WorldWideScience

Sample records for blood flow oxygen

  1. Deoxygenation Reduces Sickle Cell Blood Flow at Arterial Oxygen Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinran; Wood, David K; Higgins, John M

    2016-06-21

    The majority of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease is caused by vaso-occlusion: circulatory obstruction leading to tissue ischemia and infarction. The consequences of vaso-occlusion are seen clinically throughout the vascular tree, from the relatively high-oxygen and high-velocity cerebral arteries to the relatively low-oxygen and low-velocity postcapillary venules. Prevailing models of vaso-occlusion propose mechanisms that are relevant only to regions of low oxygen and low velocity, leaving a wide gap in our understanding of the most important pathologic process in sickle cell disease. Progress toward understanding vaso-occlusion is further challenged by the complexity of the multiple processes thought to be involved, including, but not limited to 1) deoxygenation-dependent hemoglobin polymerization leading to impaired rheology, 2) endothelial and leukocyte activation, and 3) altered cellular adhesion. Here, we chose to focus exclusively on deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes in an effort to quantify their contribution independent of the other processes that are likely involved in vivo. We take advantage of an experimental system that, to our knowledge, uniquely enables the study of pressure-driven blood flow in physiologic-sized tubes at physiologic hematocrit under controlled oxygenation conditions, while excluding the effects of endothelium, leukocyte activation, adhesion, inflammation, and coagulation. We find that deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes are sufficient to increase apparent viscosity significantly, slowing blood flow velocity at arterial oxygen tension even without additional contributions from inflammation, adhesion, and endothelial and leukocyte activation. We quantify the changes in apparent viscosity and define a set of functional regimes of sickle cell blood flow personalized for each patient that may be important in further dissecting mechanisms of in vivo vaso-occlusion as well as in assessing risk of patient

  2. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (V˙O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and V˙O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy...

  3. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the Rett syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on six patients with the Rett syndrome and the results were compared with the concurrent clinical status of the patients. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) was low in five patients, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was low in four patients; both had a tendency to decline with advancing age. Although the cause is unknown, it is suggested that impaired oxidative metabolism exists in the Rett syndrome. An analysis of the distribution among brain regions showed that the ratios of values for the frontal cortex to those for the temporal cortex for both the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CMRO2 were lower than those for the controls, which may indicate the loss of of hyperfrontality in the Rett syndrome. Distribution of brain metabolism may be immature in the Rett syndrome. (author)

  4. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the Rett syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hideto; Fueki, Noboru; Suzuki, Hisaharu; Sakuragawa, Norio; Iio, Masaaki (National Central Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on six patients with the Rett syndrome and the results were compared with the concurrent clinical status of the patients. The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) was low in five patients, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was low in four patients; both had a tendency to decline with advancing age. Although the cause is unknown, it is suggested that impaired oxidative metabolism exists in the Rett syndrome. An analysis of the distribution among brain regions showed that the ratios of values for the frontal cortex to those for the temporal cortex for both the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CMRO{sub 2} were lower than those for the controls, which may indicate the loss of of hyperfrontality in the Rett syndrome. Distribution of brain metabolism may be immature in the Rett syndrome. (author).

  5. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using positron emission tomography and 15O-steady state method, cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen consumption and oxygen extraction fraction were measured in patients with embolic occlusion and in those with thrombotic occlusion in the carotid system. By the study of patients with embolic occlusion, we evaluated ischemic threshold of CBF for infarction to be 16 ml/100 ml/min. The area of 'penumbra' could be estimated in regions with CBF value just above this threshold. In the patients with thrombotic occlusive lesion, we clarified that the efficiency of the collateral circulation was mainly related to the grade of peripheral atherosclerosis. These findings must be helpful to develop better strategy for treatment of cerebral ischemic disease. (author)

  6. A Model of Anterograde Oxygenated Lung Blood Flow in Acardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinakis, Sotirios; Burki, Marco; Abdel-Sayed, Saad; von Segesser, Ludwig Karl

    2016-01-01

    In extreme situations such as hyperacute rejection of heart transplant or major heart trauma, heart explantation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) hemodynamic support might be the only means for survival. In our previous model of acardia, pulmonary artery (PA) was clamped and did not receive any anterograde blood flow. A model of anterograde PA perfusion might be necessary to avoid ischemic pulmonary damage in prolonged ECMO in acardia. The aim of this study was to describe the surgical technique and to determine the feasibility of an anterograde lung perfusion in acardia through the anastomosis of the right internal mammary artery (RIMA) to the PA. A venoarterial cardiopulmonary bypass was established in three pigs (72 ± 2.6 kg) by the transjugular insertion to the caval axis of a double-staged cannula with carotid artery return. Heart was excised and ECMO was established as previously reported. Right internal mammary artery was harvested and after measurement of its output (93.3 ± 5.8 ml/min, representing 2.17% ± 0.15% of total pump flow), it was anastomosed to PA. Right internal mammary artery anastomosis to PA is a feasible, safe, and easy to perform maneuver assuring an anterograde lung perfusion in acardia. PMID:27442854

  7. Myocardial Ischemia: Lack of Coronary Blood Flow or Myocardial Oxygen Supply/Demand Imbalance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd

    2016-07-01

    Regional myocardial blood flow and contractile function in ischemic myocardium are well matched, and there is no evidence for an oxygen supply/demand imbalance. Thus, myocardial ischemia is lack of coronary blood flow with electric, functional, metabolic, and structural consequences for the myocardium. All therapeutic interventions must aim to improve blood flow to ischemic myocardium as much and as quickly as possible. PMID:27390331

  8. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  9. Noninvasive optical characterization of muscle blood flow, oxygenation, and metabolism in women with fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Yu; Gurley, Katelyn; Symons, Brock; Long, Douglas; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Crofford., Leslie J.; Peterson, Charlotte A.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Women with fibromyalgia (FM) have symptoms of increased muscular fatigue and reduced exercise tolerance, which may be associated with alterations in muscle microcirculation and oxygen metabolism. This study used near-infrared diffuse optical spectroscopies to noninvasively evaluate muscle blood flow, blood oxygenation and oxygen metabolism during leg fatiguing exercise and during arm arterial cuff occlusion in post-menopausal women with and without FM. Methods Fourteen women with...

  10. Cerebral blood flow, oxygen and glucose metabolism with PET in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Ichiya, Yuici; Kuwabara, Yasuo (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1989-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolic rate and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were measured with positron emission tomography (PET) in four patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Decreased blood flow and hypometabolism of oxygen and glucose were found in both subcortical and cortical regions, particularly in the striatum including the head of the caudate nucleus and the frontal cortex. The coupling between blood flow and metabolism was preserved even in the regions which showed decreased blood flow and hypometabolism. These findings indicated the hypofunction, as revealed by decreased blood flow and hypometablolism on PET, both in the striatum and the frontal cortex, and which may underlie the pathophysiological mechanism of motor and mental disturbance in PSP. (author).

  11. Cerebral blood flow, oxygen and glucose metabolism with PET in progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolic rate and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were measured with positron emission tomography (PET) in four patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Decreased blood flow and hypometabolism of oxygen and glucose were found in both subcortical and cortical regions, particularly in the striatum including the head of the caudate nucleus and the frontal cortex. The coupling between blood flow and metabolism was preserved even in the regions which showed decreased blood flow and hypometabolism. These findings indicated the hypofunction, as revealed by decreased blood flow and hypometablolism on PET, both in the striatum and the frontal cortex, and which may underlie the pathophysiological mechanism of motor and mental disturbance in PSP. (author)

  12. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F.; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These “bottom-up” models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans.

  13. Positron emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease: The relationship between regional cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease has demonstrated the importance of the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic activity. In acute stroke it has been found that within the first hours after the onset of symptoms cerebral blood flow in the affected area is more depressed than cerebral oxygen utilisation. This relative preservation of oxygen utilisation results from an increase in the oxygen extraction ratio far above its normal value. However, the oxygen extraction fraction subsequently falls in the following days indicating the transition from a situation of possibly reversible ischaemia to irreversible infarction. In patients with carotid occlusive disease an increase in the oxygen extraction ratio has been observed only in very few cases. It has been shown, however, that at an earlier stage the relationship between CBF and CBV (as CBF/CBV-ratio) provides a sensitive measure of diminished perfusion pressure which could be helpful for the selection of patients for EC-IC bypass surgery. In patients with sickle cell anaemia it has been found that oxygen delivery to the brain is maintained by an increase in cerebral blood flow, whereas the oxygen extraction ratio is not increased despite the presence of a low oxygen affinity haemoglobin. Preliminary observations in classical migraine suggest an ischaemic situation during the attack. (orig.)

  14. Blood flow and muscle oxygenation during low, moderate, and maximal sustained isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Chris J; Allen, Matti D; Olympico, Eric; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rice, Charles L

    2015-09-01

    A reduction of blood flow to active muscle will precipitate fatigue, and sustained isometric contractions produce intramuscular and compartmental pressures that can limit flow. The present study explored how blood flow and muscle oxygenation respond to isometric contractions at low, moderate, and maximal intensities. Over two visits, 10 males (26 ± 2 yr; means ± SD) performed 1-min dorsiflexion contractions at 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Doppler ultrasound of the anterior tibial artery was used to record arterial diameter and mean blood velocity and to calculate absolute blood flow. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of tibialis anterior was acquired with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There was a progressive increase in blood flow at 30% MVC (peak of 289 ± 139% resting value), no change from rest until an increase in the final 10 s of exercise at 60% MVC (peak of 197 ± 102% rest), and an initial decrease (59 ± 30% resting value) followed by a progressive increase at 100% MVC (peak of 355 ± 133% rest). Blood flow was greater at 30 and 100% than 60% MVC during the last 30 s of exercise. TOI was ∼63% at rest and, within 30 s of exercise, reached steady-state values of ∼42%, ∼22%, and ∼22% for 30, 60, and 100% MVC, respectively. Even maximal contraction of the dorsiflexors is unable to cause more than a transient decrease of flow in the anterior tibial artery. Unlike dynamic or intermittent isometric exercise, our results indicate blood flow is not linearly graded with intensity or directly coupled with oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions. PMID:26084698

  15. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Green, Sara Marie Ehrenreich;

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise...... output by dye dilution, arterial pressure by an arterial catheter-transducer, and muscle and peritendinous O2 saturation by spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). 3. Calf blood flow rose 20-fold with exercise, reaching 44 +/- 7 ml (100 g)-1 min-1 (mean +/- s.e.m. ) at 9 W, while Achilles' peritendinous...... with a rise in leg vascular conductance and microvascular haemoglobin volume, despite elevated systemic vascular resistance. 4. The parallel rise in calf muscle and peritendinous blood flow and fall in O2 saturation during exercise indicate that blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism in both...

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation with eliminated skin blood flow in young males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirasawa, Ai; Kaneko, Takahito; Tanaka, Naoki; Funane, Tsukasa; Kiguchi, Masashi; Sørensen, Henrik; Secher, Niels H; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    We estimated cerebral oxygenation during handgrip exercise and a cognitive task using an algorithm that eliminates the influence of skin blood flow (SkBF) on the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signal. The algorithm involves a subtraction method to develop a correction factor for each subject......-detector distances (15 and 30 mm) with the algorithm using the individual correction factor, we expressed cerebral oxygenation without influence from scalp and scull blood flow. Validity of the estimated cerebral oxygenation was verified during cerebral neural activation (handgrip exercise and cognitive task). With...... pressure was applied to the temporal artery, estimated O2Hb was not affected by elimination of SkBF during handgrip exercise (P = 0.666) or the cognitive task (P = 0.105). These findings suggest that the algorithm with the individual correction factor allows for evaluation of changes in an accurate...

  17. Near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation with eliminated skin blood flow in young males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, Ai; Kaneko, Takahito; Tanaka, Naoki; Funane, Tsukasa; Kiguchi, Masashi; Sørensen, Henrik; Secher, Niels H; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We estimated cerebral oxygenation during handgrip exercise and a cognitive task using an algorithm that eliminates the influence of skin blood flow (SkBF) on the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) signal. The algorithm involves a subtraction method to develop a correction factor for each subject. For twelve male volunteers (age 21 ± 1 yrs) +80 mmHg pressure was applied over the left temporal artery for 30 s by a custom-made headband cuff to calculate an individual correction factor. From the NIRS-determined ipsilateral cerebral oxyhemoglobin concentration (O2Hb) at two source-detector distances (15 and 30 mm) with the algorithm using the individual correction factor, we expressed cerebral oxygenation without influence from scalp and scull blood flow. Validity of the estimated cerebral oxygenation was verified during cerebral neural activation (handgrip exercise and cognitive task). With the use of both source-detector distances, handgrip exercise and a cognitive task increased O2Hb (P cognitive task (P = 0.105). These findings suggest that the algorithm with the individual correction factor allows for evaluation of changes in an accurate cerebral oxygenation without influence of extracranial blood flow by NIRS applied to the forehead. PMID:26018458

  18. Investigating the impact of oxygen concentration and blood flow variation on photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for cancer treatment based on the combined action of a photosensitizer, a special wavelength of light, oxygen (3O2) and generation of singlet oxygen (1O2). Intra-patient and inter-patient variability of oxygen concentration ([3O2]) before and after the treatment as well as photosensitizer concentration and hemodynamic parameters such as blood flow during PDT has been reported. Simulation of these variations is valuable, as it would be a means for the rapid assessment of treatment effect. A mathematical model has been previously developed to incorporate the diffusion equation for light transport in tissue and the macroscopic kinetic equations for simulation of [3O2], photosensitizers in ground and triplet states and concentration of the reacted singlet oxygen ([1O₂]rx) during PDT. In this study, the finite-element based calculation of the macroscopic kinetic equations is done for 2-(1- Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide (HPPH)-mediated PDT by incorporating the information of the photosensitizer photochemical parameters as well as the tissue optical properties, photosensitizer concentration, initial oxygen concentration ([3O2]0), blood flow changes and Φ that have been measured in mice bearing radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors. Then, [1O2]rx calculated by using the measured [3O2] during the PDT is compared with [1O2]rx calculated based on the simulated [3O₂]; both calculations showed a reasonably good agreement. Moreover, the impacts of the blood flow changes and [3O2]0 on [1O2]rx have been investigated, which showed no pronounced effect of the blood flow changes on the long-term 1O2 generation. When [3O2]0 becomes limiting, small changes in [3O₂] have large effects on [1O2]rx.

  19. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Langberg, Henning; Green, Stefan Mathias; Skovgaard, D; Bulow, J; Kjaer, M

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise...... output by dye dilution, arterial pressure by an arterial catheter-transducer, and muscle and peritendinous O2 saturation by spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). 3. Calf blood flow rose 20-fold with exercise, reaching 44 +/- 7 ml (100 g)-1 min-1 (mean +/- s.e.m. ) at 9 W, while Achilles' peritendinous...... flow increased (7-fold) to 14 +/- 4 ml (100 g)-1 min-1, which was 18 % of the maximal flow established during reactive hyperaemia. SRS-O2 saturation fell both in muscle (from 66 +/- 2 % at rest to 57 +/- 3 %, P <0.05) and in peritendinous regions (58 +/- 4 to 52 +/- 4 %, P <0.05) during exercise along...

  20. Linear coupling between cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption in activated human cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Richard D. Hoge; Atkinson, Jeff; Gill, Brad; Crelier, Gérard R.; Marrett, Sean; Pike, G Bruce

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that, within a specific cortical unit, fractional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) are coupled through an invariant relationship during physiological stimulation. This aim was achieved by simultaneously measuring relative changes in these quantities in human primary visual cortex (V1) during graded stimulation with patterns designed to selectively activate different populations of V1...

  1. Transcutaneous partial oxygen tension and skin blood flow monitoring: Continuous, noninvasive measures of cardiorespiratory change

    OpenAIRE

    Mark W. Greenlee; Akita, M.

    1985-01-01

    Transcutaneous partial oxygen tension (tc pO₂) and skin blood flow (via heat clearance) were measured noninvasively in 22 male subjects who performed stress-inducing tasks (i.e. hand-grip exercise, cold pressor test, breath holding, hyperventilation and mirror-tracing). An analysis of variance and covariance was conducted for tc pO₂ heat clearance, heart rate, respiration rate, finger pulse volume and systolic/diastolic blood pressure. Results indicate that tc pO₂ can depict phasic cardioresp...

  2. Meal-induced changes in splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake in middle-aged healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Søndergaard, Susanne B; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: For decades, the determination of changes in splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake after a meal has been used in the management of patients with suspected chronic intestinal ischaemia. However, little is known about the normal meal-induced responses. The aim of the present study was...... therefore to measure the splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake before and after a standardized meal in a group of middle-aged normal volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake were determined at baseline and after a 3600-kJ mixed meal in 8 healthy women (50-70 years) and 10...

  3. Integrated Measurements of Electrical Activity, Oxygen Tension, Blood Flow, and Ca2+ -Signaling in Rodents In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Claus; Thomsen, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    in rodent preparation. We also describe methods for recording of cerebral blood flow (CBF), tissue partial pressure of oxygen (tpO2), and cytosolic calcium transients. We finally give examples where electrophysiology, blood flow, metabolism, and calcium transients have been studied together....

  4. Spatial mapping of blood flow and oxygen consumption in the human calf muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Sergio; Hoimes, Matthew L.; Casavola, Claudia; Franceschini, Maria-Angela

    2001-05-01

    We have designed a new optical probe to perform spatially resolved measurements of blood flow and oxygen consumption over an area of about 4 x 4 cm2 of the lateral gastrocnemius muscle (calf muscle) of human subjects. The blood flow and the oxygen consumption were measured non- invasively with frequency-domain, near-infrared spectroscopy from the maximum rate of increase of the oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin concentrations in the muscle during venous occlusion. In a preliminary test on one subject, involving measurements at rest and after exercise, we have found that the spatial variability of the measured blood flow and oxygen consumption is significantly greater than the variability of repeated measurements at a given tissue location. We have also observed a strong spatial dependence of the exercise-induced increase in blood flow and oxygen consumption.

  5. Meal-induced changes in splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake in middle-aged healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Søndergaard, SB; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    therefore to measure the splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake before and after a standardized meal in a group of middle-aged normal volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake were determined at baseline and after a 3600-kJ mixed meal in 8 healthy women (50-70 years) and 10...... in middle-aged healthy humans. Our data may be relevant for the evaluation of corresponding data from patients with suspected chronic intestinal ischaemia....

  6. Effects of cardiopulmonary bypass on gut blood flow, oxygen utilization, and intramucosal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, S K; Becket, J; Brannan, J; Keogh, B E; Taylor, K M

    1994-05-01

    Studies documenting rises in endotoxin after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have postulated gut mucosal hypoperfusion. We have investigated alterations in jejunal blood flow by laser Doppler flow measurement, intramucosal pH (pHi) by tonometry, and oxygen utilization in a canine model of hypothermic CPB (n = 11 dogs). After 10 minutes of hypothermic CPB, despite no major reduction in superior mesenteric artery flow, mucosal laser Doppler flow decreased to -38.2% +/- 9.3% of levels obtained before bypass (p = 0.008) and serosal laser Doppler flow, to -47.3% +/- 11.4% (p = 0.006). During the hypothermic phase, mesenteric oxygen consumption fell from 0.18 +/- 0.01 to 0.098 +/- 0.01 mL.min-1.kg-1 (p = 0.005), and mesenteric oxygen delivery fell from 1.97 +/- 0.39 to 1.14 +/- 0.12 mL.min-1.kg-1 (p = 0.05). There was no change in jejunal pHi. During the rewarming phase, there was a substantial increase in mucosal laser Doppler flow, peaking at +69.8% +/- 15.2% (p = 0.03), whereas serosal laser Doppler flow returned to values seen prior to CPB (-16.4% +/- 21.5%; p = 0.25). These changes coincided with a surge in oxygen consumption (0.33 +/- 0.042 mL.min-1.kg-1; p = 0.009), while mesenteric oxygen delivery remained depressed at 1.09 +/- 0.12 mL.min-1.kg-1 (p = 0.04). Jejunal pHi fell from a value of 7.36 +/- 0.04 before CPB to 7.12 +/- 0.07 (p = 0.02), thus indicating mucosal hypoxia. During the rewarming phase of hypothermic CPB, there is a disparity between mesenteric oxygen consumption and oxygen delivery with villus tip ischemia; these findings may explain the pathophysiology of endotoxemia during CPB. PMID:8179384

  7. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in dementia with Lewy bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yoshitomo; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) and the oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) were measured using the steady-state {sup 15}O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and compared with ten patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and six normal controls. In the AD patients, rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were significantly decreased in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices compared with controls. In DLB patients, rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were decreased in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortices compared with controls, and were decreased more diffusely than in AD patients. rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were significantly decreased in occipital cortex compared with AD patients. rOEF was significantly increased in the parieto-temporal cortex in AD patients compared with controls. In DLB patients, rOEF was significantly increased not only in the parieto-temporal cortex but also in the occipital and frontal cortices compared with controls, and was significantly increased in the occipital cortex compared with AD patients. The diffuse reduction of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism including the occipital cortex may be related to visual hallucination and other visuospatial deficits frequently seen in DLB patients. The increase in rOEF may be mainly due to the reduction in the vascular bed associated with decreased activity in the vasodilatory cholinergic system. (author)

  8. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in dementia with Lewy bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2) and the oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) were measured using the steady-state 15O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and compared with ten patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and six normal controls. In the AD patients, rCBF and rCMRO2 were significantly decreased in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices compared with controls. In DLB patients, rCBF and rCMRO2 were decreased in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortices compared with controls, and were decreased more diffusely than in AD patients. rCBF and rCMRO2 were significantly decreased in occipital cortex compared with AD patients. rOEF was significantly increased in the parieto-temporal cortex in AD patients compared with controls. In DLB patients, rOEF was significantly increased not only in the parieto-temporal cortex but also in the occipital and frontal cortices compared with controls, and was significantly increased in the occipital cortex compared with AD patients. The diffuse reduction of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism including the occipital cortex may be related to visual hallucination and other visuospatial deficits frequently seen in DLB patients. The increase in rOEF may be mainly due to the reduction in the vascular bed associated with decreased activity in the vasodilatory cholinergic system. (author)

  9. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine functional changes in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were determined using 0-15 positron emission tomography in 10 PD patients and five age-matched healthy volunteers. There was a tendency among PD patients towards a decreased CBF and CMRO2 in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. These values were significantly lower in the frontal cortex in the PD group than the control group. There was no difference in OEF between the groups. A more decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was observed in patients staged as severer on the scale of Hoehn and Yahr. There was no correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesis. A decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was associated with mental disorders, such as depression, hallucination, and dementia. These results may provide an important clue for the understanding of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway and the relationship between PD and dementia. (N.K.)

  10. Local cerebral blood flow and local oxygen consumption in prolonged hemiplegic migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work gives the results of a study by positron emission tomography of the cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen-extraction rate (O2E) and oxygen consumption (CMRO2) during severe and prolonged attack of hemiplegic migraine. The salient facts observed are a high (CBF) in the brain hemisphere affected (ruling out the hypothesis of a persistent cerebral ischemia), together with a collapsed O2E (''luxury perfusion'') and especially preservation of the CMRO2 suggesting a decoupling not only between CBF and CMRO2 but also between CMRO2 and functional state of the tissue. Some time after the attack a new study showed the recoupling between CBF and CMRO2, but with the latter reduced in the affected hemisphere although the clinical and tomodensitometric state had returned to normal. These new observations should not however be improperly generalised to all migraines, given the unusual characteristics of the disorder in our patient

  11. Cerebral oxygen and glucose metabolism and blood flow in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy: a PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen metabolism (CMRO2), and glucose metabolism (CMRGlc) were measured using positron emission tomography in five patients diagnosed as having mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. The molar ratio between the oxygen and glucose consumptions was reduced diffusely, as CMRO2 was markedly decreased and CMRGlc was slightly reduced. The CBF showed less changes. The CBF increase on hypercapnia was smaller than normal, though this was not significant. CBF with hypocapnia demonstrated a significant reduction compared with the normal. These results suggest that oxidative metabolism is impaired and anaerobic glycolysis relatively stimulated, due to a primary defect of mitochondrial function, and that mild lactic acidosis occurs in brain tissue because of impaired utilisation of pyruvate in the TCA cycle. As these findings appear to indicate directly a characteristic of this disease, such measurements may be a useful tool for assessment of the pathophysiology and for diagnosis of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. (orig.). With 1 fig., 4 tabs

  12. Impaired cerebral blood flow and oxygenation during exercise in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Seifert, Thomas; Brassard, Patrice;

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial vascular function and capacity to increase cardiac output during exercise are impaired in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We tested the hypothesis that the increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise is also blunted and, therefore, that cerebral oxygenation becomes.......05). In contrast, CBF increased ~20% during exercise in the control group while the brain uptake of lactate and glucose was similar in the two groups. In conclusion, these results suggest that impaired CBF and oxygenation responses to exercise in T2DM patients may relate to limited ability to increase cardiac...... affected and perceived exertion increased in T2DM patients. We quantified cerebrovascular besides systemic hemodynamic responses to incremental ergometer cycling exercise in eight male T2DM and seven control subjects. CBF was assessed from the Fick equation and by transcranial Doppler-determined middle...

  13. Effects of diving and oxygen on autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklewski, Pawel J; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Nuckowska, Magdalena K; Tkachenko, Yurii

    2013-09-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular leisure activity with the number of divers reaching several millions worldwide. Scuba diving represents a huge challenge for integrative physiology. In mammalian evolution, physiological reflexes developed to deal with lack of oxygen, rather than with an excess, which makes adaptations to scuba diving more difficult to describe and understand than those associated with breath-hold diving. The underwater environment significantly limits the use of equipment to register the organism's functions, so, in most instances, scientific theories are built on experiments that model real diving to some extent, like hyperbaric exposures, dive reflexes or water immersion. The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge related to the influence exerted by physiological conditions specific to diving on the autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow. The main factors regulating cerebral blood flow during scuba diving are discussed as follows: 1) increased oxygen partial pressure; 2) immersion-related trigemino-cardiac reflexes and 3) exposure to cold, exercise and stress. Also discussed are the potential mechanisms associated with immersion pulmonary oedema. PMID:24122190

  14. Simple exercises that significantly increase cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation

    CERN Document Server

    Gersten, Alexander; Raz, Amir; Fried, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that simple exercises may significantly increase cerebral blood flow (CBF) and/or cerebral oxygenation. Eighteen subjects ranging in age from nineteen to thirty nine participated in a four-stage study during which measurements of end tidal CO_2 (EtCO2 - by capnometer) and local brain oxygenation (by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) sensor) were taken. The four stages were 1) baseline, 2) breathing exercises, 3) solving an arithmetic problem, and 4) biofeedback. During the breathing exercises there was a significant increase in EtCO2 indicating a significant increase in global CBF. The increase in global CBF was estimated on the basis of a theoretical model. During the arithmetic and biofeedback tasks there was a significant increase in the local (Fp1) oxygenation, but it varied between the different participants. The results may lead to new clinical applications of CBF and brain oxygenation monitoring and behavioral control. We foresee future more detailed investigations in the contr...

  15. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T.; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M.; Perthen, Joanna E.; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation...

  16. Simultaneous blood flow and blood oxygenation measurements using a combination of diffuse speckle contrast analysis and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Myeongsu; Phillips, Zephaniah; Mai, Phuong Minh; Yeo, Chaebeom; Song, Cheol; Lee, Kijoon; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-02-01

    A combined diffuse speckle contrast analysis (DSCA)-near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system is proposed to simultaneously measure qualitative blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in human tissue. The system employs an optical switch to alternate two laser sources at two different wavelengths and a CCD camera to capture the speckle image. Therefore, an optical density can be measured from two wavelengths for NIRS measurements and a speckle contrast can be calculated for DSCA measurements. In order to validate the system, a flow phantom test and an arm occlusion protocol for arterial and venous occlusion were performed. Shorter exposure times (<1 ms) show a higher drop (between 50% and 66%) and recovery of 1/KS2 values after occlusion (approximately 150%), but longer exposure time (3 ms) shows more consistent hemodynamic changes. For four subjects, the 1/KS2 values dropped to an average of 82.1±4.0% during the occlusion period and the average recovery of 1/KS2 values after occlusion was 109.1±0.8%. There was also an approximately equivalent amplitude change in oxyhemoglobin (OHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (RHb) during arterial occlusion (max RHb=0.0085±0.0024 mM/DPF, min OHb=-0.0057±0.0044 mM/DPF). The sensitivity of the system makes it a suitable modality to observe qualitative hemodynamic trends during induced physiological changes.

  17. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S; Vorstrup, S; Lassen, N A; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during light sleep (stage 2) in 8 young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness and light sleep as verified by standard...... polysomnography. Unlike our previous study in man showing a highly significant 25% decrease in CMRO2 during deep sleep (stage 3-4) we found a modest but statistically significant decrease of 5% in CMRO2 during stage 2 sleep. Deep and light sleep are both characterized by an almost complete lack of mental activity....... They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness...

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during normal human sleep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ken (Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-09-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional oxygen extraction fraction (rCEF) and regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured using the continuous inhalation technique for {sup 15}O with positron emission tomography (PET) during both wakefulness and sleep. Ten paid volunteers, with a mean age of 21.6 yrs., were deprived of sleep for a period of approximately 20 hours, and the experiments were performed mostly in the morning. {sup 15}O activity of both whole blood and the plasma, pixel count of PET, total arterial blood oxygen content were used for analysis of rCBF, rOEF and rCMRO{sub 2}. PET scannings were carried out mostly during the very light non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, i.e. stage 1 and/or 2, and wakefulness. About 10 minutes after the start of continuous inhalation of {sup 15}O gas, the {sup 15}O activity of the brain was found to be in a steady-state condition. During this steady-state condition, PET scannings were performed for about 10 minutes. Regions of interest, square in shape and having an area of 2.8 cm{sup 3}, were set in each cortex on PET images of a horizontal cross-section of the brain, set at 45 mm above the orbitomeatal line. The rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were analysed in 5 of 10 male subjects during both wakefulness and NREM sleep, and only 3 were done during three sleep stages, including REM sleep. Levels of rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} were found to be decreased in NREM sleep, and the decreasing rates were calculated at 10.2% and 7.6% from the level of wakefulness, respectively. There was no significant difference in the mean value of rOEF between wakefulness and NREM sleep. There were no significant regional differences found in the rate of decrease among the frontal, temporal and occipital cortices. It was considered that the decrease of rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} during NREM sleep suggested a decrease of the activity levels in the cerebral functions. (author).

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during normal human sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional oxygen extraction fraction (rCEF) and regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (rCMRO2) were measured using the continuous inhalation technique for 15O with positron emission tomography (PET) during both wakefulness and sleep. Ten paid volunteers, with a mean age of 21.6 yrs., were deprived of sleep for a period of approximately 20 hours, and the experiments were performed mostly in the morning. 15O activity of both whole blood and the plasma, pixel count of PET, total arterial blood oxygen content were used for analysis of rCBF, rOEF and rCMRO2. PET scannings were carried out mostly during the very light non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, i.e. stage 1 and/or 2, and wakefulness. About 10 minutes after the start of continuous inhalation of 15O gas, the 15O activity of the brain was found to be in a steady-state condition. During this steady-state condition, PET scannings were performed for about 10 minutes. Regions of interest, square in shape and having an area of 2.8 cm3, were set in each cortex on PET images of a horizontal cross-section of the brain, set at 45 mm above the orbitomeatal line. The rCBF and rCMRO2 were analysed in 5 of 10 male subjects during both wakefulness and NREM sleep, and only 3 were done during three sleep stages, including REM sleep. Levels of rCBF and rCMRO2 were found to be decreased in NREM sleep, and the decreasing rates were calculated at 10.2% and 7.6% from the level of wakefulness, respectively. There was no significant difference in the mean value of rOEF between wakefulness and NREM sleep. There were no significant regional differences found in the rate of decrease among the frontal, temporal and occipital cortices. It was considered that the decrease of rCBF and rCMRO2 during NREM sleep suggested a decrease of the activity levels in the cerebral functions. (author)

  20. Investigating tissue respiration and skin microhaemocirculation under adaptive changes and the synchronization of blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-functional laser non-invasive diagnostic systems allow the study of a number of microcirculatory parameters, including index of blood microcirculation (Im) (by laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of skin tissue (by tissue reflectance oximetry, TRO). This research aimed to use such a system to investigate the synchronization of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms under normal and adaptive change conditions. Studies were conducted on eight healthy volunteers of 21–49 years. These volunteers were observed between one and six months, totalling 422 basic tests (3 min each). Measurements were performed on the palmar surface of the right middle finger and the lower forearm's medial surface. Rhythmic oscillations of LDF and TRO were studied using wavelet analysis. Combined tissue oxygen consumption data for all volunteers during ‘adaptive changes’ increased relative to normal conditions with and without arteriovenous anastomoses. Data analysis revealed resonance and synchronized rhythms in microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation as an adaptive change in myogenic oscillation (vasomotion) resulting from exercise and possibly psychoemotional stress. Synchronization of myogenic rhythms during adaptive changes may lead to increased oxygen consumption as a result of increased microvascular blood flow velocity. (paper)

  1. Regional changes in cerebral blood flow oxygenation can indicate global changes in cerebral blood flow during coronary artery occlusion in juvenile pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a widely employed method for assessment of regional cerebral oxygenation (RcStO2). RcStO2 values are expected to vary with changes in the relative amount of oxyhaemoglobin. The present experimental study aimed to assess the response of RcStO2 to controlled alterations of carotid blood flow (CQ). Landrace pigs were anesthetized followed by surgical preparation. Cyclic variations in cardiac output were accomplished by intermittently occluding the main stem of the left coronary artery. A flow measurement probe for assessing CQ was placed around the left carotid artery. One NIRS probe was placed on the left ipsilateral forehead to assess regional cerebral oximetry. Simultaneous registration of CQ and RcStO2 was conducted. There was a strong correlation for variation in CQ and RcStO2 signal values. Based on coherence analysis the fraction of power of the RcStO2 that was coherent with the CQ signal reached 0.84 ± 0.12 (P < 0.05) for frequencies lower than 0.1 Hz. The agreement of the sample-to-sample co-variation, as assessed by the Pearson correlation coefficient, was 0.83 ± 0.08 (P < 0.05). One explanatory component for variations in cerebral oxygenation verified by NIRS should be attributed to variations in the cerebral blood flow. (paper)

  2. High-frequency photoacoustic imaging of erythrocyte aggregation and oxygen saturation: probing hemodynamic relations under pulsatile blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of high-frequency photoacoustic (PA) imaging to study the shear rate dependent relationship between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and oxygen saturation (SO2) in a simulated blood flow system. The PA signal amplitude increased during the formation of aggregates and cyclically varied at intervals corresponding to the beat rate (30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 bpm) for all optical wavelengths of illumination (750 and 850 nm).The SO2 also cyclically varied in phase with the PA signal amplitude for all beat rates. In addition, the mean blood flow velocity cyclically varied at the same interval of beat rate, and the shear rate (i.e. the radial gradient of flow velocity) also cyclically varied. On the other hand, the phase of the cyclic variation in the shear rate was reversed compared to that in the PA signal amplitude. This study indicates that RBC aggregation induced by periodic changes in the shear rate can be correlated with the SO2 under pulsatile blood flow. Furthermore, PA imaging of flowing blood may be capable of providing a new biomarker for the clinical application in terms of monitoring blood viscosity, oxygen delivery and their correlation.

  3. Blood flow mechanics and oxygen transport and delivery in the retinal microcirculation: multiscale mathematical modeling and numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causin, Paola; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Malgaroli, Francesca; Sacco, Riccardo; Harris, Alon

    2016-06-01

    The scientific community continues to accrue evidence that blood flow alterations and ischemic conditions in the retina play an important role in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. Many factors influence retinal hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation, including blood pressure, blood rheology, oxygen arterial permeability and tissue metabolic demand. Since the influence of these factors on the retinal circulation is difficult to isolate in vivo, we propose here a novel mathematical and computational model describing the coupling between blood flow mechanics and oxygen ([Formula: see text]) transport in the retina. Albeit in a simplified manner, the model accounts for the three-dimensional anatomical structure of the retina, consisting in a layered tissue nourished by an arteriolar/venular network laying on the surface proximal to the vitreous. Capillary plexi, originating from terminal arterioles and converging into smaller venules, are embedded in two distinct tissue layers. Arteriolar and venular networks are represented by fractal trees, whereas capillary plexi are represented using a simplified lumped description. In the model, [Formula: see text] is transported along the vasculature and delivered to the tissue at a rate that depends on the metabolic demand of the various tissue layers. First, the model is validated against available experimental results to identify baseline conditions. Then, a sensitivity analysis is performed to quantify the influence of blood pressure, blood rheology, oxygen arterial permeability and tissue oxygen demand on the [Formula: see text] distribution within the blood vessels and in the tissue. This analysis shows that: (1) systemic arterial blood pressure has a strong influence on the [Formula: see text] profiles in both blood and tissue; (2) plasma viscosity and metabolic consumption rates have a strong influence on the [Formula: see text] tension at the level of the retinal ganglion cells; and (3) arterial [Formula: see text

  4. Influence of erythrocyte oxygenation and intravascular ATP on resting and exercising skeletal muscle blood flow in humans with mitochondrial myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Tina D; Vissing, John; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen (O(2)) extraction is impaired in exercising skeletal muscle of humans with mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but the muscle hemodynamic response to exercise has never been directly investigated. This study sought to examine the extent to which human skeletal muscle perfusion can...... healthy control subjects: 1) at rest during normoxia, hypoxia, hyperoxia and intra-femoral artery ATP infusion, and 2) during passive and dynamic one-legged knee-extensor exercises. At rest, blood flow (LBF), femoral arterial and venous blood oxygenation and plasma ATP were similar in the two groups...

  5. Simultaneous assessment of red blood cell aggregation and oxygen saturation under pulsatile flow using high-frequency photoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of photoacoustic (PA) imaging for assessing the correlation between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and the oxygen saturation (sO2) in a simulated pulsatile blood flow system. For the 750 and 850 nm illuminations, the PA amplitude (PAA) increased and decreased as the mean blood flow velocity decreased and increased, respectively, at all beat rates (60, 120 and 180 bpm). The sO2 also cyclically varied, in phase with the PAA for all beat rates. However, the linear correlation between the sO2 and the PAA at 850 nm was stronger than that at 750 nm. These results suggest that the sO2 can be correlated with RBC aggregation induced by decreased mean shear rate in pulsatile flow, and that the correlation is dependent on the optical wavelength. The hemodynamic properties of blood flow assessed by PA imaging may be used to provide a new biomarker for simultaneous monitoring blood viscosity related to RBC aggregation, oxygen delivery related to the sO2 and their clinical correlation.

  6. Simultaneous assessment of red blood cell aggregation and oxygen saturation under pulsatile flow using high-frequency photoacoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of photoacoustic (PA) imaging for assessing the correlation between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and the oxygen saturation (sO2) in a simulated pulsatile blood flow system. For the 750 and 850 nm illuminations, the PA amplitude (PAA) increased and decreased as the mean blood flow velocity decreased and increased, respectively, at all beat rates (60, 120 and 180 bpm). The sO2 also cyclically varied, in phase with the PAA for all beat rates. However, the linear correlation between the sO2 and the PAA at 850 nm was stronger than that at 750 nm. These results suggest that the sO2 can be correlated with RBC aggregation induced by decreased mean shear rate in pulsatile flow, and that the correlation is dependent on the optical wavelength. The hemodynamic properties of blood flow assessed by PA imaging may be used to provide a new biomarker for simultaneous monitoring blood viscosity related to RBC aggregation, oxygen delivery related to the sO2 and their clinical correlation. PMID:27446705

  7. Hepatic encephalopathy is associated with decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow, not increased ammonia uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole L;

    2013-01-01

    tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Ten patients with cirrhosis were studied during an acute episode of HE; nine were reexamined after recovery. Nine patients with cirrhosis with no history of HE served as controls. Mean CMRO(2) increased from 0.73 µmol oxygen/mL brain tissue/min during HE to 0.......91 µmol oxygen/mL brain tissue/min after recovery (paired t test; P <0.05). Mean CBF increased from 0.28 mL blood/mL brain tissue/min during HE to 0.38 mL blood/mL brain tissue/min after recovery (P <0.05). After recovery from HE, CMRO(2) and CBF were not significantly different from values in the control...

  8. Effects of Cortical Spreading Depression on Synaptic Activity, Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Piilgaard

    2010-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates I have during my PhD studied the effects of cortical spreading depression (CSD) on synaptic activity, blood flow and oxygen consumption in rat cerebral cortex. This was performed in vivo using an open cranial window approach in anesthetized rats. I applied...... two different sets of interneurons. Our data imply that for a given cortical area the amplitude of vascular signals will depend critically on the type of input and hence on the type of neurons activated. In the second study I investigated the effect of cortical spreading depression (CSD) on the evoked...... Laser-Doppler Flowmetry for measurements of cerebral blood flow, glass microelectrodes for recording of synaptic activity – local field potentials – and ongoing cortical electrical activity and a Clark type electrode for measurements of tissue partial pressure of oxygen (tpO2). Offline calculations of...

  9. Effects of acetazolamide on cerebral blood flow and brain tissue oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Friberg, L; Kastrup, J;

    1987-01-01

    Oral administration of 1 g of acetazolamide to 8 normal subjects studied at sea level and in normoxia caused an acute increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). During the subsequent prolonged oral treatment with 1 g of acetazolamide daily, CBF returned to normal within 2 days. The alveolar CO2 tensi...

  10. Influence of passive stretch on muscle blood flow, oxygenation and central cardiovascular responses in healthy young males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Nicholas T; Silette, Christopher R; Scheuermann, Barry W

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of skeletal muscle stretching on peripheral, central, and autonomic cardiovascular responses in humans. Twelve healthy males completed a controlled passive stretch of the plantar flexors for 4 min at three different intensities. Doppler ultrasound velocimetry and imaging techniques assessed mean leg blood flow (MLBF), antegrade blood flow, and retrograde blood flow of the popliteal artery. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed the concentration of deoxygenated hemoglobin + myoglobin ([HHb]) and the sum of its deoxygenated and oxygenated forms [i.e., blood volume ([Hbtot])]. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure were measured simultaneously to peripheral hemodynamic responses. During stretch there was an increase (P < 0.05) in antegrade and retrograde blood flow along with [HHb] and [Hbtot] relative to baseline, whereas MLBF was not altered. HR increased (P < 0.01) in a stretch intensity- and time-dependent manner, suggesting a threshold tension must be met that results in a mechanoreflex-mediated increase in HR. After stretch there was an increase (P < 0.05) in [Hbtot] and MLBF in each condition, suggesting that stretch creates a poststretch hyperemic response. Furthermore, retrograde blood flow was decreased (P < 0.05) after stretch in each stretch condition. Mean arterial pressure was decreased (P < 0.05) after moderate-intensity stretching. Collectively, our data provide novel mechanistic evidence on cardiovascular responses to skeletal muscle stretching in humans. Moreover, the reductions in MAP and retrograde blood flow suggest that stretch transiently reduces myogenic vascular tone in a poststretch resting period. PMID:26945077

  11. Synergy between shear-induced migration and secondary flows on red blood cells transport in arteries: considerations on oxygen transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasetti, Jacopo; Spazzini, Pier Giorgio; Hedin, Ulf; Gasser, T Christian

    2014-08-01

    Shear-induced migration of red blood cells (RBCs) is a well-known phenomenon characterizing blood flow in the small vessels (micrometre to millimetre size) of the cardiovascular system. In large vessels, like the abdominal aorta and the carotid artery (millimetre to centimetre size), the extent of this migration and its interaction with secondary flows has not been fully elucidated. RBC migration exerts its influence primarily on platelet concentration, oxygen transport and oxygen availability at the luminal surface, which could influence vessel wall disease processes in and adjacent to the intima. Phillips' shear-induced particle migration model, coupled to the Quemada viscosity model, was employed to simulate the macroscopic behaviour of RBCs in four patient-specific geometries: a normal abdominal aorta, an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), a normal carotid bifurcation and a stenotic carotid bifurcation. Simulations show a migration of RBCs from the near-wall region with a lowering of wall haematocrit (volume fraction of RBCs) on the posterior side of the normal aorta and on the lateral-external side of the iliac arteries. A marked migration is observed on the outer wall of the carotid sinus, along the common carotid artery and in the carotid stenosis. No significant migration is observed in the AAA. The spatial and temporal patterns of wall haematocrit are correlated with the near-wall shear layer and with the secondary flows induced by the vessel curvature. In particular, secondary flows accentuate the initial lowering in RBC near-wall concentration by convecting RBCs from the inner curvature side to the outer curvature side. The results reinforce data in literature showing a decrease in oxygen partial pressure on the inner curvature wall of the carotid sinus induced by the presence of secondary flows. The lowering of wall haematocrit is postulated to induce a decrease in oxygen availability at the luminal surface through a diminished concentration of

  12. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G;

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle...... cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial-venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38...... decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P < 0.05), resulting in a maintained cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular...

  13. A venous outflow method for measurement of rapid changes of the cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, B; Siesjö, B K

    1983-01-01

    A technique for continuous measurement of cerebral venous outflow in the rat is described. The method involves cannulation of one retroglenoid vein close to its exit from the skull, and diversion of cerebral venous blood through a closed extracorporal circuit with a drop recording device, the blood being returned to the central venous circulation via a catheter in the external jugular vein. Occlusion of the contralateral retroglenoid vein increases measured flow and minimizes extracerebral contamination of the diverted cerebral venous blood. The venous outflow system is not further isolated from cerebral or potential extracerebral collaterals. Thus, the mass of tissue drained cannot be exactly defined anatomically. However, the experiments involving changes of PP, arterial CO2 tension, and induction of epileptic seizure activity, and simultaneous indirect measurements with radioactive tracer technique, indicate that significant extracerebral contamination does not occur and that in short term measurements the venous outflow represents cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a constant mass of (dorsal and central, mainly forebrain) cerebral tissue. Measurement of arterial blood pressure and pressure in the cisterna magna allows calculation of cerebral perfusion pressure (PP). By simultaneous measurement of arterial and cerebral venous oxygen content changes in cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO2) can be calculated. The method has been applied to document several situations of transient CBF and CMRO2 changes. PMID:6658967

  14. Embryonic mouse blood flow and oxygen correlate with early pancreatic differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sohail R.; ESNI, FARZAD; Jakub, Adam; Paredes, Jose; Lath, Nikesh; Malek, Marcus; Potoka, Douglas A.; Prasadan, Krishna; Mastroberardino, Pier G.; Shiota, Chiyo; Guo, Ping; Miller, Kelly A.; Hackam, David J.; Burns, R. Cartland; Tulachan, Sidhartha S.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian embryo represents a fundamental paradox in biology. Its location within the uterus, especially early during development when embryonic cardiovascular development and placental blood flow are not well-established, leads to an obligate hypoxic environment. Despite this hypoxia, the embryonic cells are able to undergo remarkable growth, morphogenesis, and differentiation. Recent evidence suggests that embryonic organ differentiation, including pancreatic β-cells, is tightly regulat...

  15. Cerebral tissue oxygenation index and superior vena cava blood flow in the very low birth weight infant.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Superior vena cava (SVC) flow assesses blood flow from the upper body, including the brain. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides information on brain perfusion and oxygenation. AIM: To assess the relationship between cerebral tissue oxygenation index (cTOI) and cardiac output measures in the very low birth weight (VLBW) infant in the first day of life. METHODS: A prospective observational cohort study. Neonates with birth weight less than 1500 g (VLBW) were eligible for enrollment. Newborns with congenital heart disease, major congenital malformations and greater than Papile grade1 Intraventricular Haemorrhage on day 1 of life were excluded. Echocardiographic evaluation of SVC flow was performed in the first 24 h of life. Low SVC flow states were defined as a flow less than 40 mL\\/kg\\/min. cTOI was measured using NIRO 200 Hamamatsu. RESULTS: Twenty-seven VLBW neonates had both echocardiography and NIRS performed. The median (range) gestation was 29\\/40 (25 + 3 to 31 + 5 weeks) and median birth weight was 1.2 kg (0.57-1.48 kg). The mean (SD) TOI was 68.1 (7.9)%. The mean (SD) SVC flow was 70.36(39.5) mLs\\/kg\\/min. The correlation coefficient of cerebral tissue oxygenation and SVC flow was r = 0.53, p-value 0.005. There was a poor correlation between right and left ventricular output and cTOI which is not surprising considering the influence of intra- and extracardiac shunts. CONCLUSION: There is a positive relationship between cerebral TOI values and SVC flow in the very low birth infant on day one of life.

  16. Low Cerebral Oxygen Consumption and Blood Flow in Patients With Cirrhosis and an Acute Episode of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby;

    2009-01-01

    (15)O-water PET in 6 patients with liver cirrhosis and an acute episode of overt HE, 6 cirrhotic patients without HE, and 7 healthy subjects. RESULTS: Neither whole-brain CMRO(2) nor CBF differed significantly between cirrhotic patients without HE and healthy subjects, but were both significantly...... reductions in CMRO(2) and CBF in patients with HE were essentially generalized throughout the brain. CONCLUSIONS: The observations imply that reduced cerebral oxygen consumption and blood flow in cirrhotic patients with an acute episode of overt HE are associated with HE and not cirrhosis as such, and that...

  17. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men. PMID:27044854

  18. The relationship between the cerebral blood flow, oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism in primary degenerative dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CBF, CMRO2 and CMRGlu were measured in patients with primary degenerative dementia including 5 patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type and 4 patients with Pick's disease, and then the correlation between the cerebral blood flow and energy metabolism was evaluated. The control subjects consisted of 5 age-matched normal volunteers. The CBF, CMRO2 and CMRGlu decreased in the bilateral frontal, temporal and parietal regions in the patients with Alzheimer's dementia, while they decreased in the bilateral frontal and temporal regions in the patients with Pick's disease. Both the CBF and CMRO2 were closely correlated with each other. However, the CMRGlu was more severely impaired than the CBF or CMRO2 in both pathological conditions. These results suggested that CMRGlu began to decrease before the reduction of the aerobic metabolism and thus measuring the CMRGlu is considered to be the most sensitive method for detecting abnormal regions in primary degenerative dementia. (author)

  19. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-03-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation in the capacity for oxygen metabolism. The goal of this study was to test whether CBF/CMRO(2) coupling differed when these subpopulations of neurons were preferentially stimulated, using chromatic and luminance stimuli to preferentially stimulate either the blob or interblob regions. A dual-echo spiral arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses simultaneously in 7 healthy human subjects. When the stimulus contrast levels were adjusted to evoke similar CBF responses (mean 65.4% ± 19.0% and 64.6% ± 19.9%, respectively for chromatic and luminance contrast), the BOLD responses were remarkably similar (1.57% ± 0.39% and 1.59% ± 0.35%) for both types of stimuli. We conclude that CBF-CMRO(2) coupling is conserved for the chromatic and luminance stimuli used, suggesting a consistent coupling for blob and inter-blob neuronal populations despite the difference in CO concentration. PMID:23238435

  20. Blood flow and oxygenation changes due to low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K.; Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Buckley, Erin M.; Thomas, Amy; Kim, Meeri N.; Durduran, Turgut; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Hamilton, Roy H.

    2013-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) modulates processing in the human brain and is therefore of interest as a treatment modality for neurologic conditions. During TMS administration, an electric current passing through a coil on the scalp creates a rapidly varying magnetic field that induces currents in the cerebral cortex. The effects of low-frequency (1 Hz), repetitive TMS (rTMS) on motor cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tissue oxygenation in seven healthy adults, during/after 20 min stimulation, is reported. Noninvasive optical methods are employed: diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for blood flow and diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) for hemoglobin concentrations. A significant increase in median CBF (33%) on the side ipsilateral to stimulation was observed during rTMS and persisted after discontinuation. The measured hemodynamic parameter variations enabled computation of relative changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption during rTMS, which increased significantly (28%) in the stimulated hemisphere. By contrast, hemodynamic changes from baseline were not observed contralateral to rTMS administration (all parameters, p>0.29). In total, these findings provide new information about hemodynamic/metabolic responses to low-frequency rTMS and, importantly, demonstrate the feasibility of DCS/DOS for noninvasive monitoring of TMS-induced physiologic effects.

  1. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:27181339

  2. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-05-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  3. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (‑17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution.

  4. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (-17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution. PMID:27503416

  5. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in senile dementia of Alzheimer's type and vascular dementia with deep white matter changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (rCMRO2), oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF), and cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were investigated using positron emission tomography (PET) in 16 patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT), and compared with those of 6 nondemented and 3 demented patients with deep white matter high signal (DWMH) on T2-weighted MRI and 6 controls. rCBF, rCMRO2 and rCBV were determined using C15O2, 15O2 and C15O, respectively. rCBF and CMRO2 were significantly decreased in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortex (P 2 was significantly reduced in only the frontal and temporal cortex of demented patients (P < 0.05). rOEF was significantly increased in the parietal cortex of patients with SDAT and in the white matter of patients with SDAT or DWMH (P < 0.05), and the increase in the frontal white matter significantly paralleled the progression of dementia in patients with SDAT (P < 0.05). rCBV was significantly decreased in the parietal and temporal cortex of patients with SDAT (P < 0.05), but not in any areas of those with DWMH. (orig.)

  6. Simultaneous mapping of temporally-resolved blood flow velocity and oxygenation in femoral artery and vein during reactive hyperemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langham Michael C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-occlusive hyperemia is often used as a paradigm to evaluate vascular reactivity, for example by measuring post-ischemic flow-mediated dilation, arterial blood flow or temporally resolved venous blood oxygenation (HbO2. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of a simultaneous measurement of blood flow and HbO2 in the femoral circulation as part of a single procedure. Methods A multi-echo GRE pulse sequence was designed and implemented to collect velocity-encoded projections in addition to full-image echoes for field mapping as a means to quantify intravascular magnetic susceptibility. The method's feasibility was evaluated at 3T in a small pilot study involving two groups of healthy subjects (mean ages 26 ± 1.6 and 59 ± 7.3 years, N = 7 and 5, respectively in terms of six parameters characterizing the time-course of reactive hyperemia and their sensitivity to differentiate age effects. The reproducibility was assessed on two of the seven young healthy subjects with three repeated measurements. Results The physiological parameters agree with those obtained with current methods that quantify either velocity or HbO2 alone. Of the six measures of vascular reactivity, one from each group was significantly different in the two subject groups (p Conclusion The proposed method is able quantify multiple parameters that may lead to more detailed assessment of peripheral vascular reactivity in a single cuff paradigm rather than in separate procedures as required previously, thereby improving measurement efficiency and patient comfort.

  7. Measurement of local blood flow and oxygen consumption in evolving irreversible cerebral infarction: an in vivo study in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows in vivo measurement of local cerebral blood flow (1CBF), oxygen consumption rate (1CMRO2) and glucose utilisation (1CMRG1c) in man. Although 1CMRG1c is accessible in animals, this is not the case for 1CMRO2, an excellent index of local functional state. PET imaging of the local interrelationship of CBF and metabolism in completed ischemic stroke has attracted considerable interest because of its potential to differentiate irreversibly damaged from viable tissue on the basis of the CBF- metabolism patterns. Several qualitative or semi-quantitative pioneering studies provided a limited insight into this question, while the single truly quantitative study was only briefly reported. We report here a detailed study of the local CBF-CMRO2 quantitative patterns in irreversibly infarcted brain regions

  8. Local cerebral blood flow (1CBF) and oxygen consumption (1CMRO2) in evolving irreversible ischemic infarction: a study with positron tomography and oxygen-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 25 patients suffering from cerebral ischemia set up in the area of the internal carotid artery the local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) and local cerebral oxygen consumption (lCMRO2) were measured by the method of continuous inhalation of oxygen 15-labelled gas combined with positron emission tomography. These two local parameters and their ratio, the local oxygen extraction rate (lO2E), were studied inside the brain region tending spontaneously towards ischemic necrosis, a zone defined by means of repeated tomodensitometric examinations. The essential facts observed are the variability of the lCBF and the lO2E values, from extremely low to extremely high, whereas the collapse of the lCMRO2 is constant. Consequently this last parameter alone would be a good prognostic index, an lCMRO2 decrease to a level below about 70% of the controlateral value indicating that the necrosis is spontaneously irreparable. These results are discussed in the light of published data

  9. Elevated global cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction and unchanged metabolic rate of oxygen in young adults with end-stage renal disease: an MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To noninvasively assess global cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in young adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Thirty-six patients and 38 healthy volunteers were included and took part in MR examinations, blood and neuropsychological tests. CBF and OEF were measured by phase-contrast and T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging MRI techniques, respectively. CMRO2 was computed from CBF, OEF and hematocrit according to Fick's principle. Correlations were performed between MR measurements, blood biochemistry measurements and neuropsychological test scores. Compared with controls, ESRD patients had elevated CBF (72.9 ± 12.5 vs. 63.8 ± 8.5 ml min-1 100 g-1, P < 0.001), elevated OEF (47.2 ± 10.2 vs. 35.8 ± 5.4 %, P < 0.001), but unaffected CMRO2 (199.5 ± 36.4 vs. 193.8 ± 28.6 μmol O2 min-1 100 g-1, P = 0.879). Hematocrit negatively correlated with CBF (r = -0.640, P < 0.001) and OEF (r = -0.701, P < 0.001), but not with CMRO2. Altered neuropsychological test scores of ESRD patients were associated with OEF and CBF, but not with CMRO2. There were weak relationships between eGFR and hematocrit (r = 0.308, P = 0.068) or CBF (r = 0.318, P = 0.059). Our findings suggested that anaemic young adults with ESRD may afford higher CBF and OEF to maintain a normal CMRO2. Despite this compensatory process, however, cognitive function was still impaired and its severity was correlated with their CBF and OEF abnormality. (orig.)

  10. Elevated global cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction and unchanged metabolic rate of oxygen in young adults with end-stage renal disease: an MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Gang; Lou, Yaxian; Pan, Zhiying; Liu, Ya [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, College of Aivil Aviation, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wen, Jiqiu; Li, Xue; Zhang, Zhe [Medical School of Nanjing University, National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lu, Hanzhang [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Advanced Imaging Research Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Liu, Wei [Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Shenzhen, Guangdong (China); Liu, Hui [Siemens MR NEA Collaboration, Siemens Ltd., Shanghai (China); Chen, Huijuan; Kong, Xiang; Luo, Song; Jiang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zongjun; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-06-15

    To noninvasively assess global cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) in young adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Thirty-six patients and 38 healthy volunteers were included and took part in MR examinations, blood and neuropsychological tests. CBF and OEF were measured by phase-contrast and T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging MRI techniques, respectively. CMRO{sub 2} was computed from CBF, OEF and hematocrit according to Fick's principle. Correlations were performed between MR measurements, blood biochemistry measurements and neuropsychological test scores. Compared with controls, ESRD patients had elevated CBF (72.9 ± 12.5 vs. 63.8 ± 8.5 ml min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}, P < 0.001), elevated OEF (47.2 ± 10.2 vs. 35.8 ± 5.4 %, P < 0.001), but unaffected CMRO{sub 2} (199.5 ± 36.4 vs. 193.8 ± 28.6 μmol O{sub 2} min{sup -1} 100 g{sup -1}, P = 0.879). Hematocrit negatively correlated with CBF (r = -0.640, P < 0.001) and OEF (r = -0.701, P < 0.001), but not with CMRO{sub 2}. Altered neuropsychological test scores of ESRD patients were associated with OEF and CBF, but not with CMRO{sub 2}. There were weak relationships between eGFR and hematocrit (r = 0.308, P = 0.068) or CBF (r = 0.318, P = 0.059). Our findings suggested that anaemic young adults with ESRD may afford higher CBF and OEF to maintain a normal CMRO{sub 2}. Despite this compensatory process, however, cognitive function was still impaired and its severity was correlated with their CBF and OEF abnormality. (orig.)

  11. Average blood flow and oxygen uptake in the human brain during resting wakefulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Holm, S; Herning, M; Lassen, N A

    1993-01-01

    tracer between the brain and its venous blood is not reached. As a consequence, normal values for CBF and CMRO2 of 54 ml 100 g-1 min-1 and 3.5 ml 100 g-1 min-1 obtained with the Kety-Schmidt technique are an overestimation of the true values. Using the Kety-Schmidt technique we have performed 57...

  12. One-legged endurance training: leg blood flow and oxygen extraction during cycling exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Foss, O; Krustrup, Peter; Secher, Niels H.; Hallén, J

    2012-01-01

    Aim: As a consequence of enhanced local vascular conductance, perfusion of muscles increases with exercise intensity to suffice the oxygen demand. However, when maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) and cardiac output are approached, the increase in conductance is blunted. Endurance training increases...... muscle metabolic capacity, but to what extent that affects the regulation of muscle vascular conductance during exercise is unknown. Methods: Seven weeks of one-legged endurance training was carried out by twelve subjects. Pulmonary VO(2) during cycling and one-legged cycling was tested before and after...... training, while VO(2) of the trained leg (TL) and control leg (CL) during cycling was determined after training. Results: VO(2) max for cycling was unaffected by training, although one-legged VO(2) max became 6.7 (2.3)% (mean ± SE) larger with TL than with CL. Also TL citrate synthase activity was higher...

  13. Blood flow in the choriocapillaris

    OpenAIRE

    Zouache, M. A.; Eames, I; Luthert, P J

    2015-01-01

    The choriocapillaris is a capillary bed located in a thin layer adjacent to the outer retina and is part of the oxygen delivery system to the photoreceptors of the eye. The blood flow is approximately planar and is serviced by microvessels, which join the choriocapillaris through inlets perpendicular to its plane. Capillaries are densely organised and separated by avascular septal posts, which direct the blood flow. The capillary bed is composed of a juxtaposition of tessellating vascular uni...

  14. Distinct alterations in sublingual microcirculatory blood flow and hemoglobin oxygenation in on-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Atasever; C. Boer; P. Goedhart; J. Biervliet; J. Seyffert; R. Speekenbrink; L. Schwarte; B. de Mol; C. Ince

    2011-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (on-pump) is associated with more severe changes in the microcirculatory blood flow and tissue oxygenation as compared with off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. An observational study. A university hospital and teaching hospital. Patient

  15. A Decrease in Spatially Resolved Near-Infrared Spectroscopy-Determined Frontal Lobe Tissue Oxygenation by Phenylephrine Reflects Reduced Skin Blood Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Sato, Kohei; Okazaki, Kazunobu;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy-determined frontal lobe tissue oxygenation (ScO2) is reduced with administration of phenylephrine, while cerebral blood flow may remain unaffected. We hypothesized that extracranial vasoconstriction explains the effect of phenylephrine on Sc...

  16. Influence of residual oxygen-15-labeled carbon monoxide radioactivity on cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction in a dual-tracer autoradiographic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV) are quantitatively measured with positron emission tomography (PET) with 15O gases. Kudomi et al. developed a dual tracer autoradiographic (DARG) protocol that enables the duration of a PET study to be shortened by sequentially administrating 15O2 and C15O2 gases. In this protocol, before the sequential PET scan with 15O2 and C15O2 gases (15O2-C15O2 PET scan), a PET scan with C15O should be preceded to obtain CBV image. C15O has a high affinity for red blood cells and a very slow washout rate, and residual radioactivity from C15O might exist during a 15O2-C15O2 PET scan. As the current DARG method assumes no residual C15O radioactivity before scanning, we performed computer simulations to evaluate the influence of the residual C15O radioactivity on the accuracy of measured CBF and OEF values with DARG method and also proposed a subtraction technique to minimize the error due to the residual C15O radioactivity. In the simulation, normal and ischemic conditions were considered. The 15O2 and C15O2 PET count curves with the residual C15O PET counts were generated by the arterial input function with the residual C15O radioactivity. The amounts of residual C15O radioactivity were varied by changing the interval between the C15O PET scan and 15O2-C15O2 PET scan, and the absolute inhaled radioactivity of the C15O gas. Using the simulated input functions and the PET counts, the CBF and OEF were computed by the DARG method. Furthermore, we evaluated a subtraction method that subtracts the influence of the C15O gas in the input function and PET counts. Our simulations revealed that the CBF and OEF values were underestimated by the residual C15O radioactivity. The magnitude of this underestimation depended on the amount of C15O radioactivity and the physiological conditions. This underestimation was corrected by the subtraction method. This

  17. Statistical mapping of effects of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) on blood flow and oxygen consumption in porcine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Sakoh, Masaharu; Andersen, Flemming; Rodell, Anders; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Østergaard, Leif; Mouridsen, Kim; Cumming, Paul

    2007-02-15

    The volume of cerebral tissue perturbed in experimental models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) can be highly variable. Thus, the territories of reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) or oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) following MCAO might properly be defined using statistical parametric mapping within a population. In order to establish such a method, we mapped CBF and CMRO(2) in 18 pigs with acute MCAO. Parametric maps were flipped about the axis of symmetry, and CBF and CMRO(2) in the infarcted hemisphere were calculated as percentages of the magnitudes in mirror-image pixels. There were log-linear relationships between the volumes of affected tissue and the percentages of normal CFB or CMRO(2). This graphical analysis showed that the volume of the core deficit was smaller for CBF that for CMRO(2), but expanded more rapidly with decreasing CBF deficit than did the corresponding volumes of reduced CMRO(2). Thus, acute changes in CBF and CMRO(2) following MCAO in the pig can be defined as probabilistic volumes. PMID:17129609

  18. Oxygenation to Bovine Blood in Artificial Heart and Lung Using Vibrating Flow Pump: Experiment and Numerical Analysis Based on Non-Newtonian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Yonemura, Tsubasa; Tsuru, Kazuaki; Isoyama, Takashi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    In this study, we construct an experimental apparatus for a prototype artificial heart and lung (AHL) by installing hollow fibers into the cylindrical tube of the vibrating flow pump (VFP). The oxygenation characteristics are investigated both by experiments using bovine blood and by numerical analyses based on the computational fluid dynamics. The analyses are carried out at the Reynolds numbers Re ranged from O(1) to O(103), which are determined based on the experimental conditions. The blood flow and the diffusion of oxygen gas are analyzed based on the Newtonian/non-Newtonian, unsteady, incompressible and axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, and the advection-diffusion equation. The results show that the oxygenation rate increases in proportion to Re1/3, where the phenomenon corresponds to the decreasing thickness of the concentration boundary layer with Re. Although the effects of the vibrating flow and the rheology of the blood are clearly appeared on the velocity field, their effects on the gas exchange are relatively small at the ranges of prescribed Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, the numerical results in terms of the oxygenation rate are compared with the experimental ones. The basic design data of VFP were accumulated for the development of AHL in the clinical applications.

  19. Circulation time determined by carotid angiography in patients with chronic internal Carotid artery occlusion. Comparison with cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism measured by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Inugami, Atsushi (Research Inst. for Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan)); Shishido, Fumio (and others)

    1994-10-01

    The degree of collateral circulation in patients with unilaterally chronic internal carotid artery occlusion was estimated by mean transit time of contrast material in rapid sequence carotid angiography (Angiographic MTT), and compared with cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism measured by PET. In normal density region on X-ray CT, a significant negative correlation was observed between Angiographic MTT and cerebral blood flow (CBF). This indicates that cerebral blood flow can be estimated by Angiographic MTT. It has been reported that the ratio of cerebral blood volume (CBV) to CBF (CBV/CBF), i.e., mean transit time determined by PET well agreed with OEF, and is good indicator for brain circulation reserve. In this study, no significant correlation was observed between Angiographic MTT and CBV/CBF. However, a significant positive correlation was observed between Angiographic MTT and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and no significant correlation was observed between Angiographic MTT and oxygen consumption rate (CMRO[sub 2]). These indicates that Angiographic MTT may be indicator for brain circulation reserve. (author).

  20. Correlation between quantitative EEG and cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative scalp EEG and cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) measured by the steady-state 15O technique and positron emission tomography were studied in 19 patients with mild to moderate dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) and age-matched controls (EEG=19, PET=6). Scalp electrodes were placed according to the international 10-20 method except for Cz, T3, and T4. To evaluate the relative changes in power for each frequency band between the two groups, the percentage power fraction (percentage power for each frequency band at a site compared to the total power at that site; %delta for 2.0-3.8 Hz, %theta for 4.0-7.8 Hz, %alpha for 8.0-12.8 Hz, %beta for 13.0-25.4 Hz) was calculated. Compared with controls, DAT patients showed a significant decrease in %alpha, while significant increases in %theta at all electrodes, and significant increases in %delta at the temporal, parietal and occipital electrodes were observed. The patient group displayed a significant decrease in rCBF and rCMRO2 in the parietal, temporal and frontal cortices, but the reduction in rCMRO2 was less remarkable than that of rCBF. %Theta at P3, O1 and O2 showed a significant negative correlation with rCBF, and %theta at P3, O1showed a significant negative correlation with rCMRO2. %Delta at P3, P4 and T5 was significantly negatively correlated with rCBF in the corresponding regions, and %alpha at almost all the electrodes (except O1, F3, P3) was significantly positively correlated with rCBF in the corresponding regions. %Delta and %alpha did not show any significant correlation with rCMRO2. (author)

  1. The effects of anticholinergic drugs on regional cerebral blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in previously untreated patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2) were measured using the steady-state 15O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six previously untreated patients with Parkinson's disease before and after trihexyphenidyl (THP) treatment. The patients comprised of 4 men and 2 women with Hoehn-Yahr stage II-III. Their ages at the onset of the study ranged from 46 to 57 years (mean±SD, 51.8±3.7) and the duration of the illness ranged from 10 to 48 months (mean±SD, 28.8±15.5). The PET study, assessments of the disability and cognitive function were undergone twice. The first time assessments were done was when the patients were not receiving any drugs, and the second time was one to three months after administration of 6 mg THP. All patients showed clinical improvement after THP treatment. The mean disability score of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale decreased from 35.1 (SD±11.3) to 25.7 (SD±11.6). The cognitive function assessed by Hasegawa's dementia rating scale-revised, Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, were not significantly different before and after the THP treatment. After the THP treatment, rCBF and rCMRO2 decreased significantly in the striatum (about 15%) and all cerebral cortices (about 10%) on both sides contralateral and ipsilateral to the predominantly symptomatic limbs. We conclude that an anticholinergic THP decreases the rCBF and rCMRO2 significantly in the cerebral cortices without cognitive impairment in early untreated patients with Parkinson's disease. (author)

  2. Influence of skin blood flow and source-detector distance on near-infrared spectroscopy-determined cerebral oxygenation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirasawa, Ai; Yanagisawa, Shintaro; Tanaka, Naoki;

    2015-01-01

    semi-recumbent position, while extracranial blood flow was restricted by application of four different pressures (+20 to +80 mmHg) to the left temporal artery. The O2 Hb was measured at the forehead via a multidistance probe (source-detector distance; 15, 22·5 and 30 mm), and SkBF was determined by...... to 30 mm. Therefore, new algorithms need to be developed for unbiased NIRS detection of cerebral oxygenation....

  3. Ocular Blood Flow Autoregulation Mechanisms and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main function of ocular blood flow is to supply sufficient oxygen and nutrients to the eye. Local blood vessels resistance regulates overall blood distribution to the eye and can vary rapidly over time depending on ocular need. Under normal conditions, the relation between blood flow and perfusion pressure in the eye is autoregulated. Basically, autoregulation is a capacity to maintain a relatively constant level of blood flow in the presence of changes in ocular perfusion pressure and varied metabolic demand. In addition, ocular blood flow dysregulation has been demonstrated as an independent risk factor to many ocular diseases. For instance, ocular perfusion pressure plays key role in the progression of retinopathy such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this review, different direct and indirect techniques to measure ocular blood flow and the effect of myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms on ocular blood flow are discussed. Moreover, ocular blood flow regulation in ocular disease will be described.

  4. Acute effects of nicotine and smoking on blood flow, tissue oxygen, and aerobe metabolism of the skin and subcutis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Stig; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nicotine released from tobacco smoke causing reduction in blood flow has been suggested as causative for postoperative wound complications in smokers, but the mechanism remains unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In eight healthy male smokers and eight ex-smokers, the cutaneous and...

  5. Pulmonary blood flow and pressure as well as arterial blood oxygenation simulations in ventilated artificial patient supported by continuous rotary blood pump.

    OpenAIRE

    ZielińSki, Krzysztof; Golczewski, Tomasz; Fresiello, Libera; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Kozarski, Maciej; Darowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Our previous study suggested insignificant impairment of pulmonary circulation during artificial ventilation if the inspiration time is smaller than the duration of 2-3 heart cycles. This was due to pulmonary blood volume periodic changes. The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of left ventricular assistance by continuous rotary blood pump (RBP) on hemodynamic in ventilated, virtual patient. Methods: Virtual RBP was added to a previously elaborated hybrid (pneumonumeric...

  6. Slowed muscle oxygen uptake kinetics with raised metabolism are not dependent on blood flow or recruitment dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, Rob C I; McDonald, James R; Sun, Yi; Ferguson, Brian S; Rogatzki, Matthew J; Spires, Jessica; Kowalchuk, John M; Gladden, L Bruce; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-04-15

    Oxygen uptake kinetics (τVO2) are slowed when exercise is initiated from a raised metabolic rate. Whether this reflects the recruitment of muscle fibres differing in oxidative capacity, or slowed blood flow (Q) kinetics is unclear. This study determined τVO2 in canine muscle in situ, with experimental control over muscle activation and Q during contractions initiated from rest and a raised metabolic rate. The gastrocnemius complex of nine anaesthetised, ventilated dogs was isolated and attached to a force transducer. Isometric tetanic contractions (50 Hz; 200 ms duration) via supramaximal sciatic nerve stimulation were used to manipulate metabolic rate: 3 min stimulation at 0.33 Hz (S1), followed by 3 min at 0.67 Hz (S2). Circulation was initially intact (SPON), and subsequently isolated for pump-perfusion (PUMP) above the greatest value in SPON. Muscle VO2 was determined contraction-by-contraction using an ultrasonic flowmeter and venous oximeter, and normalised to tension-time integral (TTI). τVO2/TTI and τQ were less in S1SPON (mean ± s.d.: 13 ± 3 s and 12 ± 4 s, respectively) than in S2SPON (29 ± 19 s and 31 ± 13 s, respectively; P < 0.05). τVO2/TTI was unchanged by pump-perfusion (S1PUMP, 12 ± 4 s; S2PUMP, 24 ± 6 s; P < 0.001) despite increased O2 delivery; at S2 onset, venous O2 saturation was 21 ± 4% and 65 ± 5% in SPON and PUMP, respectively. VO2 kinetics remained slowed when contractions were initiated from a raised metabolic rate despite uniform muscle stimulation and increased O2 delivery. The intracellular mechanism may relate to a falling energy state, approaching saturating ADP concentration, and/or slowed mitochondrial activation; but further study is required. These data add to the evidence that muscle VO2 control is more complex than previously suggested. PMID:24469073

  7. Autoradiographic determination of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in conscious rats after fluid resuscitation from haemorrhage with a haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschke, K F; Albrecht, D M; van Ackern, K; Kuschinsky, W

    1994-10-01

    The effects of resuscitation fluids on the brain have been investigated in previous studies by global measurements of cerebral blood flow and metabolism. In this study we have examined the effects of a novel haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier on local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) after resuscitation from a volume-controlled haemorrhage of 30 min (3.0 ml/100 g body weight) with ultrapurified, polymerized, bovine haemoglobin (UPBHB). LCBF and LCGU were measured in 34 brain structures of conscious rats 2 h after resuscitation using quantitative iodo(14C)antipyrine and 2-(14C)-deoxy-D-glucose methods. The data were compared with a control group without haemorrhage and fluid resuscitation. In the haemorrhage group, LCBF increased after resuscitation by 12-56% in the different brain structures (mean 36%). LCGU changed less (0 to +18%, mean +9%). In the control group there was a close relationship between LCGU and LCBF (r = 0.95). After fluid resuscitation the relationship was preserved (r = 0.95), although it was reset at a higher ratio of LCBF to LCGU (P < 0.05). We conclude that fluid resuscitation of a 30 min volume-controlled haemorrhage using the haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier, UPBHB, induced a moderate degree of heterogeneity in the resulting changes of LCGU and LCBF. Local disturbances of cerebral blood flow or metabolism were not observed. PMID:7999496

  8. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction by positron emission tomography: theoretical study and experimental evidence of cerebral blood flow measurement with the C15O2 continuous inhalation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of the continuous inhalation technique of oxygen-15 labelled CO2 coupled with positron emission tomography for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (C.B.F.) is described. An indirect experimental verification that this technique allowed the measurement of C.B.F. has been carried out in baboons by showing the expected change in the measured parameter with variations in the PaCO2. A critical investigation of the C15O2 model was performed. The amount of tracer present in the cerebral vascular pool has a negligible effect on C.B.F. value. The use of a mean brain-blood partition coefficient of water instead of that specific to gray or to white matter is commented upon, and its influence on the final C.B.F. value is studied. Lastly, the problem of the limited diffusion of water across the blood-brain-barrier is discussed. The study of the combined effects of gray-white mixing and limited wates extraction of the C.B.F. value shows that the C15O2 technique tends to understimate real C.B.F., and that this error is more severe with high flows and even gray white mixing. These limitations do not depart from the possibility to estimate in the same brain locus not only C.B.F. but oxygen utilization as well by the consecutive inhalation of C15O2 and 15O2. The advantages of this possibility has already been shown in a number of clinical studies

  9. Clinical usefulness of positron emission tomography in the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism under glycerol and carbon dioxide loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanada, Shuji; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Senda, Michio

    1987-02-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/) were studied in normal cerebral cortices by positron emission tomography using continuous inhalation method of oxygen-15 labeled carbon dioxide and oxygen, and single inhalation method of oxygen-15 labeled carbon monoxide. The values of CBF, CMRO/sub 2/, and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in cerebral cortices of 18 healthy normal volunteers represented 40 +- 7 ml/100 ml/min, 3.2 +- 0.5 ml O/sub 2//100 ml/min, and 0.43 +- 0.07, respectively. In cases with glycerol loading, CBF increased in 10/14 cases. Studies of 6 cases with intracranial pressure indicated the presence of mechanism by which depressed CMRO/sub 2/ improved and was kept in normal values. The loading of 5% carbon dioxide showed an increase in CBF in cases with cerebral infarction, which implied the good cerebral vascular response to the elevated arterial carbon dioxide, but no particular changes were observed in CMRO/sub 2/ which seemed to be less responsive to the elevated arterial carbon dioxide level. In cases with moyamoya disease, 5% carbon dioxide loading showed no changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/. This suggested the poor cerebral vascular response to the elevation of arterial carbon dioxide, while X-ray CT failed to demonstrate any abnormalities in corresponding areas. Positron emission tomography proved to have a great potentiality regarding the evaluation of the changes in cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism under various loadings.

  10. A new hemodynamic model shows that temporal perturbations of cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate of oxygen cannot be measured individually using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent dynamic model relates the functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) measurements to hemodynamic and metabolic parameters. This note reports modified expressions of the new model in terms of cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood flow (CBF) and metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). On the basis of these modified expressions, the new model reproduces known steady state relationships between hemoglobin concentration, CBF and CMRO2, and yields time-dependent relationships that describe transient changes. This new model allows for the translation of the fNIRS measurements into dynamic measures of ΔCBV/CBV0 and the difference ΔCBF/CBF0 – ΔCMRO2/CMRO2|0, provided that some baseline physiological parameters and a relationship between overall, arterial and venous blood volume changes are assumed. (note)

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for cerebral blood flow and electroencephalogram in patients with acute cerebral infarction Choice for therapeutic occasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Chen; Fei Li; Dexiang Gu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy increases blood oxygen content, changes cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolism. Its therapeutic effects on cerebrovascular disease have been fully confirmed, but the occasion for HBO therapy is still unclear.OBJECTIVE: To observe the therapeutic effects of HBO therapy at different time on CBF and electroencephalogram (EEG) in patients with acute cerebral infarction (CI).DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Shidong Hospital, Yangpu District of Shanghai.PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-six inpatients with acute CI, admitted to Department of Neurology, Shidong Hospital, Yangpu District of Shanghai from January 2001 to December 2006, were involved in this experiment. The involved participants met the diagnosis criteria of acute CI and confirmed by skull CT or MRI. They all were patients with moderate CI (16- 30 points) according to neurologic deficit score formulated by Chinese Medical Association. Informed consents of detected items and therapeutic regimen were obtained from all the involved participants. They were randomized into two groups with 48 in each:early-stage treatment group and advanced-stage treatment group. Among the 48 patients in the early-stage treatment group, 21 male and 27 female, aged 53 -68 years, 22 patients were found with basal ganglia infarction, 10 with brain lobe infarction, 16 with multiple infarction, 27 accompanied with hypertension and 2 accompanied with diabetes mellitus. Among the 48 patients in the advanced-stage treatment group, 23 male and 25 female, aged 52 - 71 years, 25 patients were found with basal ganglia infarction, 10 with brain lobe infarction, 12 with multiple infarction, 1 with brain stem infarction, 28 accompanied with hypertension and 1 accompanied with diabetes mellitus.METHODS: After admission, patients of two groups received routine drug treatment. ① Patients in the early-stage treatment group and advanced-stage treatment group began to

  12. Left anterior descending coronary artery blood flow and left ventricular unloading during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in a swine model of acute cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Christoph; Schubert, Sarah; Carney, Elizabeth; Ghodsizad, Ali; Koerner, Michael; McCoach, Robert; El-Banayosy, Aly

    2015-02-01

    The impact of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support on coronary blood flow and left ventricular unloading is still debated. This study aimed to further characterize the influence of ECMO on coronary artery blood flow and its ability to unload the left ventricle in a short-term model of acute cardiogenic shock. Seven anesthetized pigs were intubated and then underwent median sternotomy and cannulation for venoarterial (VA) ECMO. Flow in the left anterior descending (LAD) artery, left atrial pressure (LAP), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured before and after esmolol-induced cardiac dysfunction and after initiating VA-ECMO support. Induction of acute cardiogenic shock was associated with short-term increases in LAP from 8 ± 4 mm Hg to 18 ± 14 mm Hg (P = 0.9) and LVEDP from 5 ± 2 mm Hg to 13 ± 17 mm Hg (P = 0.9), and a decrease in MAP from 63 ± 16 mm Hg to 50 ± 24 mm Hg (P = 0.3). With VA-ECMO support, blood flow in the LAD increased from 28 ± 25 mL/min during acute unsupported cardiogenic shock to 67 ± 50 mL/min (P = 0.003), and LAP and LVEDP decreased to 8 + 5 mm Hg (P = 0.7) and 5 ± 3 mm Hg (P = 0.5), respectively. In this swine model of acute cardiogenic shock, VA-ECMO improved coronary blood flow and provided some degree of left ventricular unloading for the short duration of the study. PMID:24935151

  13. Blood Flow Multiscale Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Agić, Ante; Mijović, Budimir; Nikolić, Tatjana

    2007-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease is one of most frequent cause deaths in modern society. The objective of this work is analyse the effect of dynamic vascular geometry (curvature, torsion,bifurcation) and pulsatile blood nature on secondary flow, wall shear stress and platelet deposition. The problem was examined as multi-scale physical phenomena using perturbation analysis and numerical modelling. The secondary flow determined as influence pulsatile pressure, vascular tube time-dependen...

  14. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD). Renal imaging. Concepts and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many renal diseases as well as several pharmacons cause a change in renal blood flow and/or renal oxygenation. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging takes advantage of local field inhomogeneities and is based on a T2*-weighted sequence. BOLD is a non-invasive method allowing an estimation of the renal, particularly the medullary oxygenation, and an indirect measurement of blood flow without administration of contrast agents. Thus, effects of different drugs on the kidney and various renal diseases can be controlled and observed. This work will provide an overview of the studies carried out so far and identify ways how BOLD can be used in clinical studies. (orig.)

  15. The role of tissue oxygen tension in the control of local blood flow in the microcirculation of skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh

    2010-01-01

    . In a separate study we examined if low or high oxygen caused any change in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of isolated mouse cremaster arterioles using fluorescent microscopy. Cremaster arterioles were isolated by gentle microdissection, loaded with Fura-PE3 (calcium fluorescent dye) and placed...... high oxygen perfusate. Possible explanations for these findings could be: a) that the oxygen sensing mechanism was damaged during the dissection procedure, b) changes in oxygen tension does not cause changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but rather changes the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractive...

  16. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity

  17. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with contrast dependent on blood oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, S.; Lee, T.M.; Kay, A.R.; Tank, D.W. (AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in venous blood is a naturally occurring contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By accentuating the effects of this agent through the use of gradient-echo techniques in high yields, the authors demonstrate in vivo images of brain microvasculature with image contrast reflecting the blood oxygen level. This blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast follows blood oxygen changes induced by anesthetics, by insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and by inhaled gas mixtures that alter metabolic demand or blood flow. The results suggest that BOLD contrast can be used to provide in vivo real-time maps of blood oxygenation in the brain under normal physiological conditions. BOLD contrast adds an additional feature to magnetic resonance imaging and complement other techniques that are attempting to provide position emission tomography-like measurements related to regional neural activity.

  18. Chronic intestinal ischemia and splanchnic blood-flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Helle Damgaard; Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Abrahamsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake in healthy-subjects and patients and to relate the findings to body-composition. METHODS: The total splanchnic blood flow (SBF) and oxygen uptake (SO₂U) were measured in 20 healthy volunteers (10 women) and 29 patients with suspected...

  19. Studies of cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolism, cerebral glucose metabolism, and tissue pH in human acute cerebral infarction using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This preliminary PET study was designed to investigate physiological and biochemical changes in acute cerebral infarction by positron emission tomography (PET). PET studies were performed in six patients with acute cerebral infarction within 48 hours after onset of stroke using continuous inhalation of C15O2 for cerebral blood flow (CBF), 15O2 for cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), 11CO for cerebral blood volume, the intravenous injection of 11C-dimethyloxazolidinedione for tissue pH and the intravenous injection of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose for cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlu). Metabolic coupling index (MCI) image was made from CBF image and CMRGlu image to investigate relation between CBF and CMRGlu. Aslo oxygen glucose index (OGI) image was made from CMRO2 image and CMRG lu image to investigate relation between CMRO2 and CMRGlu. Preliminary resul ts demonstrate that reduction of CBF, CMRO2, and CMRGlu in the affected co rtex except for reperfusion case. Increase of OER was recognized four of six cases. Patterns of MCI and OGI in the cortex which CMRO2 value is less than 65 μmol/100g/min were different from those in the cortex which CMRO2 value is more than 65. MCI of the affected cortex (CMRO22>=65). OGI of the affected cortex (CMRO22>=65). Two patients showed decrease of tissue pH and reperfusion case showed increase of tissue pH in infarcted area as compared to contralateral cortex. In addition it was suggested that threshold of CBF for tissue pH was approximately 14ml/100g/min. (J.P.N.)

  20. Acute ascorbic acid ingestion increases skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption via local vasodilation during graded handgrip exercise in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jennifer C; Crecelius, Anne R; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-07-15

    Human aging is associated with reduced skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise, which may be a result of impaired endothelium-dependent dilation and/or attenuated ability to blunt sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction. Intra-arterial infusion of ascorbic acid (AA) increases nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation and forearm blood flow (FBF) during handgrip exercise in older adults, yet it remains unknown whether an acute oral dose can similarly improve FBF or enhance the ability to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction during exercise. We hypothesized that 1) acute oral AA would improve FBF (Doppler ultrasound) and oxygen consumption (V̇o2) via local vasodilation during graded rhythmic handgrip exercise in older adults (protocol 1), and 2) AA ingestion would not enhance sympatholysis in older adults during handgrip exercise (protocol 2). In protocol 1 (n = 8; 65 ± 3 yr), AA did not influence FBF or V̇o2 during rest or 5% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exercise, but increased FBF (199 ± 13 vs. 248 ± 16 ml/min and 343 ± 24 vs. 403 ± 33 ml/min; P forearm vascular conductance (FVC). In protocol 2 (n = 10; 63 ± 2 yr), following AA, FBF was similarly elevated during 15% MVC (∼ 20%); however, vasoconstriction to reflex increases in sympathetic activity during -40 mmHg lower-body negative pressure at rest (ΔFVC: -16 ± 3 vs. -16 ± 2%) or during 15% MVC (ΔFVC: -12 ± 2 vs. -11 ± 4%) was unchanged. Our collective results indicate that acute oral ingestion of AA improves muscle blood flow and V̇o2 during exercise in older adults via local vasodilation. PMID:25980023

  1. Gastric mucosal blood flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertechnetate clearance (C/sub Tc/) by the stomach before and after betazole stimulation was compared to regional measurements of gastric blood flow utilizing nuclide (Chromium-51 and Cerium-141)-labeled microspheres in five piglets. Pertechnetate clearance closely correlated (correlation coefficient 0.926) with mucosal blood flow in the gastric corpus measured by the microsphere technique. Betazole increased blood flow in the corpus region by 100 percent but did not alter this relationship. Except in one experiment, microsphere blood flow valves in the antrum and fundus were unchanged by betazole and did not significantly correlate with pertechnetate clearance. Pertechnetate clearance appears to be a reliable method of determining gastric mucosal blood flow in experimental animals and may be considered as a noninvasive method for measuring such flow in humans. (U.S.)

  2. Reduced blood flow response to acetazolamide reflects pre-existing vasodilation and decreased oxygen metabolism in major cerebral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decrease in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to acetazolamide may indicate an increase in cerebral blood volume (CBV) caused by reduced perfusion pressure in patients with major cerebral artery steno-occlusive lesions. However, a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) caused by ischemic changes may also decrease the CBF response to acetazolamide by decreasing the production of carbon dioxide. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the values of CBV and CMRO2 are independent predictors of the CBF response to acetazolamide in major cerebral arterial occlusive disease. We used positron emission tomography to study 30 patients with major cerebral artery steno-occlusive lesions. The CBF response to acetazolamide was assessed by measuring baseline CBF and CBF 10 min after an intravenous injection of 1 g of acetazolamide. Multivariate analysis was used to test the independent predictive value of the CBV and CMRO2 at baseline with respect to the percent change in CBF during acetazolamide administration. Both increased CBV and decreased CMRO2 were significant and independent predictors of the reduced CBF response to acetazolamide. CBV accounted for 25% of the variance in the absolute change in CBF during acetazolamide administration and 42% of the variance in the percent change in CBF, whereas CMRO2 accounted for 19% and 4% of the variance, respectively. In patients with major cerebral arterial occlusive disease, a decrease in CMRO2 may contribute to the reduced CBF response to acetazolamide, although an increase in CBV appears to be the major contributing factor. (orig.)

  3. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with ischemic stroke studied with high resolution pet and the O-15 labelled gas steady-state method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies have considerably increased pathophysiological knowledge in ischemic cerebrovascular disease, sometimes the results of such studies do not correlate with neurological abnormalities observed in the subjects being examined. Because regional neuronal activities always couple to the regional energy metabolism of brain tissue, simultaneous observation of rCBF and regional energy metabolism, such as regional oxygen consumption (rCMRO/sub 2/) and regional glucose consumption (rCMRG1), will provide greater understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease than rCBF study alone. Positron emission tomography (PET) using the 0-15 labelled gas steady-state method offers simultaneous measurement of rCBF and rCMRO/sub 2/ in vivo, and demonstrates imbalance between rCBF and rCMRO/sub 2/ in an ischemic lesion in a human brain. However, clinical PET studies in ischemic cerebrovascular disease reported previously, have been carried out using low resolution (more than 15 mm in the full width at half maximum; FWHM) PET. This report presents preliminary results using a high resolution tomograph; Headtome III and 0-15 labelled gas steady state method to investigate ischemic cerebrovascular disease

  4. Local Control of Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Organ blood flow is determined by perfusion pressure and vasomotor tone in the resistance vessels of the organ. Local factors that regulate vasomotor tone include myogenic and metabolic autoregulation, flow-mediated and conducted responses, and vasoactive substances released from red blood cells. The relative importance of each of these factors…

  5. Noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation in newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Wynne, Karon E.; Petrov, Yuriy; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Richardson, C. Joan; Prough, Donald S.

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral ischemia after birth and during labor is a major cause of death and severe complications such as cerebral palsy. In the USA alone, cerebral palsy results in permanent disability of 10,000 newborns per year and approximately 500,000 of the total population. Currently, no technology is capable of direct monitoring of cerebral oxygenation in newborns. This study proposes the use of an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive cerebral ischemia monitoring by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. We developed and built a multi-wavelength, near-infrared optoacoustic system suitable for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral ischemia in newborns with normal weight (NBW), low birth-weight (LBW, 1500 - 2499 g) and very low birth-weight (VLBW, neonatal intensive care unit. We performed single and continuous measurements of the SSS blood oxygenation. The data acquisition, processing and analysis software developed by our group provided real-time, absolute SSS blood oxygenation measurements. The SSS blood oxygenation ranged from 60% to 80%. Optoacoustic monitoring of the SSS blood oxygenation provides valuable information because adequate cerebral oxygenation would suggest that no therapy was necessary; conversely, evidence of cerebral ischemia would prompt therapy to increase cerebral blood flow.

  6. A Discussion on the Regulation of Blood Flow and Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Christopher B; Collier, David J; Shah, Mussadiq; Saxena, Manish; Brier, Timothy J; Kapil, Vikas; Green, David; Lobo, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses two kinds of regulation essential to the circulatory system: namely the regulation of blood flow and that of (systemic) arterial blood pressure. It is pointed out that blood flow requirements sub-serve the nutritional needs of the tissues, adequately catered for by keeping blood flow sufficient for the individual oxygen needs. Individual tissue oxygen requirements vary between tissue types, while highly specific for a given individual tissue. Hence, blood flows are distributed between multiple tissues, each with a specific optimum relationship between the rate of oxygen delivery (DO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2). Previous work has illustrated that the individual tissue blood flows are adjusted proportionately, where there are variations in metabolic rate and where arterial oxygen content (CaO2) varies. While arterial blood pressure is essential for the provision of a sufficient pressure gradient to drive blood flow, it is applicable throughout the arterial system at any one time. Furthermore, It is regulated independently of the input resistance to individual tissues (local arterioles), since they are regulated locally, that being the means by which the highly specific adequate local requirement for DO2 is ensured. Since total blood flow is the summation of all the individually regulated tissue blood flows cardiac inflow (venous return) amounts to total tissue blood flow and as the heart puts out what it receives cardiac output is therefore determined at the tissues. Hence, regulation of arterial blood pressure is independent of the distributed independent regulation of individual tissues. It is proposed here that mechanical features of arterial blood pressure regulation will depend rather on the balance between blood volume and venous wall tension, determinants of venous pressure. The potential for this explanation is treated in some detail. PMID:26782204

  7. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  8. The effects of anticholinergic drugs on regional cerebral blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in previously untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Satoko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi; Sato, Yoshitomo [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured using the steady-state {sup 15}O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six previously untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease before and after trihexyphenidyl (THP) treatment. The patients comprised of 4 men and 2 women with Hoehn-Yahr stage II-III. Their ages at the onset of the study ranged from 46 to 57 years (mean{+-}SD, 51.8{+-}3.7) and the duration of the illness ranged from 10 to 48 months (mean{+-}SD, 28.8{+-}15.5). The PET study, assessments of the disability and cognitive function were undergone twice. The first time assessments were done was when the patients were not receiving any drugs, and the second time was one to three months after administration of 6 mg THP. All patients showed clinical improvement after THP treatment. The mean disability score of Unified Parkinson`s Disease Rating Scale decreased from 35.1 (SD{+-}11.3) to 25.7 (SD{+-}11.6). The cognitive function assessed by Hasegawa`s dementia rating scale-revised, Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, were not significantly different before and after the THP treatment. After the THP treatment, rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} decreased significantly in the striatum (about 15%) and all cerebral cortices (about 10%) on both sides contralateral and ipsilateral to the predominantly symptomatic limbs. We conclude that an anticholinergic THP decreases the rCBF and rCMRO{sub 2} significantly in the cerebral cortices without cognitive impairment in early untreated patients with Parkinson`s disease. (author)

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia decreases bone blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Tyagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neetu Tyagi*, Thomas P Vacek*, John T Fleming, Jonathan C Vacek, Suresh C TyagiDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA *These authors have equal authorshipAbstract: Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy, known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, are associated with osteoporosis. A decrease in bone blood flow is a potential cause of compromised bone mechanical properties. Therefore, we hypothesized that HHcy decreases bone blood flow and biomechanical properties. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague–Dawley rats were treated with Hcy (0.67 g/L in drinking water for 8 weeks. Age-matched rats served as controls. At the end of the treatment period, the rats were anesthetized. Blood samples were collected from experimental or control rats. Biochemical turnover markers (body weight, Hcy, vitamin B12, and folate were measured. Systolic blood pressure was measured from the right carotid artery. Tibia blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flow probe. The results indicated that Hcy levels were significantly higher in the Hcy-treated group than in control rats, whereas vitamin B12 levels were lower in the Hcy-treated group compared with control rats. There was no significant difference in folate concentration and blood pressure in Hcy-treated versus control rats. The tibial blood flow index of the control group was significantly higher (0.78 ± 0.09 flow unit compared with the Hcy-treated group (0.51 ± 0.09. The tibial mass was 1.1 ± 0.1 g in the control group and 0.9 ± 0.1 in the Hcy-treated group. The tibia bone density was unchanged in Hcy-treated rats. These results suggest that Hcy causes a reduction in bone blood flow, which contributes to compromised bone biomechanical properties.Keywords: homocysteine, tibia, bone density

  10. SPECT of brain blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological observation of the brain became possible by CT and various informations on vascularity and damages in brain blood barrier (BBB) became obtainable by the combined use of contrast medium. Then the appearance of MRI had enabled to discriminate the cortex and the medula of the brain and to perform MR angiography. However, it was still difficult to observe the cerebral tissue in detail. Recently, nuclear medical procedures have been developed and applied to diagnosis. SPECT images attributable to the distribution of γ-ray from a tracer, which monitors the blood flow and various metabolisms. Thus, investigations of cerebral functions including blood flow metabolism and neural transmission etc. became possible by the technique. Here, SPECT by Xe-133 clearance and 99mTc HMPAO methods were reviewed. For Xe-133 method, subjects positioned in SPECT instrument underwent bolus inhalation of Xe-133, 1850 Mbq followed by washout respiration of room air. During these treatment, cerebral projection and determination of the concentration of Xe-133 CO2 in the expired air were continuously carried out. And the blood flow level per pixel was estimated from SPECT images and the end-tidal Xe-133 concentration curve. This method was thought to be the most excellent method for the determination of local blood flow in respect of accuracy and reproducibility. The tracer distribution expressed the functional level of the stagnant state of blood flow. SPECT provides useful informations to investigate the physiological functions and pathology in the brain. (M.N.)

  11. Doppler blood flow indicator

    OpenAIRE

    Byrtus, David

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor´s thesis deals with basis of ultra-acoustics. The project presents basic information about Doppler effect. It describes the methods of processing and analyzing of velocity and direction of blood at doppler’s systems with modulated and unmodulated carrier wave. The project presents the system design of non-directional doppler indicator with unmodulated carrier wave for 8 MHz frequency, generating intensity of ultrasound 100 mW/cm2 and diameter D-shaped transmitting transducer 8 m...

  12. New blood flow radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our program for research into the causes of mental disorders such as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness and senile dementia has led us to the development of a new radiopharmaceutical agent, IDNNA (4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine). A series of some 15 different 131I labeled molecules with various substitutions on the amine were synthesized and tested, and the uptake of the 131I labeled conpounds in rats was measured. The dimethyl amine (IDNNA) had the best brain uptake and brain/blood ratio. When injected into a dog and scanned with a whole-body scanner, the uptake in the brain could be clearly seen and quantified. Plasma sampling at the same time showed that the maximum brain/blood ratio of 8.7 occurred at 8 min after injection, and the concentration in brain remained high for at least 15 min. Labeling is achieved by reacting 131ICl and the precursor, 2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethyl amphetamine, in glacial acetic acid; the reaction is complete in less than one minute

  13. The changes of oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral blood flow of brain parenchyma in patients with unilateral cerebral vessel stenosis: initial experience of the quantitative measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Using gradient-echo sampling of spin-echo (GESSE) sequence to study the change of oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in patients with unilateral cerebral vessel stenosis and the relationship between OEF and cerebral blood flow (CBF). Methods: Eight normal volunteers and 16 patients with unilateral cerebral vessel stenosis were enrolled in this study. Written informed consents were obtained from all subjects. Routine MRI, GESSE and arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequences were performed for all patients. Raw data from GESSE and VE-ASL sequences were transferred to PC to conduct postprocessing. To obtain quantitative OEF and CBF of the brain parenchyma, 6 ROIs were placed respectively in the anterior, middle and posterior part of both hemispheres. The relative CBF (rCBF) was defined as the ratio of CBF of ischemic hemisphere to that of contralateral hemisphere. T test was used for statistics. Results: The mean value and normal range of OEF in the volunteers were 0.318±0.023 and 0.272-0.364, respectively. In the 16 patients with unilateral cerebral vessel stenosis, 8 patients had ROIs with greater OEF iri unilateral hemisphere than those in contralateral hemisphere. These cases presented multiple intracranial main arterial stenoses in digital subtraction angiography (DSA) or MR angiography (MRA) examination. The other 8 patients had normal OEF in all ROIs. And they only had single arterial stenosis in DSA or MRA. Set rCBF = 0.50 as a dividing point, the mean OEF value was 0.397±0.010 in the patients with rCBF < 0.50. In the patients with rCBF ≥ 0.5, the mean OEF value was 0.325± 0.028. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (t=-8.840, P=0.000). Conclusion: Patients with chronic cerebral ischemia may present with various hemodynamic impairment. The more CBF decreases, the more OEF increases. Those with increased OEF tended to have more than one lesion in the major intracranial arteries. (authors)

  14. Cerebral blood-flow tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Henriksen, L; Holm, S;

    1983-01-01

    Tomographic maps of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) were obtained with xenon-133 and with isopropyl-amphetamine-iodine-123 (IMP) in 11 subjects: one normal, two tumor cases, and eight cerebrovascular cases. A highly sensitive four-face, rapidly rotating, single-photon emission tomograph was used...... sampling, and with low radiation exposure to patient and personnel. On the other hand, IMP gives an image of slightly higher resolution. It also introduces a new class of iodinated brain-seeking compounds allowing, perhaps, imaging of other functions more important than mere blood flow....

  15. MUSCLE METABOLISM WITH BLOOD FLOW RESTRICTION IN CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    McCully, Kevin K; Smith, Sinclair; Rajaei, Sheeva; Leigh, John S.; Natelson, Benjamin H

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is associated with reduced blood flow and muscle oxidative metabolism. Patients with CFS according to CDC criteria (n=19) were compared to normal sedentary subjects (n = 11). Muscle blood flow was measured in the femoral artery with Doppler ultrasound after exercise. Muscle metabolism was measured in the medial gastrocnemius muscle using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Muscle oxygen saturation and blood vo...

  16. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriacou, P A [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Shafqat, K [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Pal, S K [St Andrew' s Centre for Plastic Surgery and Burns, Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, CM1 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO{sub 2}) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO{sub 2}) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO{sub 2} sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures

  17. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriacou, P. A.; Shafqat, K.; Pal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  18. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  19. Regulation of pulpal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulation of blood flow of the dental pulp was investigated in dogs and rats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. Pulpal blood flow was altered by variations of local and systemic hemodynamics. Macrocirculatory blood flow (ml/min/100 g) in the dental pulp was measured with both the 133Xe washout and the 15-microns radioisotope-labeled microsphere injection methods on the canine teeth of dogs, to provide a comparison of the two methods in the same tooth. Microcirculatory studies were conducted in the rat incisor tooth with microscopic determination of the vascular pattern, RBC velocity, and intravascular volumetric flow distribution. Pulpal resistance vessels have alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors. Activation of alpha-receptors by intra-arterial injection of norepinephrine (NE) caused both a reduction in macrocirculatory Qp in dogs and decreases in arteriolar and venular diameters and intravascular volumetric flow (Qi) in rats. These responses were blocked by the alpha-antagonist PBZ. Activation of beta-receptors by intra-arterial injection of isoproterenal (ISO) caused a paradoxical reduction of Qp in dogs. In rats, ISO caused a transient increase in arteriolar Qi followed by a flow reduction; arteriolar dilation was accompanied by venular constriction. These macrocirculatory and microcirculatory responses to ISO were blocked by the alpha-antagonist propranolol

  20. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  1. Brain energy metabolism and blood flow differences in healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders B; Jónsdottir, Kristjana Y; Møller, Arne; Ashkanian, Mahmoud; Vafaee, Manouchehr S; Iversen, Peter; Johannsen, Peter; Gjedde, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO(2) during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors...

  2. Blood flow dynamics in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Naylor, H. L.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in heart failure (HF) may be due to inadequate vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, and/or altered muscle metabolic responses that lead to fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular and metabolic responses to rhythmic forearm exercise were tested in 9 HF patients and 9 control subjects (CTL) during 2 protocols designed to examine the effect of HF on the time course of oxygen delivery versus uptake (protocol 1) and on vasoconstriction during exercise with 50 mm Hg pressure about the forearm to evoke a metaboreflex (protocol 2). In protocol 1, venous lactate and H+ were greater at 4 minutes of exercise in HF versus CTL (Pblood flow and oxygen uptake responses. In protocol 2, mean arterial pressure increased similarly in each group during ischemic exercise. In CTL, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were similar at the end of ischemic and ambient exercise. In HF, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were reduced during ischemic exercise compared with the ambient trial. CONCLUSIONS: Intrinsic differences in skeletal muscle metabolism, not vasodilatory dynamics, must account for the augmented glycolytic metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in class II and III HF. The inability to increase forearm vascular conductance during ischemic handgrip exercise, despite a normal pressor response, suggests that enhanced vasoconstriction of strenuously exercising skeletal muscle contributes to exertional fatigue in HF.

  3. Erythrocyte aggregation in flowing blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the issue of whether nonionic contrast media (CM) promote thrombosis by the formation of large, irregular red blood cell aggregates with videomicroscopy and a flow chamber, red blood cell aggregates adjacent to an endothelial cell monolayer were imaged at 17 sec-1 in dilute suspensions (hematocrit, --8) at 370C in plasma with 20% CM by non-red blood cell volume. All aggregates were rouleaux (<100 μm) readily dispersed at higher shear rates. Aggregate length in eight experiments was increased 11% by ioxaglate (320 mg of iodine per milliliter), decreased 58% by diatrizoate (370 mg of iodine per milliliter) but reduced similarly (16%) by iohexol (350 mg of iodine per milliliter) and saline. Iohexol did not enhance platelet aggregation on injured monolayers

  4. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  5. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  6. Metabolic dynamics in skeletal muscle during acute reduction in blood flow and oxygen supply to mitochondria: in-silico studies using a multi-scale, top-down integrated model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan K Dash

    Full Text Available Control mechanisms of cellular metabolism and energetics in skeletal muscle that may become evident in response to physiological stresses such as reduction in blood flow and oxygen supply to mitochondria can be quantitatively understood using a multi-scale computational model. The analysis of dynamic responses from such a model can provide insights into mechanisms of metabolic regulation that may not be evident from experimental studies. For the purpose, a physiologically-based, multi-scale computational model of skeletal muscle cellular metabolism and energetics was developed to describe dynamic responses of key chemical species and reaction fluxes to muscle ischemia. The model, which incorporates key transport and metabolic processes and subcellular compartmentalization, is based on dynamic mass balances of 30 chemical species in both capillary blood and tissue cells (cytosol and mitochondria domains. The reaction fluxes in cytosol and mitochondria are expressed in terms of a general phenomenological Michaelis-Menten equation involving the compartmentalized energy controller ratios ATP/ADP and NADH/NAD(+. The unknown transport and reaction parameters in the model are estimated simultaneously by minimizing the differences between available in vivo experimental data on muscle ischemia and corresponding model outputs in coupled with the resting linear flux balance constraints using a robust, nonlinear, constrained-based, reduced gradient optimization algorithm. With the optimal parameter values, the model is able to simulate dynamic responses to reduced blood flow and oxygen supply to mitochondria associated with muscle ischemia of several key metabolite concentrations and metabolic fluxes in the subcellular cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments, some that can be measured and others that can not be measured with the current experimental techniques. The model can be applied to test complex hypotheses involving dynamic regulation of cellular

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 16 cranial regions in 23 children and adolescents with frequent headaches using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. Blood flow response to 5% carbon dioxide (CO2) was also determined in 21 patients, while response to 50% oxygen was measured in the two patients with hemoglobinopathy. Included were 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, 4 with musculoskeletal headaches, and 3 with features of both types. Also studied were 2 patients with primary thrombocythemia, 2 patients with hemoglobinopathy and headaches, 1 patient with polycythemia, and 1 with headaches following trauma. With two exceptions, rCBF determinations were done during an asymptomatic period. Baseline rCBF values tended to be higher in these young patients than in young adults done in our laboratory. Localized reduction in the expected blood flow surge after CO2 inhalation, most often noted posteriorly, was seen in 8 of the 13 vascular headaches, but in none of the musculoskeletal headache group. Both patients with primary thrombocythemia had normal baseline flow values and altered responsiveness to CO2 similar to that seen in migraineurs; thus, the frequently reported headache and transient neurologic signs with primary thrombocythemia are probably not due to microvascular obstruction as previously suggested. These data support the concept of pediatric migraine as a disorder of vasomotor function and also add to our knowledge of normal rCBF values in younger patients. Demonstration of altered vasomotor reactivity to CO2 could prove helpful in children whose headache is atypical

  8. HEMORHEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF PERFLUOROCARBON BASED OXYGEN CARRIER INTERACTION WITH COLLOID PLASMA EXPANDERS AND BLOOD

    OpenAIRE

    Vásquez, Diana M.; Ortiz, Daniel; Alvarez, Oscar A.; Briceño, Juan C.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion based oxygen carriers lack colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and must be administered with colloid-based plasma expanders (PEs). Although PFC emulsions have been widely studied, there is limited information about PFC emulsion interaction with PEs and blood. Their interaction forms aggregates due to electrostatic and rheological phenomena, and change blood rheology and blood flow. This study analyzes the effects of the interaction between PFC emulsions with blood in...

  9. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Caprio, Di; Higgins, John M; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin in red blood cells. While the oxygen affinity of blood is well understood and is routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of red blood cell volume and hemoglobin concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers and are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume and hemoglobin concentration for individual red blood cells in high-throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.5%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with hemoglobin concentr...

  10. Cutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disappearance rate of 133Xe was studied in 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, using an epicutaneous labeling technique in involved skin lesions or normal-appearing skin of the proximal extensor site of the forearm. Control experiments were performed in 10 normal subjects. Calculations of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF) in psoriatic skin lesions were performed using a tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for 133Xe, lambda c,pso, of 1.2 ml/100 g/min. lambda c,pso was estimated after the relative content of water, lipids, and proteins had been analyzed in psoriatic skin biopsies of 6 patients with untreated psoriasis. The mean relative content of water was markedly reduced to 23.5 +/- 1.5% (SEM), and lipids and proteins were markedly increased to 2.5 +/- 0.7% and 74.0 +/- 2.2, respectively, compared to previously published data for normal skin (water 72.5%, lipids 1%, proteins 26.5%). Mean CBF in untreated psoriatic skin was 63.5 +/- 9.0 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than the mean CBF in 10 normal subjects, 6.3 +/- 0.5 ml/100 g/min (p much less than 0.0001). Mean CBF in normal-appearing skin in patients with psoriasis was 11.0 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than CBF in normal subjects (p less than 0.0002)

  11. Bone blood flow and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo;

    2012-01-01

    femoral bone at rest and during one leg intermittent isometric exercise with increasing exercise intensities. In nine men, blood flow in femur was determined at rest and during dynamic one leg exercise, and two other physiological perturbations: moderate systemic hypoxia (14 O(2) ) at rest and during...... contralateral leg. In conclusion, resting femoral bone blood flow increases by physical exercise, but appears to level off with increasing exercise intensities. Moreover, while moderate systemic hypoxia does not change bone blood flow at rest or during exercise, intra-arterially administered adenosine during......Human bone blood flow and metabolism during physical exercise remains poorly characterised. In the present study we measured femoral bone blood flow and glucose uptake in young healthy subjects by positron emission tomography in three separate protocols. In six women, blood flow was measured in...

  12. Influence of posture on hepatic blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic blood flow was measured in 28 patients in supine and prone positions using the 133Xe-inhalation washout method. Even though the reactions in individual patients were considerably different, a man blood flow of 60.9 ml/100 g/min was unaltered in both positions. This constancy of hepatic blood flow values is valid for patients without liver disease with chronic hepatitis, and with liver cirrhosis. (orig.)

  13. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD). Renal imaging. Concepts and applications; Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD). Bildgebung der Nieren. Konzepte und Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, Johanna C.; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Mie, Moritz B.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ. Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim (DE). Inst. fuer Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin (CKM)

    2010-07-01

    Many renal diseases as well as several pharmacons cause a change in renal blood flow and/or renal oxygenation. The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging takes advantage of local field inhomogeneities and is based on a T2{sup *}-weighted sequence. BOLD is a non-invasive method allowing an estimation of the renal, particularly the medullary oxygenation, and an indirect measurement of blood flow without administration of contrast agents. Thus, effects of different drugs on the kidney and various renal diseases can be controlled and observed. This work will provide an overview of the studies carried out so far and identify ways how BOLD can be used in clinical studies. (orig.)

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured via xenon133 inhalation technique in 23 patients with schizophrenia and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. The mean blood flow to both hemispheres was found to be lower for the patients. The patients and their controls did not differ on interhemispheric differences in blood flow. There were no differences in rCBF between medicated and unmedicated, subchronic and chronic, and paranoid and nonparanoid patients. Hallucinations were associated with reduced blood flow to several postcentral regions

  15. Regulation of exercise blood flow: Role of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinity, Joel D; Broxterman, Ryan M; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-09-01

    During exercise, oxygen and nutrient rich blood must be delivered to the active skeletal muscle, heart, skin, and brain through the complex and highly regulated integration of central and peripheral hemodynamic factors. Indeed, even minor alterations in blood flow to these organs have profound consequences on exercise capacity by modifying the development of fatigue. Therefore, the fine-tuning of blood flow is critical for optimal physical performance. At the level of the peripheral circulation, blood flow is regulated by a balance between the mechanisms responsible for vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Once thought of as toxic by-products of in vivo chemistry, free radicals are now recognized as important signaling molecules that exert potent vasoactive responses that are dependent upon the underlying balance between oxidation-reduction reactions or redox balance. Under normal healthy conditions with low levels of oxidative stress, free radicals promote vasodilation, which is attenuated with exogenous antioxidant administration. Conversely, with advancing age and disease where background oxidative stress is elevated, an exercise-induced increase in free radicals can further shift the redox balance to a pro-oxidant state, impairing vasodilation and attenuating blood flow. Under these conditions, exogenous antioxidants improve vasodilatory capacity and augment blood flow by restoring an "optimal" redox balance. Interestingly, while the active skeletal muscle, heart, skin, and brain all have unique functions during exercise, the mechanisms by which free radicals contribute to the regulation of blood flow is remarkably preserved across each of these varied target organs. PMID:26876648

  16. Skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise in humans: a PET study with nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Saltin, Bengt; Kemppainen, Jukka; Sipilä, Hannu T; Oikonen, Vesa; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani; Kalliokoski, Kari; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide and prostanoids on microcirculation and oxygen uptake specifically in the active skeletal muscle by use of positron emission tomography (PET). Healthy males performed 3 five min bouts of light knee-extensor exercise. Skeletal...

  17. Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wesley B.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Busch, David R.; Mesquita, Rickson C.; Greenberg, Joel H.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-03-01

    The modified Beer-Lambert law is among the most widely used approaches for analysis of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) reflectance signals for measurements of tissue blood volume and oxygenation. Briefly, the modified Beer-Lambert paradigm is a scheme to derive changes in tissue optical properties based on continuous-wave (CW) diffuse optical intensity measurements. In its simplest form, the scheme relates differential changes in light transmission (in any geometry) to differential changes in tissue absorption. Here we extend this paradigm to the measurement of tissue blood flow by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). In the new approach, differential changes of the intensity temporal auto-correlation function at a single delay-time are related to differential changes in blood flow. The key theoretical results for measurement of blood flow changes in any tissue geometry are derived, and we demonstrate the new method to monitor cerebral blood flow in a pig under conditions wherein the semi-infinite geometry approximation is fairly good. Specifically, the drug dinitrophenol was injected in the pig to induce a gradual 200% increase in cerebral blood flow, as measured with MRI velocity flow mapping and by DCS. The modified Beer-Lambert law for flow accurately recovered these flow changes using only a single delay-time in the intensity auto-correlation function curve. The scheme offers increased DCS measurement speed of blood flow. Further, the same techniques using the modified Beer-Lambert law to filter out superficial tissue effects in NIRS measurements of deep tissues can be applied to the DCS modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow monitoring of deep tissues.

  18. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  19. Laminar blood flow in stenotic microchannels

    OpenAIRE

    Calejo, Joana A. C.; Garcia, Valdemar; Fernandes, Carla S.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, Newtonian and non-Newtonian laminar blood flow in rectangular microchannels with symmetric and asymmetric atheroma were numerically studied. It was observed that the impact of symmetry of the atheroma is almost negligible and the non-Newtonian properties of blood leads to higher pressure drops and wall shear stresses than the ones obtained for Newtonian flows.

  20. Effect of low-level laser therapy on blood flow and oxygen- hemoglobin saturation of the foot skin in healthy subjects: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Heu, Franziska; Forster, Clemens; Namer, Barbara; Dragu, Adrian; Lang, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: This study on healthy test subjects intends to show whether one-off Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has an instant effect on the perfusion or the oxygenation of the skin tissue. These possible instant effects may have an influence on the accelerated wound healing which is often observed after application of LLLT, in addition to the usual postulated effects of LLLT which occur with a time delay normally.

  1. Subcutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneously recorded disappearance rates of 133xe from subcutaneous adipose tissue in the crus were studied in 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris using atraumatic labeling of the tissue in lesional skin (LS) areas and symmetrical, nonlesional skin (NLS) areas. Control experiments were performed bilaterally in 10 younger, healthy subjects. The subcutaneous washout rate constant was significantly higher in LS, 0.79 +/- 0.05 min-1 x 10(2) compared to the washout rate constant of NLS, 0.56 +/- 0.07 min-1. 10(2), or the washout rate constant in the normal subjects, 0.46 +/- 0.17 min-1 x 10(2). The mean washout rate constant in NLS was 25% higher than the mean washout rate constant in the normal subjects. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Differences in the washout rate constants might be due to abnormal subcutaneous tissue-to-blood partition (lambda) in the LS--and therefore not reflecting the real differences in the subcutaneous blood flow (SBF). The lambda for 133Xe was therefore measured--using a double isotope washout method (133Xe and [131I]antipyrine)--in symmetrical sites of the lateral crus in LS and NLS of 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and in 10 legs of normal subjects. In LS the lambda was 4.52 +/- 1.67 ml/g, which was not statistically different from that of NLS, 5.25 +/- 2.19 ml/g, nor from that of normal subcutaneous tissue, 4.98 +/- 1.04 ml/g. Calculations of the SBF using the obtained lambda values gave a significantly higher SBF in LS, 3.57 +/- 0.23 ml/100 g/min, compared to SBF in the NLS, 2.94 +/- 0.37 ml/100 g/min. There was no statistically significant difference between SBF in NLS and SBF in the normal subjects. The increased SBF in LS of psoriatics might be a secondary phenomenon to an increased heat loss in the lesional skin

  2. The Physics of Coronary Blood Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zamir, M

    2005-01-01

    Coronary blood flow is blood flow to the heart for its own metabolic needs. In the most common form of heart disease there is a disruption in this flow because of obstructive disease in the vessels that carry the flow. The subject of coronary blood flow is therefore associated mostly with the pathophysiology of this disease, rarely with dynamics or physics. Yet, the system responsible for coronary blood flow, namely the "coronary circulation," is a highly sophisticated dynamical system in which the dynamics and physics of the flow are as important as the integrity of the conducting vessels. While an obstruction in the conducting vessels is a fairly obvious and clearly visible cause of disruption in coronary blood flow, any discord in the complex dynamics of the system can cause an equally grave, though less conspicuous, disruption in the flow. This book is devoted specifically to the dynamics and physics of coronary blood flow. While relevance to the clinical and pathophysiological issues is clearly maintaine...

  3. Blood flow autoregulation in pedicled flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian T; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Elberg, Jens J

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical work on the blood perfusion in skin and muscle flaps has suggested that some degree of blood flow autoregulation exists in such flaps. An autoregulatory mechanism would enable the flap to protect itself from changes in the perfusion pressure. The purpose of the present study...... was to evaluate if, and to what extent, a tissue flap could compensate a reduction in blood flow due to an acute constriction of the feed artery. Further, we wanted to examine the possible role of smooth muscle L-type calcium channels in the autoregulatory mechanism by pharmacological intervention...... with the L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine and the vasodilator papaverine. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pedicled flaps were raised in pigs. Flow in the pedicle was reduced by constriction of the feed artery (n=34). A transit time flow probe measured the effect on blood flow continuously. Following...

  4. Frequency encoding in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Donald J; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, Alexey N;

    2005-01-01

    With a model of renal blood flow regulation, we examined consequences of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) coupling to the myogenic mechanism via voltage-gated Ca channels. The model reproduces the characteristic oscillations of the two mechanisms and predicts frequency and amplitude modulation of...... the myogenic oscillation by TGF. Analysis by wavelet transforms of single-nephron blood flow confirms that both amplitude and frequency of the myogenic oscillation are modulated by TGF. We developed a double-wavelet transform technique to estimate modulation frequency. Median value of the ratio of...... from one TGF cycle to the next. We used a blood pressure signal recorded by telemetry from a conscious rat as the input to the model. Blood pressure fluctuations induced variability in the modulation records similar to those found in the nephron blood flow results. Frequency and amplitude modulation...

  5. MRI of cerebral blood flow under hyperbaric conditions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Damon P; Muir, Eric R; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-07-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has a number of clinical applications. However, the effects of acute HBO on basal cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neurovascular coupling are not well understood. This study explored the use of arterial spin labeling MRI to evaluate changes in baseline and forepaw stimulus-evoked CBF responses in rats (n = 8) during normobaric air (NB), normobaric oxygen (NBO) (100% O2 ), 3 atm absolute (ATA) hyperbaric air (HB) and 3 ATA HBO conditions. T1 was also measured, and the effects of changes in T1 caused by increasing oxygen on the CBF calculation were investigated. The major findings were as follows: (i) increased inhaled oxygen concentrations led to a reduced respiration rate; (ii) increased dissolved paramagnetic oxygen had significant effects on blood and tissue T1 , which affected the CBF calculation using the arterial spin labeling method; (iii) the differences in blood T1 had a larger effect than the differences in tissue T1 on CBF calculation; (iv) if oxygen-induced changes in blood and tissue T1 were not taken into account, CBF was underestimated by 33% at 3 ATA HBO, 10% at NBO and HBO, HB and NBO were similar (p > 0.05) and all were higher than CBF under NB by ~40% (p HBO, similar to NB, supporting the notion that activation-induced CBF regulation in the brain does not operate through an oxygen-sensing mechanism. CBF MRI provides valuable insights into the effects of oxygen on basal CBF and neurovascular coupling under hyperbaric conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27192391

  6. Measurement of bone blood flow in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone blood flow in sheep tibia has been estimated via the measurement of the perfusion limited clearance of 41Ar from the bone mineral matrix following fast neutron activation of 44Ca. Tibia blood flows were estimated for the intact sheep, and after the installation of an intramedullary pressure tap to elevate bone marrow pressure by saline infusion. The results indicate that normal blood flow in the tibia is in the range of 1.1 to 3.7 ml/100ml-min in the intact animal and at normal marrow pressure. With an elevated intramedullary pressure of approximately 100 mmHg, the bone blood flow measured varied around 0.5 to 1.1 ml/100ml-min. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Clinical relevance of intermittent tumour blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the goals of translational cancer research is to understand basic 'phenomena' so that tumour response to therapy can be improved. One such phenomenon is intermittent tumour blood flow. The impact of the transient hypoxia that results from decreased tumour blood flow is now beginning to be appreciated in preclinical systems, and also receiving some attention in clinical practise. Thus in this article we review the nature and frequency of microregional blood flow changes in preclinical and clinical tumours and examine the impact of those changes on response to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, the implications of non-constant blood flow for both the growth of the unperturbed tumour and the regrowth of surviving tumour clonogens during and after therapy are examined

  8. Mammary blood flow and nutrient uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Chantal; Trottier, N.L.; Dourmad, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Sow milk is the major source of nutrients for suckling piglets and taking into account the large litter sizes of our current sow genotypes, it is imperative to maximize nutrient use by the mammary gland. The amount of nutrients available to mammary tissue is dependent upon the concentrations of nutrients in blood and the rate of its flow to the lactating glands. Nutrient availability to the udder may be estimated by measuring mammary arteriovenous differences, and mammary blood flow can be me...

  9. Retinal blood flow in diabetic retinopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, V.; Rassam, S; NEWSOM, R.; Wiek, J; Kohner, E.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--(a) To report on the basic parameters of retinal blood flow in a population of diabetic patients with and without retinopathy and non-diabetic controls; (b) to formulate a haemodynamic model for the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy from this and other studies. DESIGN--Laser-Doppler velocimetry and computerised image analysis to determine retinal blood flow in a large cross sectional study. SETTING--Diabetic retinopathy outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS--24 non-diabetic controls and ...

  10. Study of argon–oxygen flowing afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon–oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon–oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  11. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with 86RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory

  12. Retinal hemodynamic oxygen reactivity assessed by perfusion velocity, blood oximetry and vessel diameter measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klefter, Oliver Niels; Lauritsen, Anne Øberg; Larsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the oxygen reactivity of a fundus photographic method of measuring macular perfusion velocity and to integrate macular perfusion velocities with measurements of retinal vessel diameters and blood oxygen saturation. METHODS: Sixteen eyes in 16 healthy volunteers were studied at two...... perfusion velocities, short-term ICCs were 0.79-0.82 and long-term ICCs were 0.06-0.11. Intersession increases in blood glucose were associated with reductions in perfusion velocities (arterial p = 0.0067; venous p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Oxygen reactivity testing supported that motion-contrast velocimetry is...... a valid method for assessing macular perfusion. Results were consistent with previous observations of hyperoxic blood flow reduction using blue field entoptic and laser Doppler velocimetry. Retinal perfusion seemed to be regulated around individual set points according to blood glucose levels...

  13. CPAP and High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen in Bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ian P; McBride, Antonia K S; Smith, Rachel; Fernandes, Ricardo M

    2015-09-01

    Severe respiratory failure develops in some infants with bronchiolitis because of a complex pathophysiologic process involving increased airways resistance, alveolar atelectasis, muscle fatigue, and hypoxemia due to mismatch between ventilation and perfusion. Nasal CPAP and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen may improve the work of breathing and oxygenation. Although the mechanisms behind these noninvasive modalities of respiratory support are not well understood, they may help infants by way of distending pressure and delivery of high concentrations of warmed and humidified oxygen. Observational studies of varying quality have suggested that CPAP and HFNC may confer direct physiologic benefits to infants with bronchiolitis and that their use has reduced the need for intubation. No trials to our knowledge, however, have compared CPAP with HFNC in bronchiolitis. Two randomized trials compared CPAP with oxygen delivered by low-flow nasal cannula or face mask and found some improvements in blood gas results and some physiologic parameters, but these trials were unable to demonstrate a reduction in the need for intubation. Two trials evaluated HFNC in bronchiolitis (one comparing it with headbox oxygen, the other with nebulized hypertonic saline), with the results not seeming to suggest important clinical or physiologic benefits. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of respiratory failure in bronchiolitis, discuss these trials in detail, and consider how future research studies may be designed to best evaluate CPAP and HFNC in bronchiolitis. PMID:25836649

  14. Red blood cell aggregation, aggregate strength and oxygen transport potential of blood are abnormal in both homozygous sickle cell anemia and sickle-hemoglobin C disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tripette, Julien; Alexy, Tamas; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Mougenel, Daniele; Beltan, Eric; Chalabi, Tawfik; Chout, Roger; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hue, Olivier; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Connes, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that red cell aggregation and the ratio of hematocrit to blood viscosity, an index of the oxygen transport potential of blood, might considerably modulate blood flow dynamics in the microcirculation. The findings of this study indicate that patients with sickle cell disease and those with sickle cell hemoglobin C disease have low ratios of hematocrit to blood viscosity as compared to normal controls. This may play a role in tissue hypoxia and clinical status of these ...

  15. Aortic blood flow subtraction: an alternative method for measuring total renal blood flow in conscious dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandgaard, N C F; Andersen, J L; Holstein-Rathlou, N-H;

    2002-01-01

    We have measured total renal blood flow (TRBF) as the difference between signals from ultrasound flow probes implanted around the aorta above and below the renal arteries. The repeatability of the method was investigated by repeated, continuous infusions of angiotensin II and endothelin-1 seven t...... of TRBF by aortic blood flow subtraction is a practical and reliable method that allows direct comparison of excretory function and renal blood flow from two kidneys. The method also allows direct comparison between TRBF and flow in the caudal aorta....

  16. In vivo determination of bone blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative measurement of bone blood flow is vital to understand the hemodynamics of bone systems especially in the study of asceptic bone necroses. These ''silent bends'' result from micro-emboli in femoral arterioles from small nitrogen bubbles released from lipids during a diver's ascent. A technique to determine bone blood flow in vivo has been developed by measuring the rate of inert gas washout of Ar-41 (t /sub 1/2/ = 1.83 h, E = 1293 keV) from the bone mineral matrix. Argon gas is formed in vivo by neutron activation of Ca-44 using 14.3 MeV neutrons, following the reaction Ca-44(n, α)Ar-41. The blood flow in the irradiated bone is determined by measuring the clearance rate of Ar-41 using gamma-ray spectroscopy. To date, measurements have been made on dead and living rats (weight 300g). The results indicated that in the no-flow situation the clearance rate is consistent with the physical half-life of Ar-41, while for the live rats the clearance rate for argon is dependent on the flow of blood in the bone. The observed clearance times correspond to flows greater than 3 ml of blood per 100 ml of argon distribution volume/min (F/pV), with the bone-blood partition coefficient for argon approximately one. In addition, measurements of the partitioning of argon and other gases with bone have been measured in order to understand blood-bone systems more fully

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventy-six schizophrenic patients were examined by a Xe-133 inhalation method to determine regional cerebral blood flow. A decreased blood flow was observed in the frontal lobe, especially in the right inferior part. In a study on the relationship between disease subtypes and regional cerebral blood flow, negative symptoms were found more predominantly associated with dissolution type than delusion type. In the group of dissolution type, a decreased blood flow was observed in both the right inferior frontal lobe and the right upper hemisphere, in comparison to the group of delution type. Patients presenting with auditory hallucination had a significantly higher incidence of both negative and positive symptoms, as compared with those not presenting with it. In such patients, a significantly decreased blood flow was also seen in the left upper frontal lobe and the bilateral parietal lobe. Xe-133 inhalation method should assist in evaluating brain function in schizophrenic patients, thus leading to the likelihood of developing a new treatment modality. (N.K.)

  18. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  19. Blood flow/pump rotation ratio as an artificial lung performance monitoring tool during extracorporeal respiratory support using centrifugal pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Marcelo; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Hirota, Adriana Sayuri; dos Santos, Edzangela Vasconcelos; Costa, Eduardo Leite Vieira; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the correlations of the blood flow/pump rotation ratio and the transmembrane pressure, CO2 and O2 transfer during the extracorporeal respiratory support. Methods Five animals were instrumented and submitted to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a five-step protocol, including abdominal sepsis and lung injury. Results This study showed that blood flow/pump rotations ratio variations are dependent on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation blood flow in a positive logarithm...

  20. Higher blood flow and circulating NO products offset high-altitude hypoxia among Tibetans

    OpenAIRE

    Erzurum, S. C.; Ghosh, S; Janocha, A. J.; W Xu; Bauer, S.; Bryan, N. S.; Tejero, J.; Hemann, C.; Hille, R; Stuehr, D J; Feelisch, M; Beall, C. M.

    2007-01-01

    The low barometric pressure at high altitude causes lower arterial oxygen content among Tibetan highlanders, who maintain normal levels of oxygen use as indicated by basal and maximal oxygen consumption levels that are consistent with sea level predictions. This study tested the hypothesis that Tibetans resident at 4,200 m offset physiological hypoxia and achieve normal oxygen delivery by means of higher blood flow enabled by higher levels of bioactive forms of NO, the main endothelial factor...

  1. Determinants of resting cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Adam M; Borzage, Matthew T; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated. This study examined the physiological determinants of CBF in 37 patients with sickle cell disease, 38 ethnicity matched control subjects and 16 patients with anemia of non-sickle origin. Cerebral blood flow was measured using phase contrast MRI of the carotid and vertebral arteries. CBF increased inversely to oxygen content (r(2)  = 0.69, P Brain oxygen delivery, the product of CBF and oxygen content, was normal in all groups. Brain composition, specifically the relative amounts of grey and white matter, was the next strongest CBF predictor, presumably by influencing cerebral metabolic rate. Grey matter/white matter ratio and CBF declined monotonically until the age of 25 in all subjects, consistent with known maturational changes in brain composition. Further CBF reductions were observed with age in subjects older than 35 years of age, likely reflecting microvascular aging. On multivariate regression, CBF was independent of disease state, hemoglobin S, hemoglobin F, reticulocyte count and cell free hemoglobin, suggesting that it is regulated similarly in patients and control subjects. In conclusion, sickle cell disease patients had sufficient oxygen delivery at rest, but accomplish this only by marked increases in their resting CBF, potentially limiting their ability to further augment flow in response to stress. Am. J. Hematol. 91:912-917, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27263497

  2. Regulation of blood flow by prostaglandins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Risum, N; Kjaer, M

    2004-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) belong to the family of prostanoids together with thromboxanes and are produced mainly from arachadonic acid by the enzyme cyclooxygenase. PGs are known to stimulate platelet aggregation, mediate inflammation and edema, play a role in bone metabolism and in biological...... adaptation of connective tissues e.g. tendon. This review covers the role of PG for mediating tissue blood flow at rest and during increases in metabolic demand such as exercise and reactive hyperaemia. There is strong evidence that PGs contribute to elevate blood flow at rest and during reactive hyperaemia...... in a variety of tissues. Their role for regulating the large increases in muscle blood flow during exercise is less clear which may be explained by redundant mechanisms. Several interactions are known to exist between specific vasodilator substances, and therefore PGs can act in synergy with other...

  3. Modelling cerebral blood oxygenation using Monte Carlo XYZ-PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zam, Azhar; Jacques, Steven L.; Alexandrov, Sergey; Li, Youzhi; Leahy, Martin J.

    2013-02-01

    Continuous monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation is critically important for the management of many lifethreatening conditions. Non-invasive monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation with a photoacoustic technique offers advantages over current invasive and non-invasive methods. We introduce a Monte Carlo XYZ-PA to model the energy deposition in 3D and the time-resolved pressures and velocity potential based on the energy absorbed by the biological tissue. This paper outlines the benefits of using Monte Carlo XYZ-PA for optimization of photoacoustic measurement and imaging. To the best of our knowledge this is the first fully integrated tool for photoacoustic modelling.

  4. Venous flow velocity, venous volume and arterial blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship of arterial blood flow and venous volume to venous flow velocity was studied in normal subjects. The effects of current modes of treatment in venous thrombosis and of a vasodilator drug on venous flow velocity were also investigated. Total calf flow and venous volume were measured by venous occlusion plethysmography while venous flow axial velocity was determined by the transit time of 131I albumin from calf to inguinal region. Local intravenous epinephrine administration induced venoconstriction and increased venous flow velocity. Intra-arterial isoproterenol and angiotensin increased and decreased arterial flow, respectively, with no change in venous flow velocity or volume, but local heat increased arterial flow and venous flow velocity with no change in venous volume. Local cold, despite venoconstriction, decreased venous flow velocity accompanied by decreased arterial flow. Intravenous heparin did not affect venous flow velocity. Intravenous but not oral nylidrin increased venous flow velocity. Therefore venous flow velocity can be significantly increased by venoconstriction, by large increases in arterial flow (local heat), and by a parenteral vasodilator drug. These experiments indicate that there is a basis for applying heat but not cold in the prevention and treatment of venous thrombosis

  5. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    OpenAIRE

    Brust, Matthias,; Aouane, Othmane; Thiébaud, Marine; Flormann, Daniel; Verdier, Claude; Kaestner, Lars; Laschke, Matthias; Selmi, Hassib; Benyoussef, Abdellilah; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou; Misbah, Chaouqi; Wagner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule netw...

  6. Vasodilator interactions in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Jensen, Lasse Gliemann;

    2012-01-01

    During exercise, oxygen delivery to skeletal muscle is elevated to meet the increased oxygen demand. The increase in blood flow to skeletal muscle is achieved by vasodilators formed locally in the muscle tissue, either on the intraluminal or the extraluminal side of the blood vessels. A number...... vasodilators are both stimulated by several compounds, eg. adenosine, ATP, acetylcholine, bradykinin, and are affected by mechanically induced signals, such as shear stress. NO and prostacyclin have also been shown to interact in a redundant manner where one system can take over when formation of the other...... is compromised. Although numerous studies have examined the role of single and multiple pharmacological inhibition of different vasodilator systems, and important vasodilators and interactions have been identified, a large part of the exercise hyperemic response remains unexplained. It is plausible...

  7. Ultrasonic Doppler blood flow meter for extracorporeal circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Ricardo G.; Costa, Eduardo T.; Maia, Joaquim M.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.

    2000-04-01

    In cardiac surgeries it is frequently necessary to carry out interventions in internal heart structures, and where the blood circulation and oxygenation are made by artificial ways, out of the patient's body, in a procedure known as extracorporeal circulation (EC). During this procedure, one of the most important parameters, and that demands constant monitoring, is the blood flow. In this work, an ultrasonic pulsed Doppler blood flowmeter, to be used in an extracorporeal circulation system, was developed. It was used a 2 MHz ultrasonic transducer, measuring flows from 0 to 5 liters/min, coupled externally to the EC arterial line destined to adults perfusion (diameter of 9.53 mm). The experimental results using the developed flowmeter indicated a maximum deviation of 3.5% of full scale, while the blood flow estimator based in the rotation speed of the peristaltic pump presented deviations greater than 20% of full scale. This ultrasonic flowmeter supplies the results in a continuous and trustworthy way, and it does not present the limitations found in those flowmeters based in other transduction methods. Moreover, due to the fact of not being in contact with the blood, it is not disposable and it does not need sterilization, reducing operational costs and facilitating its use.

  8. Ascending aortic blood flow dynamics following intense exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, R D; Sellers, W R

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast aortic blood flow kinetics during recovery from intense aerobic (maximal oxygen uptake test) and anaerobic (Wingate anaerobic power test) exercise. Fifteen healthy male subjects (VO2max = 56.1 +/- 5.8 mk/kg/min) participated in this study. Beat-to-beat peak aortic blood flow velocity (pkV) and acceleration (pkA) measurements were obtained by placing a 3.0 MHz continuous-wave ultrasonic transducer on the suprasternal notch at rest and during recovery (immediately post-exercise, 2.5 min, and 5.0 min) following the two exercise conditions. Peak velocity and acceleration significantly increased (p less than 0.01) from rest to immediately post-exercise and remained elevated throughout the 5-min recovery period. No differences were observed between the aerobic and anaerobic tests. Stroke distance significantly declined (p less than 0.01) immediately following exercise and progressively rose during the 5-min recovery period. The results indicate that: 1) aortic blood flow kinetics remained elevated during short-term recovery, and 2) intense aerobic and anaerobic exercise exhibit similar post-exercise aortic blood flow kinetics. PMID:2262232

  9. Electromechanical Model of Blood Flow in Vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo Cap; Barbora Czippelova

    2008-01-01

    The present paper deals with some theoretical derivations connected with very efficient method of solution of hydrodynamic problems of blood flow in human cardiovascular system. The electromechanical analogy of liquid flow in a tube and electromagnetic wave propagating along an electric transmission line is discussed. We have derived a detailed circuit-like model of an elementary section of the elastic tube with viscose Newtonian liquid. The analogy harmonic current electrical cir...

  10. Electromechanical Model of Blood Flow in Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Cap

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with some theoretical derivations connected with very efficient method of solution of hydrodynamic problems of blood flow in human cardiovascular system. The electromechanical analogy of liquid flow in a tube and electromagnetic wave propagating along an electric transmission line is discussed. We have derived a detailed circuit-like model of an elementary section of the elastic tube with viscose Newtonian liquid. The analogy harmonic current electrical circuit has been designed

  11. Effects of flow geometry on blood viscoelasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, George B; Henderson, Nancy M

    2006-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood are dominated by microstructures formed by red cells. The microstructures are of several types such as irregular aggregates, rouleaux, and layers of aligned cells. The dynamic deformability of the red cells, aggregation tendency, cell concentration, size of confining vessel and rate of flow are determining factors in the microstructure. Viscoelastic properties, viscosity and elasticity, relate to energy loss and storage in flowing blood while relaxation time and Weissenberg number play a role in assessing the importance of the elasticity relative to the viscosity. These effects are shown herein for flow in a large straight cylindrical tube, a small tube, and a porous medium. These cases approximate the geometries of the arterial system: large vessels, small vessels and vessels with many branches and bifurcations. In each case the viscosity, elasticity, relaxation time and Weissenberg number for normal human blood as well as blood with enhanced cell aggregation tendency and diminished cell deformability are given. In the smaller spaces of the microtubes and porous media, the diminished viscosity shows the possible influence of the Fåhraeus-Lindqvist effect and at high shear rates, the viscoelasticity of blood shows dilatancy. This is true for normal, aggregation enhanced and hardened cells. PMID:17148856

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow in aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, K; Larsen, B; Skinhøj, E;

    1978-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in 13 aphasic patients with left hemisphere lesions, using the intracarotid xenon 133 injection method and a 254-detector gamma camera system. The rCBF was measured during rest and during various function tests, including a simple speech test. In...

  13. Cerebral blood flow in acute mountain sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Wright, Anne; Lassen, N A;

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured using the radioactive xenon technique and were related to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). In 12 subjects, ascending from 150 to 3,475 m, CBF was 24% increased at 24 h [45.1 to 55.9 initial slope index (ISI) units] and 4% increased...

  14. Frequency encoding in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, D.J.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A.N.;

    2005-01-01

    With a model of renal blood flow regulation, we examined consequences of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) coupling to the myogenic mechanism via voltage-gated Ca channels. The model reproduces the characteristic oscillations of the two mechanisms and predicts frequency and amplitude modulation of ...

  15. Xenon computed tomographic blood flow mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xenon CT flow information appears to be clinically useful in the diagnosis and management of a broad spectrum of clinical disorders. It also appears to be a useful tool for the experimental study of the cerebral circulation, with recent work also extending to application to the study of solid abdominal organs. The authors therefore found xenon CT CBF mapping to be a useful new blood flow methodology and are of the opinion that as CT technology improves, one will be able to obtain still better flow information with less accompanying radiation exposure and/or a reduction in the level of xenon inhalation required

  16. Contribution of transient blood flow to tumour hypoxia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumours grown in mice typically exhibit regions of hypoxia believed to result from two different processes: chronic oxygen deprivation due to consumption/diffusion limitations, and periodic deprivation resulting from transient reductions in tumour blood flow. The relative contribution of each is, however, not generally known. We have addressed this issue in transplanted SCCVII squamous cell carcinomas in C3H mice, using a quantitative extension of the fluorescence 'mismatch' technique coupled with cell sorting from irradiated tumours. At least half of the vessels in these tumours exhibit transient perfusion changes. Additionally, a majority of the 15-20% of cells that are sufficiently hypoxic to be resistant to radiation in the SCCVII tumours appear to result from cyclic, not continuous (diffusion-limited) hypoxia. Since different strategies may be necessary to counteract cyclic hypoxia in tumours, the possibility of transient blood flow changes should not be ignored when planning cancer therapy for humans. (orig.)

  17. Local aggregation characteristics of microscale blood flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Sherwood, Joseph M.; Dusting, Jonathan; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-11-01

    Erythrocyte aggregation (EA) is an important aspect of microvascular flows affecting blood flow and viscosity. Microscale blood flows have been studied extensively in recent years using computational and microfluidic based approaches. However, the relationship between the local structural characteristics of blood and the velocity field has not been quantified. We report simultaneous measurements of the local velocity, aggregation and haematocrit distributions of human erythrocytes flowing in a microchannel. EA was induced using Dextran and flows were imaged using brightfield microscopy. Local aggregation characteristics were investigated using statistical and edge-detection image processing techniques while velocity profiles were obtained using PIV algorithms. Aggregation intensity was found to strongly correlate with local variations in velocity in both the central and wall regions of the channel. The edge detection method showed that near the side wall large aggregates are associated with high local velocities and low local shear rates. In the central region large aggregates occurred in regions of low velocity and high erythrocyte concentration. The results demonstrate the combined effect of haematocrit and velocity distributions on local aggregation characteristics.

  18. Modeling of blood flow in arterial trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anor, Tomer; Grinberg, Leopold; Baek, Hyoungsu; Madsen, Joseph R; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Karniadakis, George E

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computational methods and medical imaging techniques have enabled accurate simulations of subject-specific blood flows at the level of individual blood cell and in complex arterial networks. While in the past, we were limited to simulations with one arterial bifurcation, the current state-of-the-art is simulations of arterial networks consisting of hundreds of arteries. In this paper, we review the advances in methods for vascular flow simulations in large arterial trees. We discuss alternative approaches and validity of various assumptions often made to simplify the modeling. To highlight the similarities and discrepancies of data computed with different models, computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) and inexpensive one-dimensional (1D) flow simulations in very large arterial networks are employed. Finally, we discuss the possibilities, challenges, and limitations of the computational methods for predicting outcomes of therapeutic interventions for individual patients. PMID:20836052

  19. Effects of midazolam on cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of intravenously administered midazolam on cerebral blood flow were evaluated in eight healthy volunteers using the 133Xe inhalation technique. Six minutes after an intravenous dose of 0.15 mg/kg midazolam, the cerebral blood flow decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) from a value of 40.6 +/- 3.3 to a value of 27.0 +/- 5.0 ml . 100 g-1 . min-1. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) increased from 2.8 +/- 0.2 to 3.9 to 0.6 mmHg/(ml . 100 g-1 . min-1)(P less than 0.001). Mean arterial blood pressure decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) from 117 +/- 8 to 109 +/- 9 mmHg and arterial carbon dioxide tension increased from 33.9 +/- 2.3 to 38.6 +/- 3.2 mmHg (P less than 0.05). Arterial oxygen tension remained stable throughout the study, 484 +/- 95 mmHg before the administration of midazolam and 453 +/- 76 mmHg after. All the subjects slept after the injection of the drug and had anterograde amnesia of 24.5 +/- 5 min. The decrease in mean arterial blood pressure was probably not important since it remained in the physiologic range for cerebral blood flow autoregulation. The increase in arterial carbon dioxide tension observed after the midazolam injection may have partially counteracted the effect of this new benzodiazepine on cerebral blood flow. Our data suggest that midazolam might be a safe agent to use for the induction of anethesia in neurosurgical patients with intracranial hypertension

  20. Arterial secondary blood flow patterns visualized with vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Hansen, Jens Munk;

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the first quantification and visualisation of secondary flow patterns with vector flow ultrasound. The first commercial implementation of the vector flow method Transverse Oscillation was used to obtain in-vivo, 2D vector fields in real-time. The hypothesis of this study...... was that the rotational direction is constant within each artery. Three data sets of 10 seconds were obtained from three main arteries in healthy volunteers. For each data set the rotational flow patterns were identified during the diastole. Each data set contains a 2D vector field over time and with the vector angles...... and velocity magnitudes the blood flow patterns were visualised with streamlines in Matlab (Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA). The rotational flow was quantified by the angular frequency for each cardiac cycle, and the mean rotational frequencies and standard deviations were calculated for the abdominal aorta f-1...

  1. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors. PMID:23958351

  2. Ocular Blood Flow and Normal Tension Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal tension glaucoma (NTG is known as a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and glaucomatous visual field loss, even though the intraocular pressure (IOP does not exceed the normal range. The pathophysiology of NTG remains largely undetermined. It is hypothesized that the abnormal ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. A number of evidences suggested that the vascular factors played a significant role in the development of NTG. In recent years, the new imaging techniques, fluorescein angiography, color Doppler imaging (CDI, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG, have been used to evaluate the ocular blood flow and blood vessels, and the impaired vascular autoregulation was found in patients with NTG. Previous studies showed that NTG was associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including migraine, Alzheimer’s disease, primary vascular dysregulation, and Flammer syndrome. The vascular factors were involved in these diseases. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal ocular blood flow in NTG are still not clear, but the risk factors for glaucomatous optic neuropathy likely included oxidative stress, vasospasm, and endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI for assessment of renal oxygenation

    OpenAIRE

    Neugarten J; Golestaneh L

    2014-01-01

    Joel Neugarten, Ladan Golestaneh Renal Division, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA Abstract: Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) has recently emerged as an important noninvasive technique to assess intrarenal oxygenation under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. Although this tool represents a major addition to our armamentarium of methodologies to investigate the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of acute...

  4. Stochasticity of flow through microcirculation as a regulator of oxygen delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kislukhin Viktor V

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Observations of microcirculation reveal that the blood flow is subject to interruptions and resumptions. Accepting that blood randomly stops and resumes, one can show that the randomness could be a powerful means to match oxygen delivery with oxygen demand. Method The ability of the randomness to regulate oxygen delivery is based on two suppositions: (a the probability for flow to stop does not depend on the time of uninterrupted flow, thus the number of interruptions of flow follows a Poisson distribution; (b the probability to resume the flow does not depend on the time for flow being interrupted; meaning that time spent by erythrocytes at rest follows an exponential distribution. Thus the distribution of the time to pass an organ is a compound Poisson distribution. The Laplace transform of the given distribution gives the fraction of oxygen that passes the organ. Result Oxygen delivery to the tissues directly depends on characteristics of the irregularity of the flow through microcirculation. Conclusion By variation of vasomotion activity it is possible to change delivery of oxygen to a tissue by up to 8 times.

  5. Cerebral blood flow tomography with xenon-133

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured tomographically by inhalation of Xenon-133. The calculation is based on taking a sequence of tomograms during the wash-in and wash-out phase of the tracer. Due to the dynamic nature of the process, a highly sensitive and fast moving single photon emission...... other tracers for CBF tomography using SPECT is summarized with emphasis on the 99mTc chelates that freely pass the intact blood-brain barrier. The highly sensitive brain-dedicated SPECT systems described are a prerequisite for achieving high resolution tomograms with such tracers....

  6. Effect of oxygen flow rate during oxygen-drived heparin inhalation on the arterial blood gas and coagulation function in mechanically ventilated AECOPD patients%不同氧流量驱动肝素雾化吸入对 AECOPD 机械通气患者血气及凝血功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛艳霞; 李亚军; 杨向东; 李建华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different amount oxygen-drived inhalation of heparin on arterial blood gas and coagulation function in mechanically ventilated patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( AECOPD) .Methods Fifty-one patients with AECOPD mechanical ventilation were randomly divided into A, B, C three groups.Group A (17 cases) were given the oxygen flow rate of 5 L/min atomizing inhalation, group B (19 cases) were given the oxygen flow rate of 7 L/min, group C (15 cases) were given the oxygen flow rate of 9 L/min.Arterial blood gas and coagulation function were detected before and after atomizing inhalation (30 min, 1, 3, 7 days) in all patients.Results Compared with group A and C, Patients in group B had obviously improved arterial blood gas and were statistically significant (P0.05).Compared with before atomization, Patients in group B had significantly improved arterial blood gas at each time point after inhalation ( P0.05).Seven days after inhalation, prothrombin time ( PT) , activated partial thromboplastin time ( APTT) and fibrinogen ( FIB) were not significantly different from the level before inhalation in all three groups (P>0.05).Conclusion The best oxygen flow rate is 7 L/min for heparin inhalation in mechanically ventilated patients with AECOPD.It significantly improves the arterial partial pressure of oxygen, reducing carbon dioxide partial pressure, but has less influence on the coagulation function.%目的:探讨不同氧流量驱动肝素雾化吸入对慢性阻塞性肺疾病急性加重期( AECOPD)机械通气患者血气及凝血功能的影响。方法将51例AECOPD机械通气患者随机分为A、B、C三组,其中A组(17例)给予5 L/min氧流量雾化吸入;B组(19例)给予7 L/min;C组(15例)给予9 L/min。监测雾化前、雾化后30 min、1 d、3 d、7 d各个时间点血气及雾化前及雾化后第7天的凝血功能参数的变化情况。结果与A

  7. Outcome of splanchnic blood flow determination in patients with suspected chronic intestinal ischaemia. A retrospective survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2002-01-01

    flow: A, normal response (splanchnic blood flow > or = 200 ml/min); B, possible abnormal response (splanchnic blood flow 51-199 ml/min); and C, definitive abnormal response (splanchnic blood flow < or = 50 ml/min). Where surgery took place, the type of operation was noted. RESULTS: Forty patients had a...... normal meal-induced response, 23 patients had a possible abnormal response and 10 patients had a definitive abnormal response, which gave evidence of chronic intestinal ischaemia. In the total patient population, the increase in splanchnic blood flow was significantly correlated to an increase in hepatic...... oxygen uptake (r = 0.38, P < 0.002) and to body weight (r = 0.36, P < 0.01). A total of seven patients (10%) underwent successful revascularization. CONCLUSIONS: Ten of the patients with suspected chronic intestinal ischaemia had abnormal meal-induced splanchnic blood flow and 30% of these patients...

  8. Cutaneous blood flow rate in areas with and without arteriovenous anastomoses during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, M.; Sejrsen, Per

    Arteriovenous anastomoses, capillaries, cutaneous bllod flow rate, exercise, finger blood flow, skin blood flow......Arteriovenous anastomoses, capillaries, cutaneous bllod flow rate, exercise, finger blood flow, skin blood flow...

  9. Regional blood flow studies with radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodological approaches to blood flow analysis include (1) diffusible indicator methods, (2) clearance techniques and (3) nondiffusible indicator methods. In each case, accurate measurements of blood flow can be obtained by developing mathematical models which relate the time-dependent observation derived from following the fate of a radiotracer as a function of time to the physiological process itself. Application of these models to biological systems involves constraints and necessitates compromises which may affect the validity of the measurements. Nevertheless, when these techniques are carefully applied and adequately validated, they have provided critical physiological information about such organ systems as the brain and kidney and promise to provide diagnostic information in patients with suspected coronary and peripheral vascular disease

  10. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes. PMID:23764265

  11. Blood flow-restricted exercise in space

    OpenAIRE

    Hackney, Kyle J; Everett, Meghan; Scott, Jessica M; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in chronic physiological adaptations including skeletal muscle atrophy, cardiovascular deconditioning, and bone demineralization. To attenuate the negative consequences of weightlessness during spaceflight missions, crewmembers perform moderate- to high-load resistance exercise in conjunction with aerobic (cycle and treadmill) exercise. Recent evidence from ground-based studies suggests that low-load blood flow-restricted (BFR) resistance exercise tr...

  12. Surfactant bolus instillation: effects of different doses on blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocities

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, M.; Segerer, Hugo; Kiessling, C.; Obladen, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen preterm infants suffering from respiratory distress syndrome were randomly allocated to receive either high-dose (200 mg/kg) or low-dose (100 mg/kg) surfactant treatment. Retreatments were done with the low dose. Blood pressure, blood gases and cerebral blood flow velocities were determined before and after 24 bolus instillations. With the high dose mean blood pressure and mean cerebral blood flow velocity dropped significantly. With the low dose only mean cerebral blood flow velocity...

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured at rest using the 133Xe inhalation technique in 40 DSM-III-diagnosed schizophrenics (22 males, 18 females: mean age 35.0 years, range 20-49 years) and 31 age-and sex-matched normal controls (16 males, 15 females: mean age 34.3 years, range 21-49 years). The absolute value (AV) and the percent value (PV) of the rCBF in schizophrenics were compared with those in controls. Correlations between rCBF and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores or the performance of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) were examined in schizophrenics. Schizophrenics showed significantly lower AVs in all brain regions examined and a significantly lower PV in the left superior frontal region than controls. The hyperfrontal rCBF distribution which was found in both hemispheres in controls, was absent in the left hemisphere in schizophrenics. In schizophrenics, superior frontal blood flows were significantly negatively correlated with the negative symptom scores of the BPRS but not with the total scores and the positive symptom scores of the BPRS. In schizophrenics, inferior frontal blood flows were significantly correlated with the number of sorting categories achieved. These results indicate that rCBF in schizophrenia is reduced in the whole brain and especially in the left superior frontal region. These findings suggest a frontal lobe dysfunction in schizophrenia. (author)

  14. Oxygenation and Blood Volume Periodic Waveforms in the Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Gersten, Alexander; Raz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Results of an experiment are presented whose aim is to explore the relationship between respiration and cerebral oxygenation. Measurements of end tidal CO2 (EtCO2) were taken simultaneously with cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) using the INVOS Cerebral Oximeter of Somanetics. Due to the device limitations we could explore only subjects who could perform with a breathing rate of around 2/min or less. Six subjects were used who were experienced in yoga breathing techniques. They performed an identical periodic breathing exercise including periodicity of about 2/min. The results of all six subjects clearly show a periodic change of cerebral oxygenation with the same period as the breathing exercises. Similar periodic changes in blood volume index were observed as well.

  15. Changes in pulmonary blood flow do not affect gas exchange during intermittent ventilation in resting turtles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tobias; Hicks, James W.

    2008-01-01

    The breathing pattern of many different air-breathing vertebrates, including lungfish, anuran amphibians, turtles, crocodiles and snakes, is characterized by brief periods of lung ventilation interspersed among apnoeas of variable duration. These intermittent ventilatory cycles are associated......2 excretion did not correlate with changes in pulmonary blood flow. We conclude that increases in pulmonary blood flow associated with ventilation are not required to maintain resting rates of oxygen uptake and CO2 excretion in resting animals....

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-isopropyl-p-123I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) was used to quantify the regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) in 11 diabetic patients (average age; 67.9 years) and 12 non-diabetic subjects (average age; 67.4 years), none of whom had (cerebrovascular disease (CVD) on CT studies. A reference sampling method by continuous arterial blood sampling was used to quantify r-CBF. There were no significant differences in physiological or laboratory data between diabetic and non-diabetic groups except for fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c levels. The average of r-CBF in each region of cerebrum and cerebellum was significantly lower in diabetic group than that in the control group (p<0.01). These observations show that r-CBF of diabetic patients is reduced, even in the absence of findings of CVD on a CT study. (author)

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow in diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Ono, Shinnichi; Nishikawa, Takushi (Nichinan Hospital of Miyazaki Prefecture (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-02-01

    N-isopropyl-p-[sup 123]I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) was used to quantify the regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) in 11 diabetic patients (average age; 67.9 years) and 12 non-diabetic subjects (average age; 67.4 years), none of whom had (cerebrovascular disease (CVD) on CT studies). A reference sampling method by continuous arterial blood sampling was used to quantify r-CBF. There were no significant differences in physiological or laboratory data between diabetic and non-diabetic groups except for fasting plasma glucose and HbA[sub 1c] levels. The average of r-CBF in each region of cerebrum and cerebellum was significantly lower in diabetic group than that in the control group (p<0.01). These observations show that r-CBF of diabetic patients is reduced, even in the absence of findings of CVD on a CT study. (author).

  18. Blood flow in healed and inflamed periodontal tissues of dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hock, J.M.; Kim, S.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if increased blood flow associated with gingivitis would decrease following resolution of gingival inflammation in dogs with periodontitis; if increased blood flow in inflamed gingiva was associated with changes in the blood flow of alveolar bone, and if blood flow in gingiva and alveolar bone increased if periodontitis was reactivated by ligating teeth. Regional blood flow was measured in dogs with pre-existing periodontitis, using radioisotope-labelled, plastic microspheres. In the first experiment on 4 adult Beagle dogs, teeth in the left jaws were treated to resolve the periodontitis, while teeth in the right jaws were not treated. Gingival and bone blood flow were measured after 12 wk. Blood flow was significantly (p<0.05) lower in non-inflamed healed gingiva (32.1 +- 2.7 ml/min/100 g) than in inflamed gingiva (46.1 +- 5.3 ml/min/100 g). No differences in the blood flow of the alveolar bone underlying inflamed or non-inflamed gingiva were present. In the second experiment, the right mandibular teeth of 5 dogs were treated to resolve periodontitis while teeth in the other quadrants were ligated for 4, 10 or 12 wk. The duration of ligation did not alter blood flow. Gingival blood flow around ligated maxillary and mandibular teeth was comparable and approximately 54% higher than around non-ligated teeth (p<0.03). The difference in blood flow between gingiva with G.I.>1 and gingiva with G.I.<2 was significant (p<0.04). Blood flow in bone was not altered by changes in the inflammatory status of the overlying gingiva. The findings suggest that changes in blood flow associated with inflammation are reversible and that blood flow alveolar bone is regulated independently of gingival blood flow.

  19. Blood oxygen flux estimation with a combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound microscopy system: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Forbrich, Alex; Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, an important indicator of tissue metabolism, can be expressed as the change of net blood oxygen flux into and out of a tissue region per 100 g of tissue. In this work, we propose a photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound method for imaging local blood oxygen flux of a single vessel. An imaging system for combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound microscopy is presented. This system uses a swept-scan 25-MHz ultrasound transducer with confocal dark-field laser illumination optics. A pulse-sequencer enables ultrasonic and laser pulses to be interlaced so that photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound images are co-registered. Since the mean flow speed can be measured by color Doppler ultrasound, the vessel cross-sectional area can be measured by power Doppler or structural photoacoustic imaging, and multi-wavelength photoacoustic methods can be used to estimate oxygen saturation (sO2) and total concentration of haemoglobin (CHb), all of the parameters necessary for oxygen flux estimation can be provided. The accuracy of the flow speed and sO2 estimation has been investigated. In vitro sheep blood phantom experiments have been performed at different sO2 levels and mean flow speeds. Blood oxygen flux has been estimated, and the uncertainty of the measurement has been quantified.

  20. Oxygen tension measurement using an automatic blood gas analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becket, J; Orchard, C; Chakrabarti, M K; Hall, G M; Gillies, I D; Bourdillon, P J

    1981-08-01

    Two different methods of assessing the reliability of the oxygen electrode of one model of an automatic blood gas analyser (BGA) have been studied. In the first, a single automatic BGA was assessed by using outdated bank blood which was pumped around a small extracorporeal circuit into which known gas mixtures were passed. Oxygen tension was varied between 2 and 16 kPa. In the second, fresh heparinized blood was tonometered with calibrated gases and submitted to the automatic BGA used in the first part of the study and also to three other identical machines. Each of the machines was between 3 and 4 years old.Eighteen different units of blood were used in the first part of the study. The correlation coefficient between the automatic BGA and the Po(2) in the extracorporeal circuit varied between 0.29 and 0.99. 31% of the total of 209 measurements made by the automatic BGA were more than 1.2 kPa from the reference value, 25% of them being between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the reference value. In the second part of the study, the correlation coefficient between this automatic BGA and the tonometered blood was 0.96. The correlation coefficients for the 3 other identical BGAs were 0.84, 0.97 and 0.88, indicating that the BGA used in the first part of the study was no worse than any of the others.It is suggested that although clinicians are likely to ignore readings of an automatic BGA that are more than 4.0 kPa from the true value and are likely to repeat the investigation, readings between 1.2 and 4.0 kPa from the true value may adversely affect patient management. PMID:7288796

  1. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage

  2. External carotid artery flow maintains near infrared spectroscopy-determined frontal lobe oxygenation during ephedrine administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H; Rasmussen, P; Sato, K;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phenylephrine and ephedrine affect frontal lobe oxygenation ([Formula: see text]) differently when assessed by spatially resolved near infrared spectroscopy. We evaluated the effect of phenylephrine and ephedrine on extra- vs intra-cerebral blood flow and on [Formula: see text]. METHODS...

  3. Blood oxygen transport and metabolism of the confined lugworm Arenicola marina (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulmond, A

    1975-12-01

    Oxygen consumption (MO2), haemoglobin oxygen saturation level (SVO2) and pH (pHv) in prebranchial blood were measured in lugworms experimentally confined in sea water at 15 degrees C. Total blood flow through the gills (Vb) was estimated. For sea water oxygen partial pressure (PwO2) between 120 and 150 Torr MO2, SVO2 and Vb were high and nearly constant. For PwO2 less than 120 Torr, Vb fell quickly, MO2 progressively dropped, and metabolism remained aerobic at the expense of the prebrancial blood oxygen store. For PwO2 less than 50 Torr, Vb and SvO2 values were extremely low, and the low pHv and the modified buffer power of the surrounding sea water showed that anaerobic metabolism was occurring. Changes in respiratory gas exchanges and metabolism during the tidal cycle are deduced from the comparison of these results with data obtained in the field. PMID:2646

  4. Effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to examine effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus. The authors used microspheres to measure blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum in anesthetized dogs and rabbits. A critical assumption of the microsphere method is that microspheres do not pass through arteriovenous shunts. Blood flow values obtained with simultaneous injection of 15- and 50-μm microspheres were similar, which suggest that shunting of 15-μm microspheres was minimal. Blood flow to choroid plexus under control conditions was 287 ± 26 (means ± SE) ml · min-1 · 100 g-1 in dogs and 385 ± 73 ml · min-1 100 g-1 in rabbits. Consecutive measurements under control conditions indicated that values for blood flow are reproducible. Adenosine did not alter blood flow to cerebrum but increased blood flow to choroid plexus two- to threefold in dogs and rabbits. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not affect blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum but decreased blood flow to choroid plexus by ∼ 50%. The authors suggest that (1) the microsphere method provides reproducible valid measurements of blood flow to the choroid plexus in dogs and rabbits and (2) vasoactive stimuli may have profoundly different effects on blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum

  5. Blood flow in healed and inflamed periodontal tissues of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to determine if increased blood flow associated with gingivitis would decrease following resolution of gingival inflammation in dogs with periodontitis; if increased blood flow in inflamed gingiva was associated with changes in the blood flow of alveolar bone, and if blood flow in gingiva and alveolar bone increased if periodontitis was reactivated by ligating teeth. Regional blood flow was measured in dogs with pre-existing periodontitis, using radioisotope-labelled, plastic microspheres. In the first experiment on 4 adult Beagle dogs, teeth in the left jaws were treated to resolve the periodontitis, while teeth in the right jaws were not treated. Gingival and bone blood flow were measured after 12 wk. Blood flow was significantly (p1 and gingiva with G.I.<2 was significant (p<0.04). Blood flow in bone was not altered by changes in the inflammatory status of the overlying gingiva. The findings suggest that changes in blood flow associated with inflammation are reversible and that blood flow alveolar bone is regulated independently of gingival blood flow. (author)

  6. Measurement of oxygen saturation in venous blood by dynamic near IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Meir; Babchenko, Anatoly; Khanokh, Boris; Taitelbaum, Haim

    2000-04-01

    A method for the measurement of oxygen saturation in the venous blood, SvO2, based on optical measurements of light absorption in the infrared region is presented. The method consists of applying relatively low external pressure of 25 mm Hg on the forearm, thereby increasing the venous blood volume in the tissue, and comparing the light absorption before and after the external pressure application. SvO2 has been determined from light absorption measurements in two wavelengths, before and after the pressure application, using a formula derived for two adjacent wavelengths. The method has been applied to the hands and fingers of 17 healthy male subjects, using wavelengths of 767 and 811 nm. SaO2, the oxygen saturation for arterial blood, was also obtained from photoplethysmographic measurements in these two wavelengths (pulse oximetry) using the same formula. The mean (+/- SD) value of SaO2 was 94.5%(+/- 3.0). The mean value of SvO2 was 86.2%(+/- 4.1) for the finger and 80.0%(+/- 8.2) for the hand. These SvO2 values are reasonable for the finger and the hand where arterio-venous anastomoses exist. The method enables the measurement of SvO2 in the limbs, a parameter which is related to tissue blood flow and oxygen consumption.

  7. Unchanged cerebral blood flow and oxidative metabolism after acclimatization to high altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Paulson, Olaf B; Hornbein, Thomas F.;

    2002-01-01

    . Global cerebral blood flow at rest and during exercise on a bicycle ergometer was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique. Cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were calculated by the Fick principle. Cerebral function was assessed by a computer-based measurement of reaction time...... and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose also remained unchanged, whereas cerebral metabolic rates of lactate increased slightly but nonsignificantly at high altitude during exercise compared with high altitude at rest. Reaction time was unchanged. The data indicate that cerebral blood flow...... and oxidative metabolism are unaltered after high-altitude acclimatization from sea level, despite marked changes in breathing and other organ functions....

  8. The effect of phenylephrine on arterial and venous cerebral blood flow in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Sato, Kohei; Fisher, James P; Seifert, Thomas; Overgaard, Morten; Secher, Niels H

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic regulation of the cerebral circulation remains controversial. Although intravenous phenylephrine (PE) infusion reduces the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-determined measure of frontal lobe oxygenation (S(c) O(2) ) and increases middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean......(mean) ), suggesting α-adrenergic-mediated cerebral vasoconstriction, this remains unconfirmed by evaluation of arterial and venous cerebral blood flow.......Sympathetic regulation of the cerebral circulation remains controversial. Although intravenous phenylephrine (PE) infusion reduces the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-determined measure of frontal lobe oxygenation (S(c) O(2) ) and increases middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V...

  9. Subcutaneous blood flow during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Sestoft, L

    1982-01-01

    Subcutaneous blood flow was measured preceding insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms and 2 h later in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy and in normal males. In all groups subcutaneous blood flow decreased at the onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms...... compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. Two hours after onset of hypoglycaemic symptoms, subcutaneous blood flow was still significantly decreased compared with pre-hypoglycaemic flow. In normal subjects local nerve blockade had no effect on blood flow changes during hypoglycaemia, whereas local alpha...

  10. Red blood cell (RBC) deformability, RBC aggregability and tissue oxygenation in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicco, G; Pirrelli, A

    1999-01-01

    Arterial hypertension could be considered a progressive ischaemic syndrome interesting the macro and the microcirculation. In order to improve the clinical and therapeutic approach to the treatment of arterial hypertension, research has centered on blood flow to evaluate the different components and their very intricate relationships influencing the micro- and the macrocirculation. Of course the main problem is to study the link between the blood flow and the peripheral tissue oxygenation. During hypertension very important alterations in rheological, mechanical and biochemical characteristics of erythrocytes and of blood flow have been shown. It is very relevant the increase in blood viscosity, the decrease in red blood cell (RBC) deformability, the formation of RBC "rouleaux" and RBC aggregates. These hemorheological determinants can favour an increase of peripheral resistances and of arterial blood pressure, causing or worsening hypertension, a decrease in oxygen transport to tissue and peripheral perfusion, a decrease of the active exchange surface area in the microvasculature, especially in complicated hypertension. We have studied 320 patients: 123 with Essential Hypertension (EH) (M 59, F 64 aged 50 +/- 25 years); 81 with Secondary Hypertension (SH) without associated other pathologies influencing hemorheology (M 42, F 39 aged 48 +/- 20 years); 116 SH with other pathologies or conditions associated influencing hemorheology such as: diabetes, lipoidoproteinosis, obesity, smoking, HD, elderly, etc. (M 48, F 68 aged 46 +/- 20 years). Using a Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Red Cell Analyzer (LORCA) acc. to Hardeman (1994) we studied Elongation Index (EI) and aggregation kinetics of red blood cells in these patients. We also evaluated TcpO2 and TcpCO2 using a transcutaneous oxymeter (Microgas 7650, Kontron Instruments). In hypertensives we found a decrease in erythrocyte deformability (evaluated with EI), in erythrocyte aggregation time, a fibrinogenaemia

  11. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T; Schmidt, J F; Secher, N H; Wildschiødtz, Gordon; Holm, S; Lassen, N A

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow...... velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise...

  12. Role of cerebral blood flow in extreme breath holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bain Anthony R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of cerebral blood flow (CBF on a maximal breath-hold (BH in ultra-elite divers was examined. Divers (n = 7 performed one control BH, and one BH following oral administration of the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (1.2 mg/kg. Arterial blood gases and CBF were measured prior to (baseline, and at BH termination. Compared to control, indomethacin reduced baseline CBF and cerebral delivery of oxygen (CDO2 by about 26% (p < 0.01. Indomethacin reduced maximal BH time from 339 ± 51 to 319 ± 57 seconds (p = 0.04. In both conditions, the CDO2 remained unchanged from baseline to the termination of apnea. At BH termination, arterial oxygen tension was higher following oral administration of indomethacin compared to control (4.05 ± 0.45 vs. 3.44 ± 0.32 kPa. The absolute increase in CBF from baseline to the termination of apnea was lower with indomethacin (p = 0.01. These findings indicate that the impact of CBF on maximal BH time is likely attributable to its influence on cerebral H+ washout, and therefore central chemoreceptive drive to breathe, rather than to CDO2.

  13. Regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in ageing humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearon, Christopher M; Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-04-15

    The regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery to contracting skeletal muscle is complex and involves the mechanical effects of muscle contraction; local metabolic, red blood cell and endothelium-derived substances; and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). With advancing age in humans, skeletal muscle blood flow is typically reduced during dynamic exercise and this is due to a lower vascular conductance, which could ultimately contribute to age-associated reductions in aerobic exercise capacity, a primary predictor of mortality in both healthy and diseased ageing populations. Recent findings have highlighted the contribution of endothelium-derived substances to blood flow control in contracting muscle of older adults. With advancing age, impaired nitric oxide availability due to scavenging by reactive oxygen species, in conjunction with elevated vasoconstrictor signalling via endothelin-1, reduces the local vasodilatory response to muscle contraction. Additionally, ageing impairs the ability of contracting skeletal muscle to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction (i.e. 'functional sympatholysis'), which is critical for the proper regulation of tissue blood flow distribution and oxygen delivery, and could further reduce skeletal muscle perfusion during high intensity and/or large muscle mass exercise in older adults. We propose that initiation of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization is the underlying signalling event necessary to properly modulate sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle, and that age-associated impairments in red blood cell adenosine triphosphate release and stimulation of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation may explain impairments in both local vasodilatation and functional sympatholysis with advancing age in humans. PMID:26332887

  14. Topical menthol increases cutaneous blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-09-01

    Menthol, the active ingredient in several topically applied analgesics, activates transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) receptors on sensory nerves and on the vasculature inducing a cooling sensation on the skin. Ilex paraguariensis is also a common ingredient in topical analgesics that has potential vasoactive properties and may alter the mechanisms of action of menthol. We sought to characterize the microvascular effects of topical menthol and ilex application and to determine the mechanism(s) through which these compounds may independently and combined alter cutaneous blood flow. We hypothesized that menthol would induce vasoconstriction and that ilex would not alter skin blood flow (SkBF). Three separate protocols were conducted to examine menthol and ilex-mediated changes in SkBF. In protocol 1, placebo, 4% menthol, 0.7% ilex, and combination menthol+ilex gels were applied separately to the skin and red cell flux was continuously measured utilizing laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). In protocol 2, seven concentrations of menthol gel (0.04%, 0.4%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 7%, 8%) were applied to the skin to model the dose-response curve. In protocol 3, placebo, menthol, ilex, and menthol+ilex gels were applied to skin under local thermal control (34°C) both with and without sensory nerve blockage (topical lidocaine 4%). Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and local heating (42°C) protocols were conducted to determine the relative contribution of endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs)/sensory nerves and nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Red cell flux was normalized to mean arterial pressure expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: flux·mmHg(-1)) in all protocols. Topical menthol application increased SkBF compared to placebo (3.41±0.33 vs 1.1±0.19CVC: peffect, p<0.05) with an ED50 of 1.0%. Similarly, SkBF was increased after menthol application during PORH (3.62±0.29 vs. 2.50±0.21flux·mmHg(-1); p<0.001), but not local heating

  15. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Lund; Vorstrup, S

    1991-01-01

    A review of the current literature regarding sleep-induced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) is presented. Early investigations have led to the notion that dreamless sleep was characterized by global values of CBF and CMR practically at the level of wakefulness......, while rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (dream sleep) was a state characterized by a dramatically increased level of CBF and possibly also of CMR. However, recent investigations firmly contradict this notion. Investigations on CBF and CMR performed during non-REM sleep, taking the effect of different...... levels of sleep into consideration, show that light sleep (stage II) is characterized by global levels of CBF and CMR only slightly reduced by 3-10% below the level associated with wakefulness, whereas CBF and CMR during deep sleep (stage III-IV) is dramatically reduced by 25-44%. Furthermore, recent...

  16. Laser Doppler measurement of cutaneous blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Doppler velocimetry is an instrument system which has only recently been applied to the evaluation and quantitation of perfusion in the micro-vascular bed. The instrument is based on the Doppler principle, but uses low power laser light rather than the more commonly used ultrasound, and has a sample volume of approximately 1 mm/sup 3/. As it is non-invasive, it can be used on any skin surface or exposed microvascular bed and provides a continuous semi-quantitative measure of microcirculatory perfusion, it has a number of advantages as compared to other cutaneous blood flow measurement techniques. Initial studies have shown that it is easily used, and it has demonstrated good correlation with both xenon radio-isotope clearance and microsphere deposition techniques. Areas of current evaluation and utilization are in most major areas of medicine and surgery and include plastic, vascular and orthopaedic surgery, dermatology, gastro-enterology, rheumatology, burns and anaesthesiology

  17. Laser Speckle Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingming; Jiang, Chao; Li, Pengcheng; Cheng, Haiying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng; Tuchin, Valery V.

    Monitoring the spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial for studying the normal and pathophysiologic conditions of brain metabolism. By illuminating the cortex with laser light and imaging the resulting speckle pattern, relative CBF images with tens of microns spatial and millisecond temporal resolution can be obtained. In this chapter, a laser speckle imaging (LSI) method for monitoring dynamic, high-resolution CBF is introduced. To improve the spatial resolution of current LSI, a modified LSI method is proposed. To accelerate the speed of data processing, three LSI data processing frameworks based on graphics processing unit (GPU), digital signal processor (DSP), and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) are also presented. Applications for detecting the changes in local CBF induced by sensory stimulation and thermal stimulation, the influence of a chemical agent on CBF, and the influence of acute hyperglycemia following cortical spreading depression on CBF are given.

  18. Mapping blood flow directionality in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Hong; Do, Won-Joon; Choi, Seung Hong; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty

    2016-07-01

    Diffusion properties of tissue are often expressed on the basis of directional variance, i.e., diffusion tensor imaging. In comparison, common perfusion-weighted imaging such as arterial spin labeling yields perfusion in a scalar quantity. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of mapping cerebral blood flow directionality using alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), a recently-developed arterial spin labeling technique with sensitivity to blood flow directions. ALADDIN was applied along 3 orthogonal directions to assess directional blood flow in a vector form and also along 6 equally-spaced directions to extract blood flow tensor matrix (P) based on a blood flow ellipsoid model. Tensor elements (eigenvalues, eigenvectors, etc) were calculated to investigate characteristics of the blood flow tensor, in comparison with time-of-flight MR angiogram. While the directions of the main eigenvectors were heterogeneous throughout the brain, regional clusters of blood flow directionality were reproducible across subjects. The technique could show heterogeneous blood flow directionality within and around brain tumor, which was different from that of the contralateral normal side. The proposed method is deemed to provide information of blood flow directionality, which has not been demonstrated before. The results warrant further studies to assess changes in the directionality map as a function of scan parameters, to understand the signal sources, to investigate the possibility of mapping local blood perfusion directionality, and to evaluate its usefulness for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26968145

  19. Numerical simulation of the blood flow behavior in the circle of Willis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razavi Seyyed Esmail

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper represents the numerical simulation of blood flow in the circle of Willis (CoW. Circle of Willis is responsible for the oxygenated blood distribution into the cerebral mass. To investigate the blood behavior, two Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models were considered and the results were compared under steady state conditions. Methods: Methodologically, the arterial geometry was obtained using 3D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA data. The blood flow through the cerebral vasculature was considered to be steady and laminar, and the Galerkin’s finite element method was applied to solve the systems of non-linear Navier-Stokes equations. Results: Flow patterns including flow rates and shear rates were obtained through the simulation. The minimal magnitude of shear rates was much greater than 100 s-1 through the larger arteries; thus, the non-Newtonian blood viscosity tended to approach the constant limit of infinite shear viscosity through the CoW. So, in larger arteries the non-Newtonian nature of blood was less dominant and it would be treated as a Newtonian fluid. The only exception was the anterior communicating artery (ACoA in which the blood flow showed different behavior for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian cases. Conclusion: By comparing the results it was concluded that the Newtonian viscosity assumption of blood flow through the healthy, complete circle of Willis under the normal and steady conditions would be acceptably accurate.

  20. Effect of exercise on maternal hemodynamics and placental blood flow in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauramo, I; Forss, M

    1988-01-01

    Intervillous placental blood flow responses to standardized exercise during late pregnancy were studied using a Xenon technique in 25 healthy women. Thirteen of them were studied twice between the 32nd and 38th weeks of pregnancy, with mean 32 (range 22 to 40) days between the studies. At the end of a 6-min exercise, mean maternal heart rate had risen from 77 +/- 10 (SD) to 154 +/- 11 beats/min, amounting to 63% of maximal oxygen uptake. Stroke volume rose by 9%, cardiac output by 65% and cardiac index by 71% as a consequence of exercise, but peripheral vascular resistance declined by 41%. The placental blood flow was at a similar level after the exercise as before the exercise, being 95 +/- 19 (mean +/- SD) ml/min/100 ml of intervillous space before, 98 +/- 24 one min after, and 93 +/- 16 30 min after the cessation of exercise. No change was found in the level of placental blood flow between the 32-34th and 37-38th weeks of pregnancy. The placental blood flow had a positive correlation with maternal weight, mean arterial blood pressure and with diastolic blood pressure. Maternal heart rate, cardiac output, cardiac index, placental weight and the birth weight of the infant was not correlated with placental blood flow. It is concluded that in normal pregnancy a short submaximal exercise has little effect on placental blood flow measured after exercise. PMID:3176909

  1. Renal blood flow during dynamic exercise in trained and untrained swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the effects of acute and chronic exercise on renal blood flow, we studied 13 trained and 13 untrained swine at rest and during treadmill exercise. Animals were instrumented with aortic, left artrial and pulmonary arterial catheters. Trained animals were capable of running one hr per day, five days per wk by the end of 9 to 12 wk of training. We injected 15 um radiolabeled microspheres via a left atrial catheter during resting, moderate and maximal exercise conditions. Animals in the training group exhibited a 29% increase in maximal oxygen consumption (n = 7). Renal blood flow was not different between groups for the three conditions. However, trained animals exhibited a trend towards a progressive decrease in renal blood flow with increasing exercise intensity. Thus, unlike dogs, swine exhibit adjustments in renal blood flow similar to those observed in humans

  2. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  3. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Yi, Hou-Hui; Li, Hua-Bing; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2009-02-01

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  4. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy for acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, Yukihiro; Takihara, Takahisa; Niimi, Kyoko; Komatsu, Masamichi; Sato, Masako; Tanaka, Jun; Takiguchi, Hiroto; Tomomatsu, Hiromi; Tomomatsu, Katsuyoshi; Hayama, Naoki; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Takuya; Urano, Tetsuya; Takagi, Atsushi; Asano, Koichiro

    2016-03-01

    We report 3 cases (all men, age: 69-81 years) of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia (AEIP) that were successfully treated with a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), which delivers heated, humidified gas at a fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) up to 1.0 (100%). Oxygenation was insufficient under non-rebreathing face masks; however, the introduction of HFNC with an FIO2 of 0.7-1.0 (flow rate: 40L/min) improved oxygenation and was well-tolerated until the partial pressure of oxygen in blood/FIO2 ratio increased (between 21 and 26 days). Thus, HFNC might be an effective and well-tolerated therapeutic addition to the management of AEIP. PMID:26879483

  5. Cerebral blood flow simulations in realistic geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szopos Marcela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to perform the computation of the blood flow in all the cerebral network, obtained from medical images as angiographies. We use free finite elements codes as FreeFEM++. We first test the code on analytical solutions in simplified geometries. Then, we study the influence of boundary conditions on the flow and we finally perform first computations on realistic meshes. L’objectif est ici de simuler l’écoulement sanguin dans tout le réseau cérébral (artériel et veineux obtenu à partir d’angiographies cérébrales 3D à l’aide de logiciels d’éléments finis libres, comme FreeFEM++. Nous menons d’abord une étude détaillée des résultats sur des solutions analytiques et l’influence des conditions limites à imposer dans des géométries simplifiées avant de travailler sur les maillages réalistes.

  6. Melatonin differentially affects vascular blood flow in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jonathan S.; Sauder, Charity L.; Ray, Chester A.

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin is synthesized and released into the circulation by the pineal gland in a circadian rhythm. Melatonin has been demonstrated to differentially alter blood flow to assorted vascular beds by the activation of different melatonin receptors in animal models. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of melatonin on blood flow to various vascular beds in humans. Renal (Doppler ultrasound), forearm (venous occlusion plethysmography), and cerebral blood flow (transcranial...

  7. Radionuclide renogram as a predictor of relative renal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide renograms obtained with Tc-99m-DTPA were used to calculate relative renal blood flow in 16 dogs. In 13 of these dogs, relative blood flow ratios (R:L) calculated from the renograms were correlated with ratios measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter or with radiolabeled microspheres. The results indicate that Tc-99m-DTPA renograms can be used to make an accurate prediction of relative renal blood flow

  8. [Is it necessary to humidify inhaled low-flow oxygen or low-concentration oxygen?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kenji

    2004-02-01

    In Japan, oxygen is routinely humidified in almost every hospital and clinic. In contrast, in Europe and North America, oxygen is not humidified as long as the oxygen flow is less than 4-5 L/min, according to the guidelines for oxygen therapy announced by the ACCP-NHLBI in 1984 and by AARC in 1992. In this paper, we demonstrate mathematically that: 1) the oxygen received through a nasal cannula at 0.5-4 L/min or through a Venturi mask at 24-40% constitutes only a small percentage of the patient's inspiratory tidal volume (2.4-19% and 3.8-24%, respectively), 2) the humidity deficit caused by inhaling unhumidified oxygen through a nasal cannula at 0.5-4 L/min or through a Venturi mask at 24% to 31% is very small compared with the water content delivered from the airway, and 3) this humidity deficit is easily compensated for by increasing the relative humidity of the room air a little, e.g., by only 4% in case of inhalation of 2 L/min of oxygen through a nasal cannula. Similar results are obtained when a Venturi mask is used to inhale oxygen. From these calculations, we conclude that routine humidification of low-flow oxygen or low-concentration oxygen is not justifiable in patients who need oxygen inhalation, as the humidity of room air is sufficient. PMID:15007913

  9. Noninvasive method of estimating human newborn regional cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A noninvasive method of estimating regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in premature and full-term babies has been developed. Based on a modification of the 133Xe inhalation rCBF technique, this method uses eight extracranial NaI scintillation detectors and an i.v. bolus injection of 133Xe (approximately 0.5 mCi/kg). Arterial xenon concentration was estimated with an external chest detector. Cerebral blood flow was measured in 15 healthy, neurologically normal premature infants. Using Obrist's method of two-compartment analysis, normal values were calculated for flow in both compartments, relative weight and fractional flow in the first compartment (gray matter), initial slope of gray matter blood flow, mean cerebral blood flow, and initial slope index of mean cerebral blood flow. The application of this technique to newborns, its relative advantages, and its potential uses are discussed

  10. Can abdominal NIRS detect changes in intestinal blood flow and risk of NEC in premature piglets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is major gut disease in preterm newborns. Intestinal ischemia may be an early contributing factor that precipitates NEC. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive method of measuring local tissue oxygen saturation and indicator of blood flow. Our aim was t...

  11. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI for assessment of renal oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neugarten J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Joel Neugarten, Ladan Golestaneh Renal Division, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA Abstract: Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI has recently emerged as an important noninvasive technique to assess intrarenal oxygenation under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. Although this tool represents a major addition to our armamentarium of methodologies to investigate the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury and progressive chronic kidney disease, numerous technical limitations confound interpretation of data derived from this approach. BOLD MRI has been utilized to assess intrarenal oxygenation in numerous experimental models of kidney disease and in human subjects with diabetic and nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, renal allograft rejection, contrast-associated nephropathy, and obstructive uropathy. However, confidence in conclusions based on data derived from BOLD MRI measurements will require continuing advances and technical refinements in the use of this technique. Keywords: kidney, hypoxia, oxygenation, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, contrast-associated nephropathy, BOLD MRI

  12. Effects of single-dose irradiation on tumor blood flow studied by 15O decay after photon activation in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A noninvasive technique employing photon activation of tissue oxygen in situ and detection of subsequent 15O positron decay was used to study the effects of single-dose 60Co irradiation on capillary blood flow in transplanted rat rhabdomyosarcomas. Tumor blood flow was measured before irradiation with 16.5, 38.5, or 60.5 Gy and at sever al intervals afterward (0-72 hr). Pre-irradiation values of volume-averaged blood flow in the tumor ranged from 7 to 44 ml/min/100 g. Several hours after irradiation, blood flow fell by up to 50% for 60.5 Gy and up to 35% for 16.5 Gy. However, 24 hours after irradiation, tumor blood flow had recovered completely in the 16.5-Gy group and substantially in the others. For smaller doses such as the fractions typically employed in radiotherapy, no changes in tumor blood flow were observed

  13. Effects of single-dose irradiation in tumor blood flow studied by 15O decay after proton activation in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, B; Ten Haken, R K; Nussbaum, G H; Hughes, W L

    1981-10-01

    A noninvasive technique employing photon activation of tissue oxygen in situ and detection of subsequent 15O positron decay was used to study the effects of single-dose 60Co irradiation on capillary blood flow in transplanted rat rhabdomyosarcomas. Tumor blood flow was measured before irradiation with 16.5, 38.5, or 60.5 Gy and at several intervals afterward (0-72 hr.). Pre-irradiation values of volume-averaged blood flow in the tumor ranged from 7 to 44 ml/min./100 g. Several hours after irradiation, blood flow fell by up to 50% for 60.5 Gy and up to 35% for 16.5 Gy. However, 24 hours after irradiation, tumor blood flow had recovered completely in the 16.5-Gy group and substantially in the others. For smaller doses such as the fractions typically employed in radiotherapy, no changes in tumor blood flow were observed. PMID:7291527

  14. Effects of single-dose irradiation in tumor blood flow studied by 15O decay after proton activation in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A noninvasive technique employing photon activation of tissue oxygen in situ and detection of subsequent 15O positron decay was used to study the effects of single-dose 60Co irradiation on capillary blood flow in transplanted rat rhabdomyosarcomas. Tumor blood flow was measured before irradiation with 16.5, 38.5, or 60.5 Gy and at several intervals afterward (0-72 hr.). Pre-irradiation values of volume-averaged blood flow in the tumor ranged from 7 to 44 ml/min./100 g. Several hours after irradiation, blood flow fell by up to 50% for 60.5 Gy and up to 35% for 16.5 Gy. However, 24 hours after irradiation, tumor blood flow had recovered completely in the 16.5-Gy group and substantially in the others. For smaller doses such as the fractions typically employed in radiotherapy, no changes in tumor blood flow were observed

  15. Preservation of canine myocardial high-energy phosphates during low-flow ischemia with modification of hemoglobin–oxygen affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Robert G.; Mejia, Marco A.; Kass, David A.; DiPaula, Anthony F.; Becker, Lewis C; Gerstenblith, Gary; Chacko, V P

    1999-01-01

    Conventional approaches for the treatment of myocardial ischemia increase coronary blood flow or reduce myocardial demand. To determine whether a rightward shift in the hemoglobin–oxygen saturation curve would reduce the metabolic and contractile effects of a myocardial oxygen-supply imbalance, we studied the impact of a potent synthetic allosteric modifier of hemoglobin–oxygen affinity, a 2-[4-[[(3,5-disubstituted anilino)carbonyl]methyl] phenoxy] -2-methylproprionic acid derivative (RSR13),...

  16. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow in neuropediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single photon emission computed tomography can effectively and non-invasively measure regional blood flow. Mostly used 99mTc-HMPAO is a safe brain imaging agent for pediatric applications. The radiation dose is acceptable. Knowledge of the normal rCBF pattern, including normal asymmetries and variations due to age, is necessary prerequisite for the evaluation and reporting of the results of 99mTc-HMPAO brain SPECT studies in clinical practice. The interpretation of he rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The aim of the present review is to focus on the contribution to clinical developmental neurology of SPECT The clinical use of SPECT in developmental neurology are epilepsy, brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, high-risk neonates, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury, migraine, anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity, and monitoring therapy. Sedation is not routinely used, rather each child is evaluated. However, drug sedation is mandatory in some uncooperative children. (author)

  18. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100-1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  19. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow in depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in patients with endogenous depression by the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-[123I] iodoamphetamine (IMP). The subjects were 32 patients with endogenous depression and 20 normal controls. These 32 patients, who were divided into 10 unmedicated group and 22 medicated group, were reexamined when the depressed patients reverted to a euthymic state (remission). The value of rCBF was assessed by the corticocerebellar ratio (CCR), which was expressed as a ratio of activity per pixel in the cerebral regions of interests (ROIs) to the activity per pixel in the cerebellum. The depressive patients showed a decrease in rCBF all over the cerebral regions and, especially, the lower rCBF in the left than in the right hemisphere. These changes turned toward normal in a remitted state following treatments, though there was no significant difference in rCBF between the medicated and unmedicated patients. There was a significantly negative correlation between the severity of depressive symptoms and the mean rCBF in a total of patients with depression. These results suggest that psychiatric symptoms in the depressive patients might be related to the left hemispheric dysfunction. (author)

  1. Blood Flow Restricted Exercise and Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Horiuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is established that regular aerobic training improves vascular function, for example, endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and arterial stiffness or compliance and thereby constitutes a preventative measure against cardiovascular disease. In contrast, high-intensity resistance training impairs vascular function, while the influence of moderate-intensity resistance training on vascular function is still controversial. However, aerobic training is insufficient to inhibit loss in muscular strength with advancing age; thus, resistance training is recommended to prevent sarcopenia. Recently, several lines of study have provided compelling data showing that exercise and training with blood flow restriction (BFR leads to muscle hypertrophy and strength increase. As such, BFR training might be a novel means of overcoming the contradiction between aerobic and high-intensity resistance training. Although it is not enough evidence to obtain consensus about impact of BFR training on vascular function, available evidences suggested that BFR training did not change coagulation factors and arterial compliance though with inconsistence results in endothelial function. This paper is a review of the literature on the impact of BFR exercise and training on vascular function, such as endothelial function, arterial compliance, or other potential factors in comparison with those of aerobic and resistance training.

  2. The dual roles of red blood cells in tissue oxygen delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate red blood cells (RBCs) seem to serve tissue oxygen delivery in two distinct ways. Firstly, RBCs enable the adequate transport of O2 between respiratory surfaces and metabolizing tissues by means of their high intracellular concentration of hemoglobin (Hb), appropriate allosteric...... interactions between Hb ligand-binding sites, and an adjustable intracellular chemical environment that allows fine-tuning of Hb O2 affinity. Secondly, RBCs may sense tissue O2 requirements via their degree of deoxygenation when they travel through the microcirculation and release vasodilatory compounds that...... enhance blood flow in hypoxic tissues. This latter function could be important in matching tissue O2 delivery with local O2 demand. Three main mechanisms by which RBCs can regulate their own distribution in the microcirculation have been proposed. These are: (1) deoxygenation-dependent release of ATP from...

  3. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwetsloot, C.P.; Caekebeke, J.F.V.; Jansen, J.C.; Odink, J.; Ferrari, M.D. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands))

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Data adaptive estimation of transversal blood flow velocities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirnia, E.; Jakobsson, A.; Gudmundson, E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    The examination of blood flow inside the body may yield important information about vascular anomalies, such as possible indications of, for example, stenosis. Current Medical ultrasound systems suffer from only allowing for measuring the blood flow velocity along the direction of irradiation...

  5. Regional cerebral blood flow in focal cortical epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristina Dupont; Oikawa, T; Sveinsdottir, E;

    1976-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in ten patients with focal cortical epilepsy. The blood flow was measured by the intra-arterial injection of xenon 133 (133Xe), and the isotope clearance was recorded by a multidetector scintillation camera with 254 detectors. Three patients were...

  6. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Glial and neuronal control of brain blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwell, David; Buchan, Alastair M; Charpak, Serge;

    2010-01-01

    Blood flow in the brain is regulated by neurons and astrocytes. Knowledge of how these cells control blood flow is crucial for understanding how neural computation is powered, for interpreting functional imaging scans of brains, and for developing treatments for neurological disorders. It is now...

  8. Aortic pressure reduction redistributes transmural blood flow in dog left ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied the effect of graded aortic blood pressure reduction on left ventricular (LV) blood flow in anesthetized, autonomically blocked, open-chest dogs at constant heart rate and mean left atrial pressure. Aortic diastolic pressure (ADP) was lowered from rest to 90, 75, and 60 mmHg with an arteriovenous fistula. Global and regional LV blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Mean LV blood flow fell stepwise from 145 ml · min-1 · 100 g-1 at rest to 116 ml · min-1 · 100 g-1 at ADP of 60 mmHg, whereas the endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio decreased from 1.20 to 084. The transmural redistribution of LV blood flow was not accompanied by increases in LV oxygen extraction, depression of LV contractility, LV dilatation or LV electrical dysfunction and also occurred in the presence of considerable coronary vasodilator flow reserve. Electrical evidence of subendocardial ischemia appeared at ADP of 32 mmHg and an endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio of 0.41 in a subgroup of animals. They conclude that the redistribution of LV flow during moderate aortic pressure reduction was an appropriate physiological adjustment to uneven transmural alterations in regional LV wall stress and that it preceded a more pronounced redistribution evident with myocardial ischemia

  9. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit

  10. Lattice BGK Simulations of the Blood Flow in Elastic Vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiao-Yang; YI Hou-Hui; CHEN Ji-Yao; FANG Hai-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ The lattice Boltzmann method is applied to study the flow in elastic blood vessels. The volume-flow rate increases considerably when the compliance constant of the blood vessel is below a critical value. There is a region of the compliance constant in which the average volume-flow rate is dramatically enhanced. A harmonic perturbation of the pressure does not change the behaviour of the average volume-flow rate while the harmonic wave attenuates very quickly along the tube when the resonant period is close to that of the input wave. The model, together with the simulation results, is expected to be helpful to understand the mechanism of the blood volume-flow rate related to the compliance constant of the blood vessel, especially on the dependence of the flux of human blood vessel under weather changes, which has medical significance.

  11. Design and Simulation of Axial Flow Maglev Blood Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Huachun Wu; Ziyan Wang; Xujun Lv

    2011-01-01

    The axial flow maglev blood pump (AFMBP) has become a global research focus and emphasis for artificial ventricular assist device, which has no mechanical contact, mechanical friction, compact structure and light weight, can effectively solve thrombus and hemolysis. Magnetic suspension and impeller is two of the important parts in the axial flow maglev blood pump, and their structure largely determines the blood pump performance. The research adopts electromagnetic and fluid finite element an...

  12. Computational Biorheology of Human Blood Flow in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2013-01-01

    Hematologic disorders arising from infectious diseases, hereditary factors and environmental influences can lead to, and can be influenced by, significant changes in the shape, mechanical and physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), and the biorheology of blood flow. Hence, modeling of hematologic disorders should take into account the multiphase nature of blood flow, especially in arterioles and capillaries. We present here an overview of a general computational framework based on diss...

  13. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and changes in cerebral blood flow : The Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Pieternella H.; Muller, Majon; Vincken, Koen L.; Westerink, Jan; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Doevendans, PAFM

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin and hematocrit are important determinants of blood viscosity and arterial oxygen content and may therefore influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations of hemoglobin and hematocrit with CBF in 569 patients with manifest arterial disease (me

  14. Our experience of blood flow measurements using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical study of blood flow measuring methods is proposed. After a review of the various diffusible and non-diffusible radioactive tracers and the corresponding detector systems, the principles which allow to measure blood flow from the data so obtained, are studied. There is a different principle of flow measurement for each type of tracer. The theory of flow measurement using non-diffusible tracers (human serum albumin labelled with 131I or sup(99m)Tc, 113In-labelled siderophiline) and its application to cardiac flow measurement are described first. Then the theory of flow measurement using diffusible tracers (133Xe, 85Kr) and its application to measurement of blood flow through tissues (muscles and kidney particularly) are described. A personal experience of this various flow measurements is reported. The results obtained, the difficulties encountered and the improvments proposed are developed

  15. PERFORMANCE MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF BLOOD FLOW IN ELASTIC ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil Kumar; C.L. Varshney; G.C. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Two different non-Newtonian models for blood flow are considered, first a simple power law model displaying shear thinning viscosity, and second a generalized Maxwell model displaying both shear thinning viscosity and oscillating flow viscous-elasticity. These models are used along with a Newtonian model to study sinusoidal flow of blood in rigid and elastic straight arteries in the presence of magnetic field. The elasticity of blood does not appear to influence its flow behavior under physiological conditions in the large arteries,purely viscous shear thinning model should be quite realistic for simulating blood flow under these conditions. On using the power law model with high shear rate for sinusoidal flow simulation in elastic arteries, the mean and amplitude of the flow rate were found to be lower for a power law fluid compared to Newtonian fluid for the same pressure gradient. The governing equations have been solved by Crank-Niclson scheme. The results are interpreted in the context of blood in the elastic arteries keeping the magnetic effects in view. For physiological flow simulation in the aorta, an increase in mean wall shear stress, but a reduction in peak wall shear stress were observed for power law model compared to a Newtonian fluid model for matched flow rate wave form. Blood flow in the presence of transverse magnetic field in an elastic artery is investigated and the influence of factors such as morphology and surface irregularity is evaluated.

  16. Dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddala, Jeevan; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen

    The dynamics of a complex mixture of cells and proteins, such as blood, in perturbed shear flow remains ill-defined. Microfluidics is a promising technology for improving the understanding of blood flow under complex conditions of shear; as found in stent implants and in tortuous blood vessels. We model the fluid dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network with dimensions mimicking venules. Interaction of blood cells was modeled using multiagent framework, where cells of different diameters were treated as spheres. This model served as the basis for predicting transition regions, collision pathways, re-circulation zones and residence times of cells dependent on their diameters and device architecture. Based on these insights from the model, we were able to predict the clot formation configurations at various locations in the device. These predictions were supported by the experiments using whole blood. To facilitate platelet aggregation, the devices were coated with fibrillar collagen and tissue factor. Blood was perfused through the microfluidic device for 9 min at a physiologically relevant venous shear rate of 600 s-1. Using fluorescent microscopy, we observed flow transitions near the channel intersections and at the areas of blood flow obstruction, which promoted larger thrombus formation. This study of integrating model predictions with experimental design, aids in defining the dynamics of blood flow in microvasculature and in development of novel biomedical devices.

  17. Direct and indirect assessment of skeletal muscle blood flow in chronic congestive heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeJemtel, T.H.; Scortichini, D.; Katz, S.

    1988-09-09

    In patients with chronic congestive heart failure (CHF), skeletal muscle blood flow can be measured directly by the continuous thermodilution technique and by the xenon-133 clearance method. The continuous thermodilution technique requires retrograde catheterization of the femoral vein and, thus, cannot be repeated conveniently in patients during evaluation of pharmacologic interventions. The xenon-133 clearance, which requires only an intramuscular injection, allows repeated determination of skeletal muscle blood flow. In patients with severe CHF, a fixed capacity of the skeletal muscle vasculature to dilate appears to limit maximal exercise performance. Moreover, the changes in peak skeletal muscle blood flow noted during long-term administration of captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, appears to correlate with the changes in aerobic capacity. In patients with CHF, resting supine deep femoral vein oxygen content can be used as an indirect measurement of resting skeletal muscle blood flow. The absence of a steady state complicates the determination of peak skeletal muscle blood flow reached during graded bicycle or treadmill exercise in patients with chronic CHF. Indirect assessments of skeletal muscle blood flow and metabolism during exercise performed at submaximal work loads are currently developed in patients with chronic CHF.

  18. Effects of posture on blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, S. M.; Domino, K. B.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    We used differential excretion of sulphur hexafluoride from the left and right lung to measure blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in the prone and supine positions in dogs (n = 9). Gas exchange was assessed using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Blood flow diversion from the hypoxic (3% oxygen) left lung was mean 70.7 (SD 11.2)% in the supine compared with 57.0 (12.1)% in the prone position (P vasoconstriction is greater in the supine position. This effect could contribute to the variable response in gas exchange with positioning in patients with ARDS.

  19. Measurement of normal portal venous blood flow by Doppler ultrasound.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, H S; Halliwell, M; Qamar, M.; Read, A. E.; Evans, J. M.; Wells, P N

    1989-01-01

    The volume flow rate of blood in the portal vein was measured using a duplex ultrasound system. The many errors inherent in the duplex method were assessed with particular reference to the portal vein and appropriate correction factors were obtained by in vitro calibration. The effect of posture on flow was investigated by examining 45 healthy volunteers in three different positions; standing, supine and tilted head down at 20 degrees from the horizontal. The mean volume blood flow in the sup...

  20. Spiral blood flow in aorta-renal bifurcation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-07-01

    The presence of a spiral arterial blood flow pattern in humans has been widely accepted. It is believed that this spiral component of the blood flow alters arterial haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of spiral flow on haemodynamic changes in aorta-renal bifurcations. In this regard, a computational fluid dynamics analysis of pulsatile blood flow was performed in two idealised models of aorta-renal bifurcations with and without flow diverter. The results show that the spirality effect causes a substantial variation in blood velocity distribution, while causing only slight changes in fluid shear stress patterns. The dominant observed effect of spiral flow is on turbulent kinetic energy and flow recirculation zones. As spiral flow intensity increases, the rate of turbulent kinetic energy production decreases, reducing the region of potential damage to red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, the recirculation zones which form on the cranial sides of the aorta and renal artery shrink in size in the presence of spirality effect; this may lower the rate of atherosclerosis development and progression in the aorta-renal bifurcation. These results indicate that the spiral nature of blood flow has atheroprotective effects in renal arteries and should be taken into consideration in analyses of the aorta and renal arteries. PMID:26414530

  1. A mathematical model relating cortical oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin flows and volumes to neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Suh, Minah; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To describe a toolkit of components for mathematical models of the relationship between cortical neural activity and space-resolved and time-resolved flows and volumes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin motivated by optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI). Approach. Both blood flow and blood volume and both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are accounted for. Flow and volume are described by including analogies to both resistive and capacitive electrical circuit elements. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are described by generalization of Kirchhoff's laws based on well-mixed compartments. Main results. Mathematical models built from this toolkit are able to reproduce experimental single-stimulus OISI results that are described in papers from other research groups and are able to describe the response to multiple-stimuli experiments as a sublinear superposition of responses to the individual stimuli. Significance. The same assembly of tools from the toolkit but with different parameter values is able to describe effects that are considered distinctive, such as the presence or absence of an initial decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, indicating that the differences might be due to unique parameter values in a subject rather than different fundamental mechanisms.

  2. Preparation, characterization and in vivo investigation of blood-compatible hemoglobin-loaded nanoparticles as oxygen carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingzi; Zhao, Caiyan; Wang, Quan; You, Guoxing; Wang, Ying; Deng, Hongzhang; Chen, Gan; Xia, Sha; Zhao, Jingxiang; Wang, Bo; Li, Xianlei; Shao, Leihou; Wu, Yan; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although many attempts have been made to design advanced hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs), no clinically viable product has been widely approved, because they do not perform normal blood functions, such as coagulation, hematologic reactions and stability. Additionally, the in vivo oxygenation of hemoglobin-loaded nanoparticles (HbPs) encapsulated with polymers has seldom been proved. Herein, HbPs of approximately 200nm with good stability were successfully fabricated and exhibited oxygen-carrying capacity. The HbPs preserve the biological and structure features of hemoglobin according to UV-vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectral analysis. In vitro, the HbPs showed a viscosity comparable to that of blood with no obvious effects on red blood cell aggregation. At the same time, blood compatibility was characterized in terms of platelet function, clot strength, speed of clot formation, degree of fibrin cross-linking and hemolysis rate. After intravenous administration of HbPs to mice with controlled hemorrhages, blood flow recovery and maintenance of systemic oxygenation were observed. PMID:26708138

  3. Exercise intensity modulates brachial artery retrograde blood flow and shear rate during leg cycling in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Erika; Katayama, Keisho; Ishida, Koji

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of exercise intensity on retrograde blood flow and shear rate (SR) in an inactive limb during exercise under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The subjects performed two maximal exercise tests on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer to estimate peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak) while breathing normoxic (inspired oxygen fraction [FIO2 = 0.21]) and hypoxic (FIO2 = 0.12 or 0.13) gas mixtures. Subjects then performed four exercise bouts at the same relative intensities (30 and 60% V˙O2peak) for 30 min under normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were simultaneously recorded, using Doppler ultrasonography. Retrograde SR was enhanced with increasing exercise intensity under both conditions at 10 min of exercise. Thereafter, retrograde blood flow and SR in normoxia returned to pre-exercise levels, with no significant differences between the two exercise intensities. In contrast, retrograde blood flow and SR in hypoxia remained significantly elevated above baseline and was significantly greater at 60% than at 30% V˙O2peak. We conclude that differences in exercise intensity affect brachial artery retrograde blood flow and SR during prolonged exercise under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26038470

  4. On the flow dependency of the electrical conductivity of blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoetink, AE; Faes, TJC; Visser, KR; Heethaar, RM

    2004-01-01

    Experiments presented in the literature show that the electrical conductivity of flowing blood depends on flow velocity. The aim of this study is to extend the Maxwell-Fricke theory, developed for a dilute suspension of ellipsoidal particles in an electrolyte, to explain this flow dependency of the

  5. Increased bone marrow blood flow in polycythemia vera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lathinen, R.; Lathinen, T.; Hyoedynmaa, S.

    1983-01-01

    Bone marrow blood flow was measured in polycythemia vera, in compensatory and in relative polycythemia with a /sup 133/Xe washout method. In the treated polycythemia vera bone marrow blood flow was significantly increased compared with the age-matched controls. The fraction of blood flow entering the bone and flowing through the hematopoietic marrow was markedly increased in both the untreated and the treated polycythemia vera. Although the number of observations in compensatory and relative polycythemia was small, the results suggest that bone marrow blood flow is not markedly increased in these diseases. The results also suggest that in older patients the simple /sup 133/Xe method may support the diagnosis of polycythemia vera.

  6. Impact of red blood cell transfusion on global and regional measures of oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Russell S; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is common in critically ill patients. Although the goal of transfusion of red blood cells is to increase oxygen-carrying capacity, there are contradictory results about whether red blood cell transfusion to treat moderate anemia (e.g., hemoglobin 7-10 g/dL) improves tissue oxygenation or changes outcomes. Whereas increasing levels of anemia eventually lead to a level of critical oxygen delivery, increased cardiac output and oxygen extraction are homeostatic mechanisms the body uses to prevent a state of dysoxia in the setting of diminished oxygen delivery due to anemia. In order for cardiac output to increase in the face of anemia, normovolemia must be maintained. Transfusion of red blood cells increases blood viscosity, which may actually decrease cardiac output (barring a state of hypovolemia prior to transfusion). Studies have generally shown that transfusion of red blood cells fails to increase oxygen uptake unless oxygen uptake/oxygen delivery dependency exists (e.g., severe anemia or strenuous exercise). Recently, near-infrared spectroscopy, which approximates the hemoglobin saturation of venous blood, has been used to investigate whether transfusion of red blood cells increases tissue oxygenation in regional tissue beds (e.g., brain, peripheral skeletal muscle). These studies have generally shown increases in near-infrared spectroscopy derived measurements of tissue oxygenation following transfusion. Studies evaluating the effect of transfusion on the microcirculation have shown that transfusion increases the functional capillary density. This article will review fundamental aspects of oxygen delivery and extraction, and the effects of red blood cell transfusion on tissue oxygenation as well as the microcirculation. PMID:22238040

  7. Challenges in understanding the impact of blood pressure management on cerebral oxygenation in the preterm brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminath eAzhan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Systemic hypotension in preterm infants has been related to increased mortality, cerebrovascular lesions and neurodevelopmental morbidity. Treatment of hypotension with inotropic medications aims at preservation of end organ perfusion and oxygen delivery, especially the brain. The common inotropic medications in preterm infants include dopamine, dobutamine, adrenalin, with adjunctive use of corticosteroids in cases of refractory hypotension. Whether maintenance of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP by use of inotropic medication is neuroprotective or not remains unclear. This review explores the different inotropic agents and their effects on perfusion and oxygenation in the preterm brain, in clinical studies as well as in animal models. Dopamine and adrenalin, because of their -adrenergic vasoconstrictor actions, have raised concerns of reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF. Several studies in hypotensive preterm infants have shown that dopamine elevates CBF together with increased MAP, in keeping with limited cerebro-autoregulation. Adrenaline is also effective in raising cerebral perfusion together with MAP in preterm infants. Experimental studies in immature animals show no cerebro-vasoconstrictive effects of dopamine or adrenaline, but demonstrate the consistent findings of increased cerebral perfusion and oxygenation with the use of dopamine, dobutamine and adrenaline, alongside with raised MAP. Both clinical and animal studies report the transitory effects of adrenaline in increasing plasma lactate, and blood glucose, which might render its use as a 2nd line therapy. To investigate the cerebral effects of inotropic agents in long-term outcome in hypotensive preterm infants, carefully designed prospective research possibly including preterm infants with permissive hypotension is required. Preterm animal models would be useful in investigating the relationship between the physiological effects of inotropes and histopathology outcomes in

  8. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in humans, especially in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed to quantify the flow in these devices such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended to the analysis and development of a ventricular assist device (VAD), i.e., a blood pump. The blood flow in a VAD is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure can be applied. A primitive variable formulation is used in conjunction with the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. The primary purpose of developing the incompressible flow analysis capability was to quantify the flow in advanced turbopump for space propulsion system. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey VAD that is based on an axial blood pump. Due to massive computing requirements, high-end computing is necessary for simulating three-dimensional flow in these pumps. Computational, experimental, and clinical results are presented.

  9. Global brain blood-oxygen level responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by brain injury, perhaps resulting from apnea-related hypoxia or periods of impaired cerebral perfusion. Perfusion changes can be determined indirectly by evaluation of cerebral blood volume and oxygenation alterations, which can be measured rapidly and non-invasively with the global blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal, a magnetic resonance imaging procedure. We assessed acute BOLD responses in OSA subjects to pressor challenges that elicit cerebral blood flow changes, using a two-group comparative design with healthy subjects as a reference. We separately assessed female and male patterns, since OSA characteristics and brain injury differ between sexes. We studied 94 subjects, 37 with newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA (6 female (age mean ± std: 52.1±8.1 yrs; apnea/hypopnea index [AHI]: 27.7±15.6 events/hr and 31 male 54.3±8.4 yrs; AHI: 37.4±19.6 events/hr, and 20 female (age 50.5±8.1 yrs and 37 male (age 45.6±9.2 yrs healthy control subjects. We measured brain BOLD responses every 2 s while subjects underwent cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. The global BOLD signal rapidly changed after the first 2 s of each challenge, and differed in magnitude between groups to two challenges (cold pressor, hand grip, but not to the Valsalva maneuver (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. OSA females showed greater differences from males in response magnitude and pattern, relative to healthy counterparts. Cold pressor BOLD signal increases (mean ± adjusted standard error at the 8 s peak were: OSA 0.14±0.08% vs. Control 0.31±0.06%, and hand grip at 6 s were: OSA 0.08±0.03% vs. Control at 0.30±0.02%. These findings, indicative of reduced cerebral blood flow changes to autonomic challenges in OSA, complement earlier reports of altered resting blood flow and reduced cerebral artery responsiveness. Females are more affected than males, an outcome which may contribute to the sex

  10. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Vaughn A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100–4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow i...

  11. Effect of plasma exchange on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M M; Marshall, J

    1982-01-01

    The effects of plasma exchange using a low viscosity plasma substitute on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow were investigated in eight subjects with normal cerebral vasculature. Plasma exchange resulted in significant reductions in plasma viscosity, whole blood viscosity, globulin and fibrinogen concentration without affecting packed cell volume. The reduction in whole blood viscosity was more pronounced at low shear rates suggesting an additional effect on red cell aggregation. Despite...

  12. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    CERN Document Server

    Brust, M; Thiebaud, M; Flormann, D; Verdier, C; Kaestner, L; Laschke, M W; Selmi, H; Benyoussef, A; Podgorski, T; Coupier, G; Misbah, C; Wagner, C

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These pers...

  13. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine

  14. Model estimation of cerebral hemodynamics between blood flow and volume changes: a data-based modelling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, H L; Zheng, Y; Pan, Y.; Coca, D.; Li, L M; Mayhew, J.E.W.; S. A. Billings

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that there is a dynamic relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). With increasing applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), where the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals are recorded, the understanding and accurate modelling of the hemodynamic relationship between CBF and CBV becomes increasingly important. This study presents an empirical and data-based modelling framework for model identification from CBF and...

  15. Relationship between muscle oxygenation by NIRS and blood lactate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of muscle oxygenation in term of oxy-hemoglobin concentration change (ΔHbO2) by NIRS and blood lactate (BLA) in local skeletal muscle and evaluate the capability of NIRS in the research of exercise physiology Twenty-three athlete in the national fin-swimming team took the increasing load training on the power bicycle while their ΔHbO2 and BLA were simultaneously recorded. The initial powers used in the training were set as 100 w for males and 40 w for females. During the experiment, the power kept constant for 3 min before each abrupt increment of 30 w until the limit of the athlete's capability. Statistical analysis and data visualization were performed. Following the increasing load training, ΔHbO2 step-likely increased in the phase of aerobic metabolism but linearly decreased in the phase of anaerobic metabolism. The variation tendency of BLA was the same as ΔHbO2 and the concurrency of crucial turning points between ΔHbO2 and BLA was revealed. This relationship between ΔHbO2 and BLA presented in the increasing load training suggested that ΔHbO2 might be capable for taking the place of the invasively measured parameter BLA. Considering that ΔHbO2 can be noninvasively measured by NIRS, ΔHbO2 has the potential in the evaluation of athletes' physiological function and training effect on the athletes and accordingly NIRS can be well used in this field.

  16. Relationship between muscle oxygenation by NIRS and blood lactate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Guodong [School of Physical Education, Jianghan University, Hubei Wuhan 430056 (China); Mao Zongzhen; Ye Yanjie; Lv Kunru, E-mail: xguodong@wipe.edu.cn [School of Health Sciences, Wuhan Institute of Physical Education, Hubei Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of muscle oxygenation in term of oxy-hemoglobin concentration change ({Delta}HbO{sub 2}) by NIRS and blood lactate (BLA) in local skeletal muscle and evaluate the capability of NIRS in the research of exercise physiology Twenty-three athlete in the national fin-swimming team took the increasing load training on the power bicycle while their {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA were simultaneously recorded. The initial powers used in the training were set as 100 w for males and 40 w for females. During the experiment, the power kept constant for 3 min before each abrupt increment of 30 w until the limit of the athlete's capability. Statistical analysis and data visualization were performed. Following the increasing load training, {Delta}HbO{sub 2} step-likely increased in the phase of aerobic metabolism but linearly decreased in the phase of anaerobic metabolism. The variation tendency of BLA was the same as {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and the concurrency of crucial turning points between {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA was revealed. This relationship between {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA presented in the increasing load training suggested that {Delta}HbO{sub 2} might be capable for taking the place of the invasively measured parameter BLA. Considering that {Delta}HbO{sub 2} can be noninvasively measured by NIRS, {Delta}HbO{sub 2} has the potential in the evaluation of athletes' physiological function and training effect on the athletes and accordingly NIRS can be well used in this field.

  17. Coronary blood flow in the anesthetized American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Bjarke; Elfwing, Magnus; Elsey, Ruth M; Wang, Tobias; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-01-01

    Coronary circulation of the heart evolved early within ectothermic vertebrates and became of vital importance to cardiac performance in some teleost fish, mammals and birds. In contrast, the role and function of the coronary circulation in ectothermic reptiles remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the systemic and coronary arterial responses of five anesthetized juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to hypoxia, acetylcholine, adenosine, sodium nitroprusside, isoproterenol, and phenylephrine. We recorded electrocardiograms, monitored systemic blood pressure, blood flows in both aortae, and blood flow in a major coronary artery supplying most of the right ventricle. Coronary arterial blood flow was generally forward, but there was a brief retrograde flow during a ventricular contraction. Blood pressure was significantly changed in all conditions. Acetylcholine decreased coronary forward flow, but this response was confounded by the concomitant lowered work of the ventricles due to decreased heart rate and blood pressure. Coronary forward flow was poorly correlated with heart rate and mean arterial pressure across treatments. Overall changes in coronary forward flow, significant and not significant, were generally in the same direction as mean arterial pressure and ventricular power, approximated as the product of systemic cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. PMID:26436857

  18. Collateral sources of costal and crural diaphragmatic blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured the contribution of aortic, internal mammary, and intercostal arteries to the blood flow to the costal and crural segments of the diaphragm and other respiratory muscles in seven dogs breathing against a fixed inspiratory elastic load. We used radiolabeled microspheres to measure the blood flow with control circulation, occlusion of the aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, combined occlusion of the aorta and both internal mammary arteries, and occlusion of internal mammary arteries alone. With occlusion of the aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, blood flow to the crural diaphragm decreased from 40.3 to 23.5 ml . min-1 X 100 g-1, whereas costal flow did not change significantly (from 41.7 to 38.1 ml . min-1 . 100 g-1). Blood flows to the sternomastoid and scalene muscles (above the occlusion) increased by 200 and 340%, respectively, whereas flows to the other respiratory muscles did not change significantly. Blood flows to organs above the occlusion either remained unchanged or increased, whereas flows to those below the occlusion all decreased. When the internal mammary artery was also occluded, flows to the crural segment decreased further to 12.1 and costal flow decreased to 20.4 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1. Internal mammary arterial occlusion alone in two dogs had no effect on diaphragmatic flow. In conclusion, intercostal collateral vessels are capable of supplying a significant proportion of blood flow to both segments of the diaphragm but the costal segment is better served than the crural segment

  19. Measurement of forearm oxygen consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J;

    1988-01-01

    blood flow and decreases skeletal muscle blood flow. This facilitates mixing of superficial blood with deep venous blood. Contralateral heating increased deep venous oxygen saturation and abolished the pronounced glucose-induced increase in oxygen consumption observed in the control experiments after...

  20. Low cerebral blood flow in hypotensive perinatal distress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxic brain injury is the most important neurological problem in the neonatal period and accounts for more neurological deficits in children than any other lesion. The neurological deficits are notably mental retardation, epilepsy and cerebral palsy. The pathogenesis has hitherto been poorly understood. Arterial hypoxia has been taken as the obvious mechanism but this does not fully explain the patho-anatomical findings. In the present investigation we have examined the arterial blood pressure and the cerebral blood flow in eight infants a few hours after birth. The 133Xe clearance technique was used for the cerebral blood flow measurements. The study confirmed that perinatal distress may be associated with low arterial blood pressure, and it was shown that cerebral blood flow is very low, 20 ml/100 g/min or less, in hypotensive perinatal distress. It is concluded that cerebral ischaemia plays a crucial role in the development of perinatal hypoxic brain injury. (author)

  1. Blood flow, substrate utilization and heat generation in tissues drained by the azygos vein in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundin, T; Hagenfeldt, L; Söderberg, R; Wahren, J

    1987-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the blood flow, heat generation and substrate utilization in tissues drained by the azygos vein in healthy subjects. Catheters were inserted percutaneously into the azygos vein and the pulmonary artery in 10 healthy male subjects in the basal, post-absorptive state. Blood flow in the azygos vein was measured by thermodilution technique, blood temperature was recorded in both the azygos vein and the pulmonary artery and blood samples for the determination of oxygen content and substrate concentrations were collected from both vessels repeatedly at timed intervals. Free fatty acid (FFA) exchange was evaluated following the intravenous infusion of 14-C labelled oleic acid. The average azygos vein blood flow was 94 +/- 10 ml/min. The coefficient of variation for the flow determination was 3.6%. The blood temperature in the azygos vein was consistently higher than that in the pulmonary artery, indicating an average calculated net heat production in the tissues of 0.5 W. The oxygen uptake to the tissues drained by the azygos vein amounted to 6 +/- 1 ml/min. Significant amounts of glucose, FFA and ketone bodies were taken up in the azygos area, while both glycerol and FFA were released. The FFA uptake could, if oxidized, account for about half of the oxygen uptake. In conclusion, the findings indicate that, in the basal state, the tissues drained by the azygos vein utilize both glucose and FFA. Heat is generated within the area but the rate of generation is low and can largely be explained by the oxidative metabolism. The findings do not support an important role for brown adipose tissue metabolism in the interscapular region in man. PMID:3427881

  2. IMPACT OF RED BLOOD CELL TRANSFUSION ON GLOBAL AND REGIONAL MEASURES OF OXYGENATION

    OpenAIRE

    Roberson, Russell S.; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is common in critically ill patients. While the goal of transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is to increase oxygen carrying capacity, there are contradictory results about whether RBC transfusion to treat moderate anemia (e.g. hemoglobin 7–10 g/dL) improves tissue oxygenation or changes outcomes. While increasing levels of anemia eventually lead to a level of critical oxygen delivery (DO2), increased cardiac output and oxygen extraction are homestatic mechanisms the body uses to preve...

  3. Quantitative myocardial blood flow with Rubidium-82 PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Christoffer E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1...... diagnose and risk stratify CAD patients, while assessing the potential of the modality in clinical practice.......) identification of the extent of a multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) burden, 2) patients with balanced 3-vessel CAD, 3) patients with subclinical CAD, and 4) patients with regional flow variance, despite of a high global MFR. A more accurate assessment of the ischemic burden in patients with intermediate...

  4. Skeletal Blood Flow in Bone Repair and Maintenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan E.Tomlinson; Matthew J.Silva

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue, although this aspect of bone is often overlooked. In this article, the importance of blood flow in bone repair and regeneration will be reviewed. First, the skeletal vascular anato-my, with an emphasis on long bones, the distinct mechanisms for vascularizing bone tissue, and methods for remodeling existing vasculature are discussed. Next, techniques for quantifying bone blood flow are briefly summarized. Finally, the body of experimental work that demonstrates the role of bone blood flow in fracture healing, distraction osteogenesis, osteoporosis, disuse osteopenia, and bone grafting is examined. These results illustrate that adequate bone blood flow is an important clinical consideration, particularly during bone regeneration and in at-risk patient groups.

  5. Aging, regional cerebral blood flow, and neuropsychological functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies found changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to both age and various cognitive tasks. However, no study has yet demonstrated a relationship between rCBF and performance on the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery (LNNB) in an elderly group. Seventy-nine elderly volunteers (56-88 years old), both healthy and demented, underwent the 133xenon inhalation rCBF procedure and were given the LNNB. The decrements in the gray-matter blood flow paralleled decrements in performance on the LNNB. Using partial correlations, a significant proportion of shared variance was observed between gray-matter blood flow and the LNNB scales. However, there was much less of a relationship between white-matter blood flow and performance on the LNNB. This study suggests that even within a restricted age sample rCBF is related in a global way to neuropsychological functioning

  6. Aging, regional cerebral blood flow, and neuropsychological functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacInnes, W.D.; Golden, C.J.; Gillen, R.W.; Sawicki, R.F.; Quaife, M.; Uhl, H.S.; Greenhouse, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies found changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to both age and various cognitive tasks. However, no study has yet demonstrated a relationship between rCBF and performance on the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery (LNNB) in an elderly group. Seventy-nine elderly volunteers (56-88 years old), both healthy and demented, underwent the /sup 133/xenon inhalation rCBF procedure and were given the LNNB. The decrements in the gray-matter blood flow paralleled decrements in performance on the LNNB. Using partial correlations, a significant proportion of shared variance was observed between gray-matter blood flow and the LNNB scales. However, there was much less of a relationship between white-matter blood flow and performance on the LNNB. This study suggests that even within a restricted age sample rCBF is related in a global way to neuropsychological functioning.

  7. Photoacoustic assessment of oxygen saturation: effect of red blood cell aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysi, Eno; Saha, Ratan K.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-03-01

    The simultaneous photoacoustic assessment of oxygen saturation and red blood cell aggregation is presented. Aggregation was induced on porcine red blood cells using Dextran-70 at multiple hematocrit levels. Samples were exposed to 750 nm and 1064 nm for each hematocrit and aggregate size in order to compute the oxygen saturation. As the size of the aggregate increased, the photoacoustic signal amplitude increased monotonically. The same trend was observed for increasing hematocrit at each aggregation level. The oxygen saturation of aggregated samples was 30% higher than non-aggregated samples at each hematocrit level. This suggests that the presence of red blood cell aggregates impairs the release of oxygen to the surrounding environment. Such a result has important implications for detecting red blood cell aggregation non-invasively and making clinical decisions based on the simulatenous assessment of oxygen saturation.

  8. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Andreotti, F.; Di Ricco, G.; Marini, C.; Rindi, M.; Biagini, A.; Milne, E.N.; Giuntini, C.

    1988-07-01

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions.

  9. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions

  10. [Studying the influence of some reactive oxygen species on physical and chemical parameters of blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martusevich, A K; Martusevich, A A; Solov'eva, A G; Peretyagin, S P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate the dynamics of blood physical and chemical parameters when blood specimens were processed by singlet oxygen in vitro. Our experiments were executed with whole blood specimens of healthy people (n=10). Each specimen was divided into five separate portions of 5 ml. The first portion was a control (without any exposures). The second one was processed by an oxygen-ozone mixture (at ozone concentration of 500 mcg/l, the third portion--by oxygen, and the fourth and fifth ones were processed by a gas mixture with singlet oxygen (50 and 100% of generator power). In blood samples after processing we studied the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase, erythrocyte and plasma levels of glucose and lactate, acid-base balance and the partial pressure of gases in blood. It was found out, that blood processing by singlet oxygen leads to optimization of energy, detoxication and antioxidant enzymes functioning with changes in plasma and erythrocyte level of glucose and lactate, normalization of blood gases level and acid-base balance. Our results show, that the effect of singlet oxygen on enzyme activity is more pronounced than exposure to an oxygen-ozone gas mixture. PMID:25702489

  11. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  12. Acupuncture Affects Regional Blood Flow in Various Organs

    OpenAIRE

    Harumi Hotta; Sae Uchida

    2008-01-01

    In this review, our recent studies using anesthetized animals concerning the neural mechanisms of vasodilative effect of acupuncture-like stimulation in various organs are briefly summarized. Responses of cortical cerebral blood flow and uterine blood flow are characterized as non-segmental and segmental reflexes. Among acupuncture-like stimuli delivered to five different segmental areas of the body; afferent inputs to the brain stem (face) and to the spinal cord at the cervical (forepaw), th...

  13. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reduces exercising forearm blood flow in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Darren P.; Joyner, Michael J.; Claus, Paul L.; Curry, Timothy B.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia during exercise augments blood flow in active muscles to maintain the delivery of O2 at normoxic levels. However, the impact of hyperoxia on skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise is not completely understood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the hyperemic response to forearm exercise during hyperbaric hyperoxia would be blunted compared with exercise during normoxia. Seven subjects (6 men/1 woman; 25 ± 1 yr) performed forearm exercise (20% of maximum) under normoxic and h...

  14. Effect of tropicamide on ocular blood flow in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracardiac injection of 15 microspheres labeled with 85Sr (strontium) and 141Ce (cerium) were used to determine ocular blood flow in seven rabbits before and 25 min after bilateral application of tropicamide to the cornea. By using two different isotopes distinguishable under gammaspectrometry, each animal served as its own control. After administration of two drops of 1% tropicamide, no significant difference in blood flow between treated and untreated eyes was observed

  15. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  16. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in multi-infarct dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism were studied in three aged normal volunteers and 10 patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID) by Positron Emission Tomography using O-15. The diagnosis of MID was done according to the Loeb's modified ischemic score and X-ray CT findings. The MID patients, whose X-ray CT showed localized low density areas in the subcortical white matter and basal ganglia and thalamus, were studied. No occulusion was observed at anterior cerebral artery and/or middle cerebral artery on cerebral angiography. All cases of MID were mild dementias. Regional CBF, rOEF and rCMRO2 were measured by the steady state technique described by Terry Jones et al. The values of rCBF in MID patients were significantly low compared with those of aged normal subjects in frontal, temporal, occipital, parietal cortices and thalamus. The values of CMRO2 in MID were significantly low in frontal, temporal, occipital cortices and thalamus compared with normal subjects'. The OEF was 0.46 in aged normal subjects, and 0.52 in MID patients. The MID patients in the early stage of dementia showed the increased oxygen extraction fraction, and this fact suggests that ischemia is a significant pathogenic mechanism in the production and progression of multi-infarct dementia. The decrease of CBF and CMRO2 in MID compared from normal subjects' were most remarkable in frontal cortex. The impairment of mental functions in MID should be caused by the decreased neuronal activities in frontal association cortex. (author)

  17. Mathematical Model of Blood Flow in Small Blood Vessel in the Presence of Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Bali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for blood flow in the small blood vessel in the presence of magnetic field is presented in this paper. We have modeled the two phase model for the blood flow consists of a central core of suspended erythrocytes and cell-free layer surrounding the core. The system of differential equations has been solved analytically. We have obtained the result for velocity, flow rate and effective viscosity in presence of peripheral layer and magnetic field .All the result has been obtained and discussed through graphs.

  18. Hepatic and intestinal blood flow following thermal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because cardiac output decreases after burn injuries, investigators have assumed, based upon dye clearance techniques, that hepatic and intestinal blood flow are also decreased following these injuries. Blood flow to the liver, stomach, small intestine, and kidney was determined by the uptake of 201thallium and 125I-labeled fatty acid (para-125I-phenyl-3-methyl pentanoic acid) in a 20% body surface area scald injury that also included plasma volume replacement resuscitation. Uptake of these radioisotopes was determined 15 minutes, 18 hours, and 72 hours after injury. The uptake of the 201thallium and 125I-labeled fatty acid by the gastrointestinal tissues was not statistically different at any of the time periods after comparison of the injured and control (sham-treated) animals. 201Thallium uptake by the kidney was significantly diminished 15 minutes after the burn injury (P less than 0.01). Based on these blood flow measurement techniques, the data suggest that the 20% body surface area scald injury did not alter blood flow to the liver or gastrointestinal tract within the initial 72 hours after the burn injury even though a decrease in renal blood flow was easily detected. These results suggest that the dysfunction of the gastrointestinal system or hepatic system observed after an acute burn injury is not simply the result of hypovolemic shock, which reduces both renal and mesenteric blood flow. These gastrointestinal and hepatic alterations may be related to a factor or factors other than intestinal ischemia

  19. Measuring bovine mammary gland blood flow using a transit time ultrasonic flow probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorewit, R C; Aromando, M C; Bristol, D G

    1989-07-01

    Lactating cattle were used to validate a transit time ultrasonic blood flow metering system for measuring mammary gland arterial blood flow. Blood flow probes were surgically placed around the right external pudic artery. An electromagnetic flow probe was implanted in tandem with the ultrasonic probe in two cows for comparative measurements. The absolute accuracy of the implanted flow probes was assessed in vivo by mechanical means on anesthetized cows after 2 to 3 wk of implantation. The zero offset of the ultrasonic probes ranged from -12 to 8 ml/min. When the ultrasonic probe was properly implanted, the slopes of the calibration curves were linear and ranged from .92 to .95, tracking absolute flow to within 8%. The transit time instrument's performance was examined under a variety of physiological conditions. These included milking and hormone injections. The transit time ultrasonic flow meter accurately measured physiological changes in mammary arterial blood flow in chronically prepared conscious cattle. Blood flow increased 29% during milking. Epinephrine decreased mammary blood flow by 90 to 95%. Oxytocin doses increased mammary blood flow by 15 to 24%. PMID:2674232

  20. Blood flow and arterial endothelial dysfunction: Mechanisms and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Abdul I.

    2013-06-01

    The arterial endothelium exquisitely regulates vascular function, and endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerotic lesions develop preferentially at arterial branches and bifurcations where the blood flow is disturbed. Understanding the basis for this observation requires elucidating the effects of blood flow on the endothelial cell (EC) function. The goal of this review is: (1) to describe our current understanding of the relationships between arterial blood flow and atherosclerosis, (2) to present the wide array of flow-induced biological responses in ECs, and (3) to discuss the mechanisms by which ECs sense, transmit, and transduce flow-derived mechanical forces. We conclude by presenting some future perspectives in the highly interdisciplinary field of EC mechanotransduction.

  1. A numerical model of blood oxygenation during veno-venous ECMO: analysis of the interplay between blood oxygenation and its delivery parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messai, Elmi; Bouguerra, Abdesselam; Harmelin, Guy; Di Lascio, Gabriella; Bonizzoli, Manuela; Bonacchi, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) is an important tool in the management of most severe forms of acute respiratory failure. The determinants and management of oxygen delivery in patients treated with VV-ECMO is a complex topic. The physiological principles of oxygenation on VV-ECMO are reviewed in many textbooks. However a numerical model is an additional instrument to be used in understanding and exploring this intricate subject matter. We present a numerical model of blood oxygenation during VV-ECMO. Using this model we examined the role and impact of each determinant on blood oxygenation. The numerical analysis of variation and interplay between each oxygenation determinants during VV-ECMO is presented in graphical form. These results corroborate all the findings of previous studies. The proposed numerical model facilitates understanding of oxygenation physiology during VV-ECMO; it can be used for a medical simulation system and for teaching the principles of oxygenation during VV-ECMO. PMID:26091774

  2. Measurement of directed blood flow by laser speckle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Evan R.; Thompson, Oliver B.; Andrews, Michael K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent success in reconciling laser Doppler and speckle measurements of dermal perfusion by the use of multi-exposure speckle has prompted an investigation of speckle effects arising from directed blood flow which might be expected in the small blood vessels of the eye. Unlike dermal scatter, the blood in retinal vessels is surrounded by few small and stationary scatterers able to assist the return of light energy by large-angle scatter. Returning light is expected to come from multiple small angle scatter from the large red blood cells which dominate the fluid. This work compares speckle measurements on highly scattering skin, with measurements on flow in a retinal phantom consisting of a glass capillary which is itself immersed in an index matching fluid to provide a flat air-phantom interface. Brownian motion dominated measurements when small easily levitated scatters were used, and flow was undetectable. With whole-blood, Brownian motion was small and directed flows in the expected region of tens of mm/s were detectable. The nominal flow speed relates to the known pump rate; within the capillary the flow will have a profile reducing toward the walls. The pulsatile effects on laser speckle contrast in the retina are discussed with preliminary multi-exposure measurements on retinal vessels using a fundus camera. Differences between the multiple exposure curves and power spectra of perfused tissue and ordered flow are discussed.

  3. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of that observed in LL, which supports the hypothesis that local ischemia stimulates the LBFR hypertrophic response. As the cuff did not compress the artery, the ischemia may have occurred

  4. Vasopressin in vasodilatory shock: ensure organ blood flow, but take care of the heart!

    OpenAIRE

    Dünser, Martin W; Hasibeder, Walter R

    2006-01-01

    Supplementary arginine vasopressin infusion in advanced vasodilatory shock may be accompanied by a decrease in cardiac index and systemic oxygen transport capacity in approximately 40% of patients. While a reduction of cardiac output most frequently occurs in patients with hyperdynamic circulation, it is less often observed in patients with low cardiac index. Infusion of inotropes, such as dobutamine, may be an effective strategy to restore systemic blood flow. However, when administering ino...

  5. Developmental changes in regional cerebral blood flow in fetal and newborn lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymonowicz, W; Walker, A M; Cussen, L; Cannata, J; Yu, V Y

    1988-01-01

    Developmental changes in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) were determined using radioactively labeled microspheres to measure flow to the cortex, brain stem, cerebellum, white matter, caudate nucleus, and choroid plexus in three groups of chronically catheterized lambs under physiological conditions: 90- to 100-day preterm fetal lambs (n = 14), 125- to 136-day near-term fetal lambs (n = 11), and newborn lambs 5-44 days old (n = 10). We continually monitored heart rate, central venous pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and periodically measured arterial blood O2 and CO2 tensions (PaO2, PaCO2, respectively), pH, hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation (SaO2). The regional CBF measurements (ml.100 g-1.min-1) revealed that in all three age groups the high flow areas are the choroid plexus and caudate nucleus, whereas the lowest flow area is the white matter. There is, however, a different hierarchy of regional CBF in utero (cortex less than cerebellum and brain stem) compared with extrauterine life in the newborn lamb (cortex and cerebellum greater than brain stem). Analysis of regional cerebral oxygen delivery [CBF times arterial oxygen content (CaO2)] demonstrated a progressively increasing oxygen transport to the cortex with increasing gestational maturity and after birth. Oxygen transport to the brain stem, cerebellum, and white matter increased with gestational age, but did not increase after birth. Relationships between regional CBF and natural physiological variations of cardiorespiratory parameters (PaO2, SaO2, CaO2, pH, PaCO2, and MAP) were assessed using regression analysis. Correlations of regional CBF with PaO2 and SaO2 suggest that cerebral perfusion is not primarily determined by CaO2 when variations occur within the physiological range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3337259

  6. Continuous Perfusion of Saphenous Vein by Oxygenated Blood during Beating Coronary Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Mandegar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The saphenous vein remains the most commonly used conduit for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG. However, the long-term success of surgical revascularization is largely limited by development of occlusion in vein grafts. Objectives: We sought to reduce graft ischemia by maintaining the blood flow into the harvested vein throughout surgery at lowest costs and without special devices. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on three hundred patients aged 58.5 ± 8 years undergoing elective first-time off-pump CABG with saphenous veins. Results: In addition to preserving nutritional materials and oxygen, the veins harvested via this novel technique did not go into spasm and were not subjected to high-pressure distension, eventually resulting in minimal damage to the endothelium. Conclusions: This technique confers favorable myocardial function and protection in the presence of left ventricular dysfunction, especially in elderly patients.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF RENAL BLOOD FLOW REGULATION BASED ON WAVELET COEFFICIENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, A.N.; Pavlova, O.N.; Mosekilde, Erik;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the possibility of revealing new characteristic features of renal blood flow autoregulation in healthy and pathological states through the application of discrete wavelet transforms to experimental time series for normotensive and hypertensive rats. A...... reduction in the variability of the wavelet coefficients in hypertension is observed at both the microscopic level of the blood flow in efferent arterioles of individual nephrons and at the macroscopic level of the blood pressure in the main arteries. The reduction is manifest in both of the main frequency...

  8. Micro-regional mapping of HbO2 saturations and blood flow following nicotinamide administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although nicotinamide administration has increased the radiosensitivity of experimental tumors, there is a scarcity of data detailing the underlying physiological mechanisms. The current study presents a method for quantifying both microregional distributions of intravascular HbO2 saturations and the presence or absence of blood flow in adjacent frozen tumor sections. Two murine tumor cell lines, KHT and SCCVII, were implanted and quick-frozen without the use of anesthetics. Nicotinamide was administered IP 1 h prior to freezing, and a fluorescent dye that preferentially stains cells adjacent to blood vessels was injected IV 1 min prior to freezing. To visualize the presence or absence of blood flow, six micron sections were first cut using a cryostat. The remaining frozen tumor block was then analyzed cryospectrophotometrically to determine intravascular HbO2 levels. While KHT HbO2 levels increased somewhat predictably following nicotinamide, the response in SCCVII tumors varied with distance from the tumor surface. Near the periphery, SCCVII HbO2 levels increased, but nearer the tumor center, HbO2 levels actually decreased. Perfused blood vessels were uniformly distributed throughout the tumor volume except in regions of necrosis. Even vessels containing no measurable oxygen remained perfused, as evidenced by the presence of the fluorescent marker. These results demonstrate that nicotinamide raises intravascular HbO2 saturations in both KHT and SCCVII tumors. This increase in oxygen delivery is not evenly distributed throughout the tumor volume in spite of a uniform distribution of perfused blood vessels. Blood flow in a substantial proportion of these vessels is most likely not sufficiently rapid to serve a functional purpose in terms of oxygen supply to the surrounding tumor tissue. 15 refs., 4 figs

  9. Research Advances: DRPS--Let The Blood Flow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    A team from the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine has shown the potential for clinical use of the drag-reducing polymer (DRP) poly(N-vinylformamide), or PNVF. The high molecular weight PNVF is shown to reduce resistance to turbulent flow in a pipe and to enhance blood flow in animal models and it also…

  10. Signals Analysis and Clinical Validation of Blood and Oxygen Data in Human Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kai-yang; LIU Li-jun; WANG Xiang; QIN Zhao; XIE Ze-ping

    2005-01-01

    With a self-made near-infrared analytical instrument to blood and oxygen parameters in human brain, 80 cases in which 20 are healthy persons and 30are anaesthetised cases and others are patients with heart function lack is taken to examine, and the data of blood and oxygen in brain tissue were collected and analyzed by the method of power spectrum and correlation function. The results indicate that: (1) The average brain oxygen saturation of healthy persons and anaesthetised cases is about 80%, in accord with normal parameter of physiology. Contrastively, the average brain oxygen saturation of patients with heart function lack is 72. 8%, which is obviously less than that of healthy persons and anaesthetised cases. The probability of medical statistics is less than 0. 01. (2) The shapes of wave of brain blood and oxygen for the healthy person and the anaesthetised case reveal small periodical fluctuations with stable shape and base line, and the trend of increase or decrease of blood and oxygen parameters in brain tissue is synchronous and a phase reversal, but for the patient with heart function lack in a brain oxygen lack state, the shapes of wave are irregular. This is a hint that near infrared light passing through tissue can reflect the intuitionistic change of brain blood and oxygen parameters. (3) The power spectra of brain blood and oxygen for the healthy person and the anaesthetised case has a clear main peak, narrow bandwidth and perfect superposition each other, but the power spectra for the patient with heart function lack in a brain oxygen lack state is on the contrary. (4) The average cross correlation coefficient of brain blood and oxygen for healthy persons and anaesthetised cases is -0. 9825±0. 1027 close to -1. But the average cross correlation coefficient for patients with heart function lack in a brain oxygen lack state is merely -0. 8923± 0. 1035 which is obviously greater than -1 and the probability of medical statistics is less than 0. 01

  11. Transplacental diffusion and blood flow of gravid bovine uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic blood flow transducers and uterine arterial, uterine venous, umbilical venous, fetal femoral arterial, and fetal femoral venous catheters were implanted in 11 cows on day 161 +/- 4 of gestation. Antipyrine (0.66 M) plus NaCl (0.16 M) dissolved in deuterium oxide (D2O), or H2O, was infused at a constant rate into the fetal femoral vein catheter. Concentrations of antipyrine and D2O in uterine arterial and venous blood and antipyrine in fetal arterial and umbilical venous blood, as well as middle uterine arterial blood flow (electromagnetic transducer), were determined. Antipyrine and D2O gave similar estimates (steady-state diffusion method) of gravid uterine blood flow. In addition, the slope of the regression of D2O on antipyrine estimates was not different from one. Electromagnetic transducers gave estimates of uterine blood flow that were 32-42% of those obtained with steady-state diffusion but were correlated with estimates obtained by use of both antipyrine and D2O. The transplacental clearance rate of antipyrine was similar (per kg placenta) to that observed in ewes. It was suggested that the maternal and fetal microvasculatures of the bovine placenta could have a concurrent arrangement with vascular shunts or maldistribution of flows, as has been suggested for the ewe

  12. The effect of ventricular assist devices on cerebral blood flow and blood pressure fractality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological signals often exhibit self-similar or fractal scaling characteristics which may reflect intrinsic adaptability to their underlying physiological system. This study analysed fractal dynamics of cerebral blood flow in patients supported with ventricular assist devices (VAD) to ascertain if sustained modifications of blood pressure waveform affect cerebral blood flow fractality. Simultaneous recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity using transcranial Doppler were obtained from five cardiogenic shock patients supported by VAD, five matched control patients and five healthy subjects. Computation of a fractal scaling exponent (α) at the low-frequency time scale by detrended fluctuation analysis showed that cerebral blood flow velocity exhibited 1/f fractal scaling in both patient groups (α = 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.97 ± 0.12, respectively) as well as in the healthy subjects (α = 0.86 ± 0.07). In contrast, fluctuation in blood pressure was similar to non-fractal white noise in both patient groups (α = 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.52 ± 0.09, respectively) but exhibited 1/f scaling in the healthy subjects (α = 0.87 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 compared with the patient groups). The preservation of fractality in cerebral blood flow of VAD patients suggests that normal cardiac pulsation and central perfusion pressure changes are not the integral sources of cerebral blood flow fractality and that intrinsic vascular properties such as cerebral autoregulation may be involved. However, there is a clear difference in the fractal scaling properties of arterial blood pressure between the cardiogenic shock patients and the healthy subjects

  13. A multiple disk centrifugal pump as a blood flow device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G E; Etter, B D; Dorsi, J M

    1990-02-01

    A multiple disk, shear force, valveless centrifugal pump was studied to determine its suitability as a blood flow device. A pulsatile version of the Tesla viscous flow turbine was designed by modifying the original steady flow pump concept to produce physiological pressures and flows with the aid of controlling circuitry. Pressures and flows from this pump were compared to a Harvard Apparatus pulsatile piston pump. Both pumps were connected to an artificial circulatory system. Frequency and systolic duration were varied over a range of physiological conditions for both pumps. The results indicated that the Tesla pump, operating in a pulsatile mode, is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows similar to the Harvard pump and other pulsatile blood pumps. PMID:2312140

  14. Occlusion cuff for routine measurement of digital blood pressure and blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Krähenbühl, B; Hirai, M

    1977-01-01

    A miniaturized blood pressure cuff made of plastic material and applicable to fingers and toes is described. The cuff was compared to rubber cuffs and to bladder-free cuffs. It was found to be more reliable than the former type and much easier to use than the latter type. It is recommended for us...... in conjunction with a mercury-in-Silastic strain gauge for routine measurement of digital blood pressure and blood flow in patients with arterial disease....

  15. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson Hans-Uno

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law.

  16. Intrinsic regulation of blood flow in adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Nielsen, Steen Levin; Paaske, W

    1976-01-01

    Previous studies on intact human subcutaneous tissue have shown, that blood flow remains constant during minor changes in perfusion pressure. This so-called autoregulatory response has not been demonstrable in isolated preparations of adipose tissue. In the present study on isolated, denervated...... vasoconstriction with pronounced flow reduction. These two reactions may be important for local regulation of blood flow in subcutaneous tissue during orthostatic changes in arterial and venous pressure. It is concluded that the response in adipose tissue to changes in arterial pressure (autoregulation), venous...... subcutaneous tissue in female rabbits only 2 of 12 expts. revealed an autoregulatory response during reduction in arterial perfusion pressure. Effluent blood flow from the tissue in the control state was 15.5 ml/100 g-min (S.D. 6.4, n = 12) corresponding to slight vasodilatation of the exposed tissue...

  17. Radiosensitization by oxygen in ehrlich tumor receiving artificial blood substitute (FOB 20%)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To enhance tissue PO2 of radioresistant hypoxic cells of tumor, artificial blood substitute (FOB) was applied, because it is excellent solvent for oxygen and allows the blood circulation system to recover and consequently increase the oxygen supply from blood to the tissue. When transplanted Ehrlich tumor of mice on thigh grew about 1,000 mm3 in volume, those were divided into three groups, group 1: 60Co γ-ray irradiation alone, group 2: irradiation under breathing oxygen, and group 3: irradiation under breathing oxygen after exchange transfusion with FOB. The radiosensitization of FOB was studied by compairing with the OER values of three groups for 50% TGD time, 50% SD time, and 50% and 75% TCP. The OER values of 50% TGD time, 5, 10 and 50% SD time 10 of oxygen group were 1.46, 1.29, and 1.22, respectively, and oxygen effect was observed in this group. Those values of FOB group were 2.02, 1.56, and 1.56, respectively and oxygen effect of FOB group was greater than those of oxygen group. Animals receiving FOB were apparently radiosensitized by oxygen against animals breathing oxygen at small doses irradiation effect (50% TGD time, and 50% SD time). The OER values of 50% and 75% TCP at 30 days and 90 days after irradiation of oxygen group were about 1.5 (1.46-1.61) and these of FOB group about 1.3 (1.15-1.38). Radiosensitization by oxygen of animals receiving FOB was not clearly recognized a gainst animals breathing oxygen in TCP effect at high dose irradiation. These results indicate that radioresistant hypoxic cells of tumor receiving artificial blood substitute (FOB) increase the sensitivity of 60Co γ-ray irradiation, especially at small dose irradiation. (author)

  18. Capacity Enhancement of a Lithium Oxygen Flow Battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional model is developed for an aprotic lithium oxygen (Li–O2) flow battery, in which the organic electrolyte is recirculated through the cathode to enhance oxygen supply. The conventional Li–O2 battery model is extended to incorporate convection effects. In contrast to the classic flow battery models, the pore structure change caused by the insoluble discharge product of Li–O2 batteries is considered. A parametric study is performed to study the influence of model parameters on cathode specific capacity. Results show that contrary to conventional Li–O2 cells, electrolyte with a lower conductivity would increase the specific capacity of the Li–O2 flow cell. The results also reveal those parameters that are influential to battery capacity. Based on the analysis, two methods, dual layer cathode and alternating electrolyte flow, are proposed to enhance battery capacity. The dual layer cathode has 105% higher capacity than a single layer cathode at the current density of 1.5 mA cm−2. Alternating electrolyte flow can increase the cathode capacity by 3.7% at the current density of 0.2 mA cm−2

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopy measurement of blood oxygenation content and its application in sports practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guodong; Gong, Hui; Ge, Xinfa; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    To research the change characteristics of blood oxygenation content in skeletal muscle, the change regularity between blood oxygenation content and exercise intensity as well as HbO2 and blood lactate acid while taking incremental exercises, we took an in vivo, real-time and continuous measurement on the blood oxygenation content of eight sportsmen when they did incremental exercises of five degrees on a power bicycle using a portable tissue oximeter which is based on the principle of near-infrared spectroscopy(NIRS), simultaneously, we detected the blood lactate acid of subjects after each degree of incremental physical load instantly using a blood lactate analysis equipment. The results showed that the content of HbO2 descended regularly while that of Hb ascended; blood volume decreased; and the density of lactate increased as the intensity of exercises was heightened. The statistics analyses showed that the relationship between HbO2 and blood lactate is rather close (correlation coefficient r=-0.918). With this discovery, a theoretical basis in measuring the relative change of blood oxygenation content non-invasively was evidenced, and a novel technology for assessing the physical situation of sportsman, grasping sports density and evaluating the training effect could be imported.

  20. Esmolol added in repeated, cold, oxygenated blood cardioplegia improves myocardial function after cardiopulmonary bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Dahle, Geir Olav; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Moen, Christian Arvei; Eliassen, Finn; Jonassen, Anne K.; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated if the β-receptor blocking agent esmolol, added to standard oxygenated blood cardioplegia, improved myocardial function after weaning from bypass. Design: A block-randomized, blinded study. Setting: A university laboratory. Participants: Twenty anesthetized pigs, Norwegian Landrace. Interventions: After cardiopulmonary bypass, cardiac arrest was induced with cold (12°C), oxygenated blood cardioplegia, enriched with either esmolol or vehi...

  1. One dimensional blood flow in a planetocentric orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis

    2012-05-01

    All life on earth is accustomed to the presence of gravity. When gravity is altered, biological processes can go awry. It is of great importance to ensure safety during a spaceflight. Long term exposure to microgravity can trigger detrimental physiological responses in the human body. Fluid redistribution coupled with fluid loss is one of the effects. In particular, in microgravity blood volume is shifted towards the thorax and head. Sympathetic nervous system-induced vasoconstriction is needed to maintain arterial pressure, while venoconstriction limits venous pooling of blood prevents further reductions in venous return of blood to the heart. In this paper, we modify an existing one dimensional blood flow model with the inclusion of the hydrostatic pressure gradient that further depends on the gravitational field modified by the oblateness and rotation of the Earth. We find that the velocity of the blood flow VB is inversely proportional to the blood specific volume d, also proportional to the oblateness harmonic coefficient J2, the angular velocity of the Earth ωE, and finally proportional to an arbitrary constant c. For c = -0.39073 and ξH = -0.5 mmHg, all orbits result to less blood flow velocities than that calculated on the surface of the Earth. From all considered orbits, elliptical polar orbit of eccentricity e = 0.2 exhibit the largest flow velocity VB = 1.031 m/s, followed by the orbits of inclination i = 45°and 0°. The Earth's oblateness and its rotation contribute a 0.7% difference to the blood flow velocity.

  2. Organ blood flow haemodynamics and metabolism of the albacore tuna Thunnus alalunga (Bonnaterre).

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, F C; Kelly, R; Kemper, S; Schumacker, P T; Gallagher, K R; Laurs, R M

    1988-01-01

    Metabolic haemodynamic, and organ blood flow measurements were made in tabled, partially anaesthetized albacore Thunnus alalunga. Heart rates were 115 +/- 9 beats/min: blood pressure 98/75 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic): cardiac output 36.1 +/- 5 (ml/min/kg): oxygen consumption 3.4 +/- 0.7 (ml O2/min/kg) and cardiac contractility (dP/dt) 6342 +/- 822 mm Hg/s. Organ blood flows were measured with radiolabelled microspheres. The red muscle, kidney, and spleen received the highest flows and the white-muscle the least. There was a flow gradient in the white-muscle with the inner portion near the red-muscle receiving the highest flows. Arterial and venous blood gas measurements showed a reverse temperature effect on arterial PO2 and a P50 of 15.9 Torr corrected to 37 degrees C. Red-muscle temperature was 7 degrees C higher than ambient water temperature. These measurements record the albacore's markedly high cardiovascular capability. PMID:3384072

  3. Reduced blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle in ageing humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Hellsten, Ylva

    2016-01-01

    The ability to sustain a given absolute submaximal workload declines with advancing age likely due to a lower level of blood flow and O2 delivery to the exercising muscles. Given that physical inactivity mimics many of the physiological changes associated with ageing, separating the physiological...... the O2 demand of the active skeletal muscle of aged individuals during conditions where systemic blood flow is not limited by cardiac output seems to a large extent to be related to the level of physical activity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... consequences of ageing and physical inactivity can be challenging; yet, observations from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the effects of physical activity have provided some insight. Physical activity has the potential to offset the age-related decline in blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle...... during exercise where systemic blood flow is not limited by cardiac output, thereby improving O2 delivery and allowing for an enhanced energy production from oxidative metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the increase in blood flow with regular physical activity include improved endothelial function...

  4. Definition, significance and measurement of quantities pertaining to the oxygen carrying properties of human blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, WG; Maas, AHJ; Moran, RF

    1996-01-01

    A consistent set of definitions is given of the principal quantities pertaining to the oxygen transport by the blood, and of their mutual relationships, in relation to the methods used in their measurement. At the core is the correct definition of oxygen saturation, the deviation of which has recent

  5. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  6. Effects of posture on blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, S. M.; Domino, K. B.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    We used differential excretion of sulphur hexafluoride from the left and right lung to measure blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in the prone and supine positions in dogs (n = 9). Gas exchange was assessed using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Blood flow diversion from the hypoxic (3% oxygen) left lung was mean 70.7 (SD 11.2)% in the supine compared with 57.0 (12.1)% in the prone position (P perfusion to low VA/Q regions (P ventilation to high VA/Q regions (P < 0.05). We conclude that flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is greater in the supine position. This effect could contribute to the variable response in gas exchange with positioning in patients with ARDS.

  7. Inner ocular blood flow responses to an acute decrease in blood pressure in resting humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whether inner ocular vessels have an autoregulatory response to acute fluctuations in blood pressure is unclear. We tried to examine the validity of acute hypotension elicited by thigh-cuff release as to assess the dynamic autoregulation in the ocular circulation. Blood flow velocity in the superior nasal and inferior temporal retinal arterioles, and in the retinal and choroidal vasculature were measured with the aid of laser speckle flowgraphy before and immediately after an acute decrease in blood pressure in 20 healthy subjects. Acute hypotension was induced by a rapid release of bilateral thigh occlusion cuffs that had been inflated to 220 mmHg for 2 min. The ratio of the relative change in retinal and choroidal blood flow velocity to the relative change in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was calculated. Immediately after cuff release, the MAP and blood flows in the all ocular target vessels decreased significantly from the baseline values obtained before thigh-cuff release. The ratio of the relative change in inner ocular blood flow velocity to that in the MAP exceeded 1% / %mmHg. An explicit dynamic autoregulation in inner ocular vessels cannot be demonstrated in response to an acute hypotension induced by the thigh-cuff release technique. (paper)

  8. Hall effect in electrolyte flow measurements: introduction to blood flow measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwast, Maciej; Piatkiewicz, Wojciech

    2012-06-01

    The Hall effect has been applied to electrolyte flow measurement. It has been proven that Hall voltage does not depend on electrolyte concentration; however, there is a linear relationship between Hall voltage and flow velocity. Obtained results for electrolyte allow us to suppose that Hall effect can be used to determine blood flow. Research on blood will be conducted as the next step. PMID:22145845

  9. Verapamil buffering effect on the abrupt elevation in blood pressure, linkage with microcirculatory blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmitrov, J

    2008-01-01

    1 We studied the effects of verapamil on sudden elevation in blood pressure, microcirculation and arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). 2 Thirty experiments (10 controls and 20 with verapamil) were performed in rabbits sedated using pentobarbital infusion (5 mg kg(-1) h(-1)). 3 BRS, mean femoral artery blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, estimated using microphotoelectric plethysmography (MPPG), were simultaneously measured during 30 min of verapamil infusion (20 mug kg(-1) min(-1)). BRS was assessed from HR and MAP responses to intravenous phenylephrine (Ph) and by power spectral analysis using transfer function (TF) from MAP to the HR (BRS(Ph,TF)). 4 Verapamil significantly increased microcirculatory blood flow, and decreased BRS(Ph,TF) and phenylephrine-induced abrupt elevation in MAP (MAP(AE)). 5 A significant inverse correlation was found between verapamil-induced changes in MAP(AE), BRS and in microcirculatory blood flow, measured before phenylephrine blood pressure ramps (DeltaMAP(AE) with DeltaBRS(TF), r = -0.47, P < 0.036; DeltaMAP(AE) with DeltaMPPG, r = -0.49, P < 0.025). 6 These results suggest involvement of the arterial baroreflex and vascular blood pressure-buffering mechanisms, their enhancement by verapamil, and thus a potential benefit of verapamil in cardiovascular conditions where patients present with abrupt high elevations in blood pressure. PMID:18598288

  10. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H;

    1991-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage uni...... than 0.0001). The synchronism of the nocturnal subcutaneous hyperemia and the decrease in systemic mean arterial blood pressure point to a common, possibly central nervous or humoral, eliciting mechanism.......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow after hemorrhagic hypotension in the preterm, near-term, and newborn lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymonowicz, W; Walker, A M; Yu, V Y; Stewart, M L; Cannata, J; Cussen, L

    1990-10-01

    Developmental changes in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses to hemorrhagic hypotension during normoxia and normocapnia were determined using radioactively labeled microspheres to measure flow to the cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, white matter, caudate nucleus, and choroid plexus in three groups of chronically catheterized lambs: 90- to 100-d preterm fetal lambs (n = 9); 125- to 136-d near-term fetal lambs (n = 9); and newborn lambs 5- to 35-d-old (n = 8). Heart rate, central venous pressure, and arterial blood pressure were monitored continuously and arterial blood gas tensions, pH, Hb, and oxygen saturation together with regional CBF were measured periodically. Hemorrhagic hypotension produced a mean decrease in arterial blood pressure of 27 +/- 4, 23 +/- 2, and 41 +/- 4% in the three groups, respectively, whereas reinfusion of the lamb's blood resulted in a return to control blood pressure within 3% in all three groups. In the pre-term fetal lamb, CBF decreased significantly in all regions during hypotension. In the near-term fetal lamb, only blood flow to the cortex decreased significantly during hypotension. In the newborn lamb, only the choroid plexus demonstrated a significant decrease in blood flow during hypotension. The lower limit of regional CBF autoregulation was identical to the resting mean arterial pressure in fetal life but significantly lower in newborn lambs. These experiments demonstrate for the first time that vulnerability to hypotension decreases with increasing maturity and that the brainstem, the phylogenetically oldest region of the brain, is the least vulnerable to the effects of hypotension at any age in the lamb model. PMID:2235134

  12. Nonlinear interactions in renal blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Donald J.; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Chon, Ki H.;

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a model of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the myogenic mechanism in afferent arterioles to understand how the two mechanisms are coupled. This paper presents the model. The tubular model predicts pressure, flow, and NaCl concentration as functions of time and tubular length...... vasomotor oscillation. There are nonlinear interactions between TGF and the myogenic mechanism, which include the modulation of the frequency and amplitude of the myogenic oscillation by TGF. The prediction of modulation is confirmed in a companion study ( 28)....

  13. A numerical study of blood flow using mixture theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Kim, Jeongho; Antaki, James F

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the two dimensional flow of blood in a rectangular microfluidic channel. We use Mixture Theory to treat this problem as a two-component system: One component is the red blood cells (RBCs) modeled as a generalized Reiner-Rivlin type fluid, which considers the effects of volume fraction (hematocrit) and influence of shear rate upon viscosity. The other component, plasma, is assumed to behave as a linear viscous fluid. A CFD solver based on OpenFOAM(®) was developed and employed to simulate a specific problem, namely blood flow in a two dimensional micro-channel, is studied. Finally to better understand this two-component flow system and the effects of the different parameters, the equations are made dimensionless and a parametric study is performed. PMID:24791016

  14. Oxygenation and Blood Volume Periodic Waveforms in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gersten, Alexander; Heimer, Dov; Raz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Results of an experiment are presented whose aim is to explore the relationship between respiration and cerebral oxygenation. Measurements of end tidal CO2 (EtCO2) were taken simultaneously with cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2) using the INVOS Cerebral Oximeter of Somanetics. Due to the device limitations we could explore only subjects who could perform with a breathing rate of around 2/min or less. Six subjects were used who were experienced in yoga breathing techniques. They performed an i...

  15. Effect of pregnancy on regional cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (r-CBF) of 10 pregnant women were quantified by 133Xe SPECT study with inhalation method before and after artificial abortion. During pregnancy, value of r-CBF in each region except occipital lobe was significantly higher than that of the post abortion. Arterial blood gas was analyzed after SPECT procedure. Pco2 concentration increased significantly after artificial abortion. Although its mechanism is unknown, our preliminary work demonstrates that r-CBF increased by pregnancy. (author)

  16. Cerebral blood flow velocity changes after rapid administration of surfactant.

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, F.; Whitelaw, A; D. Wertheim; Silverman, M

    1991-01-01

    A computer linked Doppler system was used to make continuous measurements of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) from the middle cerebral artery, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) from the umbilical artery, and heart rate before, during, and for 20 minutes after the endotracheal administration of 200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant in 10 preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Within two minutes of surfactant administration, there was a median fall of 6 mm Hg (15%) fall in MAP and 36...

  17. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones II: Blood-oxygen binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active squid that migrates across a strong oxygen and temperature gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Here we analyze the oxygen-binding properties of the squid's respiratory protein (hemocyanin, Hc) that facilitate such activity. A high Hc-oxygen affinity, strong temperature dependence, and pronounced pH sensitivity (P50=0.009T2.03, pH 7.4; Bohr coefficient=ΔlogP50/ΔpH=-1.55+0.034T) of oxygen binding facilitate night-time foraging in the upper water column, and support suppressed oxygen demand in hypoxic waters at greater depths. Expanding hypoxia may act to alter the species habitable depth range. This analysis supports the contention that ocean acidification could limit oxygen carrying capacity in squids at warmer temperature leading to reduced activity levels or altered distribution.

  18. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN WHOLE BLOOD, BLOOD PLASMA AND BREAST MILK: VALIDATION OF A POTENTIAL MARKER OF EXPOSURE AND EFFECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized to contribute to the pathobiology of many diseases. We have applied a simple chemiluminescent (CL) probe to detect ROS in various biological fluids (plasma, whole blood, urine and breast milk) in an environmental arsenic drinking wate...

  19. Shear stress related blood damage in laminar couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Reinhard; Apel, Jörn; Klaus, Sebastian; Schügner, Frank; Schwindke, Peter; Reul, Helmut

    2003-06-01

    Artificial organs within the blood stream are generally associated with flow-induced blood damage, particularly hemolysis of red blood cells. These damaging effects are known to be dependent on shear forces and exposure times. The determination of a correlation between these flow-dependent properties and actual hemolysis is the subject of this study. For this purpose, a Couette device has been developed. A fluid seal based on fluorocarbon is used to separate blood from secondary external damage effects. The shear rate within the gap is controlled by the rotational speed of the inner cylinder, and the exposure time by the amount of blood that is axially pumped through the device per given time. Blood damage is quantified by the index of hemolysis (IH), which is calculated from photometric plasma hemoglobin measurements. Experiments are conducted at exposure times from texp=25 - 1250 ms and shear rates ranging from tau=30 up to 450 Pa ensuring Taylor-vortex free flow characteristics. Blood damage is remarkably low over a broad range of shear rates and exposure times. However, a significant increase in blood damage can be observed for shear stresses of tau>or= 425 Pa and exposure times of texp>or= 620 ms. Maximum hemolysis within the investigated range is IH=3.5%. The results indicate generally lower blood damage than reported in earlier studies with comparable devices, and the measurements clearly indicate a rather abrupt (i.e., critical levels of shear stresses and exposure times) than gradual increase in hemolysis, at least for the investigated range of shear rates and exposure times. PMID:12780506

  20. Heart blood flow simulation: a perspective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doost, Siamak N; Ghista, Dhanjoo; Su, Boyang; Zhong, Liang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death today, incorporates a wide range of cardiovascular system malfunctions that affect heart functionality. It is believed that the hemodynamic loads exerted on the cardiovascular system, the left ventricle (LV) in particular, are the leading cause of CVD initiation and propagation. Moreover, it is believed that the diagnosis and prognosis of CVD at an early stage could reduce its high mortality and morbidity rate. Therefore, a set of robust clinical cardiovascular assessment tools has been introduced to compute the cardiovascular hemodynamics in order to provide useful insights to physicians to recognize indicators leading to CVD and also to aid the diagnosis of CVD. Recently, a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different medical imaging tools, image-based CFD (IB-CFD), has been widely employed for cardiovascular functional assessment by providing reliable hemodynamic parameters. Even though the capability of CFD to provide reliable flow dynamics in general fluid mechanics problems has been widely demonstrated for many years, up to now, the clinical implications of the IB-CFD patient-specific LVs have not been applicable due to its limitations and complications. In this paper, we review investigations conducted to numerically simulate patient-specific human LV over the past 15 years using IB-CFD methods. Firstly, we divide different studies according to the different LV types (physiological and different pathological conditions) that have been chosen to reconstruct the geometry, and then discuss their contributions, methodologies, limitations, and findings. In this regard, we have studied CFD simulations of intraventricular flows and related cardiology insights, for (i) Physiological patient-specific LV models, (ii) Pathological heart patient-specific models, including myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Finally, we

  1. Coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent papers have raised doubt as to the magnitude of coronary blood flow during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We will describe experiments that concern the methods of coronary flow measurement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nine anesthetized swine were instrumented to allow simultaneous measurements of coronary blood flow by both electromagnetic cuff flow probes and by the radiomicrosphere technique. Cardiac arrest was caused by electrical fibrillation and closed-chest massage was performed by a Thumper (Dixie Medical Inc., Houston). The chest was compressed transversely at a rate of 66 strokes/min. Compression occupied one-half of the massage cycle. Three different Thumper piston strokes were studied: 1.5, 2, and 2.5 inches. Mean aortic pressure and total systemic blood flow measured by the radiomicrosphere technique increased as Thumper piston stroke was lengthened (mean +/- SD): 1.5 inch stroke, 23 +/- 4 mm Hg, 525 +/- 195 ml/min; 2 inch stroke, 33 +/- 5 mm Hg, 692 +/- 202 ml/min; 2.5 inch stroke, 40 +/- 6 mm Hg, 817 +/- 321 ml/min. Both methods of coronary flow measurement (electromagnetic [EMF] and radiomicrosphere [RMS]) gave similar results in technically successful preparations (data expressed as percent prearrest flow mean +/- 1 SD): 1.5 inch stroke, EMF 12 +/- 5%, RMS 16 +/- 5%; 2 inch stroke, EMF 30 +/- 6%, RMS 26 +/- 11%; 2.5 inch stroke, EMF 50 +/- 12%, RMS 40 +/- 20%. The phasic coronary flow signal during closed-chest compression indicated that all perfusion occurred during the relaxation phase of the massage cycle. We concluded that coronary blood flow is demonstrable during closed-chest massage, but that the magnitude is unlikely to be more than a fraction of normal

  2. Uteroplacental blood flow during alkalosis in the sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uteroplacental blood flow was measured by the radioactive-microsphere technique in eight near-term pregnant ewes during a normal control period and during maternal metabolic alkalosis. All measurements were made on awake, unanesthetized animals. Alkalosis, defined for this study as an arterial pH of 7.60 or greater, was produced by the oral administration of sodium bicarbonate, 3 g/kg body wt. The rise in pH thus produced was unaccompanied by significant changes in systemic arterial blood pressure and cardiac output, while maternal arterial P/sub CO2/ rose slightly from control levels. Cotyledonary blood flow declined from a control value of 1.177 ml/min to 1.025 ml/min during alkalosis. This decline of 13 percent in cotyledonary blood flow is significant (P less than 0.02). Blood flow to the remaining uterine tissue, or noncotyledonary uterus, did not change with alkalosis, being maintained at approximately 195 ml/min. It is concluded that maternal alkalosis, unaccompanied by major changes in P /sub CO2/ and systemic arterial pressure, causes a small increase in the resistance of the uteroplacental circulation

  3. Pulmonary blood flow distribution in transposition of the great arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary blood flow distribution was studied by scintillation scanning of the lungs after the infusion of iodine-131-labeled macroaggregates of human albumin before and after the Mustard operation in 53 patients with transposition of the great arteries. The patients were classified as follows: Group 1 (24 infants with uncomplicated transposition of the great arteries); Group II (18 patients with transposition and ventricular septal defect); and Group III (11 patients with transposition, ventricular septal defect and pulmonary obstruction). Before operation, 21 patients had a normal distribution of pulmonary blood flow, 10 had preferential flow to the right lung and 2 had preferential flow to the left lung. After operation, 19 had a normal pattern of pulmonary blood flow, 21 had preferential flow to the right lung and 3 had preferential flow to the left lung. The scanning studies have proved helpful in follow-up of patients to rule out recurrence of the shunt, pulmonary or systemic venous obstruction, development of pulmonary hypertension and occlusion of a palliative systemic-pulmonary shunt

  4. Novel optoacoustic system for noninvasive continuous monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury are a major cause of death for individuals under 50 years of age. In the USA alone, 150,000 patients per year suffer moderate or severe TBI. Moreover, TBI is a major cause of combatrelated death. Monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation is critically important for management of TBI patients because cerebral venous blood oxygenation below 50% results in death or severe neurologic complications. At present, there is no technique for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of this clinically important variable. We proposed to use optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation by probing cerebral veins such as the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and validated it in animal studies. In this work, we developed a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system for continuous, real-time cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring and tested it in human subjects at normal conditions and during hyperventilation to simulate changes that may occur in patients with TBI. We designed and built a highly-sensitive optoacoustic probe for SSS signal detection. Continuous measurements were performed in the near infrared spectral range and the SSS oxygenation absolute values were automatically calculated in real time using a special algorithm developed by our group. Continuous measurements performed at normal conditions and during hyperventilation demonstrated that hyperventilation resulted in approximately 12% decrease of cerebral venous blood oxygenation.

  5. Replacing the Transfusion of 1–2 Units of Blood with Plasma Expanders that Increase Oxygen Delivery Capacity: Evidence from Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy G. Tsai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available At least a third of the blood supply in the world is used to transfuse 1–2 units of packed red blood cells for each intervention and most clinical trials of blood substitutes have been carried out at this level of oxygen carrying capacity (OCC restoration. However, the increase of oxygenation achieved is marginal or none at all for molecular hemoglobin (Hb products, due to their lingering vasoactivity. This has provided the impetus for the development of “oxygen therapeutics” using Hb-based molecules that have high oxygen affinity and target delivery of oxygen to anoxic areas. However it is still unclear how these oxygen carriers counteract or mitigate the functional effects of anemia due to obstruction, vasoconstriction and under-perfusion. Indeed, they are administered as a low dosage/low volume therapeutic Hb (subsequently further diluted in the circulatory pool and hence induce extremely small OCC changes. Hyperviscous plasma expanders provide an alternative to oxygen therapeutics by increasing the oxygen delivery capacity (ODC; in anemia they induce supra-perfusion and increase tissue perfusion (flow by as much as 50%. Polyethylene glycol conjugate albumin (PEG-Alb accomplishes this by enhancing the shear thinning behavior of diluted blood, which increases microvascular endothelial shear stress, causes vasodilation and lowering peripheral vascular resistance thus facilitating cardiac function. Induction of supra-perfusion takes advantage of the fact that ODC is the product of OCC and blood flow and hence can be maintained by increasing either or both. Animal studies suggest that this approach may save a considerable fraction of the blood supply. It has an additional benefit of enhancing tissue clearance of toxic metabolites.

  6. Cerebral blood flow in asymptomatic individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the relationship between cortical grey matter flow (CBF) and age, cerebrovascular risk factors and the severity of subcortical hypersignals (HS, hyperintensity score in MRI) in 47 asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors. Multiple regression analysis revealed that HS was most strongly related to CBF, and that hematocrit, age and evidence of ischemic change detected in the electrocardiogram also appeared to be independent determinants of CBF. Both the severity and location of hypersignals were correlated with CBF. The most significant negative correlation observed was that between CBF and HS in the basal ganglia-thalamic region, where the degree of signal abnormality was modest. Decreased CBF in asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors may be related to microcirculatory disturbance associated with elevated hematocrit and an increase in the number of risk factors, and functional suppression of cerebral cortex due to the neuronal disconnection associated with subcortical lesions. In addition, impaired cerebral circulation may be related to MRI signal abnormalities. (author)

  7. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzari, M.; Simonutti, M.; Degardin, J.; Sahel, J.-A.; Fink, M.; Paques, M.; Atlan, M.

    2016-08-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  8. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pellizzari, Mathilde; Degardin, Julie; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Fink, Mathias; Paques, Michel; Atlan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  9. Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Catherine N; Reynell, Clare; Gesslein, Bodil;

    2014-01-01

    that neuronal activity and the neurotransmitter glutamate evoke the release of messengers that dilate capillaries by actively relaxing pericytes. Dilation is mediated by prostaglandin E2, but requires nitric oxide release to suppress vasoconstricting 20-HETE synthesis. In vivo, when sensory input...... increases blood flow, capillaries dilate before arterioles and are estimated to produce 84% of the blood flow increase. In pathology, ischaemia evokes capillary constriction by pericytes. We show that this is followed by pericyte death in rigor, which may irreversibly constrict capillaries and damage the...

  10. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring during hyperventilation in healthy volunteers with a novel optoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Deyo, Donald J.; Henkel, Sheryl N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is useful to facilitate management of patients with severe or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt recognition of low cerebral venous oxygenation is a key to avoiding secondary brain injury associated with brain hypoxia. In specialized clinical research centers, jugular venous bulb catheters have been used for cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring and have demonstrated that oxygen saturation capnography. Good temporal correlation between decreases in optoacoustically measured SSS oxygenation and decreases in EtCO2 was obtained. Decreases in EtCO2 from normal values (35-45 mmHg) to 20-25 mmHg resulted in SSS oxygenation decreases by 3-10%. Intersubject variability of the responses may relate to nonspecific brain activation associated with voluntary hyperventilation. The obtained data demonstrate the capability of the optoacoustic system to detect in real time minor changes in the SSS blood oxygenation.

  11. Measurement of tumor blood flow following neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical oncologists and cancer researchers benefit from information on the vascularization or non-vascularization of solid tumors because of blood flow's influence on three popular treatment types: hyperthermia therapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The objective of this research is the development of a clinically useful tumor blood flow measurements technique. The designed technique is sensitive, has good spatial resolution, in non-invasive and presents no risk to the patient beyond his usual treatment. Tumor blood flow was determined by measuring the washout of positron emitting isotopes created through neutron therapy treatment. In order to do this, several technical and scientific questions were addressed first. These questions have been answered through both theoretical calculation and measurement. The first question was answered through the measurement of macroscopic cross sections for the predominant nuclear reactions in the body. These results correlate well with an independent mathematical prediction of tissue activation and measurements of mouse spleen neutron activation. The second question was addressed by performing cell suspension and protein precipitation techniques on neutron activated mouse spleens. The third and final question was answered by using first physical principles to develop a model mimicking the blood flow system and measurement technique. In a final set of experiments, the above were applied to flow models and animals. The ultimate aim of this project is to apply its methodology to neutron therapy patients

  12. Do blood components affect the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by equine synovial cells in vitro?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Brossi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blood-derived products are commonly administered to horses and humans to treat many musculoskeletal diseases, due to their potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Nevertheless, antioxidant effects have never been shown upon horse synovial fluid cells in vitro. If proved, this could give a new perspective to justify the clinical application of blood-derived products. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antioxidant effects of two blood-derived products - plasma (unconditioned blood product - UBP and a commercial blood preparation (conditioned blood product - CBP¹ - upon stimulated equine synovial fluid cells. Healthy tarsocrural joints (60 were tapped to obtain synovial fluid cells; these cells were pooled, processed, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and evaluated by flow cytometry for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Upon addition of any blood-derived product here used - UBP and CBP - there was a significant decrease in the oxidative burst of synovial fluid cells (P<0.05. There was no difference between UBP and CBP effects. In conclusion, treatment of stimulated equine synovial cells with either UBP or CBP efficiently restored their redox equilibrium.

  13. Hematocrit and oxygenation dependence of blood (1)H(2)O T(1) at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgac, Ksenija; van Zijl, Peter C M; Qin, Qin

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of blood (1)H2O T1 is critical for perfusion-based quantification experiments such as arterial spin labeling and cerebral blood volume-weighted MRI using vascular space occupancy. The dependence of blood (1)H2O T1 on hematocrit fraction (Hct) and oxygen saturation fraction (Y) was determined at 7 T using in vitro bovine blood in a circulating system under physiological conditions. Blood (1)H2O R1 values for different conditions could be readily fitted using a two-compartment (erythrocyte and plasma) model, which are described by a monoexponential longitudinal relaxation rate constant dependence. It was found that T1 = 2171 ± 39 ms for Y = 1 (arterial blood) and 2010 ± 41 ms for Y = 0.6 (venous blood), for a typical Hct of 0.42. The blood (1)H2O T1 values in the normal physiological range (Hct from 0.35 to 0.45, and Y from 0.6 to 1.0) were determined to range from 1900 to 2300 ms. The influence of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and the effect of plasma osmolality for different anticoagulants were also investigated. It is discussed why blood (1)H2O T1 values measured in vivo for human blood may be about 10-20% larger than found in vitro for bovine blood at the same field strength. PMID:23169066

  14. Correlation between abdominal fat and myocardial blood flow in sedentary and non sedentary male workers at rest

    OpenAIRE

    N, Anupama; K, Subbalakshmi N.; M, Vishnu Sharma; Nayanatara AK; Kini, Rekha D; K, Bhagyalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sedentary life has emerged as a risk factor for various negative health.  Abdominal obesity plays a major role in the pathogenesis of several metabolic and cardiovascular medical problems. The myocardial blood flow can be easily measured by knowing hemodynamic predictors the heart rate and systolic blood pressure which correlate better with the myocardial oxygen consumption.Method: In this cross sectional study 70 sedentary and 70 non-sedentary (30-40 years) age matched male worke...

  15. Altering blood flow does not reveal differences between nitrogen and helium kinetics in brain or in skeletal miracle in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolette, David J; Upton, Richard N; Grant, Cliff

    2015-03-01

    In underwater diving, decompression schedules are based on compartmental models of nitrogen and helium tissue kinetics. However, these models are not based on direct measurements of nitrogen and helium kinetics. In isoflurane-anesthetized sheep, nitrogen and helium kinetics in the hind limb (n = 5) and brain (n = 5) were determined during helium-oxygen breathing and after return to nitrogen-oxygen breathing. Nitrogen and helium concentrations in arterial, femoral vein, and sagittal sinus blood samples were determined using headspace gas chromatography, and venous blood flows were monitored continuously using ultrasonic Doppler. The experiment was repeated at different states of hind limb blood flow and cerebral blood flow. Using arterial blood gas concentrations and blood flows as input, parameters and model selection criteria of various compartmental models of hind limb and brain were estimated by fitting to the observed venous gas concentrations. In both the hind limb and brain, nitrogen and helium kinetics were best fit by models with multiexponential kinetics. In the brain, there were no differences in nitrogen and helium kinetics. Hind limb models fit separately to the two gases indicated that nitrogen kinetics were slightly faster than helium, but models with the same kinetics for both gases fit the data well. In the hind limb and brain, the blood:tissue exchange of nitrogen is similar to that of helium. On the basis of these results, it is inappropriate to assign substantially different time constants for nitrogen and helium in all compartments in decompression algorithms. PMID:25525213

  16. Oxygenation-sensitive CMR for assessing vasodilator-induced changes of myocardial oxygenation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Jiun; Dharmakumar Rohan; Green Jordin D; Flewitt Jacqueline A; Vöhringer Matthias; Tyberg John V; Friedrich Matthias G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background As myocardial oxygenation may serve as a marker for ischemia and microvascular dysfunction, it could be clinically useful to have a non-invasive measure of changes in myocardial oxygenation. However, the impact of induced blood flow changes on oxygenation is not well understood. We used oxygenation-sensitive CMR to assess the relations between myocardial oxygenation and coronary sinus blood oxygen saturation (SvO2) and coronary blood flow in a dog model in which hyperemia ...

  17. Numerical modeling of the fetal blood flow in the placental circulatory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Alexander; Gallucci, Sergio; Mirbod, Parisa

    2015-11-01

    The placenta is a unique organ of exchange between the growing fetus and the mother. It incorporates almost all functions of the adult body, acting as the fetal lung, digestive and immune systems, to mention a few. The exchange of oxygen and nutrients takes place at the surface of the villous tree. Using an idealized geometry of the fetal villous trees in the mouse placenta, in this study we performed 3D computational analysis of the unsteady fetal blood flow, gas, and nutrient transport over the chorionic plate. The fetal blood was treated as an incompressible Newtonian fluid, and the oxygen and nutrient were treated as a passive scalar dissolved in blood plasma. The flow was laminar, and a commercial CFD code (COMSOL Multiphysics) has been used for the simulation. COMSOL has been selected because it is multi-physics FEM software that allows for the seamless coupling of different physics represented by partial differential equations. The results clearly illustrate that the specific branching pattern and the in-plane curvature of the fetal villous trees affect the delivery of blood, gas and nutrient transport to the whole placenta.

  18. Noninvasive cerebral blood oxygenation monitoring: clinical test of multiwavelength optoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Y. Y.; Prough, D. S.; Petrova, I.; Patrikeev, I. A.; Cicenaite, I.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2007-02-01

    Continuous monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation is critically important for treatment of patients with life-threatening conditions like severe brain injury or during cardiac surgery. We designed and built a novel multiwavelength optoacoustic system for noninvasive, continuous, and accurate monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation. We use an Optical Parametric Oscillator as a light source. We successfully tested the system in vitro as well as in vivo in large animals (sheep) through thick tissues overlying blood vessels which drain venous blood out of the brain (e.g., superior sagittal sinus or jugular vein). Here we present the results of clinical tests of the system for continuous noninvasive cerebral blood oxygenation monitoring in the internal jugular vein of healthy volunteers. We applied our custom-built optoacoustic probe (which incorporated a wide-band acoustic transducer and an optical fiber) to the neck area overlying the internal jugular vein. We performed measurements with volunteers at 18 wavelengths in the near-infrared spectral range. Despite a thick layer of overlying connective tissue and low energy used in the experiments, we recorded signals with high signal-to-noise ratios for all volunteers. We found that the temporal (independent of signal amplitude) parameters of recorded profiles for different levels of blood oxygenation correlated well with the spectrum of effective attenuation coefficients of blood.

  19. Nitric oxide-mediated blood flow regulation as affected by smoking and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Noboru; Toda, Hiroshi

    2010-12-15

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, cerebral and coronary vascular diseases, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Chronic smoking impairs endothelial function by decreasing the formation of nitric oxide and increasing the degradation of nitric oxide via generation of oxygen free radicals. Nitric oxide liberated from efferent nitrergic nerves is also involved in vasodilatation, increased regional blood flow, and hypotension that are impaired through nitric oxide sequestering by smoking-induced factors. Influence of smoking on nitric oxide-induced blood flow regulation is not necessarily the same in all organs and tissues. However, human studies are limited mainly to the forearm blood flow measurement that assesses endothelial function under basal and stimulated conditions and also determination of penile tumescence and erection in response to endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide. Therefore, information about blood flow regulation in other organs, such as the brain and placenta, has been provided mainly from studies on experimental animals. Nicotine, a major constituent of cigarette smoke, acutely dilates cerebral arteries and arterioles through nitric oxide liberated from nitrergic neurons, but chronically interferes with endothelial function in various vasculatures, both being noted in studies on experimental animals. Cigarette smoke constituents other than nicotine also have some vascular actions. Not only active but also passive smoking is undoubtedly harmful for both the smokers themselves and their neighbors, who should bear in mind that they can face serious diseases in the future, which may result in lengthy hospitalization, and a shortened lifespan. PMID:20868673

  20. Critical contribution of KV1 channels to the regulation of coronary blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Adam G; Noblet, Jillian N; Sassoon, Daniel; Fu, Lijuan; Kassab, Ghassan S; Schepers, Luke; Herring, B Paul; Rottgen, Trey S; Tune, Johnathan D; Dick, Gregory M

    2016-09-01

    Ion channels in smooth muscle control coronary vascular tone, but the identity of the potassium channels involved requires further investigation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional role of KV1 channels on porcine coronary blood flow using the selective antagonist correolide. KV1 channel gene transcripts were found in porcine coronary arteries, with KCNA5 (encoding KV1.5) being most abundant (P muscle layer of both porcine and human coronary arteries, including microvessels. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments demonstrated significant correolide-sensitive (1-10 µM) current in coronary smooth muscle. In vivo studies included direct intracoronary infusion of vehicle or correolide into a pressure-clamped left anterior descending artery of healthy swine (n = 5 in each group) with simultaneous measurement of coronary blood flow. Intracoronary correolide (~0.3-3 µM targeted plasma concentration) had no effect on heart rate or systemic pressure, but reduced coronary blood flow in a dose-dependent manner (P metabolic vasodilation and intracoronary correolide (3 µM) significantly reduced coronary blood flow at any given level of myocardial oxygen consumption (P metabolism and transient ischemia. PMID:27496159

  1. Pulsatile blood flow in human bone assessed by laser-Doppler flowmetry and the interpretation of photoplethysmographic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human bone blood flow, mean blood speed and the number of moving red blood cells were assessed (in arbitrary units), as a function of time, during one cardiac cycle. The measurements were obtained non-invasively on five volunteers by laser-Doppler flowmetry at large interoptode spacing. The investigated bones included: patella, clavicle, tibial diaphysis and tibial malleolus. As hypothesized, we found that in all bones the number of moving cells remains constant during cardiac cycles. Therefore, we concluded that the pulsatile nature of blood flow must be completely determined by the mean blood speed and not by changes in blood volume (vessels dilation). Based on these results, it is finally demonstrated using a mathematical model (derived from the radiative transport theory) that photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulsations observed by others in the literature, cannot be generated by oscillations in blood oxygen saturation, which is physiologically linked to blood speed. In fact, possible oxygen saturation changes during pulsations decrease the amplitude of PPG pulsations due to specific features of the PPG light source. It is shown that a variation in blood oxygen saturation of 3% may induce a negative change of ∼1% in the PPG signal. It is concluded that PPG pulsations are determined by periodic ‘positive’ changes of the reduced scattering coefficient of the tissue and/or the absorption coefficient at constant blood volume. No explicit experimental PPG measurements have been performed. As a by-product of this study, an estimation of the arterial pulse wave velocity obtained from the analysis of the blood flow pulsations give a value of 7.8 m s−1 (95% confidence interval of the sample mean distribution: [6.7, 9.5] m s−1), which is perfectly compatible with data in the literature. We hope that this note will contribute to a better understanding of PPG signals and to further develop the domain of the vascular physiology of human bone. (note)

  2. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  3. Computational biorheology of human blood flow in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2014-02-01

    Hematologic disorders arising from infectious diseases, hereditary factors and environmental influences can lead to, and can be influenced by, significant changes in the shape, mechanical and physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), and the biorheology of blood flow. Hence, modeling of hematologic disorders should take into account the multiphase nature of blood flow, especially in arterioles and capillaries. We present here an overview of a general computational framework based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) which has broad applicability in cell biophysics with implications for diagnostics, therapeutics and drug efficacy assessments for a wide variety of human diseases. This computational approach, validated by independent experimental results, is capable of modeling the biorheology of whole blood and its individual components during blood flow so as to investigate cell mechanistic processes in health and disease. DPD is a Lagrangian method that can be derived from systematic coarse-graining of molecular dynamics but can scale efficiently up to arterioles and can also be used to model RBCs down to the spectrin level. We start from experimental measurements of a single RBC to extract the relevant biophysical parameters, using single-cell measurements involving such methods as optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy and micropipette aspiration, and cell-population experiments involving microfluidic devices. We then use these validated RBC models to predict the biorheological behavior of whole blood in healthy or pathological states, and compare the simulations with experimental results involving apparent viscosity and other relevant parameters. While the approach discussed here is sufficiently general to address a broad spectrum of hematologic disorders including certain types of cancer, this paper specifically deals with results obtained using this computational framework for blood flow in malaria and sickle cell anemia. PMID:24419829

  4. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the transfer of rocket engine flow simulation technology to work involving the development of blood pumps. Details are offered regarding the design and requirements of mechanical heart assist devices, or VADs (ventricular assist device). There are various computational fluid dynamics issues involved in the visualization of flow in such devices, and these are highlighted and compared to those of rocket turbopumps.

  5. Dynamic Modes of Red Blood Cells in Oscillatory Shear Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle $\\theta$, and phase angle $\\phi$ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. i) tank-treading (TT): $\\phi$ rotates while the shape and $\\theta$ oscillate. ii) tumbling (TB): $\\theta$ rotates while the shape and $\\phi$ oscillate. iii) intermediate ...

  6. Blood flow simulation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics: application to thrombus generation

    OpenAIRE

    AL-SAAD, Mohammed; Kulasegaram, Sivakumar; Bordas, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Blood flow rheology is considered to be a complex phenomenon. In order to understand the characteristics of blood flow, it is important to identify key parameters those influence the flow behaviour of blood. Further, the characterisation of blood flow will also enable us to understand flow parameters associated with physiological conditions such as atherosclerosis. Thrombosis plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis, or to stop bleeding when a blood vessel is injured. This article focuses on u...

  7. Effect of blood flow parameters on flow patterns at arterial bifurcations--studies in models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, D W

    1990-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are found primarily at arterial bends and bifurcations. Flow disturbances at these anatomic sites play a major role in atherogenesis. How hemodynamic factors such as vessel geometry, the pulsatile nature of blood flow, vessel wall elasticity and the non-Newtonian flow behavior of blood influence the flow field at these sites must be clarified. We have performed fundamental studies using a birefringent solution in a simplified rigid 90 degree T-bifurcation and pulsatile flow. The velocity distribution was measured with a laser Doppler anemometer. Flow in an elastic abdominal aorta model has been visualized using magnetic resonance imaging. In both flow studies, zones with negative velocity were found. These model measurements demonstrate that no flow parameter can be neglected. Further detailed studies are necessary to examine the interaction between fluid dynamic and cellular surface properties. PMID:2404201

  8. Preservation of canine myocardial high-energy phosphates during low-flow ischemia with modification of hemoglobin-oxygen affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R G; Mejia, M A; Kass, D A; DiPaula, A F; Becker, L C; Gerstenblith, G; Chacko, V P

    1999-03-01

    Conventional approaches for the treatment of myocardial ischemia increase coronary blood flow or reduce myocardial demand. To determine whether a rightward shift in the hemoglobin-oxygen saturation curve would reduce the metabolic and contractile effects of a myocardial oxygen-supply imbalance, we studied the impact of a potent synthetic allosteric modifier of hemoglobin-oxygen affinity, a 2-[4-[[(3,5-disubstituted anilino)carbonyl]methyl] phenoxy] -2-methylproprionic acid derivative (RSR13), during low-flow ischemia. Changes in myocardial high-energy phosphate levels and pH were studied by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in 12 open-chest dogs randomized to receive RSR13 or vehicle control during a reversible reduction of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery blood flow. Changes in cardiac metabolites and regional ventricular function studied by pressure segment-length relations were also investigated in additional animals before and after RSR13 administration during low-flow LAD ischemia. The intravenous administration of RSR13 before ischemia resulted in a substantial increase in the mean hemoglobin p50 and attenuated the decline in cardiac creatine phosphate/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP), percent PCr, and pH during ischemia without a change in regional myocardial blood flow, heart rate, or systolic blood pressure. RSR13 given after the onset of low-flow ischemia also improved cardiac PCr/ATP ratios and regional function as measured by fractional shortening and regional work. Thus, synthetic allosteric reduction in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity may be a new and important therapeutic strategy to ameliorate the metabolic and functional consequences of cardiac ischemia. PMID:10074492

  9. Hypertension, blood pressure, cognition and cerebral blood flow in the cohort of "Men born 1914"

    OpenAIRE

    Reinprecht, Faina

    2006-01-01

    "Men born 1914" is a population based cohort study of the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease. Five hundred men, born 1914, were examined at the age of 68 and 185 of them were re-examined at 81 years of age. Examination included a medical and a psychological investigation, ultrasonographic measurement of carotid arteries, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, regional cerebral blood flow, and cardiovascular risk factors. It is well known that hypertension plays a major et...

  10. Results of Pancreatic Blood Shunting into the Systemic Blood Flow in Insulin-Dependent Diabetics

    OpenAIRE

    Galperin, E. I.; Diuzheva, T. G.; Petrovsky, P. F.; A. Yu. Chevokin; Dokuchayev, K. V.; Rabinovich, S. E.; Gitel, E. P.; Kuzovlev, N. F.; Platonov, L. V.

    1996-01-01

    A new surgical method of treating patients with unstable insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD) has been developed-that of surgically shunting pancreatic blood into the systemic blood flow with the purpose of creating a more optimal interaction of subcutaneously administered insulin and pancreas-secreted glucagon. The long term results of the operation depend on the patency of a splenorenal anastomosis. This has been studied by following up 137 patients over periods from half a year to three years....

  11. Cerebral blood flow links insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John P; Sheu, Lei K; Verstynen, Timothy D; Onyewuenyi, Ikechukwu C; Gianaros, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regulation. Accordingly, we tested whether resting cerebral blood flow within central autonomic regions statistically mediated the relationship between insulin resistance and an indirect indicator of baroreflex regulation; namely, baroreflex sensitivity. Subjects were 92 community-dwelling adults free of confounding medical illnesses (48 men, 30-50 years old) who completed protocols to assess fasting insulin and glucose levels, resting baroreflex sensitivity, and resting cerebral blood flow. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by measuring the magnitude of spontaneous and sequential associations between beat-by-beat systolic blood pressure and heart rate changes. Individuals with greater insulin resistance, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment, exhibited reduced baroreflex sensitivity (b = -0.16, p mediated by cerebral blood flow in central autonomic regions, including the insula and cingulate cortex (mediation coefficients < -0.06, p-values < .01). Activity within the central autonomic network may link insulin resistance to reduced baroreflex sensitivity. Our observations may help to characterize the neural pathways by which insulin resistance, and possibly diabetes mellitus, relates to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:24358272

  12. Cerebral blood flow links insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Ryan

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regulation. Accordingly, we tested whether resting cerebral blood flow within central autonomic regions statistically mediated the relationship between insulin resistance and an indirect indicator of baroreflex regulation; namely, baroreflex sensitivity. Subjects were 92 community-dwelling adults free of confounding medical illnesses (48 men, 30-50 years old who completed protocols to assess fasting insulin and glucose levels, resting baroreflex sensitivity, and resting cerebral blood flow. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by measuring the magnitude of spontaneous and sequential associations between beat-by-beat systolic blood pressure and heart rate changes. Individuals with greater insulin resistance, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment, exhibited reduced baroreflex sensitivity (b = -0.16, p < .05. Moreover, the relationship between insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity was statistically mediated by cerebral blood flow in central autonomic regions, including the insula and cingulate cortex (mediation coefficients < -0.06, p-values < .01. Activity within the central autonomic network may link insulin resistance to reduced baroreflex sensitivity. Our observations may help to characterize the neural pathways by which insulin resistance, and possibly diabetes mellitus, relates to adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  13. Splanchnic blood flow and hepatic glucose production in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, R; Kjaer, M; Simonsen, L;

    2001-01-01

    The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin-converti......The study examined the implication of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in regulation of splanchnic blood flow and glucose production in exercising humans. Subjects cycled for 40 min at 50% maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)) followed by 30 min at 70% VO(2 max) either with [angiotensin......-converting enzyme (ACE) blockade] or without (control) administration of the ACE inhibitor enalapril (10 mg iv). Splanchnic blood flow was estimated by indocyanine green, and splanchnic substrate exchange was determined by the arteriohepatic venous difference. Exercise led to an approximately 20-fold increase (P ...-blockade group vs. the control group, hormones, metabolites, VO(2), and RER followed the same pattern of changes in ACE-blockade and control groups during exercise. Splanchnic blood flow (at rest: 1.67 +/- 0.12, ACE blockade; 1.59 +/- 0.18 l/min, control) decreased during moderate exercise (0.78 +/- 0.07, ACE...

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow studies in patients with pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in seven patients with pituitary tumours, in one patient with a craniopharyngioma, and in one patient with an empty sella; rCB was increased only in patients with gonadotrophin deficiency. The preliminary conclusion is that this is perhaps related to the pituitary tumour itself, and in particular to the endocrine state. (author)

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow in primary degenerative dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was examined, using SPECT by Xe-133 inhalation, in patients with primary degenerative dementia who were subgrouped according to predominant symptoms with respect to amnesia, apraxia, agnosia, aphasia, and personality changes. Also the effect of sex and age at dementia onset on the rCBF patterns was assessed. (author). 26 refs.; 1 fig.; 7 tabs

  16. Nocturnal foot blood flow in patients with arterial insufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Tønnesen, K H

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-four hour continuous recording of xenon (133Xe) wash-out from the forefoot was performed on patients with normal circulations (n = 10) and on patients with different degrees of arterial insufficiency (n = 36). During day hours the calculated subcutaneous blood flow in the forefoot was on a...

  17. Cerebral blood flow in patients with dementia of Alzheimer's type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postiglione, A; Lassen, N A; Holman, B L

    1993-01-01

    In the normal brain as well as in Alzheimer's disease (AD), regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) is coupled to metabolic demand and, therefore, changes in CBF reflect variations in neuronal metabolism. The use of radionuclide techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon...

  18. Nephron blood flow dynamics measured by laser speckle contrast imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Pavlov, Alexey N;

    2011-01-01

    simultaneously. The interacting nephron fields are likely to be more extensive. We have turned to laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the blood flow dynamics of 50-100 nephrons simultaneously on the renal surface of anesthetized rats. We report the application of this method and describe analytic...

  19. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  20. Age and gender related differences in aortic blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traberg, Marie Sand; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lönn, Lars; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    The abdominal aorta (AA) is predisposed to development of abdominal aneurysms (AAA), a focal dilatation of the artery with fatal consequences if left untreated. The blood flow patterns in the AA is thought to play an important role in the development of AAA. The purpose of this work is to investi...

  1. A VARIATIONAL MODEL FOR 2-D MICROPOLAR BLOOD FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ji-huan

    2003-01-01

    The micropolar fluid model is an essential generalization of the well-established Navier-Stokes model in the sense that it takes into account the microstructure of the fluid.This paper is devolted to establishing a variational principle for 2-D incompressible micropolar blood flow.

  2. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a fully...... functioning synthetic aperture scanner can be made...

  3. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a fully functioning synthetic aperture scanner can be made

  4. Simple technique for measuring relative renal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether externally monitored early renal uptake of 131I-hippurate is proportional to renal blood flow, the renal uptake of 131-hippurate at 1 to 2 min after injection was compared with the renal accumulation of radioactive carbonized microspheres in dogs. A renal artery catheter equipped with a balloon was used to decrease renal blood flow unilaterally. One minute after the intravenous injection of 100 μCi of 131I-hippurate, about 1 μCi of either 85Sr- or 95Nb-labeled carbon microspheres was injected into the left ventricle. Radioactivity was measured over both kidneys. The total radioactivity within each kidney region of interest was corrected for background and integrated over the 1 to 2 min interval after injection. Thirteen measurements of relative renal blood flow were made for seven dogs. The dogs were then killed and both kidneys were excised and counted for the radioactivity of the microspheres. The 1 to 2-min relative renal uptake of 131I-hippurate correlated well with relative microsphere uptake, suggesting that relative renal blood flow can be simply determined from the external measurements of renal uptake of 131I-hippurate

  5. Cerebral blood flow measurements using electron beam computed tomography (EBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In close collaboration with the participants of the TEMPUS-Project Nr. 11117 a new technical and theoretical approach was developed to estimate cerebral blood flow using i.v. applied contrast agent and evaluating the cerebral time density curves using EBT as imaging method. This new approach and first clinical results are described. (author)

  6. Blood oxygen binding properties for the burrowing owl, Athene cunicularia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maginniss, L A; Kilgore, D L

    1989-05-01

    Isocapnic O2 equilibrium curves (O2ECs) were generated for whole blood of 4 adult burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) using thin film techniques. At in vivo pHa (7.49 +/- 0.02; mean +/- 1 SEM) and 41 degrees C, the PO2 at half saturation (P50) was 42.3 +/- 0.8 Torr. CO2 and fixed acid (H+) Bohr slopes (delta log P50/delta pH) were -0.46 +/- 0.01 and -0.42 +/- 0.02, respectively, demonstrating a small specific CO2 effect. CO2 and H+ Bohr slopes were saturation-independent between 0.1 and 0.9 S. Hill plots for Athene blood were non-linear; the Hill coefficient (n) increased from 2.6 below 0.4 S to 3.4 above 0.6 S. Owl equilibrium data were accurately described by the equation: S = [(7.7 x 10(6]/(P4 + 44P3 - 108P2 + 3.5 x 10(4)P) + 1]-1. This complex O2EC shape may result from Hb heterogeneity; isoelectric focusing showed 4 isoHbs with a molar ratio of 9:1:1:1. This study revealed no apparent adaptations of Athene blood for hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions. We conclude that the observed blood O2 binding properties promote tissue O2 delivery during periods of surface activity. While occupying its burrow, the owl compensates for moderate alterations in inspired gas composition partly through increased ventilation. PMID:2749025

  7. Quantitative data on blood flow during tumor PDT obtained by laser Doppler spectroscopy in the hen's egg test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoorts, Anja; Rood, H. A.; Klotz, Marcus; Moser, Joerg G.; Rosenbruch, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Oxygen supply is the most important requirement of type II photodynamic reactions. Prerequisite in photodynamic tumor therapy is an intact tumor blood flow during irradiation. Most photosensitizers destroy tumor vessels due to accumulation in endothelial cells. As a prerequisite to develop novel photosensitizing drugs an in-vivo test system is required to quantitatively assess for inertness of those sensitizers to the blood supply. We adapted and further developed a system capable of measuring the relative oxygen supply to heterotransplanted tumors on the yolk sac membrane (YSM) of fertilized chicken eggs.

  8. A new utilization area for hyperbaric oxygen? Improving quality of stored blood

    OpenAIRE

    Ay, Hakan; Yüksel, Ramazan; ŞİMŞEK, Kemal; Topal, Turgut; YEŞİLYURT, Özgur; ÖTER, Şükrü; Korkmaz, Ahmet; ÖZLER, Mehmet; Uysal, Bülent; Yaman, Halil; BEDİR, Orhan; BİLGİÇ, Hayati

    2015-01-01

    Since blood bags have the ability for diffusion of gases, we investigated whether hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) exposure affects several vital parameters of stored blood. Materials and methods: Bloods obtained from the same persons were used as both control and HBO groups and stored in pediatric bags with citrate-phosphate-dextrose solution. HBO administration was performed at 2.5 atm for 90 min, started 1 day after blood collection and repeated every 2 days for a total of 10 times. The study was ...

  9. Chronically impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in long-term diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, N; Larsen, B; Lassen, N A

    1975-01-01

    Using the arteriovenous oxygen difference method autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was tested in 16 long-term diabetics and eight control patients. Blood pressure was raised by angiotensin infusion and lowered by trimethaphan camsylate infusion, in some cases combined with head-up tilting...... of the patient. Regression analysis was carried out on the results in order to quantify autoregulatory capacity. In the control patients CBF did not vary with moderate blood pressure variations, indicating normal autoregulation. In four of the 16 diabetic patients CBF showed significant pressure...... dependency, indicating impaired autoregulation. The cause of impaired autoregulation in some long-term diabetics is believed to be diffuse or multifocal dysfunction of cerebral arterioles due to diabetic vascular disease. Other conditions with impaired autoregulation are discussed and compared with that seen...

  10. Mechanical axial flow blood pump to support cavopulmonary circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, A L; Kapadia, J; Madduri, D

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a collapsible, percutaneously inserted, axial flow blood pump to support the cavopulmonary circulation in infants with a failing single ventricle physiology. An initial design of the impeller for this axial flow blood pump was performed using computational fluid dynamics analysis, including pressure-flow characteristics, scalar stress estimations, blood damage indices, and fluid force predictions. A plastic prototype was constructed for hydraulic performance testing, and these experimental results were compared with the numerical predictions. The numerical predictions and experimental findings of the pump performance demonstrated a pressure generation of 2-16 mm Hg for 50-750 ml/min over 5,500-7,500 RPM with deviation found at lower rotational speeds. The axial fluid forces remained below 0.1 N, and the radial fluid forces were determined to be virtually zero due to the centered impeller case. The scalar stress levels remained below 250 Pa for all operating conditions. Blood damage analysis yielded a mean residence time of the released particles, which was found to be less than 0.4 seconds for both flow rates that were examined, and a maximum residence time was determined to be less than 0.8 seconds. We are in the process of designing a cage with hydrodynamically shaped filament blades to act as a diffuser and optimizing the impeller blade shape to reduce the flow vorticity at the pump outlet. This blood pump will improve the clinical treatment of patients with failing Fontan physiology and provide a unique catheter-based therapeutic approach as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. PMID:19089799

  11. Problems with cerebral blood flow measurement in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring cerebral blood flow in man is usually thought to be of great physiological and pathological interest. Thus, since 30 years, attemps to quantify the cerebral blood flow have given rise to a growing field of research. But, none of the proposed methods has never been currently used as a means of diagnosis or as a test of cerebral function. Methodological and technical difficulties greatly account for this failure. First, a steady flow must be ensured, while measuring it. This requires the operator to keep lung ventilation and cerebral activity to a constant level. Second, the classical models, the stochastic or the compartimental one, imperfectly fit the clearance curves. The calculations based on these models involve systematic errors, specially with low flows. Third, no tracer has been found to quite satisfactory. 133Xe remains the most commonly used radiotracer. But its low solubility in vivo gives low cerebral count-rates. If the actual local partition coefficient is unknown, cerebral blood flow cannot be accurately quantified. Recently, positron emitters have been employed and their advantages begin to be exploited. The most reliable results have been obtained using an intracarotid injection. Finally, the characteristics of the detecting part of the stationary and tomographic systems vary greatly. But, till now, no study has shown what is the best compromise between good statistics and good spatial resolution

  12. Cerebral blood flow mapping in children with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cerebral blood flow mapping system was applied to the evaluation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 21 patients with sickle cell cerebrovascular disease, by means of a Picker xenon computed tomographic (CT) scanner. Results indicate that (1) xenon CT is a safe and reliable procedure in children with cerebrovascular diseases; (2) CBF in the gray matter of children seems to be higher than in previously reported data obtained with use of isotopes; and (3) regional CBF can be altered significantly by changing the size of the region of interest (ROI). The term regional CBF probably has to be carefully defined in xenon CT flow mapping. Correlation with anatomy by means of CT or magnetic resonance imaging and comparison with the ROI of the contralateral side and/or adjacent sections is important

  13. Determination of uteroplacental blood flow by a radionuclide technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The placental blood flow was determined using a non-invasive radioisotopic approach, with the intravenous administration of 113mIn (37 MBq). The method was employed in 20 normal pregnancies, in 24 patients with intrauterine growth retardation, in 8 patients with iso-Rh-incompatibility and in 9 patients with gestational diabetes. In the group with intrauterine growth retardation 2 pregnancies with extensive fetal malformations were included. In one case without evident histological placental alteration the index was 3.94 at 34 weeks of gestation and 5.62 at 36 weeks of gestation. In the second one with placental infarcts the index was 3.46 at 38 weeks of gestation. Normal pregnancies showed a flow index of 5.50 ± 1.57 units compared to the pathological pregnancies value of 2.74 ± 0.90 units. The method is very well suited to clinical evaluation of placental blood flow. (author)

  14. Influence of Gravity on Blood Volume and Flow Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, D.; Olszowka, A.; Bednarczyk, E.; Shykoff, B.; Farhi, L.

    1999-01-01

    In our previous experiments during NASA Shuttle flights SLS 1 and 2 (9-15 days) and EUROMIR flights (30-90 days) we observed that pulmonary blood flow (cardiac output) was elevated initially, and surprisingly remained elevated for the duration of the flights. Stroke volume increased initially and then decreased, but was still above 1 Gz values. As venous return was constant, the changes in SV were secondary to modulation of heart rate. Mean blood pressure was at or slightly below 1 Gz levels in space, indicating a decrease in total peripheral resistance. It has been suggested that plasma volume is reduced in space, however cardiac output/venous return do not return to 1 Gz levels over the duration of flight. In spite of the increased cardiac output, central venous pressure was not elevated in space. These data suggest that there is a change in the basic relationship between cardiac output and central venous pressure, a persistent "hyperperfusion" and a re-distribution of blood flow and volume during space flight. Increased pulmonary blood flow has been reported to increase diffusing capacity in space, presumably due to the improved homogeneity of ventilation and perfusion. Other studies have suggested that ventilation may be independent of gravity, and perfusion may not be gravity- dependent. No data for the distribution of pulmonary blood volume were available for flight or simulated microgravity. Recent studies have suggested that the pulmonary vascular tree is influenced by sympathetic tone in a manner similar to that of the systemic system. This implies that the pulmonary circulation is dilated during microgravity and that the distribution of blood flow and volume may be influenced more by vascular control than by gravity. The cerebral circulation is influenced by sympathetic tone similarly to that of the systemic and pulmonary circulations; however its effects are modulated by cerebral autoregulation. Thus it is difficult to predict if cerebral perfusion is

  15. In vitro validation of volumetric blood flow measurement using Doppler flow wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, R; Kaufmann, P A; Jiang, Z; Attenhofer, C; Linka, A; Mandinov, L

    2000-10-01

    Determination of any volumetric blood flow requires assessment of mean blood flow velocity and vessel cross-sectional area. For evaluation of coronary blood flow and flow reserve, however, assessment of average peak velocity alone is widely used, but changes in velocity profile and vessel area are not taken into account. We studied the feasibility of a new method for calculation of volumetric blood flow by Doppler power using a Doppler flow wire. An in vitro model with serially connected silicone tubes of known lumen diameters (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 mm) and pulsatile blood flow ranging from 10 to 200 mL/min was used. A Doppler flow wire was connected to a commercially available Doppler system (FloMap(R), Cardiometrics) for online calculation of the zeroth (M(0)) and the first (M(1)) Doppler moment, as well as mean flow velocity (V(m)). Two different groups of sample volumes (at different gate depths) were used: 1. two proximal sample volumes lying completely within the vessel were required to evaluate the effect of scattering and attenuation on Doppler power, and 2. distal sample volumes intersecting completely the vessel lumen to assess the vessel cross-sectional area. Area (using M(0)) and V(m) (using M(1)/M(0)) obtained from the distal gates were corrected for scattering and attenuation by the data obtained from the proximal gates, allowing calculation of absolute volumetric flow. These results were compared to the respective time collected flow. Correlation between time collected and Doppler-derived flow measurements was 0.98 (p measurements in each individual tube. The mean paired flow difference between the two techniques was 1.5 +/- 9.0 mL/min (ns). Direct volumetric blood flow measurement from received Doppler power using a Doppler flow wire system is feasible. This technique may potentially be of great clinical value because it allows an accurate assessment of coronary flow and flow reserve with a commercially available flow wire system. PMID

  16. [Synchonization of the blood flow rate in arterial with the changing rate of space of blood pressure with time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenghua; Qin, Renjia

    2012-10-01

    In physiology-related books, there are many relationship curves about blood flow rate in arteries and blood pressure changes with time, but there are not much explanation about such relationship. This is the very the question that the present article tries to answer. We clarified the relations between blood flow rate and blood pressure gradient using the experimental curves as the basis, using Poiseuille Law and relative knowledge of phisics and mathematics, and using analysis and reasoning. Based on the study, it can be concluded that in every course of cardiac cycle, the blood flow rate of any section in artery blood vessel is roughly synchronized with changing rate of space and time of the blood pressure, but blood flow rate is not synchronized with blood pressure. PMID:23198422

  17. Cerebral blood flow in migraine and cortical spreading depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a series of migraine patients, carotid arteriography was carried out as part of the clinical evaluation. Nine patients developed a migrainous attack with focal neurological symptoms and headache after the angiography and during the subsequent, ongoing regional cerebral blood flow rCBF study. rCBF was measured by bolus injection of Xenon133 into the internal carotid artery and a gamma camera with 254 collimated scintillation detectors covering the lateral aspect of the hemisphere. This technique depicts rCBF mainly at the level of the superficial cortex, with no depth resolution. The resolution is 1 cm2 providing detailed spatial information of the cortical blood flow. Other methods for measuring local blood flow in animal and man employ a radioactive, freely diffusible tracer, in combination with an autoradiographic technique for the assessment of the tissue concentration, the so-called autoradiographic methods. In the series of patients with spontaneous migraine, rCBF was estimated using an in-vivo application of the autoradiographic principle. Xenon133 was administered by inhalation and the time course of the arterial concentration curve was assessed by a scintillation detector over the upper right lung, since the arterial curve has been found to follow the shape of the lung curve. The rCBF was studied accompanying cortical spreading depression in rat experiments to evaluate whether this phenomenon could explain the blood flow changes in migraine. (14C) iodoantipyrine was given as an intravenous bolus injection and the brain content of indicator was determined by tissue sample or autoradiography after 10 or 20 seconds of isotope circulation. The conditions of the autoradiographic methods are that the flow remains constant within the period of measuring, and that the region under study is homogenous with regard to flow and λ. (EG)

  18. Assessment of maternal cerebral blood flow in patients with preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Systemic vasoconstrktion in preeclamptic patients increases vascular resistance, and is manifested by increased arterial blood flow velocity. The aim of the study is to evaluate if there is a change of Doppler indices in maternal medial cerbral artery (MCA in severe preeclampsia due to: 1 severity of clinical symptoms, 2 the beginning of eclamptic attack and 3 the application of anticonvidsive therapy. Material and methods A prospective clinical study included 92 pregnant women, gestational age 28-36 weeks. They were divided into three groups: normotensive (n=30, mild preeclampsia (n=33, and severe preeclampsia (n=29. We investigated maternal cerebral circulation by assessing the MCA. We registrated: pulsatility index (Pi, resistance index (Ri, Systolic/diastolic ratio (S/D, and the maximum systolic, end diastolic and medium velocity. Patients with severe preeclampsia were divided into two subgroups: subgroup 1 included patients without symptoms of threatening eclampsia (n=18; 62.06%; while subgroup 2 included those with symptoms of preeclampsia (n=11; 37.94%. All patients with severe preeclampsia were treated with magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, and cerebral blood flow was measured before and after the treatment. Statistical analysis was done by oneway ANOVA, Student t-test and t-paired sample test. The difference was considered to be significant if p < 0.05. Results Significantly increased Pi, Ri and all velocities were established in the group of patients with severe preeclampsia compared with the other two groups. In the group with severe preeclamsia we registrated significantly increased values of all velocities (patients with signs of threatening eclampsia. After MgSO4 treatment in patients with severe preeclampsia significantly decreased values of Pi, Ri, S/D ratio and all velocities were registered. Discussion In the studied group of patients with severe preclampsia we found increased velocity values, Pi and Ri, especially in

  19. Oxygenated-blood colour change thresholds for perceived facial redness, health, and attractiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Re

    Full Text Available Blood oxygenation level is associated with cardiovascular fitness, and raising oxygenated blood colouration in human faces increases perceived health. The current study used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC psychophysics design to quantify the oxygenated blood colour (redness change threshold required to affect perception of facial colour, health and attractiveness. Detection thresholds for colour judgments were lower than those for health and attractiveness, which did not differ. The results suggest redness preferences do not reflect a sensory bias, rather preferences may be based on accurate indications of health status. Furthermore, results suggest perceived health and attractiveness may be perceptually equivalent when they are assessed based on facial redness. Appearance-based motivation for lifestyle change can be effective; thus future studies could assess the degree to which cardiovascular fitness increases face redness and could quantify changes in aerobic exercise needed to increase facial attractiveness.

  20. Effects of oxygen concentration and flow rate on cognitive ability and physiological responses in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun-Jun Kim; Soon-Cheol Chung; Hyun-Kyung Park; Dae-Woon Lim; Mi-Hyun Choi; Hyun-Joo Kim; In-Hwa Lee; Hyung-Sik Kim; Jin-Seung Choi; Gye-Rae Tack

    2013-01-01

    The supply of highly concentrated oxygen positively affects cognitive processing in normal young adults. However, there have been few reports on changes in cognitive ability in elderly subjects following highly concentrated oxygen administration. This study investigated changes in cognitive ability, blood oxygen saturation (%), and heart rate (beats/min) in normal elderly subjects at three different levels of oxygen [21% (1 L/min), 93% (1 L/min), and 93% (5 L/min)] administered during a 1-back task. Eight elderly male (75.3 ± 4.3 years old) and 10 female (71.1 ± 3.9 years old) subjects, who were normal in cognitive ability as shown by a score of more than 24 points in the Mini-Mental State Examination-Korea, participated in the experiment. The experiment consisted of an adaptation phase after the start of oxygen administration (3 minutes), a control phase to obtain stable baseline measurements of heart rate and blood oxygen saturation before the task (2 minutes), and a task phase during which the 1-back task was performed (2 minutes). Three levels of oxygen were administered throughout the three phases (7 minutes). Blood oxygen saturation and heart rate were measured during each phase. Our results show that blood oxygen saturation increased, heart rate decreased, and response time in the 1-back task decreased as the concentration and amount of administered oxygen increased. This shows that administration of sufficient oxygen for optimal cognitive functioning increases blood oxygen saturation and decreases heart rate.

  1. Ozone Therapy on Cerebral Blood Flow: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone therapy is currently being used in the treatment of ischemic disorders, but the underlying mechanisms that result in successful treatment are not well known. This study assesses the effect of ozone therapy on the blood flow in the middle cerebral and common carotid arteries. Seven subjects were recruited for the therapy that was performed by transfusing ozone-enriched autologous blood on 3 alternate days over 1 week. Blood flow quantification in the common carotid artery (n = 14 was performed using color Doppler. Systolic and diastolic velocities in the middle cerebral artery (n = 14 were estimated using transcranial Doppler. Ultrasound assessments were conducted at the following three time points: 1 basal (before ozone therapy, 2 after session #3 and 3 1 week after session #3. The common carotid blood flow had increased by 75% in relation to the baseline after session #3 (P < 0.001 and by 29% 1 week later (P = 0.039. In the middle cerebral artery, the systolic velocity had increased by 22% after session #3 (P = 0.001 and by 15% 1 week later (P = 0.035, whereas the diastolic velocity had increased by 33% after session #3 (P < 0.001 and by 18% 1 week later (P = 0.023. This preliminary Doppler study supports the clinical experience of achieving improvement by using ozone therapy in peripheral ischemic syndromes. Its potential use as a complementary treatment in cerebral low perfusion syndromes merits further clinical evaluation.

  2. Measurement of limb blood flow using technetium-labelled red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, A; Robinson, P.J.; Wiggins, P.A.; Leveson, S.H.; Salter, M.C.P.; Matthews, I.F.; Ware, F.M.

    1986-05-01

    A method for measuring blood flow below the knee during reactive hyperaemia induced by 3 min of arterial occlusion has been developed. Subjects are positioned with lower limbs within the field of view of a gamma camera and pneumatic cuffs are placed below the knees to isolate the blood and induce a hyperaemic response. The remaining blood pool is labelled with /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-labelled red cells. Blood flows have been derived from the initial gradients of time-activity curves and from equilibrium blood sampling. The technique has been validated using a tissue-equivalent leg phantom and peristaltic pump. The method has been applied to a small group of patients with peripheral vascular disease and to normal controls. The mean value (+-SD) of limb perfusion for normal controls was found to be 16.4 +- 3.0 ml/100 ml/min and for patients with intermittent claudication was 5.1 +- 2.6 ml/100 ml/min. Flow measurements are found to correlate with clinical findings and with symptoms. Reproducibility (established by repeated measurements) is high. The method is well tolerated even by patients suffering from rest pain.

  3. The measurement of limb blood flow using technetium-labelled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring blood flow below the knee during reactive hyperaemia induced by 3 min of arterial occlusion has been developed. Subjects are positioned with lower limbs within the field of view of a gamma camera and pneumatic cuffs are placed below the knees to isolate the blood and induce a hyperaemic response. The remaining blood pool is labelled with 99Tcsup(m)-labelled red cells. Blood flows have been derived from the initial gradients of time-activity curves and from equilibrium blood sampling. The technique has been validated using a tissue-equivalent leg phantom and peristaltic pump. The method has been applied to a small group of patients with peripheral vascular disease and to normal controls. The mean value (+-SD) of limb perfusion for normal controls was found to be 16.4+-3.0 ml/100 ml/min and for patients with intermittent claudication was 5.1+-2.6 ml/100 ml/min. Flow measurements are found to correlate with clinical findings and with symptoms. Reproducibility (established by repeated measurements) is high. The method is well tolerated even by patients suffering from rest pain. (author)

  4. Functional photoacoustic tomography for non-invasive imaging of cerebral blood oxygenation and blood volume in rat brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Xie, Xueyi; Ku, Geng; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2005-04-01

    Based on the multi-wavelength laser-based photoacoustic tomography, non-invasive in vivo imaging of functional parameters, including the hemoglobin oxygen saturation and the total concentration of hemoglobin, in small-animal brains was realized. The high sensitivity of this technique is based on the spectroscopic differences between oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin while its spatial resolution is bandwidth-limited by the photoacoustic signals rather than by the optical diffusion as in optical imaging. The point-by-point distributions of blood oxygenation and blood volume in the cerebral cortical venous vessels, altered by systemic physiological modulations including hyperoxia, normoxia and hypoxia, were visualized successfully through the intact skin and skull. This technique, with its prominent intrinsic advantages, can potentially accelerate the progress in neuroscience and provide important new insights into cerebrovascular physiology and brain function that are of great significance to the neuroscience community.

  5. Occlusion-free Blood Flow Animation with Wall Thickness Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Vilanova, Anna; Preim, Bernhard; Isenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We present the first visualization tool that combines pathlines from blood flow and wall thickness information. Our method uses illustrative techniques to provide occlusion-free visualization of the flow. We thus offer medical researchers an effective visual analysis tool for aneurysm treatment risk assessment. Such aneurysms bear a high risk of rupture and significant treatment-related risks. Therefore, to get a fully informed decision it is essential to both investigate the vessel morphology and the hemodynamic data. Ongoing research emphasizes the importance of analyzing the wall thickness in risk assessment. Our combination of blood flow visualization and wall thickness representation is a significant improvement for the exploration and analysis of aneurysms. As all presented information is spatially intertwined, occlusion problems occur. We solve these occlusion problems by dynamic cutaway surfaces. We combine this approach with a glyph-based blood flow representation and a visual mapping of wall thickness onto the vessel surface. We developed a GPU-based implementation of our visualizations which facilitates wall thickness analysis through real-time rendering and flexible interactive data exploration mechanisms. We designed our techniques in collaboration with domain experts, and we provide details about the evaluation of the technique and tool. PMID:26529724

  6. Narcolepsy: regional cerebral blood flow during sleep and wakefulness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, F.; Meyer, J.S.; Karacan, I.; Yamaguchi, F.; Yamamoto, M.

    1979-01-01

    Serial measurements of regional cerebral blood flow were made by the 135Xe inhalation method during the early stages of sleep and wakefulness in eight normal volunteers and 12 patients with narcolepsy. Electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram, and submental electromyogram were recorded simultaneously. In normals, mean hemispheric gray matter blood flow (Fg) during stages I and II sleep was significantly less than waking values. Maximum regional blood flow decreases during sleep occurred in the brainstem-cerebellar, right inferior temporal, and bilateral frontal regions. In patients with narcolepsy, mean hemispheric Fg while awake was 80.5 +- 13 ml per 100 gm brain per minute. During REM sleep, mean hemispheric Fg increased concurrently with large increases in brainstem-cerebellar region flow. During stages I and II sleep without REM, there were significant increases in mean hemispheric Fg and brainstem-cerebellar Fg, just the opposite of changes in normals. In narcolepsy, there appears to be a reversal of normal cerebral deactivation patterns, particularly involving the brainstem, during stages I and II sleep.

  7. Holographic laser Doppler imaging of pulsatile blood flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bencteux, Jeffrey; Kostas, Thomas; Bayat, Sam; Atlan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We report on wide-field imaging of pulsatile motion induced by blood flow using heterodyne holographic interferometry on the thumb of a healthy volunteer, in real-time. Optical Doppler images were measured with green laser light by a frequency-shifted Mach-Zehnder interferometer in off-axis configuration. The recorded optical signal was linked to local instantaneous out-of-plane motion of the skin at velocities of a few hundreds of microns per second, and compared to blood pulse monitored by plethysmoraphy during an occlusion-reperfusion experiment.

  8. Blood Flow Imaging in Maternal and Fetal Arteries and Veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, S.; Urban, G.; Vergani, P.; Paidas, M. J.; Tortoli, P.

    Maternal and fetal blood circulation has been investigated for nearly a decade through ultrasound (US) techniques. Evaluation of the spectrogram related to a single sample volume has been proven valuable for the assessment of fetal well-being and for prediction of pregnancy complications. In this work, an alternative technique, called Multigate Spectral Doppler Analysis (MSDA), is proposed. In this approach, 128 sample volumes aligned along the same scan line are simultaneously investigated to detect the blood velocity profile with high resolution. Profiles obtained through MSDA reveal features not detectable with the standard US technique, thus representing a more accurate flow signature. Some preliminary illustrative results are reported here.

  9. Blood flow changes in Alzheimer's disease induced by lactate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Lactate, as metabolite of the glycolysis is a source of energy of the nerves. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed the neuroprotective effect of lactate and improvement of brain function after ischaemic injury. Intravenous infusion of lactate increases the global cerebral blood flow (CBF). In Alzheimer disease (AD) characteristic regional blood flow abnormalities and in the cerebrospinal fluid abnormal lactate levels were detected. Since disturbed CBF and vasoregulation was found in AD the effect of intravenous Na-lactate on CBF and related metabolic parameters was examined in order to assess the CBF response in the AD brain. In twenty (14 woman, 6 man, age ± SD.: 74 ± 7 years) patients with Alzheimer's disease (DSM IV, MMT.:13 ± 6) self-control study was performed. rCBF SPECT (99mTc-HMPAO) investigations were fulfilled during 5 mg/kg body weight 0.5 M Na-lactate infusion and in control state (0.9 % saline infusion) one week apart. The rCBF changes visually and by statistical parametric mapping were analyzed. ECG, blood pressure, heart rate, venous blood pH, pCO2, bicarbonate, serum lactate and cortisol level were measured before and after the SPECT investigation. Acute panic inventory and anxiety rating scales were used to access the psychiatric effect of lactate. The serum lactate levels increased in average from 0.8 mmol/L to 4.6 mmol/L, and 6.1 mmol/L 10 and 20 minutes after lactate infusion respectively. Compensatory changes were found in the venous blood pH, pCO2 and bicarbonate levels. Significant psychiatric symptoms and blood pressure and heart rate increase were not observed. The serum cortisol level remained unchanged. At the baseline investigation all of the patients have bilateral temporal or parietal hypoperfused areas in 8 patients with other additional localization of abnormalities. In 12 patients the global cerebral blood flow increased, in 8 decreased rCBF was detected by visual evaluation. According to the SPM analysis the

  10. Noninvasive functional photoacoustic tomography of blood-oxygen saturation in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueding; Ku, Geng; Xie, Xueyi; Wang, Yiwen; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2004-07-01

    Since optical contrast is sensitive to functional parameters, including the hemoglobin oxygen saturation and the total concentration of hemoglobin, imaging based on optical contrast has been widely employed for the real-time monitoring of tissue oxygen consumption and hemodynamics in biological tissues. However, due to the overwhelming scattering of light in tissues, traditional optical imaging modalities cannot provide satisfactory spatial resolution. Functional photoacoustic tomography is a novel technique that combines high optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution. Here, we present our study of a laser-based photoacoustic technique that, for the first time to our knowledge, monitors blood oxygenation in the rat brain in vivo. The cerebral blood oxygenation in the rat brain was imaged by photoacoustic detection at two wavelengths. The change in the hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the brain vessels as a result of the alternation from hyperoxia status to hypoxia status was visualized successfully with satisfactory spatial resolution. This work demonstrates that photoacoustic technique, based on the spectroscopic absorption of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, can provide accurate functional imaging of cerebral blood oxygenation in the small-animal brain non-invasively with the skin and skull intact.

  11. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Christine L.; Ances, Beau M.; Perthen, Joanna E.; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T.; Hopkins, Susan R.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO2 coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological c...

  12. Margination of leukocytes in blood flow through small tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, H L; Spain, S

    1984-03-01

    Leukocyte margination in the vessels of the microcirculation has been attributed to a flow-dependent interaction with red cells. To determine the extent of this effect, experiments with human blood were done in 100- to 180-micron tubes to detect changes in cell distribution as a function of hematocrit and flow rate. Using a flow visualization technique, the leukocyte concentration distribution was determined in 45% ghost cell suspensions. Migration of cells toward the wall was observed at centerline velocities greater than 1 mm sec-1 and increased with increasing flow rate. The effect was probably due to a more rapid inward migration of ghosts than leukocytes because of fluid inertia and cell density differences. Experiments were therefore carried out in whole blood at hematocrits from 20 to 60%, measuring the number concentration of leukocytes and erythrocytes within the tube, nt, and comparing it to that in the infusing reservoir, no, (Fahraeus effect). At mean tube shear rates G less than 100 sec-1, nt/no less than 1 for both leukocytes and erythrocytes showing net migration of cells away from the wall, although at nearly all hematocrits there was an enrichment of leukocytes relative to erythrocytes in the tubes. At G less than 50 sec-1, nt/no remained less than 1 for erythrocytes but increased to greater than 1 for leukocytes showing migration toward the wall, the increase being greatest at 20% hematocrit in the 100-micron tubes. The nature of the effect was revealed by cine films which showed that, as the flow rate decreased, erythrocytes formed rouleaux which migrated inward creating a core and displacing leukocytes to the periphery. In control experiments using washed blood cells in phosphate buffer-albumin, nt/no less than 1 for both leukocytes and erythrocytes at all G and hematocrits, and leukocytes were now distributed. Cine films of washed blood confirmed that, in the absence of rouleaux, no significant inward migration of erythrocytes occurred. PMID

  13. Arterial blood gas analysis or oxygen saturation in the assessment of acute asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Carruthers, D M; Harrison, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A study was undertaken to determine if arterial blood gas estimation is always necessary in the assessment of patients presenting to hospital with acute severe asthma, or whether oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry is a reliable screening test for predicting those in respiratory failure. METHODS--A prospective study was conducted in a specialist respiratory medical unit. Arterial blood gas tensions and pulse oximetry were measured in 89 consecutive patients admitted wi...

  14. Ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy does not detect hyperventilation-induced reduction in cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Secher, Niels H; Hirasawa, Ai;

    2015-01-01

    healthy males (age 21-26 years) hyperventilated and were administered phenylephrine to increase mean arterial pressure by 20-30 mmHg. Frontal lobe tissue oxygenation (ScO2) and CFI were obtained using the CerOx and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAvmean) was determined by....... Administration of phenylephrine was not associated with any changes in MCAvmean, ICAf, ECAf, ScO2, SkBF, SskinO2, or CFI. CONCLUSION: The CerOx was able to detect a stable CBF during administration of phenylephrine. However, during hyperventilation MCAvmean and ICAf decreased while CFI increased, likely due to...

  15. Relations of blood pressure and head injury to regional cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Jason E; Allen, Allyssa J; Katzel, Leslie I; Wendell, Carrington R; Siegel, Eliot L; Lefkowitz, David; Waldstein, Shari R

    2016-06-15

    Hypertension confers increased risk for cognitive decline, dementia, and cerebrovascular disease. These associations have been attributed, in part, to cerebral hypoperfusion. Here we posit that relations of higher blood pressure to lower levels of cerebral perfusion may be potentiated by a prior head injury. Participants were 87 community-dwelling older adults - 69% men, 90% white, mean age=66.9years, 27.6% with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) defined as a loss of consciousness ≤30min resulting from an injury to the head, and free of major medical (other than hypertension), neurological or psychiatric comorbidities. All engaged in clinical assessment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Computerized coding of the SPECT images yielded relative ratios of blood flow in left and right cortical and select subcortical regions. Cerebellum served as the denominator. Sex-stratified multiple regression analyses, adjusted for age, education, race, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and depressive symptomatology, revealed significant interactions of blood pressure and head injury to cerebral blood flow in men only. Specifically, among men with a history of head injury, higher systolic blood pressure was associated with lower levels of perfusion in the left orbital (β=-3.21, p=0.024) and left dorsolateral (β=-2.61, p=0.042) prefrontal cortex, and left temporal cortex (β=-3.36, p=0.014); higher diastolic blood pressure was marginally associated with lower levels of perfusion in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (β=-2.79, p=0.051). Results indicate that men with a history of head injury may be particularly vulnerable to the impact of higher blood pressure on cerebral perfusion in left anterior cortical regions, thus potentially enhancing risk for adverse brain and neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:27206865

  16. Oxygen-implanted induced formation of oxide layer enhances blood compatibility on titanium for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Chiang; Chang, Fang-Mo; Yang, Tzu-Sen; Ou, Keng-Liang; Lin, Che-Tong; Peng, Pei-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) layers were prepared on a Ti substrate by using oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (oxygen PIII). The surface chemical states, structure, and morphology of the layers were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscope. The mechanical properties, such as the Young's modulus and hardness, of the layers were investigated using nanoindentation testing. The Ti(4+) chemical state was determined to be present on oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces, which consisted of nanocrystalline TiO2 with a rutile structure. Compared with Ti substrates, the oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces exhibited decreased Young's moduli and hardness. Parameters indicating the blood compatibility of the oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces, including the clotting time and platelet adhesion and activation, were studied in vitro. Clotting time assays indicated that the clotting time of oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces was longer than that of the Ti substrate, which was associated with decreased fibrinogen adsorption. In conclusion, the surface characteristics and the blood compatibility of Ti implants can be modified and improved using oxygen PIII. PMID:27524050

  17. Increasing venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation flow negatively affects left ventricular performance in a porcine model of cardiogenic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Ostadal, Petr; Mlcek, Mikulas; Kruger, Andreas; Hala, Pavel; Lacko, Stanislav; Mates, Martin; Vondrakova, Dagmar; Svoboda, Tomas; Hrachovina, Matej; Janotka, Marek; Psotova, Hana; Strunina, Svitlana; Kittnar, Otomar; Neuzil, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between extracorporeal blood flow (EBF) and left ventricular (LV) performance during venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) therapy. Methods Five swine (body weight 45 kg) underwent VA ECMO implantation under general anesthesia and artificial ventilation. Subsequently, acute cardiogenic shock with signs of tissue hypoxia was induced. Hemodynamic and cardiac performance parameters were then measured at differen...

  18. The Effect of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Blood Flow on Viscoelasticity and Red Blood Cell Aggregation in Extracorporeal Circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Kang, Yang Jun; Kim, Myoung Gon; Yang, Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, So Young; Son, Kuk Hui; Sun, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) can induce alterations in blood viscoelasticity and cause red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of pump flow pulsatility on blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation. Methods Mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: a nonpulsatile pump group (n=6) or a pulsatile pump group (n=6). After ECC was started at a pump flow rate of 80 mL/kg/min, cardiac fibrillation was induced. Blood sampling was perfo...

  19. Vascular Steal Explains Early Paradoxical Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Cerebrovascular Response in Brain Regions with Delayed Arterial Transit Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Poublanc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during manipulation of inhaled carbon dioxide (CO2 can be used to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR and map regions of exhausted cerebrovascular reserve. These regions exhibit a reduced or negative BOLD response to inhaled CO2. In this study, we sought to clarify the mechanism behind the negative BOLD response by investigating its time delay (TD. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC MRI with the injection of a contrast agent was used as the gold standard in order to provide measurement of the blood arrival time to which CVR TD could be compared. We hypothesize that if negative BOLD responses are the result of a steal phenomenon, they should be synchronized with positive BOLD responses from healthy brain tissue, even though the blood arrival time would be delayed. Methods: On a 3-tesla MRI system, BOLD CVR and DSC images were collected in a group of 19 patients with steno-occlusive cerebrovascular disease. For each patient, we generated a CVR magnitude map by regressing the BOLD signal with the end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2, and a CVR TD map by extracting the time of maximum cross-correlation between the BOLD signal and PETCO2. In addition, a blood arrival time map was generated by fitting the DSC signal with a gamma variate function. ROI masks corresponding to varying degrees of reactivity were constructed. Within these masks, the mean CVR magnitude, CVR TD and DSC blood arrival time were extracted and averaged over the 19 patients. CVR magnitude and CVR TD were then plotted against DSC blood arrival time. Results: The results show that CVR magnitude is highly correlated to DSC blood arrival time. As expected, the most compromised tissues with the longest blood arrival time have the lowest (most negative CVR magnitude. However, CVR TD shows a noncontinuous relationship with DSC blood arrival time. CVR TD is well correlated to DSC blood arrival time

  20. Disparity in regional cerebral blood flow during electrically induced seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sestoft, D; Meden, P; Hemmingsen, R; Hancke, B; Madsen, P L; Friberg, L

    1993-01-01

    This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized on electroencepha......This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized on...... electroencephalography, the regional neuronal activity expressed as rCBF unexpectedly was markedly asymmetrical in one of the cases. These findings demonstrated that the 99mTc-HMPAO technique makes it possible to discriminate intraictal variation in cortical and subcortical activation between the hemispheres during...

  1. Subcutaneous blood flow in early male pattern baldness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) was measured by the 133Xe washout method in the scalp of 14 patients with early male pattern baldness. Control experiments were performed in 14 normal haired men matched for age. The SBF in the scalp of the normal individuals was about 10 times higher than previously reported SBF values in other anatomical regions. In patients with early male pattern baldness, SBF was 2.6 times lower than the values found in the normal individuals (13.7 +/- 9.6 vs 35.7 +/- 10.5 ml/100 g/min-1). This difference was statistically significant (p much less than 0.001). A reduced nutritive blood flow to the hair follicles might be a significant event in the pathogenesis of early male pattern baldness

  2. Pulmonary blood flow distribution measured by radionuclide computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distributions of pulmonary blood flow per unit lung volume were measured in sitting patients with a radionuclide computed tomography (RCT) by intravenously administered Tc-99m macroaggregates of human serum albumin (MAA). Four different types of distribution were distinguished, among which a group referred as type 2 had a three zonal blood flow distribution as previously reported (West and co-workers, 1964). The pulmonary arterial pressure (Pa) and the venous pressure (Pv) were determined in this group of distribution. These values showed satifactory agreements with the pulmonary artery pressure (Par) and the capillary wedged pressure (Pcw) measured by Swan-Ganz catheter in eighteen supine patients. Those good correlations enable to establish a noninvasive methodology for measurement of pulmonary vascular pressures

  3. Cerebral autoregulation control of blood flow in the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Payne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This Brief provides a comprehensive introduction to the control of blood flow in the brain. Beginning with the basic physiology of autoregulation, the author goes on to discuss measurement techniques, mathematical models, methods of analysis, and relevant clinical conditions, all within this single volume. The author draws together this disparate field, and lays the groundwork for future research directions. The text gives an up-to-date review of the state of the art in cerebral autoregulation, which is particularly relevant as cerebral autoregulation moves from the laboratory to the bedside. Cerebral Autoregulation will be useful to researchers in the physical sciences such as mathematical biology, medical physics, and biomedical engineering whose work is concerned with the brain. Researchers in the medical sciences and clinicians dealing with the brain and blood flow, as well as industry professionals developing techniques such as ultrasound, MRI, and CT will also find this Brief of interest.

  4. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzari, M; Simonutti, M; Degardin, J; Sahel, J-A; Fink, M; Paques, M; Atlan, M

    2016-08-01

    We performed noninvasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (∼30 microns diameter) over 400×400  pixels with a spatial resolution of ∼8 microns and a temporal resolution of ∼6.5  ms. PMID:27472604

  5. Regulation of the skeletal muscle blood flow in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan; Saltin, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    hyperaemia whereas the role of ATP remains uncertain due to lack of specific purinergic receptor blockers for human use. The purpose of this review is to address the interaction between vasodilator systems and to discuss the multiple proposed roles of ATP in human skeletal muscle blood flow regulation......In humans, skeletal muscle blood flow is regulated by an interaction between several locally formed vasodilators including nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins. In plasma, ATP is a potent vasodilator that stimulates the formation of NO and prostaglandins and very importantly can offset local...... sympathetic vasoconstriction. ATP is released into plasma from erythrocytes and endothelial cells and the plasma concentration increases in both the feeding artery and the vein draining the contracting skeletal muscle. Adenosine also stimulates the formation of NO and prostaglandins, but the plasma adenosine...

  6. Subcutaneous blood flow in early male pattern baldness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemp, P.; Peters, K.; Hansted, B.

    1989-05-01

    The subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) was measured by the /sup 133/Xe washout method in the scalp of 14 patients with early male pattern baldness. Control experiments were performed in 14 normal haired men matched for age. The SBF in the scalp of the normal individuals was about 10 times higher than previously reported SBF values in other anatomical regions. In patients with early male pattern baldness, SBF was 2.6 times lower than the values found in the normal individuals (13.7 +/- 9.6 vs 35.7 +/- 10.5 ml/100 g/min-1). This difference was statistically significant (p much less than 0.001). A reduced nutritive blood flow to the hair follicles might be a significant event in the pathogenesis of early male pattern baldness.

  7. Quantification of complex blood flow using real-time in vivo vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per;

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative method for distinguishing complex from non-complex flow patterns in ultrasound is presented. A new commercial BK Medical ultrasound scanner uses the Transverse Oscillation vector flow technique for visualising flow patterns in real-time. In vivo vector flow data of the blood flow...... ultrasound. From the same data the mean standard deviation of the flow angles (MSTDA) were calculated and compared to the expert evaluations. Comparison between the combined experts evaluations and the MSTDA was performed. Using linear regression analysis, a correlation coefficient of 0.925 was found....... The upper and lower bounds for a 95% confidence interval of 0.974 and 0.792 respectively, were calculated. The MSTDA was below 25 for the common carotid artery and above 25 for the carotid bulb. Thus, the MSTDA value can distinguishing complex flow from non-complex flow and can be used as the basis...

  8. Cerebral blood flow and mental processes in schizophrenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Liddle, P F; Friston, K.J.; Frith, C D; Frackowiak, R S

    1992-01-01

    The patterns of cerebral blood flow associated with three syndromes of schizophrenic symptoms are compared with the loci of cerebral activation in normal subjects during the performance of mental processes implicated in the three syndromes. The psychomotor poverty syndrome, which has been shown to involve a diminished ability to generate words, is associated with decreased perfusion of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at a locus which is activated in normal subjects during the internal gene...

  9. Myocardial blood flow and metabolism in left ventricular ischemic dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis

    1995-01-01

    Due to its inherent truly quantitative capabilities, its noninvasive nature and its nondestructive characteristics, PET has emerged as a unique investigative tool for the assessment and quantification of myocardial blood flow and metabolism in man. The present thesis reviews some of the insights gained with the use of PET into the pathophysiology of regional left ventricular ischemic dysfunction. Chapters 1 and 2 dealt with definitions and specific issues pertinent to the pathophysiologic...

  10. Feasibility of patient specific aortic blood flow CFD simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Johan; Gårdhagen, Roland; Heiberg, Einar; Ebbers, Tino; Loyd, Dan; Länne, Toste; Karlsson, Matts

    2006-01-01

    Patient specific modelling of the blood flow through the human aorta is performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Velocity patterns are compared between computer simulations and measurements. The workflow includes several steps: MRI measurement to obtain both geometry and velocity, an automatic levelset segmentation followed by meshing of the geometrical model and CFD setup to perform the simulations follwed by the actual simulations. The computational results agree well with the measured data. PMID:17354898

  11. Determination of cerebral blood flow with the EMI CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) determinations were made in seven baboons and two patients with the EMI CT dedicated head scanner. The method for determining the CBF was tested and measurements were made during physiological states elicited by changes in pCO2 and depth of anaesthesia. The method has a number of advantages, particularly for assessing CBF responses to pCO2 changes. (author)

  12. Flow of red blood cells in capillary networks

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Ana; Teixeira, Lúcia; Leble, Vladimir; Lima, R.; Ribeiro, António E.; Dias, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the flow of red blood cells through a column packed with soda lime glass spheres with diameter of 337.5 micron (pore diameter 150 micron). The ratio between the average velocity of the RBCs and the average velocity of the carrying fluid (physiological saline) was close to 0.9. The RBCs migrated faster through the column than the carrying fluid mainly due to a hydrodynamic chromatographic effect.

  13. Influence of restoration adjustments on prefrontal blood flow

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaguri, Kenichi; Otsuka, Takero; Tsunashima, Hiroyuki; Shimazaki, Tateshi; Kubo, Kin-Ya; Onozuka, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine, after setting several restorations, the influence of adjusted occlusal interference during gum chewing on blood flow in the prefrontal area as determined using near-infrared spectroscopy. Material and methods The physiological rate was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) questionnaire. We selected 16 patients who desired prosthetic restorative treatment on the lateral dentition, and eight healthy volunteers. Subjects were divided into thr...

  14. CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW AND METABOLISM IN ANXIETY AND ANXIETY DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Roy J.

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are some of the commonest psychiatric disorders and anxiety commonly co-exists with other psychiatric conditions. Anxiety can also be a normal emotion. Thus, study of the neurobiological effects of anxiety is of considerable significance. In the normal brain, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism (CMR) serve as indices of brain function. CBF/CMR research is expected to provide new insight into alterations in brain function in anxiety disorders and other psychiatric disord...

  15. Pulsatile ocular blood flow in subjects with sleep apnoea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Nowak, Michal S.; Jurowski, Piotr; Gos, Roman; Prost, Marek E.; Smigielski, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to determine the correlation between pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) and sleep apnoea syndrome (SAS). Material and methods Patients were recruited from those who underwent polysomnography in the “Sleep Unit” of the physiology department (Medical University, Lodz, Poland). A total of 52 Caucasian patients, 34 with SAS and 18 age- and gender-matched controls, were included in the study. Comprehensive ophthalmic examination included the pulsatile ocular b...

  16. Interpretation of Doppler blood flow velocity waveforms using neural networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Baykal, N; Reggia, J. A.; Yalabik, N.; Erkmen, A.; Beksac, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    Doppler umbilical artery blood flow velocity waveform measurement is used in perinatal surveillance for the evaluation of pregnancy status. There is an ongoing debate on the predictive value of Doppler measurements concerning the critical effect of the selection of parameters for the evaluation of Doppler output. In this paper, we describe how neural network methods can be used both to discover relevant classification features and subsequently to classify patients. Classification accuracy var...

  17. Modeling study of terminal transients of blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiukhina, Elena S.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2016-04-01

    In spite of growing body of experimental and theoretical results on blood flow (BF) patterns under the continuously sustained circulation, much less is known about BF dynamics under the exceptional, but still important cases of venous or arterial occlusion used in medical probes. Since these conditions finally lead to complete or nearly complete stop of red blood cells (RBC) motion, we term it as TTBF, being the Terminal Transients of Blood Flow. An extreme case of such transients is the ultimate extinction of BF after the stopping of heart contractions, during which it is governed by gravitation, some vascular-originated propulsion mechanisms, and, possibly, by RBC aggregation. Quite little is known about this process, while reports the detectable post-mortal motion of mice RBC during at least 2 hours. In our work we present the modeling study of TTBF patterns due to gravitational forces. We present the minimalistic model configuration of vasculature in order to simulate what happens immediately after the pumping of blood has been stopped. Our main findings are concerned to reversal of arterial BF, as well as to duration and non-monotonicity of transients.

  18. Simultaneous high-resolution pH and spectrophotometric recordings of oxygen binding in blood microvolumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oellermann, Michael; Pörtner, Hans-O; Mark, Felix C

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen equilibrium curves have been widely used to understand oxygen transport in numerous organisms. A major challenge has been to monitor oxygen binding characteristics and concomitant pH changes as they occur in vivo, in limited sample volumes. Here we report a technique allowing highly resolved and simultaneous monitoring of pH and blood pigment saturation in minute blood volumes. We equipped a gas diffusion chamber with a broad-range fibre-optic spectrophotometer and a micro-pH optode and recorded changes of pigment oxygenation along oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and pH gradients to test the setup. Oxygen binding parameters derived from measurements in only 15 μl of haemolymph from the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris showed low instrumental error (0.93%) and good agreement with published data. Broad-range spectra, each resolving 2048 data points, provided detailed insight into the complex absorbance characteristics of diverse blood types. After consideration of photobleaching and intrinsic fluorescence, pH optodes yielded accurate recordings and resolved a sigmoidal shift of 0.03 pH units in response to changing PO2 from 0 to 21 kPa. Highly resolved continuous recordings along pH gradients conformed to stepwise measurements at low rates of pH changes. In this study we showed that a diffusion chamber upgraded with a broad-range spectrophotometer and an optical pH sensor accurately characterizes oxygen binding with minimal sample consumption and manipulation. We conclude that the modified diffusion chamber is highly suitable for experimental biologists who demand high flexibility, detailed insight into oxygen binding as well as experimental and biological accuracy combined in a single setup. PMID:24436387

  19. Cerebral blood flow is reduced in patients with sepsis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between sepsis-induced CNS dysfunction and changes in brain blood flow remains unknown, and animal studies examining the influence of sepsis on cerebral blood flow (CBF) do not satisfactorily address that relationship. We measured CBF and cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2 in nine patients with sepsis syndrome using the 133Xe clearance technique. Mean CBF was 29.6 +/- 15.8 (SD) ml/100 g.min, significantly lower than the normal age-matched value in this laboratory of 44.9 +/- 6.2 ml/100 g.min (p less than .02). This depression did not correlate with changes in mean arterial pressure. Despite the reduction in CBF, the specific reactivity of the cerebral vasculature to changes in CO2 was normal, 1.3 +/- 0.9 ml/100 g.min/mm Hg. Brain blood flow is reduced in septic humans; the contribution of this reduction to the metabolic and functional changes observed in sepsis requires further study

  20. Predicting Blood Lactate Concentration and Oxygen Uptake from sEMG Data during Fatiguing Cycling Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras Ražanskas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of the relationship between electromyographic (EMG signals from vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles, collected during fatiguing cycling exercises, and other physiological measurements, such as blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. In contrast to the usual practice of picking one particular characteristic of the signal, e.g., the median or mean frequency, multiple variables were used to obtain a thorough characterization of EMG signals in the spectral domain. Based on these variables, linear and non-linear (random forest models were built to predict blood lactate concentration and oxygen consumption. The results showed that mean and median frequencies are sub-optimal choices for predicting these physiological quantities in dynamic exercises, as they did not exhibit significant changes over the course of our protocol and only weakly correlated with blood lactate concentration or oxygen uptake. Instead, the root mean square of the original signal and backward difference, as well as parameters describing the tails of the EMG power distribution were the most important variables for these models. Coefficients of determination ranging from R2 = 0:77 to R2 = 0:98 (for blood lactate and from R2 = 0:81 to R2 = 0:97 (for oxygen uptake were obtained when using random forest regressors.

  1. Advances of blood oxygen-level dependent MRI in muscular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOLD-fMRI has been applied to muscular system to observe muscular pathophysiological change after performing a task and show the characteristics of muscle perfusion. This paper mainly introduces the scanning sequence, common tasking methods, such as cuff compression, excise, oxygen and drug, etc. It also introduces clinical study of perfusion reserve of muscular tissue with abnormal blood vessels. (authors)

  2. Resistance exercise with different volumes: blood pressure response and forearm blood flow in the hypertensive elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito AF

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aline de Freitas Brito,1 Caio Victor Coutinho de Oliveira,2 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos,1 Amilton da Cruz Santos1 1Physical Education Department, 2Research Laboratory for Physical Training Applied to Performance and Health, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, Brazil Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of two sessions of resistance exercise with different volumes on post-exercise hypotension, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance in hypertensive elderly subjects.Methods: The study was conducted with ten hypertensive elderly (65±3 years, 28.7±3 kg/m2 subjected to three experimental sessions, ie, a control session, exercise with a set (S1, and exercise with three sets (S3. For each session, the subjects were evaluated before and after intervention. In the pre-intervention period, blood pressure, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance were measured after 10 minutes of rest in the supine position. Thereafter, the subjects were taken to the gym to perform their exercise sessions or remained at rest during the same time period. Both S1 and S3 comprised a set of ten repetitions of ten exercises, with an interval of 90 seconds between exercises. Subsequently, the measurements were again performed at 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 minutes of recovery (post-intervention in the supine position.Results: Post-exercise hypotension was greater in S3 than in S1 (systolic blood pressure, −26.5±4.2 mmHg versus −17.9±4.7 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure, −13.8±4.9 mmHg versus −7.7±5 mmHg, P<0.05. Similarly, forearm blood flow and forearm vascular resistance changed significantly in both sessions with an increase and decrease, respectively, that was more evident in S3 than in S1 (P<0.05.Conclusion: Resistance exercises with higher volume were more effective in causing post-exercise hypotension, being accompanied by an increase in forearm blood flow and a reduction of forearm vascular

  3. Cerebral blood flow and metabolic abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review I summarize observations of PET and SPECT studies about cerebral blood flow and metabolic abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In very early AD flow or metabolism reduces first in the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus. This reduction may arise from functional deafferentation caused by primary neural degeneration in the remote area of the entorhinal cortex that is the first to be pathologically affected in AD. Then medial temporal structures and parietotemporal association cortex show flow or metabolic reduction as disease processes. The reason why flow or metabolism in medial temporal structures shows delay in starting to reduce in spite of the earliest pathological affection remains to be elucidated. It is likely that anterior cingulate gyrus is functionally involved, since attention is the first non-memory domain to be affected, before deficits in language and visuospatial functions. However few reports have described involvement in the anterior cingulate gyrus. Relationship between cerebral blood flow or metabolism and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype has been investigated. Especially, the APOEε4 allele has been reported to increase risk and to lower onset age as a function of the inherited dose of the ε4 allele. Reduction of flow or metabolism in the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus has been reported even in presymptomatic nondemented subjects who were cognitively normal and had at least a single ε4 allele. On the contrary the relation of ε4 allele to the progression rate of AD has been controversial from neuroimaging approaches. PET and SPECT imaging has become to be quite useful for assessing therapeutical effects of newly introduced treatment for AD. Recent investigations observed significant regional flow increase after donepezil hydrochloride treatment. Most of these observations have been made by applying computer assisted analysis of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection or statistical parametric mapping

  4. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... to baseline ventilation, whereas CMR(glu) increased. CONCLUSION: In patients with acute bacterial meningitis, we found variable levels of CBF and cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity, a low a-v DO(2), low cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose, and a cerebral lactate efflux. In these patients, a...... ventilation strategy guided by jugular bulb oximetry and/or repeated CBF measurements may be more optimal in terms of cerebral oxygenation than a strategy aiming at identical levels of P(a)CO(2) for all patients....

  5. Relationship between cardiac function and resting cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M; Jensen, Lars T; Krabbe, Katja;

    2014-01-01

    and cardiac output were measured in 31 healthy subjects 50-75 years old using magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Mean values of CBF, cardiac output and cardiac index were 43.6 ml per 100 g min(-1), 5.5 l min(-1) and 2.7 l min(-1) m(-2), respectively, in males, and 53.4 ml per 100 g min(-1), 4.3 l......Although both impaired cardiac function and reduced cerebral blood flow are associated with ageing, current knowledge of the influence of cardiac function on resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of cardiac function on CBF. CBF...... min(-1) and 2.4 l min(-1) m(-2), respectively, in females. No effects of cardiac output or cardiac index on CBF or structural signs of brain ageing were observed. However, fractional brain flow defined as the ratio of total brain flow to cardiac output was inversely correlated with cardiac index (r(2...

  6. Alteration of blood glucose levels in the rat following exposure to hyperbaric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynan, Mirit; Mullokandov, Michael; Krinsky, Nitzan; Biram, Adi; Arieli, Yehuda

    2015-09-01

    Findings regarding blood glucose level (BGL) on exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) are contradictory. We investigated the influence of HBO on BGL, and of BGL on latency to central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). The study was conducted on five groups of rats: Group 1, exposure to oxygen at 2.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), 90 min/day for 7 days; Group 2, exposure to oxygen once a week from 2 to 6 ATA in increments of 1 ATA/wk, for a period of time calculated as 60% of the latency to CNS-OT (no convulsions); Group 3, exposure to 6 ATA breathing a gas mixture with a pO2 of 0.21; Group 4, received 10 U/kg insulin to induce hypoglycemia before exposure to HBO; Group 5, received 33% glucose to induce hyperglycemia before exposure to HBO. Blood samples were drawn before and after exposures for measurement of BGL. No change was observed in BGL after exposure to oxygen at 2.5 ATA, 90 min/day for 7 days. BGL was significantly elevated after exposure to oxygen at 6 ATA until the appearance of convulsions, and following exposure to 4, 5, and 6 ATA without convulsions (P HBO exposure on elevation of BGL, starting at 4 ATA. This implies that BGL may serve as a marker for the generation of CNS-OT. PMID:26183474

  7. Blood gas analyzer utility in evaluating oxygen kinetics of the aqueous humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ersan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To measure the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 and carbon dioxide (PCO2 and the pH of aqueous humor (AH and arterial blood samples from rabbits using a blood gas analyzer. Methods: Twenty New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized intramuscularly with ketamine and xylazine and were then allowed to breathe room air. Using a gas blood analyzer, arterial blood and AH samples were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH. Results: The mean arterial blood pressure was 87.14 ± 15.0 mmHg. The mean blood and AH PO2 were 95.18 ± 11.76 mmHg and 88.83 ± 9.92 mmHg, the mean blood and AH PCO2 were 25.86 ± 5.46 mmHg and 29.50 ± 5.36 mmHg, and the mean blood and AH pH were 7.38 ± 0.06 and 7.33 ± 0.09, respectively. Conclusion: Conclusions: The blood gas analyzer was easily employed to evaluate the aqueous humor in rabbits. When comparing the results of studies evaluating aqueous PO2, care should be taken to determine the methods used in these studies.

  8. PERFUSION PRESSURE AND RENAL BLOOD FLOW: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND DIFFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G. Musso, MD. PhD.1,2, Manuel Vilas, MD.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of renal perfusion pressure (RPP and renal blood flow (RBF are usually confused, but although they are intimately related, they are not strictly the same. RPP originates from the minute cardiac volume and is, therefore, the cause of RBF, which generates glomerular filtration and as a consequence, also induces the urinary flow. On the other hand, whereas RPP can be subject to fluctuations, the same happens to RBF though at a much lower level due to the existence of physiological mechanisms, such as self-regulation of the flow and tubule-glomerular feed-back. We conclude that there is a dependence of the RBF in relation with RPP, with the former acting as the final responsible of the glomerular filtration.

  9. Effect of TIPS placement on portal and splanchnic arterial blood flow in 4-dimensional flow MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Zoran [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Roessle, Martin; Schultheiss, Michael [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Gastroenterology, Freiburg (Germany); Euringer, Wulf; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Salem, Riad; Barker, Alex; Carr, James; Collins, Jeremy D. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To assess changes in portal and splanchnic arterial haemodynamics in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a non-invasive, non-contrast imaging technique. Eleven patients undergoing TIPS implantation were enrolled. K-t GRAPPA accelerated non-contrast 4D flow MRI of the liver vasculature was applied with acceleration factor R = 5 at 3Tesla. Flow analysis included three-dimensional (3D) blood flow visualization using time-resolved 3D particle traces and semi-quantitative flow pattern grading. Quantitative evaluation entailed peak velocities and net flows throughout the arterial and portal venous (PV) systems. MRI measurements were taken within 24 h before and 4 weeks after TIPS placement. Three-dimensional flow visualization with 4D flow MRI revealed good image quality with minor limitations in PV flow. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant increase in PV flow (562 ± 373 ml/min before vs. 1831 ± 965 ml/min after TIPS), in the hepatic artery (176 ± 132 ml/min vs. 354 ± 140 ml/min) and combined flow in splenic and superior mesenteric arteries (770 ml/min vs. 1064 ml/min). Shunt-flow assessment demonstrated stenoses in two patients confirmed and treated at TIPS revision. Four-dimensional flow MRI might have the potential to give new information about the effect of TIPS placement on hepatic perfusion. It may explain some unexpected findings in clinical observation studies. (orig.)

  10. Effect of TIPS placement on portal and splanchnic arterial blood flow in 4-dimensional flow MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess changes in portal and splanchnic arterial haemodynamics in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a non-invasive, non-contrast imaging technique. Eleven patients undergoing TIPS implantation were enrolled. K-t GRAPPA accelerated non-contrast 4D flow MRI of the liver vasculature was applied with acceleration factor R = 5 at 3Tesla. Flow analysis included three-dimensional (3D) blood flow visualization using time-resolved 3D particle traces and semi-quantitative flow pattern grading. Quantitative evaluation entailed peak velocities and net flows throughout the arterial and portal venous (PV) systems. MRI measurements were taken within 24 h before and 4 weeks after TIPS placement. Three-dimensional flow visualization with 4D flow MRI revealed good image quality with minor limitations in PV flow. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant increase in PV flow (562 ± 373 ml/min before vs. 1831 ± 965 ml/min after TIPS), in the hepatic artery (176 ± 132 ml/min vs. 354 ± 140 ml/min) and combined flow in splenic and superior mesenteric arteries (770 ml/min vs. 1064 ml/min). Shunt-flow assessment demonstrated stenoses in two patients confirmed and treated at TIPS revision. Four-dimensional flow MRI might have the potential to give new information about the effect of TIPS placement on hepatic perfusion. It may explain some unexpected findings in clinical observation studies. (orig.)

  11. Response of Retinal Blood Flow to Systemic Hyperoxia as Measured with Dual-Beam Bidirectional Doppler Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Werkmeister, René M.; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Gröschl, Martin; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There is a long-standing interest in the study of retinal blood flow in humans. In the recent years techniques have been established to measure retinal perfusion based on optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the present study we used a technique called dual-beam bidirectional Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to characterize the effects of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood flow. These data were compared to data obtained with a laser Doppler velocimete...

  12. Predictors of cerebral blood flow in patients with and without anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzage, Matthew T; Bush, Adam M; Choi, Soyoung; Nederveen, Aart J; Václavů, Lena; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2016-04-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common cause of stroke in childhood and results primarily from a mismatch of cerebral oxygen supply and demand rather than arterial obstruction. However, resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) has not been examined in the general African American population, in whom obesity, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, and diminished cerebrovascular reserve capacity are common. To better understand the underlying physiological substrate upon which SCD is superimposed, we measured CBF in 32 young (age 28 ± 10 yr), asymptomatic African American subjects with and without sickle cell trait (n= 14). To characterize the effects of chronic anemia, in isolation of sickle hemoglobin we also studied a cohort of 13 subjects with thalassemia major (n= 10), dyserythropoetic anemia (n= 1), or spherocytosis (n= 2). Blood was analyzed for complete blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis, cell free hemoglobin, and lactate dehydrogenase. Multivariate regression analysis showed that oxygen content was the strongest predictor of CBF (r(2)= 0.33,P< 0.001). CBF declined rapidly in the second and third decades of life, but this drop was explained by reductions in cerebral gray matter. However, age effects persisted after correction for brain composition, possibly representing microvascular impairment. CBF was independent of viscosity, hemoglobin S%, and body mass index. Hyperoxia resulted in reduced CBF by 12.6% (P= 0.0002), and CBF changes were proportional to baseline oxygen content (r(2)= 0.16,P= 0.02). These data suggest that these hemoglobin subtypes do not alter the normal CBF regulation of the balance of oxygen supply and demand. PMID:26796758

  13. ASSESSMENT OF VERTEBRAL ARTERIES BLOOD FLOW SPECTRAL DOPPLER INDICES IN COMPARISON WITH INTERNAL AND COMMON CAROTID ARTERIES BLOOD FLOW SPECTRAL DOPPLER INDICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mazaher

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrobasilar insufficiency is the cause of cerebrovascular accidents in 20% of cases. There are few reports regarding spectral Doppler indices (SDIs of vertebral arteries (VAs normal blood flow. The objective of this study was to provide basic reference data about SDIs of VAs normal blood flow separately and in comparison with internal carotid arteries (ICAs and common carotid arteries (CCAs normal blood flows SDIs. This cross-sectional study performed on 70 normal patients. Color Doppler sonography (CDS and spectral Doppler sonography (SDS of right and left VAs (RVA and LVA, right and left CCAs (RCCA and LCCA, right and left ICAs (RICA and LICA, were performed. The mean PSV, EDV, and RI values of RVA blood flow were as 41.60 ± 9.6 cm/s, 14.60 ± 3.7 cm/s and 0.65 ± 0.06, and the mean PSV, EDV and RI values of LVA blood flow were as 42.20 ± 10.2 cm/s, 15.20 ± 4.2 cm/s, and 0.64 ± 0.05, respectively. There was not statistically significant difference between the mean PSV, EDV and RI values of RVA and LVA blood flows. The mean PSV and EDV values of VAs blood flows were significantly lower than the values of CCAs and ICCAs blood flows, respectively. The mean RI value of VAs blood flows was significantly lower than the mean RI Value of CCAs blood flows, but there was not statistically significant difference between the mean RI value of VAs blood flows and the mean RI value of ICAs blood flows.

  14. Evaluation of the Extension of the Cerebral Blood Flow and its Main Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Gersten, A

    1999-01-01

    Among the major factors controlling the cerebral blood flow (CBF) - cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), cerebral metabolism, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), and cardiac output, the effect of PaCO2 is peculiar in being independent of autoregulatory CBF mechanisms and it allows to explore the full range of the CBF. We have developed a simple physical model, and have derived a simple four parameter formula, relating the CBF to PaCO2. The parameters can be extracted in an easy way, directly from the experimental data. With this model five experimental data sets of human, rats, baboons and dogs were well fitted. The same type of parametrization was also used successfully for fitting experimental data of PaO2 of dogs. We have also looked on the dependence of the parameters on other factors and were able to evaluate their dependence on the mean arterial blood pressure.

  15. Vascular Function and Regulation of Blood Flow in Resting and Contracting Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin

    no single compound can explain exercise hyperemia and indicates that any condition associated with reduced oxygen delivery needs to be investigated independently. Physical activity can attenuate or even counteract the effects of essential hypertension and aging on vascular function and exercise...... importance. The present work provides new insight in to vasodilator interactions important for exercise hyperemia and sheds light on mechanisms important for vascular function and regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow in essential hypertension (high blood pressure) and aging and identifies mechanisms by...... which physical activity affects the function of the vascular network. Conclusion The vasodilators ATP and adenosine stimulate the nitric oxide and prostanoid systems in skeletal muscle. These vasodilator interactions may, at least in part, explain the central role of nitric oxide and prostanoids in the...

  16. Effects of exercise training with blood flow restriction on blood pressure in medicated hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio Cezar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of non-pharmacological approaches to hypertension (HA is critical for both prevention and treatment. This study examined the hemodynamic and biochemical responses of medicated hypertensive women to resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (vascular occlusion. Twenty-three women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: High intensity strength training (n = 8; low-intensity resistance exercise with occlusion (n = 8; and control (n = 7. The first two groups underwent eight weeks of training performed twice a week, including three series of wrist flexion exercises with or without vascular occlusion. The exercised with occlusion group showed pre- to post-test reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and double product, whereas the other groups showed no significant hemodynamic changes. In conclusion, resistance exercise during 8 weeks was effective in lowering blood pressure in medicated hypertensive subjects.

  17. Protection of spermatogenisis during X-irradiation and chemotherapy by temporary blood flow interruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an animal model the possibility was tested to interrupt the blood flow to the testis temporarily and repeatedly. Subsequently, it was investigated whether blood flow interuption during irradiation or during cytostatic drug administration could limit the damage induced to the spermatogonial stem cells. The effect of repeatedly blood flow interruptions on spermatogenesis was evaluated. (author). 192 refs.; 15 figs.; 11 tabs

  18. Mucosal/submucosal blood flow in the gut wall determined by local washout of 133Xenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Olsen, J; Bülow, J; Hage, E; Edelfors, Sven

    1991-01-01

    . Therefore the initial slope of the washout was used for measuring blood flow rate. Blood flow rate was simultaneously measured by microsphere entrapment technique. There was an excellent correlation between the blood flow rate determined by the two techniques the correlation coefficient R being 0.89 in the...

  19. Resistance exercise with different volumes: blood pressure response and forearm blood flow in the hypertensive elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Brito AF; Oliveira CV; Brasileiro-Santos MS; Santos AC

    2014-01-01

    Aline de Freitas Brito,1 Caio Victor Coutinho de Oliveira,2 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos,1 Amilton da Cruz Santos1 1Physical Education Department, 2Research Laboratory for Physical Training Applied to Performance and Health, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa, Brazil Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of two sessions of resistance exercise with different volumes on post-exercise hypotension, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular re...

  20. Effects of terlipressin on patients with sepsis via improving tissue blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xudong; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yaoli; Zhou, Jian; Zhu, Yu; Jiang, Dongpo; Liu, Liangming; Li, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Terlipressin (TP), an analog of arginine vasopressin, was reported beneficial in sepsis patients when combined use with norepinephrine (NE), but the undetermined action, mechanism, and safety limited it to become the first-line vasopressor for sepsis patients. With 32 septic shock patients, we investigated the effects of a small dose of TP (1.3 μg/kg/h) on hemodynamic, tissue blood flow, vital organ function, acid-base balance, and coagulation function to systemically know the beneficial effect and side effects of TP on septic shock. The results showed that as compared with the single use of NE group (17 patients), a small dose of TP (1.3 μg/kg/h) in combination with NE continuous infusion, except for decreasing the mortality and NE requirement, could better improve and stabilize the hemodynamics, improve the tissue blood flow, increase the blood oxygen saturation and urine volume, and decrease the lactate level and complication rate (47% versus 82.3% in NE group). Meanwhile, TP + NE did not induce blood bilirubin increase and platelet count decrease and hyponatremia that vasopressin has. The results show that low dose of TP continuous infusion can help NE achieve the good resuscitation effect by improving tissue blood flow, stabilizing hemodynamics, and protecting organ function in septic shock patients while did not induce the side effects that high dose or bonus of TP or vasopressin induced. Low dose of TP may be recommended as the first-line vasopressor for refractory hypotension after severe sepsis or septic shock. PMID:26253455

  1. Structured Tree Outflow Condition for Blood Flow in Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufsen, Mette

    1998-11-01

    Modeling blood flow and especially propagation of the pulse wave in the systemic arteries is of interests to the medical society because of the significance of the dicrotic wave. The pulse wave propagating along the larger arteries is reflected because of tapering and branching of the vessels, as well as the peripheral resistance, which is mainly stemming from the smaller arteries and arterioles. In order to avoid artificial reflections it is important to determine a boundary condition, representing the smaller arteries and arterioles, which is physiologically correct. In this work we have proposed a boundary condition based on a structured tree model. The result will be compared both with other modeling approaches as well as with results from measurements of flow and pressure at a number of locations along the larger arteries. The model for the larger arteries is based on the axisymmetrical Navier Stokes equations where the blood is assumed Newtonian and incompressible and the vessels are tapering. In the structured tree the model is based on a linearization of the axisymmetrical Navier-Stokes equations. The reason for setting up a structured tree is that the smaller arteries consist of an almost binary tree. Furthermore, the role of the smaller arteries is to allow blood perfusion of specific tissues. This is done in a structured and optimal way such that the smaller arteries cover the tissue evenly using a minimization principle.

  2. The effect of euglucaemic hyperinsulinaemia on forearm blood flow and glucose uptake in the human forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugmann, A; Lind, L; Andersson, P E; Millgård, J; Hänni, A; Berne, C; Lithell, H

    1998-12-01

    Insulin-mediated stimulation of blood flow to skeletal muscle has been proposed to be of major importance for insulin-mediated glucose uptake. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative importance of blood flow and glucose extraction as determinants of insulin-mediated glucose uptake in the human forearm. Forearm blood flow (FBF), glucose extraction and oxygen consumption were evaluated for 100 min during the euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (92 mU/l) in nine healthy subjects. FBF was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Forearm glucose uptake increased sevenfold during the hyperinsulinaemia (P<0.001). Forearm glucose extraction showed a minor increase during the first 10 min of hyperinsulinaemia, but the most marked increase took place between 10 and 20 min (+170%). Thereafter, only a minor further increase was seen. During the first 10 min of hyperinsulinaemia FBF was unchanged. Thereafter, FBF increased steadily to a plateau reached after 60 min (+50%, P<0.001). A close relationship between whole body glucose uptake and FBF was seen at the end of the clamp (r = 0.75, P<0.02), but at this time the relationship between whole body glucose uptake and forearm glucose extraction was not significant. The modest increase in O2 consumption seen at the beginning of the clamp (+19%) was not related to FBF during the early phase of the clamp. In conclusion, the early course of insulin-mediated glucose uptake in the human forearm was mainly due to an increase in glucose extraction. However, with time the insulin-mediated increase in blood flow increased in importance and after 100 min of hyperinsulinaemia FBF was the major determinant of glucose uptake. PMID:9934819

  3. Validation of an optical flow algorithm to measure blood flow waveforms in arteries using dynamic digital x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, Kawal; Lambrou, Tryphon; Hawkes, David J.; Hamilton, George; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2000-06-01

    We have developed a weighted optical flow algorithm for the extraction of instantaneous blood velocity from dynamic digital x-ray images of blood vessels. We have carried out in- vitro validation of this technique. A pulsatile physiological blood flow circuit was constructed using sections of silicone tubing to simulate blood vessels with whole blood as the fluid. Instantaneous recording of flow from an electromagnetic flow meter (EMF) provided the gold standard measurement. Biplanar dynamic digital x-ray images of the blood vessel with injection of contrast medium were acquired at 25 fps using a PC frame capture card. Imaging of a Perspex calibration cube allowed 3D reconstruction of the vessel and determination of true dimensions. Blood flow waveforms were calculated off-line on a Sun workstation using the new algorithm. The correlation coefficient between instantaneous blood flow values obtained from the EMF and the x-ray method was r equals 0.871, n equals 1184, p less than 0.0001. The correlation coefficient for average blood flow was r equals 0.898, n equals 16, p less than 0.001. We have successfully demonstrated that our new algorithm can measure pulsatile blood flow in a vessel phantom. We aim to use this algorithm to measure blood flow clinically in patients undergoing vascular interventional procedures.

  4. Mapping of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen using dynamic susceptibility contrast and blood oxygen level dependent MR imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO2) has been suggested to be analogous to PET-derived CMRO2 and therefore may be used for detection of viable tissue at risk for infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR-derived CMRO2 mapping in acute ischemic stroke in relation to established diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging. In 23 patients (mean age 63 ± 18.7 years, 11 women) with imaging findings for acute ischemic stroke, relative oxygen extraction fraction was calculated from quantitative transverse relaxation times (T2, T2*) and relative cerebral blood volume using a quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) approach in order to detect a local increase of deoxyhemoglobin. Relative CMRO2 (rCMRO2) maps were calculated by multiplying relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) by cerebral blood flow, derived from PWI. After co-registration, rCMRO2 maps were evaluated in comparison with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps. Mean rCMRO2 values in areas with diffusion-restriction or TTP/ADC mismatch were compared with rCMRO2 values in the contralateral tissue. In tissue with diffusion restriction, mean rCMRO2 values were significantly decreased compared to perfusion-impaired (17.9 [95 % confidence interval 10.3, 25.0] vs. 58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3]; P < 0.001) and tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (68.2 [95 % confidence interval 61.4, 75.0]; P < 0.001). rCMRO2 in perfusion-impaired tissue showed no significant change compared to tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3] vs. 66.7 [95 % confidence interval 53.4, 73.4]; P = 0.34). MR-derived CMRO2 was decreased within diffusion-restricted tissue and stable within perfusion-impaired tissue, suggesting that this technique may be adequate to reveal different pathophysiological stages in acute stroke. (orig.)

  5. Mapping of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen using dynamic susceptibility contrast and blood oxygen level dependent MR imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersing, Alexandra S.; Schwaiger, Benedikt J. [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ankenbrank, Monika; Toth, Vivien; Bauer, Jan S.; Zimmer, Claus [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Insa [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany); Kooijman, Hendrik [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Wunderlich, Silke [Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Preibisch, Christine [Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Technical University Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    MR-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization (CMRO{sub 2}) has been suggested to be analogous to PET-derived CMRO{sub 2} and therefore may be used for detection of viable tissue at risk for infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} mapping in acute ischemic stroke in relation to established diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging. In 23 patients (mean age 63 ± 18.7 years, 11 women) with imaging findings for acute ischemic stroke, relative oxygen extraction fraction was calculated from quantitative transverse relaxation times (T2, T2*) and relative cerebral blood volume using a quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) approach in order to detect a local increase of deoxyhemoglobin. Relative CMRO{sub 2} (rCMRO{sub 2}) maps were calculated by multiplying relative oxygen extraction fraction (rOEF) by cerebral blood flow, derived from PWI. After co-registration, rCMRO{sub 2} maps were evaluated in comparison with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps. Mean rCMRO{sub 2} values in areas with diffusion-restriction or TTP/ADC mismatch were compared with rCMRO{sub 2} values in the contralateral tissue. In tissue with diffusion restriction, mean rCMRO{sub 2} values were significantly decreased compared to perfusion-impaired (17.9 [95 % confidence interval 10.3, 25.0] vs. 58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3]; P < 0.001) and tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (68.2 [95 % confidence interval 61.4, 75.0]; P < 0.001). rCMRO{sub 2} in perfusion-impaired tissue showed no significant change compared to tissue in the contralateral hemisphere (58.1 [95 % confidence interval 50.1, 70.3] vs. 66.7 [95 % confidence interval 53.4, 73.4]; P = 0.34). MR-derived CMRO{sub 2} was decreased within diffusion-restricted tissue and stable within perfusion-impaired tissue, suggesting that this technique may be adequate to reveal different pathophysiological stages in acute stroke. (orig.)

  6. Effects of anesthetic agents on brain blood oxygenation level revealed with ultra-high field MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ciobanu

    Full Text Available During general anesthesia it is crucial to control systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation levels. However, anesthetic agents can affect cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a drug-dependent manner, while systemic hemodynamics is stable. Brain-wide monitoring of this effect remains highly challenging. Because T(2*-weighted imaging at ultra-high magnetic field strengths benefits from a dramatic increase in contrast to noise ratio, we hypothesized that it could monitor anesthesia effects on brain blood oxygenation. We scanned rat brains at 7T and 17.2T under general anesthesia using different anesthetics (isoflurane, ketamine-xylazine, medetomidine. We showed that the brain/vessels contrast in T(2*-weighted images at 17.2T varied directly according to the applied pharmacological anesthetic agent, a phenomenon that was visible, but to a much smaller extent at 7T. This variation is in agreement with the mechanism of action of these agents. These data demonstrate that preclinical ultra-high field MRI can monitor the effects of a given drug on brain blood oxygenation level in the absence of systemic blood oxygenation changes and of any neural stimulation.

  7. Membrane oxygenator heat exchanger failure detected by unique blood gas findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Justin L

    2014-03-01

    Failure of components integrated into the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, although rare, can bring about catastrophic results. One of these components is the heat exchanger of the membrane oxygenator. In this compartment, unsterile water from the heater cooler device is separated from the sterile blood by stainless steel, aluminum, or by polyurethane. These areas are glued or welded to keep the two compartments separate, maintaining sterility of the blood. Although quality control testing is performed by the manufacturer at the factory level, transport presents the real possibility for damage. Because of this, each manufacturer has included in the instructions for use a testing procedure for testing the integrity of the heat exchanger component. Water is circulated through the heat exchanger before priming and a visible check is made of the oxygenator bundle to check for leaks. If none are apparent, then priming of the oxygenator is performed. In this particular case, this procedure was not useful in detecting communication between the water and blood chambers of the oxygenator. PMID:24779125

  8. Development of a Flexible Implantable Sensor for Postoperative Monitoring of Blood Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Cannata, Jonathan M.; Chilipka, Thomas; Yang, Hao-Chung; Han, Sukgu; Ham, Sung W.; Rowe, Vincent L.; Weaver, Fred A; Shung, K. Kirk; Vilkomerson, David

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a blood flow measurement system using Doppler ultrasound flow sensors fabricated of thin and flexible piezoelectric-polymer films. These flow sensors can be wrapped around a blood vessel and accurately measure flow. The innovation that makes this flow sensor possible is the diffraction-grating transducer. A conventional transducer produces a sound beam perpendicular to its face; therefore, when placed on the wall of a blood vessel, the Doppler shift in the backscattered ultr...

  9. Experimental study on therapy of ultraviolet blood irradiation and oxygenation in acute soman intoxication in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-qing; MU Shi-jie; ZHANG Xiao-di; CHEN Rui; XIA Ai-jun; LIANG Xin; HAI Chun-xu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapy effect of ultraviolet blood irradiation and oxygenation(UBIO) on blood AChe activity and lung injury due to acute soman intoxication in rabbits. Methods :Forty rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, intoxication group, routine therapy group and UBIO therapy group. Blood AChe activity and artery blood gas were analyzed 2 h after intoxication. ACP and AKP activities in BALF were determined respectively. Results:Blood AChe activity in intoxication group was lower than that in normal control group (P<0. 05). BALF ACP and AKP activities in intoxication group were higher than that in normal control group. Blood AChe activities in UBIO therapy group increased and were higher than that in intoxication and routine therapy groups. Compared with intoxication group, BALF ACP and AKP activities were decreased (P<0.05) in UBIO therapy group,while artery blood pH, PaO2 and SaO2 increased (P<0.05). Conclusion: UBIO therapy can elevate blood AChe activity and alleviate lung injury induced by soman intoxication. So it may be a new way to treat acute soman intoxication.

  10. Alteration of pulmonary blood flow in tetralogy of Fallot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulmonary blood distribution was examined in 17 patients with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) pre and postoperatively with macroaggregates of 99mTC-labeled human serum albumin. Most of the patients with TOF demonstrated an abnormal preoperative distribution pattern. The abnormalities included not only an unbalanced distribution between the right and left lungs but also a maldistribution of peripheral vessels in each lung. The right/left lung counts ratio and pulmonary peripheral index (calculated in order to express the severity of peripheral maldistribution) correlated neither to the diameter nor the cross-sectional area of either right or left pulmonary arteries which were measured angiographically. Postoperatively, the pulmonary blood was shunted toward the developed side of the lung which further contributed to maldistribution of blood flow and unbalanced pulmonary growth. Since the patients with an unbalanced pulmonary blood distribution demonstrated a higher right ventricular pressure one year after the operation, a palliative operation facilitating the growth of the underdeveloped side of the lung might be considered as an effective procedure to precede intracardiac repair. (author)

  11. Effects of intramedullary reaming and nailing on blood flow in rat femora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indrekvam, K.; Lekven, J.; Engesaeter, L.B.; Langeland, N. (University of Bergen, Surgical Research Laboratory, Orthopedic Division, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen (Norway))

    1992-01-01

    The right femur in 40 rats was reamed, and in 40 others it was additionally nailed. Analysis of bone blood flow was performed by the distribution of radiolabeled microspheres at different postoperative time intervals. Blood-flow measurements were accompanied by analyses of hydroxyproline and calcium contents. Immediately after reaming, the blood flow of the diaphyseal part of the femur was reduced to approximately one third of that of the intact femur, whereas the contents of hydroxyproline and calcium were reduced by 10 percent. Within 1 week, the blood flow was normal. This study provides evidence that the presence of a nail does not interfere with the restoration of bone blood flow. Restoration of blood flow in bone apparently is a rapid process. The replacement of hydroxyproline and calcium contents seemed to be linked to flow, as no increase in these constituents were found until the blood flow had approximated the level of the intact femur. (au).

  12. The influence of ultraviolet blood irradiation and oxygenation on oxygen free radicals metabolism in rabbits with soman intoxication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of ultraviolet blood irradiation and oxygenation (UBIO) on the metabolism of oxygen free radicals in rabbits with acute soman intoxication. Methods: One hundred rabbits were randomly divided into 5 groups: normal control group, intoxication group, routine therapy group, UBIO therapy group and combined therapy group. After 14 d, the concentration of malondiadehyde (MDA) and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathionperoxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT)and total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) in serum were determined respectively. Results: Compared with the normal control group, the concentration of MDA and activity of CAT in the intoxication group were significantly higher (P < 0. 05 ), but SOD, GSH-Px activity and T-AOC were significantly lower (P<0.05). After UBIO or combined therapy, serum MDA level was significantly lower in comparison with intoxication group (P<0.05), but the activity of SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and T AOC were higher than intoxication group(P<0.05). Conclusion: There is an obvious oxygen free radical injury in rabbits with acute soman intoxication. UBIO can improve the antioxidation ability of rabbits and may be applied to treat acute soman intoxication as adjunctive therapy.

  13. Quantifying Blood Flow in the DIEP Flap: An Ultrasonographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The maximum weight of tissue that a single perforator can perfuse remains an important question in reconstructive microsurgery. An empirically based equation, known as the flap viability index (FVI), has been established to determine what weight of tissue will survive on one or more perforators. The equation is FVI = Sum d(n)^4/W, where d is the internal diameter of each perforator and W is the final weight of the flap. It has been shown that if FVI exceeds 10, total flap survival is likely, but if under 10, partial flap necrosis is probable. The aim of this study was to measure absolute flow rates in deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap pedicles and assess correlation with the determinants of the FVI, perforator diameter and flap weight. Methods: Color Doppler ultrasound was used to quantify arterial flow in 10 consecutive DIEP flap pedicles 24 hours after anastomosis. Results: In single-perforator DIEP flaps, flow rate was highly correlated with perforator diameter (r = 0.82, P = 0.01). Mean arterial flow rate was significantly reduced in DIEP flaps with 2 or more perforators (6 vs 38 cm3/min; P perforator size is a critical factor in optimizing blood flow in perforator-based free tissue transfer. Further research is required to understand the flow dynamics of perforator flaps based on multiple perforators. However, surgeons should be cognizant that a single large perforator may have substantially higher flow rates than multiple small perforators. Routine FVI calculation is recommended to ensure complete flap survival. PMID:25426345

  14. Testing of models of flow-induced hemolysis in blood flow through hypodermic needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangsheng; Kent, Timothy L; Sharp, M Keith

    2013-03-01

    Hemolysis caused by flow in hypodermic needles interferes with a number of tests on blood samples drawn by venipuncture, including assays for metabolites, electrolytes, and enzymes, causes discomfort during dialysis sessions, and limits transfusion flow rates. To evaluate design modifications to address this problem, as well as hemolysis issues in other cardiovascular devices, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based prediction of hemolysis has potential for reducing the time and expense for testing of prototypes. In this project, three CFD-integrated blood damage models were applied to flow-induced hemolysis in 16-G needles and compared with experimental results, which demonstrated that a modified needle with chamfered entrance increased hemolysis, while a rounded entrance decreased hemolysis, compared with a standard needle with sharp entrance. After CFD simulation of the steady-state velocity field, the time histories of scalar stress along a grid of streamlines were calculated. A strain-based cell membrane failure model and two empirical power-law blood damage models were used to predict hemolysis on each streamline. Total hemolysis was calculated by weighting the predicted hemolysis along each streamline by the flow rate along each streamline. The results showed that only the strain-based blood damage model correctly predicted increased hemolysis in the beveled needle and decreased hemolysis in the rounded needle, while the power-law models predicted the opposite trends. PMID:23419169

  15. On the shear-thinning and viscoelastic effects of blood flow under various flow rates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bodnár, Tomáš; Sequeira, A.; Prosi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 217, č. 11 (2011), s. 5055-5067. ISSN 0096-3003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : non - Newtonian * viscoelastic * Oldroyd-B * finite-volume * blood flow Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.317, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009630031000799X

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow Behavior in Modelled Stenosed Vessels with Different Severities

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Mehrabi; Saeed Setayeshi

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the behavior of blood flow in the stenosed vessels. Blood is modelled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid which is based on the power law viscosity model. A numerical technique based on the finite difference method is developed to simulate the blood flow taking into account the transient periodic behaviour of the blood flow in cardiac cycles. Also, pulsatile blood flow in the stenosed vessel is based on the Womersley model, and fluid flow in the lumen region is gove...

  17. History of International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Kanno, Iwao; Reivich, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    dealing with CBF and metabolism were arranged, and the fast growing research led to a demand for a specialized journal. In this scientific environment, the International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism (ISCBFM) and its official Journal of Cerebral Metabolism were established in 1981 and has...... grown within the society and is now an integrated part. The ISCBFM is a sound society, and support of young scientists is among its goals. Several awards have been established. Other activities including summer schools, courses, satellite meetings, and Gordon conferences have contributed to the success...

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow in psychiatry: Application to clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the following sections, the authors describe aspects of the xenon-133 inhalation technique as it has been modified in their lab, as well as a number of considerations and prerequisites for setting up such a facility. The authors also discuss the processes by which they technically and clinically validated the methods used. Several case studies follow along with descriptions of the approaches they are taking in investigating psychiatric illnesses with rCBF. Since the concept of a relation between brain functional activity, metabolism, and blood flow has a long history, both in theory and in practice, they first briefly review some of this history and some of the principles involved

  19. A dynamic model of renal blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1994-01-01

    of renal autoregulation, a broad band perturbation of the arterial pressure was employed in both the simulations and the experiments. Renal blood flow and tubular pressure were used as response variables in the comparison. To better approximate the situation in vivo where a large number of individual...... observations. However, in combination they reproduced most of hte features of the various transfer functions calculated from the experimental data. The major discrepancy was the presence of a bimodal distribution of the admittance phase in the simulations. This is not consistent with most of the experimental...

  20. Methylphenidate decreases regional cerebral blood flow in normal human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Fowler, J.S.; Ferrieri, R.; Schlyer, D.J.; Alexoff, D.; Warner, D.; Wolf, A.P.; Pappas, N.; King, P.; Wong, C. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Hitzemann, R.J. (SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Lieberman, J. (Hillside Hospital, Glen Oaks, NY (United States))

    1994-01-01

    To assess the effects of methylphenidate (MP) on cerebral blood flow (CBF), 5 healthy males were studied using [sup 15]O-water and positron emission tomography before and after MP (0.5mg/kg iv). MP significantly decreased whole brain CBF at 5-10 minutes (25[+-]11%) and at 30 minutes (20[+-]10%) after its administration. Decrements in CBF were homogeneous throughout the brain (regional decrements 23-30%) and probably reflect the vasoactive properties of MP. The vasoactive properties of MP should be considered when prescribing this drug chronically and/or when giving it to subjects with cerebrovascular compromise.

  1. Changes in human cerebral blood flow and myocardial blood flow during mental stress measured by dual positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mental stress causes a substantial sympathetic response, thus increasing myocardial blood flow (MBF). However, the effects of mental stress on global cerebral blood flow (CBF) have not been elucidated. In this study, changes in CBF and MBF in relation to mental stress were measured by a dual positron emission tomography system that can measure CBF and MBF simultaneously. CBF and MBF were measured in 10 healthy men with O-15 labeled water at rest (baseline) and during the performance of a mental task that required subtraction of 7s serially from a four-digit number. Baseline global CBF and values obtained during the mental activity were 0.42±0.05 and 0.45±0.06 ml/ml/min (mean±SD), respectively. Baseline MBF and values obtained during mental activity were 0.61±0.12 and 1.09±0.58 ml/ml/min, respectively. Percent changes in CBF and MBF during mental stress were 6±11% and 78±73%, respectively. No significant difference was observed in arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) level between the mental stress and baseline conditions. MBF, blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline increased significantly during mental stress. Sympathetic stimulation is reported to cause cerebral vasoconstriction and reduce CBF in animals. Although such a sympathetic response was observed in relation to mental stress, no significant change in CBF was observed in our subjects. (author)

  2. 14 CFR 25.1443 - Minimum mass flow of supplemental oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... may not be less than the flow required to maintain, during inspiration, a mean tracheal oxygen partial pressure of 149 mm. Hg. when breathing 15 liters per minute, BTPS, and with a maximum tidal volume of 700... not be less than the flow required to maintain, during inspiration, a mean tracheal oxygen...

  3. Volumetric liquid flow measurement through thermography to simulate blood flow in an artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Mora, Carlos; Rabell-Montiel, Adela; González-Vega, Arturo; Gutierrez-Juarez, Gerardo

    2015-09-01

    Encouraged to improve the procedure to measure the blood flow in cases with peripheral artery disease using thermography, that allows to evaluate several arteries simultaneously, it was developed an alternative to measure the volumetric flow through a conduit, it was studied the variation of the thermal energy computed from thermal images due to changes in flow at different temperatures, and it was observed that the measurement is not strongly influenced by the emissivity of the conduit, the ambient temperature and humidity, but that is necessary to establish an adequate calibration of the camera to can use it as measurement instrument.

  4. Endogenous endothelium-derived relaxing factor opposes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and supports blood flow to hypoxic alveoli in anesthetized rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Sprague, R. S.; Thiemermann, C; Vane, J R

    1992-01-01

    Agents that inhibit nitric oxide synthesis augment hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. In an animal model of unilateral alveolar hypoxia, we investigated the hypothesis that endogenous endothelium-derived relaxing factor/nitric oxide opposes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and supports blood flow to hypoxic alveoli, resulting in a reduction in arterial oxygen tension (PO2). In pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits, unilateral alveolar hypoxia was produced by ventilation of one lung with 100% ...

  5. Skin temperature and subcutaneous adipose blood flow in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Bülow, J; Madsen, J

    1980-01-01

    correlation between skin temperature and ATBF. In the range from 25 to 37 degrees CATBF increased 9% of the control flow on average per centigrade increase in skin temperature. ATBF at the control side was uninfluenced by the contralateral variations in skin temperature. Although no better correlation could......The abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) was measured bilaterally by the 133Xe washout method. At one side of the skin (epicutaneous) temperature was varied with a temperature blanket, the other side served as control. There was a significant (P less than 0.001) positive...... be demonstrated between ATBF and subcutaneous temperature than between ATBF and skin temperature, arguments are presented in favour of the hypothesis that ATBF is influenced by the subcutaneous temperature rather than via reflexes from the skin. Infiltration of the 133Xe depots with 20 microgram...

  6. Holographic laser Doppler imaging of microvascular blood flow

    CERN Document Server

    Magnain, C; Boucneau, T; Simonutti, M; Ferezou, I; Rancillac, A; Vitalis, T; Sahel, J A; Paques, M; Atlan, M

    2014-01-01

    We report on local superficial blood flow monitoring in biological tissue from laser Doppler holographic imaging. In time averaging recording conditions, holography acts as a narrowband bandpass filter, which, combined with a frequency shifted reference beam, permits frequency selective imaging in the radiofrequency range. These Doppler images are acquired with an off axis Mach Zehnder interferometer. Microvascular hemodynamic components mapping is performed in the cerebral cortex of the mouse and the eye fundus of the rat with near-infrared laser light without any exogenous marker. These measures are made from a basic inverse method analysis of local first order optical fluctuation spectra at low radiofrequencies, from 0 Hz to 100 kHz. Local quadratic velocity is derived from Doppler broadenings induced by fluid flows, with elementary diffusing wave spectroscopy formalism in backscattering configuration. We demonstrate quadratic mean velocity assessment in the 0.1 to 10 millimeters per second range in vitro ...

  7. The effects of graded changes in oxygen and carbon dioxide tension on coronary blood velocity independent of myocardial energy demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Lindsey M; Stembridge, Mike; Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Foster, Glen E

    2016-08-01

    In humans, coronary blood flow is tightly regulated by microvessels within the myocardium to match myocardial energy demand. However, evidence regarding inherent sensitivity of the microvessels to changes in arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen is conflicting because of the accompanied changes in myocardial energy requirements. This study aimed to investigate the changes in coronary blood velocity while manipulating partial pressures of end-tidal CO2 (Petco2) and O2 (Peto2). It was hypothesized that an increase in Petco2 (hypercapnia) or decrease in Peto2 (hypoxia) would result in a significant increase in mean blood velocity in the left anterior descending artery (LADVmean) due to an increase in both blood gases and energy demand associated with the concomitant cardiovascular response. Cardiac energy demand was assessed through noninvasive measurement of the total left ventricular mechanical energy. Healthy subjects (n = 13) underwent a euoxic CO2 test (Petco2 = -8, -4, 0, +4, and +8 mmHg from baseline) and an isocapnic hypoxia test (Peto2 = 64, 52, and 45 mmHg). LADVmean was assessed using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Hypercapnia evoked a 34.6 ± 8.5% (mean ± SE; P < 0.01) increase in mean LADVmean, whereas hypoxia increased LADVmean by 51.4 ± 8.8% (P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regressions revealed that both mechanical energy and changes in arterial blood gases are important contributors to the observed changes in LADVmean (P < 0.01). In summary, regulation of the coronary vasculature in humans is mediated by metabolic changes within the heart and an inherent sensitivity to arterial blood gases. PMID:27233761

  8. Dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon, during winter flow conditions, 1991 and 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, V.J.

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the winter period, November through April, wastewater treatment plants in the Tualatin River Basin discharge from 10,000 to 15,000 pounds per day of biochemical oxygen demand to the river. These loads often increase substantially during storms when streamflow is high. During the early winter season, when streamflow is frequently less than the average winter flow, the treatment plants discharge about 2,000 pounds per day of ammonia. This study focused on the capacity of the Tualatin River to assimilat oxygen-demanding loads under winter streamflow conditions during the 1992 water year, with an emphasis on peak-flow conditions in the river, and winter-base-flow conditions during November 1992. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen throughout the main stem of the river during the winter remained generally high relative to the State standard for Oregon of 6 milligrams per liter. The most important factors controlling oxygen consumption during winter-low-flow conditions were carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and input of oxygen-depleted waters from tributaries. During peak-flow conditions, reduced travel time and increased dilution associated with the increased streamflow minimized the effect of increased oxygen-demanding loads. During the base-flow period in November 1992, concentrations of dissolved oxygen were consistently below 6 milligrams per liter. A hydrodynamic water-quality model was used to identify the processes depleting dissolved oxygen, including sediment oxygen demand, nitrification, and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand. Sediment oxygen demand was the most significant factor; nitrification was also important. Hypothetical scenarios were posed to evaluate the effect of different wastewater treatment plant loads during winter-base-flow conditions. Streamflow and temperature were significant factors governing concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the main-stem river.

  9. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology.

  10. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology. PMID:27358000

  11. Evaluation of the Effects of Acupuncture on Blood Flow in Humans with Ultrasound Color Doppler Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Shin; WATANABE, Masashi; Kusuyama, Hiroko; Nagase, Satoru; Seki, Takashi; Nakazawa, Toru; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging (CDI) can be used to noninvasively create images of human blood vessels and quantitatively evaluate blood flow in real-time. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of acupuncture on the blood flow of the peripheral, mesenteric, and retrobulbar arteries by CDI. Statistical significance was defined as P values less than 0.05. Blood flow in the radial and brachial arteries was significantly lower during needle stimulation on LR3 than before in healthy volunteer...

  12. The effects of flosequinan on regional blood flow in normal man.

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, R. A.; Woods, K. L.; Barnett, D B

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of 100 mg and 200 mg flosequinan on limb, hepatic and renal blood flow were investigated in 14 healthy male volunteers in a placebo controlled double-blind randomised three-way crossover study. 2. Heart rate, blood pressure, forearm blood flow and venous capacitance measured by volume plethysmography, were recorded sequentially over 4 h, after oral dosing. 3. Apparent hepatic and renal blood flows were estimated 2 h post-dose by indocyanine green dye clearance and clearance of ...

  13. Acrolein-Induced Increases in Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Are Coupled with Decreased Blood Oxygen Levels During Exposure in Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in individuals with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Recent studies link exposure to air pollution with reduced blood oxygen saturation suggesting that hypoxia is a potential me...

  14. MRI-based blood oxygen saturation measurements in infants and children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Vessel oxygen saturation can be determined with MR oximetry using an in vivo measurement of signal decay (T2) and the calibration curve relating T2 to blood oxygen saturation (%HbO2), where: 1/T2=1/T2O+K (1-%HbO2/100)2 and K is a constant parameter which correlates with measured fibrinogen levels. The ability to noninvasively measure %HbO2 in cardiac chambers and vessels has enormous potential in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Objective: The purpose of the study was to prospectively characterize the T2-%HbO2 relationship in infants where T2-%HbO2 is the realtionship between T2 and %HbO2 (blood oxygen saturation) expressed by the equation given above, and to determine whether adult values for K and T2O (where T2O is the T2 of fully oxygenated blood) can be extrapolated to pediatric patients with CHD. A second objective was to apply this method to calculate the %HbO2 in vivo using MR imaging in infants with CHD. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with CHD undergoing cardiac catheterization (9 male; 6 female), median age 8 months, were recruited for the calibration study. T2O and K were measured directly from blood samples, compared with the values estimated from adult population statistics, and plotted against hematocrit and fibrinogen, respectively. In four studies of infants with CHD, T2 measurements were converted to %HbO2 using the calibration curve. Results: The T2-%HbO2 relationship in infants correlated with the adult calibration statistics (1/T2O vs. hematocrit, r=0.77; K vs. fibrinogen, r=0.61). Our initial in vivo studies demonstrated that the MR oximetry reflected the expected oxygen saturations. Conclusion: Adult values for T2-%HbO2 calibration can be used to measure blood oxygen saturation in vivo in children with CHD. (orig.)

  15. Complex blood flow quantification using real-time in vivo vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Per, Haugaard;

    for the vector angle estimates was calculated for each box in every frame. For comparison three ultrasound experts evaluated the presence of complex flow in every box. The trial was blinded. For every sequence the mean standard deviation of the vector angle estimates were calculated for box1 {39......A new method to define and quantify complex blood flow is presented. The standard deviations of real-time in vivo vector flow angle estimates are used. Using vector flow ultrasound imaging both carotid bifurcations of two healthy volunteers were scanned. Scanning was performed with a 7.6 MHz linear...... transducer (8670, B-K Medical, Denmark) and a commercial vector flow ultrasound scanner (ProFocus 2202, B-K Medical). Eight video sequences of one cardiac cycle were obtained. In every frame boxes were placed to define the common carotid artery(box1) and the carotid bulb(box2). The standard deviation...

  16. Effects of Therapeutic Ultrasound on Intramuscular Blood Circulation and Oxygen Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Morishita, Katsuyuki; Karasuno, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Yuka; Morozumi, Kazunori; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Ito, Toshikazu; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to clarify the effects of therapeutic ultrasound on intramuscular local blood circulation (and oxygen dynamics) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Participants: The participants were 11 healthy males. Methods: All participants performed all three trials; (1) the ultrasound (US group), (2) without powered ultrasound (placebo group), and (3) rest (control group). Ultrasound was applied at 3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, and 100% duty cycle for 10 minutes. Evaluation index were...

  17. Two and Three Dimensional Blood Flow Simulations in Different Types of Blood Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balazs ALBERT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a synthesis of our results obtained on blood flow simulation in different types of blood vessels. We present first some remarks on the wall shear stress (WSS in the case of a human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA, and then we concentrate on the mechanical conditions which would lead to the “rupture” of the vascular vessel with aneurysm and implicitly to a possible stroke. We also make some investigations on the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect in arterioles. Considering an axial-symmetric reservoir full of blood and which is linked to an arteriole (with the same particular geometry, we have pointed out the concentration of the red blood cells in this arteriole towards the core of the vessel. To improve our work we have considered a real three-dimensional geometry, which is a serious jump versus our previous results, where only the axial-symmetric geometries were considered. In this respect we have reconsidered the case of a carotid artery stenosis with and without a stent.

  18. T2 and T2* measurements of fetal brain oxygenation during hypoxia with MRI at 3T: correlation with fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the oxygen saturation of blood in the fetal brain based on T2 and T2* measurements in a fetal sheep model. Five sheep fetuses were investigated during normoxia and hypoxia by 3T MRI. Multi-echo gradient-echo and turbo-spin-echo sequences were performed on the fetal brain. MR-determined oxygen saturation (MR-sO2) of blood in the fetal brain was calculated based on T2 and T2* values. Fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation (blood-sO2) was measured during the two experimental phases. The slope of MR-sO2 as a function of blood-sO2 was estimated and tested for compatibility using the one-sample t-test. During normoxia, mean values for carotid blood oxygen saturation were 67%, 83 ms for T2*, 202 ms for T2 and 96% for MR-sO2. During hypoxia, arterial blood oxygen saturation, T2* and calculated MR-sO2 decreased to 22%, 64 ms, and 68% respectively. The one-sample t-test revealed the slope to be significantly different from 0(T=5.023, df=4, P=0.007). It is feasible to perform quantitative T2 and T2* measurements in the fetal brain. MR-sO2 and fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation correlated significantly. However, based on these data a reliable quantification of fetal brain tissue oxygenation is not possible. (orig.)

  19. T2 and T2* measurements of fetal brain oxygenation during hypoxia with MRI at 3T: correlation with fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedegaertner, Ulrike; Adam, Gerhard [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Kooijman, Hendrik [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Andreas, Thomas; Beindorff, Nicola; Hecher, Kurt [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the oxygen saturation of blood in the fetal brain based on T2 and T2* measurements in a fetal sheep model. Five sheep fetuses were investigated during normoxia and hypoxia by 3T MRI. Multi-echo gradient-echo and turbo-spin-echo sequences were performed on the fetal brain. MR-determined oxygen saturation (MR-sO{sub 2}) of blood in the fetal brain was calculated based on T2 and T2* values. Fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation (blood-sO{sub 2}) was measured during the two experimental phases. The slope of MR-sO{sub 2} as a function of blood-sO{sub 2} was estimated and tested for compatibility using the one-sample t-test. During normoxia, mean values for carotid blood oxygen saturation were 67%, 83 ms for T2*, 202 ms for T2 and 96% for MR-sO{sub 2}. During hypoxia, arterial blood oxygen saturation, T2* and calculated MR-sO{sub 2} decreased to 22%, 64 ms, and 68% respectively. The one-sample t-test revealed the slope to be significantly different from 0(T=5.023, df=4, P=0.007). It is feasible to perform quantitative T2 and T2* measurements in the fetal brain. MR-sO{sub 2} and fetal arterial blood oxygen saturation correlated significantly. However, based on these data a reliable quantification of fetal brain tissue oxygenation is not possible. (orig.)

  20. Xenon-133 determination of muscle blood flow in electrical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xe-133 washout determination of muscle blood flow (MBF) was used to detect muscle ischemia in electrical injury of an experimental animal model and three patients. The control MBF of rabbit hindlimbs, which averaged 11.29 +- 1.07 cc/min/100 gm, was significantly reduced by electrical injury, to 5.82 +- 1.49 cc/min/100 gm (p less than 0.001). An electrical injury of 4,000 watt-seconds or greater was associated with uniform MBF less than 1.00 cc/min/100 gm and with histopathologic alterations of muscle necrosis. Thenar MBF less than 1.00 cc/min/100 gm in two patients was associated with muscle necrosis requiring distal arm amputation. The remaining patient with sequential muscle blood flows above this level had uneventful healing of hand electrical injuries. Xe-133 determination of MBF may be a useful objective technique to determine the extent of electrical injury in muscle