are analyzed and interpreted with bubble flow visualization to develop a simple model that describes the hydrodynamics responsible for the observed increase in mean efficiency. Challenges associated with implementing this control scheme on commercial-scale devices are discussed. If solutions are found, the performance increase presented here may impact the future development of cross flow turbines.

  13. Slip Effects on Pulsatile Flow of Blood through a Stenosed Arterial Segment under Periodic Body Acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, A; Shit, G. C.; Kundu, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical investigation concerning the influence of externally imposed periodic body acceleration on the flow of blood through a time-dependent stenosed arterial segment by taking into account the slip velocity at the wall of the artery has been carried out. A mathematical model is developed by treating blood as a non-Newtonian fluid obeying the Casson fluid model. The pulsatile flow is analyzed by considering a periodic pressure gradient and the inertial effects as negligibly small. A su...

  14. Pre- and post-processing filters for improvement of blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    The standard deviation on the blood velocity estimates are influenced by measurement noise, velocity spread, and signal alteration introduced by de-noising and clutter filters. A noisy and non-smooth appearance of the velocity distribution is obtained, which is not consistent with the actual...... with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). The exact extent of the vessel and the true velocities are thereby known. Velocity estimates were obtained by employing Kasai's autocorrelator on the data. The post-processing filter was used on the computed 2D velocity map. An improvement of the RMS error...... of the filter to in-vivo data acquired with a dedicated sampling system....

  15. Two-phase non-linear model for the flow through stenosed blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsatile flow of a two-phase model for blood flow through arterial stenosis is analyzed through a mathematical analysis. The effects of pulsatility, stenosis, peripheral layer and non-Newtonian behavior of blood, assuming the blood in the core region as a Herschel-Bulkley fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid, are discussed. A perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear quasi-steady differential equations. The expressions for velocity, wall shear stress, plug core radius, flow rate and resistance to flow are obtained. It is noticed that the plug core radius and resistance to flow increase as the stenosis size increases while all other parameters held constant The wall shear stress increases with the increase of yield stress while keeping other parameters as invariable. It is observed that the velocity increases with the axial distance in the stenosed region of the tube upto the maximum projection of the stenosis

  16. Numerical analysis of the internal flow field in screw centrifugal blood pump based on CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W.; Han, B. X.; Y Wang, H.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    As to the impeller blood pump, the high speed of the impeller, the local high shear force of the flow field and the flow dead region are the main reasons for blood damage. The screw centrifugal pump can effectively alleviate the problems of the high speed and the high shear stress for the impeller. The softness and non-destructiveness during the transfer process can effectively reduce the extent of the damage. By using CFD software, the characteristics of internal flow are analyzed in the screw centrifugal pump by exploring the distribution rules of the velocity, pressure and shear deformation rate of the blood when it flows through the impeller and the destructive effects of spiral blades on blood. The results show that: the design of magnetic levitation solves the sealing problems; the design of regurgitation holes solves the problem of the flow dead zone; the magnetic levitated microcirculation screw centrifugal pump can effectively avoid the vortex, turbulence and high shear forces generated while the blood is flowing through the pump. Since the distribution rules in the velocity field, pressure field and shear deformation rate of the blood in the blood pump are comparatively uniform and the gradient change is comparatively small, the blood damage is effectively reduced.

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 16 cranial regions in 23 children and adolescents with frequent headaches using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. Blood flow response to 5% carbon dioxide (CO2) was also determined in 21 patients, while response to 50% oxygen was measured in the two patients with hemoglobinopathy. Included were 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, 4 with musculoskeletal headaches, and 3 with features of both types. Also studied were 2 patients with primary thrombocythemia, 2 patients with hemoglobinopathy and headaches, 1 patient with polycythemia, and 1 with headaches following trauma. With two exceptions, rCBF determinations were done during an asymptomatic period. Baseline rCBF values tended to be higher in these young patients than in young adults done in our laboratory. Localized reduction in the expected blood flow surge after CO2 inhalation, most often noted posteriorly, was seen in 8 of the 13 vascular headaches, but in none of the musculoskeletal headache group. Both patients with primary thrombocythemia had normal baseline flow values and altered responsiveness to CO2 similar to that seen in migraineurs; thus, the frequently reported headache and transient neurologic signs with primary thrombocythemia are probably not due to microvascular obstruction as previously suggested. These data support the concept of pediatric migraine as a disorder of vasomotor function and also add to our knowledge of normal rCBF values in younger patients. Demonstration of altered vasomotor reactivity to CO2 could prove helpful in children whose headache is atypical

  18. EFFECTS OF VASCULAR ZERO-STRESS STATE ON PULSATILE BLOOD FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, blood flow in artery was treated as the flow under equilibrium state (the steady flow under mean pressure) combined with the periodically small pulsatile flow. Based on vascular zero-stress state[1], the pulsatile strains according to the radial and axial displacements of blood vessel were obtained. With the use of Hooke’s law, the pulsatile strains and the corresponding Cauchy stresses were connected, so the corresponding wall motion equations could be established here. By solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, the analytic expressions of the blood flow velocities and the vascular displacements could be obtained, and the influence of the circumferential and axial stretch ratio on pulsatile blood flow and vascular motion was discussed in details.

  19. Testing of models of flow-induced hemolysis in blood flow through hypodermic needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangsheng; Kent, Timothy L; Sharp, M Keith

    2013-03-01

    Hemolysis caused by flow in hypodermic needles interferes with a number of tests on blood samples drawn by venipuncture, including assays for metabolites, electrolytes, and enzymes, causes discomfort during dialysis sessions, and limits transfusion flow rates. To evaluate design modifications to address this problem, as well as hemolysis issues in other cardiovascular devices, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based prediction of hemolysis has potential for reducing the time and expense for testing of prototypes. In this project, three CFD-integrated blood damage models were applied to flow-induced hemolysis in 16-G needles and compared with experimental results, which demonstrated that a modified needle with chamfered entrance increased hemolysis, while a rounded entrance decreased hemolysis, compared with a standard needle with sharp entrance. After CFD simulation of the steady-state velocity field, the time histories of scalar stress along a grid of streamlines were calculated. A strain-based cell membrane failure model and two empirical power-law blood damage models were used to predict hemolysis on each streamline. Total hemolysis was calculated by weighting the predicted hemolysis along each streamline by the flow rate along each streamline. The results showed that only the strain-based blood damage model correctly predicted increased hemolysis in the beveled needle and decreased hemolysis in the rounded needle, while the power-law models predicted the opposite trends. PMID:23419169

  20. Velocity prediction errors related to flow model calibration uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, D.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Duffield, G.M.; Buss, D.R. (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Reston, VA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), a United States Department of Energy facility in South Carolina, a three-dimensional, steady-state numerical model has been developed for a four aquifer, three aquitard groundwater flow system. This model has been used for numerous predictive simulation applications at SRS, and since the initial calibration, the model has been refined several times. Originally, calibration of the model was accomplished using a nonlinear least-squares inverse technique for a set of 50 water-level calibration targets non-uniformly distributed in the four aquifers. The estimated hydraulic properties from this calibration generally showed reasonable agreement with values estimated from field tests. Subsequent model refinements and application of this model to field problems have shown that uncertainties in the model parameterization become much more apparent in the prediction of the velocity field than in the simulation of the distribution of hydraulic heads. The combined use of three types of information (hydraulic head distributions, geologic framework models, and velocity field monitoring) provide valuable calibration data for flow modeling investigations; however, calibration of a flow model typically relies upon measured water levels. For a given set of water-level calibration targets, the uncertainties associated with imperfect knowledge of physical system parameters or groundwater velocities may not be discernable in the calibrated hydraulic head distribution. In this paper, modeling results from studies at SRS illustrate examples of model inadequacy resulting from calibrating only on observed water levels, and the effects of these inadequacies on velocity field prediction are discussed. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Magnetic field effect on flow parameters of blood along with magnetic particles in a cylindrical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shashi, E-mail: shashisharma1984@gmail.com; Singh, Uaday; Katiyar, V.K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of external uniform magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles is reported through a mathematical model using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) approach. The fluid is acted upon by a varying pressure gradient and an external uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cylindrical tube. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations were solved numerically and found that flow parameters are affected by the influence of magnetic field. Further, artificial blood (75% water+25% Glycerol) along with iron oxide magnetic particles were prepared and transported into a glass tube with help of a peristaltic pump. The velocity of artificial blood along with magnetic particles was experimentally measured at different magnetic fields ranging from 100 to 600 mT. The model results show that the velocity of blood and magnetic particles is appreciably reduced under the influence of magnetic field, which is supported by our experimental results. - Highlights: • Effect of magnetic field on flow parameters of blood and magnetic particles is studied. • The velocity of blood and magnetic particles is appreciably reduced under a magnetic field. • Experimental results of the velocity of magnetic particles within blood support the mathematical model results.

  2. Magnetic field effect on flow parameters of blood along with magnetic particles in a cylindrical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the effect of external uniform magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles is reported through a mathematical model using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) approach. The fluid is acted upon by a varying pressure gradient and an external uniform magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the cylindrical tube. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations were solved numerically and found that flow parameters are affected by the influence of magnetic field. Further, artificial blood (75% water+25% Glycerol) along with iron oxide magnetic particles were prepared and transported into a glass tube with help of a peristaltic pump. The velocity of artificial blood along with magnetic particles was experimentally measured at different magnetic fields ranging from 100 to 600 mT. The model results show that the velocity of blood and magnetic particles is appreciably reduced under the influence of magnetic field, which is supported by our experimental results. - Highlights: • Effect of magnetic field on flow parameters of blood and magnetic particles is studied. • The velocity of blood and magnetic particles is appreciably reduced under a magnetic field. • Experimental results of the velocity of magnetic particles within blood support the mathematical model results

  3. The Effect of Doppler Phenomenon on the Speed of Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaidaa Abdulrahman Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research studying the phenomenon of Doppler (frequency Doppler as a method through which the direction and speed of the blood cells flows in blood vessels wear measured. This Doppler frequency is relied upon in medicine for measuring the speed of blood flow, because the blood flow is an important concept from the concepts of medicine. It represents the function and efficient of the heart and blood vessels in the body so any defect in this function will appear as a change in the speed of blood flow from the normal value assumed. As this speed changes alot in cases of disease and morbidity of the heart, so in order to identify the effect of changing the Doppler frequency on the speed of blood flow and the relationship of this frequency with the angles of transitions and receptions and the effect of changing the ultrasound transmitted frequencies on the measured velocities .The Doppler ultrasound system has been used which is more efficient and easier to be widely used as a practical application in Al Yarmouk Teaching Hospital on two subjects. The normal had a natural medical history in the blood vessels, and abnormal had carotid artery stenosis. This device will give the flow velocity of blood in the blood vessels which is useful to the examiner, the equation of Doppler as a mathematical model in the research is adopted the measured speed to clarify the amount of change in the frequency (shift in frequency. This speed was measured in five different blood vessels, large arteries (abdominal aorta and carotid artery in the neck and large veins (the inferior vena cava across the abdomen and the external Jugular vein in the neck and capillaries in the hand and fingers. Then using the measured velocities in these vessels the Doppler frequency was calculated from this mathematical model using MATLAB program, was found that as velocity of the blood increases, so does the Doppler frequency and vice versa. The greater the value of the Doppler angle

  4. Blood flow dynamics in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Naylor, H. L.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in heart failure (HF) may be due to inadequate vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, and/or altered muscle metabolic responses that lead to fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular and metabolic responses to rhythmic forearm exercise were tested in 9 HF patients and 9 control subjects (CTL) during 2 protocols designed to examine the effect of HF on the time course of oxygen delivery versus uptake (protocol 1) and on vasoconstriction during exercise with 50 mm Hg pressure about the forearm to evoke a metaboreflex (protocol 2). In protocol 1, venous lactate and H+ were greater at 4 minutes of exercise in HF versus CTL (Pblood flow and oxygen uptake responses. In protocol 2, mean arterial pressure increased similarly in each group during ischemic exercise. In CTL, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were similar at the end of ischemic and ambient exercise. In HF, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were reduced during ischemic exercise compared with the ambient trial. CONCLUSIONS: Intrinsic differences in skeletal muscle metabolism, not vasodilatory dynamics, must account for the augmented glycolytic metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in class II and III HF. The inability to increase forearm vascular conductance during ischemic handgrip exercise, despite a normal pressor response, suggests that enhanced vasoconstriction of strenuously exercising skeletal muscle contributes to exertional fatigue in HF.

  5. The in situ permeable flow sensor: A device for measuring groundwater flow velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technology called the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. These sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to directly measure the direction and magnitude of the full three dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector in unconsolidated, saturated, porous media. The velocity measured is an average value characteristic of an approximately 1 cubic meter volume of the subsurface. During a test at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, two flow sensors were deployed in a confined aquifer in close proximity to a well which was screened over the entire vertical extent of the aquifer and the well was pumped at four different pumping rates. In this situation horizontal flow which is radially directed toward the pumping well is expected. The flow sensors measured horizontal flow which was directed toward the pumping well, within the uncertainty in the measurements. The observed magnitude of the horizontal component of the flow velocity increased linearly with pumping rate, as predicted by theoretical considerations. The measured horizontal component of the flow velocity differed from the predicted flow velocity, which was calculated with the assumptions that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer were radially homogeneous and isotropic, by less than a factor of two. Drawdown data obtained from other wells near the pumping well during the pump test indicate that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer are probably not radially homogeneous but the effect of the inhomogeneity on the flow velocity field around the pumping well was not modeled because the degree and distribution of the inhomogeneity are unknown. Grain size analysis of core samples from wells in the area were used to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-isopropyl-p-123I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) was used to quantify the regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) in 11 diabetic patients (average age; 67.9 years) and 12 non-diabetic subjects (average age; 67.4 years), none of whom had (cerebrovascular disease (CVD) on CT studies. A reference sampling method by continuous arterial blood sampling was used to quantify r-CBF. There were no significant differences in physiological or laboratory data between diabetic and non-diabetic groups except for fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c levels. The average of r-CBF in each region of cerebrum and cerebellum was significantly lower in diabetic group than that in the control group (p<0.01). These observations show that r-CBF of diabetic patients is reduced, even in the absence of findings of CVD on a CT study. (author)

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow in diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Ono, Shinnichi; Nishikawa, Takushi (Nichinan Hospital of Miyazaki Prefecture (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-02-01

    N-isopropyl-p-[sup 123]I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) was used to quantify the regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) in 11 diabetic patients (average age; 67.9 years) and 12 non-diabetic subjects (average age; 67.4 years), none of whom had (cerebrovascular disease (CVD) on CT studies). A reference sampling method by continuous arterial blood sampling was used to quantify r-CBF. There were no significant differences in physiological or laboratory data between diabetic and non-diabetic groups except for fasting plasma glucose and HbA[sub 1c] levels. The average of r-CBF in each region of cerebrum and cerebellum was significantly lower in diabetic group than that in the control group (p<0.01). These observations show that r-CBF of diabetic patients is reduced, even in the absence of findings of CVD on a CT study. (author).

  8. Blood flow in healed and inflamed periodontal tissues of dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hock, J.M.; Kim, S.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if increased blood flow associated with gingivitis would decrease following resolution of gingival inflammation in dogs with periodontitis; if increased blood flow in inflamed gingiva was associated with changes in the blood flow of alveolar bone, and if blood flow in gingiva and alveolar bone increased if periodontitis was reactivated by ligating teeth. Regional blood flow was measured in dogs with pre-existing periodontitis, using radioisotope-labelled, plastic microspheres. In the first experiment on 4 adult Beagle dogs, teeth in the left jaws were treated to resolve the periodontitis, while teeth in the right jaws were not treated. Gingival and bone blood flow were measured after 12 wk. Blood flow was significantly (p<0.05) lower in non-inflamed healed gingiva (32.1 +- 2.7 ml/min/100 g) than in inflamed gingiva (46.1 +- 5.3 ml/min/100 g). No differences in the blood flow of the alveolar bone underlying inflamed or non-inflamed gingiva were present. In the second experiment, the right mandibular teeth of 5 dogs were treated to resolve periodontitis while teeth in the other quadrants were ligated for 4, 10 or 12 wk. The duration of ligation did not alter blood flow. Gingival blood flow around ligated maxillary and mandibular teeth was comparable and approximately 54% higher than around non-ligated teeth (p<0.03). The difference in blood flow between gingiva with G.I.>1 and gingiva with G.I.<2 was significant (p<0.04). Blood flow in bone was not altered by changes in the inflammatory status of the overlying gingiva. The findings suggest that changes in blood flow associated with inflammation are reversible and that blood flow alveolar bone is regulated independently of gingival blood flow.

  9. On retrodictions of global mantle flow with assimilated surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Lorenzo; Bunge, Hans-Peter; Schuberth, Bernhard S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Modeling past states of Earth's mantle and relating them to geologic observations such as continental-scale uplift and subsidence is an effective method for testing mantle convection models. However, mantle convection is chaotic and two identical mantle models initialized with slightly different temperature fields diverge exponentially in time until they become uncorrelated, thus limiting retrodictions (i.e., reconstructions of past states of Earth's mantle obtained using present information) to the recent past. We show with 3-D spherical mantle convection models that retrodictions of mantle flow can be extended significantly if knowledge of the surface velocity field is available. Assimilating surface velocities produces in some cases negative Lyapunov times (i.e., e-folding times), implying that even a severely perturbed initial condition may evolve toward the reference state. A history of the surface velocity field for Earth can be obtained from past plate motion reconstructions for time periods of a mantle overturn, suggesting that mantle flow can be reconstructed over comparable times.

  10. Simulation of the Second Grade Fluid Model for Blood Flow through a Tapered Artery with a Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, S.; Noreen Sher, Akbar

    2010-06-01

    We analyze the blood flow through a tapered artery, assuming the blood to be a second order fluid model. The resulting nonlinear implicit system of partial differential equations is solved by the perturbation method. The expressions for shear stress, velocity, flow rate, wall shear stress and longitudinal impedance are obtained. The physical behavior of different parameters is also discussed, as are trapping phenomena.

  11. Intensive blood pressure control affects cerebral blood flow in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Davis, Shyrin C A T; Truijen, Jasper;

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with microvascular complications, hypertension, and impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. Intensive blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients reduces their risk of stroke but may affect cerebral perfusion. Systemic hemodynamic...... variables and transcranial Doppler-determined cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), cerebral CO2 responsiveness, and cognitive function were determined after 3 and 6 months of intensive BP control in 17 type 2 diabetic patients with microvascular complications (T2DM+), in 18 diabetic patients without (T2DM...... groups. However, in contrast to nondiabetic hypertensive patients, intensive BP control reduced CBFV in T2DM- (58±9 to 54±12 cm · s-1) and T2DM+ (57±13 to 52±11 cm · s-1) at 3 months, but CBFV returned to baseline at 6 months only in T2DM-, whereas the reduction in CBFV progressed in T2DM+ (to 48±8 cm...

  12. Numerical Investigation of Developing Velocity Distributions in Open Channel Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Ghani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The velocity profiles in open channel flows start developing after entering into the channel for quite some length. All types of laboratory experiments for open channel flows are carried out in the fully developed flow regions which exist at some length downstream the inlet. In this research work an attempt has been made to investigate the impact of roughness and slope of the channel bed on the length required for establishment of fully developed flow in an open channel. A range of different roughness values along with various slopes were considered for this purpose. It was observed that an increase in roughness results in reduction of development length; and development length reduces drastically when roughness reaches to the range normally encountered in open channel flows with emergent vegetation or natural river flows. However, it was observed that the change of slope did not have any noticeable effect on development length. This work suggests that CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics technique can be used for getting a reliable development length before performing an experimental work

  13. Numerical investigation of developing velocity distributions in open channel flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The velocity profiles in open channel flows start developing after entering into the channel for quite some length. All types of laboratory experiments for open channel flows are carried out in the fully developed flow regions which exist at some length downstream the inlet. In this research work an attempt has been made to investigate the impact of roughness and slope of the channel bed on the length required for establishment of fully developed flow in an open channel. A range of different roughness values along with various slopes were considered for this purpose. It was observed that an increase in roughness results in reduction of development length; and development length reduces drastically when roughness reaches to the range normally encountered in open channel flows with emergent vegetation or natural river flows. However, it was observed that the change of slope did not have any noticeable effect on development length. This work suggests that CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) technique can be used for getting a reliable development length before performing an experimental work. (author)

  14. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage

  15. Comparison of reduced models for blood flow using Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin methods

    CERN Document Server

    Puelz, Charles; Canic, Suncica; Rusin, Craig G

    2015-01-01

    Reduced, or one-dimensional blood flow models take the general form of nonlinear hyperbolic systems, but differ greatly in their formulation. One class of models considers the physically conserved quantities of mass and momentum, while another class describes mass and velocity. Further, the averaging process employed in the model derivation requires the specification of the axial velocity profile; this choice differentiates models within each class. Discrepancies among differing models have yet to be investigated. In this paper, we systematically compare several reduced models of blood flow for physiologically relevant vessel parameters, network topology, and boundary data. The models are discretized by a class of Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin methods.

  16. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF BLOOD FLOW IN ARTERIES AFFECTED BY MULTIPLE ANEURYSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. GIRIJA BAI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is a numerical simulation of hemodynamics in blood vessels with multiple fusiform aneurysms. Dilation of 0.25 is considered. Using computational fluid dynamics, hemodynamic factors such as velocity and pressure are investigated. The problem is solved by finite volume method. Numerical simulation is prescribed using the CFD softwares Fluent and Gambit. High pressure and low velocity is observed in the region of aneurysm. This is an indication to the interruption of blood flow. These techniques based on computer flow study are important for understanding the relationship between hemodynamic parameters and risk of rupture.

  17. The effect of phenylephrine on arterial and venous cerebral blood flow in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Sato, Kohei; Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Overgaard, Morten; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic regulation of the cerebral circulation remains controversial. Although intravenous phenylephrine (PE) infusion reduces the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-determined measure of frontal lobe oxygenation (S(c) O(2) ) and increases middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean......(mean) ), suggesting α-adrenergic-mediated cerebral vasoconstriction, this remains unconfirmed by evaluation of arterial and venous cerebral blood flow.......Sympathetic regulation of the cerebral circulation remains controversial. Although intravenous phenylephrine (PE) infusion reduces the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-determined measure of frontal lobe oxygenation (S(c) O(2) ) and increases middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V...

  18. Probing depth and dynamic response of speckles in near infrared region for spectroscopic blood flow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Naomichi; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2016-04-01

    Imaging method based on bio-speckles is a useful means for blood flow visualization of living bodies and, it has been utilized for analyzing the condition or the health state of living bodies. Actually, the sensitivity of blood flow is influenced by tissue optical properties, which depend on the wavelength of illuminating laser light. In the present study, we experimentally investigate characteristics of the blood flow images obtained with two wavelengths of 780 nm and 830 nm in the near-infrared region. Experiments are conducted for sample models using a pork layer, horse blood layer and mirror, and for a human wrist and finger, to investigate optical penetration depth and dynamic response of speckles to the blood flow velocity for two wavelengths.

  19. Electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood and heat transfer in a capillary with thermal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, A. [Department of Mathematics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mathematics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical study on heat transfer characteristics together with fully developed electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood through a capillary, having electrokinetic effects by considering the constant heat flux at the wall. The effect of thermal radiation and velocity slip condition have been taken into account. A rigorous mathematical model for describing Joule heating in electro-osmotic flow of blood including the Poisson–Boltzmann equation, the momentum equation and the energy equation is developed. The alterations in the thermal transport phenomenon, induced by the variation of imposed electromagnetic effects, are thoroughly explained through an elegant mathematical formalism. Results presented here pertain to the case where the height of the capillary is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer comprising the stern and diffuse layers. The essential features of the electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood and associated heat transfer characteristics through capillary are clearly highlighted by the variations in the non-dimensional parameters for velocity profile, temperature profile and the Nusselt number. The study reveals that the temperature of blood can be controlled by regulating Joule heating parameter. - Highlights: • Electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood in capillary is studied. • Potential electric field is applied for driving elecroosmotic flow of blood. • Effect of thermal radiation, Joule heating and velocity slip is investigated. • Thermal radiation bears the significant change in the temperature field.

  20. Electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood and heat transfer in a capillary with thermal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical study on heat transfer characteristics together with fully developed electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood through a capillary, having electrokinetic effects by considering the constant heat flux at the wall. The effect of thermal radiation and velocity slip condition have been taken into account. A rigorous mathematical model for describing Joule heating in electro-osmotic flow of blood including the Poisson–Boltzmann equation, the momentum equation and the energy equation is developed. The alterations in the thermal transport phenomenon, induced by the variation of imposed electromagnetic effects, are thoroughly explained through an elegant mathematical formalism. Results presented here pertain to the case where the height of the capillary is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer comprising the stern and diffuse layers. The essential features of the electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood and associated heat transfer characteristics through capillary are clearly highlighted by the variations in the non-dimensional parameters for velocity profile, temperature profile and the Nusselt number. The study reveals that the temperature of blood can be controlled by regulating Joule heating parameter. - Highlights: • Electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood in capillary is studied. • Potential electric field is applied for driving elecroosmotic flow of blood. • Effect of thermal radiation, Joule heating and velocity slip is investigated. • Thermal radiation bears the significant change in the temperature field

  1. Effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to examine effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus. The authors used microspheres to measure blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum in anesthetized dogs and rabbits. A critical assumption of the microsphere method is that microspheres do not pass through arteriovenous shunts. Blood flow values obtained with simultaneous injection of 15- and 50-μm microspheres were similar, which suggest that shunting of 15-μm microspheres was minimal. Blood flow to choroid plexus under control conditions was 287 ± 26 (means ± SE) ml · min-1 · 100 g-1 in dogs and 385 ± 73 ml · min-1 100 g-1 in rabbits. Consecutive measurements under control conditions indicated that values for blood flow are reproducible. Adenosine did not alter blood flow to cerebrum but increased blood flow to choroid plexus two- to threefold in dogs and rabbits. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not affect blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum but decreased blood flow to choroid plexus by ∼ 50%. The authors suggest that (1) the microsphere method provides reproducible valid measurements of blood flow to the choroid plexus in dogs and rabbits and (2) vasoactive stimuli may have profoundly different effects on blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum

  2. Blood flow in healed and inflamed periodontal tissues of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to determine if increased blood flow associated with gingivitis would decrease following resolution of gingival inflammation in dogs with periodontitis; if increased blood flow in inflamed gingiva was associated with changes in the blood flow of alveolar bone, and if blood flow in gingiva and alveolar bone increased if periodontitis was reactivated by ligating teeth. Regional blood flow was measured in dogs with pre-existing periodontitis, using radioisotope-labelled, plastic microspheres. In the first experiment on 4 adult Beagle dogs, teeth in the left jaws were treated to resolve the periodontitis, while teeth in the right jaws were not treated. Gingival and bone blood flow were measured after 12 wk. Blood flow was significantly (p1 and gingiva with G.I.<2 was significant (p<0.04). Blood flow in bone was not altered by changes in the inflammatory status of the overlying gingiva. The findings suggest that changes in blood flow associated with inflammation are reversible and that blood flow alveolar bone is regulated independently of gingival blood flow. (author)

  3. Characteristics of low-mass-velocity vertical gas-liquid two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-mass-velocity two-phase flow in a vertical pipe shows lower void fraction than high-mass-velocity two-phase flow even though their qualities are the same. In order to clarify the flow characteristics of the low-mass-velocity two-phase flow, air-water two-phase flow experiments were conducted under the froth or annular flow conditions. Experimental results show that wall shear stress is positive even though both gas and liquid superficial velocities are positive. Measured water film average velocity is negative under this condition. These results indicate that local flow reversal should exist along the channel wall. This local flow reversal gives to the low void fraction in low-mass-velocity two-phase flow. It is also clarified that the drift flux model can be applied to the low-mass-velocity two-phase flow with local reversal. (author)

  4. Subcutaneous blood flow during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Sestoft, L

    1982-01-01

    Subcutaneous blood flow was measured preceding insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms and 2 h later in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal males. In all groups subcutaneous blood flow decreased at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms...... compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. Two hours after onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms, subcutaneous blood flow was still significantly decreased compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. In normal subjects local nerve blockade had no effect on blood flow changes during hypoglycaemia, whereas local alpha...

  5. Mathematical Analysis of Blood Flow in Porous Tubes: A Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sankar, D. S.; Nagar, Atulya K.

    2013-01-01

    The steady flow of Herschel-Bulkley and Casson fluids for blood flow in tubes filled with homogeneous porous medium with (i) constant and (ii) variable permeability is analyzed. The expression for the shear stress is obtained first by general iteration method and then using numerical integration; the solutions for velocity and flow rate are obtained. It is noticed that the shear stress and plug core radius are considerably higher in the case of variable permeability than those of the constant...

  6. Preliminary study of flow velocity measurement by means of ultrasonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different flow velocities of a water loop were associated with different ultrasonic wave velocities that traveled in the water. It was also observed that water temperature influenced the ultrasonic wave velocity but in an inverse manner to that of the water flow velocity. This experiment showed the possibility of using the ultrasonic system to measure a liquid flow velocity with precision. (author). 6 refs., 8 figs

  7. Testing HEPA filter response to high flow velocity and overpressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cooperation with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) HEPA filters presently on the market and modified versions were tested using the LANL blowdown facility. The filter response during the test was documented on high speed films which indicated, among other information, the load when first failure occurred and the failure mode. Differential pressure through the filter and velocity were measured with variable reluctance pressure transducers and an oscilloscope recorder. New HEPA filters show first failures already at differential pressures between some 4 kPa and 17 kPa. The better results are obtained with conventionally pleated filter paper packs sealed in a wooden frame with a polyurethane material. However, these filters cannot be used under accident conditions. Metal frame filters considered as potential filters for accident situations showed only poor resistance against overpressures. The weakest point in such filters proved to be the attachment of the filter pack in the metal frame, which limited the loadability to about 10 kPa. As soon as proper attachment is assured, the integrity of the filter pack limits the admissible differential pressure. Through some modifications of wood frame filters, physical integrity was improved to a failure pressure of 24 kPa. During operation, the filter elements are loaded with dust. Dust loading up to 1000 Pa pressure drop at rated flow, which was simulated with polystyrene latex aerosols, was found to reduce the mechanical stability by up to 40%. Pressure drop characteristics of HEPA filters influence the occurrence of high differential pressures and high mechanical loads. Pressure drops (δp) of unloaded and preloaded filters were investigated up to high flow velocities (v). Measured data can be presented in the form of δp=av+bv2, where a and b are constants. Theory, in contrast, predicts a linear relationship. The deviation is due to deformations of the pleated filter paper pack with increasing flow velocity and

  8. Implementation of ultrasound time-domain cross-correlation blood velocity estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    The implementation of real-time blood velocity estimators using time-domain cross-correlation is investigated. The basic algorithm for stationary echo canceling, cross-correlation estimation and subsequent velocity estimation is presented. Sampled data acquired at rates of approximately 20 MHz are...

  9. Simultaneous measurement of liquid velocity and interface profiles of horizontal duct wavy flow by ultrasonic velocity profile meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simultaneous measurement of the liquid velocity and interface profiles was performed for stratified-smooth and wavy flows in a horizontal duct using a ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) meter. The influences of the reflections of ultrasonic pulses at the gas-liquid interface and channel bottom were reduced by using an absorbent for the ultrasonic pulses on the duct bottom wall and optimization of the liquid level and time interval between pulses. For a smooth-stratified flow, good comparison was obtained with a velocity profile obtained by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) for video pictures taken simultaneously at the UVP measurement. Polystyrene beads were used as the reflector and tracers respectively, for the UVP and PTV measurements. The velocity profiles measured for a wavy flow with periodically-generated interfacial waves agreed well with the theoretical prediction for solitary waves. Turbulence component appeared in the velocity profiles of both the smooth-stratified and wavy flows. (orig.)

  10. Dual-beam optical coherence tomography system for quantification of flow velocity in capillary phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, S. M.; Silien, C.; Leahy, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    The quantification of (blood) flow velocity within the vasculature has potent diagnostic and prognostic potential. Assessment of flow irregularities in the form of increased permeability (micro haemorrhaging), the presence of avascular areas, or conversely the presence of vessels with enlarged or increased tortuosity in the acral regions of the body may provide a means of non-invasive in vivo assessment. If assessment of dermal flow dynamics were performed in a routine manner, the existence and prevalence of ailments such as diabetes mellitus, psoriatic arthritis and Raynaud's condition may be confirmed prior to clinical suspicion. This may prove advantageous in cases wherein the efficacy of a prescribed treatment is dictated by a prompt diagnosis and to alleviate patient discomfort through early detection. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality which utilises the principle of optical interferometry to distinguish between spatial changes in refractive index within the vasculature and thus formulate a multi-dimensional representation of the structure of the epi- and dermal skin layers. The use of the Doppler functionality has been the predominant force for the quantification of moving particles within media, elucidated via estimation of the phase shift in OCT A-scans. However, the theoretical formulation for the assessment of these phase shifts dictates that the angle between the incident light source and the vessel under question be known a priori; this may be achieved via excisional biopsy of the tissue segment in question, but is counter to the non-invasive premise of the OCT technique. To address the issue of angular dependence, an alternate means of estimating absolute flow velocity is presented. The design and development of a dual-beam (db) system incorporating an optical switch mechanism for signal discrimination of two spatially disparate points enabling quasi-simultaneous multiple specimen scanning is described. A crosscorrelation (c

  11. Erosion due to high flow velocities: A description of relevant processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, F.; Visser, P.J.; Van Rhee, C.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Convential models for the erosion of non-cohesive sediments overestimate the erosion rate induced by high flow velocities. These high flow velocities occur, for instance, in breaching of embankments or dunes (flow velocities up to 10 m/s) or in jetting sand with a trailing suction hopper dredger (30

  12. Peritumoral interstitial fluid flow velocity predicts survival in cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: High tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is associated with poor outcome in locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We have recently developed a noninvasive assay of the IFP of tumors, and in this assay, the outward interstitial fluid flow velocity at the tumor surface (v0) is measured by Gd-DTPA-based DCE-MRI and used as a parameter for IFP. Here, we investigated the independent prognostic significance of v0 in cervical cancer patients given cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent. Patients: The study involved 62 evaluable patients from a cohort of 74 consecutive patients (Stage IB through IIIB) with a median follow-up of 5.5 years. Results: The actuarial disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were 67% and 76%, respectively. Significant associations were found between v0 dichotomized about the median value and DFS and OS, both in the total patient cohort and a subcohort of 40 Stage IIB patients. Multivariate analysis involving stage, tumor volume, lymph node status, and v0 revealed that only v0 provided independent prognostic information about DFS and OS. Conclusion: This investigation demonstrates a strong, independent prognostic impact of the pretreatment peritumoral fluid flow velocity in cervical cancer

  13. Velocity Variation Assessment of Red Blood Cell Aggregation with Spectral Domain Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiangqun; Yu, Lingfeng; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    We propose spectral domain Doppler optical coherence tomography (SD-D-OCT) to qualitatively measure red blood cell aggregation. Variance/standard deviation (SD) of the Doppler frequency spectrum in Doppler variance imaging of flowing blood under shearing conditions was developed as a new aggregation index. In in vitro microchannel-flow experiments, porcine blood at various hematocrits with aggregation characteristics induced by dextran 500 or at the presence of plasma fibrinogen was measured ...

  14. Finite element analysis of magnetohydrodynamic effects on blood flow in an aneurysmal geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Anastasios; Xenos, Michalis; Tzirtzilakis, Efstratios; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2014-10-01

    Blood flow in an aneurysmal geometry, subjected to a static and uniform magnetic field, was studied. Blood was considered as a Newtonian, incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid. The nonlinear system of partial differential equations, describing the blood flow under the presence of a magnetic field, was discretized by the Galerkin weighted residual method. The transformation in generalized curvilinear coordinates facilitates the solution of the governing equations within arbitrary geometries. Pressure and velocity fields along with wall shear stress distributions were obtained for varying magnetic field intensities and directions. The visualization of the blood streamlines in the dilatation region highlights the effect of a magnetic field on the recirculation zones. The application of static magnetic fields can yield spatio-temporal description of blood flow patterns. The current study discusses implications of the hemodynamic properties estimated by respective screening techniques since the static magnetic field might cause alterations that possibly cannot be detected and thus eliminated.

  15. Topical menthol increases cutaneous blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-09-01

    Menthol, the active ingredient in several topically applied analgesics, activates transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) receptors on sensory nerves and on the vasculature inducing a cooling sensation on the skin. Ilex paraguariensis is also a common ingredient in topical analgesics that has potential vasoactive properties and may alter the mechanisms of action of menthol. We sought to characterize the microvascular effects of topical menthol and ilex application and to determine the mechanism(s) through which these compounds may independently and combined alter cutaneous blood flow. We hypothesized that menthol would induce vasoconstriction and that ilex would not alter skin blood flow (SkBF). Three separate protocols were conducted to examine menthol and ilex-mediated changes in SkBF. In protocol 1, placebo, 4% menthol, 0.7% ilex, and combination menthol+ilex gels were applied separately to the skin and red cell flux was continuously measured utilizing laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). In protocol 2, seven concentrations of menthol gel (0.04%, 0.4%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 7%, 8%) were applied to the skin to model the dose-response curve. In protocol 3, placebo, menthol, ilex, and menthol+ilex gels were applied to skin under local thermal control (34°C) both with and without sensory nerve blockage (topical lidocaine 4%). Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and local heating (42°C) protocols were conducted to determine the relative contribution of endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs)/sensory nerves and nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Red cell flux was normalized to mean arterial pressure expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: flux·mmHg(-1)) in all protocols. Topical menthol application increased SkBF compared to placebo (3.41±0.33 vs 1.1±0.19CVC: peffect, p<0.05) with an ED50 of 1.0%. Similarly, SkBF was increased after menthol application during PORH (3.62±0.29 vs. 2.50±0.21flux·mmHg(-1); p<0.001), but not local heating

  16. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Lund; Vorstrup, S

    1991-01-01

    A review of the current literature regarding sleep-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) is presented. Early investigations have led to the notion that dreamless sleep was characterized by global values of CBF and CMR practically at the level of wakefulness......, while rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (dream sleep) was a state characterized by a dramatically increased level of CBF and possibly also of CMR. However, recent investigations firmly contradict this notion. Investigations on CBF and CMR performed during non-REM sleep, taking the effect of different...... levels of sleep into consideration, show that light sleep (stage II) is characterized by global levels of CBF and CMR only slightly reduced by 3-10% below the level associated with wakefulness, whereas CBF and CMR during deep sleep (stage III-IV) is dramatically reduced by 25-44%. Furthermore, recent...

  17. Laser Doppler measurement of cutaneous blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Doppler velocimetry is an instrument system which has only recently been applied to the evaluation and quantitation of perfusion in the micro-vascular bed. The instrument is based on the Doppler principle, but uses low power laser light rather than the more commonly used ultrasound, and has a sample volume of approximately 1 mm/sup 3/. As it is non-invasive, it can be used on any skin surface or exposed microvascular bed and provides a continuous semi-quantitative measure of microcirculatory perfusion, it has a number of advantages as compared to other cutaneous blood flow measurement techniques. Initial studies have shown that it is easily used, and it has demonstrated good correlation with both xenon radio-isotope clearance and microsphere deposition techniques. Areas of current evaluation and utilization are in most major areas of medicine and surgery and include plastic, vascular and orthopaedic surgery, dermatology, gastro-enterology, rheumatology, burns and anaesthesiology

  18. Laser Speckle Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Jiang, Chao; Li, Pengcheng; Cheng, Haiying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng; Tuchin, Valery V.

    Monitoring the spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial for studying the normal and pathophysiologic conditions of brain metabolism. By illuminating the cortex with laser light and imaging the resulting speckle pattern, relative CBF images with tens of microns spatial and millisecond temporal resolution can be obtained. In this chapter, a laser speckle imaging (LSI) method for monitoring dynamic, high-resolution CBF is introduced. To improve the spatial resolution of current LSI, a modified LSI method is proposed. To accelerate the speed of data processing, three LSI data processing frameworks based on graphics processing unit (GPU), digital signal processor (DSP), and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) are also presented. Applications for detecting the changes in local CBF induced by sensory stimulation and thermal stimulation, the influence of a chemical agent on CBF, and the influence of acute hyperglycemia following cortical spreading depression on CBF are given.

  19. Mapping blood flow directionality in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Hong; Do, Won-Joon; Choi, Seung Hong; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty

    2016-07-01

    Diffusion properties of tissue are often expressed on the basis of directional variance, i.e., diffusion tensor imaging. In comparison, common perfusion-weighted imaging such as arterial spin labeling yields perfusion in a scalar quantity. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of mapping cerebral blood flow directionality using alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), a recently-developed arterial spin labeling technique with sensitivity to blood flow directions. ALADDIN was applied along 3 orthogonal directions to assess directional blood flow in a vector form and also along 6 equally-spaced directions to extract blood flow tensor matrix (P) based on a blood flow ellipsoid model. Tensor elements (eigenvalues, eigenvectors, etc) were calculated to investigate characteristics of the blood flow tensor, in comparison with time-of-flight MR angiogram. While the directions of the main eigenvectors were heterogeneous throughout the brain, regional clusters of blood flow directionality were reproducible across subjects. The technique could show heterogeneous blood flow directionality within and around brain tumor, which was different from that of the contralateral normal side. The proposed method is deemed to provide information of blood flow directionality, which has not been demonstrated before. The results warrant further studies to assess changes in the directionality map as a function of scan parameters, to understand the signal sources, to investigate the possibility of mapping local blood perfusion directionality, and to evaluate its usefulness for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26968145

  20. Evidence of redistribution of cerebral blood flow during treatment for an intracranial arteriovenous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of an intracranial arteriovenous malformation has a dramatic impact on local circulatory dynamics. Treatment of some arteriovenous malformations can result in disastrous hyperemic states caused by redistribution of previously shunted blood. This report describes serial hemodynamic measurements of both cerebral blood flow and flow velocity in 3 patients during treatment for arteriovenous malformations. Measurements of cerebral blood flow were made by computed tomographic scan employing the stable xenon inhalation technique; flow velocity, including autoregulatory characteristics, was measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasonogram. Substantial hyperemia developed in one patient (Case 1) after resection and in another (Case 3) after embolization. Embolization resulted in restoration of normal regional cerebral blood flow in a patient who demonstrated hypoperfusion before treatment (Case 2). In Patient 1, postoperative hyperemia was associated with persistently elevated flow velocities, and may have been accompanied by hemispheric neurological deficits. Sequential hemodynamic measurements may predict patients at risk of perioperative complications, and may become useful clinical guidelines for the extent and timing of embolization and for the timing of surgery after intracranial hemorrhage or preoperative embolization procedures

  1. Evidence of redistribution of cerebral blood flow during treatment for an intracranial arteriovenous malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batjer, H.H.; Purdy, P.D.; Giller, C.A.; Samson, D.S. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA))

    1989-10-01

    The presence of an intracranial arteriovenous malformation has a dramatic impact on local circulatory dynamics. Treatment of some arteriovenous malformations can result in disastrous hyperemic states caused by redistribution of previously shunted blood. This report describes serial hemodynamic measurements of both cerebral blood flow and flow velocity in 3 patients during treatment for arteriovenous malformations. Measurements of cerebral blood flow were made by computed tomographic scan employing the stable xenon inhalation technique; flow velocity, including autoregulatory characteristics, was measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasonogram. Substantial hyperemia developed in one patient (Case 1) after resection and in another (Case 3) after embolization. Embolization resulted in restoration of normal regional cerebral blood flow in a patient who demonstrated hypoperfusion before treatment (Case 2). In Patient 1, postoperative hyperemia was associated with persistently elevated flow velocities, and may have been accompanied by hemispheric neurological deficits. Sequential hemodynamic measurements may predict patients at risk of perioperative complications, and may become useful clinical guidelines for the extent and timing of embolization and for the timing of surgery after intracranial hemorrhage or preoperative embolization procedures.

  2. Normalization of thyroid blood flow in Graves' hyperthyroidism following radioactive iodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, D.C.S.; Woodcock, J.P.; Shedden, E.J.; Lazarus, J.H.; Wheeler, M.H.; McGregor, A.M. (University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (UK). Medical Physics Dept.)

    1990-05-01

    In a group of 12 patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism, administration of 514 {plus minus} 43 (mean {plus minus} SD) MBq iodine-131 was associated with a fall of superior thyroid artery (STA) blood flow in two at 6 months and in eight at 11 months. The reduction in time-averaged velocity at 11 months correlated with the reduction in FT4 and in FT3 at this time. In four patients who had persistent elevated STA blood flow, two were still hyperthyroid. The diameter of the STA was unchanged at 6 months and only half the patients had reduction of their STA size at 11 months after radioiodine (RAI) therapy. These data indicate that normalization of STA blood flow precedes normalization of STA size in patients treated with RAI. Further work is required to determine whether STA blood flow measurements are of predictive value in treatment outcome. (author).

  3. Numerical and Analytical Study of Two-Layered Unsteady Blood Flow through Catheterized Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Akbar; Ali, Nasir; Sajid, M; Hayat, Tasawar

    2016-01-01

    The pulsatile flow of blood in a catheterized blood vessel is analyzed. The flow of blood in vessel is modeled as the flow of two immiscible fluids. The fluid in the core region is characterized as a non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluid satisfying the constitutive equation of an Oldroyd-B fluid. The fluid in the peripheral region is treated as a Newtonian fluid. The catheter inside the vessel is modeled as a rigid tube of very small radius. The resulting differential system for velocity in each region is computed numerically by finite-difference scheme and analytically by Laplace transform. A comparison of numerical solution with Laplace transform solution is carried out. Various physical quantities of interest through the computed velocity are also analyzed. PMID:27548476

  4. Evaluation of MR angiography and blood flow measurement in abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the characteristics of blood flow measurement with MR Angiography (MRA) to evaluate the status of vascular stenoses, two or three dimensional time-of-flight MRA and velocity-encoded cine MR were performed in the 230 segments of 35 patients, with abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. In 11 of these 35 patients digital subtraction angiography was additionally underwent, and the stenotic findings was compared with MRA. There were 17 segments in which the velocity could not be measured, because the blood flow exceeded the upper limit of peak-encoded velocity (VENC) which was set at 120 cm/sec. Therefore, it is necessary to set the upper limit of VENC at higher than 120 cm/sec. There were 11 stenotic findings in DSA and 20 stenotic findings in MRA. Pulsatility Index (PI=(max velocity-min. velocity)/average velocity) were used for evaluating the blood flow waveform, and there were significant difference between the 11 stenotic findings of DSA and the others'. In summery, MRA was considered as useful examination to assess the degree of the vascular stenoses in abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. (author)

  5. Evaluation of MR angiography and blood flow measurement in abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabuchi, Kenji [Dokkyo Univ. School of Medicine, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    To assess the characteristics of blood flow measurement with MR Angiography (MRA) to evaluate the status of vascular stenoses, two or three dimensional time-of-flight MRA and velocity-encoded cine MR were performed in the 230 segments of 35 patients, with abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. In 11 of these 35 patients digital subtraction angiography was additionally underwent, and the stenotic findings was compared with MRA. There were 17 segments in which the velocity could not be measured, because the blood flow exceeded the upper limit of peak-encoded velocity (VENC) which was set at 120 cm/sec. Therefore, it is necessary to set the upper limit of VENC at higher than 120 cm/sec. There were 11 stenotic findings in DSA and 20 stenotic findings in MRA. Pulsatility Index (PI=(max velocity-min. velocity)/average velocity) were used for evaluating the blood flow waveform, and there were significant difference between the 11 stenotic findings of DSA and the others'. In summery, MRA was considered as useful examination to assess the degree of the vascular stenoses in abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. (author)

  6. Simulation of blood flow in a small-diameter vascular graft model with a swirl (spiral) flow guider

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; GUIDOIN

    2008-01-01

    Small-diameter vascular grafts are in large demand for coronary and peripheral bypass procedures, but present products still fail in long-term clinical application. In the present communication, a new type of small-diameter graft with a swirl flow guider was proposed to improve graft patency rate. Flow pattern in the graft was simulated numerically and compared with that in a conventional graft. The numerical results revealed that the swirl flow guider could indeed make the blood flow rotate in the new graft. The swirling flow distal to the flow guider significantly altered the flow pattern in the new graft and the ve- locity profiles were re-distributed. Due to the swirling flow, the blood velocity near the vessel wall and wall shear rate were greatly enhanced. We believe that the increased blood velocity near the wall and the wall shear rate can impede the occurrence of acute thrombus formation and intimal hyperplasia, hence can improve the graft patency rate for long-term clinical use.

  7. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  8. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Yi, Hou-Hui; Li, Hua-Bing; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2009-02-01

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  9. On the shape of the common carotid artery with implications for blood velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical and engineering studies typically assume that the common carotid artery (CCA) is straight enough to assume fully developed flow, yet recent studies have demonstrated the presence of skewed velocity profiles. Toward elucidating the influence of mild vascular curvatures on blood flow patterns and atherosclerosis, this study aimed to characterize the three-dimensional shape of the human CCA. The left and right carotid arteries of 28 participants (63 ± 12 years) in the VALIDATE (Vascular Aging-–The Link that Bridges Age to Atherosclerosis) study were digitally segmented from 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiograms, from the aortic arch to the carotid bifurcation. Each CCA was divided into nominal cervical and thoracic segments, for which curvatures were estimated by least-squares fitting of the respective centerlines to planar arcs. The cervical CCA had a mean radius of curvature of 127 mm, corresponding to a mean lumen:curvature radius ratio of 1:50. The thoracic CCA was significantly more curved at 1:16, with the plane of curvature tilted by a mean angle of 25° and rotated close to 90° with respect to that of the cervical CCA. The left CCA was significantly longer and slightly more curved than the right CCA, and there was a weak but significant increase in CCA curvature with age. Computational fluid dynamic simulations carried out for idealized CCA geometries derived from these and other measured geometric parameters demonstrated that mild cervical curvature is sufficient to prevent flow from fully-developing to axisymmetry, independent of the degree of thoracic curvature. These findings reinforce the idea that fully developed flow may be the exception rather than the rule for the CCA, and perhaps other nominally long and straight vessels

  10. Multimodal Pressure-Flow Analysis: Application of Hilbert Huang Transform in Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Novak

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of nonlinear interactions between two nonstationary signals presents a computational challenge in different research fields, especially for assessments of physiological systems. Traditional approaches that are based on theories of stationary signals cannot resolve nonstationarity-related issues and, thus, cannot reliably assess nonlinear interactions in physiological systems. In this review we discuss a new technique called multimodal pressure flow (MMPF method that utilizes Hilbert-Huang transformation to quantify interaction between nonstationary cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV and blood pressure (BP for the assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA. CA is an important mechanism responsible for controlling cerebral blood flow in responses to fluctuations in systemic BP within a few heart-beats. The MMPF analysis decomposes BP and BFV signals into multiple empirical modes adaptively so that the fluctuations caused by a specific physiologic process can be represented in a corresponding empirical mode. Using this technique, we showed that dynamic CA can be characterized by specific phase delays between the decomposed BP and BFV oscillations, and that the phase shifts are significantly reduced in hypertensive, diabetics and stroke subjects with impaired CA. Additionally, the new technique can reliably assess CA using both induced BP/BFV oscillations during clinical tests and spontaneous BP/BFV fluctuations during resting conditions.

  11. Modeling cerebral blood flow during posture change from sitting to standing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Olufsen, M.; Tran, H.T.

    2004-01-01

    change from sitting to standing. The mathematical model uses a compartmental approach to describe pulsatile blood flow velocity and pressure in a number of compartments representing the systemic circulation. Our model includes compartments representing the trunk and upper extremities, the lower...

  12. The effect of varicocele on the right testicular blood flow in patients with left varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Üçer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are many theories about the mechanism how varicocele causes infertility. One of these theories is about the negative effect of varicocele on testicular blood flow. We aimed to compare the measurements of testicular blood flow in right and left testes in patients with left varicocele and normal right testes. Methods: Forty-one patients with left varicocele were enrolled in the study. All participants were performed color Doppler sonography to assess testicular blood flow of the both testes. Blood flow parameters such as peak systolic velocity (PSV, end diastolic velocity (EDV, resistive index (RI, pulsatility index (PI were measured in testicular, capsular and intratesticular arteries. Semen parameters were also assessed in the participants. Testicular blood flow parameters were compared between the two testes. Results: Mean age of the patients was 25,95±5,27(16-37. The mean semen parameters of the patients; sperm count (million/ml was 31.56±19.05, motility (% was 51.21±22.27, normal morphology (% was 12.75±2.97 and total motile sperm count (million/ml was 54.92±47.46. There were no statistically significant differences between the testicular blood flow parameters of both testes which are PSV, EDV, RI and PI values in the testicular artery and its branches (capsular and intratesticular arteries(p>0.05. Conclusion: The fact that there were no differences between the blood flows in both testes may depend on the study group who had normal sperm parameters. We suggest that testicular blood flow may be evaluated in patients with left varicocele and impaired sperm parameters.

  13. Velocity Dip and Boundary Influence on the location of the Maximum Velocity in Open Channel Flows: An Experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing YAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Velocity Dip phenomenon will appear in part or whole flow field of open channel flows due to the secondary flow effect. Based on rectangular flume experiments and Laser Doppler Velocimetry, the influence of the distance to side wall and the aspect ratio of the Velocity Dip is investigated. Through applying statistical methods to obtained results,, it is proposed that the flow field may be divided into two regions, the Relative Strong Side Wall Region and the Relative Weak Side Wall Region. In the Relative Strong Side Wall Region, the distance to the side wall greatly affects the location of maximum velocity, and in the Relative Weak Side Wall Region, both the distance to the side wall and the aspect ratio influence the location of maximum velocity.

  14. Cerebral blood flow simulations in realistic geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szopos Marcela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to perform the computation of the blood flow in all the cerebral network, obtained from medical images as angiographies. We use free finite elements codes as FreeFEM++. We first test the code on analytical solutions in simplified geometries. Then, we study the influence of boundary conditions on the flow and we finally perform first computations on realistic meshes. L’objectif est ici de simuler l’écoulement sanguin dans tout le réseau cérébral (artériel et veineux obtenu à partir d’angiographies cérébrales 3D à l’aide de logiciels d’éléments finis libres, comme FreeFEM++. Nous menons d’abord une étude détaillée des résultats sur des solutions analytiques et l’influence des conditions limites à imposer dans des géométries simplifiées avant de travailler sur les maillages réalistes.

  15. Melatonin differentially affects vascular blood flow in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jonathan S.; Sauder, Charity L.; Ray, Chester A.

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin is synthesized and released into the circulation by the pineal gland in a circadian rhythm. Melatonin has been demonstrated to differentially alter blood flow to assorted vascular beds by the activation of different melatonin receptors in animal models. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of melatonin on blood flow to various vascular beds in humans. Renal (Doppler ultrasound), forearm (venous occlusion plethysmography), and cerebral blood flow (transcranial...

  16. Radionuclide renogram as a predictor of relative renal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide renograms obtained with Tc-99m-DTPA were used to calculate relative renal blood flow in 16 dogs. In 13 of these dogs, relative blood flow ratios (R:L) calculated from the renograms were correlated with ratios measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter or with radiolabeled microspheres. The results indicate that Tc-99m-DTPA renograms can be used to make an accurate prediction of relative renal blood flow

  17. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small IV, W; Gjersing, E; Herberg, J L; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2008-10-29

    Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

  18. Noninvasive method of estimating human newborn regional cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A noninvasive method of estimating regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in premature and full-term babies has been developed. Based on a modification of the 133Xe inhalation rCBF technique, this method uses eight extracranial NaI scintillation detectors and an i.v. bolus injection of 133Xe (approximately 0.5 mCi/kg). Arterial xenon concentration was estimated with an external chest detector. Cerebral blood flow was measured in 15 healthy, neurologically normal premature infants. Using Obrist's method of two-compartment analysis, normal values were calculated for flow in both compartments, relative weight and fractional flow in the first compartment (gray matter), initial slope of gray matter blood flow, mean cerebral blood flow, and initial slope index of mean cerebral blood flow. The application of this technique to newborns, its relative advantages, and its potential uses are discussed

  19. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors

  20. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-12-31

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors. 45 refs. The thesis includes also five previous publications by author.

  1. Flow measurements using an Turbo-FLASH sequence with a velocity-encoding pulse train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordinary phase-contrast techniques in MRI for velocity quantification requires long data measurement times in order to acquire images. A snapshot FLASH sequence with velocity-encoding pulses was evaluated for velocity measurement utilizing a specifically designed phantom. A velocity-encoding (900degx-Gs-180degy-Gs-90degy) pulse train was added prior to a standard Turbo-FLASH sequence with centric phase reordering where Gs is a velocity-encoding gradient. Water flow through a tube (Φ=2.25 mm) was imaged with this sequence implemented on a 1.5 T MR unit. Flow signal intensities were acquired with several magnitudes of the velocity-encoding gradient. A mathematical model in which flow was considered to be laminar was fitted to these data and the flow velocity was obtained from a parameter of the model. The measurement time for a single image was about 2 seconds. In order to calculate velocity, several images had to be acquired. When the maximum flow velocity in the tube was less than 30 cm/sec, calculated velocities were in good agreement with mean flow velocities obtained from outflow rates and the cross-sectional area of the tube. Above that velocity, a ghost artifact appeared on the image. Turbo-FLASH sequence with a velocity-encoding pulse train is an efficient means for measuring the velocity of slow flow rates in a short time. (author)

  2. Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Akbar; Ali, Nasir; Sajid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood hydro-magnetic flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery are analyzed. The constitutive equation of power law model is employed to simulate the rheological characteristics of the blood. The governing equations giving the flow derived by assuming the flow to be unsteady and two-dimensional. Mild stenosis approximation is employed to obtain the reduced form of the governing equations. Finite difference method is employed to obtain the solution of the non-linear partial differential equation in the presence of slip at the surface. An extensive quantitative analysis is performed for the effects of slip parameter, Hartmann number, cathetered parameter and arterial geometrical parameters of stenosis on the quantities of interest such as axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress. The streamlines for the blood flow through the artery are also included.

  3. Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Zaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood hydro-magnetic flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery are analyzed. The constitutive equation of power law model is employed to simulate the rheological characteristics of the blood. The governing equations giving the flow derived by assuming the flow to be unsteady and two-dimensional. Mild stenosis approximation is employed to obtain the reduced form of the governing equations. Finite difference method is employed to obtain the solution of the non-linear partial differential equation in the presence of slip at the surface. An extensive quantitative analysis is performed for the effects of slip parameter, Hartmann number, cathetered parameter and arterial geometrical parameters of stenosis on the quantities of interest such as axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress. The streamlines for the blood flow through the artery are also included.

  4. EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE ON BLOOD FLOW OF VERTEBRAL AND BASILAR ARTERIES IN STROKE PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕建明; 王伟志

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the short-term effect and long-term effect of acupuncture on blood flow of vertebral and basilar arteries in stroke patients.Methods: A total of 58 stroke patients (34 males and 24 females) were agreed to participate in this study, and changes of blood flow of the vertebral and basilar arteries were detected after one week's and 45 days' continuous acupuncture treatment by using a Doppler's ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus.Bilateral Fengchi (GB 20), Wangu (GB 12), Tianzhu (BL 10), etc.were punctured and stimulated with small amplitude, high frequency and twirling-reinforcing method for 3 min.The treatment was conducted once daily.Results: Following one week's and 45 days' acupuncture treatment, diastolic velocity (DV), systolic velocity (SV) and mean velocity (MV) of the basilar artery increased significantly in comparison with pre-treatment (P0.05).Results indicated that acupuncture treatment could effectively improve blood supply of the basilar artery and regulate the uneven blood flow of the bilateral vertebral arteries.Conclusion: Acupuncture treatment can raise blood flow of the brain in stroke patients.

  5. A Discussion on the Regulation of Blood Flow and Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Christopher B; Collier, David J; Shah, Mussadiq; Saxena, Manish; Brier, Timothy J; Kapil, Vikas; Green, David; Lobo, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses two kinds of regulation essential to the circulatory system: namely the regulation of blood flow and that of (systemic) arterial blood pressure. It is pointed out that blood flow requirements sub-serve the nutritional needs of the tissues, adequately catered for by keeping blood flow sufficient for the individual oxygen needs. Individual tissue oxygen requirements vary between tissue types, while highly specific for a given individual tissue. Hence, blood flows are distributed between multiple tissues, each with a specific optimum relationship between the rate of oxygen delivery (DO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2). Previous work has illustrated that the individual tissue blood flows are adjusted proportionately, where there are variations in metabolic rate and where arterial oxygen content (CaO2) varies. While arterial blood pressure is essential for the provision of a sufficient pressure gradient to drive blood flow, it is applicable throughout the arterial system at any one time. Furthermore, It is regulated independently of the input resistance to individual tissues (local arterioles), since they are regulated locally, that being the means by which the highly specific adequate local requirement for DO2 is ensured. Since total blood flow is the summation of all the individually regulated tissue blood flows cardiac inflow (venous return) amounts to total tissue blood flow and as the heart puts out what it receives cardiac output is therefore determined at the tissues. Hence, regulation of arterial blood pressure is independent of the distributed independent regulation of individual tissues. It is proposed here that mechanical features of arterial blood pressure regulation will depend rather on the balance between blood volume and venous wall tension, determinants of venous pressure. The potential for this explanation is treated in some detail. PMID:26782204

  6. In Vivo Validation of a Blood Vector Velocity Estimator with MR Angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Thomsen, Carsten;

    2009-01-01

    angiography (MRA) by comparing in vivo measurements of stroke volume. Eleven healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. From the obtained data sets recorded with the 2 modalities, vector velocity sequences were constructed and stroke volume calculated. Angle of insonation was approximately 90...... transverse oscillation (TO), which combines estimates of the axial and the transverse velocity components in the scan plane, makes it possible to estimate the vector velocity of the blood regardless of the Doppler angle. The present study evaluates the TO method with magnetic resonance phase contrast...... indicate that reliable vector velocity estimates can be obtained in vivo using the presented angle-independent 2-D vector velocity method. The TO method can be a useful alternative to conventional Doppler systems by avoiding the angle artifact, thus giving quantitative velocity information....

  7. Doppler transcraniano convencional em voluntários assintomáticos: variabilidade e valores de referência para parâmetros de fluxo sanguíneo Reference values for measures of blood flow velocities and impedance indexes in healthy individuals through conventional transcranial Doppler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Fregonesi Barbosa

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer valores de referência para medidas de velocidade sanguínea e índices de impedância em indivíduos saudáveis por meio do Doppler transcraniano convencional (DTC e observar suas variações em relação à idade e sexo. MÉTODO: Foram examinados 88 voluntários assintomáticos, sem antecedentes de doença cerebrovascular, cardíaca ou vascular periférica. Os exames de DTC foram realizados pelo mesmo examinador, sendo as artérias cerebrais médias, anteriores e posteriores estudadas por meio da janela temporal e as artérias vertebrais e basilar por meio da janela suboccipital. Foram arquivados os valores de velocidade média (VM, velocidade de pico sistólico (VPS, velocidade diastólica final (VDF e índices de resistência (IR e pulsatilidade (IP de cada segmento arterial examinado. RESULTADOS: Os limites de referência encontrados por nós foram semelhantes aos descritos por outros autores para todos os parâmetros estudados. Houve tendência das velocidades de fluxo diminuírem e dos índices de impedância aumentarem com o avançar da idade. Os valores de velocidade nas mulheres foram superiores aos encontrados em homens. CONCLUSÃO: O DTC se mostrou útil na avaliação hemodinâmica cerebral de nossa população. Os nossos resultados são semelhantes aos de outros estudos, tanto nos valores de referência quanto na sua relação com a idade e o sexo.OBJECTIVE: To establish reference values for measures of blood flow velocities and impedance indexes in healthy individuals through conventional transcranial Doppler (TCD and to observe their variations in relation to the age and sex. METHOD: 88 asymptomatic volunteers were examined without antecedents of cardiac, peripheral or cerebrovascular diseases. The TCD were accomplished by the same examiner. The middle, anterior and posterior cerebral arteries were studied through the temporal acoustic window and the vertebral and basilar arteries through the suboccipital

  8. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  9. Flow velocities and bed shear stresses in a stone cover under an oscillatory flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenanato, F.; Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Sumer, B. Mutlu;

    2010-01-01

    I order to get a better understanding of the interaction between the wave-induced, near-bed oscillatory flow, the stome cover and the sea bed, physical model tests were carried out. The tests were conducted in an oscillating water tunnel. The bottom of the tunnes was covered by one, two and three...... layers of stones. The flow velocities in the pores of the stones were measured using LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometer). In addition to the velocity measurements, the bed shear stresses were also measured using a hotfilm (Constant Temperature Anemometry). It is found that the boundary layer of the outer flow...... current boundary layer without any externally generated turbulence. The bd shear stress is found to be very low, more than ten times smaller than in the case of a smooth base bottom without stone cover....

  10. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.; Nielsen, Michael B.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wave...... approaches 90°. The majority of the vessels in the human body is parallel to the surface and therefore positioned in a way that prevents proper placement and angulation of the transducer, when the velocity and direction of blood flow is to be estimated. Different techniques to circumvent this problem have...

  11. CFD simulation of blood flow inside the corkscrew collaterals of the Buerger’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Sharifi

    2016-03-01

    Results: The local velocity patterns, pressure and kinematic viscosity distributions in different segments of the corkscrew collateral artery was demonstrated and discussed for the first time for this kind of artery. The effects of non-Newtonian consideration for the blood viscosity behavior were investigated in different segments of the artery. Moreover, the variations of the blood flow patterns along the artery were investigated in details for each segment. Conclusion: It was found that the flow patterns were affected by the complex geometry of this artery in such a way that it could lead to the presence of sites that were prone to the accumulation of the flowing particles in blood like nicotine. Furthermore, due to the existence of many successive bends in this artery, the variations of kinematic viscosity along this artery were significant, therefore the non-Newtonian behavior of the blood viscosity must be considered.

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow in neuropediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single photon emission computed tomography can effectively and non-invasively measure regional blood flow. Mostly used 99mTc-HMPAO is a safe brain imaging agent for pediatric applications. The radiation dose is acceptable. Knowledge of the normal rCBF pattern, including normal asymmetries and variations due to age, is necessary prerequisite for the evaluation and reporting of the results of 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT studies in clinical practice. The interpretation of he rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The aim of the present review is to focus on the contribution to clinical developmental neurology of SPECT The clinical use of SPECT in developmental neurology are epilepsy, brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, high-risk neonates, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury, migraine, anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity, and monitoring therapy. Sedation is not routinely used, rather each child is evaluated. However, drug sedation is mandatory in some uncooperative children. (author)

  13. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100-1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  14. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow in depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in patients with endogenous depression by the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-[123I] iodoamphetamine (IMP). The subjects were 32 patients with endogenous depression and 20 normal controls. These 32 patients, who were divided into 10 unmedicated group and 22 medicated group, were reexamined when the depressed patients reverted to a euthymic state (remission). The value of rCBF was assessed by the corticocerebellar ratio (CCR), which was expressed as a ratio of activity per pixel in the cerebral regions of interests (ROIs) to the activity per pixel in the cerebellum. The depressive patients showed a decrease in rCBF all over the cerebral regions and, especially, the lower rCBF in the left than in the right hemisphere. These changes turned toward normal in a remitted state following treatments, though there was no significant difference in rCBF between the medicated and unmedicated patients. There was a significantly negative correlation between the severity of depressive symptoms and the mean rCBF in a total of patients with depression. These results suggest that psychiatric symptoms in the depressive patients might be related to the left hemispheric dysfunction. (author)

  16. Blood Flow Restricted Exercise and Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Horiuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is established that regular aerobic training improves vascular function, for example, endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and arterial stiffness or compliance and thereby constitutes a preventative measure against cardiovascular disease. In contrast, high-intensity resistance training impairs vascular function, while the influence of moderate-intensity resistance training on vascular function is still controversial. However, aerobic training is insufficient to inhibit loss in muscular strength with advancing age; thus, resistance training is recommended to prevent sarcopenia. Recently, several lines of study have provided compelling data showing that exercise and training with blood flow restriction (BFR leads to muscle hypertrophy and strength increase. As such, BFR training might be a novel means of overcoming the contradiction between aerobic and high-intensity resistance training. Although it is not enough evidence to obtain consensus about impact of BFR training on vascular function, available evidences suggested that BFR training did not change coagulation factors and arterial compliance though with inconsistence results in endothelial function. This paper is a review of the literature on the impact of BFR exercise and training on vascular function, such as endothelial function, arterial compliance, or other potential factors in comparison with those of aerobic and resistance training.

  17. Study on relationship between perifollicular blood flow and in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhang; Jing Yang; Wangming Xu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between perifoUicular blood flow and follicule development, oocyte maturing rate, fertilizing rate, cleaving rate, embryo quality and the outcomes of embryo transfer. Methods: The samples were selected from 66 suffers who underwent in vitro fertilization(IVF)or intracytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI). Eeach patients' perifollicular blood flow(diameter≥12mm )was estimated on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin(HCG)administration. Results:Among 66 cycles, 26(39.4%) cycles resulted in pregnancy, perifollicular blood flow resistance index(Rl), peak systolic velocity/end diastasis velocity(S/D) of non-preg-nant group was significantly higher than that of the pregnant group (P < 0.004). When RI<0.49, the pregnancy rates, fecundation rates, fertilization rates, metaphase numbers for the of second meiosis oocytes increased evidently(P<0.05), but there were no statistical difference in gonadotropin dosage, cycle frequency, infertility years, ages, estradiol(E2)on the day of HCG administration,numbers of oocyet retrieved and high-quality embryo rates (P > 0.05 ). There were no statistical difference between non-pregnant group and pregnant group in S and D (P>0.05). There was no correlation between periFollicular blood flow RI and follicular diameter by linear regression analysis. Conclusion:Our study shows that perifollicular blood flow RI and S/D are effective indices of predicting the pregnancy outcome of IVF-ET.

  18. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-15

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field.

  19. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field

  20. Detection of Site-Specific Blood Flow Variation in Humans during Running by a Wearable Laser Doppler Flowmeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Iwasaki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wearable wireless physiological sensors are helpful for monitoring and maintaining human health. Blood flow contains abundant physiological information but it is hard to measure blood flow during exercise using conventional blood flowmeters because of their size, weight, and use of optic fibers. To resolve these disadvantages, we previously developed a micro integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter using microelectromechanical systems technology. This micro blood flowmeter is wearable and capable of stable measurement signals even during movement. Therefore, we attempted to measure skin blood flow at the forehead, fingertip, and earlobe of seven young men while running as a pilot experiment to extend the utility of the micro blood flowmeter. We measured blood flow in each subject at velocities of 6, 8, and 10 km/h. We succeeded in obtaining stable measurements of blood flow, with few motion artifacts, using the micro blood flowmeter, and the pulse wave signal and motion artifacts were clearly separated by conducting frequency analysis. Furthermore, the results showed that the extent of the changes in blood flow depended on the intensity of exercise as well as previous work with an ergometer. Thus, we demonstrated the capability of this wearable blood flow sensor for measurement during exercise.

  1. The effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on the response of cerebral blood flow to acute hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Sugawara, Jun; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Ueda, Shinya; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the response of cerebral blood flow to an acute change in perfusion pressure is modified by an acute increase in central blood volume. Nine young, healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. To measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation during normocapnic and hypercapnic (5%) conditions, the change in middle cerebral artery mean blood flow velocity was analyzed during acute hypotension caused by two methods: 1) thigh-cuff occlusion release (without change in central blood volume); and 2) during the recovery phase immediately following release of lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -50 mmHg) that initiated an acute increase in central blood volume. In the thigh-cuff occlusion release protocol, as expected, hypercapnia decreased the rate of regulation, as an index of dynamic cerebral autoregulation (0.236 ± 0.018 and 0.167 ± 0.025 s(-1), P = 0.024). Compared with the cuff-occlusion release, the acute increase in central blood volume (relative to the LBNP condition) with LBNP release attenuated dynamic cerebral autoregulation (P = 0.009). Therefore, the hypercapnia-induced attenuation of dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not observed in the LBNP release protocol (P = 0.574). These findings suggest that an acute change in systemic blood distribution modifies dynamic cerebral autoregulation during acute hypotension. PMID:26159757

  2. Chronic intestinal ischemia and splanchnic blood-flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Helle Damgaard; Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Abrahamsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake in healthy-subjects and patients and to relate the findings to body-composition. METHODS: The total splanchnic blood flow (SBF) and oxygen uptake (SO₂U) were measured in 20 healthy volunteers (10 women) and 29 patients with suspected...

  3. Regional cerebral blood flow in focal cortical epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristina Dupont; Oikawa, T; Sveinsdottir, E;

    1976-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in ten patients with focal cortical epilepsy. The blood flow was measured by the intra-arterial injection of xenon 133 (133Xe), and the isotope clearance was recorded by a multidetector scintillation camera with 254 detectors. Three patients were...

  4. Glial and neuronal control of brain blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwell, David; Buchan, Alastair M; Charpak, Serge;

    2010-01-01

    Blood flow in the brain is regulated by neurons and astrocytes. Knowledge of how these cells control blood flow is crucial for understanding how neural computation is powered, for interpreting functional imaging scans of brains, and for developing treatments for neurological disorders. It is now...

  5. Effect of 0.2 % Brimonidine onRetinal Blood Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minbin Yu; Yang Li; Xing Liu; Yunlan Ling; Xiaoping Zheng

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of 0.2 % brimonidine eye drops on retinal blood flow of patients with glaucoma. Methods: Using self-control method and Heidelberg Retina Flowmeter (HRF), we examined the volume, flow and velocity of the superior nasal and temporal, the inferior nasal and temporal artery of retina at baseline and 2 hours after single instillation of 0.2% brimonidine. Results: There were no significant changes in volume, fio~ and velocity of four vessels betore and after the administration of 0.2 % brimonidine. Conclusions: There are no significant ocular haemodvnamic benefits associated with Brimonidine therapy to the glaucoma patients. Eye Science 2001; 17:42 ~ 45.

  6. Mathematical modelling of blood flow through a tapered overlapping stenosed artery with variable viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Shit, G C; Sinha, A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of blood flow through a tapered and overlapping stenosed artery under the action of an externally applied magnetic field. The fluid (blood) medium is assumed to be porous in nature. The variable viscosity of blood depending on hematocrit (percentage volume of erythrocytes) is taken into account in order to improve resemblance to the real situation. The governing equation for laminar, incompressible and Newtonian fluid subject to the boundary conditions is solved by using a well known Frobenius method. The analytical expressions for velocity component, volumetric flow rate, wall shear stress and pressure gradient are obtained. The numerical values are extracted from these analytical expressions and are presented graphically. It is observed that the influence of hematocrit, magnetic field and the shape of artery have important impact on the velocity profile, pressure gradient and wall shear stress. Moreover, the effect of primary stenosis on the secondary one has been sig...

  7. Mathematical Modelling of Blood Flow through a Tapered Overlapping Stenosed Artery with Variable Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Shit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical study of blood flow through a tapered and overlapping stenosed artery under the action of an externally applied magnetic field. The fluid (blood medium is assumed to be porous in nature. The variable viscosity of blood depending on hematocrit (percentage volume of erythrocytes is taken into account in order to improve resemblance to the real situation. The governing equation for laminar, incompressible and Newtonian fluid subject to the boundary conditions is solved by using a well known Frobenius method. The analytical expressions for velocity component, volumetric flow rate, wall shear stress and pressure gradient are obtained. The numerical values are extracted from these analytical expressions and are presented graphically. It is observed that the influence of hematocrit, magnetic field and the shape of artery have important impact on the velocity profile, pressure gradient and wall shear stress. Moreover, the effect of primary stenosis on the secondary one has been significantly observed.

  8. In vivo validation of a blood vector velocity estimator with MR angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.L.; Udesen, J.; Thomsen, C.;

    2009-01-01

    contrast angiography (MRA) by comparing in vivo measurements of stroke volume. Eleven healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. From the obtained data sets recorded with the 2 modalities, vector velocity sequences were constructed and stroke volume calculated. Angle of insonation...... method transverse oscillation (TO), which combines estimates of the axial and the transverse velocity components in the scan plane, makes it possible to estimate the vector velocity of the blood regardless of the Doppler angle. The present study evaluates the TO method with magnetic resonance phase.......4 ml and 1.9 ml. The results indicate that reliable vector velocity estimates can be obtained in vivo using the presented angle-independent 2-D vector velocity method. The TO method can be a useful alternative to conventional Doppler systems by avoiding the angle artifact, thus giving quantitative...

  9. Effect of Induced Vibration on the Blood Flow Properties in a Mechanical Aortic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadhim Saleem Khalefa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of induced vibration on velocity distribution for the blood flow in the bileaflet mechanical heart valves conveying blood was investigated in this study. The bileaflet valve was simulated as an orifice. The induced vibration is due to the pulsed blood flow in the artery. Results presented in this study were performed using CFD FLUENT software. This analysis is based on the non-linear numerical solution by using a finite-element method, for the system of governing partial differential equations (continuity, momentum of Navier - Stokes equation of blood flow through the orifice. It has been found that as the flow through the orifice increased, the vibration at the orifice inlet increased. For steady state conditions, at Reynolds number 50 the recorded frequency was 20Hz. When the Reynolds number increased to 100 due to the increase in the blood flow the recorded frequency increased to 30Hz. The increase in frequency may result in damaging the blood red cells and platelets which subsequently results in increasing the blood clogging downstream of the orifice.

  10. Measured effects of reduced flow velocity in a laminar flow cleanroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical laminar flow (VLF) cleanrooms generally operate with air flows between 60 feet per minute (fpm) and 110 fpm. Tests were performed to evaluate the effects on particle contamination levels when the air flow velocity in a Federal Standard 209 Class 1 VLF cleanroom was reduced. The cleanroom normally operates at 90 fpm. Measurements of surface particle concentrations were made on settling monitor wafers and on wafers carried in an open cassette. Optical particle counters measured the airborne particle concentrations at several locations. Results at 100 fpm and 50 fpm respectively, for particles larger than or equal to 0.3 μm in optical equivalent diameter were -0.0002 and +0.0029 particles per square centimeter per hour for the settling wafers and 0.0009 and 0.024 per sq. cm total for the wafers carried for five hours in the open cassettes. Summary statistics are given for the airborne and surface particle counts. Deposition velocity is the ratio of surface deposition rate to airborne concentration. For the monitor wafers at the lower flow, the calculated particle deposition velocities were near 0.003 cm/s, which is within the range expected from theory and experiments in the literature

  11. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit

  12. Lattice BGK Simulations of the Blood Flow in Elastic Vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiao-Yang; YI Hou-Hui; CHEN Ji-Yao; FANG Hai-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ The lattice Boltzmann method is applied to study the flow in elastic blood vessels. The volume-flow rate increases considerably when the compliance constant of the blood vessel is below a critical value. There is a region of the compliance constant in which the average volume-flow rate is dramatically enhanced. A harmonic perturbation of the pressure does not change the behaviour of the average volume-flow rate while the harmonic wave attenuates very quickly along the tube when the resonant period is close to that of the input wave. The model, together with the simulation results, is expected to be helpful to understand the mechanism of the blood volume-flow rate related to the compliance constant of the blood vessel, especially on the dependence of the flux of human blood vessel under weather changes, which has medical significance.

  13. Differences in superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery blood flow spectrum parameters in subacute thyroiditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Bo Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the differences in superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery blood flow spectrum parameters in subacute thyroiditis. Methods:A Total of 40 cases of patients with subacute thyroiditis and 40 cases of healthy volunteers were selected for study and enrolled in pathology group and control group respectively, color Doppler ultrasonography was conducted to detect peak blood flow velocities (Vmax) of superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery as well as resistance index (RI), and serum was collected to detect thyroid hormone contents, infection indexes and oxidative stress indexes. Results:Peak blood flow velocities Vmax of superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery of pathology group were significantly higher than those of control group, and resistance index RI was not different from that of control group;FT3, FT4, TT3, TT4, ESR, CRP, PCT and MDA of pathology group were significantly higher than those of control group, and SOD and TAOC were significantly lower than those of control group;Vmax of superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery were positively correlated with FT3, FT4, TT3, TT4, ESR, CRP, PCT and MDA, and negatively correlated with SOD and TAOC. Conclusion:Peak blood flow velocities (Vmax) of superior thyroid artery and inferior thyroid artery in subacute thyroiditis are significantly accelerated, Vmax has good consistency with thyroid hormone contents, infection indexes and oxidative stress indexes, and it can accurately assess the severity of the disease.

  14. Design and Simulation of Axial Flow Maglev Blood Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Huachun Wu; Ziyan Wang; Xujun Lv

    2011-01-01

    The axial flow maglev blood pump (AFMBP) has become a global research focus and emphasis for artificial ventricular assist device, which has no mechanical contact, mechanical friction, compact structure and light weight, can effectively solve thrombus and hemolysis. Magnetic suspension and impeller is two of the important parts in the axial flow maglev blood pump, and their structure largely determines the blood pump performance. The research adopts electromagnetic and fluid finite element an...

  15. Computational Biorheology of Human Blood Flow in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2013-01-01

    Hematologic disorders arising from infectious diseases, hereditary factors and environmental influences can lead to, and can be influenced by, significant changes in the shape, mechanical and physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), and the biorheology of blood flow. Hence, modeling of hematologic disorders should take into account the multiphase nature of blood flow, especially in arterioles and capillaries. We present here an overview of a general computational framework based on diss...

  16. MUSCLE METABOLISM WITH BLOOD FLOW RESTRICTION IN CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    McCully, Kevin K; Smith, Sinclair; Rajaei, Sheeva; Leigh, John S.; Natelson, Benjamin H

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is associated with reduced blood flow and muscle oxidative metabolism. Patients with CFS according to CDC criteria (n=19) were compared to normal sedentary subjects (n = 11). Muscle blood flow was measured in the femoral artery with Doppler ultrasound after exercise. Muscle metabolism was measured in the medial gastrocnemius muscle using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Muscle oxygen saturation and blood vo...

  17. Our experience of blood flow measurements using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical study of blood flow measuring methods is proposed. After a review of the various diffusible and non-diffusible radioactive tracers and the corresponding detector systems, the principles which allow to measure blood flow from the data so obtained, are studied. There is a different principle of flow measurement for each type of tracer. The theory of flow measurement using non-diffusible tracers (human serum albumin labelled with 131I or sup(99m)Tc, 113In-labelled siderophiline) and its application to cardiac flow measurement are described first. Then the theory of flow measurement using diffusible tracers (133Xe, 85Kr) and its application to measurement of blood flow through tissues (muscles and kidney particularly) are described. A personal experience of this various flow measurements is reported. The results obtained, the difficulties encountered and the improvments proposed are developed

  18. PERFORMANCE MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF BLOOD FLOW IN ELASTIC ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil Kumar; C.L. Varshney; G.C. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Two different non-Newtonian models for blood flow are considered, first a simple power law model displaying shear thinning viscosity, and second a generalized Maxwell model displaying both shear thinning viscosity and oscillating flow viscous-elasticity. These models are used along with a Newtonian model to study sinusoidal flow of blood in rigid and elastic straight arteries in the presence of magnetic field. The elasticity of blood does not appear to influence its flow behavior under physiological conditions in the large arteries,purely viscous shear thinning model should be quite realistic for simulating blood flow under these conditions. On using the power law model with high shear rate for sinusoidal flow simulation in elastic arteries, the mean and amplitude of the flow rate were found to be lower for a power law fluid compared to Newtonian fluid for the same pressure gradient. The governing equations have been solved by Crank-Niclson scheme. The results are interpreted in the context of blood in the elastic arteries keeping the magnetic effects in view. For physiological flow simulation in the aorta, an increase in mean wall shear stress, but a reduction in peak wall shear stress were observed for power law model compared to a Newtonian fluid model for matched flow rate wave form. Blood flow in the presence of transverse magnetic field in an elastic artery is investigated and the influence of factors such as morphology and surface irregularity is evaluated.

  19. Dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddala, Jeevan; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen

    The dynamics of a complex mixture of cells and proteins, such as blood, in perturbed shear flow remains ill-defined. Microfluidics is a promising technology for improving the understanding of blood flow under complex conditions of shear; as found in stent implants and in tortuous blood vessels. We model the fluid dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network with dimensions mimicking venules. Interaction of blood cells was modeled using multiagent framework, where cells of different diameters were treated as spheres. This model served as the basis for predicting transition regions, collision pathways, re-circulation zones and residence times of cells dependent on their diameters and device architecture. Based on these insights from the model, we were able to predict the clot formation configurations at various locations in the device. These predictions were supported by the experiments using whole blood. To facilitate platelet aggregation, the devices were coated with fibrillar collagen and tissue factor. Blood was perfused through the microfluidic device for 9 min at a physiologically relevant venous shear rate of 600 s-1. Using fluorescent microscopy, we observed flow transitions near the channel intersections and at the areas of blood flow obstruction, which promoted larger thrombus formation. This study of integrating model predictions with experimental design, aids in defining the dynamics of blood flow in microvasculature and in development of novel biomedical devices.

  20. Single image correlation for blood flow mapping in complex vessel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Giuseppe; Sironi, Laura; Bouzin, Margaux; D'Alfonso, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Ceffa, Nicolo'G.; Marquezin, Cassia

    2015-05-01

    Microcirculation plays a key role in the maintenance and hemodynamics of tissues and organs also due to its extensive interaction with the immune system. A critical limitation of state-of-the-art clinical techniques to characterize the blood flow is their lack of the spatial resolution required to scale down to individual capillaries. On the other hand the study of the blood flow through auto- or cross-correlation methods fail to correlate the flow speed values with the morphological details required to describe an intricate network of capillaries. Here we propose to use a newly developed technique (FLICS, FLow Image Correlation Spectroscopy) that, by employing a single raster-scanned xy-image acquired in vivo by confocal or multi-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy, allows the quantitative measurement of the blood flow velocity in the whole vessel pattern within the field of view, while simultaneously maintaining the morphological information on the immobile structures of the explored circulatory system. Fluorescent flowing objects produce diagonal lines in the raster-scanned image superimposed to static morphological details. The flow velocity is obtained by computing the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) of the intensity fluctuations detected in pairs of columns of the image. The whole analytical dependence of the CCFs on the flow speed amplitude and the flow direction has been reported recently. We report here the derivation of approximated analytical relations that allows to use the CCF peak lag time and the corresponding CCF value, to directly estimate the flow speed amplitude and the flow direction. The validation has been performed on Zebrafish embryos for which the flow direction was changed systematically by rotating the embryos on the microscope stage. The results indicate that also from the CCF peak lag time it is possible to recover the flow speed amplitude within 13% of uncertainty (overestimation) in a wide range of angles between the flow and

  1. Theoretical analysis of the ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter for measurements of high flow velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabin, Jozef

    1987-07-01

    A geometric approach is used to analyze the ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter for measurements of flow velocities that are high but yet much smaller than the ultrasound velocity. The approach is based on the calculation of the transit time difference between the ultrasonic waves that are reflected from a moving particle at its various positions. Beam divergence is taken into account, and each path of the ultrasonic wave propagation is approximated by two rectilinear components. It is shown that the Doppler frequency shift is influenced not only by the suspended particle velocity, but also by the mean flow velocity of the fluid. This influence is of second order in the flow velocity.

  2. Artifacts in blood velocity estimation using ultrasound and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    Estimation of blood velocities using ultrasound and time-domain cross-correlation is investigated. The measurement principle is introduced, and the basic properties of the cross-correlation function are discussed. Expressions for the variance of the estimates of the peak location are given, showing...

  3. Relations between diabetes, blood pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity in haemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjærgaard, Krista Dybtved; Dzeko, Mirela;

    Diabetes (DM) is common in haemodialysis (HD) patients and affects both blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects the stiffness of the aorta and is regarded as a strong risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) mortality in HD patients. However, PWV is...

  4. Measurement of normal portal venous blood flow by Doppler ultrasound.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, H S; Halliwell, M; Qamar, M.; Read, A. E.; Evans, J. M.; Wells, P N

    1989-01-01

    The volume flow rate of blood in the portal vein was measured using a duplex ultrasound system. The many errors inherent in the duplex method were assessed with particular reference to the portal vein and appropriate correction factors were obtained by in vitro calibration. The effect of posture on flow was investigated by examining 45 healthy volunteers in three different positions; standing, supine and tilted head down at 20 degrees from the horizontal. The mean volume blood flow in the sup...

  5. Meridional flow velocities on solar-like stars with known activity cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Baklanova, Dilyara

    2014-01-01

    The direct measurements of the meridional flow velocities on stars are impossible today. To evaluate the meridional flow velocities on solar-like stars with stable activity periods, we supposed that during the stellar Hale cycle the matter on surfaces of stars passes the meridional way equivalent to $2\\pi R_\\star$. We present here the dependence of the mean meridional flow velocity on Rossby number, which is an effective parameter of the stellar magnetic dynamo.

  6. The effects of graded changes in oxygen and carbon dioxide tension on coronary blood velocity independent of myocardial energy demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Lindsey M; Stembridge, Mike; Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Foster, Glen E

    2016-08-01

    In humans, coronary blood flow is tightly regulated by microvessels within the myocardium to match myocardial energy demand. However, evidence regarding inherent sensitivity of the microvessels to changes in arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen is conflicting because of the accompanied changes in myocardial energy requirements. This study aimed to investigate the changes in coronary blood velocity while manipulating partial pressures of end-tidal CO2 (Petco2) and O2 (Peto2). It was hypothesized that an increase in Petco2 (hypercapnia) or decrease in Peto2 (hypoxia) would result in a significant increase in mean blood velocity in the left anterior descending artery (LADVmean) due to an increase in both blood gases and energy demand associated with the concomitant cardiovascular response. Cardiac energy demand was assessed through noninvasive measurement of the total left ventricular mechanical energy. Healthy subjects (n = 13) underwent a euoxic CO2 test (Petco2 = -8, -4, 0, +4, and +8 mmHg from baseline) and an isocapnic hypoxia test (Peto2 = 64, 52, and 45 mmHg). LADVmean was assessed using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Hypercapnia evoked a 34.6 ± 8.5% (mean ± SE; P < 0.01) increase in mean LADVmean, whereas hypoxia increased LADVmean by 51.4 ± 8.8% (P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regressions revealed that both mechanical energy and changes in arterial blood gases are important contributors to the observed changes in LADVmean (P < 0.01). In summary, regulation of the coronary vasculature in humans is mediated by metabolic changes within the heart and an inherent sensitivity to arterial blood gases. PMID:27233761

  7. Design optimization of flow channel and performance analysis for a new-type centrifugal blood pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, J. J.; Luo, X. W.; Y Wu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a new-type centrifugal blood pump, whose impeller is suspended inside a pump chamber with hydraulic bearings, is presented. In order to improve the hydraulic performance of the pump, an internal flow simulation is conducted to compare the effects of different geometrical parameters of pump flow passage. Based on the numerical results, the pumps can satisfy the operation parameters and be free of hemolysis. It is noted that for the pump with a column-type supporter at its inlet, the pump head and hydraulic efficiency decreases compared to the pump with a step-type support structure. The performance drop is caused by the disturbed flow upstream impeller inlet. Further, the unfavorable flow features such as reverse flow and low velocity in the pump may increases the possibility of thrombus. It is also confirmed that the casing shape can little influence pump performance. Those results are helpful for design optimization in blood pump development.

  8. Flow of a circulating tumor cell and red blood cells in microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the behavior of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood stream is of fundamental importance for understanding metastasis. Here, we investigate the flow mode and velocity of CTCs interacting with red blood cells (RBCs) in various sized microvessels. The flow of leukocytes in microvessels has been described previously; a leukocyte forms a train with RBCs in small microvessels and exhibits margination in large microvessels. Important differences in the physical properties of leukocytes and CTCs result from size. The dimensions of leukocytes are similar to those of RBCs, but CTCs are significantly larger. We investigate numerically the size effects on the flow mode and the cell velocity, and we identify similarities and differences between leukocytes and CTCs. We find that a transition from train formation to margination occurs when (R -a ) /tR≈1 , where R is the vessel radius, a is the cell radius, and tR is the thickness of RBCs, but that the motion of RBCs differs from the case of leukocytes. Our results also show that the velocities of CTCs and leukocytes are larger than the average blood velocity, but only CTCs move faster than RBCs for microvessels of R /a ≈1.5 -2.0 . These findings are expected to be useful not only for understanding metastasis, but also for developing microfluidic devices.

  9. An analytic study on the effect of alginate on the velocity profiles of blood in rectangular microchannels using microparticle image velocimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Pitts

    Full Text Available It is desired to understand the effect of alginic acid sodium salt from brown algae (alginate as a viscosity modifier on the behavior of blood in vitro using a micro-particle image velocimetry (µPIV system. The effect of alginate on the shape of the velocity profile, the flow rate and the maximum velocity achieved in rectangular microchannels channels are measured. The channels were constructed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, a biocompatible silicone. Porcine blood cells suspended in saline was used as the working fluid at twenty percent hematocrit (H = 20. While alginate was only found to have minimal effect on the maximum velocity and the flow rate achieved, it was found to significantly affect the shear rate at the wall by between eight to a hundred percent.

  10. Measurement of anisotropic reflection of flowing blood using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jeong, Bosu; Jung, In Oh; Ha, Hojin; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-12-01

    Light reflectance of blood is a complex phenomenon affected by hematocrit and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation (rouleaux formation). According to the hypothesis that RBC rouleaux are aligned with the direction of blood flow, the spatial alignment of RBC rouleaux, as well as their size and quantity in the blood, may also affect light reflectance. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the spatial alignment and distribution of RBC rouleaux on light reflection using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Blood flow velocity and reflectance profiles in a rat jugular-femoral bypass loop were simultaneously measured using a Doppler swept-source OCT system at various incident angles from -30 to +30 deg. The reflectance profiles of flowing blood show nonmonotonous decay with a local negative peak at the center of the tube. The profiles vary depending on the incident angle. This angular dependence is stronger at a higher angle of incidence. The anisotropic reflectance of flowing blood is consistent with the hypothesis on the spatial alignment of RBC rouleaux.

  11. The postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is not explained by PaCO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Secher, N H; Roos, C M;

    2006-01-01

    In the normocapnic range, middle cerebral artery mean velocity (MCA Vmean) changes approximately 3.5% per mmHg carbon-dioxide tension in arterial blood (PaCO2) and a decrease in PaCO2 will reduce the cerebral blood flow by vasoconstriction (the CO2 reactivity of the brain). When standing up MCA...... Vmean and the end-tidal carbon-dioxide tension (PETCO2) decrease, suggesting that PaCO2 contributes to the reduction in MCA Vmean. In a fixed body position, PETCO2 tracks changes in the PaCO2 but when assuming the upright position, cardiac output (Q) decreases and its distribution over the lung changes...

  12. Increased bone marrow blood flow in polycythemia vera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lathinen, R.; Lathinen, T.; Hyoedynmaa, S.

    1983-01-01

    Bone marrow blood flow was measured in polycythemia vera, in compensatory and in relative polycythemia with a /sup 133/Xe washout method. In the treated polycythemia vera bone marrow blood flow was significantly increased compared with the age-matched controls. The fraction of blood flow entering the bone and flowing through the hematopoietic marrow was markedly increased in both the untreated and the treated polycythemia vera. Although the number of observations in compensatory and relative polycythemia was small, the results suggest that bone marrow blood flow is not markedly increased in these diseases. The results also suggest that in older patients the simple /sup 133/Xe method may support the diagnosis of polycythemia vera.

  13. Full-field velocity imaging of red blood cells in capillaries with spatiotemporal demodulation autocorrelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingyi; Zeng, Yaguang; Dong, Nannan; Liao, Riwei; Yang, Guojian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a full-field optical method for the label-free and quantitative mapping of the velocities of red blood cells (RBCs) in capillaries. It integrates spatiotemporal demodulation and an autocorrelation algorithm, and measures RBC velocity according to the ratio of RBC length to lag time. Conventionally, RBC length is assumed to be a constant and lag time is taken as a variable, while our method treats both of them as variables. We use temporal demodulation and the Butterworth spatial filter to separate RBC signal from background signal, based on which we obtain the RBC length by image segmentation and lag time by autocorrelation analysis. The RBC velocity calculated now is more accurate. The validity of our method is verified by an in vivo experiment on a mouse ear. Owing to its higher image signal-to-noise ratio, our method can be used for mapping RBC velocity in the turbid tissue case.

  14. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in humans, especially in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed to quantify the flow in these devices such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended to the analysis and development of a ventricular assist device (VAD), i.e., a blood pump. The blood flow in a VAD is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure can be applied. A primitive variable formulation is used in conjunction with the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. The primary purpose of developing the incompressible flow analysis capability was to quantify the flow in advanced turbopump for space propulsion system. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey VAD that is based on an axial blood pump. Due to massive computing requirements, high-end computing is necessary for simulating three-dimensional flow in these pumps. Computational, experimental, and clinical results are presented.

  15. Spatial and velocity statistics of inertial particles in turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial and velocity statistics of heavy point-like particles in incompressible, homogeneous, and isotropic three-dimensional turbulence is studied by means of direct numerical simulations at two values of the Taylor-scale Reynolds number Reλ ∼ 200 and Reλ ∼ 400, corresponding to resolutions of 5123 and 20483 grid points, respectively. Particles Stokes number values range from St ≈ 0.2 to 70. Stationary small-scale particle distribution is shown to display a singular -multifractal- measure, characterized by a set of generalized fractal dimensions with a strong sensitivity on the Stokes number and a possible, small Reynolds number dependency. Velocity increments between two inertial particles depend on the relative weight between smooth events - where particle velocity is approximately the same of the fluid velocity-, and caustic contributions - when two close particles have very different velocities. The latter events lead to a non-differentiable small-scale behaviour for the relative velocity. The relative weight of these two contributions changes at varying the importance of inertia. We show that moments of the velocity difference display a quasi bi-fractal-behavior and that the scaling properties of velocity increments for not too small Stokes number are in good agreement with a recent theoretical prediction made by K. Gustavsson and B. Mehlig arXiv: 1012.1789v1 [physics.flu-dyn], connecting the saturation of velocity scaling exponents with the fractal dimension of particle clustering.

  16. The flow of red blood cells in stenosed microvessels and the influence of red blood cells on wall-bounded rolling motion of microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2015-11-01

    In the first part of this work, we consider a 3D computational study of the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. We observe that the apparent viscosity of blood increases by several folds, and the rate of increase with increasing vessel diameter is also higher than that in non-stenosed vessels, implying an enhancement of the well-known Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect. The flow of the red blood cells causes time-dependent fluctuations in the blood flow rate. The RMS of the flow rate oscillations in the stenosed vessel is observed to be significantly higher than that in the non-stenosed vessel. Furthermore, several folds increase in the Eulerian velocity fluctuations and a transient flow reversal upstream the stenosed region are also observed, which would not occur in absence of the cells. In the second part, we consider the adhesive rolling motion of wall-bounded microparticles in presence of flowing red blood cells in microvessels. We observe two contradictory role of the red blood cells: On one hand, the cells facilitate the establishment of the particle-wall contact, and, thereby, initiation of adhesion. On the other hand, they augment the rolling velocity of the particles. Implications of these results on the optimal design of drug carriers are discussed.

  17. Simulation of the Second Grade Fluid Model for Blood Flow through a Tapered Artery with a Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the blood flow through a tapered artery, assuming the blood to be a second order fluid model. The resulting nonlinear implicit system of partial differential equations is solved by the perturbation method. The expressions for shear stress, velocity, flow rate, wall shear stress and longitudinal impedance are obtained. The physical behavior of different parameters is also discussed, as are trapping phenomena. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  18. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Vaughn A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100–4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow i...

  19. Effect of plasma exchange on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M M; Marshall, J

    1982-01-01

    The effects of plasma exchange using a low viscosity plasma substitute on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow were investigated in eight subjects with normal cerebral vasculature. Plasma exchange resulted in significant reductions in plasma viscosity, whole blood viscosity, globulin and fibrinogen concentration without affecting packed cell volume. The reduction in whole blood viscosity was more pronounced at low shear rates suggesting an additional effect on red cell aggregation. Despite...

  20. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  1. Two-Fluid Mathematical Models for Blood Flow in Stenosed Arteries: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile flow of blood through stenosed arteries is analyzed by assuming the blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as a non-Newtonian fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluid in the core region of the artery is assumed as a (i Herschel-Bulkley fluid and (ii Casson fluid. Perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear partial differential equations. Expressions for various flow quantities are obtained for the two-fluid Casson model. Expressions of the flow quantities obtained by Sankar and Lee (2006 for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model are used to get the data for comparison. It is found that the plug flow velocity and velocity distribution of the two-fluid Casson model are considerably higher than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. It is also observed that the pressure drop, plug core radius, wall shear stress and the resistance to flow are significantly very low for the two-fluid Casson model than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, the two-fluid Casson model would be more useful than the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model to analyze the blood flow through stenosed arteries.

  2. Regulation of exercise blood flow: Role of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinity, Joel D; Broxterman, Ryan M; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-09-01

    During exercise, oxygen and nutrient rich blood must be delivered to the active skeletal muscle, heart, skin, and brain through the complex and highly regulated integration of central and peripheral hemodynamic factors. Indeed, even minor alterations in blood flow to these organs have profound consequences on exercise capacity by modifying the development of fatigue. Therefore, the fine-tuning of blood flow is critical for optimal physical performance. At the level of the peripheral circulation, blood flow is regulated by a balance between the mechanisms responsible for vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Once thought of as toxic by-products of in vivo chemistry, free radicals are now recognized as important signaling molecules that exert potent vasoactive responses that are dependent upon the underlying balance between oxidation-reduction reactions or redox balance. Under normal healthy conditions with low levels of oxidative stress, free radicals promote vasodilation, which is attenuated with exogenous antioxidant administration. Conversely, with advancing age and disease where background oxidative stress is elevated, an exercise-induced increase in free radicals can further shift the redox balance to a pro-oxidant state, impairing vasodilation and attenuating blood flow. Under these conditions, exogenous antioxidants improve vasodilatory capacity and augment blood flow by restoring an "optimal" redox balance. Interestingly, while the active skeletal muscle, heart, skin, and brain all have unique functions during exercise, the mechanisms by which free radicals contribute to the regulation of blood flow is remarkably preserved across each of these varied target organs. PMID:26876648

  3. Blood flow and muscle oxygenation during low, moderate, and maximal sustained isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Chris J; Allen, Matti D; Olympico, Eric; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rice, Charles L

    2015-09-01

    A reduction of blood flow to active muscle will precipitate fatigue, and sustained isometric contractions produce intramuscular and compartmental pressures that can limit flow. The present study explored how blood flow and muscle oxygenation respond to isometric contractions at low, moderate, and maximal intensities. Over two visits, 10 males (26 ± 2 yr; means ± SD) performed 1-min dorsiflexion contractions at 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Doppler ultrasound of the anterior tibial artery was used to record arterial diameter and mean blood velocity and to calculate absolute blood flow. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of tibialis anterior was acquired with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There was a progressive increase in blood flow at 30% MVC (peak of 289 ± 139% resting value), no change from rest until an increase in the final 10 s of exercise at 60% MVC (peak of 197 ± 102% rest), and an initial decrease (59 ± 30% resting value) followed by a progressive increase at 100% MVC (peak of 355 ± 133% rest). Blood flow was greater at 30 and 100% than 60% MVC during the last 30 s of exercise. TOI was ∼63% at rest and, within 30 s of exercise, reached steady-state values of ∼42%, ∼22%, and ∼22% for 30, 60, and 100% MVC, respectively. Even maximal contraction of the dorsiflexors is unable to cause more than a transient decrease of flow in the anterior tibial artery. Unlike dynamic or intermittent isometric exercise, our results indicate blood flow is not linearly graded with intensity or directly coupled with oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions. PMID:26084698

  4. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  5. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbour, Maya [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jarvis, Kelly [Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  6. Effects of bee venom acupuncture on heart rate variability, pulse wave, and cerebral blood flow for types of Sasang Constitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang-min

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available 1. Objectives: To evaluate effects of bee venom acupuncture on cardiovascular system and differences according to each constitution. 2. Methods: Heart rate variability, pulse wave and the velocity of cerebral blood flow were measured before bee venom acupuncture(BVA, right after and after 30 minuets, had been applied to 20 subjects. 3. Results: 1. BVA did not have effects on measurement variables of heart rate variability. 2. BVA had effects on pulse wave, showing total time, radial augmentation index up and height of percussion wave, time to percussion wave, sum of pulse pressure down. 3. BVA did not have effects on the cerebral blood flow velocity when considering not Sasang Constitution 4. Considering Sasang Constitution, BVA demonstrates different responses in time to preincisura wave, mean blood flow velocity, peak systolic velocity and end diastolic velocity. 4.Conclusion: From those results, the following conclusions are obtained. Cause BVA alters pulse wave and makes differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity according to Sasang Constitution. Various methods of BVA treatment are needed considering Sasang Constitution.

  7. Numerical simulation of blood pulsatile flow in a stenosed carotid artery using different rheological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, A; Shirani, E; Sadeghi, M R

    2011-07-28

    Symmetrical 30-60% stenosis in a common carotid artery under unsteady flow condition for Newtonian and six non-Newtonian viscosity models are investigated numerically. Results show power-law model produces higher deviations, in terms of velocity and wall shear stress in comparison with other models while generalized power-law and modified-Casson models are more prone to Newtonian state. Comparing separation length of recirculation region at different critical points of cardiac cycle confirms the necessity of considering blood flow in unsteady mode. Increasing stenosis intensity causes flow patterns more disturbed downstream of the stenosis and WSS appear to develop remarkably at the stenosis throat. PMID:21696742

  8. Relationship between blood pressure and cerebral blood flow during supine cycling: influence of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirl, Jonathan D; Hoffman, Keegan; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Hansen, Alex; Ainslie, Philip N

    2016-03-01

    The cerebral pressure-flow relationship can be quantified as a high-pass filter, where slow oscillations are buffered (TFA) findings (altered phase or intact gain). This study aimed to determine whether these previous findings accurately represent this relationship. Both younger (20-30 yr; n = 10) and older (62-72 yr; n = 9) adults were examined. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, large oscillations in blood pressure (via oscillatory lower body negative pressure; OLBNP) were induced during steady-state moderate intensity supine exercise (∼45-50% of heart rate reserve). Beat-to-beat blood pressure, cerebral blood velocity, and end-tidal Pco2 were monitored. Very low frequency (0.02-0.07 Hz) and low frequency (0.07-0.20 Hz) range spontaneous data were quantified. Driven OLBNP point estimates were sampled at 0.05 and 0.10 Hz. The OLBNP maneuvers augmented coherence to >0.97 at 0.05 Hz and >0.98 at 0.10 Hz in both age groups. The OLBNP protocol conclusively revealed the cerebrovascular system functions as a high-pass filter during exercise throughout aging. It was also discovered that the older adults had elevations (+71%) in normalized gain (+0.46 ± 0.36%/%: 0.05 Hz) and reductions (-34%) in phase (-0.24 ± 0.22 radian: 0.10 Hz). There were also age-related phase differences between resting and exercise conditions. It is speculated that these age-related changes in the TFA metrics are mediated by alterations in vasoactive factors, sympathetic tone, or the mechanical buffering of the compliance vessels. PMID:26586907

  9. Coronary blood flow in the anesthetized American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Bjarke; Elfwing, Magnus; Elsey, Ruth M; Wang, Tobias; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-01-01

    Coronary circulation of the heart evolved early within ectothermic vertebrates and became of vital importance to cardiac performance in some teleost fish, mammals and birds. In contrast, the role and function of the coronary circulation in ectothermic reptiles remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the systemic and coronary arterial responses of five anesthetized juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to hypoxia, acetylcholine, adenosine, sodium nitroprusside, isoproterenol, and phenylephrine. We recorded electrocardiograms, monitored systemic blood pressure, blood flows in both aortae, and blood flow in a major coronary artery supplying most of the right ventricle. Coronary arterial blood flow was generally forward, but there was a brief retrograde flow during a ventricular contraction. Blood pressure was significantly changed in all conditions. Acetylcholine decreased coronary forward flow, but this response was confounded by the concomitant lowered work of the ventricles due to decreased heart rate and blood pressure. Coronary forward flow was poorly correlated with heart rate and mean arterial pressure across treatments. Overall changes in coronary forward flow, significant and not significant, were generally in the same direction as mean arterial pressure and ventricular power, approximated as the product of systemic cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. PMID:26436857

  10. Collateral sources of costal and crural diaphragmatic blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured the contribution of aortic, internal mammary, and intercostal arteries to the blood flow to the costal and crural segments of the diaphragm and other respiratory muscles in seven dogs breathing against a fixed inspiratory elastic load. We used radiolabeled microspheres to measure the blood flow with control circulation, occlusion of the aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, combined occlusion of the aorta and both internal mammary arteries, and occlusion of internal mammary arteries alone. With occlusion of the aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, blood flow to the crural diaphragm decreased from 40.3 to 23.5 ml . min-1 X 100 g-1, whereas costal flow did not change significantly (from 41.7 to 38.1 ml . min-1 . 100 g-1). Blood flows to the sternomastoid and scalene muscles (above the occlusion) increased by 200 and 340%, respectively, whereas flows to the other respiratory muscles did not change significantly. Blood flows to organs above the occlusion either remained unchanged or increased, whereas flows to those below the occlusion all decreased. When the internal mammary artery was also occluded, flows to the crural segment decreased further to 12.1 and costal flow decreased to 20.4 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1. Internal mammary arterial occlusion alone in two dogs had no effect on diaphragmatic flow. In conclusion, intercostal collateral vessels are capable of supplying a significant proportion of blood flow to both segments of the diaphragm but the costal segment is better served than the crural segment

  11. Variability in lateralised blood flow response to language is associated with language development in children aged 1-5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, M; Keage, H A D; Spooner, R; Flitton, A; Hofmann, J; Churches, O F; Elliott, S; Badcock, N A

    2015-01-01

    The developmental trajectory of language lateralisation over the preschool years is unclear. We explored the relationship between lateralisation of cerebral blood flow velocity response to object naming and cognitive performance in children aged 1-5 years. Functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound was used to record blood flow velocity bilaterally from middle cerebral arteries during a naming task in 58 children (59% male). At group level, the Lateralisation Index (LI) revealed a greater relative increase in cerebral blood flow velocity within the left as compared to right middle cerebral artery. After controlling for maternal IQ, left-lateralised children displayed lower expressive language scores compared to right- and bi-lateralised children, and reduced variability in LI. Supporting this, greater variability in lateralised response, rather than mean response, was indicative of greater expressive language ability. Findings suggest that a delayed establishment of language specialisation is associated with better language ability in the preschool years. PMID:25950747

  12. Linear response range characterization and in vivo application of laser speckle imaging of blood flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bernard; Ramírez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Lotfi, Justin; Nelson, J. S.

    2006-07-01

    Noninvasive blood flow imaging can provide critical information on the state of biological tissue and the efficacy of approaches to treat disease. With laser speckle imaging (LSI), relative changes in blood flow are typically reported, with the assumption that the measured values are on a linear scale. A linear relationship between the measured and actual flow rate values has been suggested. The actual flow rate range, over which this linear relationship is valid, is unknown. Herein we report the linear response range and velocity dynamic range (VDR) of our LSI instrument at two relevant camera integration times. For integration times of 1 and 10 ms, the best case VDR was 80 and 60 dB, respectively, and the worst case VDR was 20 and 50 dB. The best case VDR values were similar to those reported in the literature for optical Doppler tomography. We also demonstrate the potential of LSI for monitoring blood flow dynamics in the rodent dorsal skinfold chamber model. These findings imply that LSI can provide accurate wide-field maps of microvascular blood flow rate dynamics and highlight heterogeneities in flow response to the application of exogenous agents.

  13. Low cerebral blood flow in hypotensive perinatal distress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxic brain injury is the most important neurological problem in the neonatal period and accounts for more neurological deficits in children than any other lesion. The neurological deficits are notably mental retardation, epilepsy and cerebral palsy. The pathogenesis has hitherto been poorly understood. Arterial hypoxia has been taken as the obvious mechanism but this does not fully explain the patho-anatomical findings. In the present investigation we have examined the arterial blood pressure and the cerebral blood flow in eight infants a few hours after birth. The 133Xe clearance technique was used for the cerebral blood flow measurements. The study confirmed that perinatal distress may be associated with low arterial blood pressure, and it was shown that cerebral blood flow is very low, 20 ml/100 g/min or less, in hypotensive perinatal distress. It is concluded that cerebral ischaemia plays a crucial role in the development of perinatal hypoxic brain injury. (author)

  14. Droplet velocity in horizontal two-phase air/water free jet flow in stagnant ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surma, R.; Friedel, L. [Wissenschaftlicher Arbeitsbereich Stroemungsmechanik, TU Hamburg-Harburg, Eissendorferstr. 38, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    For the case of an isothermal free jet flow the velocity and the size of the drops were measured with a Phase-Doppler-Anemometer. The axial velocity decay downstream from the nozzle outlet and the radial drop velocity profile are reproducible within reasonable limits, if a so-called homogeneous flow mixture density in the nozzle outlet is introduced. In case of low mass flow qualities an adjustment of the entrainment coefficient and a virtual jet origin as well as a reduced exponent for the Gaussian function type radial velocity profile is required. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Quantitative myocardial blood flow with Rubidium-82 PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Christoffer E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1...... diagnose and risk stratify CAD patients, while assessing the potential of the modality in clinical practice.......) identification of the extent of a multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) burden, 2) patients with balanced 3-vessel CAD, 3) patients with subclinical CAD, and 4) patients with regional flow variance, despite of a high global MFR. A more accurate assessment of the ischemic burden in patients with intermediate...

  16. Skeletal Blood Flow in Bone Repair and Maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan E.Tomlinson; Matthew J.Silva

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue, although this aspect of bone is often overlooked. In this article, the importance of blood flow in bone repair and regeneration will be reviewed. First, the skeletal vascular anato-my, with an emphasis on long bones, the distinct mechanisms for vascularizing bone tissue, and methods for remodeling existing vasculature are discussed. Next, techniques for quantifying bone blood flow are briefly summarized. Finally, the body of experimental work that demonstrates the role of bone blood flow in fracture healing, distraction osteogenesis, osteoporosis, disuse osteopenia, and bone grafting is examined. These results illustrate that adequate bone blood flow is an important clinical consideration, particularly during bone regeneration and in at-risk patient groups.

  17. Aging, regional cerebral blood flow, and neuropsychological functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies found changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to both age and various cognitive tasks. However, no study has yet demonstrated a relationship between rCBF and performance on the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery (LNNB) in an elderly group. Seventy-nine elderly volunteers (56-88 years old), both healthy and demented, underwent the 133xenon inhalation rCBF procedure and were given the LNNB. The decrements in the gray-matter blood flow paralleled decrements in performance on the LNNB. Using partial correlations, a significant proportion of shared variance was observed between gray-matter blood flow and the LNNB scales. However, there was much less of a relationship between white-matter blood flow and performance on the LNNB. This study suggests that even within a restricted age sample rCBF is related in a global way to neuropsychological functioning

  18. Aging, regional cerebral blood flow, and neuropsychological functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacInnes, W.D.; Golden, C.J.; Gillen, R.W.; Sawicki, R.F.; Quaife, M.; Uhl, H.S.; Greenhouse, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies found changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to both age and various cognitive tasks. However, no study has yet demonstrated a relationship between rCBF and performance on the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery (LNNB) in an elderly group. Seventy-nine elderly volunteers (56-88 years old), both healthy and demented, underwent the /sup 133/xenon inhalation rCBF procedure and were given the LNNB. The decrements in the gray-matter blood flow paralleled decrements in performance on the LNNB. Using partial correlations, a significant proportion of shared variance was observed between gray-matter blood flow and the LNNB scales. However, there was much less of a relationship between white-matter blood flow and performance on the LNNB. This study suggests that even within a restricted age sample rCBF is related in a global way to neuropsychological functioning.

  19. Acupuncture Affects Regional Blood Flow in Various Organs

    OpenAIRE

    Harumi Hotta; Sae Uchida

    2008-01-01

    In this review, our recent studies using anesthetized animals concerning the neural mechanisms of vasodilative effect of acupuncture-like stimulation in various organs are briefly summarized. Responses of cortical cerebral blood flow and uterine blood flow are characterized as non-segmental and segmental reflexes. Among acupuncture-like stimuli delivered to five different segmental areas of the body; afferent inputs to the brain stem (face) and to the spinal cord at the cervical (forepaw), th...

  20. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reduces exercising forearm blood flow in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Darren P.; Joyner, Michael J.; Claus, Paul L.; Curry, Timothy B.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia during exercise augments blood flow in active muscles to maintain the delivery of O2 at normoxic levels. However, the impact of hyperoxia on skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise is not completely understood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the hyperemic response to forearm exercise during hyperbaric hyperoxia would be blunted compared with exercise during normoxia. Seven subjects (6 men/1 woman; 25 ± 1 yr) performed forearm exercise (20% of maximum) under normoxic and h...

  1. Effect of tropicamide on ocular blood flow in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracardiac injection of 15 microspheres labeled with 85Sr (strontium) and 141Ce (cerium) were used to determine ocular blood flow in seven rabbits before and 25 min after bilateral application of tropicamide to the cornea. By using two different isotopes distinguishable under gammaspectrometry, each animal served as its own control. After administration of two drops of 1% tropicamide, no significant difference in blood flow between treated and untreated eyes was observed

  2. Retrobulbar blood flow and visual field alterations after acute ethanol ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Anke Weber, Andreas Remky, Marion Bienert, Klaudia Huber-van der Velden, Thomas Kirschkamp, Corinna Rennings, Gernot Roessler, Niklas Plange Department of Ophthalmology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany Background: The purpose of this study was to test the effect of ethyl alcohol on the koniocellular and magnocellular pathway of visual function and to investigate the relationship between such visual field changes and retrobulbar blood flow in healthy subjects. Methods: In 12 healthy subjects (mean age 32 ± 4 years, color Doppler imaging, short-wavelength automated perimetry, and frequency doubling perimetry was performed before and 60 minutes after oral intake of 80 mL of 40 vol% ethanol. Mean and pattern standard deviations for short-wavelength automated and frequency doubling perimetry were assessed. End diastolic velocity (EDV and peak systolic velocity (PSV were measured in the central retinal and ophthalmic arteries using color Doppler imaging. Systemic blood pressure, heart rate, intraocular pressure, and blood alcohol concentration were determined. Results: Mean PSV and EDV in the central retinal artery showed a significant increase after alcohol intake (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02, respectively. Similarly, we found a significant acceleration of blood flow velocity in the ophthalmic artery (P = 0.02 for PSV; P = 0.04 for EDV. Mean intraocular pressure decreased by 1.0 mmHg after alcohol ingestion (P = 0.01. Retinal sensitivity in short-wavelength automated perimetry did not alter, whereas in frequency doubling perimetry, the mean deviation decreased significantly. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not change significantly. Mean blood alcohol concentration was 0.38 ± 0.16 g/L. Conclusion: Although ethanol is known to cause peripheral vasodilation, our subjects had no significant drop in systemic blood pressure. However, a significant increase of blood flow velocity was seen in the retrobulbar vessels. Regarding visual function

  3. Quantitative blood flow measurements in the small animal cardiopulmonary system using digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of preclinical rodent models of disease continues to grow because these models help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and provide robust test beds for drug development. Among the major anatomic and physiologic indicators of disease progression and genetic or drug modification of responses are measurements of blood vessel caliber and flow. Moreover, cardiopulmonary blood flow is a critical indicator of gas exchange. Current methods of measuring cardiopulmonary blood flow suffer from some or all of the following limitations--they produce relative values, are limited to global measurements, do not provide vasculature visualization, are not able to measure acute changes, are invasive, or require euthanasia. Methods: In this study, high-spatial and high-temporal resolution x-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to obtain vasculature visualization, quantitative blood flow in absolute metrics (ml/min instead of arbitrary units or velocity), and relative blood volume dynamics from discrete regions of interest on a pixel-by-pixel basis (100x100 μm2). Results: A series of calibrations linked the DSA flow measurements to standard physiological measurement using thermodilution and Fick's method for cardiac output (CO), which in eight anesthetized Fischer-344 rats was found to be 37.0±5.1 ml/min. Phantom experiments were conducted to calibrate the radiographic density to vessel thickness, allowing a link of DSA cardiac output measurements to cardiopulmonary blood flow measurements in discrete regions of interest. The scaling factor linking relative DSA cardiac output measurements to the Fick's absolute measurements was found to be 18.90xCODSA=COFick. Conclusions: This calibrated DSA approach allows repeated simultaneous visualization of vasculature and measurement of blood flow dynamics on a regional level in the living rat.

  4. Quantitative blood flow measurements in the small animal cardiopulmonary system using digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Mingde; Marshall, Craig T.; Qi, Yi; Johnston, Samuel M.; Badea, Cristian T.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Johnson, G. Allan [Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3823, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3823, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The use of preclinical rodent models of disease continues to grow because these models help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and provide robust test beds for drug development. Among the major anatomic and physiologic indicators of disease progression and genetic or drug modification of responses are measurements of blood vessel caliber and flow. Moreover, cardiopulmonary blood flow is a critical indicator of gas exchange. Current methods of measuring cardiopulmonary blood flow suffer from some or all of the following limitations--they produce relative values, are limited to global measurements, do not provide vasculature visualization, are not able to measure acute changes, are invasive, or require euthanasia. Methods: In this study, high-spatial and high-temporal resolution x-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to obtain vasculature visualization, quantitative blood flow in absolute metrics (ml/min instead of arbitrary units or velocity), and relative blood volume dynamics from discrete regions of interest on a pixel-by-pixel basis (100x100 {mu}m{sup 2}). Results: A series of calibrations linked the DSA flow measurements to standard physiological measurement using thermodilution and Fick's method for cardiac output (CO), which in eight anesthetized Fischer-344 rats was found to be 37.0{+-}5.1 ml/min. Phantom experiments were conducted to calibrate the radiographic density to vessel thickness, allowing a link of DSA cardiac output measurements to cardiopulmonary blood flow measurements in discrete regions of interest. The scaling factor linking relative DSA cardiac output measurements to the Fick's absolute measurements was found to be 18.90xCO{sub DSA}=CO{sub Fick}. Conclusions: This calibrated DSA approach allows repeated simultaneous visualization of vasculature and measurement of blood flow dynamics on a regional level in the living rat.

  5. Hepatic and intestinal blood flow following thermal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because cardiac output decreases after burn injuries, investigators have assumed, based upon dye clearance techniques, that hepatic and intestinal blood flow are also decreased following these injuries. Blood flow to the liver, stomach, small intestine, and kidney was determined by the uptake of 201thallium and 125I-labeled fatty acid (para-125I-phenyl-3-methyl pentanoic acid) in a 20% body surface area scald injury that also included plasma volume replacement resuscitation. Uptake of these radioisotopes was determined 15 minutes, 18 hours, and 72 hours after injury. The uptake of the 201thallium and 125I-labeled fatty acid by the gastrointestinal tissues was not statistically different at any of the time periods after comparison of the injured and control (sham-treated) animals. 201Thallium uptake by the kidney was significantly diminished 15 minutes after the burn injury (P less than 0.01). Based on these blood flow measurement techniques, the data suggest that the 20% body surface area scald injury did not alter blood flow to the liver or gastrointestinal tract within the initial 72 hours after the burn injury even though a decrease in renal blood flow was easily detected. These results suggest that the dysfunction of the gastrointestinal system or hepatic system observed after an acute burn injury is not simply the result of hypovolemic shock, which reduces both renal and mesenteric blood flow. These gastrointestinal and hepatic alterations may be related to a factor or factors other than intestinal ischemia

  6. Effects of Heat Stress on Ocular Blood Flow During Exhaustive Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Ikemura

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that heat stress reduces the ocular blood flow response to exhaustive exercise was tested by measuring ocular blood flow, blood pressure, and end- tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2 in 12 healthy males while they performed cycle ergometer exercise at 75% of the maximal heart rate at ambient temperatures of 20°C (control condition and 35°C (heat condition, until exhaustion. The blood flows in the retinal and choroidal vasculature (RCV, the superior temporal retinal arteriole (STRA and the superior nasal retinal arteriole (SNRA were recorded at rest and at 6 and 16 min after the start of exercise period and at exhaustion [after 16 ± 2 min (mean ± SE and 24 ± 3 min of exercise in the heat and control condition, respectively]. The mean arterial pressure at exhaustion was significantly lower in the heat condition than in the control condition at both 16 min and exhaustion. The degree of PETCO2 reduction did not differ significantly between the two thermal conditions at either 16 min or exhaustion. The blood flow velocity in the RCV significantly increased from the resting baseline value at 6 min in both thermal conditions (32 ± 6% and 25 ± 5% at 20°C and 35°C, respectively. However, at 16 min the increase in RCV blood flow velocity had returned to the resting baseline level only in the heat condition. At exhaustion, the blood flows in the STRA and SNRA had decreased significantly from the resting baseline value in the heat condition (STRA: -19 ± 5% and SNRA: -30 ± 6%, and SNRA blood flow was lower than that in the control condition (-14 ± 6% vs -30 ± 6% at 20°C and 35°C, respectively, despite the finding that both thermal conditions induced the same reductions in PETCO2 and vascular conductance. These findings suggested that the heat condition decreases or suppresses ocular blood flow via attenuation of pressor response during exhaustive exercise.

  7. Rheological and dynamical characterization of blood analogue flows in a slit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study blood analogue potential of H2O/glycerine/xanthan mixtures through viscosity. • Water/glycerine (35% w/w)/xanthan (0.02% w/w) solution mimics well blood viscosity. • We characterize dynamics of blood analogue flows in open slits with μPIV and CFD. • Results refer to flow rates 4.3 ⩽ Q ⩽ 25.3 L/h. • Wall shear stresses are bellow haemolysis threshold but may trigger thrombus formation. - Abstract: Thrombus formation and haemolysis are blood destructive phenomena depending on the flow hydrodynamics, particularly the shear stresses. This work addresses this issue by characterizing experimentally (using the micro-PIV technique) and numerically (using CFD) steady-state Newtonian (water and water/glycerine solutions) fluid flows and non-Newtonian (water/glycerine/xanthan) blood analogue flows, in a slit with a height of 1.3 mm and a width of 30 mm. The results obtained may provide useful information in the design of extracorporeal devices manipulating blood for diagnosis and therapeutics. Results from CFD showed that the Herschel–Bulkley viscosity model yields velocity predictions in excellent agreement with the experimental data obtained with the micro-PIV. Viscosity measurements evidenced that the water/glycerine (35% w/w)/xanthan (0.02% w/w) solution mimics well the blood global viscosity, exhibiting velocity profile shapes in fully developed flows flattened at the centre, typical of shear-thinning fluids. The maximum shear stresses obtained experimentally (1.39–3.11 Pa) for the blood analogue flows at the studied rates (6.7–25.3 L/h) evidence that haemolysis is unlikely to occur since lysis threshold values are 150 Pa for erythrocytes, 10 Pa for leucocytes and 7.5 Pa for platelets. However, the smallest flow rate cases may be of concern in blood circulation by yielding clot formation near the walls since the shear stresses there are bellow the thrombus/coagulation threshold (1.0–1.8 Pa)

  8. Measuring bovine mammary gland blood flow using a transit time ultrasonic flow probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorewit, R C; Aromando, M C; Bristol, D G

    1989-07-01

    Lactating cattle were used to validate a transit time ultrasonic blood flow metering system for measuring mammary gland arterial blood flow. Blood flow probes were surgically placed around the right external pudic artery. An electromagnetic flow probe was implanted in tandem with the ultrasonic probe in two cows for comparative measurements. The absolute accuracy of the implanted flow probes was assessed in vivo by mechanical means on anesthetized cows after 2 to 3 wk of implantation. The zero offset of the ultrasonic probes ranged from -12 to 8 ml/min. When the ultrasonic probe was properly implanted, the slopes of the calibration curves were linear and ranged from .92 to .95, tracking absolute flow to within 8%. The transit time instrument's performance was examined under a variety of physiological conditions. These included milking and hormone injections. The transit time ultrasonic flow meter accurately measured physiological changes in mammary arterial blood flow in chronically prepared conscious cattle. Blood flow increased 29% during milking. Epinephrine decreased mammary blood flow by 90 to 95%. Oxytocin doses increased mammary blood flow by 15 to 24%. PMID:2674232

  9. Blood flow and arterial endothelial dysfunction: Mechanisms and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Abdul I.

    2013-06-01

    The arterial endothelium exquisitely regulates vascular function, and endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerotic lesions develop preferentially at arterial branches and bifurcations where the blood flow is disturbed. Understanding the basis for this observation requires elucidating the effects of blood flow on the endothelial cell (EC) function. The goal of this review is: (1) to describe our current understanding of the relationships between arterial blood flow and atherosclerosis, (2) to present the wide array of flow-induced biological responses in ECs, and (3) to discuss the mechanisms by which ECs sense, transmit, and transduce flow-derived mechanical forces. We conclude by presenting some future perspectives in the highly interdisciplinary field of EC mechanotransduction.

  10. Measurement of aortic blood flow by magnetic resonance below and above the origin of the coronary arteries in postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Beck; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Jensen, Henrik Halvor;

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Principal blood flow measures might be assessable by velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance (VENC MR) of aortic blood flow. The feasibility of using VENC MR for clinical research was tested in a contemporary and controversial human model: the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E) and cyclic...

  11. Effects of the fractional order and magnetic field on the blood flow in cylindrical domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Shah, Nehad; Vieru, Dumitru; Fetecau, Constantin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, based on the magnetohydrodynamics approach, the blood flow along with magnetic particles through a circular cylinder is studied. The fluid is acted by an oscillating pressure gradient and an external magnetic field. The study is based on a mathematical model with Caputo fractional derivatives. The model of ordinary fluid, corresponding to time-derivatives of integer order, is obtained as a particular case. Closed forms of the fluid velocity and magnetic particles velocity are obtained by means of the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms. Effects of the order of Caputo's time-fractional derivatives and of the external magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles are studied. Numerical simulations and graphical illustrations are used in order to study the influence of the fractional parameter α, Reynolds number and Hartmann number on the fluid and particles velocity. The results highlights that, models with fractional derivatives bring significant differences compared to the ordinary model. This fact can be an important advantage for some practical problems. It also results that the blood velocity, as well as that of magnetic particles, is reduced under influence of the exterior magnetic field.

  12. Measurement of directed blood flow by laser speckle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Evan R.; Thompson, Oliver B.; Andrews, Michael K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent success in reconciling laser Doppler and speckle measurements of dermal perfusion by the use of multi-exposure speckle has prompted an investigation of speckle effects arising from directed blood flow which might be expected in the small blood vessels of the eye. Unlike dermal scatter, the blood in retinal vessels is surrounded by few small and stationary scatterers able to assist the return of light energy by large-angle scatter. Returning light is expected to come from multiple small angle scatter from the large red blood cells which dominate the fluid. This work compares speckle measurements on highly scattering skin, with measurements on flow in a retinal phantom consisting of a glass capillary which is itself immersed in an index matching fluid to provide a flat air-phantom interface. Brownian motion dominated measurements when small easily levitated scatters were used, and flow was undetectable. With whole-blood, Brownian motion was small and directed flows in the expected region of tens of mm/s were detectable. The nominal flow speed relates to the known pump rate; within the capillary the flow will have a profile reducing toward the walls. The pulsatile effects on laser speckle contrast in the retina are discussed with preliminary multi-exposure measurements on retinal vessels using a fundus camera. Differences between the multiple exposure curves and power spectra of perfused tissue and ordered flow are discussed.

  13. Capillary blood flow imaging within human finger cuticle using optical microangiography

    OpenAIRE

    Baran, Utku; Shi, Lei; Ruikang K. Wang

    2013-01-01

    We report non-invasive 3D imaging of capillary blood flow within human finger cuticle by the use of Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) and ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) techniques. Wide velocity range DOMAG method is applied to provide RBC axial velocity mapping in capillary loops with ranges of ±0.9 mm/s and ±0.3 mm/s. Additionally, UHS-OMAG technique is engineered to acquire high resolution image of capillary morphology. The presented results are promising t...

  14. Flow Velocity Measurement by Image Processing of Optically Activated Tracers

    OpenAIRE

    Gharib, M.; Hernan, M. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Sarohia, V.

    1985-01-01

    A computerized flow visualization technique capable of quantifying the flow field automatically has been developed. This technique uses afterglowing effect of optically activated phosphorescent particles to retrieve vectorial information on each trace. By using this information, in conjunction with computer image processing, the flow field of a free surface transient vortex was investigated.

  15. Examination of nanoparticles as a drug carrier on blood flow through catheterized composite stenosed artery with permeable walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, S; Nadeem, S

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have discussed the influence of copper nanoparticles on a blood flow through composite stenosed artery with permeable walls. The nature of blood is discussed mathematically by considering it as viscous nanofluid. The study is carried out for a blood vessel under mild stenosis approximations and expressions of the temperature, velocity, resistance impedance to flow, wall shear stress and the pressure gradient is obtained by using corresponding boundary conditions. Results for the effects of permeability on blood flow through composite stenosis have been discussed graphically. The considered analysis also summarizes that the drug copper nanoparticles are efficient to reduce hemodynamics of stenosis and could be helpful to predict important uses for biomedical applications. Results indicate that nanoparticles are helpful as drug carriers to minimize the effects of resistance impedance to blood flow or coagulation factors due to stenosis. PMID:27393802

  16. Estimation of red blood cell aggregate velocity during sedimentation using the Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempczyński, A.; Grzegorzewski, B.

    2008-11-01

    A method for velocity estimation of sedimenting three-dimensional (3D) red blood cell (RBC) aggregates by means of an image processing technique is proposed. Successive images of RBC suspension near the wall of a container reveal rouleaux formation, sedimentation of 3D RBC aggregates and formation of the deposit of the cells. Plots of the position versus time for the 3D RBC aggregates were extracted by a processing of successive images of the suspension. The plots exhibit a quasi-linear structures in noisy background. With the use of the Hough transform the detection of the slope of the structures was performed and the velocity of the aggregates was estimated. To show the potential of the method spatio-temporal dependence of the aggregate velocity is presented for RBCs in plasma, RBCs in Dextran and for hardened cells at haematocrit 5%.

  17. PIV Investigations of the Flow Field in the Volute of a Rotary Blood Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankovic, John M.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Smith, William A.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    A full-size acrylic model of a rotary blood pump was developed in order to utilize Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to make measurements of the fluid velocities and turbulent stresses throughout the device. The development of an understanding of the hemodynamics within the blood pump is critical to the development and validation of computational models. A blood analog solution, consisting of sodium iodide solution and glycerin, was developed to match physiological kinematic viscosity. The refractive indices of the fluid, the pump casing, and the impeller were matched to facilitate the use of PIV to make velocity measurements. Velocity measurements made in the volute exit/diffuser region are presented for pumps speeds of 3000-3850 rpm. At each speed data were obtained at a physiological pressure of 12 kPa and at a maximum flow condition. Four hundred data pairs were used for each resultant mean velocity vector value, representing greater than an order of magnitude more data pairs than reported previously in the literature on similar devices and resulting in velocity uncertainty levels of approximately 22.9%.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF RENAL BLOOD FLOW REGULATION BASED ON WAVELET COEFFICIENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, A.N.; Pavlova, O.N.; Mosekilde, Erik;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the possibility of revealing new characteristic features of renal blood flow autoregulation in healthy and pathological states through the application of discrete wavelet transforms to experimental time series for normotensive and hypertensive rats. A...... reduction in the variability of the wavelet coefficients in hypertension is observed at both the microscopic level of the blood flow in efferent arterioles of individual nephrons and at the macroscopic level of the blood pressure in the main arteries. The reduction is manifest in both of the main frequency...

  19. Instability of the middle cerebral artery blood flow in response to CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary E Regan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The middle cerebral artery supplies long end-artery branches to perfuse the deep white matter and shorter peripheral branches to perfuse cortical and subcortical tissues. A generalized vasodilatory stimulus such as carbon dioxide not only results in an increase in flow to these various tissue beds but also redistribution among them. We employed a fast step increase in carbon dioxide to detect the dynamics of the cerebral blood flow response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was approved by the Research Ethics Board of the University Health Network at the University of Toronto. We used transcranial ultrasound to measure the time course of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity in 28 healthy adults. Normoxic, isoxic step increases in arterial carbon dioxide tension of 10 mmHg from both hypocapnic and normocapnic baselines were produced using a new prospective targeting system that enabled a more rapid step change than has been previously achievable. In most of the 28 subjects the responses at both carbon dioxide ranges were characterised by more complex responses than a single exponential rise. Most responses were characterised by a fast initial response which then declined rapidly to a nadir, followed by a slower secondary response, with some showing oscillations before stabilising. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A rapid step increase in carbon dioxide tension is capable of inducing instability in the cerebral blood flow control system. These dynamic aspects of the cerebral blood flow responses to rapid changes in carbon dioxide must be taken into account when using transcranial blood flow velocity in a single artery segment to measure cerebrovascular reactivity.

  20. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  1. Time-resolved blood flow measurement in the in vivo mouse model by optical frequency domain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Julia; Mueller, Gregor; Meissner, Sven; Cimalla, Peter; Homann, Hanno; Morawietz, Henning; Koch, Edmund

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that phase-resolved Doppler optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is very suitable to quantify the pulsatile blood flow within a vasodynamic measurement in the in vivo mouse model. For this, an OFDI-system with a read-out rate of 20 kHz and a center wavelength of 1320 nm has been used to image the time-resolved murine blood flow in 300 μμm vessels. Because OFDI is less sensitive to fringe washout due to axial sample motion, it is applied to analyze the blood flow velocities and the vascular dynamics in six-week-old C57BL/6 mice compared to one of the LDLR knockout strain kept under sedentary conditions or with access to voluntary wheel running. We have shown that the systolic as well as the diastolic phase of the pulsatile arterial blood flow can be well identified at each vasodynamic state. Furthermore, the changes of the flow velocities after vasoconstriction and -dilation were presented and interpreted in the entire physiological context. With this, the combined measurement of time-resolved blood flow and vessel diameter provides the basis to analyze the vascular function and its influence on the blood flow of small arteries of different mouse strains in response to different life styles.

  2. Research Advances: DRPS--Let The Blood Flow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    A team from the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine has shown the potential for clinical use of the drag-reducing polymer (DRP) poly(N-vinylformamide), or PNVF. The high molecular weight PNVF is shown to reduce resistance to turbulent flow in a pipe and to enhance blood flow in animal models and it also…

  3. Transplacental diffusion and blood flow of gravid bovine uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic blood flow transducers and uterine arterial, uterine venous, umbilical venous, fetal femoral arterial, and fetal femoral venous catheters were implanted in 11 cows on day 161 +/- 4 of gestation. Antipyrine (0.66 M) plus NaCl (0.16 M) dissolved in deuterium oxide (D2O), or H2O, was infused at a constant rate into the fetal femoral vein catheter. Concentrations of antipyrine and D2O in uterine arterial and venous blood and antipyrine in fetal arterial and umbilical venous blood, as well as middle uterine arterial blood flow (electromagnetic transducer), were determined. Antipyrine and D2O gave similar estimates (steady-state diffusion method) of gravid uterine blood flow. In addition, the slope of the regression of D2O on antipyrine estimates was not different from one. Electromagnetic transducers gave estimates of uterine blood flow that were 32-42% of those obtained with steady-state diffusion but were correlated with estimates obtained by use of both antipyrine and D2O. The transplacental clearance rate of antipyrine was similar (per kg placenta) to that observed in ewes. It was suggested that the maternal and fetal microvasculatures of the bovine placenta could have a concurrent arrangement with vascular shunts or maldistribution of flows, as has been suggested for the ewe

  4. CFD simulation of blood flow inside the corkscrew collaterals of the Buerger’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Alireza; Charjouei Moghadam, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Buerger’s disease is an occlusive arterial disease that occurs mainly in medium and small vessels. This disease is associated with Tobacco usage. The existence of corkscrew collateral is one of the established characteristics of the Buerger’s disease. Methods: In this study, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of blood flow within the corkscrew artery of the Buerger’s disease is conducted. The geometry of the artery is constructed based on the actual corkscrew artery of a patient diagnosed with the Buerger’s disease. The blood properties are the same as the actual blood properties of the patient. The blood flow rate is taken from the available experimental data in the literature. Results: The local velocity patterns, pressure and kinematic viscosity distributions in different segments of the corkscrew collateral artery was demonstrated and discussed for the first time for this kind of artery. The effects of non-Newtonian consideration for the blood viscosity behavior were investigated in different segments of the artery. Moreover, the variations of the blood flow patterns along the artery were investigated in details for each segment. Conclusion: It was found that the flow patterns were affected by the complex geometry of this artery in such a way that it could lead to the presence of sites that were prone to the accumulation of the flowing particles in blood like nicotine. Furthermore, due to the existence of many successive bends in this artery, the variations of kinematic viscosity along this artery were significant, therefore the non-Newtonian behavior of the blood viscosity must be considered. PMID:27340623

  5. Computational Dynamics of Arterial Blood Flow in the Presence of Magnetic Field and Thermal Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chinyoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We conduct a numerical study to determine the influence of magnetic field and thermal radiation on both velocity and temperature distributions in a single blood vessel. The model here assumes that blood is a Newtonian incompressible conducting fluid with radially varying viscosity due to hematocrit variation. The transient equations of momentum and energy transport governing the flow in an axisymmetric configuration are solved numerically using a semi-implicit finite difference method. Results are presented graphically and discussed both qualitatively and quantitatively from the physiological point of view. The results of this work may enhance current understanding of the factors that determine the effects of hyperthermia treatment on tumor tissues.

  6. Effect of Applied Magnetic Field on Pulsatile Flow of Blood in a Porous Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfraz Ahmed

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An approximate solution is presented to the problem of pulsatile flow of blood in porous channel in presence of induced magnetic field. The blood is assumed to be an incompressible Non Newtonian fluid. To reduce the equation of motion to an ordinary differential equation, a dimensionless variable is used. Numerical results were obtained for different values of the magnetic parameter, frequency parameter and Reynolds number. It is observed that when the magnetic parameter, the Hartmann number increases, the velocity as well as magnitude of mass flux decreases. For non magnetic case the paper reduces to the problem investigated by Wang

  7. Measurement of blood velocity using laser Doppler method for the designing module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Liang; Lee, Jen-Ai; Lu, Tung-Wu; Chen, Zhao-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Ming

    2005-04-01

    We built the Dual Beam Mode of the LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) frame, set the photodetector at the same side with light source which collect the scattering light of blood cell. It's proper to reduce LDA optical path and convenient for our designing module. The concentration of chicken blood in this study is about 1% and we measured the relations actually between flood velocity and the angle of beams cross on particles, temperature, and the diameter of aqueduct. We found better results while the cross angle was less than 38.8 degree, diameter of aqueduct was 6 mm, and temperature of blood was set to 36 . These parameters can also provide important basis for the LDA module kit that we are designing.

  8. Velocity profile variations in granular flows with changing boundary conditions: insights from experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Marius; Bugnion, Louis

    2013-06-01

    We present results of detailed velocity profile measurements in a large series of granular flow experiments in a dam-break setup. The inclination angle, bead size, and roughness of the running surface were varied. In all experiments, the downstream velocity profiles changed continuously from the head to the tail of the avalanches. On rough running surfaces, an inflection point developed in the velocity profiles. These velocity profiles cannot be modeled by the large class of constitutive laws which relate the shear stress to a power law of the strain rate. The velocity profile shape factor increased from the head to the tail of the avalanches. Its maximum value grew with increasing roughness of the running surface. We conclude that flow features such as velocity profiles are strongly influenced by the boundary condition at the running surface, which depends on the ratio of bead size to the typical roughness length of the surface. Furthermore, we show that varying velocity profile shape factors inside gravitationally driven finite-mass flows give rise to an additional term in the depth-averaged momentum equation, which is normally solved in the simulation software of hazardous geophysical flows. We therefore encourage time dependent velocity profile measurements inside hazardous geophysical flows, to learn about the importance of this "new" term in the mathematical modeling of these flows.

  9. A multiple disk centrifugal pump as a blood flow device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G E; Etter, B D; Dorsi, J M

    1990-02-01

    A multiple disk, shear force, valveless centrifugal pump was studied to determine its suitability as a blood flow device. A pulsatile version of the Tesla viscous flow turbine was designed by modifying the original steady flow pump concept to produce physiological pressures and flows with the aid of controlling circuitry. Pressures and flows from this pump were compared to a Harvard Apparatus pulsatile piston pump. Both pumps were connected to an artificial circulatory system. Frequency and systolic duration were varied over a range of physiological conditions for both pumps. The results indicated that the Tesla pump, operating in a pulsatile mode, is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows similar to the Harvard pump and other pulsatile blood pumps. PMID:2312140

  10. Occlusion cuff for routine measurement of digital blood pressure and blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Krähenbühl, B; Hirai, M

    1977-01-01

    A miniaturized blood pressure cuff made of plastic material and applicable to fingers and toes is described. The cuff was compared to rubber cuffs and to bladder-free cuffs. It was found to be more reliable than the former type and much easier to use than the latter type. It is recommended for us...... in conjunction with a mercury-in-Silastic strain gauge for routine measurement of digital blood pressure and blood flow in patients with arterial disease....

  11. Analysis of Pulsatile Flow of Blood in a Porous Channel under Effect of Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitali Sarma

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of magnetic field on pulsatile flow of blood in a porous channel a numerical model has been developed. An approximate solution is presented to the problem of pulsatile flow of blood in a porous channel in presence of transverse magnetic field. The blood is assumed to be an incompressible non Newtonian fluid. To reduce the equation of motion to an ordinary differential equation, a dimensionless variable is used. Numerical results were obtained for different values of the magnetic parameter, frequency parameter and Reynolds number. It is observed that when the Hartmann number increases, the fluid velocity as well as magnitude as well as magnitude of mass flux decrease.

  12. Magnetic resonance flow velocity and temperature mapping of a shape memory polymer foam device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Thomas S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. Methods A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Results Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Conclusions Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

  13. Intrinsic regulation of blood flow in adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Nielsen, Steen Levin; Paaske, W

    1976-01-01

    Previous studies on intact human subcutaneous tissue have shown, that blood flow remains constant during minor changes in perfusion pressure. This so-called autoregulatory response has not been demonstrable in isolated preparations of adipose tissue. In the present study on isolated, denervated...... vasoconstriction with pronounced flow reduction. These two reactions may be important for local regulation of blood flow in subcutaneous tissue during orthostatic changes in arterial and venous pressure. It is concluded that the response in adipose tissue to changes in arterial pressure (autoregulation), venous...... subcutaneous tissue in female rabbits only 2 of 12 expts. revealed an autoregulatory response during reduction in arterial perfusion pressure. Effluent blood flow from the tissue in the control state was 15.5 ml/100 g-min (S.D. 6.4, n = 12) corresponding to slight vasodilatation of the exposed tissue...

  14. Electroosmotic oscillatory flow of micropolar fluid in microchannels:application to dynamics of blood flow in microfluidic devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JC MISRA; S CHANDRA; GC SHIT; PK KUNDU

    2014-01-01

    The electroosmotic flow of a micropolar fluid in a microchannel bounded by two parallel porous plates undergoing periodic vibration is studied. The equations for conservation of linear and angular momentums and Gauss’s law of charge distribution are solved within the framework of the Debye-H¨uckel approximation. The fluid velocity and microrotation are assumed to depend linearly on the Reynolds number. The study shows that the amplitude of microrotation is highly sensitive to the changes in the magnitude of the suction velocity and the width of the microchannel. An increase in the micropolar parameter gives rise to a decrease in the amplitude of microrotation. Numerical estimates reveal that the microrotation of the suspended microelements in blood also plays an important role in controlling the electro-osmotically actuated flow dynamics in micro-bio-fluidic devices.

  15. Application of electromagnetic velocity meter for measuring liquid velocity distribution in air-water two-phase flow along a large vertical pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electromagnetic velocity meter has been applied to measure the liquid velocity distribution along a large vertical pipe (Inner diameter: 0.48 m, Length of flow path: 2 m) under air-water two-phase flow. This measurement is performed to examine the flow structure along the large vertical pipe where the flow structure has not been fully understood yet. The experiment was performed under atmospheric pressure and superficial air and water velocities in the test section were 0.02--0.87 m/s and 0.01--0.2 m/s, respectively. The accuracy of the electromagnetic velocity meter was firstly checked and was confirmed to be within the error of ±10% for the local liquid velocity up to about 2 m/s under bubbly two-phase flow. The velocity meter was used to measure the radial distribution of local liquid velocity including flow direction in the large vertical pipe. With increasing air flow rate, the axial liquid velocity at the center of the pipe becomes higher, the direction of axial liquid flow near the wall becomes downward and the degree of anisotropy of liquid velocity fluctuation becomes larger. A developing region exists below about 1 m from the bottom of the test section and the flow structure above the elevation is considered to be almost developed based on the measurement of the radial distribution of axial liquid velocity

  16. Measurement of pressure distributions and velocity fields of water jet intake flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Eun Ho; Yoon, Sang Youl; Kwon, Seong Hoon; Chun, Ho Hwan; Kim, Mun Chan; Kim, Kyung Chun [Busan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Waterjet propulsion system can avoid cavitation problem which is being arised conventional propeller propulsion system. The main issue of designing waterjet system is the boundary layer separation at ramp and lib of water inlet. The flow characteristics are highly depended on Jet to Velocity Ratio(JVR) as well as the intake geometry. The present study is conducted in a wind tunnel to provide accurate pressure destribution at the inlet wall and velocity field of the inlet and exit planes. Particle image velocimetry technique is used to obtain detail velocity fields. Pressure distributions and velocity field are discussed with accelerating and deaccelerating flow zones and the effect of JVR.

  17. 3D Computer Simulations of Pulsatile Human Blood Flows in Vessels and in the Aortic Arch: Investigation of Non-Newtonian Characteristics of Human Blood

    CERN Document Server

    Sultanov, Renat A; Engelbrekt, Brent; Blankenbecler, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Methods of Computational Fluid Dynamics are applied to simulate pulsatile blood flow in human vessels and in the aortic arch. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the human blood is investigated in simple vessels of actual size. A detailed time-dependent mathematical convergence test has been carried out. The realistic pulsatile flow is used in all simulations. Results of computer simulations of the blood flow in vessels of two different geometries are presented. For pressure, strain rate and velocity component distributions we found significant disagreements between our results obtained with realistic non-Newtonian treatment of human blood and widely used method in literature: a simple Newtonian approximation. A significant increase of the strain rate and, as a result, wall sear stress distribution, is found in the region of the aortic arch. We consider this result as theoretical evidence that supports existing clinical observations and those models not using non-Newtonian treatment underestimate the risk of disru...

  18. Exercise intensity modulates brachial artery retrograde blood flow and shear rate during leg cycling in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Erika; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of exercise intensity on retrograde blood flow and shear rate (SR) in an inactive limb during exercise under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The subjects performed two maximal exercise tests on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer to estimate peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak) while breathing normoxic (inspired oxygen fraction [FIO2 = 0.21]) and hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.12 or 0.13) gas mixtures. Subjects then performed four exercise bouts at the same relative intensities (30 and 60% V˙O2peak) for 30 min under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were simultaneously recorded, using Doppler ultrasonography. Retrograde SR was enhanced with increasing exercise intensity under both conditions at 10 min of exercise. Thereafter, retrograde blood flow and SR in normoxia returned to pre-exercise levels, with no significant differences between the two exercise intensities. In contrast, retrograde blood flow and SR in hypoxia remained significantly elevated above baseline and was significantly greater at 60% than at 30% V˙O2peak. We conclude that differences in exercise intensity affect brachial artery retrograde blood flow and SR during prolonged exercise under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26038470

  19. A method of calibrating wind velocity sensors with a modified gas flow calibrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure was described for calibrating air velocity sensors in the exhaust flow of a gas flow calibrator. The average velocity in the test section located at the calibrator exhaust was verified from the mass flow rate accurately measured by the calibrator's precision sonic nozzles. Air at elevated pressures flowed through a series of screens, diameter changes, and flow straighteners, resulting in a smooth flow through the open test section. The modified system generated air velocities of 2 to 90 meters per second with an uncertainty of about two percent for speeds below 15 meters per second and four percent for the higher speeds. Wind tunnel data correlated well with that taken in the flow calibrator.

  20. SONIC SPEED AND SHOCK WAVE IN HIGH VELOCITY AERATED FLOWS FROM HIGH HEAD DISCHARGE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zhi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The compressible characteristics in aerated flows at the high velocity of about 50m/s were analyzed. Based on the theory of compressible the relations between the sonic speed and shock wave in high-velocity aerated flow were theoretically deduced. And comparisons with measured data were made. The theoretical and experimental results show the sonic speed in aerated flow is merely of the order of several-dozen meters per second, and its minimum value is only 20m/s, which is far much less than that in water or air alone. So high subsonic flow, supersonic flow and transonic flow as well as compression wave, shock wave and expansion wave similarly to aerodnamics may be produced in high velocity aerated flow at the speed of the order of 50m/s. Hence the influences of these compressible characteristics on high head discharge structures can not be neglected, especially on super high dams over 200m high.

  1. Device for measuring the flow velocity according to the principle of Karman's vortex path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention refers to a device for measuring the flow velocity of gaseous or liquid media according to the principle of Karman's vortex path by means of a resting, flow-dividing external drag body extending across the flow direction and having a plane back and a back element connected with the drag body which likewise is extended at right angles to the flow and whose flat front is arranged at a gap-forming distance from and parallel to the plane backside of the drag body. In addition, the device has at least one frequency-depending sensor for detecting the flow velocity. (orig.)

  2. Point and planar LIF for velocity-concentration correlations in a jet in cross flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik; Özcan, Oktay; Larsen, Poul Scheel;

    2002-01-01

    (LDA). The flow considered is the mixing of a jet in a fully developed cross flow in a square duct with a width of 10 jet diameters. Both a laminar flow case, Re=675, and a turbulent flow case, Re=33750, are presented . For both flows, the ratio jet-to-duct mean velocities was R=3.3. Result of mean...... velocities, mean concentration and Reynolds fluxes in the symmetry plane of the jet are presented for PIV and PLIF measurements. The LIF measurements performed with the LDA equipment was in general in good agreement with the PIV/PLIF measurements. The cross sections selected for comparison are challenging...

  3. The structure of a jet in cross flow at low velocity ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Shridhar; Abraham, Bruce M.; Katz, Joseph

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines in detail the flow structure and associated wall pressure fluctuations caused by the injection of a round, turbulent jet into a turbulent boundary layer. The velocity ratio, r, ratio of mean jet velocity to the mean cross flow, varies from 0.5 to 2.5 and the Reynolds number based on the cross flow speed and jet diameter is 1.9×104. Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the flow and flush mounted pressure sensors installed at several locations used to determine the wall pressure. The results consist of sample instantaneous flow structures, distributions of mean velocity, vorticity and turbulence intensity, as well as wall pressure spectra. The flow structure depends strongly on the velocity ratio and there are two distinctly different regions. At low velocity ratios, namely r2, the near-wall flow behind the jet resembles a Karman vortex street and the wall-normal vortical structures contain cross flow boundary layer vorticity. Autospectra of the pressure signals show that the effect of the jet is mainly in the 15-100 Hz range. At r2, the wall pressure levels reach a plateau demonstrating the diminishing effect of the jet on the near-wall flow. Consistent with the flow structure, the highest wall pressure fluctuations occur off the jet centerline for r2. Also, the advection speed of near-wall vortical structures increase with r at r2 it is a constant.

  4. Assessing cerebrospinal fluid flow connectivity using 3D gradient echo phase contrast velocity encoded MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using three-directional velocity encoded 3D gradient echo (GE) phase contrast (PC) imaging to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow connectivity in the human brain. Five healthy volunteers were scanned using low velocity sensitivity (Venc = 0.04–0.05 m s−1). Flow–time curves were compared to standard 2D PC scans. The 3D data were used to reconstruct in vivo CSF flow volumes based on time-averaged phase-difference information, and the patency of the CSF flow pathways was assessed using nearest-neighbour connectivity. A pulsatile flow phantom was used to gauge the measurement accuracy of the CSF flow volumes at low flow velocities. Flow connectivity from the lateral ventricles down to the cisterna magna was successfully demonstrated in all volunteers. The phantom tests showed a good distinction between the flow cavities and the background noise. 3D PC imaging results in CSF flow waveforms with similar pulsatility but underestimated peak velocities compared to 2D PC data. 3D time-resolved velocity encoded GE imaging has successfully been applied to assess CSF flow connectivity in normal subjects

  5. The use of a novel in-bed active Leg Exercise Apparatus (LEX) for increasing venous blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenta; Kamada, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Aikawa, Shizu; Nishino, Tomofumi; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Sakane, Masataka; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and leg deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has increased in recent years in association with aging and an increase in the number of bedridden individuals. We developed an active in-bed leg exercise apparatus labeled the Leg Exercise Apparatus (LEX) for DVT prevention. We compared the effect of leg exercises performed using the LEX to conventional active ankle exercises on increased blood flow. Materials & Methods: The subjects were eight healthy adult volunteers [five men and three women, aged 20–34 (mean 27.0) years]. Subjects performed two types of exercise; exercise 1 consisted of leg exercises using the LEX, while exercise 2 consisted of in-bed active plantar flexion/dorsiflexion exercises without the device. Measurements were taken 1, 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes after exercise including common femoral vein blood flow, mean blood flow velocity, maximum blood flow velocity, and vessel diameter using Doppler ultrasound. Statistical procedures included timed measurement data analysis using a linear mixed model. A Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons. Results: Compared to resting levels, blood flow reached a maximum value 1 minute after exercise for both exercise types, with a significantly greater increase after exercise 1 (1.76-fold increase) compared to exercise 2 (1.44-fold increase) (p = 0.005). There was a significant difference (p = 0.03) between the two exercises for all values from 1 minute to 30 minutes following exercise. There was no significant difference between exercises for peak or mean blood flow velocity. Compared to resting levels, blood vessel diameter reached a maximum value of 1.47-fold greater at 5 minutes post-exercise for exercise 1 and a maximum value of 1.21-fold greater at 1 minute post-exercise for exercise 2. Conclusions: Exercise using the LEX increased lower leg venous blood flow and vessel diameter. We propose that the LEX may serve as a new DVT prevention tool. PMID

  6. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghui; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  7. Slip-velocity and drag of large neutrally-buoyant particles in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bellani, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    We discuss possible definitions for a slip velocity that describes the relative motion between large particles and a turbulent flow. This definition is necessary because the slip velocity used in the standard drag model fails when particle size falls within the inertial subrange of ambient turbulence. By decomposing drag into steady and stochastic components, we obtain both a steady slip velocity and a fluctuating slip velocity. From this decomposition, we propose two definitions for stochastic slip velocity. These definitions were selected in part due to their simplicity: they do not require filtration of the fluid phase velocity field, nor do they require the construction of conditional averages on particle locations. A key benefit of this simplicity is that the stochastic slip velocity proposed here can be calculated equally well for laboratory, field, and numerical experiments. The stochastic slip velocity allows the definition of a Reynolds number that should indicate whether large particles in turbulent...

  8. Measurement of turbulent flow using ultrasound velocity profile method. 2. Comparison with laser doppler velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic Velocity Profile (UVP) measuring method has many advantages over the conventional flow measurement methods, such as measurement of an instantaneous velocity profile on a line with the transducer was measured, and it is applicable to opaque liquids because of possible to measure from outside of the wall. This method has capabilities applicable to various flow measurements, but requires a large measurement volume. In this paper, the effect of the measurement volume on the mean velocity profile have been investigated for fully developed turbulent flows in a vertical pipe and was compared with a result obtained by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and results of Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurement. (author)

  9. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Liao, Yihua [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McDermott, Mary M. [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  10. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  11. Reduced blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle in ageing humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Hellsten, Ylva

    2016-01-01

    The ability to sustain a given absolute submaximal workload declines with advancing age likely due to a lower level of blood flow and O2 delivery to the exercising muscles. Given that physical inactivity mimics many of the physiological changes associated with ageing, separating the physiological...... the O2 demand of the active skeletal muscle of aged individuals during conditions where systemic blood flow is not limited by cardiac output seems to a large extent to be related to the level of physical activity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... consequences of ageing and physical inactivity can be challenging; yet, observations from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the effects of physical activity have provided some insight. Physical activity has the potential to offset the age-related decline in blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle...... during exercise where systemic blood flow is not limited by cardiac output, thereby improving O2 delivery and allowing for an enhanced energy production from oxidative metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the increase in blood flow with regular physical activity include improved endothelial function...

  12. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  13. Galaxy Cluster Bulk Flows and Collision Velocities in QUMOND

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Harley; Teuben, Peter; Angus, G W

    2013-01-01

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {\\Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain about 1000 km/s by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {\\Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {\\Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for 'pink elephants' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  14. Verapamil buffering effect on the abrupt elevation in blood pressure, linkage with microcirculatory blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmitrov, J

    2008-01-01

    1 We studied the effects of verapamil on sudden elevation in blood pressure, microcirculation and arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). 2 Thirty experiments (10 controls and 20 with verapamil) were performed in rabbits sedated using pentobarbital infusion (5 mg kg(-1) h(-1)). 3 BRS, mean femoral artery blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, estimated using microphotoelectric plethysmography (MPPG), were simultaneously measured during 30 min of verapamil infusion (20 mug kg(-1) min(-1)). BRS was assessed from HR and MAP responses to intravenous phenylephrine (Ph) and by power spectral analysis using transfer function (TF) from MAP to the HR (BRS(Ph,TF)). 4 Verapamil significantly increased microcirculatory blood flow, and decreased BRS(Ph,TF) and phenylephrine-induced abrupt elevation in MAP (MAP(AE)). 5 A significant inverse correlation was found between verapamil-induced changes in MAP(AE), BRS and in microcirculatory blood flow, measured before phenylephrine blood pressure ramps (DeltaMAP(AE) with DeltaBRS(TF), r = -0.47, P < 0.036; DeltaMAP(AE) with DeltaMPPG, r = -0.49, P < 0.025). 6 These results suggest involvement of the arterial baroreflex and vascular blood pressure-buffering mechanisms, their enhancement by verapamil, and thus a potential benefit of verapamil in cardiovascular conditions where patients present with abrupt high elevations in blood pressure. PMID:18598288

  15. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H;

    1991-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage uni...... than 0.0001). The synchronism of the nocturnal subcutaneous hyperemia and the decrease in systemic mean arterial blood pressure point to a common, possibly central nervous or humoral, eliciting mechanism.......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...

  16. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki;

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to...... fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples...... were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to...

  17. Nonlinear interactions in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Donald J.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Chon, Ki H.;

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a model of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the myogenic mechanism in afferent arterioles to understand how the two mechanisms are coupled. This paper presents the model. The tubular model predicts pressure, flow, and NaCl concentration as functions of time and tubular length...... vasomotor oscillation. There are nonlinear interactions between TGF and the myogenic mechanism, which include the modulation of the frequency and amplitude of the myogenic oscillation by TGF. The prediction of modulation is confirmed in a companion study ( 28)....

  18. Inverse Problem for Color Doppler Ultrasound-Assisted Intracardiac Blood Flow Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jaeseong

    2016-01-01

    For the assessment of the left ventricle (LV), echocardiography has been widely used to visualize and quantify geometrical variations of LV. However, echocardiographic image itself is not sufficient to describe a swirling pattern which is a characteristic blood flow pattern inside LV without any treatment on the image. We propose a mathematical framework based on an inverse problem for three-dimensional (3D) LV blood flow reconstruction. The reconstruction model combines the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with one-direction velocity component of the synthetic flow data (or color Doppler data) from the forward simulation (or measurement). Moreover, time-varying LV boundaries are extracted from the intensity data to determine boundary conditions of the reconstruction model. Forward simulations of intracardiac blood flow are performed using a fluid-structure interaction model in order to obtain synthetic flow data. The proposed model significantly reduces the local and global errors of the reconstructed flow fields. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of the proposed reconstruction model in predicting dynamic swirling patterns inside the LV over a cardiac cycle. PMID:27313657

  19. A numerical study of blood flow using mixture theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Kim, Jeongho; Antaki, James F

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the two dimensional flow of blood in a rectangular microfluidic channel. We use Mixture Theory to treat this problem as a two-component system: One component is the red blood cells (RBCs) modeled as a generalized Reiner-Rivlin type fluid, which considers the effects of volume fraction (hematocrit) and influence of shear rate upon viscosity. The other component, plasma, is assumed to behave as a linear viscous fluid. A CFD solver based on OpenFOAM(®) was developed and employed to simulate a specific problem, namely blood flow in a two dimensional micro-channel, is studied. Finally to better understand this two-component flow system and the effects of the different parameters, the equations are made dimensionless and a parametric study is performed. PMID:24791016

  20. Reflood experiments under nontypical flow conditions of alternatively high liquid velocities, plug flow and wet steam flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes results of reflood experiments in the directly heated tube (14 mm diam, 1.4 m length) of the PEANUT rig. The experiments were performed in the pressure range of 0.2 to 0.6 MPascal with high flooding velocities up to 2.2 m/s, as well as limited amount of water and alternatively with wet steam flow. In addition, some of the experiments were compared to the results of calculations with the thermohydraulic code RELAP5/Mode2.5. A first series of experiments was devoted to reflood with entrance velocities between 0.2 and 2.2 m/s. A second series dealt with intermediate liquid and steam flow at the entrance of the test section to simulate a kind of plug flow within the test section. An attempt was made to simulate these experiments with the RELAP5/Mod2.5 code but the results were poor for liquid velocities higher than 0.5 m/s. The third series of experiments was devoted to reflood experiments with a limited amount of water, i.e. the content of a container (220 ml max) mounted directly at the entrance of the test section was blown into it by high velocity steam. It was found that a small amount of water (i.e. some water droplets in the steam flow) is enough to partly quench the test section (for 220 ml of water, half of the test section could be quenched). On the other hand, dry steam flow only cooled the test section but did not quench it. Again, an attempt was made to simulate these experiments with RELAP5/Mod2.5, but the code failed to handle the problem of steam water mixing in the container at low pressure (0.2 MPascal) during the period when the steam starts to blow the water out of the container into the test section. (author) 3 refs., 36 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Effect of pregnancy on regional cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) of 10 pregnant women were quantified by 133Xe SPECT study with inhalation method before and after artificial abortion. During pregnancy, value of r-CBF in each region except occipital lobe was significantly higher than that of the post abortion. Arterial blood gas was analyzed after SPECT procedure. Pco2 concentration increased significantly after artificial abortion. Although its mechanism is unknown, our preliminary work demonstrates that r-CBF increased by pregnancy. (author)

  2. System for measuring three fluctuating velocity components in a turbulently flowing fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, D. Y. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A system is described for measuring fluid velocity in a turbulently flowing fluid including a sensing apparatus for dynamically sensing the mainstream and two orthogonal cross velocity components of the fluid. A transducer operative is included to provide three electrical output signals representative of the velocity components in the mainstream, and in the cross directions. Signal processors can be utilized to derive the Reynolds stress wave and the Reynolds stress.

  3. Comparison of rill flow velocity over frozen and thawed slopes with electrolyte tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yunyun; Lei, Tingwu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Freeze-thaw erosion is the primary soil water erosion form in high altitude and/or high latitude regions. The water flow velocity along an eroding rill over frozen and thawed slopes is vital to understanding of rill erosion hydrodynamics. This study experimentally measured rill flow velocity over frozen and thawed slopes using electrolyte trace method under Pulse Boundary Model. The experiments used three flow rates of 1, 2, and 4 L min-1, three slope gradients of 5°, 10°, and 15°. The temperature of the rill flow water was supplied at 0 °C as controlled with ice-water mixture. Seven sensors were used to measure flow velocity by tracing the solute transport process at 10, 110, 210, 310, 410, 510, and 610 cm distances from the electrolyte injection position. The measured velocity became steady at a distance of about 3 m from the electrolyte injection location, where the effect of the pulse boundary condition on the analytic solution to the partial differential equation becomes negligible. Results showed that flow velocity increased with slope gradient and flow rate on frozen slopes. A significant effect was observed on the steepest slope or at the highest flow rate over the thawed slope, which changed slightly on the gentle slopes and low flow rates. Flow velocity was about 25%, 30%, and 40% higher on the frozen soil than on the thawed slope at 5°, 10°, and 15° slopes and about 30% higher over the frozen slope at all flow rates. This study demonstrates that water over a frozen slope flows much faster than over a thawed slope. This study helps in the study and further understanding of the hydrodynamics of soil erosion and sediment transport behaviors of frozen and thawed slopes.

  4. Shear stress related blood damage in laminar couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Reinhard; Apel, Jörn; Klaus, Sebastian; Schügner, Frank; Schwindke, Peter; Reul, Helmut

    2003-06-01

    Artificial organs within the blood stream are generally associated with flow-induced blood damage, particularly hemolysis of red blood cells. These damaging effects are known to be dependent on shear forces and exposure times. The determination of a correlation between these flow-dependent properties and actual hemolysis is the subject of this study. For this purpose, a Couette device has been developed. A fluid seal based on fluorocarbon is used to separate blood from secondary external damage effects. The shear rate within the gap is controlled by the rotational speed of the inner cylinder, and the exposure time by the amount of blood that is axially pumped through the device per given time. Blood damage is quantified by the index of hemolysis (IH), which is calculated from photometric plasma hemoglobin measurements. Experiments are conducted at exposure times from texp=25 - 1250 ms and shear rates ranging from tau=30 up to 450 Pa ensuring Taylor-vortex free flow characteristics. Blood damage is remarkably low over a broad range of shear rates and exposure times. However, a significant increase in blood damage can be observed for shear stresses of tau>or= 425 Pa and exposure times of texp>or= 620 ms. Maximum hemolysis within the investigated range is IH=3.5%. The results indicate generally lower blood damage than reported in earlier studies with comparable devices, and the measurements clearly indicate a rather abrupt (i.e., critical levels of shear stresses and exposure times) than gradual increase in hemolysis, at least for the investigated range of shear rates and exposure times. PMID:12780506

  5. Heart blood flow simulation: a perspective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doost, Siamak N; Ghista, Dhanjoo; Su, Boyang; Zhong, Liang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death today, incorporates a wide range of cardiovascular system malfunctions that affect heart functionality. It is believed that the hemodynamic loads exerted on the cardiovascular system, the left ventricle (LV) in particular, are the leading cause of CVD initiation and propagation. Moreover, it is believed that the diagnosis and prognosis of CVD at an early stage could reduce its high mortality and morbidity rate. Therefore, a set of robust clinical cardiovascular assessment tools has been introduced to compute the cardiovascular hemodynamics in order to provide useful insights to physicians to recognize indicators leading to CVD and also to aid the diagnosis of CVD. Recently, a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different medical imaging tools, image-based CFD (IB-CFD), has been widely employed for cardiovascular functional assessment by providing reliable hemodynamic parameters. Even though the capability of CFD to provide reliable flow dynamics in general fluid mechanics problems has been widely demonstrated for many years, up to now, the clinical implications of the IB-CFD patient-specific LVs have not been applicable due to its limitations and complications. In this paper, we review investigations conducted to numerically simulate patient-specific human LV over the past 15 years using IB-CFD methods. Firstly, we divide different studies according to the different LV types (physiological and different pathological conditions) that have been chosen to reconstruct the geometry, and then discuss their contributions, methodologies, limitations, and findings. In this regard, we have studied CFD simulations of intraventricular flows and related cardiology insights, for (i) Physiological patient-specific LV models, (ii) Pathological heart patient-specific models, including myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Finally, we

  6. Coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent papers have raised doubt as to the magnitude of coronary blood flow during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We will describe experiments that concern the methods of coronary flow measurement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nine anesthetized swine were instrumented to allow simultaneous measurements of coronary blood flow by both electromagnetic cuff flow probes and by the radiomicrosphere technique. Cardiac arrest was caused by electrical fibrillation and closed-chest massage was performed by a Thumper (Dixie Medical Inc., Houston). The chest was compressed transversely at a rate of 66 strokes/min. Compression occupied one-half of the massage cycle. Three different Thumper piston strokes were studied: 1.5, 2, and 2.5 inches. Mean aortic pressure and total systemic blood flow measured by the radiomicrosphere technique increased as Thumper piston stroke was lengthened (mean +/- SD): 1.5 inch stroke, 23 +/- 4 mm Hg, 525 +/- 195 ml/min; 2 inch stroke, 33 +/- 5 mm Hg, 692 +/- 202 ml/min; 2.5 inch stroke, 40 +/- 6 mm Hg, 817 +/- 321 ml/min. Both methods of coronary flow measurement (electromagnetic [EMF] and radiomicrosphere [RMS]) gave similar results in technically successful preparations (data expressed as percent prearrest flow mean +/- 1 SD): 1.5 inch stroke, EMF 12 +/- 5%, RMS 16 +/- 5%; 2 inch stroke, EMF 30 +/- 6%, RMS 26 +/- 11%; 2.5 inch stroke, EMF 50 +/- 12%, RMS 40 +/- 20%. The phasic coronary flow signal during closed-chest compression indicated that all perfusion occurred during the relaxation phase of the massage cycle. We concluded that coronary blood flow is demonstrable during closed-chest massage, but that the magnitude is unlikely to be more than a fraction of normal

  7. Uteroplacental blood flow during alkalosis in the sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uteroplacental blood flow was measured by the radioactive-microsphere technique in eight near-term pregnant ewes during a normal control period and during maternal metabolic alkalosis. All measurements were made on awake, unanesthetized animals. Alkalosis, defined for this study as an arterial pH of 7.60 or greater, was produced by the oral administration of sodium bicarbonate, 3 g/kg body wt. The rise in pH thus produced was unaccompanied by significant changes in systemic arterial blood pressure and cardiac output, while maternal arterial P/sub CO2/ rose slightly from control levels. Cotyledonary blood flow declined from a control value of 1.177 ml/min to 1.025 ml/min during alkalosis. This decline of 13 percent in cotyledonary blood flow is significant (P less than 0.02). Blood flow to the remaining uterine tissue, or noncotyledonary uterus, did not change with alkalosis, being maintained at approximately 195 ml/min. It is concluded that maternal alkalosis, unaccompanied by major changes in P /sub CO2/ and systemic arterial pressure, causes a small increase in the resistance of the uteroplacental circulation

  8. Pulmonary blood flow distribution in transposition of the great arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary blood flow distribution was studied by scintillation scanning of the lungs after the infusion of iodine-131-labeled macroaggregates of human albumin before and after the Mustard operation in 53 patients with transposition of the great arteries. The patients were classified as follows: Group 1 (24 infants with uncomplicated transposition of the great arteries); Group II (18 patients with transposition and ventricular septal defect); and Group III (11 patients with transposition, ventricular septal defect and pulmonary obstruction). Before operation, 21 patients had a normal distribution of pulmonary blood flow, 10 had preferential flow to the right lung and 2 had preferential flow to the left lung. After operation, 19 had a normal pattern of pulmonary blood flow, 21 had preferential flow to the right lung and 3 had preferential flow to the left lung. The scanning studies have proved helpful in follow-up of patients to rule out recurrence of the shunt, pulmonary or systemic venous obstruction, development of pulmonary hypertension and occlusion of a palliative systemic-pulmonary shunt

  9. Suitable image parameters and analytical method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow volume with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine suitable image parameters and an analytical method for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow volume. This was done by constructing an experimental model and applying the results to a clinical application. The experimental model was constructed from the aorta of a bull and circulating isotonic saline. The image parameters of PC-MRI (repetition time, flip angle, matrix, velocity rate encoding, and the use of square pixels) were studied with percent flow volume (the ratio of actual flow volume to measured flow volume). The most suitable image parameters for accurate blood flow measurement were as follows: repetition time, 50 msec; flip angle, 20 degrees; and a 512 x 256 matrix without square pixels. Furthermore, velocity rate encoding should be set ranging from the maximum flow velocity in the vessel to five times this value. The correction in measuring blood flow was done with the intensity of the region of interest established in the background. With these parameters for PC-MRI, percent flow volume was greater than 90%. Using the image parameters for PC-MRI and the analytical method described above, we evaluated cerebral blood flow volume in 12 patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. The results were compared with conventional xenon computed tomography. The values found with both methods showed good correlation. Thus, we concluded that PC-MRI was a noninvasive method for evaluating cerebral blood flow in patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. (author)

  10. Flow Scales of Influence on the Settling Velocities of Particles with Varying Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Corrine N; Merchant, Wilmot; Jendrassak, Marek; Limpasuvan, Varavut; Gurka, Roi; Hackett, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    The settling velocities of natural, synthetic, and industrial particles were measured in a grid turbulence facility using optical measurement techniques. Particle image velocimetry and 2D particle tracking were used to measure the instantaneous velocities of the flow and the particles' trajectories simultaneously. We find that for particles examined in this study (Rep = 0.4-123), settling velocity is either enhanced or unchanged relative to stagnant flow for the range of investigated turbulence conditions. The smallest particles' normalized settling velocities exhibited the most consistent trends when plotted versus the Kolmogorov-based Stokes numbers suggesting that the dissipative scales influence their dynamics. In contrast, the mid-sized particles were better characterized with a Stokes number based on the integral time scale. The largest particles were largely unaffected by the flow conditions. Using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), the flow pattern scales are compared to particle trajectory curvature to complement results obtained through dimensional analysis using Stokes numbers. The smallest particles are found to have trajectories with curvatures of similar scale as the small flow scales (higher POD modes) whilst mid-sized particle trajectories had curvatures that were similar to the larger flow patterns (lower POD modes). The curvature trajectories of the largest particles did not correspond to any particular flow pattern scale suggesting that their trajectories were more random. These results provide experimental evidence of the "fast tracking" theory of settling velocity enhancement in turbulence and demonstrate that particles align themselves with flow scales in proportion to their size. PMID:27513958

  11. Influence of aeration and initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-ru WEI; Jun DENG; Bin LIU

    2013-01-01

    With the development of ski-jump energy dissipation for high and large discharge among the hydraulic projects,the effects of characteristics of water flow on energy dissipation are increasingly important.In the present study,the effects of aeration and the initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flow were analyzed,using variance analysis and numerical calculated methods.From the analysis of test data,both of the air concentration and initial water thickness are sensitive factors for the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow along the axial way,and there is no significant interaction effect between the aeration and initial water thickness.Aeration has a more significant effect on the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow.Decreasing the initial water thickness of jet flow can reduce the length of jet core,and make the initial position of axial velocity attenuation closer to the nozzle exit.The numerical calculation results show that aeration can contribute to the enhancement of entrainment ability of jet flow,which may improve the interaction between jet flow and surroundings.For ski-jump energy dissipation among the hydraulic projects,combining aeration with decreasing initial water thickness of jet flow is an effective way to enhance the rate of axial velocity attenuation.

  12. Cerebral blood flow in asymptomatic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the relationship between cortical grey matter flow (CBF) and age, cerebrovascular risk factors and the severity of subcortical hypersignals (HS, hyperintensity score in MRI) in 47 asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors. Multiple regression analysis revealed that HS was most strongly related to CBF, and that hematocrit, age and evidence of ischemic change detected in the electrocardiogram also appeared to be independent determinants of CBF. Both the severity and location of hypersignals were correlated with CBF. The most significant negative correlation observed was that between CBF and HS in the basal ganglia-thalamic region, where the degree of signal abnormality was modest. Decreased CBF in asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors may be related to microcirculatory disturbance associated with elevated hematocrit and an increase in the number of risk factors, and functional suppression of cerebral cortex due to the neuronal disconnection associated with subcortical lesions. In addition, impaired cerebral circulation may be related to MRI signal abnormalities. (author)

  13. Effect of Heat Transfer on Oscillatory Flow of Blood through a Permeable Capillary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Of concern in the paper is a study on heat transfer in the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of blood through a porous segment of a capillary subject to the action of an external magnetic field. Nonlinear thermal radiation and velocity slip condition are taken into account. The time-dependent permeability and suction velocity are considered. The governing non-linear patial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations and then solved numerically using Crank-Nicolson scheme. The computational results are presented in graphical/tabular form and thereby some theoretical predictions are made with respect to the hemodynamical flow of blood in a hyperthermal state under the action of a magnetic field. Effects of different parameters are adequately discussed. The results clearly indicate that the flow is appreciably influenced by slip velocity and also by the value of the Grashof number. It is also observed that the thermal boundary layer thickness enhances with increase of thermal radiation.

  14. Magnetic resonance velocity mapping of 3D cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in hydrocephalus: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, St. Poelten (Austria); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Salomonowitz, Erich [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, St. Poelten (Austria); Brenneis, Christian [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Department of Neurology, St. Poelten (Austria); Ungersboeck, Karl [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Department of Neurosurgery, St. Poelten (Austria); Riet, Wilma van der [European MRI Consultancy (EMRIC), Strasbourg (France); Buchfelder, Michael; Ganslandt, Oliver [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    To investigate the detectability of CSF flow alterations in the ventricular system of patients with hydrocephalus using time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping. MR velocity mapping was performed in 21 consecutive hydrocephalus patients and 21 age-matched volunteers using a 3D phase-contrast (PC) sequence. Velocity vectors and particle path lines were calculated for visualisation of flow dynamics. CSF flow was classified as ''hypomotile flow'' if it showed attenuated dynamics and as ''hypermotile flow'' if it showed increased dynamics compared with volunteers. Diagnostic efficacy was compared with routine 2D cine PC-MRI. Seven patients showed hypomotile CSF flow: six had non-communicating hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. One showed oscillating flow between the lateral ventricles after craniotomy for intracranial haemorrhage. Seven patients showed normal flow: six had hydrocephalus ex vacuo due to brain atrophy. One patient who underwent ventriculostomy 10 years ago showed a flow path through the opening. Seven patients showed hypermotile flow: three had normal pressure hydrocephalus, three had dementia, and in one the diagnosis remained unclear. The diagnostic efficacy of velocity mapping was significantly higher except for that of aqueductal stenosis. Our approach may be useful for diagnosis, therapy planning, and follow-up of different kinds of hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  15. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzari, M.; Simonutti, M.; Degardin, J.; Sahel, J.-A.; Fink, M.; Paques, M.; Atlan, M.

    2016-08-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  16. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pellizzari, Mathilde; Degardin, Julie; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Fink, Mathias; Paques, Michel; Atlan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  17. Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Catherine N; Reynell, Clare; Gesslein, Bodil;

    2014-01-01

    that neuronal activity and the neurotransmitter glutamate evoke the release of messengers that dilate capillaries by actively relaxing pericytes. Dilation is mediated by prostaglandin E2, but requires nitric oxide release to suppress vasoconstricting 20-HETE synthesis. In vivo, when sensory input...... increases blood flow, capillaries dilate before arterioles and are estimated to produce 84% of the blood flow increase. In pathology, ischaemia evokes capillary constriction by pericytes. We show that this is followed by pericyte death in rigor, which may irreversibly constrict capillaries and damage the...

  18. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  19. Measurement of tumor blood flow following neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical oncologists and cancer researchers benefit from information on the vascularization or non-vascularization of solid tumors because of blood flow's influence on three popular treatment types: hyperthermia therapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The objective of this research is the development of a clinically useful tumor blood flow measurements technique. The designed technique is sensitive, has good spatial resolution, in non-invasive and presents no risk to the patient beyond his usual treatment. Tumor blood flow was determined by measuring the washout of positron emitting isotopes created through neutron therapy treatment. In order to do this, several technical and scientific questions were addressed first. These questions have been answered through both theoretical calculation and measurement. The first question was answered through the measurement of macroscopic cross sections for the predominant nuclear reactions in the body. These results correlate well with an independent mathematical prediction of tissue activation and measurements of mouse spleen neutron activation. The second question was addressed by performing cell suspension and protein precipitation techniques on neutron activated mouse spleens. The third and final question was answered by using first physical principles to develop a model mimicking the blood flow system and measurement technique. In a final set of experiments, the above were applied to flow models and animals. The ultimate aim of this project is to apply its methodology to neutron therapy patients

  20. High-frequency photoacoustic imaging of erythrocyte aggregation and oxygen saturation: probing hemodynamic relations under pulsatile blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of high-frequency photoacoustic (PA) imaging to study the shear rate dependent relationship between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and oxygen saturation (SO2) in a simulated blood flow system. The PA signal amplitude increased during the formation of aggregates and cyclically varied at intervals corresponding to the beat rate (30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 bpm) for all optical wavelengths of illumination (750 and 850 nm).The SO2 also cyclically varied in phase with the PA signal amplitude for all beat rates. In addition, the mean blood flow velocity cyclically varied at the same interval of beat rate, and the shear rate (i.e. the radial gradient of flow velocity) also cyclically varied. On the other hand, the phase of the cyclic variation in the shear rate was reversed compared to that in the PA signal amplitude. This study indicates that RBC aggregation induced by periodic changes in the shear rate can be correlated with the SO2 under pulsatile blood flow. Furthermore, PA imaging of flowing blood may be capable of providing a new biomarker for the clinical application in terms of monitoring blood viscosity, oxygen delivery and their correlation.

  1. New sensor for measurement of low air flow velocity. Phase I final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project described here is the Phase I feasibility study of a two-phase program to integrate existing technologies to provide a system for determining air flow velocity and direction in radiation work areas. Basically, a low air flow sensor referred to as a thermocouple flow sensor has been developed. The sensor uses a thermocouple as its sensing element. The response time of the thermocouple is measured using an existing in-situ method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test. The response time results are then converted to a flow signal using a response time-versus-flow correlation. The Phase I effort has shown that a strong correlation exists between the response time of small diameter thermocouples and the ambient flow rate. As such, it has been demonstrated that thermocouple flow sensors can be used successfully to measure low air flow rates that can not be measured with conventional flow sensors. While the thermocouple flow sensor developed in this project was very successful in determining air flow velocity, determining air flow direction was beyond the scope of the Phase I project. Nevertheless, work was performed during Phase I to determine how the new flow sensor can be used to determine the direction, as well as the velocity, of ambient air movements. Basically, it is necessary to use either multiple flow sensors or move a single sensor in the monitoring area and make flow measurements at various locations sweeping the area from top to bottom and from left to right. The results can then be used with empirical or physical models, or in terms of directional vectors to estimate air flow patterns. The measurements can be made continuously or periodically to update the flow patterns as they change when people and objects are moved in the monitoring area. The potential for using multiple thermocouple flow sensors for determining air flow patterns will be examined in Phase II

  2. Effects of induced endometritis on uterine blood flow in cows as evaluated by transrectal Doppler sonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debertolis, Letizia; Mari, Gaetano; Merbach, Sabine; Schoon, Heinz-Adolf; Iacono, Eleonora; Bollwein, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of induced endometritis on uterine blood flow in cows. Transrectal Doppler sonography was performed on uterine arteries of six cyclic cows before and for 4 days after inducing acute endometritis by intrauterine infusion of 720 mg of policresulen, and for 4 days of the following estrous cycle. Time-averaged maximum velocity (TAMV) increased (p 0.05) in the next 4 days of the same cycle. TAMV and PI values in the subsequent cycle did not differ (p > 0.05) from the values measured before infusion and showed no changes (p > 0.05) within the cycle. Blood flow parameters were not related (p > 0.05) to plasma concentrations of progesterone and estrogen. All cows showed an acute endometritis determined by histopathological findings of biopsy samples taken 1 day after infusion and fibrotic endometrial alterations detected in the subsequent cycle. No relationships were observed between fibrotic changes of the endometrium and uterine blood flow during either cycle. In conclusion, acute inflammation is accompanied by a rise in uterine blood flow, but fibrotic alterations do not seem to be related to Doppler sonographic findings. PMID:26645345

  3. Blood flow changes after unilateral carotid artery ligation monitored by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yushu; Liang, Chengbo; Suo, Yanyan; Zhao, Yuqian; Wang, Yi; Xu, Tao; Wang, Ruikang; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    Unilateral carotid artery ligation which could induce adaptive improvement is a classic model that has been widely used to study pathology of ischemic disease. In those studies, blood flow is an important parameter to characterize the ischemia. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging modality which can provide depth resolved images in biological tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. SPF rats was anesthetized with isoflurane and divided into two groups. In first group, bilateral carotid artery was surgically exposed, and then left carotid artery was ligated. Blood flow changes of the contralateral carotid artery was monitored using high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography, including the absolute flow velocity and the flow volume. In the other group, skull window was opened at the ipsilateral cerebral cortex of ligation and blood supply of small artery was measured before and after the ligation. The measured results demonstrate the blood supply compensation process after unilateral carotid artery ligation. With the superiority of high resolution, OCT is an effective technology in monitoring results of carotid artery after ligation.

  4. Effects of anesthesia on the cerebral capillary blood flow in young and old mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeini, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Maryam S.; Bélanger, Samuel; Avti, Pramod; Castonguay, Alexandre; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    Despite recent findings on the possible role of age-related cerebral microvasculature changes in cognition decline, previous studies of capillary blood flow in aging (using animal models) are scarce and limited to anesthetized conditions. Since anesthesia can have different effects in young and old animals, it may introduce a confounding effect in aging studies. The present study aimed to eliminate the potential confound introduced by anesthesia by measuring capillary blood flow parameters in both awake conditions and under isoflurane anesthesia. We used 2-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy to measure capillary diameter, red blood cell velocity and flux, hematocrit and capillary volumetric flow in individual capillaries in the barrel cortex of 6- and 24-month old C57Bl/6 mice. It was observed that microvascular properties are significantly affected by anesthesia leading to different trends in capillary blood flow parameters with aging when measured under awake or anesthetized conditions. The findings in this study suggest taking extra care in interpreting aging studies from anesthetized animals.

  5. Intravaginal Administration of Sildenafil Citrate Increases Blood Flow in the Bovine Uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzięcioł Michał

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of sildenafil citrate administrated intravaginaly on the blood flow in the bovine uterus during dioestrus. Uterine blood flow was examined in six healthy adult cows. Sildenafil was administrated intravaginaly to each co w between the 6th and 8th d of the ovarian cycle, in the form of vaginal suppositories containing 100 mg of active substance at a dose of 100, 200, or 300 mg per animal. Uterine perfusion was estimated by the colour Doppler examination, and obtained results were analysed with the Pixel Flux Software (Chameleon, Germany. Moreover, cardiovascular parameters were also evaluated. Animals were examined before and five times after drug application (two times at 15 min intervals, and three times at 2 h intervals. A placebo suppository was also given to the cows. The analysis of the intensity and velocity of blood flow in the uterus proved that sildenafil administrated intravaginaly significantly increased blood flow in the uterus and the effect of increased perfusion was observed for 4 h and 30 min after administration. The effect of increased uterine perfusion was observed after low as well as high doses of sildenafil. Significant changes in the cardio-vascular parameters were not detected. There were no changes in the uterine perfusion as well as in cardiovascular parameters after placebo administration.

  6. Effects of induced endometritis on uterine blood flow in cows as evaluated by transrectal Doppler sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debertolis, Letizia; Mari, Gaetano; Merlo, Barbara; Merbach, Sabine; Schoon, Heinz-Adolf; Iacono, Eleonora; Bollwein, Heinrich

    2016-06-30

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of induced endometritis on uterine blood flow in cows. Transrectal Doppler sonography was performed on uterine arteries of six cyclic cows before and for 4 days after inducing acute endometritis by intrauterine infusion of 720 mg of policresulen, and for 4 days of the following estrous cycle. Time-averaged maximum velocity (TAMV) increased (p 0.05) in the next 4 days of the same cycle. TAMV and PI values in the subsequent cycle did not differ (p > 0.05) from the values measured before infusion and showed no changes (p > 0.05) within the cycle. Blood flow parameters were not related (p > 0.05) to plasma concentrations of progesterone and estrogen. All cows showed an acute endometritis determined by histopathological findings of biopsy samples taken 1 day after infusion and fibrotic endometrial alterations detected in the subsequent cycle. No relationships were observed between fibrotic changes of the endometrium and uterine blood flow during either cycle. In conclusion, acute inflammation is accompanied by a rise in uterine blood flow, but fibrotic alterations do not seem to be related to Doppler sonographic findings. PMID:26645345

  7. FORMULAE FOR AVERAGE VELOCITY OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE OF NON-DARCY'S FLOW THROUGH A SINGLE FRACTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Jia-zhong; Wang Jia-quan; Li Ru-zhong; Liu Yong

    2003-01-01

    The formulae for average velocity of groundwater flow in a single fracture were derived based on the characteristics of fracture properties and hydraulic methods. The results show that the average velocity is proportional to the square root of the hydraulic gradient. In order to verify the results, a laboratory model was established, and the experimental data were analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the relation between the average velocity and hydraulic gradient is nonlinear, and can be fitted with power functions. And for both the unconfined and confined flows, the value of the exponent of power functions are close to 0.5. Thus the experimental results agree well with those from the theoretical analysis. By comparing the calculated and measured values of the average velocity under the same conditions, the formulae presented herein are more effective than the traditional formula based on Darcy's Law. These results provide the evidences of non-Darcy's flow in single fracture.

  8. Effect on cerebral blood flow velocity and electroneurophysiology in unconscious patients with brain injury after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation%重复经颅磁刺激对脑损伤后意识障碍患者脑血流速度及神经电生理的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢瑛; 何院娟; 陈滟; 蒋燕; 胡玥

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究重复经颅磁刺激(rTiS)对脑损伤后意识障碍患者脑血流速度及神经电生理的影响,以探索其可能的促苏醒机制.方法 30例脑损伤后意识障碍患者随机分为治疗组(n=15)和对照组(n=15),两组均给予常规促醒治疗,治疗组在常规治疗的基础上加用rTMS治疗,两组治疗前后均行脑电图(EEG),脑干听觉诱发(BAEP)及上肢体感诱发电位(SSEP)检查,同时行经颅多普勒脑血管超声检测患者大脑中动脉(MCA)、大脑前动脉(ACA)、基底动脉(BA)平均血流速度.治疗后行Glasgow昏迷评分(GCS)及JFK昏迷恢复量表评分(CRS-R)进行疗效评定.结果 治疗1个月后,治疗组GCS评分及CRS.R评分较对照组有改善(P0.05).结论 rTMS能改善脑电生理活动,对意识障碍患者有一定的促苏醒作用.%Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect on cerebral blood flow velocity and electroneurophysiology in unconscious patients with brain injury after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) , and to explore the possible mechanism of hastening awakening from coma . Methods 30 unconscious patients with brain injury were randomly assigned to the treated group ( n = 15 ) and the control group (re = 15). The patients in the control group were treated routinely. Besides routine therapy the patients in the treated group were treated with rTMS. Electroencephalography ( EEG) , brain stem auditory evoked potential ( BAEP) and somatosensory evoked potential ( SSEP) were determinated before and after treatment, at the same time, mean flow rates of middle cerebral artery ( MCA ) , anterior cerebral artery ( ACA) and basilar artery (BA) were determinated with transcranial Doppler (TCD) , Glasgow scale (GCS) and JFK coma recovery scale (CRS-R)were used to evaluate the curative effect after treatment. Results After one-month treatment,the GCS and CRS-R score in treated group was increased than control group (P 0. 05 ). Conclusions The therapy of r

  9. Relaxin mediates uterine artery compliance during pregnancy and increases uterine blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodstrcil, Lenka A; Tare, Marianne; Novak, Jacqueline; Dragomir, Nicoleta; Ramirez, Rolando J; Wlodek, Mary E; Conrad, Kirk P; Parry, Laura J

    2012-10-01

    Normal pregnancy involves dramatic remodeling of the uterine vasculature, with abnormal vascular adaptations contributing to pregnancy diseases such as preeclampsia. The peptide hormone relaxin is important for the renal and systemic hemodynamic adaptations to pregnancy, and has been shown to increase arterial compliance and outward hypertrophic remodeling. Therefore, we investigated the possibility that relaxin acts on its receptor, RXFP1, to mediate uterine artery compliance in late pregnancy and increase uterine blood flow velocity in rats. RXFP1 was predominantly localized to the tunica media vascular smooth muscle cells in the uterine artery, although receptors were also detected in endothelial cells. Highest expression of Rxfp1 in the uterine artery occurred in estrus and early pregnancy. Isolated uterine arteries from late pregnant rats treated with a monoclonal antibody against circulating relaxin (MCA1) had significantly increased vessel wall stiffness compared with controls, with no reduction in wall thickness. Chronic infusion of relaxin (4 μg/h, osmotic minipump) for 5 d in nonpregnant rats significantly increased uterine artery blood flow velocity. Overall, these data demonstrate a functional role for relaxin in mediating uterine artery compliance in pregnant rats, which may be necessary to maintain adequate uterine blood flow to the uterus and placenta. PMID:22744867

  10. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s‑1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  11. Axial and radial velocities in the creeping flow in a pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuykov Andrey L'vovich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to analytical study of transformation fields of axial and radial velocities in uneven steady creeping flow of a Newtonian fluid in the initial portion of the cylindrical channel. It is shown that the velocity field of the flow is two-dimensional and determined by the stream function. The article is a continuation of a series of papers, where normalized analytic functions of radial axial distributions in uneven steady creeping flow in a cylindrical tube with azimuthal vorticity and stream function were obtained. There is Poiseuille profile for the axial velocity in the uniform motion of a fluid at an infinite distance from the entrance of the pipe (at x = ∞, here taken equal to zero radial velocity. There is uniform distribution of the axial velocity in the cross section at the tube inlet at x = 0, at which the axial velocity is constant along the current radius. Due to the axial symmetry of the flow on the axis of the pipe (at r = 0, the radial velocities and the partial derivative of the axial velocity along the radius, corresponding to the condition of the soft function extremum, are equal to zero. The authors stated vanishing of the velocity of the fluid on the walls of the pipe (at r = R , where R - radius of the tube due to its viscous sticking and tightness of the walls. The condition of conservation of volume flow along the tube was also accepted. All the solutions are obtained in the form of the Fourier - Bessel. It is shown that the hydraulic losses at uniform creeping flow of a Newtonian fluid correspond to Poiseuille - Hagen formula.

  12. Computational biorheology of human blood flow in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2014-02-01

    Hematologic disorders arising from infectious diseases, hereditary factors and environmental influences can lead to, and can be influenced by, significant changes in the shape, mechanical and physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), and the biorheology of blood flow. Hence, modeling of hematologic disorders should take into account the multiphase nature of blood flow, especially in arterioles and capillaries. We present here an overview of a general computational framework based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) which has broad applicability in cell biophysics with implications for diagnostics, therapeutics and drug efficacy assessments for a wide variety of human diseases. This computational approach, validated by independent experimental results, is capable of modeling the biorheology of whole blood and its individual components during blood flow so as to investigate cell mechanistic processes in health and disease. DPD is a Lagrangian method that can be derived from systematic coarse-graining of molecular dynamics but can scale efficiently up to arterioles and can also be used to model RBCs down to the spectrin level. We start from experimental measurements of a single RBC to extract the relevant biophysical parameters, using single-cell measurements involving such methods as optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy and micropipette aspiration, and cell-population experiments involving microfluidic devices. We then use these validated RBC models to predict the biorheological behavior of whole blood in healthy or pathological states, and compare the simulations with experimental results involving apparent viscosity and other relevant parameters. While the approach discussed here is sufficiently general to address a broad spectrum of hematologic disorders including certain types of cancer, this paper specifically deals with results obtained using this computational framework for blood flow in malaria and sickle cell anemia. PMID:24419829

  13. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the transfer of rocket engine flow simulation technology to work involving the development of blood pumps. Details are offered regarding the design and requirements of mechanical heart assist devices, or VADs (ventricular assist device). There are various computational fluid dynamics issues involved in the visualization of flow in such devices, and these are highlighted and compared to those of rocket turbopumps.

  14. Dynamic Modes of Red Blood Cells in Oscillatory Shear Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle $\\theta$, and phase angle $\\phi$ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. i) tank-treading (TT): $\\phi$ rotates while the shape and $\\theta$ oscillate. ii) tumbling (TB): $\\theta$ rotates while the shape and $\\phi$ oscillate. iii) intermediate ...

  15. Flow velocity and volume measurement of superior and inferior mesenteric artery with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flow velocity and volume of the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries (SMA, IMA) were measured with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in five healthy volunteers. Each volunteer was first measured in a fasting state, and then one, two, and three hours after a meal. The average SMA flow volume of the volunteers was 230.3±46.8 ml/min (mean±standard error) during the fasting state, and 714.7±207.7 ml/min, 339.2±85.7 ml/min, and 263.8±21.0 ml/min, respectively, at one, two, and three hours postmeal. The increase at one hour postmeal was statistically significant (p<0.05). The corresponding flow measurements in the IMA were 63.1±11.2 ml/min, 67.6±11.2 ml/min, 57.9±8.6 ml/min, and 53.2±6.8 ml/min. These values do not represent a statistically significant flow volume change in the IMA. In all volunteers, the SMA volumetric flow increased the most one hour after the food challenge (72-400% relative to baseline). Diastolic velocity in the SMA increased significantly one hour postmeal, but systolic velocity did not change significantly. The IMA did not demonstrate a significant change in either systolic or diastolic velocity. The difference between the SMA and IMA in the way of reacting against the food challenge is thought to represent the difference between the requirements of small and large intestine for blood supply after the food challenge. These data demonstrate the possibility of this modality for the assessment of conditions such as chronic mesenteric ischemia. (author)

  16. Blood flow simulation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics: application to thrombus generation

    OpenAIRE

    AL-SAAD, Mohammed; Kulasegaram, Sivakumar; Bordas, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow rheology is considered to be a complex phenomenon. In order to understand the characteristics of blood flow, it is important to identify key parameters those influence the flow behaviour of blood. Further, the characterisation of blood flow will also enable us to understand flow parameters associated with physiological conditions such as atherosclerosis. Thrombosis plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis, or to stop bleeding when a blood vessel is injured. This article focuses on u...

  17. Reduction in cerebral blood flow volume in infants complicated with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy resulting in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Sumio; Mizuno, Keisuke; Kawai, Satomi; Kakita, Hiroki; Goto, Tatenobu; Hussein, Mohamed Hamed; Daoud, Ghada A; Ito, Tetsuya; Kato, Ineko; Suzuki, Satoshi; Togari, Hajime

    2008-04-01

    Hypoxic ischemic brain can result in cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and learning disabilities in surviving children. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the cerebral blood flow volume in infants complicated with brain damage after the birth. Nine term infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and 41 normal term infants were studied. Four infants with HIE suffered from CP or mental retardation, and the other five infants exhibited normal neurodevelopment. The mean blood flow velocity and diameter of the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery were measured for 28 days. The intravascular flow volume was determined by calculating the flow velocity and the cross-sectional area. The ejection fraction and cardiac output were obtained, and the mean blood pressures were recorded. The summed flow volumes in both the ICA and VA, and the total CBFV increased after the birth in both the normal infants and the infants diagnosed with HIE with no disability complications. The total blood flow volume was significantly lower in infants with HIE and CP than in normal infants on days 0, 2, 5, 7, 10, 21, and 28, and significantly lower in infants with HIE and CP than in normal infants with HIE on days 2, 4, and 7. The ejection fraction was significantly lower in infants with HIE than in normal infants only on day 0. Our results suggest that the total cerebral blood supply is decreased in infants with HIE in those complicated with brain damage. PMID:17950550

  18. Full-field velocity and temperature measurements using magnetic resonance imaging in turbulent complex internal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow and heat transfer in complex internal passages are difficult to predict due to the presence of strong secondary flows and multiple regions of separation. Two methods based on magnetic resonance imaging called 4D magnetic resonance velocimetry (4D-MRV) and thermometry (4D-MRT) are described for measuring the full-field mean velocities and temperatures, respectively, in complex internal passage flows. 4D-MRV measurements are presented for flow through a model of a gas turbine blade internal cooling passage geometry with Reh = 10,000 and compared to PIV measurements in a highly complex 180 deg bend. Measured three-component velocities provide excellent qualitative and quantitative insight into flow structures throughout the entire flow domain. The velocities agree within ±10% in magnitude and ±10 deg in direction in a large portion of the bend which is characterized by turbulent fluctuations as high as 10-20% of the passage inlet bulk velocity. Integrated average flow rates are accurate to 4% throughout the flow domain. Preliminary 4D-MRV/MRT results are presented for heated fully developed turbulent pipe flow at ReD = 13,000

  19. In vitro blood flow model with physiological wall shear stress for hemocompatibility testing-An example of coronary stent testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Gerwin Erik; Blok, Sjoerd Leendert Johannes; van Oeveren, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Hemocompatibility of blood contacting medical devices has to be evaluated before their intended application. To assess hemocompatibility, blood flow models are often used and can either consist of in vivo animal models or in vitro blood flow models. Given the disadvantages of animal models, in vitro blood flow models are an attractive alternative. The in vitro blood flow models available nowadays mostly focus on generating continuous flow instead of generating a pulsatile flow with certain wall shear stress, which has shown to be more relevant in maintaining hemostasis. To address this issue, the authors introduce a blood flow model that is able to generate a pulsatile flow and wall shear stress resembling the physiological situation, which the authors have coined the "Haemobile." The authors have validated the model by performing Doppler flow measurements to calculate velocity profiles and (wall) shear stress profiles. As an example, the authors evaluated the thrombogenicity of two drug eluting stents, one that was already on the market and one that was still under development. After identifying proper conditions resembling the wall shear stress in coronary arteries, the authors compared the stents with each other and often used reference materials. These experiments resulted in high contrast between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, showing the exceptional testing capabilities of the Haemobile. In conclusion, the authors have developed an in vitro blood flow model which is capable of mimicking physiological conditions of blood flow as close as possible. The model is convenient in use and is able to clearly discriminate between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, making it suitable for evaluating the hemocompatible properties of medical devices. PMID:27435456

  20. Simultaneous HF measurements of E- and F-region Doppler velocities at large flow angles

    OpenAIRE

    Makarevitch, R. A.; F. Honary; Koustov, A. V.

    2004-01-01

    Data collected by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar are used to illustrate the significant difference between the cosine component of the plasma convection in the F-region and the Doppler velocity of the E-region coherent echoes observed at large flow angles. We show that the E-region velocity is ~5 times smaller in magnitude and rotated by ~30° clockwise with respect to convection in the F-region. Also, measurements at flow angles larger than 90° exhibit a completely new feature: Doppler velocity...