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Sample records for blood donation safe

  1. Improving Safe Blood Donation in Nigeria: The Roles of the Mass Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriji, Christian Chigozi

    2015-01-01

    The study discusses improving safe blood donation in Nigeria and the roles of the mass media in achieving same in Nigerian hospitals. In this regard, it answers the questions: What is blood? What is blood donation? And is safe blood donation adequate in Nigeria? Beyond the relevant answers given on the above questions, it also explains the roles…

  2. Blood donation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A blood donation is organised by the Cantonal Hospital of Geneva On Thursday 19 March 2009 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CERN RESTAURANT 2 Number of donations during the last blood donations :135 donors in July 2008 122 donors in November 2008 Let’s do better in 2009 !!! Give 30 minutes of your time to save lives...

  3. Blood Donation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Donating Blood > Donation Process Printable Version Donation Process View Video Getting Ready for Your Donation The ... worry about. Make a Donation Appointment The Donation Process Step by Step Donating blood is a simple ...

  4. Autologous blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2004-01-01

    Although preoperative autologous blood donation is employed in elective surgery, this is declining because of the increasingly safe allogeneic blood supply. However, it continues to be used because of the public's perception of allogeneic blood risks and increasing blood shortages. Patients may donate a unit of blood (450 ± 45 ml) as often as twice weekly, up to 72 hours before surgery. Preoperative autologous blood is most beneficial in procedures that cause significant blood loss. It has be...

  5. Donating Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... And be sure to drink plenty of water, milk, or other liquids. Before donating, you'll need to answer some questions about your medical history, and have your temperature, pulse, blood pressure, and ...

  6. BLOOD DONATION

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    A blood donation, organized by EFS (Etablissement Français du Sang) of Annemasse will take place On Wednesday 12 November 2008, from 8:30 to 16:00, at CERN Restaurant 2 If possible, please, bring your blood group Card.

  7. Types of Blood Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Double Red Cell Plasma Platelets Red Cells What blood donation type is best for me? **If you do not ... blood type, a whole blood donation is recommended** Blood Donation Types: Volunteer Donations The standard or most common type ...

  8. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000367.htm Blood donation before surgery To use the sharing features ... vessels. Several sources of blood are described here. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  9. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... choose to use a method called autologous blood donation. Autologous blood is blood donated by you, which you later receive if you need a transfusion during or after surgery. You can have blood ...

  10. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page Print this page Donating peripheral blood stem cells Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is a nonsurgical procedure to collect ... Donating bone marrow Donor experiences videos Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is one of two methods of ...

  11. [Blood donation in urban areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, F

    2013-05-01

    Medical and technical developments increase the difficulty to provide sufficient safe blood for all patients in developed countries and their sociodemographic and societal changes. Sufficient national blood supply remains a reached, however still actual, challenge. Tomorrow is prepared today: the management of blood donation programs both in line with these developments and with social marketing strategies is one of the keys to success. If the main components of this organization are well known (mobile blood drives in various appropriate environments, and permanent blood donation centers) their proportions in the whole process must evolve and their contents require adaptations, especially for whole blood donation in urban areas. We have to focus on the people's way of life changes related to increasing urbanization of the society and prominent position taken by very large cities. This requires targeting several goals: to draw the attention of the potential blood-giving candidate, to get into position to collect him when he will decide it, to give meaning and recognition to his "sacrifice" (give time rather than donate blood) and to give him desire and opportunity to come back and donate one more time. In this strategy, permanent blood centers in urban areas have significant potential for whole blood collection, highlighted by the decrease of apheresis technology requirements. This potential requires profound changes in their location, conception and organization. The concept of Maison Du Don (MDD) reflects these changes. PMID:23597586

  12. Blood Donation Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Akkas Ali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on Blood Donation Management System which is a web application with supporting mobile application aimed to serve as a communication tool between patients (who need blood and blood donor. To become members of the system, donors need to create their profiles by providing fundamental information like name, blood group, email address, password, and exact location from “Google Map”. In order to find out the exact location of a donor, Google Map is integrated with this application. The mobile application always updates the location of a donor. As a result, the system can automatically find a registered donor wherever he/she goes. Visitors can search blood donors from the home page by blood group and the place where blood is needed. The system will show the available donors along with their phone number, email address and mailing address through arranging them by nearest place and blood donation expire date. Visitors can send message to all donors through email but a member can send message using email and mobile phone. An appointment will be created only whenever a donor confirms that he/she will donate blood. Then the system will alert the donor before 12 hours of donation. Blood donors can also be searched from the mobile application, but this is only accessible for registered members. The goal of this paper is to reduce the complexity of the system to find blood donors in an emergency situation.

  13. Blood Donation Management System

    OpenAIRE

    K M Akkas Ali; Israt Jahan; Md. Ariful Islam; Md. Shafa-at Parvez

    2015-01-01

    This paper is focused on Blood Donation Management System which is a web application with supporting mobile application aimed to serve as a communication tool between patients (who need blood) and blood donor. To become members of the system, donors need to create their profiles by providing fundamental information like name, blood group, email address, password, and exact location from “Google Map”. In order to find out the exact location of a donor, Google Map is integrated with this app...

  14. What Happens to Donated Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood? Step 1: The Donation Donor registers Health history and mini physical are completed About 1 pint of blood and several small test tubes are collected from each donor The bag, test tubes and the donor record are labeled ...

  15. Sufficient blood, safe blood: can we have both?

    OpenAIRE

    Bönig Halvard; Schmidt Michael; Hourfar Kai; Schüttrumpf Jörg; Seifried Erhard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The decision in September 2011 in the UK to accept blood donations from non-practicing men who have sex with men (MSM) has received significant public attention. Will this rule change substantially boost the number of blood donations or will it make our blood less safe? Clearly, most European countries have a blood procurement problem. Fewer young people are donating, while the population is aging and more invasive therapies are requiring more blood. Yet if that was the reason for al...

  16. Potential donor segregation to promote blood donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Santana, Josefa D; Beerli-Palacio, Asunción

    2008-04-01

    This work is set in the field of social marketing and more specifically in the context of blood donation. Its principal objective focuses on segregating potential donors by using the inhibitors or barriers to a blood donation behaviour as criteria. Moreover, an analysis of the predisposition to donate blood, the intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for donating blood, and the incentives that may stimulate their donation conduct was conducted for each of the four identified groups. The results reveal that the four segments differ significantly in their predisposition to donate, in their motivations and in the incentives that encourage them to donate blood. PMID:18343199

  17. Donating Blood Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Communication, Outreach and Development Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Building 71 Room 3103 Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 More in Donating Blood Resources for You Consumers (Biologics) Healthcare Providers (Biologics) Industry (Biologics) About the Center for ...

  18. FAQ: Blood Donation and Organ Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mosquito Surveillance Software Health Education Public Service Videos Blood Donation & Organ Transplant Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... get infected with West Nile virus by donating blood? No. You cannot get West Nile virus by ...

  19. Temporal distribution of blood donations in three Brazilian blood centers and its repercussion on the blood supply

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Di Lorenzo Oliveira; Cesar de Almeida-Neto; Emily Jing Liu; Ester Cerdeira Sabino; Silvana Carneiro Leao; Paula Loureiro; David Wright; Brian Custer; Thelma Therezinha Goncalez; Ligia Capuani; Michael Busch; Anna Barbara de Freitas Carneiro Proietti

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Seasonal distribution of blood donation hinders efforts to provide a safe and adequate blood supply leading to chronic and persistent shortages. This study examined whether holidays, geographical area and donation type (community versus replacement) has any impact on the fluctuation of donations. METHODS: The numbers of blood donations from 2007 through 2010 in three Brazilian Retrovirus Epidemiological Donor Study II (REDS-II) participating centers were analyzed according to t...

  20. Special Blood Donation Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sugar Control Helps Fight Diabetic Eye Disease Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... donor's blood pressure could become low enough to cause symptoms, such as light-headedness or loss of ...

  1. Knowledge Attitude & Practices towards Voluntary Blood Donation among Medical Students in Barabanki

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Chopra; Nidhi Jauhari

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:  Blood Donation can save million lives. Voluntary blood donations are the cornerstone of a safe and adequate supply of blood and blood products. The safest blood donors are voluntary, non-remunerated blood donors from low-risk populations. Objectives: The present study was undertaken with an aim to understand the factors like knowledge, attitude and practices associated with voluntary blood donation among the medical students in a medical college. Materials & Methods: This i...

  2. STUDY ON KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE OF BLOOD DONORS TOWARDS BLOOD DONATION IN BIJAPUR DISTRICT

    OpenAIRE

    Himanshu Dilip; Prakash M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blood is the living force of our body and there is no substitute for it. It can only be replaced through blood donation. Blood donation can save millions of lives. Demand for safe blood is increasing every day because of increase in population, increased life-expectancy and urbanisation, trauma cases, major surgeries, patients with regular transfusion requirement like cases of thalassaemia, haemophilia and chemotherapy. To increase blood donor recruitment and retenti...

  3. Attitudes towards blood and living organ donations

    OpenAIRE

    Cabasés Hita, Juan Manuel; Errea, María

    2010-01-01

    We model the decision of whether or not to become a blood/living organ donor. The expected utility for becoming a donor is a function of the degree of altruism, the consumption of goods, the costs of donation, the very pleasure of giving, and the recipient’s utility associated to donation. Empirically, we observe differences in the expected costs and benefits from donation between blood and non-blood donors, and between individuals with different willingness to donate living organs. Looking a...

  4. Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Blood Donation in Rural Puducherry, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umakant G Shidam, Subitha Lakshminarayanan, Suman Saurabh, Gautam Roy

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Though the awareness regarding blood donation was high, the practice of voluntary blood donation was remarkably low. Education and motivation through various media is recommended to eliminate misbelieves and to reinforce positive attitudes towards blood donation."

  5. Sufficient blood, safe blood: can we have both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bönig Halvard

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The decision in September 2011 in the UK to accept blood donations from non-practicing men who have sex with men (MSM has received significant public attention. Will this rule change substantially boost the number of blood donations or will it make our blood less safe? Clearly, most European countries have a blood procurement problem. Fewer young people are donating, while the population is aging and more invasive therapies are requiring more blood. Yet if that was the reason for allowing non-practicing MSM to donate, clearly re-admission of some other, much larger populations that are currently deferred from donation should likewise be considered. As far as risks for blood safety are concerned, evidence has been provided that the current quality of infectious disease marker testing significantly mitigates against, although does not completely eradicate, risks associated with admission of donors with a high risk of carrying certain blood-transmissible agents. However, it could be argued that more effective recruitment of the non-donor pool, which is substantially larger than the group of currently ineligible donors, would be a better strategy. Recruitment of this group will benefit the availability of blood without jeopardizing the current excellent safety profile of blood.

  6. Attitude to blood donation in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Gader Abdel Galil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The blood donor system in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia depends on a combination of voluntary and involuntary donors. The aim of this study is to explore the attitudes, beliefs and motivations of Saudis toward blood donation. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at the Donor Centers at King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH Blood Bank and King Saud University Students Health Center, Riyadh. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to donors (n = 517 and nondonors (n = 316, between February and June 2008. All were males. Results: Ninety-nine percent of the respondents showed positive attitude toward blood donations and its importance for patients care, and object the importation of blood from abroad. Blood donors: Ninety-one percent agree that that blood donation is a religious obligation, 91% think no compensation should be given, 63% will accept a token gift, 34% do not object to donating six times/year and 67% did not mind coming themselves to the donor center to give blood. Nondonors: Forty-six percent were not asked to give blood and those who were asked mentioned fear (5% and lack of time (16% as their main deterrents. Reasons for rejection as donors include underweight and age (71% and health reasons (19%. Seventy-five percent objected to money compensation but 69% will accept token gifts and 92% will donate if a relative/friend needs blood. Conclusion: These results reflect an encouraging strong positive attitude toward blood donation. Further future planning with emphasis on educational/publicity programs and careful organization of donor recruitment campaigns could see the dream of total voluntary nonremunerated blood donations should not take long to be true.

  7. Blood donation and risk of polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Nyrén, Olof; Hultcrantz, Malin; Nielsen, Kaspar Rene; Pedersen, Ole B V; Björkholm, Magnus; Rostgaard, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that blood donors could have an increased risk of polycythemia vera (PV). However, no study has assessed whether frequent donors have a higher PV risk than less frequent donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: From the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT2......) database, we established a cohort of blood donors who had donated whole blood at least once between 1980 and 2012. Within this cohort we first assessed the risk of PV, comparing the donors to the general population using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs......). To assess the association between frequency of blood donation and risk of PV we then conducted a case-control study nested within the cohort, where we compared prior donation activity among donors who were diagnosed with PV and matched controls. Here odds ratios (ORs) were used as measures of...

  8. Blood Donation and Transfusion (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... donor, a person who has recently received the hepatitis B vaccine should wait 21 days before donating blood. At ... PARTY WHO HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN THE CREATION, PRODUCTION, PROMOTION OR MARKETING OF THE LICENSED MATERIALS BE ...

  9. "The Tramp", a blood donation propagandist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, J-J; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    The French pioneer for blood transfusion, who eventually organized the very early blood transfusion centers worldwide, went to imagine a scenario written in purpose for Charlie Chaplin, the unique character of "The Tramp" ("Charlot" in French). The movie Star was offered to feature a blood donation propagandist, and no longer the perpetual, well-known, "loser". This anecdote, besides being amusing, tells a lot on how Arnault Tzank encompassed all the difficulties in collecting blood enough to meet the demand, at all times; his proposal turns out to be extremely modern and questions nowadays marketing for blood donation. PMID:26778105

  10. Knowledge Attitude & Practices towards Voluntary Blood Donation among Medical Students in Barabanki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Chopra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  Blood Donation can save million lives. Voluntary blood donations are the cornerstone of a safe and adequate supply of blood and blood products. The safest blood donors are voluntary, non-remunerated blood donors from low-risk populations. Objectives: The present study was undertaken with an aim to understand the factors like knowledge, attitude and practices associated with voluntary blood donation among the medical students in a medical college. Materials & Methods: This is a cross sectional study with a sample size of 278. A pre-tested semi structured questionnaire was used to assess the level of knowledge, attitude and practices regarding blood donation in the study subjects. The data was analyzed by applying suitable statistical methods. Results:  The knowledge about the recommended age and interval of blood donation was 90 % & 48.9% respectively. Nearly 23% of students had ever donated blood and the majority of subjects (56.5% did not have an opportunity to donate blood. 75.54 % of students were willing to donate blood at the time of study. Conclusion: Creating the opportunities regarding the blood donation may lead to the achievement of goal of 100% non-remunerated voluntary blood donation.

  11. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Motivations towards Blood Donation among King Abdulaziz Medical City Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najd Alfouzan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blood donation is remarkably safe medical procedure. However, attitudes, beliefs, and level of knowledge may affect it. Objectives. To measure the level of knowledge regarding blood donation, find out positive and negative attitudes, identify the obstacles, and suggest some motivational factors. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC. Participants were selected by convenient nonrandom sampling technique. A self-created questionnaire was used for data collection. Results. The study included 349 individuals. About 45.8% of the participants claimed that they have a history of blood donation. Reported causes for not donating blood were blood donation not crossing their mind (52.4%, no time for donation (45%, and difficulty in accessing blood donation center (41.3%. Reported motivating factors for donating blood were one day off (81.4%, mobile blood donation caravans in public areas (79.1%, token gifts (31.5%, and finally paying money (18.9%. Conclusion. People in the age group 31–50 years, males, higher education and military were more likely to donate blood as well as People who showed higher knowledge level and positive attitude towards blood donation. More educational programs to increase the awareness in specific targeted populations and also to focus on some motivational factors are recommended.

  12. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Motivations towards Blood Donation among King Abdulaziz Medical City Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfouzan, Najd

    2014-01-01

    Background. Blood donation is remarkably safe medical procedure. However, attitudes, beliefs, and level of knowledge may affect it. Objectives. To measure the level of knowledge regarding blood donation, find out positive and negative attitudes, identify the obstacles, and suggest some motivational factors. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC). Participants were selected by convenient nonrandom sampling technique. A self-created questionnaire was used for data collection. Results. The study included 349 individuals. About 45.8% of the participants claimed that they have a history of blood donation. Reported causes for not donating blood were blood donation not crossing their mind (52.4%), no time for donation (45%), and difficulty in accessing blood donation center (41.3%). Reported motivating factors for donating blood were one day off (81.4%), mobile blood donation caravans in public areas (79.1%), token gifts (31.5%), and finally paying money (18.9%). Conclusion. People in the age group 31-50 years, males, higher education and military were more likely to donate blood as well as People who showed higher knowledge level and positive attitude towards blood donation. More educational programs to increase the awareness in specific targeted populations and also to focus on some motivational factors are recommended. PMID:25431668

  13. Attitude, belief and knowledge about blood donation and transfusion in saudi population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood donation and transfusion are remarkably safe medical procedures. However, attitudes, beliefs and level of knowledge associated with blood donation and transfusion may affect such procedures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the attitude, belief and knowledge about blood donation and transfusion in Saudi Population. The present study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University Hospitals, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A well structured Arabic questionnaire was used to asses the attitude, belief and knowledge regarding blood donation and transfusion. The sample consisted of 335 male (55%) and 274 female (45%); the majority of the sample (65.84%) were non-donors. These non-donors (78.98%) were between the ages of 15-30 years. The 88.5% of the people who participated in the study believed that blood donation was not harmful, 20% of them stated that they would refuse blood transfusion even if they were in need because of the risk of acquiring infectious disease. 84.5% preferred direct donation, (49%) of the sample stated that they would accept blood donation only from relatives, 55.1% believed that blood transfusion was safe. However, 11.6% claimed to have acquired infectious disease after blood transfusion, 58% female in addition to 11.34% male preferred to receive blood from female donor and 69.5% did not know if the blood banks were in need of blood or not and 17.4% believed that all surgical procedures require blood transfusion. Different fears, mistrust in hospital and lack of information may serve as an important issue to be addressed when developing donors recruitment programs or campaigns to clear misconceptions about blood donation. In addition, public should know that numerous screening measures are implemented to ensure that blood donation is safe for the donor and that transfusion of the donated blood is safe for the recipient. (author)

  14. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  15. The heritability of blood donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Birger; Axel, Skytthe; Rostgaard, Klaus;

    2015-01-01

    component analysis in a liability threshold model. RESULTS: A total of 274 MZ and 484 same-sex DZ twins age 17 to 27 years were identified as donors in SCANDAT. There was no difference between MZ and DZ twins with regard to age at first donation or number of donations. Casewise concordance rates were 0.......61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56-0.67) and 0.41 (95% CI, 0.36-0.47) in MZ and DZ twin pairs, respectively. Heritability analysis using the ACE model found that additive genetic and shared environmental effects accounted for 0.53 (95% CI, 0.33-0.73) and 0.28 (95% CI, 0.10-0.45) of the variance in...

  16. Blood Donation in Nigeria: Standard of the Donated Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Nwogoh Benedict; Awodu Omolade Augustina; Bazuaye Godwin Nosakhare

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to determine the basic hematological parameters of remunerated blood donors in Benin City and to compare them with those of voluntary donors. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary health facility in Benin City. Pretransfusion samples were obtained from blood bags after gentle mixing and analyzed for hematological parameters. Samples were analyzed using the hematology autoanalyzer MODEL SYSMEX KN21. Result: A total of 215...

  17. Results of the 24 July blood donation

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2013-01-01

    "Bravo! A huge success! A big thanks to everyone involved for their valuable participation this summer," says Ms. Troillet, the nurse responsible for the Transfusion Centre (CTS) at HUG.   During the 24 July blood donation, blood was collected from 109 of the 150 people who attended (including 53 new donors). This excellent result is particularly noteworthy, since blood supplies are at their lowest levels in hospitals during the summer season. The CERN Medical Service joins CTS in thanking all donors for their generous gesture and Ms. Vuattaz, manager of the restaurant NOVAE No. 2 and her team, for their collaboration. Upcoming blood donations:           Wednesday 16 October 2013           Thursday 3 April 2014           Wednesday 23 July 23 2014

  18. What happens to donated blood?

    OpenAIRE

    A. Robinson

    1995-01-01

    Pursuing their chief work--gathering, processing and distributing blood--the blood donor centres of the Canadian Red Cross Society follow standard operating procedures like those in place at the Ottawa centre. Here, recruitment staff and volunteers work to recruit donors to meet needs at a time when the number of donors is falling. When they register, donors must show proof of identity. Each receives a permanent identification number that is linked to the numbers assigned to the units of bloo...

  19. [Blood donation: Representations and issues associated with blood product collection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquier, B; Zegierman, A; Pelletier, B

    2015-08-01

    In order to answer to its aim of standardised self-sufficiency, the Établissement français du sang (main French national platform for blood donation) needs to know well the donors, what moves them, what motivates them, and the meaning that they give to their action. This knowledge allows the EFS to better understand the different sensitivities among donors, and therefore to improve the strategy regarding loyalty or/and newcomers. In this paper we follow, without attempting to be fully exhaustive, the evolution of the research regarding blood donation. The aim is to highlight the role played by social and historical representations regarding donation in general. In a given community, its norms, and its values influence both the image of donors as well as the meaning attached to the act itself of donation. Moreover, these norms have also influenced the way that research has tried to analyse this topic. The initial studies conducted in this field tried generally to understand the meaning and the symbolism attached to the act of blood donation. Later on, researchers started to focus on the assessment of notions such as generosity, and then solidarity. Nowadays, research is more focused on describing the population that gives blood. They are more scrutinised through their socio-demographic traits (who they are) than through the specific study of how they donate, the reasons behind the decision to act and the notion of satisfaction. PMID:26112917

  20. Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Blood Donation in Rural Puducherry, India

    OpenAIRE

    Umakant G Shidam, Subitha Lakshminarayanan, Suman Saurabh, Gautam Roy

    2015-01-01

    "Background: Blood and blood components save lives in various conditions. In India there is a need of about 8 million units of blood per year and only one-third of this is obtained from voluntary donors. Assessment of awareness and attitude regarding blood donation will help in designing effective health education strategy to improve blood donation. Objectives: To assess the knowledge and attitude regarding blood donation among individuals aged 18-60 years in rural Puducherry. Meth...

  1. Behavior disparities towards blood donation in Sikkim, India

    OpenAIRE

    Shenga Namgay; Pal Ranabir; Sengupta Subhabrata

    2008-01-01

    Background: The aim of the current research was to determine disparities in blood donation motives among the general mass of Sikkim. Aims: To identify the reasons for people donating and not donating blood voluntarily. Settings and Design: Population based cross-sectional study in Gangtok, East Sikkim. Materials and Methods: PARTICIPANTS: 300 adults by two-stage cluster sampling technique. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Correlates of attitudes towards blood donation. DATA ...

  2. a field experiment on blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Stutzer, Alois; Goette, Lorenz; Zehnder, Michael

    2006-01-01

    "In this paper, we propose a decision framework where people are individually asked to either actively consent or dissent to some pro-social behavior. We hypothesize that confronting individuals with the choice of engaging in a specific pro-social behavior contributes to the formation of issue-specific altruistic preferences while simultaneouslyninvolving a commitment. The hypothesis is tested in a large-scale field experiment on blood donation. We find that this ""active-decision"" intervent...

  3. [Marketing in the world of blood donation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigneault, Sylvie

    2007-05-01

    Public and non-profit organizations have long debated how marketing concepts and management styles apply to their sector of activity as they are largely derived from principles of consumerism and economic decision-making proper to the private sector. The arrival of marketing in the world of blood donation is no exception. The purpose of this article is to illustrate concretely how marketing techniques can contribute in achieving the objectives of a blood donation program: a marketing model that is adapted to the realities of blood donation in Quebec. Although types of marketing are as varied as the fields they are used in, the major marketing activities of this program fall under positioning, operational or relationship marketing. The process is presented in the form of a cycle that includes four major phases containing all marketing functions, that is, raising public awareness, acquiring a clientele, client retention and loyalty building, and establishing the relationship. Finally, the information and effective management of information are at the heart of the marketing process. In fact, research, understanding our customers and their expectations, and measuring our performance are essential for the success of any marketing initiative. PMID:17524694

  4. Blood donors' motivation and attitude to non-remunerated blood donation in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazeviciene Aurelija

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Soviet period, the blood donation system operated in Lithuania exclusively on a remunerative basis. After joining the EU, Lithuania committed itself to meeting the EU requirements to provide all consumers within its boundaries with safe blood products made from voluntary unpaid blood donations. However, the introduction of a non-remunerated donation system may considerably affect donors' motivation and retention. Thus the aim of the current research was to determine blood donation motives among the present donors and investigate their attitude towards non-remunerated donation. Methods A questionnaire survey of 400 blood donors. Survey data processed using SPSS statistical analysis package. Statistical data reliability checked using Fisher's exact test (p Results Paid donors comprised 89.9%, while non-paid ones made 10.1% of the respondents. Research findings show that 93 per cent of the paid donors give blood on a regular basis; while among the non-remunerated donors the same figure amounted merely to 20.6 per cent. The idea of the remuneration necessity is supported by 78.3 per cent of the paid donors, while 64.7 per cent of the non-remunerated respondents believe that remuneration is not necessary. The absolute majority of the paid donors (92% think they should be offered a monetary compensation for blood donation, while more than half of the non-remunerated donors (55.9 claim they would be content with a mere appreciation of the act. Provided no remuneration were offered, 28.44 per cent of the respondents would carry on doing it, 29.6 per cent would do it only in emergency, 29.6 per cent would donate blood merely for their family or friends, and 12.3 per cent would quit it completely. Conclusion Most respondents admitted having donated blood for the following reasons: willingness to help the ill or monetary compensation. Majority would consent to free blood donation only in case of emergency or as a family

  5. Study of Knowledge, Perceptions and Practices Related to Blood Donation Among the Healthcare Support Staff of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruq Mullah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a serious mismatch between demand and availability of blood in our country. One of the important factors motivating people for donating blood is their interaction with staff of health facilities including support staff. The knowledge and perceptions of support staff about blood donation have not been studied adequately. Methodology: Data was collected from randomly selected 100healthcare support staff using a pretested questionnaire. The questionnaire was based on prior qualitative analysis of perceptions of few of the potential participants. Results: 91% of the respondents felt that blood donation was not safe. Only 16% had adequate knowledge about eligibility for blood donation and all of them were females. 39% respondents had donated blood themselves and 79% had family history of blood donation. None of the socio-demographic factors except young age were found to be associated with better knowledge or positive perceptions about blood donation. Many among those who had donated blood also did not perceive blood donation as safe. Apprehension about blood being not properly used and not having been approached by anyone were commonest reasons for not donating. Conclusions: The knowledge about safety, eligibility and motivation for blood donation is very poor among the healthcare support staff. Efforts must be made to educate these employees and promote voluntary blood donation among them. Various incentives as suggested by employees themselves and several international bodies may be considered to promote blood donation among healthcare support staff.

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Motivations towards Blood Donation among King Abdulaziz Medical City Population

    OpenAIRE

    Najd Alfouzan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Blood donation is remarkably safe medical procedure. However, attitudes, beliefs, and level of knowledge may affect it. Objectives. To measure the level of knowledge regarding blood donation, find out positive and negative attitudes, identify the obstacles, and suggest some motivational factors. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC). Participants were selected by convenient nonrandom sampling technique. A self-created questionnair...

  7. FDA Recommends All Blood Donations Be Tested for Zika

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FDA Recommends All Blood Donations Be Tested for Zika Updated guidance provides further protection for U.S. blood ... entire blood supply be routinely screened for the Zika virus. In February, the FDA recommended testing of ...

  8. Public awareness of blood donation in Central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfotouh MA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1,2 Mohammed H Al-Assiri,1 Manar Al-Omani,2 Alwaleed Al Johar,3 Abdulaziz Al Hakbani,3 Ahmed S Alaskar1,2 1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, 2King Saud bin-Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, 3College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: In Saudi Arabia, voluntary donors are the only source of blood donation. The aim of this study was to assess the level of public knowledge and attitude toward blood donation in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Using a previously validated questionnaire that comprises 38 questions to assess the levels of knowledge, attitudes, and motivations towards blood donation, 469 Saudi adults who attended different shopping malls in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were surveyed. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify the significant predictors of blood donation, with the significance set at P<0.05. Results: Approximately half of all subjects (53.3% reported that they had previously donated blood, 39% of whom had donated more than once. The knowledge percentage mean score was 58.07%, denoting a poor level of knowledge, with only 11.9% reporting a good level of knowledge. The attitude percentage mean score towards donation was 75.45%, reflecting a neutral attitude towards donating blood, with 31.6% reporting a positive attitude. Donation was significantly more prevalent among males than females (66% versus 13.3%; P<0.001. After adjustment for confounders, a higher knowledge score (t=2.59; P=0.01, a higher attitude score (t=3.26; P=0.001, and male sex (t=10.45; P<0.001 were significant predictors of blood donation. An inability to reach the blood donation centers and a fear of anemia were the main reasons for females not donating blood (49.9% and 35.7%, respectively, whereas a lack of time was the main reason for males (59.5%. Conclusion: Prevalence of blood donation was less than satisfactory among the Saudi public, probably due to misconceptions, poor

  9. Hong Kong young people′s blood donation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Juliana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Similar to other developed countries, only 3% of the total population in Hong Kong donate blood (Hong Kong Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service 2003. More than 20% of annual donations come from youngsters aged 18-25. However, this category of donors has decreased gradually from 24.6% in 2004 to 22.9% in 2008. This study aims to examine the characteristics and intention of young blood donors versus nondonors in Hong Kong; and to explore the factors that may influence Hong Kong young people′s donation behavior. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study using questionnaire to solicit information from young people including both blood donors and non-donors. Results: It showed that more non-donors were underweight (26% than blood donors (16.9%. Blood donors demonstrated to have more knowledge on the usage of donated blood (87.2%. Nearly half of youngster admitted that they made use of donation as a means for blood testing (53.1% or free physical check-up (47.3%. Conclusions: Recruitment strategies should focus on the enhancement of health education programs related to blood and blood donation for young people to increase their awareness of blood and alleviate their misconceptions about blood donation.

  10. Knowledge, attitude and practice study about blood donation in the urban population of Yazd, Iran, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadeh Shahshahani, H; Yavari, M T; Attar, M; Ahmadiyeh, M H

    2006-12-01

    The most important aim of all blood transfusion centres is to recruit blood donors from low-risk groups of society to donate blood voluntarily and regularly to have a safe and continuous blood supply. The aim of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitude and practice regarding blood donation in the city of Yazd, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 1394 cases aged between 20 and 60 years were selected by clustering sampling method and asked to fill a specially formatted questionnaire. Data were analysed by analysis of variance, Sheffe test and t-test. Less than half of the population under study was aware about the appropriate age for blood donation and certain deferral criteria. Only 98% of them believed that blood donation is a moral duty with a spiritual reward and 38% of the population under study (60% of men and 16% of women) had donated blood at least once in the past. There was a direct relationship between knowledge and performance (P= 0.000). Women and young people had the least levels of knowledge and performance. Although the attitude level of women was high, their performance level was very low. Increase in the level of knowledge of women and young should be the topmost priority. Barriers to donation of blood by women who comprise half of the population should be studied and evaluated, and steps must be taken to remove or decrease them as far as possible. Advertisements should be with the aim of increasing the level of awareness of the general population regarding specific factors of blood donation and keeping fresh the idea of regular voluntary blood donations in their minds. PMID:17163871

  11. Blood donation and cardiovascular disease. Addressing the healthy donor effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peffer, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the possible protective effect of frequent blood donation on cardiovascular disease was studied. Previous research has shown that high iron stores could have damaging effects on developing cardiovascular disease, and that blood donation lowers iron stores. Lowering iron stores throug

  12. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  13. Characteristics of blood donors and factors associated with blood donation in Guangzhou

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Jian; 欧阳剑

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare the characteristics of blood donors and non-donors and to examine factors associated with donation, including motivators and barriers of blood donation in Guangzhou, China. Design: Cross-sectional survey using self-administered standardized structured questionnaires on both donors and non-donors. Setting: 12 mobile and 4 permanent blood donation stations in Guangzhou during the whole operation time. Participants: 500 blood donors who donated at th...

  14. Behavior disparities towards blood donation in Sikkim, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenga Namgay

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the current research was to determine disparities in blood donation motives among the general mass of Sikkim. Aims: To identify the reasons for people donating and not donating blood voluntarily. Settings and Design: Population based cross-sectional study in Gangtok, East Sikkim. Materials and Methods: PARTICIPANTS: 300 adults by two-stage cluster sampling technique. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Correlates of attitudes towards blood donation. DATA COLLECTION PROCEDURE: The data collection tool used for the study was a pre-tested structured interview schedule by which the principal investigator collected the data using interview technique. Statistical Analysis Used: Percentages and ODDS ratio were used in this study. Results and Conclusions: Out of 300 respondents, overwhelming majority (78.7% of the respondents in the present study felt that people donate blood to save a friend or a relative. On the contrary, minority respondents (46% were ready to donate blood voluntarily. Only 12.7% of the respondents had ever donated blood while 87.3% had never donated. Among ever donors, gender wise men donors were found to be more; 89% were married, half were from the 30 to 39 years age group. As the per-capita income or level of education increased, so did the percent of blood donors.

  15. A study on knowledge, attitude and practice regarding voluntary blood donation among medical students in Puducherry, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowsalya, V; Vijayakumar, R; Chidambaram, R; Srikumar, R; Reddy, E Prabhakar; Latha, S; Fathima, I Gayathri; Kumar, C Kishor

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge, attitude and practice studies have been used to understand the various factors that influence blood donation which is the basis for donor mobilization and retention strategies. Role of youngsters in voluntary blood donation is crucial to meet the demand of safe blood. The present study was aimed to assess the level of knowledge, attitude and practice regarding voluntary blood donation among the health care students. A validated and pre-tested questionnaire on knowledge, attitude and practice on blood donation were assessed among 371 medical students from Sri Lakshmi Narayana Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Institute, Puducherry, India. Result showed that knowledge on blood donation among respondents was 44.8% (1st year 36.7%, 2nd year 42.8% and 3rd year 54.9%). About 62.6% of non-donors (1st year 51%, 2nd year 61% and 3rd year 77%) showed positive attitude by expressing their willingness to donate blood while 22.8%.of the non-donors had negative attitude (1st year 33%, 2nd year 23% and 3rd year 13%). In practice 13.2% of students had donated blood (1st year 10%, 2nd year 13% and 3rd year 24%), in which 2.7% of male students alone donating blood on regular basis. Over all 3rd year student showed significantly higher knowledge compared with 1st years, in attitude and practice section 3rd year student's showed significantly higher positive attitude and practice than that of 1st and 2nd years. The present study reveals that there is a positive association among knowledge, attitude and practice on blood donation, which suggest that positive attitude and practice can be improved by inculcating knowledge on blood donation among college students to recruit and donate blood regularly, which will help to achieve 100% of blood donation on voluntary basis. PMID:24498809

  16. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice on Blood Donation among Health Science Students in a University campus, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabu Karakkamandapam

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The major part of demand for blood in India has been meeting through voluntary blood donations. The healthy, active and receptive huge student population is potential blood donors to meet safe blood requirements. However, there is a paucity of studies on awareness and attitude among health science students on voluntary blood donation. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitude about blood donation among health science students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 410 health sciences students from different streams in a University campus of South India through a structured survey questionnaire in the year 2009. Results: The overall knowledge on blood donation was good, but majority (62% of students never donated blood. Knowledge level was found highest among allied health science (53.1% and lowest among pharmacy students (20.7%. ‘Feeling of medically unfit’ and ‘never thought of blood donation’ were the major reasons for not donating blood. A significant association was observed between different streams of students and levels of knowledge and attitude about blood donation. Conclusion: This study elicits the importance of adopting effective measures in our campuses to motivate about voluntary blood donation among students.

  17. Complications related to blood donation: A multicenter study of the prevalence and influencing factors in voluntary blood donation camps in Karnataka, India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajat Kumar Agarwal; Sundar Periyavan; Rakesh Dhanya; Parmar, Lalith G.; Amit Sedai; Kumari Ankita; Arpit Vaish; Ritesh Sharma; Prabha Gowda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Complications associated with blood donation significantly lower odds of subsequent donations. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of complications related to blood donation, identify the influencing factors, and come up with suggestions for minimizing discomfort to donors and making outdoor voluntary blood donation camps safer. Materials and Methods: This study covered 181 blood donation camps organized by Sankalp India Foundation where 16 blood banks participated ...

  18. Evolution of the MSM Blood Donation Policy in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Ham, David

    2015-01-01

    In order to ensure the safety of the blood supply, potential blood donors in Canada are screened for eligibility prior to making a donation. This process includes answering a series of questions intended to identify those at higher risk of carrying transfusion-transmissible pathogens. Prior to 2013, male donors who had had sex with another man, even once, since 1977 were banned for life from donating blood. From 2013 onward, men who have sex with men (MSM) could donate blood provided that the...

  19. Blood donation and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although blood donations may reduce body iron stores, to date, prospective data on frequent blood donation and colorectal cancer risk are limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested whether frequent blood donation is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We prospectively followed 35,121 men who provide the information on lifetime number of blood donations in 1992 through 2008. Serum ferritin levels were measured in a random sample of 305 men. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the multivariable relative risks (RRs, 95%CIs after adjusting for age and other established colorectal cancer risk factors. We documented 684 incident colorectal cancer cases and 224 deaths from colorectal cancer. The mean serum ferritin levels varied from 178 µg/L for men who did not donate blood to 98 µg/L for men who had at least 30 donations. Age-adjusted results for both incidence and mortality were essentially the same as the multivariable-adjusted results. Comparing with non-donors, the multivariable RRs (95%CIs for colorectal cancer incidence were 0.92 (0.77, 1.11 for 1-5 donation, 0.85 (0.64, 1.11 for 6-9 donations, 0.96 (0.73, 1.26 for 10-19 donations, 0.91 (0.63, 1.32 for 20-29 donations, and 0.97 (0.68, 1.38 for at least 30 donations (P(trend = 0.92. The multivariable RRs for colorectal cancer mortality were 0.99 (0.72, 1.36 for 1-5 donation, 0.93 (0.57, 1.51 for 6-9 donations, 0.85 (0.50, 1.42 for 10-19 donations, and 1.14 (0.72, 1.83 for at least 20 donations (P(trend = 0.82. The results did not vary by cancer sub-sites, intake levels of total iron, heme iron, or family history of colorectal cancer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Frequent blood donations were not associated with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in men. Our results do not support an important role of body iron stores in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  20. A study on knowledge, attitude and practice on blood donation among medical students in a tertiary care teaching hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

    OpenAIRE

    Jeya S. Ponmari; Malar Sivaraman; Aruna Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Role of youngsters in voluntary blood donation is crucial to meet the demand of safe blood. Therefore understanding the various factors contributing to knowledge, attitude and practice of voluntary blood donation (VBD) among youngsters is important. The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitude and practice regarding blood donation among the health care medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 students in second MBB...

  1. Hong Kong young people′s blood donation behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Juliana; Loke Alice

    2011-01-01

    Introduction : Similar to other developed countries, only 3% of the total population in Hong Kong donate blood (Hong Kong Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service 2003). More than 20% of annual donations come from youngsters aged 18-25. However, this category of donors has decreased gradually from 24.6% in 2004 to 22.9% in 2008. This study aims to examine the characteristics and intention of young blood donors versus nondonors in Hong Kong; and to explore the factors th...

  2. Attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul-Monim Batiha; Mohammed ALBashtawy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Blood is fundamental to saving lives and is considered to be the force that sustains our bodies. Objective: To assess the attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was employed to assess the attitudes and practices of health science students regarding blood donation. 453 students (56.7% male) from the four health faculties (Pharmacy, Genetic engineering, Nursing, and Hospital administration) were surveyed...

  3. Factors Associated with Repeat Blood Donation at the Northern Zone Blood Transfusion Centre in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhellmuss I. Mauka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with repeat blood donation. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study carried out among blood donors aged 18–65 years in northern Tanzania. The questionnaire was administered among 454 participants through the phone. Results. Of the 454 participants, the proportion of repeat donation was 63.9%. In the backward logistic regression analysis, the significant predictors were living in Arusha which had lower odds of repeat donation compared to those living in Kilimanjaro. Knowledge of time interval between donations increased odds of repeating donations. High intention increased odds of repeat donation compared to low intention. Altruistic score had minor effect on increasing odds of repeating donation. Conclusion. Repeat blood donation is affected by proximity of donating site, awareness of the blood donation interval, intention to donate, and experience on previous donation. We recommend continuous education concerning blood donors and donation among health workers and society as a whole; this will create awareness on motivational factors for repeat donations.

  4. To donate or not donate, that is the question: an analysis of the critical factors of blood donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Rodrigues; Sousa, Caissa Veloso E; Matos, Eliane Bragança de; Rezende, Leonardo Benedito Oliveira; Bueno, Natália Xavier; Dias, Álvaro Machado

    2016-08-01

    Currently, in Brazil, 1.78% of the population area blood donors, a level lower than the ideal one that, according to WHO, should be between 3% and 5% of the population. Following this scenario, the current study has a general goal of identifying and analyzing the main critical factors of the process of blood donation in the city of Belo Horizonte, MG, under the perception of donors, potential donors and non donors. A qualitative research approach was conducted, through twenty-four semi-structured interviews. The results highlight the lack of information in the various stages of the blood donation system. During the stages of donor recruitment and awareness, communication actions convey to society incomplete information about the donation process, discouraging future actions of donation. On the other hand, a lack of appreciation of the donation experience and the construction of social values associated with the donor prevent the multiplication of social behaviors for donation. The results of this study, found from theoretical framework outlined in this study, highlight the causes or critical factors that impede changes in behavior, incremental or radical, proposed by social marketing. PMID:27557020

  5. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bloodtransfusionanddonation.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  6. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Adult Population towards Blood Donation in Gondar Town, Northwest Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Melku, Mulugeta; Terefe, Betelihem; Asrie, Fikir; Enawgaw, Bamlaku; Melak, Tadele; Tsegay, Yakob Gebregziabher; Areba, Mohamedamin; Shiferaw, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Background. Though World Health Organization recommends 100% voluntary blood donation, the percentage of blood collected from voluntary blood donors and the average annual blood collection rate are extremely low in Ethiopia. The role of adults is crucial to meet the demand of safe blood. Thus, this study aimed to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice of adult population towards blood donation in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. Method. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted ...

  7. Blood donation by the elderly. Clinical and policy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindyck, J; Avorn, J; Kuriyan, M; Reed, M; Iqbal, M J; Levine, S J

    1987-03-01

    At present, healthy potential blood donors older than the age of 66 years often leave the donor pool for reasons of age alone, despite the fact that this demographic group is growing, is a potentially willing source of blood products, and constitutes the cohort with highest per capita use of blood and its derivatives. There is no clinical or physiological rationale for this. We performed a controlled study to measure the feasibility and safety of blood donation by healthy elderly donors aged 66 years and older, compared with a younger cohort aged 55 to 65 years of age. A study group of prior donors aged 66 years and older and a control group of prior donors between the ages of 50 and 65 were sent letters inviting them to donate blood. The volume donated did not differ between the two groups. In the older group, there were eight immediate reactions, seven mild and one moderate. The control population experienced seven immediate reactions, six mild and one severe. We conclude that it is both clinically feasible and efficient to recruit healthy prior donors older than the age of 66 years for blood donation. As a group, this population is potentially able to donate large volumes of blood and do so without any difference in immediate or short-term reactions. Further study of hemodynamic variables as more objective markers of safety is needed. PMID:3806916

  8. Solving shortage in a priceless market: Insights from blood donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianshu; Lu, Susan Feng; Jin, Ginger Zhe

    2016-07-01

    Shortage is common in many markets, such as those for human organs or blood, but the problem is often difficult to solve through price adjustment, given safety and ethical concerns. In this paper, we study two non-price methods that are often used to alleviate shortage for human blood. The first method is informing existing donors of a current shortage via a mobile message and encouraging them to donate voluntarily. The second method is asking the patient's family or friends to donate in a family replacement (FR) program at the time of shortage. Using 447,357 individual donation records across 8 years from a large Chinese blood bank, we show that both methods are effective in addressing blood shortage in the short run but have different implications for total blood supply in the long run. We compare the efficacy of these methods and discuss their applications under different scenarios to alleviate shortage. PMID:27263024

  9. A Framework for a Smart Social Blood Donation System Based on Mobile Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa, Almetwally M.; Youssef, Ahmed E.; Alshorbagy, Gamal

    2014-01-01

    Blood Donation and Blood Transfusion Services (BTS) are crucial for saving people lives. Recently, worldwide efforts have been undertaken to utilize social media and smartphone applications to make the blood donation process more convenient, offer additional services, and create communities around blood donation centers. Blood banks suffer frequent shortage of blood; hence, advertisements are frequently seen on social networks urging healthy individuals to donate blood for patients who urgent...

  10. Raman spectroscopy of stored red blood cells: evaluating clinically-relevant biochemical markers in donated blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Chad G.; Buckley, Kevin; Chen, Deborah; Schulze, H. G.; Devine, Dana V.; Blades, Michael W.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    2015-07-01

    Modern transfusion medicine relies on the safe, secure, and cost-effective delivery of donated red blood cells (RBCs). Once isolated, RBCs are suspended in a defined additive solution and stored in plastic blood bags in which, over time, they undergo chemical, physiological, and morphological changes that may have a deleterious impact on some patients. Regulations limit the storage period to 42 days and the cells do not routinely undergo analytical testing before use. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy to interrogate stored RBCs and we identify metabolic and cell-breakdown products, such as haemoglobin and membrane fragments, that build-up in the blood bags as the cells age. Our work points the way to the development of an instrument which could quickly and easily assess the biochemical nature of stored RBC units before they are transfused.

  11. Hong Kong young people’s blood donation behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Juliana; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Similar to other developed countries, only 3% of the total population in Hong Kong donate blood (Hong Kong Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service 2003). More than 20% of annual donations come from youngsters aged 18-25. However, this category of donors has decreased gradually from 24.6% in 2004 to 22.9% in 2008. This study aims to examine the characteristics and intention of young blood donors versus nondonors in Hong Kong; and to explore the factors that may influence Hong Kong yo...

  12. Rate of growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens in donated blood.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibb, A. P.; Martin, K M; Davidson, G A; Walker, B.; Murphy, W G

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To examine how delayed refrigeration of blood affects the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, one of the two most important causes of sepsis resulting from transfusion of contaminated blood. METHODS--Two donations of whole blood were each divided into three aliquots and inoculated with 5-10 cfu/ml of a P fluorescens strain from a case of transfusion associated sepsis. From each donation, one aliquot was placed at 4 degrees C, one was held at 20 degrees C for six hours prior to refrigerat...

  13. A single-centre study of vasovagal reaction in blood donors: Influence of age, sex, donation status, weight, total blood volume and volume of blood collected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Philip

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Vasovagal reactions (VVRs in blood donors. Aim: To find an association of age, sex, donation status, weight, total blood volume and volume of blood collected with occurrence of immediate VVR. Settings and Design: Retrospective single-centre study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted from March 2000 to November 2010 at a tertiary care blood transfusion centre. All VVRs with or without syncope occurring during or at the end of donation were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: For qualitative association, c 2 -test was used. Unpaired ′t′ test was used for assessing difference between two groups with respect to VVR status. Simultaneous impact of all risk factors was assessed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The data entry software SPSS (version 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. A P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Overall 1085 VVRs were reported in relation to 88,201 donations, resulting in an overall VVR rate of 1.23%, that is, an incidence of 1 in every 81 donations. Donors with low blood volume, first-time donors, with low weight and female donors had higher absolute donation VVR rates than other donors. Conclusions: Donation-related vasovagal syncopal reactions are a multifactorial process determined largely by weight, age, first-time donor status and total blood volume. Our study reinforces the fact that blood donation is a very safe procedure, which could be made even more event-free by following certain friendly, reassuring practices and by ensuring strict pre-donation screening procedures.

  14. Cognitive Polyphasia, Themata and Blood Donation: Between or Within Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloney, G

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive polyphasia has typically been understood through the notion of situated knowledge. This paper adds to this body of work by suggesting that the processes involved in representation, namely themata, be considered in concert with the content of the representation. We present research that investigated why so few people in Australia donate blood when most people agree that blood donation is a worthwhile, altruistic act. Using word association data we show that the representational field associated with blood donation has contradictory normative and functional meanings that are not delineated by donor status. We suggest that the thema of self/other gives rise to a heterogeneous field that manifests as polyphasic responses bound to the salience of the social context

  15. 'Corpore sano in mens sana'. The Morality of Blood Donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casado Neira, David

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern conceptions of health separate body from soul in the familiar Cartesian dualism. In blood donation this separation is easy to identify: embodiment is a civilizing process, and altruism is the moral basis that supports it. The donor is treated as essentially a vessel of blood, a mere container which can be directed to discharge its contents into blood banks. The biomedical use of blood is not morally neutral; indeed, the donor's moral conscience is mobilised in order to get them to donate blood as a gift, or offering. By associating donors' altruism with their bodies' physical nature as a container from which blood can be extracted, altruism is treated as a physiological phenomenon.

  16. To pay or not to pay? Evidence from whole blood donations in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Niesse-Ruenzi, Alexandra; Weber, Martin; Becker, David Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of monetary incentives on whole blood donations. The analysis is based on a uniquely large database containing virtually all voluntary whole blood donations in South-West Germany from 2005 through 2009. The sample comprises several donation sites that offer (do not offer) monetary compensation. We take advantage of a natural experiment caused by the abolishment of monetary compensation at one of the donation sites. We find a sharp decrease in blood donations...

  17. Blood donation and blood donor mortality after adjustment for a healthy donor effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that blood donors experience lower mortality than the general population. While this may suggest a beneficial effect of blood donation, it may also reflect the selection of healthy persons into the donor population. To overcome this bias, we...... investigated the relation between blood donation frequency and mortality within a large cohort of blood donors. In addition, our analyses also took into consideration the effects of presumed health differences linked to donation behavior. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Using the Scandinavian Donation and...... and mortality. The magnitude of the association was reduced after adjustment for an estimate of self-selection in the donor population. Our observations indicate that repeated blood donation is not associated with premature death, but cannot be interpreted as conclusive evidence of a beneficial health...

  18. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Adult Population towards Blood Donation in Gondar Town, Northwest Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melku, Mulugeta; Terefe, Betelihem; Asrie, Fikir; Enawgaw, Bamlaku; Melak, Tadele; Tsegay, Yakob Gebregziabher; Areba, Mohamedamin; Shiferaw, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Background. Though World Health Organization recommends 100% voluntary blood donation, the percentage of blood collected from voluntary blood donors and the average annual blood collection rate are extremely low in Ethiopia. The role of adults is crucial to meet the demand of safe blood. Thus, this study aimed to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice of adult population towards blood donation in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. Method. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted among 768 adults. Multistage sampling technique together with simple random and systematic random sampling technique was employed. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis and bivariate correlation analysis were done. Result. About 436 (56.8%), 630 (82%), and 141 (18.4%) study participants had adequate knowledge, good attitude, and experience of blood donation, respectively. Secondary and higher educational statuses were significantly associated with adequate knowledge towards blood donation. Participants who were protestant by religion were more likely to have good attitude towards blood donation. Age, self-perceived health status, and religion were significantly associated with blood donation practice. Conclusion. Knowledge and attitude towards blood donation are high. However, the level of practice is low. District and national blood banks and transfusion agency should design strategies that promote and motivate the communities to donate blood. PMID:27516920

  19. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Adult Population towards Blood Donation in Gondar Town, Northwest Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulugeta Melku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Though World Health Organization recommends 100% voluntary blood donation, the percentage of blood collected from voluntary blood donors and the average annual blood collection rate are extremely low in Ethiopia. The role of adults is crucial to meet the demand of safe blood. Thus, this study aimed to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice of adult population towards blood donation in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. Method. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted among 768 adults. Multistage sampling technique together with simple random and systematic random sampling technique was employed. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis and bivariate correlation analysis were done. Result. About 436 (56.8%, 630 (82%, and 141 (18.4% study participants had adequate knowledge, good attitude, and experience of blood donation, respectively. Secondary and higher educational statuses were significantly associated with adequate knowledge towards blood donation. Participants who were protestant by religion were more likely to have good attitude towards blood donation. Age, self-perceived health status, and religion were significantly associated with blood donation practice. Conclusion. Knowledge and attitude towards blood donation are high. However, the level of practice is low. District and national blood banks and transfusion agency should design strategies that promote and motivate the communities to donate blood.

  20. Generation Y and Blood Donation: The Impact of Altruistic Help in a Darwiportunistic Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the members of Generation Y and their willingness to offer voluntary (unpaid) blood donations. Using statistics from various sources, a three-stage model is developed to explain blood donation behaviour especially of this generation. It consists of i) developing altruism, ii) raising the willingness to donate blood, and iii) activating actual blood donation behaviour. Members of Generation Y live in a Darwinistic society. They also to some degree act opportunistically,...

  1. Donation intensity and metabolic syndrome in active whole-blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peffer, K.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Swinkels, D.W.; Geurts-Moespot, A.; Heijer, M. den; Atsma, F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Increased iron and metabolic syndrome (MetS) go hand in hand. Frequent blood donation depletes iron stores. This study investigates whether high-intensity blood donation is associated with lower MetS prevalence compared with low-intensity blood donation, and whether iron a

  2. First report of the impact on voluntary blood donation by the blood mobile from India

    OpenAIRE

    Suchet Sachdev; Lakhvinder Singh; Neelam Marwaha; Ratti Ram Sharma; Divjot Singh Lamba; Puneet Sachdeva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The blood mobile is one of the modern methods of mobile blood collection facility funded through the third phase of National AIDS Control Programme by the National Blood Transfusion Council of India. Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis of data in relation to the blood mobile was carried out with respect to the number of blood donation camps, number of blood units collected, adverse donor reactions, and the expenditure that occurred during the blood collection in the b...

  3. Directed blood donation: a matter of public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, K

    1996-08-01

    Trust is the key issue in blood treatment with respect to public policy. Public trust in the blood system in Canada continues to be exceedingly low. According to the February, 1996 Gallup poll conducted by Janssen-Ortho Inc., 89% of those surveyed chose alternatives to the Red Cross (volunteer) blood. Strategies directed at improving the safety of the blood system will fall short of this goal unless public knowledge and consumer participation are considered. Consumers need to participate in decision making for themselves with the physicians, as well as in the decision making process at the level of public policy. Consumer involvement would contribute to an overall plan of rebuilding public trust. Canadian health care consumers have been significantly affected by the blood tragedy of the 1980s. Public perception of blood safety has been characterized by misunderstanding and fear. The search for alternate methods of transfusion, such as directed donation, are based on a lack of trust of the current blood system. As introducing a program of directed blood donation would not increase safety or decrease the expense of blood transfusions, such a program should not be introduced in Ontario at this time. PMID:10162823

  4. Prosocial Motivation and Blood Donations: A Survey of the Empirical Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Goette, Lorenz; Stutzer, Alois; Frey, Beat M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent shortages in the supply of blood donations have renewed the interest in how blood donations can be increased temporarily. We survey the evidence on the role of financial and other incentives in eliciting blood donations among donors who are normally willing to donate pro bono. We present the predictions from different empirical/psychological-based theories, with some predicting that incentives are effective while others predict that incentives may undermine prosocial motivation. The ev...

  5. Factors Associated with Repeat Blood Donation at the Northern Zone Blood Transfusion Centre in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mauka, Wilhellmuss I.; Mahande, Michael J; Msuya, Sia E; Rune N. Philemon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with repeat blood donation. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study carried out among blood donors aged 18–65 years in northern Tanzania. The questionnaire was administered among 454 participants through the phone. Results. Of the 454 participants, the proportion of repeat donation was 63.9%. In the backward logistic regression analysis, the significant predictors were living in Arusha which had lower odds o...

  6. Factors that motivate and hinder blood donation in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Marantidou, O; Loukopoulou, L; Zervou, E; Martinis, G; Egglezou, A; Fountouli, P; Dimoxenous, P; Parara, M; Gavalaki, M; Maniatis, A

    2007-01-01

    Donations in Greece are insufficient to cover the high transfusion needs arising from large numbers of thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia patients and the implementation of new surgical techniques. Efforts to achieve self-sufficiency, and to render blood supplies safer and manageable must focus on recruiting and retaining more volunteer donors and on converting the large pool of replacement donors. The aim of the study was to gain insight into public perception regarding the risks of donati...

  7. 77 FR 10756 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Opinions and Perspectives About the Current Blood Donation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... positive in pre-donation testing: Results indicated MSM behavior to be a risk factor for 56% of male donors... paper and pencil mailed surveys, 1.2% of male blood donors reported MSM behavior. In a 2007 study... four geographic areas who report donating blood or the intention to donate will be asked to...

  8. 77 FR 35408 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Opinions and Perspectives About the Current Blood Donation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... be HIV positive in pre-donation testing: Results indicated MSM behavior to be a risk factor for 56... anonymously surveyed by paper and pencil mailed surveys, 1.2% of male blood donors reported MSM behavior. In a... four geographic areas who report donating blood or the intention to donate will be asked to...

  9. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Voluntary Blood Donation among Healthcare Workers at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwogoh, Benedict; Aigberadion, Usimenahon; Nwannadi, Alexander Ikenna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Adequate and safe blood supply has remained a challenge in developing countries like ours. There is a high dependency on family replacement and remunerated blood donors in our environment which carries an attendant increased risk of transfusion transmissible infection. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary blood donation among healthcare workers (nonphysicians) and to identify and recruit potential voluntary blood donors. Methodology. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. A total of 163 staffs were recruited. Pretest questionnaires were used to assess their knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary blood donation. Statistical Analysis. The responses were collated and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 16. The association between blood donation practice and gender of respondents, category of staff, and level of education was tested using Chi-square and Fisher's tests where appropriate. P knowledge and positive attitude towards donation; however, only 22.1% (36) have donated blood with 41.7% (15) of these being voluntary. Male workers were more likely to donate (P blood donation and level of education. Conclusion. There is a strong disparity between the knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary donation amongst healthcare workers. PMID:24222890

  10. Time course for the recovery of physical performance, blood hemoglobin, and ferritin content after blood donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Andreas K; Grand, Johannes; Stangerup, Ida;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that blood donation negatively affects endurance performance, but data on physical recovery after a standard blood donation are scarce. This study aimed to elucidate the temporary impact of blood donation on endurance performance, measured as peak oxygen uptake (VO......2peak ) and time trial (TT) performance. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: VO2peak , TT performance, blood, iron, and anthropometric variables were determined before (baseline) and 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after blood donation in 19 healthy men. RESULTS: VO2peak was reduced by 6.5% from 49.7 ± 2 mL/kg/min at...... baseline to 46.3 ± 2 mL/kg/min on Day 3 (p < 0.001), and TT performance was reduced by 5.2% from 13:31 ± 00:42 to 14:13 ± 00:50 min:sec (p < 0.001). Both VO2peak and TT performance were back to baseline 14 days after blood donation. Blood hemoglobin (Hb) concentration declined 7.9% from 9.3 ± 0.11 mmol...

  11. Motivating Factors and Potential Deterrents to Blood Donation in High School Aged Blood Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Rachel; Ziman, Alyssa; Hoffman, Matthew; Phan-Tang, Michelle; Yuan, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Background. To ensure an adequate supply of blood, collection centers must design campaigns that successfully recruit and maintain an active donor pool. Understanding factors that motivate and deter individuals from donating may help centers develop targeted recruitment campaigns. These factors among high school aged blood donors have not yet been fully investigated. Study Design and Methods. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to student donors at high school mobile blood drives. The survey instrument asked the students to rate several potential motivating factors in their importance in the decision to donate blood and several potential deterring factors in their future decision whether or not to donate blood again. The survey also asked the students to rate the desirability of several potential incentives. Results. Motivating factors that reflected prosocial, empathetic, and altruistic thoughts and beliefs were rated highly by students. Pain from phlebotomy was most commonly chosen as potential deterrent. Movie tickets and cookies/snacks at the drive were rated as the most attractive incentives. Conclusion. High school aged blood donors are similar to other donor groups in their expressed motives for donating blood. This group may be unique in the factors that deter them from donating and in their preferences for different incentives. PMID:27293985

  12. Motivating Factors and Potential Deterrents to Blood Donation in High School Aged Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Finck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To ensure an adequate supply of blood, collection centers must design campaigns that successfully recruit and maintain an active donor pool. Understanding factors that motivate and deter individuals from donating may help centers develop targeted recruitment campaigns. These factors among high school aged blood donors have not yet been fully investigated. Study Design and Methods. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to student donors at high school mobile blood drives. The survey instrument asked the students to rate several potential motivating factors in their importance in the decision to donate blood and several potential deterring factors in their future decision whether or not to donate blood again. The survey also asked the students to rate the desirability of several potential incentives. Results. Motivating factors that reflected prosocial, empathetic, and altruistic thoughts and beliefs were rated highly by students. Pain from phlebotomy was most commonly chosen as potential deterrent. Movie tickets and cookies/snacks at the drive were rated as the most attractive incentives. Conclusion. High school aged blood donors are similar to other donor groups in their expressed motives for donating blood. This group may be unique in the factors that deter them from donating and in their preferences for different incentives.

  13. Safety of predeposit autologous blood donation in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbaum, C R; Schwartz, I R; Chhibber, G; Teplick, F B; Cohen, A W

    1990-05-01

    The option of predeposit autologous blood donation (PABD) before elective surgery has been gaining popularity as a means of eliminating the transmission of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome and hepatitis. It also prevents potential antigen sensitization and transfusion reactions. The use of PABD in pregnant women has been described, but its safety for both mother and fetus, especially in the first and third trimester, has not been established. After studying 16 third-trimester pregnant women with antenatal surveillance techniques and continuous fetal monitoring, we concluded that PABD is a safe procedure for both mother and fetus. PMID:2352248

  14. Targeted Preoperative Autologous Blood Donation in Total Knee Arthroplasty Reduces the Need for Postoperative Transfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Bou Monsef, Jad; Buckup, Johannes; Mayman, David; Marx, Robert; Ranawat, Amar; Boettner, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Background Preoperative donation of autologous blood has been widely used to minimize the potential risk of allogeneic transfusions in total knee arthroplasty. A previous study from our center revealed that preoperative autologous donation reduces the allogeneic blood exposure for anemic patients but has no effect for non-anemic patients. Questions/Purposes The current study investigates the impact of a targeted blood donation protocol on overall transfusion rates and the incidence of allogen...

  15. Knowledge and practice of blood donation: a comparison between medical and non-medical Nepalese students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatya, A; Prajapati, R; Yadav, R

    2012-12-01

    College students form a large and important group of population eligible for blood donation. Studies report that students do not donate much, and medical students' blood donation rate is less as compared to non-medical students. To assess and compare the knowledge, attitude, and practice of blood donation among medical and non-medical Nepalese students. A cross-sectional descriptive study using structured self-administered questionnaire was conducted in students of medical (MBBS) and non-medical programs of different colleges of Nepal. Total 456 students, 177 non-medical and 279 medical, participated; 28.5% students were donors. More medical students donated blood, more often, and were more knowledgeable in all aspects of blood and blood donation related knowledge (p values 0.01 or less). In both groups, proportionately more boys donated than girls. Common reasons for not donating included no request, medically unfit, no information about blood collection services, fear of weakness, and fear related to venepuncture. Moral satisfaction was the commonest reason to donate. Among Nepalese students, medical students donate more and are more knowledgeable than non-medical students. Lack of information and lack of direct requests are important causes of fewer donors in the non-medical group and girls. PMID:24579535

  16. Geographical differences in blood donation and philanthropy in the Netherlands : what role for social capital?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René; Veldhuizen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    The key question addressed in this paper is whether geographical differences in blood donation and philanthropy reflect differences in social capital. We do find considerable spatial variation in blood donation and philanthropy between municipalities in the Netherlands. But we do not find that blood

  17. Trends of Blood and Plasma Donations in Kazakhstan: 12-Years Retrospective Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurbek Igissinov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Each country faces a continuing challenge to collect enough blood to meet the national needs. According to WHO, there should be at least 20 blood donations per 1,000 population for developing countries, in Kazakhstan this indicator was only 16.8 in 2011. Thus, we conducted an epidemiological assessment and drew a map of the regional distribution of blood and plasma donations in Kazakhstan during the years 2000-2011.The retrospective study was conducted from 2000 to 2011. Data on blood and its components donations were acquired from the Ministry of Health (annual statistical reporting form N° 39.During 2000-2011, number of blood donors decreased to 17.4% and blood donations to 6.3%. The proportion of non-remunerated blood donations and donors decreased from 97.6% to 77.9% and 97.9% to 87.7%, respectively. The paid donations had the opposite trend. Number of plasma donors increased in 2.1 times, plasma donations in 2.4 times, nevertheless the proportion of non-remunerated plasma donations decreased from 60.1% to 29.8%. The average number of blood donations per 1,000 population decreased from 19.8 (2000 to 16.8 (2011, plasma donations increased from 1.4 to 3.1. Regionally, annual average rates of blood and plasma donations per 1,000 population over 12 years varied greatly.This is the first study conducted in Kazakhstan to provide detailed information, including the regional characteristics of blood and plasma donations over an extended period of time, which can be used in blood transfusion services work.

  18. Motivating Factors and Potential Deterrents to Blood Donation in High School Aged Blood Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Finck; Alyssa Ziman; Matthew Hoffman; Michelle Phan-Tang; Shan Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background. To ensure an adequate supply of blood, collection centers must design campaigns that successfully recruit and maintain an active donor pool. Understanding factors that motivate and deter individuals from donating may help centers develop targeted recruitment campaigns. These factors among high school aged blood donors have not yet been fully investigated. Study Design and Methods. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to student donors at high school mobile blood drives. ...

  19. Practices and attitudes towards blood donation in health high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Daştan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few studies demonstrating the awareness level of our society about “blood requirement” and “blood donation”. The aim of the present study was to investigate practices and attitudes towards blood donation among students from Kars Health High School. The study was conducted in Kars Health High School between March and May 2009. In the present study, was used a questionairre based on the literature review and that aimed to assess sociodemographic characteristics (18 items and practices and attitudes towards blood donation (34 items. 291 students participated in this study. The obtained data were evaluated using descriptive analysis. It is observed that the students (12.0% voluntary donate blood at a rate much above the Turkish average (1.5%, a great majority of the participants consider donating blood (61.5% and most of them have positive attitudes and practices toward blood donation. A majority of students have positive attitudes and practices towards blood donation. However, donor recruitment programs and regular blood donation campaigns are required to increase the blood donation rate.

  20. Practices and attitudes towards blood donation in health high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Bostancı Daştan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few studies demonstrating the awareness level of our society about “blood requirement” and “blood donation”. The aim of the present study was to investigate practices and attitudes towards blood donation among students from Kars Health High School. The study was conducted in Kars Health High School between March and May 2009. In the present study, was used a questionairre based on the literature review and that aimed to assess sociodemographic characteristics (18 items and practices and attitudes towards blood donation (34 items. 291 students participated in this study. The obtained data were evaluated using descriptive analysis. It is observed that the students (12.0% voluntary donate blood at a rate much above the Turkish average (1.5%, a great majority of the participants consider donating blood (61.5% and most of them have positive attitudes and practices toward blood donation.  A majority of students have positive attitudes and practices towards blood donation. However, donor recruitment programs and regular blood donation campaigns are required to increase the blood donation rate.

  1. Complications related to blood donation: A multicenter study of the prevalence and influencing factors in voluntary blood donation camps in Karnataka, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajat Kumar; Periyavan, Sundar; Dhanya, Rakesh; Parmar, Lalith G.; Sedai, Amit; Ankita, Kumari; Vaish, Arpit; Sharma, Ritesh; Gowda, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Complications associated with blood donation significantly lower odds of subsequent donations. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of complications related to blood donation, identify the influencing factors, and come up with suggestions for minimizing discomfort to donors and making outdoor voluntary blood donation camps safer. Materials and Methods: This study covered 181 blood donation camps organized by Sankalp India Foundation where 16 blood banks participated from 01-04-2011 to 01-08-2014 in Karnataka. Uniform protocols for donor selection, predonation preparation, counseling, postdonation care, and refreshments were used. The postdonation complications were recorded on a form immediately, after they were observed. Results: We observed 995 (3.2%) complications in 30,928 whole blood donations. Of these 884 (2.86%) mild, 77 (0.25%) moderate, and 5 (0.02%) severe complications were observed. Local symptoms (blood outside vessels, pain, and allergy) contributed 1.0%, and generalized symptoms (vasovagal reaction) contributed 2.2% to all the complications. Conclusion: We observed 322 complications for every 10,000 donations. Since 27 out of every 10000 experience moderate and severe complication, the readiness to manage complications is crucial. Women donors, young donors, and donors with a lower weight are at a significantly greater risk of experiencing complications, highlighting the need for specific guidelines for the management of higher risk donor groups. Complications varied significantly between various blood banks. Predonation hydration was effective in limiting complications with generalized symptoms. We recommend a robust donor hemovigilance program for voluntary blood donation for monitoring complications and enable assessment of effectiveness and implementation of appropriate interventions. PMID:27011671

  2. Complications related to blood donation: A multicenter study of the prevalence and influencing factors in voluntary blood donation camps in Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Kumar Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Complications associated with blood donation significantly lower odds of subsequent donations. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of complications related to blood donation, identify the influencing factors, and come up with suggestions for minimizing discomfort to donors and making outdoor voluntary blood donation camps safer. Materials and Methods: This study covered 181 blood donation camps organized by Sankalp India Foundation where 16 blood banks participated from 01-04-2011 to 01-08-2014 in Karnataka. Uniform protocols for donor selection, predonation preparation, counseling, postdonation care, and refreshments were used. The postdonation complications were recorded on a form immediately, after they were observed. Results: We observed 995 (3.2% complications in 30,928 whole blood donations. Of these 884 (2.86% mild, 77 (0.25% moderate, and 5 (0.02% severe complications were observed. Local symptoms (blood outside vessels, pain, and allergy contributed 1.0%, and generalized symptoms (vasovagal reaction contributed 2.2% to all the complications. Conclusion: We observed 322 complications for every 10,000 donations. Since 27 out of every 10000 experience moderate and severe complication, the readiness to manage complications is crucial. Women donors, young donors, and donors with a lower weight are at a significantly greater risk of experiencing complications, highlighting the need for specific guidelines for the management of higher risk donor groups. Complications varied significantly between various blood banks. Predonation hydration was effective in limiting complications with generalized symptoms. We recommend a robust donor hemovigilance program for voluntary blood donation for monitoring complications and enable assessment of effectiveness and implementation of appropriate interventions.

  3. Beliefs about the effect of using blood donation payments : survey results from Norway

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The scarcity of blood is and has been a global problem. Efforts to increase the supply of blood have become a priority issue for every nation, so that the rising demands for blood are sustained. The most commonly used method of blood donation worldwide is voluntary (unpaid) donations, however, in order to increase the supply the use of financial incentives has been suggested OBJECTIVE: To investigate to what degree people believe that higher payments for giving blood will lead ...

  4. Influencing factors on the cord-blood donation of post-partum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miok; Han, Seungchul; Shin, Minho

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to identify the factors on the cord-blood donation of Korean post-partum women, who may store, donate, or discard their infant's cord blood. This descriptive research assesses the level of knowledge and attitude of post-partum women in Korea, regarding cord blood and its usage. The participants in this study were 320 post-partum women of which 109 stored, 34 donated, and 177 discarded their cord blood. The knowledge level of women who donated or stored their cord blood was higher than that of those who discarded. The attitude level of the women who donated was higher than that of those who stored or discarded. Knowledge, attitude, income, and source of information were the factors on the cord-blood donation; high knowledge, high attitude, low income, and information source from mass media contributes to cord-blood donation. In order to promote the cord-blood donation, it is necessary to develop guidelines for cord-blood education to improve the knowledge and attitudes of child-bearing women and healthcare professionals. PMID:25912386

  5. Donation frequency, iron loss, and risk of cancer among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Reilly, Marie; Hjalgrim, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term deleterious effects of repeated blood donations may be masked by the donors' healthy lifestyle. To investigate possible effects of blood donation and iron loss through blood donation on cancer incidence while minimizing "healthy donor effects," we made dose......-response comparisons within a cohort of Swedish and Danish blood donors. METHODS: We used a nested case-control study design, in which case patients were defined as all donors who were diagnosed with a malignancy between their first recorded blood donation and study termination (n = 10866). Control subjects (n...... = 107140) were individually matched on sex, age, and county of residence. Using conditional logistic regression, we estimated relative risks of cancer according to number of blood donations made or estimated iron loss 3-12 years before a case patient was diagnosed with cancer. All statistical tests were...

  6. Knowledge, attitude and practice survey regarding blood donation in a Northwestern Chinese city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, N; Nelson, K E; Ness, P; Wen, G; Bai, X; Shan, H

    2005-08-01

    Recruitment of low-risk blood donors in developing countries is challenging. We studied the attitudes towards blood donation in several populations in a city in Western China. A survey of knowledge, attitude and practice was performed including 1280 individuals from eight distinct populations in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China. Included were Han Chinese and Uyghur populations of blood donors, non-donors, injection drug users, students and factory workers. Knowledge about blood donation varied between the groups. Factors motivating blood donation included social pressure, desire to know screening results and altruism. Inhibiting factors included fear of contracting an infection and other adverse health effects, including loss of vitality. Misconceptions about the effects of blood donation are widespread, even among educated persons in Urumqi. Fear of acquiring a serious infection may have been increased by the reports of HIV acquisition during plasma donations in China. PMID:16101805

  7. Correlates of voluntary blood donation among people in a hill capital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenga Namgay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to understand the problems and to improve voluntary blood donation at Gangtok, East Sikkim, this study was designed to assess the possible reasons for donating and not donating blood. Study Design: Population based cross-sectional study; Study Period: 01.01.2004 to 30.03.2004. (Three months activity; Setting: Gangtok, East Sikkim; Interventions: None; Study Population: 300 adults; Sampling Technique: Two-stage cluster sampling technique; Main Outcome Measures: socioeconomic and demographic variables of voluntary blood donation. Data Collection Procedure: Three hundred adults were selected from the adult population of Gangtok, East Sikkim. Then by interview technique the principal investigator Dr. Namgay Shenga collected the data using the pretested, close-ended structured schedule. In 300 adults, the study showed a significant association between attitude towards voluntary blood donation and education. There was a significant association between knowledge about blood donation and attitude towards voluntary blood donation, along with moral obligation, charity and duty parameters. Variables that were not significantly associated with voluntary blood donation were age, sex, religion, marital status, community status, occupation and per-capita monthly income. Several possible reasons have been put forward for not donating blood voluntarily, varying from problems of time, procedure and physical health. The finding of the study indicated that education gives birth to an ocean of difference between the positive attitudes of the general mass towards voluntary blood donation, in true life practice. The results suggested that reinforced steps should be taken to educate the population about voluntary blood donation.

  8. Blood donation, body iron status and carotid intima-media thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberink, M.F.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Durga, J.; Swinkels, D.W.; Kort, de W.L.A.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Verhoef, P.

    2008-01-01

    Iron could promote free radical formation, which may lead to injury of the arterial wall and atherosclerosis. Blood donation may reduce cardiovascular risk by lowering body iron status. We collected data on blood donation history and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (CIMT) in 819

  9. Knowledge and attitude towards voluntary blood donation among Dhaka University students in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosain, G M; Anisuzzaman, M; Begum, A

    1997-09-01

    This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted among the students of the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh, to assess their knowledge and attitudinal variables towards voluntary, non-remunerated blood donation. Two hundred students were selected to participate in this study and were interviewed face to face on various aspects of blood donation using a structured questionnaire. Eighty two per cent of the participants showed a positive attitude towards blood donation, however, only 16 per cent of the respondents in this study had actually ever donated blood voluntarily. Among the non-donor respondents, physical harm and fear were found to be the common reasons for not donating blood. The results also showed that a high number of respondents (93%) had a negative attitude towards paid blood donation. We suggest that appropriate motivational campaign should be launched immediately among this young section of the population to convert this favourable "attitude" towards blood donation into a regular "practice" in order to increase the voluntary blood donation in Bangladesh. PMID:9487428

  10. Knowledge, attitude and practices of people towards voluntary blood donation in Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood transfusions form a crucial and irreplaceable part in the medical management of many diseases. The collection of blood from voluntary, non-remunerated blood donors from low risk populations is an important measure for ensuring the availability and safety of blood transfusion. In a state like Uttarakhand which is visited by lakhs of visitors during pilgrimage season and where natural calamities and accidents are very common, the availability of blood is of utmost importance. Aim: To find out knowledge, attitude and practices of people towards voluntary blood donation to comprehend the situation and find ways to enhance voluntary blood donation in the state of Uttarakhand. Materials and Methods: Multi stage methodology was designed to target population including general population, influencers (doctors and supporting organizations (camp organizers, State AIDS Control Society Officials who were subjected to in-depth interview using pre-structured questionnaires to assess knowledge/awareness about voluntary blood donation, factors preventing and source of knowledge about voluntary blood donation. Result: The sample population consisted of mostly men (67% in the age-group of 26-35 years. Requirement of blood and the measures to promote voluntary blood donation have a direct relationship with the total population and literacy level of the population. Awareness about blood donation, source of knowledge about blood donation, reasons for not donating blood are particularly stressed. With increase in educational level, the awareness level was also found to increase. While among illiterates 81 percent of the respondents knew about blood donation, among the post graduates the same ratio was found to be almost cent-percent. Among various reasons cited for not donating blood, lack of awareness being the most common reason. People gathered information about blood donation from several different sources with electronic media being the most

  11. Practice and Experience to Carry out Mutual Blood Donation in A City%某市互助献血工作的实践与体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彬; 廖燕; 李丽兰; 申卫东

    2011-01-01

    Mutual blood donation aid is a special blood donation model to ensure the needs of emergency and clinical medicine. The harmonization of health administrative departments, hospital transfusion departments and blood banks are needed to jointly improve the policy advocacy and mobilization of mutual donation, to develop work -flow and to implement rigorous testing of blood to ensure blood quality and safe use of blood.%互助献血是保障急救和临床医疗用血需求的一种特殊模式.需要卫生行政部门、医院输血科、血站等协调统一,共同做好互助献血的宣传与动员,并制定互助献血流程,实施血液严格检测,以确保血液质量与用血安全.

  12. Regional transfusion centre preoperative autologous blood donation programme: the first two years.

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, M R; Chapman, C E; Dunstan, J. A.; Mitchell, C.; Lloyd, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the efficacy of a regional autologous blood donation programme. DESIGN--Clinical and laboratory data were collected and stored prospectively. Transfusion data were collected retrospectively from hospital blood bank records. SETTING--Northern Region Blood Transfusion Service and 14 hospitals within the Northern Regional Health Authority. SUBJECTS--505 patients referred for autologous blood donation before elective surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patient eligibility, advers...

  13. Incentives when altruism is impure: the case of blood and living organ donations

    OpenAIRE

    Errea, María; Cabasés Hita, Juan Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The decision to donate blood and living organs is considered voluntary and altruistic. However, the shortage of donors has opened an interesting debate in recent years, considering offering economic incentives to donors. This paper analyzes theoretically and empirically, the effects of incentives over individuals when facing the decision of becoming donors. Results show that crowding-in of blood donors would be more likely by offering 'Information concerning blood donations' or 'Blood Tests'....

  14. Factors associated with intention to donate blood: sociodemographic and past experience variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pule, Pule Ishmael; Rachaba, Boitshwarelo; Magafu, Mgaywa Gilbert Mjungu Damas; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. This study was conducted to assess the level of intention of the general public towards blood donation and the factors associated with it. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in South-East Botswana amongst participants aged 21-65 years. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was completed for 384 participants. Results. Of the 384 participants, 104 (27.1%) reported that they had donated blood in the past and 269 (70.1%) stated that they were willing to donate blood in the future. Thirteen out of the 104 past donors (12.5%) reported that they had donated blood in the 12 months preceding the survey and only 10 (9.6%) participants reported that they have been regular donors. In the backward logistic regression analysis, the variables that remained significant predictors of the intention to donate blood were secondary education (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 2.92 (1.48, 5.77)), tertiary education (AOR (95% CI): 3.83 (1.52, 9.62)), and knowing a family member who had ever donated blood (AOR (95% CI): 2.84 (1.58, 5.12)). Conclusion. Being informed about blood transfusion and its life-saving benefits through either the education system or the experience made people more likely to intend to donate blood. Evidence-based interventions to retain blood donors as regular donors are recommended. PMID:25431742

  15. Factors Associated with Intention to Donate Blood: Sociodemographic and Past Experience Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pule Ishmael Pule

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. This study was conducted to assess the level of intention of the general public towards blood donation and the factors associated with it. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in South-East Botswana amongst participants aged 21–65 years. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was completed for 384 participants. Results. Of the 384 participants, 104 (27.1% reported that they had donated blood in the past and 269 (70.1% stated that they were willing to donate blood in the future. Thirteen out of the 104 past donors (12.5% reported that they had donated blood in the 12 months preceding the survey and only 10 (9.6% participants reported that they have been regular donors. In the backward logistic regression analysis, the variables that remained significant predictors of the intention to donate blood were secondary education (adjusted odds ratio (AOR (95% confidence interval (CI: 2.92 (1.48, 5.77, tertiary education (AOR (95% CI: 3.83 (1.52, 9.62, and knowing a family member who had ever donated blood (AOR (95% CI: 2.84 (1.58, 5.12. Conclusion. Being informed about blood transfusion and its life-saving benefits through either the education system or the experience made people more likely to intend to donate blood. Evidence-based interventions to retain blood donors as regular donors are recommended.

  16. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Voluntary Blood Donation among Healthcare Workers at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Nwogoh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adequate and safe blood supply has remained a challenge in developing countries like ours. There is a high dependency on family replacement and remunerated blood donors in our environment which carries an attendant increased risk of transfusion transmissible infection. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary blood donation among healthcare workers (nonphysicians and to identify and recruit potential voluntary blood donors. Methodology. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. A total of 163 staffs were recruited. Pretest questionnaires were used to assess their knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary blood donation. Statistical Analysis. The responses were collated and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 16. The association between blood donation practice and gender of respondents, category of staff, and level of education was tested using Chi-square and Fisher’s tests where appropriate. were considered statistically significant. Results. The median age of the respondents was 32 years (18–56 with females accounting for 55.6% (90. A total of 74.8% (122 attained tertiary education, and 55.8% (91 of respondents were senior staffs. The majority has good knowledge and positive attitude towards donation; however, only 22.1% (36 have donated blood with 41.7% (15 of these being voluntary. Male workers were more likely to donate (. There is no significant association between blood donation and level of education. Conclusion. There is a strong disparity between the knowledge, attitude, and practice of voluntary donation amongst healthcare workers.

  17. Non-monetary rewards could be used to incentivise blood donation

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-Font, Joan; Jofre-Bonet, Mireia; Yen, Steven T.

    2012-01-01

    Joan Costa-Font, Mireia Jofre-Bonet and Steven T Yen present research into incentivising blood donation. Classic research has found that monetary incentives to blood donors may crowd out blood supply as purely altruistic donors may feel less inclined to donate if a reward is involved. However it is argued that there would be no supply displacement of altruistic donors if non-monetary rewards were offered instead.

  18. Modelling antecedents of blood donation motivation among non-donors of varying age and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K P H; Abraham, C; Ruiter, R A C; Veldhuizen, I J T; Dehing, C J G; Bos, A E R; Schaalma, H P

    2009-02-01

    Understanding blood donation motivation among non-donors is prerequisite to effective recruitment. Two studies explored the psychological antecedents of blood donation motivation and the generalisability of a model of donation motivation across groups differing in age and educational level. An older well-educated population and a younger less well-educated population were sampled. The studies assessed the role of altruism, fear of blood/needles and donation-specific cognitions including attitudes and normative beliefs derived from an extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Across both samples, results showed that affective attitude, subjective norm, descriptive norm, and moral norm were the most important correlates of blood donation intentions. Self-efficacy was more important among the younger less well-educated group. Altruism was related to donation motivation but only indirectly through moral norm. Similarly, fear of blood/needles only had an indirect effect on motivation through affective attitude and self-efficacy. Additional analyses with the combined data set found no age or education moderation effects, suggesting that this core model of donation-specific cognitions can be used to inform future practical interventions recruiting new blood donors in the general population. PMID:18547458

  19. A study on attitude towards blood donation among people in a rural district, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, V

    2000-09-01

    Blood and blood components are important in many situations. At present, there is only a donation system for blood banks to get blood in Thailand. Although the blood bank process has been founded in Thailand for many years, there is still an insufficient amount of blood for use. There are misguided attitudes on blood donation among the people in the rural areas. This study has been designed as a cross-sectional descriptive study to study attitude towards blood donation among the people in Bang Sapan District, Prachuab Kiri Khan Province, Thailand. Data from self-administered questionnaires were collected and statistical analysis was performed. We found that people in that area had a rather good attitude but this was still found in less than 50%. We found the attitude of the subjects only significantly correlated with the level of education. We concluded that improving the people's attitude on blood donation is important. We suggest that every blood bank should design a program for providing knowledge in order to improve the attitude of the people in that area. We also suggest that knowledge on blood donation should be repeatedly taught at any education level including the school system. This study can provided preliminary results for other studies. PMID:11289031

  20. A prospective analysis of blood donation history and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazusa; Birmann, Brenda M; Zhang, Xuehong; Giovannucci, Edward; Bertrand, Kimberly A

    2016-06-01

    Blood donation may influence subsequent NHL development via temporary immune system alterations. To test the hypothesis that frequent blood donation is associated with an increased risk of NHL and its most common histologic subtypes, this study followed 36 576 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), who provided information on frequency of blood donation in the past 30 years in 1992. This study confirmed 544 incident cases of NHL through 2010. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazards ratios (HR) and 95% CI for the risk of all NHL and major NHL histologic subtypes associated with number of blood donations. In this prospective study, there was no significant evidence of an association between blood donation frequency and incidence of NHL (age-adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.94-1.68, comparing > 20 donations vs 0 donations over 30 years, p for trend = 0.18) or of any major NHL subtypes. PMID:26373836

  1. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE (KAP OF BLOOD DONATION AMONG MBBS STUDENTS OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE IN KOLLAM, KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Nadeem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion is a very crucial component to manage patients suffering from various medical conditions. Voluntary blood donors are the need of the hour. There is a need to spread awareness among general population and students abo ut blood donation to maintain a regular blood supply. Young medical students can serve as best example to take a lead in this noble cause. OBJECTIVE: To assess the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP of Blood Donation among 1 st and 2 nd year MBBS students of a Medical College. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The cross sectional study was conducted in a medical college in Kollam district of Kerala in September 2013 among all 1 st and 2 nd year medical students. A separate Health awareness session was organized . Data was collected and analyzed with the Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS 12. RESULTS AND OBSERVATIONS: Not a single participant answered all knowledge questions correctly. Only 35% had adequate knowledge. The gender has no signifi cant association with knowledge about blood donation. 90% of the respondents had a positive attitude about blood donation. Religion only plays a minor role in their decision to donate blood. Only 10% actually donated blood. 57% students gave blood to a nee dy relative. The most common reason for not donating blood was having no opportunity. There is a significant association between 2 nd year students and blood donation. After awareness session, the overall willingness to donate blood increased from 89.3% to 97. 1%. CONCLUSION: Only one third of students have adequate knowledge level regarding blood donation. Only few among them have donated blood. Majority of them intend to donate blood in future. Information, Education and Communication (IEC activities shoul d be increased and regular seminars and classes should be conducted to increase awareness among medical students for encouraging them to donate blood voluntarily.

  2. Association between religiousness and blood donation among Brazilian postgraduate students from health-related areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Zangiacomi Martinez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the association between religiousness and blood donation among postgraduate students.METHODS: The Portuguese-language version of the Duke University Religion Index was administered to a sample of 226 Brazilian students with ages ranging from 22 to 55 years. All study participants had completed undergraduate courses in health-related areas.RESULTS: In the present study, 23.5% of the students were regular donors. Organizational religiousness was found to be associated with attitudes related to blood donation. This study also shows evidence that regular blood donors have a higher intrinsic religiousness than subjects who donate only once and do not return.CONCLUSION: This study shows that the attitudes concerning blood donation may have some association with religiosity.

  3. Racially conditional donation: the example of umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komesaroff, Paul A; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Samuel, Gabrielle; Lipworth, Wendy; Jordens, Christopher F C

    2012-03-01

    While direction of donated tissue to family members has long been accepted, direction to members of specific racial groups has been opposed, on the basis that it is discriminatory and contrary to the ethos the institution of organ donation seeks to promote. It has, however, recently been proposed that racially conditional donation may provide a useful--and ethically acceptable--way to address the social inequalities and injustices experienced by certain cultural groups. This article examines the ethical, legal and cultural arguments for and against racially conditional donation, concluding that the practice is more likely to undermine the values of equity and justice than to promote them and that it may also lead to other unfavourable personal and social outcomes. PMID:22558904

  4. Looking to the future, working on the present. Intention to donate blood and risk behavior: A study on adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Alfieri Sara; Saturni Vincenzo; Marta Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this work was to investigate adolescents′ propensity to donate blood, the incidence in this population of risk behaviors that limit and restrict the potential for blood donation, thus reducing the number of possible subjects suitable for donation, and the link between propensity to donate and healthy lifestyles. Materials and Methods: Adolescents were asked to complete an anonymous self-report questionnaire during class time. The questionnaire included ad hoc items desi...

  5. Blood donation knowledge and attitudes among undergraduate health science students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannis, Dimitrios; Rachiotis, George; Symvoulakis, Emmanouil K; Anyfantakis, Dimitrios; Douvlataniotis, Karolos; Zilidis, Christos; Markaki, Adelais; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Awareness towards blood donation can be empowered by health professionals' role-modelling. We aimed to assess knowledge and attitudes among Greek undergraduate medical laboratory students. A questionnaire was distributed to 330 students (response rate: 88.7%). Overall, 24% had donated blood at least once, with males 4.62 times more likely to be donors. Voluntary, non-remunerated blood donors were more likely to be repeaters. A quarter of all students were inclined to offer blood for monetary reward, with men more prone to accept payment. There is a need to campaign health science students during formal education through need-based as well as altruistic 'smart' messages. PMID:26653930

  6. Blood donation: comparing individual characteristics, attitudes, and feelings of donors and nondonors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Deborah; Grace, Debra; O'Cass, Aron

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of blood donors and increased demand for blood is an important health issue. Finding ways to increase donor recruitment and retention is a priority and, thus, an important area for research. This article aims to better understand donors and nondonors on the basis of their social responsibility, susceptibility to interpersonal influence, involvement in and attitude towards the blood donation issue, and their aroused feelings. The data from 345 completed surveys were collected via a web-based, self-administered method. Mean differences were examined and the conceptual model was tested via structural equation modeling. The findings provide important clarification of donation and nondonation behavior. PMID:25120042

  7. An analysis of decision making in cord blood donation through a participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvaterra, Elena; Casati, Sara; Bottardi, Simonetta; Brizzolara, Antonella; Calistri, Daniela; Cofano, Rosanna; Folliero, Emanuela; Lalatta, Faustina; Maffioletti, Cristina; Negri, Mariangela; Rebulla, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    We analysed knowledge, comprehension, opinions, attitudes and choices related to cord blood donation in seven heterogeneous focus groups including pregnant women, future parents, cord blood donors, midwives and obstetricians/gynaecologists. Comparative evaluations focused on attitudes before versus after delivery and preferences of public versus private banking. The study outlined large support to altruistic cord blood donation and need for better health professionals education in this field. Collected information was presented in a public conference and used to develop an informative brochure which was tested for readability and clearliness in four workshops and finally distributed to 26 regional delivery suites. PMID:20381426

  8. 'Corpore sano in mens sana'. The Morality of Blood Donation

    OpenAIRE

    Casado Neira, David

    2006-01-01

    Modern conceptions of health separate body from soul in the familiar Cartesian dualism. In blood donation this separation is easy to identify: embodiment is a civilizing process, and altruism is the moral basis that supports it. The donor is treated as essentially a vessel of blood, a mere container which can be directed to discharge its contents into blood banks. The biomedical use of blood is not morally neutral; indeed, the donor's moral conscience is mobilised in order to get them to dona...

  9. Platelet Donation (Apheresis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donation Student Donors Donation Process Eligibility Blood FAQs Blood Donor Community Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Types Blood Components What Happens to Donated Blood Blood and Diversity History of Blood Transfusion Hosting a Blood Drive What to Expect Hosting ...

  10. Response to post-donation counseling is still a challenge in outdoor voluntary blood donation camps: A survey from a tertiary care regional blood center in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood transfusion carries the risk of transmission of several infectious agents. The latest method for blood screening, nucleic acid testing is not affordable in developing countries. Aim: The study was aimed to find response to post-donation counseling for reactive markers among the voluntary blood donors donating in blood donation camps. Material and Methods: This 1 year study was conducted in 2011. Transfusion transmitted infections testing was performed by routine enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. The initial human immunodeficiency virus (HIV reactive donors who returned back to the blood bank were confidentially counseled and referred to the Integrated Counseling Cum Testing Center (ICTC. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV reactive donors were referred to the gastroenterology department for confirmation by qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR, Roche Diagnostics, Germany and followed-up. Results: Twenty seven thousand two hundred forty six 27,246 units were collected during the survey. One hundred twenty nine129 units were reactive for HIV 1 and 2, 99 were reactive for HCV, 206 for hepatitis B virus (HBV. Of these reactive donors, 138 could be personally communicated. Out of 47, 27 donors who returned for counseling were initially reactive for HIV 1 and 2, 8 for HBsAg and 12 for anti-HCV. Two were positive for HBV deoxyribonucleic acid and one was positive for HCV ribonucleic acid. The HIV positivity was detected in 1 of 27 donors at ICTC. Conclusion: The response to the post-donation counseling appears in this study to be only 34% (47/138, which is still a challenge.

  11. Study of knowledge and attitude among college-going students toward voluntary blood donation from north India

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    Mishra SK

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Shailesh Kumar Mishra,1 Suchet Sachdev,1 Neelam Marwaha,1 Ajit Avasthi21Department of Transfusion Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, IndiaIntroduction: The study was conducted to assess the knowledge and attitude of college-going students toward voluntary blood donation and to bring out and compare the reasons for donating or not donating blood.Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1,000 college-going students after taking their consent for participation using a prevalidated, self-administered, structured questionnaire after its content and construct validation.Results: The difference in the means of the level of knowledge among the donor (mean: 14.71±2.48 and nondonor students (mean: 11.55±2.82 was statistically significant. There was significant impact of previous blood donation on the level of knowledge in donor students. The attitude toward blood donation was more positive among blood donor as compared to nondonor students, and the difference in their means was statistically significant. About one in two (45.8% college-going students fear that either they are not fit enough to donate blood (26.8% or that they will become weak (19% after blood donation. Almost one in four (27.4% have fear of needle pain; therefore, they do not come forward for blood donation.Interpretation and conclusion: The most significant reason hindering blood donation comes out to be related to health of the individual donor. The findings of this study conclude that the national targets of voluntary blood donation could be better met with specific blood donor information, education, motivation, and recruitment strategies focusing on the myths and misconceptions prevalent in the donor demographic area of that particular region, specifically targeting high-school children in countries developing a volunteer donor base.Keywords: knowledge, attitude, voluntary blood

  12. Ethical challenges in voluntary blood donation in Kerala, India

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, L P; Tetali, S

    2007-01-01

    The National Blood Policy in India relies heavily on voluntary blood donors, as they are usually assumed to be associated with low levels of transfusion‐transmitted infections (TTIs). In India, it is mandatory to test every unit of blood collected for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, syphilis and malaria. Donors come to the blood bank with altruistic intentions. If donors test positive to any of the five infections, their blood is discarded. Although the blood policy advocates disclosure o...

  13. Factors Associated with Intention to Donate Blood: Sociodemographic and Past Experience Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Pule Ishmael Pule; Boitshwarelo Rachaba; Mgaywa Gilbert Mjungu Damas Magafu; Dereje Habte

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. This study was conducted to assess the level of intention of the general public towards blood donation and the factors associated with it. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in South-East Botswana amongst participants aged 21–65 years. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was completed for 384 participants. Results. Of the 384 participants, 104 (27.1%) reported that they had donated blood in the past and 269 (70.1%) stated that they were...

  14. Characteristics of Lapsed German Whole Blood Donors and Barriers to Return Four Years after the Initial Donation

    OpenAIRE

    Weidmann, Christian; Müller-Steinhardt, Michael; Schneider, Sven; Weck, Eberhard; Klüter, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to identify characteristics of lapsed donors 4 years after the initial donation as well as self-reported barriers to return for further blood donations. Methods: A random number of 8,000 blood donors, donating for the German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Wurttemberg - Hessen, were asked to fill in a self-administered questionnaire. The response rate was 38.5%. Donors were categorized as ”lapsed’ if they had not donated within the last 24 months. The odds o...

  15. Practices and attitudes towards blood donation in health high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Daştan; Nihal Bostancı Daştan; Nilüfer Kıranşal

    2013-01-01

    There are very few studies demonstrating the awareness level of our society about “blood requirement” and “blood donation”. The aim of the present study was to investigate practices and attitudes towards blood donation among students from Kars Health High School. The study was conducted in Kars Health High School between March and May 2009. In the present study, was used a questionairre based on the literature review and that aimed to assess sociodemographic characteristics (18 items) and pra...

  16. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE (KAP) OF BLOOD DONATION AMONG MBBS STUDENTS OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE IN KOLLAM, KERALA

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Nadeem; Abraham, [No Value; Sony, .; Nahla; Pranav,; Mohammed; Nikhila; Nishani

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion is a very crucial component to manage patients suffering from various medical conditions. Voluntary blood donors are the need of the hour. There is a need to spread awareness among general population and students abo ut blood donation to maintain a regular blood supply. Young medical students can serve as best example to take a lead in this noble cause. OBJECTIVE: To assess the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) of Blood Donation...

  17. Knowledge and Attitude about Blood Donation Amongst Undergraduate Students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed University of Central India

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    Purushottam A Giri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The major part of demand for blood in India is met through voluntary blood donations. Students consists a large and healthy group who are able to provide a large number of blood donation. However, there is a paucity of studies on knowledge and attitude among undergraduate students from medical and paramedical branches. Objectives: A present study was conducted to assess the knowledge and attitude about blood donation among undergraduate medical science university students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 400 final year undergraduate students from medical, dental, nursing, and physiotherapy disciplines in a Pravara institute of Medical Sciences University campus of central India during the period of May- August 2011. Data was analyzed in the form of percentage and proportions and Chi-square test. Results: The overall knowledge on blood donation was good; however, majority (52.5% of students never donated blood. Knowledge level was found highest among medical students (53.1% and lowest among physiotherapy students (20.7%. Non-consideration, forgetfulness, and lack of time were the major reasons for not donating blood. A significant association was observed between different streams of students and levels of knowledge and attitude about blood donation. Conclusion: This study elicits the importance of adopting effective measures in our campus to motivate about voluntary blood donation among students.

  18. Study of knowledge and attitude among college-going students toward voluntary blood donation from north India

    OpenAIRE

    SK Mishra; Sachdev S; Marwaha N; Avasthi A

    2016-01-01

    Shailesh Kumar Mishra,1 Suchet Sachdev,1 Neelam Marwaha,1 Ajit Avasthi21Department of Transfusion Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, IndiaIntroduction: The study was conducted to assess the knowledge and attitude of college-going students toward voluntary blood donation and to bring out and compare the reasons for donating or not donating blood.Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1,000 colle...

  19. Emerging Pathogens - How Safe is Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Geilenkeuser, Wolf-Jochen; Sireis, Walid; Seifried, Erhard; Hourfar, Kai

    2014-02-01

    During the last few decades, blood safety efforts were mainly focused on preventing viral infections. However, humanity's increased mobility and improved migration pathways necessitate a global perspective regarding other transfusion-transmitted pathogens. This review focuses on the general infection risk of blood components for malaria, dengue virus, Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Babesia spp. Approximately 250 million people become infected by Plasmodium spp. per year. Dengue virus affects more than 50 million people annually in more than 100 countries; clinically, it can cause serious diseases, such as dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Chagas disease, which is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, mainly occurs in South America and infects approximately 10 million people annually. Babesia spp. is a parasitic infection that infects red blood cells; although many infections are asymptomatic, severe clinical disease has been reported, especially in the elderly. Screening assays are available for all considered pathogens but make screening strategies more complex and more expensive. A general pathogen inactivation for all blood components (whole blood) promises to be a long-term, sustainable solution for both known and unknown pathogens. Transfusion medicine therefore eagerly awaits such a system. PMID:24659943

  20. Koplin, Titmuss and the social tail that wags the dog: Commentary on Koplin, "From blood donation to kidney sales".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearmur, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a commentary on Koplin's "From Blood Donation to Kidney Sales". While appreciative of his paper, it argues that an argument from social solidarity to a Titmussian donor system is problematic. It reviews weaknesses in Titmuss, discusses problems about Titmussian blood donation as a vehicle for solidarity, and explores problems about extending a Titmussian approach to organs. PMID:26507137

  1. Effect of preoperative autologous blood donation on patients undergoing bimaxillary orthognathic surgery: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, A Y; Seo, K S; Lee, G E; Kim, H J

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) was evaluated according to preoperative haemoglobin (Hb) values. The records of 295 patients who underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery between July 2007 and August 2008 were reviewed. The records for autologous blood donation, intraoperative transfusion, and related laboratory studies were also evaluated. The transfusion trigger used during this period was Hb blood transfusion was significantly lower in the PABD group than in the no PABD group (15.9% vs. 29.2%, P=0.007). This difference was greater in patients with a preoperative Hb blood transfusion in patients undergoing bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, particularly in patients with a preoperative Hb blood transfusion in these patients. PMID:26678802

  2. Using a sponsorship to improve the success of blood drive donations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Beth; Hershey, Lewis; Hogan, Reed; Callum, Corley

    2007-01-01

    Promoting the idea of blood donation as well as the successful recruitment of blood donors represents substantial marketing challenges. For example, blood products have a short shelf life, donation is invasive, the industry is heavily regulated, and safety issues restrict the number of eligible donors. Moreover, many organizations that collect blood are non-profit services that are not equipped to make use of many of the tools of marketing and promotion. In the for-profit world, organizations are increasingly using sponsorships to enhance the effectiveness of their marketing expenditures. This paper reports on the use of a sponsorship to increase blood drive donations. The sponsorship used a standing annual holiday promotion/stakeholder appreciation campaign conducted by a large local group of gastroenterologists. Linkage of the sponsorship to a local blood drive resulted in increased response rates from donors and in the number of units of blood collected. Implications of the use of sponsorships for future blood drives are discussed. PMID:19042519

  3. Blood Donation and Citizenship Education. An approach from service learning and the Theory of Don

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. PUIG ROVIRA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The altruistic donation of blood recommended by the World Health Organisation and carried out through blood banks not only contributes to providing the health system with an indispensable therapeutic element, it is also a means of fostering social integration and educating for citizenship. Within this general context, the article begins by arguing why altruistic donation is better than buying and selling blood and why the gift theory – developed by sociology on the basis of the work by Marcel Mauss – more than justifies the possibility of meeting the demand for blood in this way. On the basis of these considerations it can be said that blood banks are social institutions that perform three basic functions: technical, civic and educational. The article continues by examining the educational project undertaken by the Blood and Tissue Bank of Catalonia, which consists in a programme based on the methodology of service learning and which invites young people to cultivate and develop a communicative approach to promoting the altruistic donation of blood in their neighbourhood. The article concludes by evaluating the consolidation, effectiveness and degree of satisfaction of the project, and suggesting that this model can be used to form the basis of ideas for educational proposals of other social institutions.

  4. Possibility of enhanced risk of retinal neovascularization in repeated blood donors: blood donation and retinal alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastmanesh R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reza RastmaneshDepartment of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Tehran, IranAbstract: Repeated blood donors manifest clinical, subclinical, and biochemical signs of iron deficiency anemia, have significantly higher erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF concentrations, and decreased tissue oxygen saturation, oxygenated tissue hemoglobin, and regional cerebral oxygen saturation. Erythropoietin and VEGF are potent retinal angiogenic factors which may initiate and promote the retinal angiogenesis process independently or simultaneously. Increases in circulating levels of erythropoietin and VEGF are proportionate to the levels of hematocrit, hypoxemia, and tissue hypoxia. It is suggested that higher erythropoietin production following iron deficiency anemia-induced chronic hypoxemia/hypoxia may, hypothetically, enhance the risk of retinal angiogenesis and/or neovascularization, possibly by inducing hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha, which consequently upregulates genes stimulating angiogenesis, resulting in formation of a new vasculature, possibly by modulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in the retina. Implications of this hypothesis cover erythropoietin doping, chronic hypoxia, and hypoxemic situations, such as angiogenesis-related cardiac and pulmonary diseases.Keywords: repeated blood donation, erythropoietin, retinal neovascularization, vascular endothelial growth factor, hypoxia

  5. Development of standard definitions for surveillance of complications related to blood donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, M; Land, K; Robillard, P; Wiersum-Osselton, J

    2016-02-01

    Standard definitions of donor reactions allow each blood establishment to monitor donor adverse events and compare with other organizations to develop best practices. The ISBT Haemovigilance Working Party leads a multi-organizational effort to update the 2008 ISBT standard for surveillance of complications related to blood donation. Revised definitions have been developed and endorsed by the ISBT, AABB, International Haemovigilance Network (IHN) and other international organizations. PMID:26361365

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Janine M Ramsey

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide...

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilberto Sánchez-González; Alejandro Figueroa-Lara; Miguel Elizondo-Cano; Leslie Wilson; Barbara Novelo-Garza; Leopoldo Valiente-Banuet; Janine M Ramsey

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide...

  8. Blood donation as a public good: an empirical investigation of the free rider problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abásolo, Ignacio; Tsuchiya, Aki

    2014-04-01

    A voluntary blood donation system can be seen as a public good. People can take advantage without contributing and have a free ride. We empirically analyse the extent of free riding and its determinants. Interviews of the general public in Spain (n = 1,211) were used to ask whether respondents were (or have been) regular blood donors and, if not, the reason. Free riders are defined as those who are medically capable to donate blood but do not. In addition, we distinguish four different types of free riding depending on the reason given for not donating. Binomial and multinomial logit models estimate the effect of individual characteristics on the propensity to free ride and the likelihood of the free rider types. Amongst those who are able to donate, there is a 67 % probability of being a free rider. The most likely free rider is female, single, with low/no education and abstained from voting in a recent national election. Gender, age, religious practice, political participation and regional income explain the type of free rider. PMID:23797489

  9. Translation into Portuguese and validation of the Blood Donation Reactions Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Garcia Braz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the Blood Donation Reactions Inventory (BDRI scale was proposed as part of a study about the predictors of psychological reactions in volunteer blood donors, as uncomfortable reactions are associated with a lower probability to return for further donations. Objective: to translate the Inventory into Brazilian Portuguese and evaluate its psychometric properties (validity and reliability. The inventory has 11 items, but the literature suggests that shorter inventories, of four or six items, should be used. Methods: this study was carried out at the blood center of Franca, Brazil. Three people with knowledge of English and familiarity with medical terms translated the Blood Donation Reactions Inventory into Brazilian Portuguese. Aiming to evaluate the objectivity and relevance of the items of the translated instrument, its content was independently evaluated by a panel of eight assessors. After this, data on 1,001 blood donors was collected. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. An exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to analyze the measure for construct validity. Results: the sample consisted of 65.8% men, and 27.3% first time donors. Internal consistency determined by Cronbach's alpha coefficient was satisfactory for the 11, 6 and 4-item scales. Considering the factor analysis, the 11-item scale seems to measure more than one construct as three factors were identified with eigenvalues greater than 1. These factors correspond to 'vasovagal adverse reactions', 'fear' and 'anxiety/excitation'. Conclusion: the Portuguese version of the Blood Donation Reactions Inventory is a valid and reliable instrument for collecting information regarding systemic reactions experienced by blood donors. The 6-item scale seems to be useful when the objective is to measure only vasovagal adverse reactions.

  10. Solving Shortage in a Priceless Market: Insights from Blood Donation

    OpenAIRE

    Tianshu Sun; Susan Feng Lu; Ginger Zhe Jin

    2015-01-01

    Shortage is common in many markets, such as those for human organs or blood, but the problem is often difficult to solve through price adjustment, given safety and ethical concerns. In this paper, we investigate whether market designers can use non-price methods to address shortage. Specifically, we study two methods that are used to alleviate shortage in the market for human blood. The first method is informing existing donors of a current shortage via a mobile message and encouraging them t...

  11. [Digital marketing: what place does it have in blood donation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, A

    2013-05-01

    Blood transfusion arose from the actions of medical doctors and has to answer to the increasing evolution of the blood product. To answer this vital need, marketing intervenes with the implementation of strategy and a multi-channel campaign. The emergence, acquisition and evolution of new information technologies in today's society require that marketing and communication professionals use of digital marketing in their relational initiatives and the promotion of the gift of life. PMID:23582526

  12. Why don't women volunteer to give blood? A study of knowledge, attitude and practice of women about blood donation, Yazd, Iran, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadeh Shahshahani, H

    2007-12-01

    The most important aim of all blood transfusion centres is to recruit blood donors from low-risk groups of society to donate blood voluntarily and regularly. In the city of Yazd, Iran, only 5% of blood donors are women. The aim of this study was to assess barriers of donation of blood by women and the level of knowledge, attitude and practice regarding blood donation. In this cross-sectional study, 1602 women were selected by cluster sampling method and asked to fill a specially formatted questionnaire. Data were analysed by ANOVA and the t-test. Levels of knowledge were different between the various groups. Illiterate women and housewives had the least levels of knowledge. Fifteen per cent of the women had donated blood at least once in the past. The most important motivational factor was sense of moral duty with a spiritual reward and the most important barriers for donating blood were anaemia, fear, lack of time and difficulty in access to donation sites. A significant percentage of women had false beliefs about blood donation. Increase in the level of knowledge of women and correction of false beliefs should be the topmost priority. Further studies are needed to determine whether addressing anaemia and women's health can tend to increase the number of female blood donors. PMID:18067649

  13. Effects of Lifting Blood Donation Bans on Men Who Have Sex with Men

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Naomi G.; Gates, Gary

    2010-01-01

    If the current FDA blood ban on men who have sex with men (MSM) were lifted, an estimated 360,600 men would likely donate 615,300 additional pints of blood each year. Lifting the ban would increase the total annual blood supply in the U.S. by 2 to 4 percent and could be used to help save the lives of more than a million people. If MSM who have not had sexual contact with another man in the past twelve months were permitted to donate, the report estimates that 185,800 additional men are likely...

  14. Treatment-donation-stockpile dynamics in ebola convalescent blood transfusion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xi; Sun, Xiaodan; Lan, Kunquan; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-03-01

    The interim guidance issued by the World Health Organization during the West Africa 2014 Ebola outbreak provides guidelines on the use of convalescent blood from Ebola survivors for transfusion therapy. Here we develop a novel mathematical model, based on the interim guidance, to examine the nonlinear transmission-treatment-donation-stockpile dynamics during an Ebola outbreak and with a large scale use of the transfusion therapy in the population. We estimate the reduction of case fatality ratio by introducing convalescent blood transfusion as a therapy, and inform optimal treatment-donation-stockpile strategies to balance the treatment need for case fatality ratio reduction and the strategic need of maintaining a minimal blood bank stockpile for other control priorities. PMID:26721704

  15. Looking to the future, working on the present. Intention to donate blood and risk behavior: A study on adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfieri Sara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this work was to investigate adolescents′ propensity to donate blood, the incidence in this population of risk behaviors that limit and restrict the potential for blood donation, thus reducing the number of possible subjects suitable for donation, and the link between propensity to donate and healthy lifestyles. Materials and Methods: Adolescents were asked to complete an anonymous self-report questionnaire during class time. The questionnaire included ad hoc items designed to investigate the intention to donate blood and behaviors traditionally considered to put adolescents′ health "at risk." Participants were 201 students from northern Italy (range 12-19, M = 17.98, SD = 1.82; 38.9% male, 61.1% female. Results: About half of respondents perceived that they were able to donate blood and could overcome any obstacle that might prevent them from doing so. Some of the examined risk behaviors were widespread in the population under consideration. The linear regressions run show that there is no link between the propensity to give blood and a tendency to engage in healthy lifestyles. Conclusion: The study shows that adolescents demonstrate an interest in blood donation; however, it shows a real lack of "action" to make it happen: there is, indeed, a serious lack of attention to matters related to healthy lifestyles. In fact, adolescents are not aware of how to act to access the world of donation, with the risk that they present themselves at blood donation centers and are then found to be unfit to donate. The research offers many suggestions and implications.

  16. The prevalence of bacterial contamination in donated blood in Dar es salaam, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Malimu, Emmanuel Zephania

    2012-01-01

    Blood transfusion services are required to provide blood and components which are safe in cost effective way for transfusion into patients who require the blood products. This study aims to determine the prevalence of bacterial contamination and the antimicrobial resistance pattern in collected blood in Eastern zone blood transfusion centre. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Eastern Zone Blood Transfusion Services located at Mchikichini, Ilala District, in Dar es Salaam. Stored whole b...

  17. Evaluation of Intervention on Voluntary Blood Donation among 1st Prof Medical and Dental Students of Index Medical College, Indore (MP), India

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Bachhotiya, V K Arora, Piyusha Mahashabde

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Objectives of this study was to assess KAP regarding voluntary blood donation among 1stprof MBBS & BDS students of Index Medical College, Indore and also to evaluate the intervention in making the students aware about voluntary blood donation Methods: Among 209 students (125 MBBS, 84 BDS) a questionnaire was administered followed by participants’ visit to the hospital blood donation centre where a short interactive awareness session was organized. The willingness to donate b...

  18. Behavior of the hepatitis C in blood donaters in the Sancti Spiritus province. 2008 -2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Quesada Concepción

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of the viral hepatitis type C (VHC as a health problem in the world and in Cuba and its transmission that include as a fundamental way the blood. A descriptive reseach was done with the objective of determining the behaviour of the blood donaters carrier of the hepatitis C virus in the Provincial Blood Bank of Sancti Spiritus in the period between January 1st, 2006 to december 31st, 2008. The sample was conformed by 312 donaters with positive diagnosis of Hepatitis C. Different variables were used such as: prevailing, age, sex, race and residence municipality. The prevalence of hepatitis C virus was of (8,95 x 1000 donants, it prevailed the male sex (95,5 %, the age group between 36-40 years (22,6 % and the white race (55,9%; Sancti Spiritus municipality was which gave more cases. The prevailing of viral hepatitis type c was high in blood donaters of Sanct Spiritus province wich constituted a real health problem.

  19. Identifying belief targets to increase bone marrow registry participation among students who have never donated blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Melissa K; McLaren, Patrick J; White, Katherine M

    2014-01-01

    New members on bone marrow registries worldwide are needed to allow sufficient diversity in the donor pool to meet patient needs. We used the theory of planned behaviour belief-basis and surveyed students who had not donated blood previously (i.e. non-donors) (N = 150) about the behavioural, normative, and control beliefs informing their intentions to join the Australian Bone Marrow Donor Registry. Key beliefs predicting non-donors' intentions included: viewing bone marrow donation as an invasion of the body (β = -.35), normative support from parents (β = .40), anticipating pain/side effects from giving blood (β = -.27), and lack of knowledge about how to register (β = -.30). Few non-donors endorsed these beliefs, suggesting they are ideal targets for change in strategies encouraging bone marrow donor registration. PMID:23473418

  20. [Blood donation in the media between 1950 and 1980].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, J-J; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    Anecdotes, such as found in the media and chiefly the humor journals and magazines aim at bringing revisited insights on society subjects, which can even be the most serious. Anecdotes reported here on blood transfusion and the transfusion environment, that were retrieved from French news released in the media press between the 1950s to 1980s give a view on what has been achieved since then, but also on what is at a standstill by some incapability in moving forward or in changing minds. Those anecdotes would be used to stimulate or refresh debates in transfusion related-ethics. PMID:26774418

  1. Association between religiousness and blood donation among Brazilian postgraduate students from health-related areas

    OpenAIRE

    Edson Zangiacomi Martinez; Rodrigo Guimarães dos Santos Almeida; Ana Carolina Garcia Braz; Antonio Carlos Duarte de Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the association between religiousness and blood donation among postgraduate students.METHODS: The Portuguese-language version of the Duke University Religion Index was administered to a sample of 226 Brazilian students with ages ranging from 22 to 55 years. All study participants had completed undergraduate courses in health-related areas.RESULTS: In the present study, 23.5% of the students were regular donors. Organizational religiousness was f...

  2. Nucleic acid amplification technology screening for hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus for blood donations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the performance of the commercial Roche COBAS AmpliScreen assay, and demonstrate whether the COBAS AmpliScreen human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) test, v1.5, and COBAS AmpliScreen hepatitis C virus (HCV) v 2.0 for screening for HIV-1 and HCV RNA in the donated blood units from which plasma mini pools were collected, by nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT), could detect the positive pools and reduce the risk of transmission of infections for those routinely tested by serological assays. The study was performed on 3288 plasma samples collected from blood donors in a period of 13 months, from August 2004 to August 2005, at Al-Hada Armed Forces Hospital, Molecular Pathology Laboratory, Taif, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The samples were tested by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after RNA extraction (this represents the major method in NAT assays), in parallel with the routine serological testing to detect qualitatively for HIV-1 and HCV. The NAT assays that include an automated COBAS AmpliPrep system for RNA extraction and COBAS Amplicor Analyzer using AmpliScreen kits for RT-PCR assays, and the routine serological screening assays for the detection of the HIV-1 and HCV RNA in the plasma samples from the blood donors have shown to be a reliable combination that would meet our requirements. The collected data further confirms the results from the serological assays and enables us to decrease the residual risk of transmission to a minimum with the finding of no seronegative window period donation. The results demonstrate that out of 3288 samples, the percentages of RT-PCR (NAT) negative blood donations that were also confirmed as seronegative were 99% for HCV, and 99.1% for HIV-1. The modified combined systems (automated COBAS AmpliPrep system for RNA extraction and COBAS Amplicor Analyzer using AmpliScreen kits for RT-PCR assays) for NAT screening assays has allowed the release of all blood donations supplied in the

  3. A study of the noncompliance of blood banks on safety and quality parameters in blood donation camps in Bengaluru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Kumar Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The compliance of safety and quality parameters laid out by national and international guidelines in outdoor blood donation camps has not been studied in India. Our study aimed at identifying, monitoring, analyzing, and developing preventive strategies for several key parameters associated with the quality and safety of outdoor voluntary blood donation camps (VBDC. Settings: The study covered a total of 424 VBDCs at various locations in Bengaluru, Karnataka (South India from 2009 to 2013. Seven government hospitals based blood banks, three private hospitals based blood banks and two voluntary standalone blood banks participated in the VBDCs included in the study. Materials and Methods: At the onset, the quality and safety standards to be followed were discussed and agreed upon. During the study, noncompliance (NC to the agreed upon standards were recorded and shared. Periodic trainings were also organized to help minimize NC. Results: One or more instances of NC in 73% of the VBDCs. Highest NC were observed associated with punctuality (34%, wearing gloves (16%, hemoglobin (Hb estimation (11% and donor screening and selection other than Hb check (8-9%. Conclusion: For all 16 parameters under study, significant NC was observed. As a whole private hospital based blood banks were more noncompliant. The high degree of NC to matters relating to quality and safety in VBDCs is high and warrants for urgent attention and further study. Our study also shows that regular monitoring and systematic and strategic intervention can decrease the rate of NC.

  4. Blood Donation as a Public Good: An Empirical Investigation of the Free-Rider

    OpenAIRE

    Abásolo, I.; Tsuchiya, A.

    2012-01-01

    A voluntary blood donation system can be seen as a public good. People can take advantage without contributing, which leads to the so called free-rider problem. An empirical study is undertaken to analyse the extent of free-riding and its determinants in this context. Interviews of the general public in Spain (n=1,211) ask whether respondents are (or have been) regular blood donors; and if not, the reason. Free-riders are defined as those individuals who have no medical reason that disables t...

  5. From blood donation to kidney sales: the gift relationship and transplant commercialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplin, Julian J

    2015-01-01

    In The Gift Relationship, Richard Titmuss argued that the practice of altruistic blood donation fosters social solidarity while markets in blood erode it. This paper considers the implications of this line of argument for the organ market debate. I defend Titmuss' arguments against a number of criticisms and respond to claims that Titmuss' work is not relevant to the context of live donor organ transplantation. I conclude that Titmuss' arguments are more resilient than many advocates of organ markets suggest, and more relevant to the debate than is commonly appreciated. PMID:26458365

  6. Evaluation of Intervention on Voluntary Blood Donation among 1st Prof Medical and Dental Students of Index Medical College, Indore (MP, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Bachhotiya, V K Arora, Piyusha Mahashabde

    2014-01-01

    Methods: Among 209 students (125 MBBS, 84 BDS a questionnaire was administered followed by participants’ visit to the hospital blood donation centre where a short interactive awareness session was organized. The willingness to donate blood was noted at the end of the session. Results: All the participants had lack of knowledge regarding blood donation with no difference between male and female. The proportion of male blood donors was 36 (36.7% while 9 (8.2% female students had donated blood so far. At first, a total of 88 students were willing to donate blood, including those 45 who had earlier done it. Out of the 164 students who did not donate blood earlier, 24 (14.6% had no support from family, 16 (9.75% were afraid of needle prick, 34 (20.7% had fear of becoming weak after blood donation and 8 (4.8% were afraid of contracting any disease through needle prick. After the awareness session, a total of 196 students (93.77% showed willingness to donate blood and the change was statistically significant. Conclusion: The knowledge and practice of voluntary blood donation among the study participants was found much better than the results of previous studies [7] and the awareness session-cum-visit to the blood donation centre fetched very high level of willingness. This implies the im-portance of regular intervention which can be most easily and successfully carried out by the teaching faculties in the medical college.

  7. The Effect of Information Provision on Voluntary Contributions to Public Goods: A Field Experiment on Blood Donation

    OpenAIRE

    Sobei Oda; Erika Seki; Yan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    When the provision of public goods requires contributions from individuals with different abilities, solicitation of efficient voluntary contributions from heterogeneous individuals becomes important. Blood banks are one such public resource. Blood banks perform a challenging task in ensuring a balanced supply of blood types to provide effective blood transfusion services. This study designs a field experiment in conjunction with a blood donation campaign to examine whether making potential d...

  8. Influence of blood donation on oxygen uptake kinetics during moderate and heavy intensity cycle exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, D; Marshall, K; Connell, A; Barnes, R J

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a reduced whole body blood volume on the kinetic response of VO(2) during moderate and heavy intensity exercise. Six males and four females (age, 21+/-2 yrs; height, 175.2+/-5.1 cm; weight, 66.4+/-2.8 kg; VO(2)max, 53.0+/-4.1 ml x kg (-1) x min(-1)), completed a square-wave cycling ramp test to determine ventilatory threshold (VT) and VO(2max). Kinetics trials were completed 24 h pre and post donation of 450 cm (3) of blood. The kinetics trials were moderate intensity (80%VT) and heavy intensity (Delta50% VT - VO(2max)). Breath-by-breath gas exchange, heart rate, blood pressure, haemoglobin O(2) saturation, and blood [lactate] were measured throughout the trials. Post-donation haemoglobin, haematocrit and erythrocyte count were all significantly reduced (pexercise (p>or= 0.05), or in the amplitude of the slow component. The capacity of the cardiovascular system to meet the metabolic demands of skeletal muscle at the onset of exercise does not limit the oxygen uptake. PMID:20180178

  9. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    10-6, respectively). Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5%) or anaerobic (27.8%) species, which are not likely to be detected during current...

  10. Quantification of print, radio and television exposure among previous blood donors in Kenya: an opportunity for encouraging repeat donation in a resource-limited setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraju, S V; Mwangi, J; Kellogg, T A; Odawo, L; Marum, L H

    2010-10-01

    Blood services in sub-Saharan Africa experience blood shortages and low retention of voluntary, non-remunerated donors. To boost collections by encouraging repeat donations, the Kenya National Blood Transfusion Service is exploring the likelihood of reaching previous donors through targeted print, radio and television advertising. We analysed data from a national AIDS Indicator Survey to determine whether previous donors have significant exposure to media. Respondents reporting history of blood donation had significantly higher exposure to print, radio and television media than those without history of blood donation. Targeted media campaigns encouraging repeat donation are likely to reach previous donors even in resource-limited settings. PMID:20598106

  11. [Introducing marketing strategies and techniques into the field of voluntary blood donation, to meet the rise in blood demand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, S; Bégué, L

    2011-04-01

    Social marketing uses marketing principles and techniques to induce a target audience to voluntary accept, reject, change or abandon a behaviour for the benefit of individuals, groups, or society as a whole. Thus, individual or societal gain is the primary goal of social marketing. This kind of marketing is frequently used in the United States or in Canada in several fields such as healthcare, social work, or the environment. In 2008, we introduced these strategies and techniques in the field of blood donation in France. This article describes what has been achieved in the last three years and outlines the main steps in the social marketing planning process: analyzing the social marketing environment, defining target audiences and objectives, building and implementing strategies and action plans, evaluating and monitoring. On the way to self-sufficiency, while respecting donors, social marketing is additional to the work done by the blood collection staffs, communication teams, and volunteers. Social marketing is a complementary tool to the work done by the blood collection staff, communication teams and blood donation organizations and can help to meet the challenge of self-sufficiency while still allowing for the privacy and rights of donors. PMID:21474359

  12. Low transfusion transmission of hepatitis E among 25,637 single-donation, nucleic acid-tested blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritshøj, Lene H.; Holm, Dorte K.; Sækmose, Susanne G.;

    2016-01-01

    investigated among Danish blood donors, and the prevalence of HEV transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) was investigated among recipients. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Samples from 25,637 consenting donors collected during 1 month in 2015 were screened retrospectively using an individual-donation HEV RNA...... immune response could not be excluded. Phylogenetic analysis showed relatively large sequence differences between HEV from donors, symptomatic patients, and swine. CONCLUSIONS: Despite an HEV RNA prevalence of 0.04% in Danish blood donations, all HEV-positive donations carried low viral loads, and no...... nucleic acid test with a 95% detection probability of 7.9 IU/mL. HEV-positive samples were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and genotyped. Transmission was evaluated among recipients of HEV RNA-positive blood components. Phylogenetic analyses compared HEV sequences from blood donors...

  13. Analysis of Pre-Donation Deferral Causes in Blood Donors at a Rural Medical Institute of Rohilkhand Region, India

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, Milan; Maheshwari, Sonam; Saxena, Ratna; Yadav, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Deferral of potential blood donors due to various reasons at the time of pre-donation medical examination and interrogation leads to the scarcity of blood for the treatment of patients requiring blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to analyze the reasons for deferral and the demographic profile of these deferred blood donors, so that necessary changes in donor recruitment policies could be made in future.Methods: Deferral record of five years from January 2010 to December 2014 w...

  14. A Stochastic Simulator of a Blood Product Donation Environment with Demand Spikes and Supply Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ming-Wen; Reich, Nicholas G.; Crawford, Stephen O.; Brookmeyer, Ron; Louis, Thomas A.; Nelson, Kenrad E.

    2011-01-01

    The availability of an adequate blood supply is a critical public health need. An influenza epidemic or another crisis affecting population mobility could create a critical donor shortage, which could profoundly impact blood availability. We developed a simulation model for the blood supply environment in the United States to assess the likely impact on blood availability of factors such as an epidemic. We developed a simulator of a multi-state model with transitions among states. Weekly numbers of blood units donated and needed were generated by negative binomial stochastic processes. The simulator allows exploration of the blood system under certain conditions of supply and demand rates, and can be used for planning purposes to prepare for sudden changes in the public's health. The simulator incorporates three donor groups (first-time, sporadic, and regular), immigration and emigration, deferral period, and adjustment factors for recruitment. We illustrate possible uses of the simulator by specifying input values for an -week flu epidemic, resulting in a moderate supply shock and demand spike (for example, from postponed elective surgeries), and different recruitment strategies. The input values are based in part on data from a regional blood center of the American Red Cross during –. Our results from these scenarios suggest that the key to alleviating deficit effects of a system shock may be appropriate timing and duration of recruitment efforts, in turn depending critically on anticipating shocks and rapidly implementing recruitment efforts. PMID:21814550

  15. A stochastic simulator of a blood product donation environment with demand spikes and supply shocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wen An

    Full Text Available The availability of an adequate blood supply is a critical public health need. An influenza epidemic or another crisis affecting population mobility could create a critical donor shortage, which could profoundly impact blood availability. We developed a simulation model for the blood supply environment in the United States to assess the likely impact on blood availability of factors such as an epidemic. We developed a simulator of a multi-state model with transitions among states. Weekly numbers of blood units donated and needed were generated by negative binomial stochastic processes. The simulator allows exploration of the blood system under certain conditions of supply and demand rates, and can be used for planning purposes to prepare for sudden changes in the public's health. The simulator incorporates three donor groups (first-time, sporadic, and regular, immigration and emigration, deferral period, and adjustment factors for recruitment. We illustrate possible uses of the simulator by specifying input values for an 8-week flu epidemic, resulting in a moderate supply shock and demand spike (for example, from postponed elective surgeries, and different recruitment strategies. The input values are based in part on data from a regional blood center of the American Red Cross during 1996-2005. Our results from these scenarios suggest that the key to alleviating deficit effects of a system shock may be appropriate timing and duration of recruitment efforts, in turn depending critically on anticipating shocks and rapidly implementing recruitment efforts.

  16. The development of the program of voluntary blood donation promotion in students population of the University of Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović-Srzentić Snežana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Given that in each country students represent the most progressive population group, as of 2001, the Blood Transfusion Institute of Serbia (BTIS has been carrying the program of voluntary blood donation promotion and education of volunteers at the University of Belgrade (UB. In 2011, the BTIS intensified all activities at the UB. The aim of this study was to present activities performed from 2001 at the Blood Donors` Motivation Department (DMD of the BTIS related with increasing the level of awareness on voluntary blood donation in the Belgrade students` population, enhancing their motivation to become voluntary blood donors (VBDs, increasing the number of blood donations at faculties of the UB, and increasing the number of blood donations in the UB students population compared with the total number of blood units collected by BTIS in Belgrade, with the emphasis on the year 2013. Methods. Initially, the applied methodology was based on encouraging students to donate blood through discussions and preparatory lectures, followed by organized blood drives. Appropriate selection of volunteers at each faculty was crucial. Besides their recognisable identity, they had to have remarkable communication skills and ability to positivly affect persons in their environment. The applied principle was based on retention of volunteers all through the final academic year, with the inclusion of new volunteers each year and 1,000 preparatory lectures on the annual basis. The activities were realized using two Facebook profiles, SMS messages and continuous notification of the public through the media. Results. There was an increase in the average number of students in blood drives at the faculties from 2011, when the average number of the students per blood drive was 39, followed by 43 in 2012 and 46 in 2013. The number of students who donated blood in 2013 increased by 21.3% compared with 2012 data. Conclusion. The applied concept highly

  17. The relative efficacy of telephone and email reminders to elicit blood donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, M; Godin, G

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to test the relative efficacy of telephone and email reminders to trigger blood donation. A sample of 3454 donors was randomized to one of three conditions: phone only (n = 1176), email only (n = 1091) and phone + email (n = 1187). There was a higher proportion of donors who registered to give blood in the phone + email condition (18·45%) compared to the other two conditions (phone: 15·73%, P < 0·05; email: 13·20%; P < 0·001); this effect was apparent only in men. The phone and email conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0·16), suggesting equivalent efficacy. PMID:26198382

  18. The development of the program of voluntary blood donation promotion in students population of the University of Belgrade

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović-Srzentić Snežana; Rodić Ivana; Knežević Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim. Given that in each country students represent the most progressive population group, as of 2001, the Blood Transfusion Institute of Serbia (BTIS) has been carrying the program of voluntary blood donation promotion and education of volunteers at the University of Belgrade (UB). In 2011, the BTIS intensified all activities at the UB. The aim of this study was to present activities performed from 2001 at the Blood Donors` Motivation Department ...

  19. Pre-donation deferral of blood donors in South Indian set-up: An analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is well known that quite a large number of apparently healthy donors are not able to donate blood successfully because of varied reasons. Aim: We want to analyze the rate and various reasons for deferrals. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of records of the donors, for 3 years, from January 2005 to December 2007 was done, in order to find out the rate and causes of deferral in four categories of age groups, both in male and female, in our Transfusion Medicine Centre, Bangalore, India. Result: There were 16,706 donors, of which 976 donors were deferred (5.84% for various reasons. Of the 16,706 donors registered for donation, females constituted only 11.27%. And deferral rate was about five times more for female (19.85% compared to male (4.06%. The three most common reasons for deferral in female were low hemoglobin levels, low body weight, and hypotension. The deferral rate was higher in the age group of 18-25 years and most common cause was low hemoglobin level. In male, the three most common reasons for deferral were hypertension, under weight, and low hemoglobin levels. The deferral rate varied from 4 to 15% as reported in the literature. The most common cause of deferral in our study and in several studies available in the literature is the same.

  20. Factors that Affect Willingness to Donate Blood for the Purpose of Biospecimen Research in the Korean American Community

    OpenAIRE

    Yen, Glorian P.; Davey, Adam; Grace X. Ma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Biorepositories have been key resources in examining genetically-linked diseases, particularly cancer. Asian Americans contribute to biorepositories at lower rates than other racial groups, but the reasons for this are unclear. We hypothesized that attitudes toward biospecimen research mediate the relationship between demographic and healthcare access factors, and willingness to donate blood for research purposes among individuals of Korean heritage.

  1. Compensation for Blood Plasma Donation as a Distinctive Ethical Hazard: Reformulating the Commodification Objection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    In this essay, I argue that the Commodification Objection (suitably redescribed), locates a phenomenon of real moral significance. In defending the Commodification Objection, I review three common criticisms of it, which claim firstly, that commodification doesn't always lead to instrumentalization; secondly, that commodification isn't the only route to such an outcome; and finally, that the Commodification Objection applies only to persons, and human organs (and, therefore, blood products) are not persons. In response, I conclude that (i) moral significance does not require that an undesirable outcome be a necessary consequence of the phenomenon under examination; (ii) the relative likelihood of an undesirable mode of regard arising provides a morally-relevant distinguishing marker for assessing the comparative moral status of social institutions and arrangements; and (iii) sales in blood products (and human organs more generally) are sufficiently distinct from sales of everyday artefacts and sufficiently close to personhood to provide genuine grounds for concern. Accordingly, criticisms of the Commodification Objection do not provide grounds for rejecting the claim that human organ sales in general and compensation for blood plasma donation in particular can have morally pernicious 'commodificatory effects' upon our attitudes, for what human organ sales provide is a distinctive ethical hazard. PMID:26100662

  2. “Well done, CERN!” A big thank you to all those who donated their blood

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    The blood donation clinic held on 27 July resulted in a total of 147 units collected from 171 volunteers, including 64 first-time donors. The Swiss blood bank CTS is grateful for the support and dedication of the CERN personnel, particularly as blood stocks tend to be at their lowest during the summer period. The CTS and the Medical Service wish to express their gratitude to all the donors for their generosity, and to Novae (Restaurant 1) for the refreshments it provided free of charge for the donors. Forthcoming dates for blood collection at CERN are: 2 November 2011, 15 March 2012 and 25 July 2012.

  3. Blood iron stores reduction affects lipoprotein status – a potential benefit of blood donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoj Jadrić

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the lipoprotein proile of voluntary blood donors, and on the basis of parameters to evaluate the risk of atherosclerosis. Methods The study included voluntary blood donors of both sexes. Participants were divided into two groups. The irst group of subjects consisted of men and women in menopause (BD1. Thesecond group consisted of women in reproductive age (BD2. Analysisof concentration of lipoproteins was performed by direct determination of total cholesterol, LDL-C and HDL-C. From the totalserum cholesterol and concentration of lipoproteins ratios of totalcholesterol/ HDL-C ratio and LDL-C/HDL-C were calculated. Results Signiicantly higher concentration of LDL-C was obtained in the serum of BD 1, compared to LDL-C in the serum of BD 2, within the reference range. Mean concentration of HDL-C in the serum of BD 2 group was higher than the values measured in the BD group 1, without signiicant difference. The ratio of total cholesterol / HDL-C showed signiicantly higher values in the BD 1 group compared with results in the BD 2 group. Signiicantly higher values in the BD group 1 were observed for the ratio of LDL-C/HDL-C. Obtained results showed that all voluntary blood donors had a concentration of individual lipoprotein fractions in a lower risk range for atherosclerosis development. Conclusion Female voluntary blood donors in reproductive age have a more favorable lipid status in relation to the voluntary blood donors, men and women in menopause, indicating that this population of women is exposed to lower risk of developing atherosclerosis.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M

    2016-03-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico's mandated

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Sánchez-González

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico’s national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico

  7. Pre-operative blood donation versus acute normovolemic hemodilution in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezvan Nobahar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH and preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD have questionable efficacy, viral and bacterial infection risks, intermittent blood shortages as homeostasis problem, electrolyte and hemodynamic disturbances. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional survey, we studied 70 patients undergoing open heart coronary artery bypass grafts [CABG] and different valvular replacement 1 ml surgery (35 in ANH, 35 in PABD in Shaheed Modares - Hospital. We measured electrolytes and homeostatic factors to evaluate the influence of two transfusion methods on homeostatic function and hemodynamic balance. Results: We compared 70 patients (38 male [54.3%] and 32 female [45.7%] with mean age 54.8 years undergoing open heart surgery (CABG and valvular. In ANH group, significant decrease was detected in Na (28.5% K (2.5%, prothrombin time (PT (88.57%, partial thromboplastin time (PTT (94.28%, creatine phosphokinase (CPK (11.4%, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH (11.43%, albumin (Alb (17.14%, globulin (91.43% and total protein (80%. Mean initial and post-operative hemoglobin was 14.12 ± 1.06 versus 11.97 ± 0.98, hematocrit 42.22 ± 3.45 versus 35.40 ± 2.88, systolic blood pressure 124.1 ± 14.4 versus 110.88 ± 15.6 (reduction 22.86% diastolic blood pressure 76.02 ± 10 versus 69.26 ± 11 (reduction 3% and pulse rate was 75.45 ± 10 versus 84.45 ± 12 (12% in this case difference between two groups was strongly significant (P = 0.001. In PABD group, significant decrease was detected in Na (20%, K (2.5%, PT (91.43% PTT (80%, CPK (8.57%, LDH (5.72%, Alb (57.15%, globulin (71.43% and total-protein (62.85%, the value of hemodynamic changes were in normal range. Conclusion: Though autologous blood transfusion (ANH and PABD was preferable to allogeneic transfusion in cardiac surgical patients; but PABD offers more advantages in homeostasis, hemodynamic stability and electrolyte balance.

  8. Blood donation and Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour: an examination of perceived behavioural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, M; Cairns, E

    1995-06-01

    In spite of the success achieved by the theory of reasoned action, researchers continue to suggest that new components should be added to the original model. Indeed, Ajzen has himself acknowledged that some behaviours may be subject to control problems and thus proposed the theory of planned behaviour to handle behaviours of this kind. This study set out to explore the predictive superiority of the revised theory of planned behaviour by focusing on blood donation, a behavioural domain in which volitional control was thought to be incomplete. It was also the intention to explore the extent to which the belief-based measure of attitude exists as a multidimensional construct. An Ajzen & Fishbein type questionnaire was administered to 141 undergraduate students. Multiple regression analyses provided strong support for the theory of planned behaviour, suggesting that perception of control has an important impact on a person's behavioural motivation. Also, some support for a multidimensional representation of the belief-based measure of attitude was provided. PMID:7620844

  9. The impact of donor health and psychosocial factors on the donation experience and recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Billen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Donation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), either through bone marrow (BM) or peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection, is a generally safe procedure for healthy donors, although adverse reactions (ARs) are a known and definable risk. The physical reactions to donation have been established for some time, but less is known about factors predicting poorer experiences. In my thesis, I explore the donation experience in a prospective study involving 275 PBSC and 37 BM donors and focus att...

  10. Impacto da doação de sangue nos depósitos de ferro do organismo de doadores Impact of blood donation on donor iron reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita C. Mousinho-Ribeiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a vital element in the human metabolism. It plays a central role in erythropoiesis and is also involved in many other intracellular processes in all the tissues of the body. Blood donation results in a substantial (200 to 250 ng loss of iron at each donation (425 to 475 ml with subsequent mobilization of iron from body deposits. Repetitive donations of blood my cause the depletion of iron reserves in blood donors and thus cause health disorders. Recent reports have shown that iron reserves are generally small and iron depletion is more common in blood donors than in non-donors. The high frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors reported by these studies suggests a need for more accurate studies, as measurement of hemoglobin and hematicrit alone is insufficient to identify and exclude prospective blood donors with iron deficiency but without anemia. It is important, therefore, that blood banks evaluate the risk-benefit of implanting tests to analyze organism iron reserves such as the measurement of serum ferritin of all individuals who donate more than three times per year in order to make the blood donation process safer for both donors and transfused patients.

  11. Influencing factors of voluntary blood donation in street%影响街头自愿无偿献血的因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李浩

    2013-01-01

    [ Objective] To explore the influencing factors of f voluntary blood donation in street, and provide evidence for improving the rate of voluntary blood donation. [Methods] By stratified random sampling method, a total of 256 cases of blood donation and 200 cases of non-blood donation were randomly selected. They were investigated with self-designed questionnaire, then univariate and multivariate analysis was adopted for analysis of factors affecting blood donation. [ Results] Multivariate analysis results showed age ( OR =1.484) , cultural level ( OR = 0.533) , occupation ( student) ( OR = 0.578) , health status ( OR = 0. 535 ) , awareness of blood donation (OR = 2. 527) , free use of blood for family of blood donor ( OR = 2. 811) , worrying about affecting health ( OR = 4. 792) were protective factors. [ Conclusion ] According to the characteristics and correlated factors of blood donors, propaganda education of blood donation and related policy advocacy should be positively carried out to exclude unnecessary concerns of blood donor, to improve environment of blood donation and raise the quality of medical staff, so as to develop voluntary blood donation.%目的 通过探讨影响街头无偿献血的因素,为提高无偿献血率提供依据.方法 采用分层随机抽样的方法,随机抽取雅安市市中心地区256例献血人群和200例未献血人群,对这两组人群分别进行问卷调查,采用单因素和多因素分析影响献血的因素.结果 多因素分析结果显示,年龄(OR=1.484)、文化程度(OR =0.533)、职业(学生)(OR=0.578)、健康状况(OR=0.535)、献血知识知晓情况(OR=2.527)、献血者家人可免费用血(OR=2.811)、担心影响身体健康(OR =4.792)为保护性因素.结论 应根据献血人群的特点和相关因素,积极开展献血知识宣传教育及相关政策宣传,排除献血者的不必要顾虑,改善献血环境及提高医务人员素质,从而发展无偿献血.

  12. Exploring the dynamics of the theory of planned behavior in the context of blood donation: does donation experience make a difference?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, I.; Ferguson, E.; Kort, W. de; Donders, R.; Atsma, F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study investigates the influence of different variables from the theory of planned behavior (TPB) on intention within multiple donation categories, covering the entire range of lifetime number of donations (LND). Does the same set of variables predict intention equally strong throug

  13. Research Progress of Preoperative Autologous Blood Donation%贮存式自体输血的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章健萍(综述); 郭建荣; 金孝岠(审校)

    2016-01-01

    随着对异体输血风险认识加深,自体输血越来越受关注。贮存式自体输血作为一种重要的血液保护策略应用于临床,它不仅能够避免异体输血带来的风险,还能够缓解我国临床用血紧张的局面。贮存式自体输血的适应证、采血原则以及其对机体重要功能的影响一直是医学界关注的焦点,积极探索其应用前景,可以使更多患者受益。%With the recognition of the risk of allogeneic blood transfusion , autologous blood transfusion has drawn more and more attention.As an important kind of blood protection strategy used in clinical ,preop-erative autologous blood donation(PABD) can not only avoid the risk caused by allogeneic blood transfusion, but also relieve the tension of clinical blood reserve in China .Indication and blood collection principle of PABD,and its effect on the body′s important function are the focus in the world medical science , and the active exploration of the application prospect will benefit more patients .

  14. Changes of metabolic syndrome related indexes before and after blood donation in blood donors%献血前后代谢综合征相关血液指标变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡珍; 罗琼

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the significance of blood donation in preventing metabolic syndrome (MS)by analyzing the changes of the blood pressure and the related biochemical indexes before and after blood donation in the blood donors with high risk of MS.Methods The blood specimens of 102 blood donors,aged 45 -55 years old with the systolic blood pressure of 110 -140 mmHg and the diastolic blood pressure of 75 -90 mmHg,the body mass index> 24 kg/m2 ,were selected as the subjects.The blood pressure,heart rate,iron reserves,blood glucose,blood lipids,and the other indicators were determined before blood donation. All the above indicators were tested again on 42 d after blood donation.Results The blood pressure,iron reserves,blood glucose and LDL/HDL ratio after donation showed significant changes compared with before blood donation(P <0.05 ).Conclusion The changes of the MS related blood indexes exist before and after blood donation,blood donation has a certain significance for preven-ting MS in the blood donors with high risk of MS.%目的:分析代谢综合征(MS)的高危献血者献血前后的血压及相关生化指标来探讨献血对预防 MS 的意义。方法研究对象为男性或绝经后女性共102例,年龄45~55岁,收缩压110~140 mm Hg,舒张压75~90 mm Hg,体质量指数大于24 kg/m2,献血前测定血压、心率、铁储量、血糖、血脂等指标与献血42 d 后再测定相同指标进行比较。结果血压、铁储量、血糖、低密度脂蛋白/高密度脂蛋白(LDL/HDL)与献血前比较差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。结论献血前后 MS 相关血液指标存在变化,献血对于 MS 高危者预防 MS 具有一定意义。

  15. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000839.htm Bone marrow (stem cell) donation To use the sharing ... stem cells from a donor's blood. Types of Bone Marrow Donation There are two types of bone ...

  16. Blood donor management in china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ling; Wang, Jingxing; Liu, Zhong; Stevens, Lori; Sadler, Andrew; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2014-07-01

    Despite a steady increase in total blood collections and voluntary non-remunerated blood donors, China continues to have many challenges with its blood donation system. The country's donation rate remains low at 9%o, with over 60% of donors being first-time donors. Generally there is a lack of adequate public awareness about blood donation. The conservative donor selection criteria, the relatively long donation interval, and the small donation volume have further limited blood supply. To ensure a sufficient and safe blood supply that meets the increasing clinical need for blood products, there is an urgent need to strengthen the country's blood donor management. This comprehensive effort should include educating and motivating more individuals especially from the rural areas to be involved in blood donation, developing rational and evidence-based selection criteria for donor eligibility, designing a donor follow-up mechanism to encourage more future donations, assessing the current donor testing strategy, improving donor service and care, building regional and national shared donor deferral database, and enhancing the transparency of the blood donation system to gain more trust from the general public. The purpose of the review is to provide an overview of the key process of and challenges with the blood donor management system in China. PMID:25254023

  17. An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour to blood donation: the importance of self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, M; McClenahan, C; Cairns, E; Mallet, J

    2004-08-01

    Given that self-efficacy has emerged as a key construct in health psychology, this study set out to explore its utility in the context of blood donation as defined within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). An Ajzen and Fishbein-type questionnaire was administered to 100 undergraduate students at the University of Ulster, Coleraine. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis provided strong support for the role of self-efficacy as a major determinant of intention. It not only helped to explain some 73% of the variance, but also made a greater contribution to the prediction of intention than the other main independent variables of the model-past behaviour and self-identity. Demonstrating the utility of self-efficacy in the context of blood donor behaviour not only has several important practical implications, but serves to further highlight its importance within the TPB. PMID:15155590

  18. Blood donation and institutional trust: risk, policy rhetoric, and the men who have sex with men lifetime deferral policy in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, André; Fiddler, Jay; Walby, Kevin; Hier, Sean

    2011-11-01

    This article examines the process of rebuilding institutional trust in the Canadian blood system in the aftermath of the tainted blood scandal. Our focus is the policy of lifetime deferral from donating blood for men who have sex with men. Drawing on findings from interviews with representatives of Health Canada's Expert Advisory Committee on Blood Regulation, the National Liaison Committee, Canadian Blood Services, and blood consumer groups, we demonstrate how claims making about rights, discrimination, science, and risk contribute to policy continuity. We also examine the link between policy continuity and the management of reputational risk. PMID:22400205

  19. 浅谈心理咨询技能在无偿献血工作中的应用%Application of psychological consultation technique in blood donation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯刚丽

    2014-01-01

    Blood donors have various degrees of fears which produce an effect on their blood donation. The application of psychological consultation technique can help blood donors set up their blood donation concept. It’s vital to ensure the blood safety by effecting psychological nursing for blood donors, providing excellent blood collection service and developing more blood donors with low risk. This paper simply states the application of psychological consultation technique in blood donation.%在无偿献血的工作中,献血者有着不同程度的恐惧心理,严重影响献血行为。因此,运用心理咨询技术,帮助献血者树立正确的献血观念。对无偿献血者实施有效的心理护理,提供优质的采血服务,发展低危无偿献血者。不断建立和扩大自愿无偿献血者队伍,对保证血液安全至关重要。本文就心理咨询技能在无偿献血中的应用体会作简单地阐述。

  20. PSYCHOSOCIAL VARIABLES OF HIGHLY MOTIVATED VOLUNTARY BLOOD DONORS AT BLOOD BANK OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalodia Jignasa N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The adequacy of blood depends on blood donation rates and numbers of blood donors. To prepare adequate blood supplies, it is essential to investigate the factors that motivate individuals from donating. This study aimed to identify the character of highly motivated donors. This study was undertaken to study the motivational factors leading to voluntary blood donation and understanding the psychosocial variables of blood donors. Methodology: We selected 50 regular blood donors who have donated blood five or more than five times. Results: It was observed that most of the voluntary donors were males (94% and belonged to age group 41-50 years (42%. Most of the donors (86% had studied up to graduate and above. 70% donors have donate up to 30 times and 88% donors have started their first donation before 25 years of age. 94% donors have donated blood first time in voluntary blood donation camp. Conclusion: Motivation, recruitment and retention of voluntary blood donors are important criteria to achieve safe blood donation. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(1.000: 39-41

  1. Reasons for blood donation deferral in sub-Saharan Africa: experience in Ivory Coast

    OpenAIRE

    Kouao, MD; Dembelé, B; N'Goran, LK; Konaté, S.; Bloch, E.; Murphy, EL; Lefrère, JJ

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Blood donor selection is important to ensure the safety of both donors and recipients. There is a paucity of data on reasons for blood donor deferral in Ivory Coast. The aim of this study was to identify the reasons for predonation deferral at a blood collection site at General Hospital, Yopougon Attié in Abidjan. Materials and Methods: The investigators conducted a retrospective audit of data pertaining to donor deferral for blood donors that presented to the general hospital o...

  2. A study on knowledge, attitude and practice on blood donation among medical students in a tertiary care teaching hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

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    Jeya S. Ponmari

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The present study shows second MBBS students participated in the study has adequate knowledge and attitude. The practice of blood donation is also good and further can be improved by educational programmes. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 802-804

  3. Carbon monoxide concentration in donated blood : relation to cigarette smoking and other sources

    OpenAIRE

    Åberg, Anna-Maja; Nilsson Sojka, Birgitta; Winsö, Ola; Abrahamsson, Pernilla; Johansson, Göran; Larsson, Jan Erik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide (CO) is normally present in the human body due to endogenous production of CO. CO can also be inhaled by exposure to external sources such as cigarette smoke, car exhaust, and fire. The purpose of this study was to investigate CO concentrations in blood from 410 blood donors at the blood center in Umea, Sweden. To further evaluate the effects of cigarette smoking on CO concentrations, the elimination time for CO was examined in six volunteer smokers after a smoked ...

  4. Can latent heat safely warm blood? – in vitro testing of a portable prototype blood warmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McEwen Mark P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma/retrieval patients are often in shock and hypothermic. Treatment of such patients usually involves restoring their blood volume with transfusion of blood (stored at 2°C – 6°C and/or crystalloids or colloids (stored at ambient temperature. Rapid infusion of these cold fluids can worsen or even induce hypothermia in these patients. Warming of intravenous fluids at accident sites has traditionally been difficult due to a lack of suitable portable fluid warmers that are not dependent on mains electrical or battery power. If latent heat, the heat released when a liquid solidifies (an inherently temperature limiting process can warm intravenous fluids, portable devices without a reliance on electrical energy could be used to reduce the incidence of hypothermia in trauma patients. Methods Rapid infusion of red cells into patients was timed to sample typical clinical flow rates. An approved dry heat blood warmer was compared with a prototype blood warmer using a supercooled liquid latent heat storage material, to warm red cells whilst monitoring inlet and outlet temperatures. To determine the effect of warming on red cell integrity compared to the normal storage lesion of blood, extracellular concentrations of potassium, lactate dehydrogenase and haemoglobin were measured in blood which had been warmed after storage at 2°C – 6°C for 1 to 42 days. Results A prototype latent heat fluid warmer consistently warmed red cells from approximately 4°C to approximately 35°C at typical clinical flow rates. Warming of stored blood with latent heat did not affect red cell integrity more than the approved dry heat blood warmer. Conclusion Using latent heat as an energy source can satisfactorily warm cold blood or other intravenous fluids to near body temperature, without any adverse affects.

  5. 晚期妊娠储存式自体输血的护理%Care of Preoperative Autologous Blood Donation in Late Pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄琴

    2014-01-01

    [Objective] To ensure the safety of preoperative autologous blood donation in late pregnancy through a series of nursing measures.[Methods]From January 2010 to November 2011, 52 cases of pregnant women in late pregnancy took storage autotransfusion. After prenatal guardianship, psychological care, health education, blood were col ected before and after care, custody and from the blood transfusion care; record blood col ection process pregnant women with maternal-fetal reaction, the vital signs of pregnant women, birth outcomes, since the amount of al ogeneic blood transfusion, and achieve satisfactory re-sults.[Results] 52 cases of pregnant women with the blood col ection process were good, normal, with stable vital signs, abnormal fetal heart rate monitoring, one case of fetal moved too much, given the oxygen, improved with the left lateral decubitus position. In the process of self-blood transfusion, there's no ma-ternal discomfort, but with safe motherhood. [Conclusion] Effective care measures and storage of a pregnant woman autologous transfusion are relatively safe, economical and effective in the transfusion way, achieve good results, and help to improve the quality of obstetric care.%[目的]探究确保晚期妊娠储存式自体输血安全性的护理措施。[方法]对2010年1月至2011年11月的52例晚期妊娠孕妇进行储存式自体输血,采取产前监护、心理护理、健康教育、采血前后护理、监护和自血回输等一系列护理方式,记录采血过程孕妇配合、母胎反应,孕妇生命体征、分娩结局及自体输血量等,观察临床护理效果。[结果]52例孕妇在采血过程中均配合良好,生命体征正常且稳定,胎心监护正常,其中1例胎动过多,予吸氧、左侧卧位后好转。在自血回输过程中,产妇无不适反应,母婴安全。[结论]通过有效的护理措施,孕妇的储存式自体输血是相对安全、经济、有效的输血方式,可以取

  6. Blood Donation and Prevalence of Bloodborne Infections in a Clinic in Luanda, Angola Donación de sangre y prevalencia de infecciones transmitidas por la sangre en una clínica de Luanda, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Dámaso Fernádez Águila

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Many African countries lack an adequate supply of safe blood and have no reliable records on the prevalence of bloodborne infections. Objectives: To characterize blood donation in a clinic in Luanda and to determine the cause of rejection of candidates to blood donation and the prevalence among them of infections to be researched. Methods: A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted at the Multiprofile Clinic in Angola. We included 8 043 candidates to blood donation who performed this activity between 2005 and 2010. The variables analyzed were: type of donor, results of laboratory tests and donor’s assessment and causes of rejection. We applied the chi-square test to determine differences between the values ​​of frequency, with a confidence interval of 95% (p <0.05. Results: 9.7% of donations were voluntary and the rest were provided by relatives. There were significant differences between the rates of rejection of candidates to donate by type of donation: 29.9% for relatives and 6.8% for volunteers. The most common cause of rejection was the positive result of the surface antigen test for hepatitis B both in relatives and in occasional volunteers. Among regular volunteers malaria and non-infectious causes prevailed. Differences in the prevalence of infections in different types of donors were demonstrated. Conclusions: The prevalence of infections that can be transmitted through blood is high. Volunteer donors present the lowest risk but they are also the smallest group of donors and the hardest to find.

    Fundamento: muchos países africanos carecen de un suministro adecuado de sangre segura y no tienen  registros fiables sobre la prevalencia de infecciones transmitidas por la sangre. Objetivos: caracterizar la donación de sangre en una clínica, determinar las causas de rechazo de candidatos

  7. 影响无偿献血行为的相关因素分析%Factors affecting blood donation Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邝娇慧

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the related factors in blood donation behavior. Methods:June 2012 to June 2013 I got blood donation 279 blood donors, select a questionnaire survey of al blood donors, blood donation related factors analyzed behavior. Results:A total of 263 copies of the survey, the effective response rate was 94.27%. Among them, men accounted for 53.99%;range 18-30 years old accounted for 45.25%;tertiary and higher education accounted for 46.77%;institutions and enterprises accounted for 34.60%of internal staff;understand blood donation safety accounted for 41.06%;donation motivation internal organizational units accounted for 63.50%. The results were statistical y significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: gender, age, education, occupation, level of understanding of the behavior of blood donation motivation and behavior is a major factor affecting the behavior of blood donation, should take the necessary measures to address the various factors that accelerate the overal development of the cause of voluntary blood donation.%目的:分析无偿献血行为的相关影响因素。方法:搜集2012年6月—2013年6月来我站无偿献血的279名献血者,选择问卷调查的形式对全部献血者进行调查,分析无偿献血行为的相关影响因素。结果:本调查共收回263份,有效应答率为94.27%。其中,男性占53.99%;18岁-30岁范围占45.25%;大专及以上学历人数占46.77%;事业单位及企业单位内部工作人员占34.60%;了解无偿献血安全性的占41.06%;献血动机为单位内部组织占63.50%。结果有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:性别、年龄、学历、职业、对献血行为了解程度及行为动机是影响无偿献血行为的主要因素,应当针对各个因素采取必要措施加快无偿献血事业的全面发展。

  8. HCV INFECTION THROUGH PERFORATING AND CUTTING MATERIAL AMONG CANDIDATES FOR BLOOD DONATION IN BELÉM, BRAZILIAN AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubenilson Caldas Valois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated epidemiological factors for HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments among candidates for blood donation (CBD in the city of Belém, Pará, Brazilian Amazon. Two definitions of HCV infection cases were used: anti-HCV positivity shown by EIA, and HCV-RNA detection by PCR. Infected and uninfected CBD completed a questionnaire about possible risk factors associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments. The information was evaluated using simple and multiple logistic regressions. Between May and November 2010, 146 (1.1% persons with anti-HCV antibodies and 106 (0.8% with HCV-RNA were detected among 13,772 CBD in Belém. Risk factors associated with HCV infection based on the EIA (model 1 and PCR (model 2 results were: use of needles and syringes sterilized at home; shared use of razors at home, sharing of disposable razors in barbershops, beauty salons etc.; and sharing manicure and pedicure material. The models of HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments should be taken into account by local and regional health authorities and by those of other countries with similar cultural practices, in order to provide useful information to guide political and public strategies to control HCV transmission.

  9. Comparative study of Treponemal and non-Treponemal test for screening of blood donated at a blood center

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, Narinder Kaur; Bharucha, Z. S.; Sonawane, Vandana; Ahmed, Imran

    2012-01-01

    The non-Treponemal tests such as Rapid Plasma Reagin test (RPR) or the Venereal Disease Reference Laboratory test are the most commonly used test for screening of syphilis in the blood centers in India. Now, with the availability of Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Immunochromatographic assays in the market, we decided to evaluate these assays in comparison with Treponema pallidum Haemagglutination Assay (TPHA) which was considered as a gold standard for this study. A total of 8 ...

  10. Comparative study of Treponemal and non-Treponemal test for screening of blood donated at a blood center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinder Kaur Naidu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-Treponemal tests such as Rapid Plasma Reagin test (RPR or the Venereal Disease Reference Laboratory test are the most commonly used test for screening of syphilis in the blood centers in India. Now, with the availability of Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Immunochromatographic assays in the market, we decided to evaluate these assays in comparison with Treponema pallidum Haemagglutination Assay (TPHA which was considered as a gold standard for this study. A total of 8 685 samples of voluntary blood donors were tested on Trepolisa 3.0 and then the initially reactive samples were retested in duplicate on the same assay as well as on Omega Pathozyme, RPR, RAPHA (Rapid Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay, and TPHA. Of the 158 initially reactive samples, 104 were repeatedly reactive on the same assay, 85 were reactive with RPR, 77 were reactive with RAPHA, 60 were reactive on Omega, and 53 were confirmed reactive on TPHA. 48 (56.4% of the results on RPR were biological false positive, while 21.9% of results were false negative on RPR. We evaluated that Omega Pathozyme was quite in agreement with TPHA as compared with Trepolisa 3.0, RAPHA, and RPR. We concluded that Omega Pathozyme (ELISA can be considered as a suitable test for screening of syphilis in a blood center.

  11. 长沙市大学生无偿献血现状分析及对策研究%Analysis on status quo of unpaid blood donation of college students in Changsha and study on countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张英; 张亚; 高梦姣; 何思思

    2014-01-01

    [目的]了解长沙市大学生无偿献血现状,以探讨针对性的措施来增强大学生的献血意识,提高无偿献血率。[方法]自行设计调查问卷表,随机选择长沙市7所高校各年级学生1000人进行问卷调查。[结果]59.7%的学生知道有无偿献血活动但很少关注,20%的学生知道有相关活动但从未关注,知道并经常关注的仅占15.6%;学生对献血常识中“《献血法》”“世界无偿献血日”和“成分献血与全血献血的区别”三项知之甚少;“采血器具不卫生会传染疾病”“认为自己身体差”为影响大学生献血的主要认知因素。[结论]长沙市在校大学生对无偿献血的关注度不够,无偿献血相关知识的知晓率低,需要采取各种更科学更有效的措施来加强《献血法》和无偿献血相关知识的宣传和普及,提高大学生的无偿献血意识。%Obj ective:To know about the status quo of blood donation of college students in Changsha city,so as to probe into targeted measures to strengthen college students’consciousness of unpaid blood donation and increase the rate of unpaid blood donation.Methods:A total of 1000 students in all grades in 7 universities in changsha city were randomly selected and surveyed with self designed questionnaire.Results:5 9 .7% of students knew that there was unpaid blood donation activity but they paid little attention to it;20% of the students knew that there were related activities but they never paid attention to;only 1 5 .6% of students knew and often focused on the blood donation in the blood donation survey.Students knew about “the blood donation law”,“the unpaid blood donation day”and “the difference between the composition of blood do-nation and whole blood donation”very little.“Blood donation will spread dis-ease and impair ones health”and “thinking they are under poor health”were the main cognitive factors affecting the blood donation of university

  12. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27186530

  13. To evaluate the extent of awareness about hazards of blood transfusion among the blood recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M S; Islam, A; Rahman, A; Rahman, M M; Akter, D; Afrin, S

    2012-10-01

    This cross-sectional, observational study was carried out among the blood receiving patients conducted in the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University from April 2008 to August 2009, over 126 purposively selected, to evaluate the extent of awareness about hazards of blood transfusion among the blood recipient. In this study 74.1% of male and 73.3% of female respondents had correct knowledge of blood transfusion (p>0.05). In literate group 85(91.4%) had knowledge about blood donation and transfusion compared to 8(8.6%) in illiterate group with significant statistical difference (p=0.001). Different misconception and lack of awareness about safe blood transfusion is present among people receiving blood and blood products. Illiterate persons have significant less level of knowledge about safe blood transfusion. So the number of educational programs on blood-donation should be expanded and transmitted to encourage possible receivers to take blood from nonprofessional volunteer donor and to carry out relevant screening tests before receiving blood products. Furthermore, they should know that all measures besides screening tests are implemented by blood banks to ensure that blood donation is safe for donors and that transfusion of the donated blood is safe for recipients. PMID:23134916

  14. The use of ephemera with particular reference to blood and organ donation: a review of sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, G M

    1994-06-01

    Emphasis has been placed upon a study of the use made of ephemera such as leaflets, pamphlets and booklets by non-professional staff working in British statutory organizations such as health authorities, community health councils and family health services authorities as well as voluntary organizations such as charities, citizens' advice bureaux and patient participation groups. Publicity methods and the use made of ephemeral materials by those statutory and voluntary organizations involved in recruiting and retaining blood and organ donors is highlighted. Research findings confirm that patients, carers and others, wish to receive comprehendable and appropriate health information. Ephemera provided in support of this need are not comprehensive in subject coverage and lack any standardization of format. In particular, great care needs to be taken with the design of leaflets, pamphlets and booklets. Ephemeral materials are difficult to locate and obtain, and no bibliographical centre exists to coordinate and support existing activity by identifying, acquiring, storing, advertising and distributing such health care material. Marketing and publicity skills, and much time and effort are required to rectify this deficiency, and thus to satisfy the needs of consumers. PMID:10136650

  15. 多次捐献机采血小板后献血者外周血象的变化%The changes of peripheral blood indexes in donors donating blood several times for apheresis platelet concentrates*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛健民; 赵宏祥; 任素玲; 袁秀珍

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the changes of peripheral blood several times indexes in donors donating blood for apheresis platelet concentrates. Methods 20 donors who donated blood for apheresis platelet concentrates 10 38 times (interval: 1- 2 months), were enrolled and detected for peripheral blood indexes respectively before the first and the last time for donating platelet,and the results were analyzed. Results Of all enrolled donors, the platelet number, red blood cell number, white blood cell number and haemoglobin concentrates and the average value before the last donating blood were not statistical different with those before the first donating(P>0.05) ,but mean platelet volume and platelet large cell rate were decreased(P<0.01). Conclusion Blood do nation could promote hematopoiesis of the bone marrow,and might not be harmful to the body health.%目的 研究多次捐献机采血小板后献血者外周血象的变化情况.方法 选择20名自愿捐献机采血小板达10~38次的献血者(每次间隔期为1~2个月),在首次和末次采集血小板前分别进行外周血象的检测,进行统计分析.结果 多次捐献机采血小板的献血者,末次采集前外周血小板数(PLT)与首次采集前PLT、正常值均数相比,差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05),外周血中的红细胞数(RBC)、白细胞数(WBC)、血红蛋白浓度(Hb)并未发生明显的变化,但血小板分布宽度(PDW)增加,血小板平均体积(MPV)、大形血小板比例(P-LCR)下降,且差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 献血可以促进骨髓的造血功能,对机体并无明显不利的影响.

  16. Where to Donate Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

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  17. Blood Donation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

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  18. 云浮市无偿献血初筛血型错误原因分析及预防%Cause analysis and prevention of primary screening blood type errors of donating blood in Yunfu City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高炳谏; 区勇勤; 李惠玲

    2015-01-01

    目的:对无偿献血者ABO血型初筛错误进行原因分析,并采取相应的预防措施,以减少初筛血型的错误率。方法统计2010~2014年本站无偿献血标本94298人次中初筛血型与实验室正反定型检测结果血型进行比较分析。结果94298例无偿献血标本中,发现初筛血型错误368例,错误率0.39%,以B型误判为O型最高,占17.12%,其次为AB型误判为A型,占15.22%;各采血点分布差异明显,新兴、罗定采血点错误率最高,分别占0.58%和0.44%;各年份比较,初筛血型错误率逐年下降。结论初筛血型错误大多是由于人为因素导致,应增强工作人员的质量意识和责任心教育,加强理论知识和操作技能的培训,严格遵守操作规程,改善献血环境和试剂的管理,使献血前ABO血型筛查错误降到最低。%Objective To analyze the causes of primary screening errors of the ABO blood types of voluntary blood donors and take corresponding preventative measures to reduce the error rate of primary screening blood type. Methods The primary screening blood types and the laboratory positive and negative blood grouping test results of 94 298 donat-ing blood specimens of our station between 2010 and 2014 were analyzed comparatively. Results Of the 94 298 donat-ing blood specimens,368 cases of primary screening blood type errors were found,with the error rate of 0.39%,of which type B misjudged as type O was the commonest,accounting for 17.12%,followed by type AB misjudged as type A,ac-counting for 15.22%.The errors distributed significantly differently over each blood collection station and the error rates in Xinxing and Luoding blood collection stations were the highest,accounting for 0.58% and 0.44% respectively.As for the errors of different years,the primary screening blood type error rate decreased year by year. Conclusion As primary screening blood type errors are mainly caused by human factors,enhancement of

  19. Multicenter Evaluation of a Semiautomated, Standardized Assay for Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Blood Donations

    OpenAIRE

    Romanò, Luisa; Velati, Claudio; Baruffi, Lorella; Fomiatti, Laura; Colucci, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Alessandro R.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the COBAS Ampliscreen hepatitis B virus (HBV) test using standards, seroconversion panels, consecutive donations, and samples from patients with abnormal alanine aminotransferase and chronic hepatitis C. Specificity was 100% and sensitivity was 20 IU/ml. In seroconversion panels, HBV DNA was detected up to 4 to 18 days before HBsAg, suggesting that this assay is useful in shortening the infectious window phase.

  20. Clausura grupal e identificación de necesidades en las donaciones de sangre y órganos Group closure and needs identification in blood and organ donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Casado-Neira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available La acción de dar sin compromiso, el altruismo y la solidaridad están en el centro de la donación de sangre y órganos con fines terapéuticos. Según se hace ver las personas hacen una entrega desinteresada y transcendental: ‘la sangre salva vidas’. El altruismo y la solidaridad son aquí ineludibles, pero la donación está sometida a los principios de la reciprocidad. La captación y fidelización de donantes se enfrenta a veces a crisis o dificultades que se pueden explicar en parte por cómo los donantes interpretan la reciprocidad. Recurriendo a entrevistas y al análisis de contenido de campañas de captación de donantes de sangre y órganos identificamos dos tipos de reciprocidad (según sea el tipo de destino y concepción de la comunidad: focalizada o difusa. La focalizada es característica de sistemas sociales basados en relaciones personales estrechas (reales o virtuales. La difusa responde a una concepción individualista y anónima de la vida social. En la donación esto va a ser fundamental porque la reciprocidad focalizada es difícilmente compatible con la donación terapéutica, que es voluntaria, altruista y anónima. Lo que dificulta la donación es el intercambio restrictivo de la reciprocidad focalizada, no que este grupo comparta sangre o herencia biológica común que deseen preservar.Three moral values are within the blood and organ donation with therapeutical purpose: giving without obligation, altruism and solidarity. It seems than for donors unselfishness is something transcendental: blood save lives. Altruism and solidarity are present, but spending is under the pattern of reciprocity. Recruiting and keeping blood and organ spenders is an uncertain and complex process. How spenders live reciprocity can help us to understand rejections to donation. The research work is based on personal interviews and on the analyses of the material used in recruitment actions of blood and organ donors. Two kinds of

  1. Analysis of discard of whole blood and its components with suggested possible strategies to reduce it

    OpenAIRE

    Parikshit Patil; Arvind Bhake; Kishor Hiwale

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advances in medical technology demand more and more provision of safe blood for effective management of patients. To tackle with the demand and supply of blood and blood components, more stringent criteria should be applied for blood donations and for proper utilization of blood. The present study was designed to analyze the various reasons for the discard of whole blood and blood components. It also intended to suggest various possible strategies for optimum utilization of blood ...

  2. The analysis of the blood donation adverse reaction and its protective countermeasures%献血不良反应的分析及防护对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘林清

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the causes of blood donation adverse reaction and its protective measures.Methods:The blood pressure vraibles were examined in the voluntary unpaid blood donors for the first time and again as well as the people in different age and different occupations,from the begin of blood sampling to after 30 minutes of its end.TO stop sampling and gave symptomatic treatment due to adverse reactions.Results: The incidence of adverse reactions is 1.13% in 29864 blood donors, among them,the frist and again blood donors are 1.34% and 0.71%;For occupation,The incidence of adverse reactions of the other group is highest,it is 1.89%,instead the medical worker group is lowest,it is 0.50%,there is a statistically significant difference be-tween the two groups and the different age groupP<0.01.Conclusion:The occurrence of adverse reactions is closely related to the history of blood donation,the professional distribution and age;Publicity and preventive care can reduce the incidence of ad-verse reactions effectively.%目的 探讨献血不良反应发生的原因及防护对策.方法 对首次、再次、不同年龄及职业的无偿献血者,自采血开始观察血压、心率、意识等,至采血结束30min,对出现不良反应者中止采血并对症处理.结果 29864名献血者,不良反应发生率1.13%,其中首次、再次献血者分别为1.34%和0.71%;职业分布以其他组最高1.89%,医务人员最低0.50%,二者及不同年龄组间差异均有统计学意义(χ2=20.13,73.51;均P<0.01).结论 献血不良反应的发生与献血史、职业分布、年龄密切相关,宣传、预防护理,可有效降低不良反应发生.

  3. Blood and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Process Risks and Complications History of Blood Transfusion Iron and Blood Donation Iron Info. for All Donors Iron Info. for ... Donation Student Donors Donation Process Eligibility Blood FAQs Blood Donor ... of Blood Transfusion Hosting a Blood Drive What to Expect Hosting ...

  4. [A new separation protocol (DRBCP-F) for automated blood component donation with the MCS 3p cell separator for collection of leukocyte depleted erythrocyte concentrates and plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, T; Kretschmer, V

    1997-01-01

    Previously published studies on automated blood component donation with the MCS 3p cell separator proved fairly good quality of the collected red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP), with the disadvantage of a low hematocrit of the filtered RBC and a high platelet contamination of the FFP (RBCP-F protocol.) The DRBCP-F protocol was designed to eliminate the above-mentioned disadvantages and to provide 1 unit of leuko-depleted (filtered) RBC, 2 units of FFP, and additionally 1 platelet concentrate (PC) from the buffy coat. Twenty automated blood component collections (2 cycles, Latham bowl at 5,500 rpm, 230 ml isotonic saline for volume balance, PAGGS-M as additive solution) were performed. The RBC were filtered in a closed system after storage at 4 degrees C for 24 h. Blood cell counts and biochemical parameters of the RBC were determined initially and after 49 days. PC were separated from buffy coat after a soft spin. The volume of the RBC amounted to 293 +/- 12 ml (mean +/- SD) with a hematocrit of 0.61 +/- 0.05 l/l. Residual leukocytes after filtration were found to be 0.04 x 10(6) +/- 0.06 per unit. After storage, the following data were obtained: hemolysis 0.38%, ATP 2.1 +/- 0.4 mumol/g Hb, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) 1.4 +/- 0.3 mumol/g Hb, ph 6.3 +/- 0.1, potassium 6.4 mmol per unit, and LDH in the supernatant was 219 U/l. None of the RBC showed bacterial growth after 49 days. The volume of the collected FFP was 398 +/- 32 ml, with 3.4 +/- 3.5 x 10(3) residual platelets and 5 +/- 12 leukocytes per microliter. Platelet concentrates contained 90.2 +/- 32 x 10(9) platelets in 88 +/- 14 ml plasma. Automated blood donation with the DRBCP-F protocol provided RBC with very low residual leukocyte counts, adequate hematocrit and good metabolic status up to 49 days, and FFP with low platelet contamination. The platelet concentrates were even superior to those prepared from whole blood using the buffy coat method. The storable leuko-depleted RBC are

  5. Blood Donation, Being Asian, and a History of Iron Deficiency Are Stronger Predictors of Iron Deficiency than Dietary Patterns in Premenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. Beck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated dietary patterns and nondietary determinants of suboptimal iron status (serum ferritin < 20 μg/L in 375 premenopausal women. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, determinants were blood donation in the past year [OR: 6.00 (95% CI: 2.81, 12.82; P<0.001], being Asian [OR: 4.84 (95% CI: 2.29, 10.20; P<0.001], previous iron deficiency [OR: 2.19 (95% CI: 1.16, 4.13; P=0.016], a “milk and yoghurt” dietary pattern [one SD higher score, OR: 1.44 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.93; P=0.012], and longer duration of menstruation [days, OR: 1.38 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.68; P=0.002]. A one SD change in the factor score above the mean for a “meat and vegetable” dietary pattern reduced the odds of suboptimal iron status by 79.0% [OR: 0.21 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.50; P=0.001] in women with children. Blood donation, Asian ethnicity, and previous iron deficiency were the strongest predictors, substantially increasing the odds of suboptimal iron status. Following a “milk and yoghurt” dietary pattern and a longer duration of menstruation moderately increased the odds of suboptimal iron status, while a “meat and vegetable” dietary pattern reduced the odds of suboptimal iron status in women with children.

  6. Is blood donation induced low iron status associated with favourable levels of OxLDL, s-ICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and vWF-antigen in healthy men.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoydonck, P.G.A.; Schouten, E.G.; Hoppenbrouwers, K.P.M.; Temme, E.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    The potential effect of iron depletion by blood donation and its relevance to cardiovascular diseases are still under debate. Markers of vascular integrity are increasingly applied in investigations of atherothrombotic diseases. In this study, we investigated whether a lower iron status through bloo

  7. 关于境内机构捐赠外汇管理有关问题的通知%Circular of the SAFE on Relevant Issues Concerning the Administration of Donations in Foreign Exchange by Domestic Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国家外汇管理局

    2010-01-01

    @@ For the purpose of realizing the adminiswation of donations in foreign exchange and facilitating the receipt and payment of donations in foreign exchange,and pursuant to the Regulations of the People's Republic of China on Foreign Exchange Administration and other relevant laws and regulations, the relevant issues concerning administration of donations in foreign exchange by domestic institutions are hereby promulgated:

  8. Health care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and practices relating to umbilical cord blood banking and donation: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Peberdy, Lisa; Young, Jeanine; Kearney, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Collection and storage of an infant’s cord blood at birth is an option available to many new parents. Antenatal health care providers have an important role in providing non-biased and evidence based information to expectant parents about cord blood and tissue banking options. The aim of this paper was to identify and review studies of health care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning cord blood banking and the sources by which healthcare professionals obtain...

  9. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  10. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this ... several sources of blood which are described below. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  11. Safe Blood Transfusion: Screening for Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Infections in Potential Blood Donors in Rural Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Van Viet

    2014-01-01

    2,400 blood samples from potential voluntary rural blood donors in a multicentre cross-sectional study in Cambodia and Vietnam were analysed with rapid and EIA tests for detection of HBsAg, anti-HBc and anti-HCV at local laboratories. 640 randomly selected blood samples were blindly validated in a Norwegian accredited micro-laboratory by a chemiluminescent micro particle immunoassay technique (CMIA). Rapid test for donor screening of hepatitis proved to have far lover accuracy than claimed by...

  12. Safe surgery: how accurate are we at predicting intra-operative blood loss?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Introduction Preoperative estimation of intra-operative blood loss by both anaesthetist and operating surgeon is a criterion of the World Health Organization\\'s surgical safety checklist. The checklist requires specific preoperative planning when anticipated blood loss is greater than 500 mL. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of surgeons and anaesthetists at predicting intra-operative blood loss. Methods A 6-week prospective study of intermediate and major operations in an academic medical centre was performed. An independent observer interviewed surgical and anaesthetic consultants and registrars, preoperatively asking each to predict expected blood loss in millilitre. Intra-operative blood loss was measured and compared with these predictions. Parameters including the use of anticoagulation and anti-platelet therapy as well as intra-operative hypothermia and hypotension were recorded. Results One hundred sixty-eight operations were included in the study, including 142 elective and 26 emergency operations. Blood loss was predicted to within 500 mL of measured blood loss in 89% of cases. Consultant surgeons tended to underestimate blood loss, doing so in 43% of all cases, while consultant anaesthetists were more likely to overestimate (60% of all operations). Twelve patients (7%) had underestimation of blood loss of more than 500 mL by both surgeon and anaesthetist. Thirty per cent (n = 6\\/20) of patients requiring transfusion of a blood product within 24 hours of surgery had blood loss underestimated by more than 500 mL by both surgeon and anaesthetist. There was no significant difference in prediction between patients on anti-platelet or anticoagulation therapy preoperatively and those not on the said therapies. Conclusion Predicted intra-operative blood loss was within 500 mL of measured blood loss in 89% of operations. In 30% of patients who ultimately receive a blood transfusion, both the surgeon and anaesthetist significantly underestimate

  13. Application of information technology may increase the efficacy of Confidential Unit Exclusion (CUE) in blood donors

    OpenAIRE

    Jalalian, Mehrdad; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    Confidential Unit Exclusion (CUE) refers to a procedure by which a blood donor designates confidentially whether his or her blood might not be safe for transfusion. It applies to situations in which an individual who is not eligible for blood donation in terms of blood safety feel pressured by others to donate his or her blood. A potential problem in the CUE system is misunderstanding of the procedure and its significance by blood donors as well as the lack of their confidence regarding the c...

  14. Maintaining a Safe Blood Supply in an Era of Emerging Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Peter W; Epstein, Jay S; Borio, Luciana L

    2016-06-01

    Coming shortly after outbreaks of dengue and chikungunya virus in related locations, the recent outbreak of Zika virus in the southern part of the western hemisphere is yet another reminder that infectious pathogens continue to emerge rapidly and can adversely affect public health, including the safety of the blood supply. In response to Zika virus, public health measures that rely largely on donor deferral and sourcing of blood from non-outbreak areas until a blood donor screening test becomes available have been implemented to address the safety of the blood supply in the United States. However, a more universal approach to ensuring blood safety in the setting of rapidly emerging infectious diseases is needed. PMID:26962237

  15. Donate Life America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us News You Have the Power to Donate Life. Register as an Organ, Eye and Tissue Donor ... reach 30K milestone, thanks to increased donations Donate Life America Announces 2015 James S. Wolf, M.D., Courage ...

  16. Organ Donation: The Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Search Register with your state as an Organ Donor Home Why Donate Becoming a Donor About Donation & ... Plan Your Finances After Your Transplant Contact Your Donor Family Organ Donation: The Process Enrolling as a Donor : The ...

  17. Safe extension of red blood cell storage life at 4{degree}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitensky, M.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to develop methods to extend the storage life of red blood cells. Extended storage would allow donor to self or autologous transfusion, expand and stabilize the blood supply, reduce the cost of medical care and eliminate the risk of transfusion related infections, including a spectrum of hepatitides (A, B and C) and HIV. The putative cause of red blood cell spoilage at 4 C has been identified as oxidative membrane damage resulting from deoxyhemoglobin and its denaturation products including hemichrome, hemin and Fe{sup 3+}. Trials with carbon monoxide, which is a stabilizer of hemoglobin, have produced striking improvement of red blood cell diagnostics for cells stored at 4 C. Carbonmonoxy hemoglobin is readily converted to oxyhemoglobin by light in the presence of oxygen. These findings have generated a working model and an approach to identify the best protocols for optimal red cell storage and hemoglobin regeneration.

  18. Nucleic acid testing: Is it the only answer for safe Blood in India?

    OpenAIRE

    N K Naidu; Bharucha, Z. S.; Vandana Sonawane; Imran Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background: With the implementation of NAT in countries around the world, there is a growing pressure on the transfusion services in India to adopt NAT testing. India has about 2545 licensed Blood Centres. The Transfusion Services in India are fragmented, poorly regulated and the quality standards are poorly implemented. Blood Centres are still dependent on replacement/family donors and in most places laboratory testing for Transfusion transmitted infections is not quality assured, laboratory...

  19. THE PROBLEMS OF PROVIDING INFECTIOUS DISEASE SAFETY FOR ORGAN AND TISSUE DONATION BY SCREENING BLOOD-BORNE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sh. Khubutiya; S. A. Solonin; M. A. Godkov

    2016-01-01

    It provided data on the prevalence, clinical signifi cance and methods of laboratory diagnostics for occult forms of blood-borne viral infections (BBVIs). It considered causes of such forms of infection and their signifi cance for clinical transplantation. We analyzed the existing algorithm of laboratory screening of a potential organ donor for BBVIs in Russia. It is shown that the current screening algorithm doesn’t allow detecting hidden forms of BBVIs.

  20. A doação de sangue sob a ótica de escolares: concepções e valores Blood donation in the view of schoolchildren: conceptions and values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Pagotto Bossolan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nesta pesquisa investigou-se o nível de informação, percepção, motivos e sentimentos de escolares sobre a doação de sangue. 145 escolares do pré, 2ª, 4ª séries com seis, oito e 10 anos de idade foram submetidos a provas piagetianas, responderam uma entrevista, se posicionaram frente a um dilema. Verificou-se pouca informação e informações errôneas sobre a doação. A escola foi a fonte de informação menos citada. A maioria dos entrevistados tanto na entrevista, como no dilema, justificou a doação de sangue como um ato solidário, permitindo supor que valores como generosidade podem ser adquiridos na fase pré-operatória. Discute-se o papel da escola nos programas de Educação em Saúde voltados a comportamentos que serão emitidos a longo prazo e que beneficiam a coletividade.This study investigated children's values and perceptions of blood donation. A hundred forty-five students (preschool, second- and fourth-graders aged 6, 8 and 10 years old answered Piagetian tests. They were also interviewed on blood donation and faced a moral dilemma. Lack of information and misinformation were observed. The school was the least frequently cited information source. Findings showed that the participants justified blood donation as an act of solidarity. It indicates that children have a conception of values since the preoperational stage of cognitive development. It is also presented a discussion on the role of schools in Health Care Education, particularly targeting specific behaviors which will be expressed in the long term such as blood donation.

  1. Brazilian blood donation eligibility criteria for dermatologic patients Critérios brasileiros de elegibilidade à doação de sangue para pacientes dermatológicos

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Gustavo Wambier; Caroline Silva Pereira; Benedito de Pina Almeida Prado Júnior; Norma Tiraboschi Foss

    2012-01-01

    A focused and commented review on the impact of dermatologic diseases and interventions in the solidary act of donating blood is presented to dermatologists to better advise their patients. This is a review of current Brazilian technical regulations on hemotherapeutic procedures as determined by Ministerial Directive #1353/2011 by the Ministry of Health and current internal regulations of the Hemotherapy Center of Ribeirão Preto, a regional reference center in hemotherapeutic procedures. Crit...

  2. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and eAG Hypoglycemia (Low blood glucose) Hyperglycemia (High blood glucose) Dawn Phenomenon Checking for Ketones Tight Diabetes Control donate en -- Diabetes Must Be Stopped - 2016-06-donation- ...

  3. America's Blood Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or less. Please donate now! Full Stoplight Report America's Blood Centers is... FEATURED TODAY Support the Foundation ... purchase will be donated to the Foundation for America's Blood Centers! Simply Click Here! "We Are" This ...

  4. Volume-dependent hemodynamic effects of blood collection in canine donors - evaluation of 13% and 15% of total blood volume depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUI R.F. FERREIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no consensus regarding the blood volume that could be safely donated by dogs, ranging from 11 to 25% of its total blood volume (TBV. No previous studies evaluated sedated donors.Aim: To evaluate the hemodynamic effects of blood collection from sedated and non-sedated dogs and to understand if such effects were volume-dependent.Materials and Methods: Fifty three donations of 13% of TBV and 20 donations of 15% TBV were performed in dogs sedated with diazepam and ketamine. Additionally, a total of 30 collections of 13% TBV and 20 collections of 15% TBV were performed in non-sedated dogs. Non-invasive arterial blood pressures and pulse rates were registered before and 15 min after donation. Results: Post-donation pulse rates increased significantly in both sedated groups, with higher differences in the 15% TBV collections. Systolic arterial pressures decreased significantly in these groups, while diastolic pressures increased significantly in 13% TBV donations. Non-sedated groups revealed a slight, but significant, SBP decrease. No clinical signs related to donations were registered.Conclusion: These results suggest that the collection of 15% TBV in sedated donors induces hemodynamic variations that may compromise the harmlessness of the procedure, while it seems to be a safe procedure in non-sedated dogs.

  5. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confidence to respond in emergency situations with the skills that can help to save a life. Learn more » Red Cross Information Donating Blood Learn About Blood Hosting a Blood Drive For Hospitals Engage with Us About Us Media ...

  6. Perioperative blood loss in open retropubic radical prostatectomy - is it safe to get operated at an educational hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blood loss during radical prostatectomy has been a long term issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the training level of the first assistant regarding blood loss in open retropubic radical prostatectomy at an educational hospital. Material and methods 364 patients underwent radical prostatectomy from 11/2006 to 10/2007 at one institution operated by one surgeon. In 319 patients all predefined parameters were obtained. Training level was determined by year of residency (1-5 yrs or consultant status. Perioperative blood loss was calculated using three parameters: Hemoglobin level before and after surgery, postoperative sucker volume and weight of compresses. Furthermore the influence of prostatic size and BMI was analyzed. Results The Hb-decrease 24 h postoperatively was 2.4 g/dl median (-0.4-7.6 g/dl; sucker volume was 250 ml median (10-1500 ml; weight of compresses and swabs was 412 g median (0-972 g. One patient needed a transfusion with two erythrocyte concentrates one day after the surgery. There was no significant correlation regarding Hb-decrease (p = 0.86 or sucker volume plus weight of compresses (p = 0.59 in regard to the years of residency of the assisting physician. Also the number of assisted operations (n = 20 had no significant influence on calculated blood loss (p = 0.38. Conclusions For an experienced surgeon the impact of the assistant regarding blood loss seems negligible. The training level of the assistant was not significantly correlated to a rise or decrease of perioperative blood loss. In our data radical prostatectomy could be safely performed at an educational hospital independent of the training level of the first assistant.

  7. Clinical observation of 34 cases preoperative autologous blood donation%34例贮存式自身输血患者的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琼; 王静; 张洪为

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide reference for the clinical application of preoperative autologous blood donation(PABD).Meth-ods 34 patients met the conditions of PABD,and underwent PABD were enrolled in the study.Five laboratory indicators include Hemoglobin(Hb),RBC,WBC,PLT)and hematocrit(HCT),and prepared blood volume before surgery,intraoperative and postop-erative reinfusion volume were recorded before blood collection and after reinfusion.Results In the patients who only underwent PABD(A group),compared between before blood collection and after blood transfusion(intraoperative or postoperative 24 h),all the five Hematology Index were statistically different(P 0.05).Con-clusion The effective of PABD application in surgical patients undergoing elective operation is good,which won′t cause harm to the patient′s body(reflected in the hematology indicators).However,in some cases preoperative assessment of blood loss is not accurate enough,result in the amount of blood collected before operaton not meeting the needs,which might impact the effect PABD.%目的:为贮存式自身输血(PABD)在临床上的应用提供参考。方法选取34例符合 PABD 条件并进行了 PABD 的外科择期手术患者,观察采血前和回输后患者血红蛋白(Hb)、 RBC、WBC、PLT、红细胞比容(HCT)5项血液学指标,以及患者术前备血和术中、术后用血量。结果只进行自身输血的患者(A 组)采血前和回输后(术中或者术后24 h 内)的5项血液学指标进行比较,差异均有统计学意义(P <0.05)。其中 RBC、Hb、HCT、PLT 都下降(P<0.05),WBC 则上上升(P <0.05)。既进行了自身输血又进行了异体输血的患者(B 组)的实验室检查结果也有相似的情况,RBC、Hb、HCT、PLT 都下降(P <0.05),WBC 则升(P <0.05)。两组患者间比较,采血前和回输后的5项血液学指标差异均无统计学意义(P >0.05)。结论 PABD 在

  8. Possible Risks of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  9. Renal Blood Oxygenation Level-dependent Imaging in Longitudinal Follow-up of Donated and Remaining Kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Maryam; Eisenberger, Ute; Binser, Tobias; Thoeny, Harriet C; Krauer, Fabienne; Rusch, Aurelia; Boesch, Chris; Vogt, Bruno; Vermathen, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine renal oxygenation changes associated with uninephrectomy and transplantation in both native donor kidneys and transplanted kidneys by using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MR imaging. Materials and Methods The study protocol was approved by the local ethics committee. Thirteen healthy kidney donors and their corresponding recipients underwent kidney BOLD MR imaging with a 3-T imager. Written informed consent was obtained from each subject. BOLD MR imaging was performed in donors before uninephrectomy and in donors and recipients 8 days, 3 months, and 12 months after transplantation. R2* values, which are inversely related to tissue partial pressure of oxygen, were determined in the cortex and medulla. Longitudinal R2* changes were statistically analyzed by using repeated measures one-way analysis of variance with post hoc pair-wise comparisons. Results R2* values in the remaining kidneys significantly decreased early after uninephrectomy in both the medulla and cortex (P oxygen content. In donors, R2* remained significantly decreased in both the medulla and cortex at 3 (P < .01) and 12 (P < .01) months. In transplanted kidneys, R2* remained stable during the first year after transplantation, with no significant change. Among donors, cortical R2* was found to be negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (R = -0.47, P < .001). Conclusion The results suggest that BOLD MR imaging may potentially be used to monitor renal functional changes in both remaining and corresponding transplanted kidneys. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:26744926

  10. Quality control and evaluation of human immunodeficiency virus antibody assays used for screening donated blood in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU CHUN WANG; XIU HUA LI; AI JING SONG; CHUN TAO ZHANG; SI HONG XU; FENG ZHANG; HONG ZHANG YIN

    2006-01-01

    During 2004, a total of 124 batches of HIV antibody ELISAs from domestic and overseas manufacturers, comprising approximately 60 million tests, were tested for quality and released for screening blood in China. The inter- and intra-batch variation, specificity, and sensitivity were evaluated using a laboratory panel and clinical samples. The inter-batch variation was less than 15% and only 2 of 12 assays had intra-batch variation of less than 20% for 4 dilutions of a control specimen.257 samples confirmed positive for HIV antibody and 4826 negative samples from different regions in China were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the assays. The results showed that the sensitivity is in the range from 93.7% to 100% for assays sampled directly from the manufacturers,and 91.4%-99.6% for those retrieved from the consumers; the specificity was in the range from 97.88% to 99.97%. The testing environment may vary in different regions of China. Therefore, manufacturers should provide robust assays to satisfy the requirements of these diverse environments, and especially reduce the intra-assay variation and improve the stability of the kits.

  11. Investigation on voluntary blood donation in Guangzhou (1998-2009)%广州市无偿献血10年情况分析(1998-2009年)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾四海; 李锦城; 张晋昕; 唐钱

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析广州市无偿献血的发展趋势,为促进广州市无偿献血的发展提供参考.方法 数据检索自1998年10月1日至2009年12月31日在广州血液中心参加无偿献血的个人基本信息,包括:献血者年龄、性别、献血组织形式(单位、个人)、献血场所(集体、街头)、主要流动献血点的血液采集情况等,PASW Statistics 18.0统计分析.结果 男性无偿献血人数明显高于女性,差异有统计学意义(X2=1916.978,P=0.000).男性献血者1次献血400ml的情况明显好于女性(P<0.001);无偿献血人数比例最高的是25-岁组,男女性均超过30.00%,18-39岁献血者所占比例高达84.31%;在所有参加献血者中,10年期间只献血1次的人数最多,达到77.6%;献血10次以上的献血者仅有0.35%;街头献血人数增长比较快,在1998-2008年间参加单位(集体)献血的人数与参加街头献血的人数相比为1:0.95,2009年则为1:1.78.结论 广州市无偿献血的重点人群是青年群体.在重点发展街头无偿献血的同时,集体招募无偿献血也是保证广州市临床血液供应的有效方式.%Objective To analyze the voluntary blood donation program in Guangzhou, and to promote the development of voluntary blood donation.Methods Data from the Guangzhou Blood Center (October 1, 1998-December 31, 2009) were analyzed.These included the age, gender, the source of blood donation (from organizations or individuals), blood donation sites (at the center or mobile units), and the situation of blood collection in the main mobile blood collection stations.Results There was a significant difference in the number of male and female donors (P<0.001).There was more male blood donors donating 400 ml of blood at one time than the female donors (P<0.001).Most of the voluntary blood donors are in the age group of 25.The proportion of male and female are both over 30.00%.84.31% of the donors were in the age group of 18~39.77.6% of donors donated

  12. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as smart and safe devices for regulating blood biomolecule levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive end-capped MSN materials are promising drug carriers that securely deliver a large payload of drug molecules without degradation or premature release. A general review of the recent progress in this field is presented, including a summary of a series of hard and soft caps for drug encapsulation and a variety of internal and external stimuli for controlled release of different therapeutics, a discussion of the biocompatibility of MSN both in vitro and in vivo, and a description of the sophisticated stimuli-responsive systems with novel capping agents and controlled release mechanism. The unique internal and external surfaces of MSN were utilized for the development of a glucose-responsive double delivery system end-capped with insulin. This unique system consists of functionalized MSNs capable of releasing insulin when the concentration of sugar in blood exceeds healthy levels. The insulin-free nanoparticles are then up taken by pancreatic cells, and release inside of them another biomolecule that stimulates the production of more insulin. The in vivo application of this system for the treatment of diabetes requires further understanding on the biological behaviors of these nanoparticles in blood vessels. The research presented in this dissertation demonstrated the size and surface effects on the interaction of MSNs with red blood cell membranes, and discovered how the surface of the nanoparticles can be modified to improve their compatibility with red blood cells and avoid their dangerous side effects. In order to optimize the properties of MSN for applying them as efficient intracellular drug carriers it is necessary to understand the factors that can regulate their internalization into and exocytosis out of the cells. The correlation between the particle morphology and aggregation of MSNs to the effectiveness of cellular uptake is discussed and compared with different cell lines. The differences in the degree of exocytosis of MSNs between

  13. Disentangling the stigma of HIV/AIDS from the stigmas of drugs use, commercial sex and commercial blood donation – a factorial survey of medical students in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kong-Lai

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS related stigma interferes with the provision of appropriate care and support for people living with HIV/AIDS. Currently, programs to address the stigma approach it as if it occurs in isolation, separate from the co-stigmas related to the various modes of disease transmission including injection drug use (IDU and commercial sex (CS. In order to develop better programs to address HIV/AIDS related stigma, the inter-relationship (or 'layering' between HIV/AIDS stigma and the co-stigmas needs to be better understood. This paper describes an experimental study for disentangling the layering of HIV/AIDS related stigmas. Methods The study used a factorial survey design. 352 medical students from Guangzhou were presented with four random vignettes each describing a hypothetical male. The vignettes were identical except for the presence of a disease diagnosis (AIDS, leukaemia, or no disease and a co-characteristic (IDU, CS, commercial blood donation (CBD, blood transfusion or no co-characteristic. After reading each vignette, participants completed a measure of social distance that assessed the level of stigmatising attitudes. Results Bivariate and multivariable analyses revealed statistically significant levels of stigma associated with AIDS, IDU, CS and CBD. The layering of stigma was explored using a recently developed technique. Strong interactions between the stigmas of AIDS and the co-characteristics were also found. AIDS was significantly less stigmatising than IDU or CS. Critically, the stigma of AIDS in combination with either the stigmas of IDU or CS was significantly less than the stigma of IDU alone or CS alone. Conclusion The findings pose several surprising challenges to conventional beliefs about HIV/AIDS related stigma and stigma interventions that have focused exclusively on the disease stigma. Contrary to the belief that having a co-stigma would add to the intensity of stigma attached to people with HIV

  14. Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator Can Be Safely Given without Complete Blood Count Results Back.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Dong

    Full Text Available It is well known that the efficacy of intravenous (i.v. tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is time-dependent when used to treat patients with acute ischemic strokes.Our study examines the safety issue of giving IV tPA without complete blood count (CBC resulted.This is a retrospective observational study by examining the database from Huashan Hospital in China and OSF/INI Comprehensive Stroke Center in United States. Patient data collected included demographics, occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, door to needle intervals, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale scores on admission, CBC results on admission and follow-up modified Rankin Scale scores. Linear regression and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify factors that would have an impact on door-to-needle intervals.Our study included 120 patients from Huashan Hospital and 123 patients from INI. Among them, 36 in Huashan Hospital and 51 in INI received i.v. tPA prior to their CBC resulted. Normal platelet count was found in 98.8% patients after tPA was given. One patient had thrombocytopenia but no hemorrhagic event. A significantly shorter door to needle interval (DTN was found in the group without CBC resulted. There was also a difference in treatment interval between the two hospitals. Door to needle intervals had a strong correlation to onset to treatment intervals and NIHSS scores on admission.In patients presented with acute ischemic stroke, the risk of developing hemorrhagic event is low if i.v. tPA is given before CBC has resulted. The door to needle intervals can be significantly reduced.

  15. Bibliometric analysis on the exploring of the effective promotion of unpaid blood donation%基于文献计量分析的无偿献血有效宣传探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅媛媛; 林振平; 王晖; 赵轶伦; 蔡旭兵

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To probe into the effective promotion of unpaid blood donation in China. Methods:Unpaid blood donation advocacy papers were analyzed by bibliometric analysis method. Results: A total of 110 papers involved 19 provinces and cities were selected. 85.45% authors' affiliations were blood collection agencies. 32.73%papers came from “Chin J Blood Transfusion”. The ratio of qualitative research was 52.73%. The target audiences were college students and migrants in the street accounted for 58.89%. The ratio of effective evaluation was 47.83%. The proportion of effective evaluation of the mass media was 32.00%. Conclusion: The promotion of blood donation is receiving more and more attention. The top three evaluation of effective promotion are celebrity events, heroic deeds of donation reports and special date. The top three of media are advertising, TV news and billboards.%目的:探讨我国无偿献血的有效宣传情况。方法:采用文献计量分析法对无偿献血宣传期刊文献进行分析。结果:110篇文献涉及19个省市,作者单位是采供血机构占85.45%。期刊来自《中国输血杂志》占32.73%,以定性研究为主占52.73%。宣传对象是在校大学生和街头流动人群占58.89%,宣传活动有效评价比例为47.83%,宣传媒体有效评价比例为32.00%。结论:无偿献血宣传研究日益受到重视,评价有效宣传活动位居前3位的是名人效应活动、献血英雄事迹报道、特殊日期活动,评价有效宣传媒体位居前3位的是广告、电视新闻、宣传栏。

  16. Analysis on results of blood test for first-time blood donation volunteers and mutual-aid blood donors in Anyang area%安阳地区首次无偿献血志愿者与互助献血者血液检测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈艳萍; 武丽娟

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze results of blood test for first‐time blood donation volunteers and mutual‐aid blood donors in Anyang area ,in order to improve cognition of characteristics of different blood donors and safety of blood transfusion .Methods A total of 31 363 cases of first‐time blood donation volunteers(first‐time blood donation group) and 1 046 cases of mutual‐aid blood donors(control group) from January to December 2013 in Anyang area were collected .The results of blood tests were compared and related factors affected qualities of blood were analysed .Results A total of 1 160 cases of donors in the first‐time blood donation group were failed to pass the blood test and the unqualified rate was 3 .70% ,in the control group 17 cases of donors failed to pass the blood test and the unqualified rate was 1 .62% ;the difference was statistically significant (P<0 .05) .The test results of unqual‐ified blood samples shown that in the first‐time blood donation group the constituent ratios of alanine aminotransferase(ALT) ,anti‐body to hepatitis C virus(anti‐HCV) ,antibody to human immunodeficiency virus(anti‐HIV) ,hepatitis B surface antigen(HBsAg) and syphilis positive blood donors were 37 .67% ,12 .59% ,8 .79% ,31 .38% and 9 .57% respectively ,and those in the control group were 29 .41% ,17 .65% ,5 .88% ,35 .30% and 11 .76% respectively .The constituent ratio of ALT positive blood donors between the two groups had statistically significant difference(P<0 .05) .There were statistically significant differences in gender ,age and occu‐pations between unqualified blood donors in the two groups(P<0 .05) .Conclusion The first‐time blood donation volunteers might have relatively higher unqualified rate in blood test ,it is necessary to enhance blood screening and management before transfusion , in order to ensure safety of blood transfusion .%目的:分析安阳地区首次无偿献血志愿者与互助献血者的血液检验结果,以提高

  17. The new Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions database (SCANDAT2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus; Vasan, Senthil K;

    2015-01-01

    METHODS: We have previously created the anonymized Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT) database, containing data on blood donors, blood transfusions, and transfused patients, with complete follow-up of donors and patients for a range of health outcomes. Here we describe the re-creation of...... SCANDAT with updated, identifiable data. We collected computerized data on blood donations and transfusions from blood banks covering all of Sweden and Denmark. After data cleaning, two structurally identical databases were created and the entire database was linked with nationwide health outcomes...... over 40 million person-years, with possibility for future extension. Data quality is generally high with 96% of all transfusions being traceable to their respective donation(s) and a very high (>97%) concordance with official statistics on annual number of blood donations and transfusions. CONCLUSIONS...

  18. Have You Given Blood Lately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testing: After donation, blood establishments are required to test each unit of donated blood for the following infectious disease agents: · Hepatitis B · Hepatitis C · Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) 1 and ...

  19. Aggressive Blood Pressure Lowing Therapy in Patients with Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage is Safe: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Pan; Yang Hu; Na Liu; Ping Zhang; You-Ping Zhang; Miribanu Aimaiti; Hong Deng

    2015-01-01

    Background:The influence of blood pressure (BP) lowering on intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients is unclear.To assess the safety and efficacy of aggressive antihypertensive therapies in acute ICH patients,we carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis.Methods:PubMed,EMBASE,Cochrane Library,China National Knowledge Infrastructure,and VIP database up to July 2014 were searched.High-quality randomized controlled trials were included.Low-quality trials were excluded.Serious adverse events were defined as the primary outcome.The secondary outcomes were hematoma enlargement (HE) at 24 h after onset,mortality,and favorable clinical outcome at 90 days.Results:Four high-quality trials involving a total of 1427 patients met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed.Odds ratios (ORs) of primary outcome was 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI]:0.82-1.13,P =0.61).ORs of HE at 24 h after onset,mortality and favorable clinical outcome at 90 days were 0.91 (95% CI:0.72-1.17,P =0.47),0.97 (95% CI:0.79-1.20,P =0.81),1.13 (95% CI:0.98-1.30,P =0.09) respectively.Conclusions:Aggressive BP management policies are safe and might have a potency of reducing HE and improving clinical outcome.

  20. Donation Intentions for Cancer Genetics Research Among African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Jasmine A; Weathers, Benita; Barg, Frances K.; Troxel, Andrea B; Shea, Judy A; Bowen, Deborah; Guerra, Carmen E.; Halbert, Chanita Hughes

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Scientific agencies rely on individuals to donate their DNA to support research on chronic conditions that disproportionately affect African Americans; however, donation is variable in this population. The purpose of this study was to identify sociodemographic characteristics, health care variables, and cultural values having significant independent associations with intentions to donate blood or saliva samples for cancer genetics research among African American adults. Method: Cross-se...

  1. [Organs, tissues, and cells donation in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Treviño, María Guadalupe; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Transplants are one of the most important advances of modern medicine; in the last 50 years in our country there have been more than fifty thousand transplants, which makes it clear that this is one of the most sought-after medical practices not only in Mexico but worldwide. In life, it is possible for a person to donate a kidney, a lung or a liver segment. When brain death occurs it is possible for a person to donate kidneys, heart, liver, pancreas, intestines, lungs, blood, hematopoietic cells, bone marrow, bones, corneas, heart valves, tendons, and arteries. However, the culture of organ donation is not widespread among Mexicans, hence in our country there is not even 50 % of the number of donations recommended by WHO, which impacts the number of patients who are waiting for an organ or tissue, which causes many of them die before receiving them. PMID:26506496

  2. Defaults and Donations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmann, Steffen; Falk, Armin; Heidhues, Paul;

    We study how website defaults affect consumer behavior in the domain of charitable giving. In a field experiment that was conducted on a large platform for making charitable donations over the web, we exogenously vary the default options in two distinct choice dimensions. The first pertains...... to the primary donation decision, namely, how much to contribute to the charitable cause. The second relates to an "add-on" decision of how much to contribute to supporting the online platform itself. We find a strong impact of defaults on individual behavior: in each of our treatments, the modal positive...... contributions in both choice dimensions invariably correspond to the specified default amounts. Defaults, nevertheless, have no impact on aggregate donations. This is because defaults in the donation domain induce some people to donate more and others to donate less than they otherwise would have. In contrast...

  3. 75 FR 17843 - National Donate Life Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... another in the most difficult of circumstances through organ, tissue, stem cell, and blood donation... donation on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network waiting list. Many will receive a lifesaving... of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-8026 Filed 4-6-10;...

  4. Blood safety and availability: continuing challenges in China's blood banking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ling; Wang, Jing-Xing; Stevens, Lori; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2014-02-01

    Social and economic development, along with increased health care coverage, has caused a sharp increase in the clinical demand for blood in China. Whole blood collection has increased rapidly in the past decade but has failed to keep pace with the ever-increasing demand. Overall, the country's blood safety has been improved with 99% of whole blood donations collected from voluntary unpaid donors. However, the unmet clinical demand for blood and the increasing incidence of human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis in the general population pose new challenges to China's blood banking system. To ensure a safe and adequate blood supply, continued efforts are required to recruit and retain a sufficient number of low-risk voluntary blood donors, improve donor prescreening and blood testing process, ease donor restrictions, and strengthen patient blood management. PMID:23710600

  5. Effect of whole blood donation on serum iron and ferritin%定期无偿献血对献血者血清铁和铁蛋白的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    亓法英; 赵孔波; 张春来; 于继徐

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究献血对血清铁含量的影响。方法收集76例无偿献血人员为献血组,83例健康人员(非献血人员)为对照组,采集空腹静脉血,进行血常规、血清铁和铁蛋白检查。结果献血组血清铁、红细胞和红细胞压积均在正常范围,血清铁蛋白和血红蛋白除1例外也在正常范围。献血组男性血清铁蛋白为(116.52±67.16)ng/mL,对照组男性为(186.39±103.15) ng/mL,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P <0.05);献血组女性血清铁蛋白为(66.2±47.62)ng/mL,对照组女性为(101.1±73.89) ng/mL,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。献血组血清铁与对照组比较差异无统计学意义(P >0.05)。结论献血组血清铁蛋白降低,但是并没有造成贫血。因此,献血可以减少体内的铁贮存量。%Objective To study the influence of blood donation serum iron levels.Methods 76 blood donors and 83 control subjects (who had never donated blood)were enrolled to this study.Venous blood samples were drawn for Hb,RBC,HCT,serum iron and ferritin analysis.Results Serum ferritin and Hb of enrolled donors except one were above the mandatory threshold.Serum iron,RBC and HCT of enrolled donors were all above the mandatory threshold.Furthermore,we found that serum ferritin of male blood donors(116.52±67.16 ng/mL)were significantly lower than that of control subjects (186.39±103.15 ng/mL),and serum ferritin of female blood donors(66.2±47.62 ng/mL)were significantly lower than that of control subjects(101.1±73.89 ng/mL). In contrast,there was no difference of serum iron between blood donors and control group.Conclusion Anemia had not occurred in enrolled donors,but serum ferritin level decreased.Thus,whole blood donation could diminish iron stores.

  6. Dengue viremia in blood donors in Northern India: Challenges of emerging dengue outbreaks to blood transfusion safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhana Mangwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backdround: Emerging infectious diseases pose threats to the general human population; including recipients of blood transfusions. Dengue is spreading rapidly to new areas and with increasing frequency of major outbreaks. Screening blood for dengue antigens in dengue-endemic countries would be costly and should, therefore, be recommended only after careful assessment of risk for infection and cost. Aim: A prospective study was conducted to establish the magnitude of the threat that dengue poses to blood safety where it is sporadic with seasonal variations, to quantify risk and to assess that whether screening is feasible and cost-effective. Materials and Methods: Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 antigen test was done on 1709 donations during dengue outbreak in the months August to November 2013 as an additional test using Bio-Rad Platelia Dengue NS1AG test kit which is one step sandwich format microplate enzyme immunoassay using murine monoclonal antibodies for capture and revelation. Chi-square test was used to find statistical significance. Results and Conclusions: Majority cases were whole blood, replacement, male donors with 76.10% donors in <35 years age group. About 17.85% were single donor platelet donations. NS1 antigen in all donors was negative. In the past, dengue affected mainly children who do not donate blood. With the changing trend, mean age of infection increased affecting the population that does donate blood, further reducing blood donation pool. Further studies need to be done in different geographic regions of the country during dengue transmission season to establish maximum incidence of viremic donations, rates of transfusion transmission and clinical consequences in recipients. If risk is found to be substantial, decision will be taken by the policymakers at what threshold screening should be instituted to ensure safe blood transfusion.

  7. Whole blood donor deferral analysis at Genera l hospital blood bank – A retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinal Gajjar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: A blood transfusion is a life saving procedure in many instances and it requir es an adequate supply of safe blood. The most important is the selection of blood donors by donor selection criteria. A large number of blood donors are deferred from donating blood for several reasons either temporarily or permanently. A shortage of safe blood donor is frequent and it is important to understand the causes of deferral of potential donors. Aims: 1. Primary objective of this study was to record and document the current rate and reasons for donor deferred in our blood bank. 2. Apply relevant findings to modify recruitment strategy for blood donors. Materials and methods: Data for WBD presenting for blood donation in a blood bank V S General Hospital and outdoor camps over two and half years from January 2011 to June 2013 were analysed retrospectively. National Guidelines were used for selection & deferral of WBD. Results: 3836 (11.16% WBD were deferred out of 34373 registered donors during the study period. Donor deferrals were tabulated into temporary and permanent reasons. Temporary deferrals were 3113 (81.15% and permanent deferrals were 723 (18.85%. The most common reasons were low haemoglobin (48.33%, high blood pressure (11.94%, underweight donors (7.95% and history of medication use (6.13% among total deferral donors. Majority of donors (47.16% deferred were between 18 -30 years. Females were found to have higher deferral rate (25.48% than males (10.76%. Discussion and conclusion: A deferral study in blood donors may shed light on the health status of general population which may affect the present and future blood supply. It is important to provide donors with a clear message on their deferral status so that most of temporary deferral donors will return for donation in future.

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 26,035 views 49:19 Scott: Donating Blood ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 27,845 views 49:19 Scott: Donating Blood ...

  10. Why People with Cancer Might Need Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  11. TRYPTOPHAN PROMOTES CHARITABLE DONATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eSteenbergen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The link between serotonin (5-HT and one of the most important elements of prosocial behavior, charity, has remained largely uninvestigated. In the present study, we tested whether charitable donating can be promoted by administering the food supplement L-Tryptophan (TRP, the biochemical precursor of 5-HT. Participants were compared with respect to the amount of money they donated when given the opportunity to make a charitable donation. As expected, compared to a neutral placebo, TRP appears to increase the participants’ willingness to donate money to a charity. This result supports the idea that the food we eat may act as a cognitive enhancer modulating the way we think and perceive the world and others.

  12. Organ donations after death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernarda Logar

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses public opinion on post-mortem organ donation, especially the difference between high support of public opinion to transplant activity, its general readiness to donate organs and the low number of signed organ donor cards. Through different approaches the article tries to point out possible factors relevant to the decision to donate organs. Early studies showed demographic variables and information as significant factors when deciding to donate organs after death. As there was not enough evidence that long-term effect through these factors is significant, the need for new investigation has grown. Social cognition theories helped understanding the difference mentioned above. It seems that the use of this approach might contribute to the understanding the problem and to delimit most useful factors when working with public.

  13. Organ Donation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maya; Reid

    2011-01-01

    CHINA’S first voluntary organ donation system is in the midst of its trial run. The program is being tested in 11 pilot regions around the country, having harvested organs from more than 100 donors in this inaugural year. Overseen by the Red Cross Society of China and the country’s Ministry of Health, the system follows cardiac death standards in organ donation

  14. Screening Donated Blood for Transfusion Transmitted Infections by Serology along with NAT and Response Rate to Notification of Reactive Results: An Indian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Rahul; Zaman, Shamsuz; Das, Bankim; Chatterjee, Kabita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Transfusion safety begins with healthy donors. A fundamental part of preventing transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs) is to notify and counsel reactive donors. Donor notification and counselling protect the health of the donor and prevent secondary transmission of infectious diseases. Methods. 113,014 donations were screened for TTIs, namely, HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis, by serology and nucleic acid testing. All reactive donors were retested (wherever possible) and notified of their status by telephone or letter. All initial reactive screens were followed over six months. Results. We evaluated 2,838 (2.51%) cases with reactive screening test results (1.38% HBV, 0.54% HCV, 0.27% HIV, and 0.32% syphilis). Only 23.3% of donors (662) responded to notification. The response among voluntary donors was better as compared to the replacement donors (43.6% versus 21.2%). Only 373 (56.3%) responsive donors followed their first attendance at referral specialties. Over six months, only 176 of 662 (26.6%) reactive donors received treatment. Conclusion. Our study shed light on the importance of proper donor counselling and notification of TTI status to all reactive donors who opt to receive this information. There is also an urgent need to formulate the nationally acceptable guidelines for notification and follow-up of reactive donors. PMID:25485163

  15. Screening Donated Blood for Transfusion Transmitted Infections by Serology along with NAT and Response Rate to Notification of Reactive Results: An Indian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Chaurasia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transfusion safety begins with healthy donors. A fundamental part of preventing transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs is to notify and counsel reactive donors. Donor notification and counselling protect the health of the donor and prevent secondary transmission of infectious diseases. Methods. 113,014 donations were screened for TTIs, namely, HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis, by serology and nucleic acid testing. All reactive donors were retested (wherever possible and notified of their status by telephone or letter. All initial reactive screens were followed over six months. Results. We evaluated 2,838 (2.51% cases with reactive screening test results (1.38% HBV, 0.54% HCV, 0.27% HIV, and 0.32% syphilis. Only 23.3% of donors (662 responded to notification. The response among voluntary donors was better as compared to the replacement donors (43.6% versus 21.2%. Only 373 (56.3% responsive donors followed their first attendance at referral specialties. Over six months, only 176 of 662 (26.6% reactive donors received treatment. Conclusion. Our study shed light on the importance of proper donor counselling and notification of TTI status to all reactive donors who opt to receive this information. There is also an urgent need to formulate the nationally acceptable guidelines for notification and follow-up of reactive donors.

  16. Medical Students' Knowledge, Familiarity, and Attitudes towards Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donation: Stem Cell Donation Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Praveena; Wolanskyj, Alexandra; Ehlers, Shawna L; Litzow, Mark R; Patnaik, Mrinal S; Hogan, William J; Hashmi, Shahrukh K

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with blood disorders and genetic diseases. Approximately 70% of the HSCTs currently performed in the United States use stems cells from an unrelated donor who donated voluntarily. Medical students (MS) are a young, diverse, influential population whose willingness to engage in altruistic acts, such as donating stem cells, may be correlated with knowledge on the topic. A literature gap exists in MS perspectives towards HSCT and the bone marrow registry (BMR) and prior studies suggest that misconceptions about donation deter MS from participation on the BMR, which may decrease opportunities to educate other potential donors. We performed a cross-sectional survey among the 4-year cohort of MS at Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minnesota. The questionnaire evaluated multiple areas including whether MS were current members of the BMR and/or prior blood donors, MS current knowledge on donor eligibility (DE) and the donation process (DP), MS familiarity with HSCT and the DP, and MS attitudes towards joining the BMR and towards donating stem cells. The responses were analyzed and assessed alongside a self-reported, standardized scale measuring students' altruistic behaviors. There were 99 out of 247 potential respondents (40%), with 45% (n = 44) of MS in preclinical years 1 or 2, 37% (n = 37) in clinical years 3 or 4, and 18% (n = 18) in research or alternative portions of their training, of which 43% (n = 41) in total were current BMR members. BMR status correlated positively with prior blood donation (P = .015) and female sex (P = .014). Respondents had a 57.7% and 63.7% average correct response rate regarding knowledge of DE and DP, respectively, with knowledge of DE not surprisingly higher in BMR members (P donating stem cells: lower concern with all evaluated aspects of HSCT-time, cost, pain, and side effects (for all subsections, P blood

  17. The importance of education in the promotion of organ donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taise Ribeiro Morais

    2012-09-01

    .The profile of the opponent to organ donation is: man or woman over the age of 45 years, with low schooling, who does not know the concept of brain death and has a partner also against organ donation, is not conducive to blood donation and fears the manipulation of the body after death. The main reasons for not accepting the donation is the lack of knowledge of how to become a donor and the fear of misdiagnosis of death(7.Facing this reality, health professionals should act as educators, to modify public opinion regarding the misconceptions. However, unfavorable beliefs can be modified only if educators are well prepared for that, so that the population is prompted to participate in debates on organ transplants and legislation.Modifying the existing reality means developing programs planned and evaluated in an ongoing educational process, supported by theoretical background and scientifically recognized models, for all segments of the community, along with incorporating the knowledge of thanatology in the formation of health professionals, with better appreciation of religious principles, to avoid making an aggressive approach to the families of potential donors. The preparation of families should be taken into consideration, to prevent the false idea that death is being expected in order to save others’ lives, because every family wants their patient to have the opportunity to live. Therefore, the government is to be exhorted to realize that the lack of support to the practice of organ donation is a real problem, and to include educational activities regarding transplants in priority governmental programs and in public policies of health care.Since organ donation in Brazil depends exclusively on the family permission, campaigns that seek to increase the understanding of the concept of brain death among the population, and, most of all, to encourage people to express their desire to be a donor and to discuss their decision with family are important strategies to tackle this

  18. PSYCHOSOCIAL VARIABLES OF HIGHLY MOTIVATED VOLUNTARY BLOOD DONORS AT BLOOD BANK OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE

    OpenAIRE

    Bhalodia Jignasa N; Patel Kinara A; Oza Hiren V

    2012-01-01

    Background: The adequacy of blood depends on blood donation rates and numbers of blood donors. To prepare adequate blood supplies, it is essential to investigate the factors that motivate individuals from donating. This study aimed to identify the character of highly motivated donors. This study was undertaken to study the motivational factors leading to voluntary blood donation and understanding the psychosocial variables of blood donors. Methodology: We selected 50 regular blood donors who ...

  19. What's It Like to Donate Stem Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To learn more What’s it like to donate stem cells? People usually volunteer to donate stem cells for ... an autologous transplant. If you want to donate stem cells for someone else People who want to donate ...

  20. Development of blood transfusion service in Sultanate of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Sanmukh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sultanate of Oman is geographically situated in south-west of Asia, having common borders on western side by the land with United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Yemen and with the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman in the east and the north respectively. The country enjoys one of the best health care facilities including blood transfusion services in the region. Study design: Information was collected through informal personal interviews, digging out the past records, and the report presentations at various forums. Results: A modest start by providing blood units through import, the country is now self-reliant on procuring blood units from voluntary non-remunerate blood donors within the sultanate. A steady growth of blood banks is witnessed in every aspect of blood banking including blood collection, blood processing and supply. Various modalities are adapted in promoting voluntary blood donation programme. Conclusion: Sultanate of Oman has created one of the best blood transfusion services in the region in providing safe blood for transfusion through voluntary donation, a use of blood components and irradiating blood products.

  1. Intrapleural instillation of autologous blood for persistent air leak in spontaneous pneumothorax- is it as effective as it is safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karangelis Dimos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of autologous blood pleurodesis in the management of persistent air leak in spontaneous pneumothorax. Patients and methods A number of 15 patients (10 male and 5 female were included in this prospective study between March 2005 and December 2009. The duration of the air leak exceeded 7 days in all patients. The application of blood pleurodesis was used as the last preoperative conservative method of treatment in 12 patients. One patient refused surgery and two were ineligible for operation due to their comorbidities. A blood sample of 50 ml was obtained from the patient's femoral vein and immediately introduced into the chest tube. Results A success rate of 27% was observed having the air leak sealed in 4 patients in less than 24 hours. Conclusion Despite our disappointingly poor outcome, the authors believe that the procedure's safety, convenience and low cost establish it as a worth trying method of conservative treatment for patients with the aforementioned pathology for whom no other alternative than surgery would be a choice.

  2. Deceased Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israni, A K; Zaun, D; Bolch, C; Rosendale, J D; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    SRTR uses data collected by OPTN to calculate metrics such as donation/conversion rate, organ yield, and rate of organs recovered for transplant but not transplanted. In 2014, 9252 eligible deaths were reported by organ procurement organizations, a slight increase from 8944 in 2012, and the donation/conversation rate was 73.4 eligible donors per 100 eligible deaths, a slight increase from 71.3 in 2013. Some metrics show variation across organ procurement organizations, suggesting that sharing best practices could lead to gains in efficiency and organ retrieval. PMID:26755269

  3. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymphoma , and myeloma can be treated with a bone marrow transplant . This is now often called a stem cell ... are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. " ...

  4. Controversies in kidney paired donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Sommer E; Montgomery, Robert A; Segev, Dorry L

    2012-07-01

    Kidney paired donation represented 10% of living kidney donation in the United States in 2011. National registries around the world and several separate registries in the United States arrange paired donations, although with significant variations in their practices. Concerns about ethical considerations, clinical advisability, and the quantitative effectiveness of these approaches in paired donation result in these variations. For instance, although donor travel can be burdensome and might discourage paired donation, it was nearly universal until convincing analysis showed that living donor kidneys can sustain many hours of cold ischemia time without adverse consequences. Opinions also differ about whether the last donor in a chain of paired donation transplants initiated by a nondirected donor should donate immediately to someone on the deceased donor wait-list (a domino or closed chain) or should be asked to wait some length of time and donate to start another sequence of paired donations later (an open chain); some argue that asking the donor to donate later may be coercive, and others focus on balancing the probability that the waiting donor withdraws versus the number of additional transplants if the chain can be continued. Other controversies in paired donation include simultaneous versus nonsimultaneous donor operations, whether to enroll compatible pairs, and interactions with desensitization protocols. Efforts to expand public awareness of and participation in paired donation are needed to generate more transplant opportunities. PMID:22732046

  5. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ASH Apps Share Your Idea Donate My Account Search Show Main Menu + About Awards Membership ASH Foundation ... help: Results of Clinical Studies Published in Blood Search Blood , the official journal of ASH, for the ...

  6. Careful treatment planning enables safe ablation of liver tumors adjacent to major blood vessels by percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a tissue ablation method, which relies on the phenomenon of electroporation. When cells are exposed to a sufficiently electric field, the plasma membrane is disrupted and cells undergo an apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Although heating effects are known IRE is considered as non-thermal ablation technique and is currently applied to treat tumors in locations where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. The manufacturer of the only commercially available pulse generator for IRE recommends a voltage-to-distance ratio of 1500 to 1700 V/cm for treating tumors in the liver. However, major blood vessels can influence the electric field distribution. We present a method for treatment planning of IRE which takes the influence of blood vessels on the electric field into account; this is illustrated on a treatment of 48-year-old patient with a metastasis near the remaining hepatic vein after a right side hemi-hepatectomy. Output of the numerical treatment planning method shows that a 19.9 cm3 irreversible electroporation lesion was generated and the whole tumor was covered with at least 900 V/cm. This compares well with the volume of the hypodense lesion seen in contrast enhanced CT images taken after the IRE treatment. A significant temperature raise occurs near the electrodes. However, the hepatic vein remains open after the treatment without evidence of tumor recurrence after 6 months. Treatment planning using accurate computer models was recognized as important for electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. An important finding of this study was, that the surface of the electrodes heat up significantly. Therefore the clinical user should generally avoid placing the electrodes less than 4 mm away from risk structures when following recommendations of the manufacturer

  7. Burden of hepatitis C virus infection and its genotypes among the blood donors at Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh

    OpenAIRE

    Verma A; DS Jothi Bai; Sarma PVGK; Nagaraj M.; Srikant L; Vasavi B; Chandramouli P; Kalawat U

    2015-01-01

    Background: Safe blood donation remains a challenge in resource limited countries. False positive serological tests lead to wastage of large number of blood units. Nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) technology has greatly enhanced the accuracy in identification of transfusions transmitted infections. Methods: The present study was undertaken to study the seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and asses the concordance between seropositivity with the presence of HCV ribonucleic ac...

  8. Incidence of human herpes virus-6 and human cytomegalovirus infections in donated bone marrow and umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad-Behbahani A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the incidence of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections that are potentially transmitted to haematopoietic stem cells (HSC transplant recipients via bone marrow (BM or umbilical cord blood (UCB. Bone marrow progenitor cells were collected from 30 allogenic BM donors. UCB HSC were collected from 34 subjects. The extracted DNA was then processed using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR technique. HCMV and HHV-6 serological status were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Nested PCR identified HCMV in 22 (73% of 30 samples of BM progenitor cells but in only eight (23.5% of 34 samples of UBC HSC ( P = 0.001. HHV-6 DNA was detected in 11 (36.6% of 30 BM progenitor cells and in only one (2.9% of 34 UBC cells ( P = 0.002. Both HHV-6 and HCMV infections were determined in nine (26.5% of 34 bone marrow samples. The results indicate that, the risk of HCMV and HHV-6 via BM progenitor cells is higher than transmission by UCB cells ( P= 0.04.

  9. Crowdfunding as 'Donations'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreau, Kevin J.; Jeppesen, Lars Bo; Reichstein, Toke;

    For a wide class of crowdfunding approaches, we argue that the reward structure (for funders) is closer to that of charitable donations to public goods than it is to traditional entrepreneurial finance. Many features of the design of crowdfunding platforms can therefore be understood as attempts to...... deal with attendant “free-rider” problems in motivating contributions. Reviewing institutional features of today’s crowdfunding, we clarify that there are often limits in the extent to which tangible rewards can be used to motivate contributions. Drawing on analogies with charitable donations, we...... theorize that intangible sources of motivation — (i) direct psychological rewards, (ii) reciprocity and (iii) social interactions — can play a role in entrepreneurial crowdfunding. In our detailed empirical analysis of a representative project we find abundant evidence consistent with this characterization...

  10. Low hemoglobin deferral in blood donors

    OpenAIRE

    Mast, Alan E.

    2013-01-01

    Low hemoglobin deferral occurs in about 10% of attempted whole blood donations and commonly is a consequence of iron deficiency anemia. Pre-menopausal women often have iron deficiency anemia caused by menstruation and pregnancy and have low hemoglobin deferral on their first donation attempt. Frequent donors also develop iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia because blood donation removes a large amount of iron from the donor and the 56-day minimum inter-donation interval for donors in t...

  11. Brazilian blood donation eligibility criteria for dermatologic patients Critérios brasileiros de elegibilidade à doação de sangue para pacientes dermatológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gustavo Wambier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A focused and commented review on the impact of dermatologic diseases and interventions in the solidary act of donating blood is presented to dermatologists to better advise their patients. This is a review of current Brazilian technical regulations on hemotherapeutic procedures as determined by Ministerial Directive #1353/2011 by the Ministry of Health and current internal regulations of the Hemotherapy Center of Ribeirão Preto, a regional reference center in hemotherapeutic procedures. Criteria for permanent inaptitude: autoimmune diseases (>1 organ involved, personal history of cancer other than basal cell carcinoma, severe atopic dermatitis or psoriasis, pemphigus foliaceus, porphyrias, filariasis, leprosy, extra pulmonary tuberculosis or paracoccidioidomycosis, and previous use of etretinate. Drugs that impose temporary ineligibility: other systemic retinoids, systemic corticosteroids, 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors, vaccines, methotrexate, beta-blockers, minoxidil, anti-epileptic, and anti-psychotic drugs. Other conditions that impose temporary ineligibility: occupational accident with biologic material, piercing, tattoo, sexually transmitted diseases, herpes, and bacterial infections, among others. Discussion: Thalidomide is currently missing in the teratogenic drugs list. Although finasteride was previously considered a drug that imposed permanent inaptitude, according to its short halflife current restriction of 1 month is still too long. Dermatologists should be able to advise their patients about proper timing to donate blood, and discuss the impact of drug withdrawal on treatment outcomes and to respect the designated washout periods.Uma revisão centrada no impacto de doenças e intervenções dermatológicas no ato solidário de doar sangue é apresentada aos dermatologistas para melhor aconselhamento dos seus pacientes. Esta é uma revisão das atuais normas técnicas brasileiras sobre procedimentos hemoterápicos conforme

  12. Prevalência de doação de sangue e fatores associados, Pelotas, RS Prevalencia de donación de sangre y factores asociados, Pelotas, Sur de Brasil Blood donation prevalence and associated factors in Pelotas, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alethea Zago

    2010-02-01

    vida, donación en el último año y donación fidelizada (por lo menos dos donaciones en el último año. Cada hecho fue analizado de acuerdo con variables demográficas, socioeconómicas, de salud, exposición a campañas de promoción de la donación de sangre y tener pariente o amigo donador. El análisis bruto y multivariable fue hecho utilizándose regresión e Poisson, con ajuste para el efecto del diseño muestral. RESULTADOS: Las prevalencias encontradas de donación de sangre alguna vez en la vida, en el último año y de donación fidelizada, fueron, respectivamente, 32%, 7,7% 3,6%. Tales prevalencias fueron mayores para individuos del sexo masculino y aumentó conforme el nivel económico y la autopercepción de la salud. La prevalencia de donación en la vida fue mayor para el grupo etareo de 50 a 65 años; en el último año, fue mayor entre los más jóvenes (20 a 29 años; y la donación fidelizada fue mayor para el grup de 30 a 49 años. Color de la piel, situación conyugal, religión, tener pariente o amigo donador y conocimiento sobre campañas no presentaron asociación con ningún de los hechos analizados. CONCLUSIONES: La prevalencia de donación de sangre fue mayor para los hombres y para aquellos con mejor autopercepción de salud y nivel económico. Las campañas de incentivo a la donación deberían diversificar el perfil de los donadores, de modo de alcanzar los grupos de personas menos propensas a donar sangre.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of blood donation and factors associated. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out with a representative sample of 2,986 individuals, aged 20 or more, in the municipaly of Pelotas, Southern Brazil, in 2007. Three outcomes were considered: ever donating blood, donation during in the previous year and frequent donation pattern (at least two donations in the previous year. Each outcome was analyzed according to demographic, socioeconomic and health factors, exposure to blood donation

  13. Attitudes toward organ donation among personnel from the University Hospital of Rabat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flayou, Kaoutar; Kouam, Nada; Miara, H; Raoundi, O; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Benamar, Loubna; Bayahia, Rabiaa; Rhou, Hakima

    2016-01-01

    The medical staff could play a major role in promoting for organ donation. The aim of our study was to assess the attitudes of the medical staff toward organ donation. It is a prospective study conducted over a period of six months. A questionnaire was distributed and explained to the medical staff in our institute. Fifteen questions were designed to include four main themes: sociodemographic information, attitude toward organ donation, perceived knowledge about organ donation, and reasons for refusal or acceptance of organ donation. Among the 245 respondents, 36.3% had prior knowledge about organ transplantation, 31.8% knew about the law of organ donation, 43.2% had already donated blood sometimes, 65.7% expressed their consent to organ donation during their lifetime, and 82.8% expressed their agreement to donation after their death. The grounds for refusal were generally: a misunderstanding of risks, desire for respect of corpse. The religious and the ethical motive were present too as a ground for decision making. The medical staff is the key for organ donation. To promote organ transplantation, personnel should be well informed about ethical, moral, and religious dimensions of organ donation and transplantation. PMID:27424694

  14. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... see "What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?" ) Blood bank staff also screen each blood donation to find out whether it's type A, B, AB, or O and whether it's Rh-positive or Rh-negative. Getting a blood type that ... blood for a transfusion, some blood banks remove white blood cells. This ...

  15. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations

    CERN Document Server

    Traag, V A

    2016-01-01

    Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50 000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find the diffusion of donations to be driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the via...

  16. Knowledge and awareness about Iron deficiency and megaloblastic anaemia among blood donors: a study at rural based tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar R. Shah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Voluntary blood donation is promoted in order to make the blood banking safe and successful. Research in the area of blood donation has found that, iron stores are influenced by regular blood donation if dietary intake of iron is inadequate. Awareness and knowledge among blood donors regarding iron and B12 deficiency and its prevention is very much required. Objective: To assess the knowledge and awareness about iron deficiency and megaloblastic anaemia among blood donors. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among the 500 voluntary blood donors during the span of 1 year at one of the blood bank of tertiary care hospital using prestructured questionnaire on the various aspect of iron and B12 deficiency/folate deficiency anemia. The data was analysed with the help of Microsoft excel and SPSS. Results: Out of 500 blood donors, 15.6% donors were regular blood donor. It was observed 60% blood donors were having knowledge of anemia in general. Iron deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency were known to 42% and 31.6% donors, respectively. Only 20% donors could able to answer the acceptable level of hemoglobin require for donating the blood. About 42% donors were aware about importance of iron, folate and vitamin B12 in maintaining normal hemoglobin level. Majority (82.7% of regular blood donors were willing to get information regarding iron, folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. Conclusion: Significant lack of awareness regarding iron and vitamin B12 deficiency was observed in regular voluntary blood donors. The present study recommends the provision of health education on iron and vitamin B12 deficiency as well as Iron, folate and vitamin B12 rich foods to regular blood donor to prevent anaemia among them. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 708-710

  17. Public awareness of organ donation.

    OpenAIRE

    EVERS, S; Farewell, V. T.; Halloran, P F

    1988-01-01

    A telephone survey of public attitudes toward organ donation and transplantation was conducted in a community in southwestern Ontario. The subjects were selected at random; the response rate was 57%. Of the 50 respondents 62% stated that they had signed the organ donor card accompanying their driver's licence. These respondents were more likely than those who did not sign it to have discussed organ donation with their families. At least 80% of the respondents said they would agree to donate t...

  18. Solid organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlow, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in solid organ donation and transplantation. In addition to confirming the clinical diagnosis of brain death, imaging examinations are used to assess potential organ donors and recipients, evaluate donated organs, and monitor transplantation outcomes. This article introduces the history, biology, ethics, and institutions of organ donation and transplantation medicine. The article also discusses current and emerging imaging applications in the transplantation field and the controversial role of neuroimaging to confirm clinically diagnosed brain death. PMID:22461345

  19. The Janet Donation

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, Sarah; Chatellier, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Bibliothèque générale’s collections and the Collège’s archives were recently enriched by a large archive and book collection bequeathed by Mrs Noëlle Janet, the grand-daughter of Pierre Janet, Professor of Experimental and Comparative Psychology at the Collège de France from 1902 to 1934. This donation, which the Faculty accepted on 30 June 2013, completes the Collège’s existing Janet collection, comprised essentially of books, but also of administrative and scientific archives. The Janet col...

  20. Don’t ask, don’t tell . . . and don’t donate

    OpenAIRE

    Neill, Ushma S.

    2010-01-01

    Did you know that gay men can’t donate blood, nor can they donate sperm anonymously to sperm banks? I applaud the 18 senators who have banded together to urge FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg to revisit this issue, as current scientific data on infectious diseases does not lend credence to these policies.

  1. [Organ donation after circulatory death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, J; Kalisvaart, M; van der Hoeven, M; Epker, J; de Haan, J; IJzermans, J N M; Grüne, F

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 17 million inhabitants live in the Netherlands. The number of potential organ donors in 1999 was the lowest in Europe with only 10 donors per million inhabitants. Medical associations, public health services, health insurance companies and the government had to find common solutions in order to improve organ allocation, logistics of donations and to increase the number of transplantations. After a prolonged debate on medical ethical issues of organ transplantation, all participants were able to agree on socio-medico-legal regulations for organ donation and transplantation. In addition to improving the procedure for organ donation after brain death (DBD) the most important step was the introduction of organ donation after circulatory death (DCD). Measures such as the introduction of a national organ donor database, improved information to the public, further education on intensive care units (ICU), guidelines for end of life care on the ICU, establishment of transplantation coordinators on site, introduction of autonomous explantation teams and strict procedures on the course of organ donations, answered many practical issues about logistics and responsibilities for DBD and DCD. In 2014 the number of postmortem organ donations rose to 16.4 per million inhabitants. Meanwhile, up to 60 % of organ donations in the Netherlands originate from a DCD procedure compared to approximately 10 % in the USA. This overview article discusses the developments and processes of deceased donation in the Netherlands after 15 years of experience with DCD. PMID:26810404

  2. The Mectizan Donation Program (MDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thylefors, B

    2008-09-01

    The launch of the Mectizan Donation Program (MDP) in 1987, by Merck & Co., Inc., created a number of new opportunities for onchocerciasis control. The microfilaricide Mectizan was rapidly put to ?use by the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP), for mass treatment by field teams in selected areas. Other milestones in Mectizan treatment included the establishment, in 1992, of the Onchocerciasis Elimination Program for the Americas, and the creation of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) in 1995, the latter programme covering all African countries in need outside of the OCP area. In 1998, the donation of Mectizan was expanded to include the treatment of lymphatic filariasis in those African countries where that disease is co-endemic with onchocerciasis. In the past, the development of a broad partnership around the MDP played a very important role, including non-governmental development organizations collaborating with the ministries of health in endemic countries. A new community-directed treatment strategy, which made it easier to reach out to all those in need, including those in remote areas, was developed by the APOC in collaboration with the World Health Organization's Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR). Several drug-management issues, including dosing, shelf-life, safety, and the reporting of severe adverse experiences, were addressed by the MDP, through its Mectizan Expert Committee, and by Merck & Co., Inc. A major research effort for the safe treatment of onchocerciasis in loiasis-endemic areas has also been supported by the MDP. Presently there are national programmes for Mectizan mass treatment in all 33 endemic countries in need of such treatment; >69 million Mectizan treatments for onchocerciasis were provided during 2006, and this number is expected to grow to at least 100 million treatments/year by 2010. This achievement has resulted in great public-health and socio

  3. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose ... glucose) Dawn Phenomenon Checking for Ketones Tight Diabetes Control donate en -- Your Gift for Research Doubled - 2016- ...

  4. Knowledge about HIV-AIDS among first-time and regular voluntary non-remunerated blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ripal; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Shah, Priti; Tulsiani, Sunita; Harimoorthy, V; Choudhury, N

    2007-10-01

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is one of the serious public health problems in India. AIDS education has been considered as one of the main intervention for control. Sexual route is the major route of transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV); however, approximately 2.5% is transmitted through blood and blood products. The present study was carried out to know the level of awareness about HIV infection and blood donation among first time (190) and repeat (310) voluntary donors of all age groups. One pre-structured questionnaire was circulated among altruistic blood donors. About 96.6% donors want to become repeat donors. Majority of the donors had good knowledge about routes of HIV transmission. According to 97.4% donors, it is transmitted by sexual route, according to 87.4% of donors by sharing needle, according to 85% of donors by blood transfusion and 82.4% of donors believe through vertical transmission. However, 32.4% of the donors, still believe that HIV infection could be transmitted through blood donation. Intense motivational program among donors is needed to remove this myth. Regular donors were convinced the importance of regular and repeat blood donation. They came forward to donate blood for the cause of humanity (80.6%) and the sense of pride (27.79%). First time donors were less motivated by the cause of humanity (56.21%) and volunteered because of peer pressure (26.03%) and motivated by relative or friend. Donors were very alert about precaution to be taken for protecting themselves from danger of HIV infection and priority wise use of safe sexual practice (90%), disposable needles (61.43%) and receive tested blood (45.71%) whenever required. When in need of blood for relatives the donors will give priority to the quality (64.65%) and properly tested blood from voluntary blood donors (86.7%). PMID:18306600

  5. Seroprevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections and evaluation of the pre-donation screening performance at the Provincial Hospital of Tete, Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidane Solon

    2011-05-01

    TTIs after questionnaire screening is high in Tete, Mozambique, but HCV infection does not appear as a major issue. The questionnaire did not exclude effectively HIV-infected donor candidates, while the locally used assays led to unnecessary rejection of many safe donations. A contextualized questionnaire and consistent use of quality-assured assays would considerably improve the current screening procedure for blood donation.

  6. Safe sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safe sex means taking steps before and during sex that can prevent you from getting an infection, or from ... the skin around the genital area. Before having sex: Get to know your partner and discuss your ...

  7. Processing and storage of blood components: strategies to improve patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietersz RNI

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruby NI Pietersz, Pieter F van der Meer Department of Product and Process Development, Sanquin Blood Bank, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: This review focuses on safety improvements of blood processing of various blood components and their respective storage. A solid quality system to ensure safe and effective blood components that are traceable from a donor to the patient is the foundation of a safe blood supply. To stimulate and guide this process, National Health Authorities should develop guidelines for blood transfusion, including establishment of a quality system. Blood component therapy enabled treatment of patients with blood constituents that were missing, only thus preventing reactions to unnecessarily transfused elements. Leukoreduction prevents many adverse reactions and also improves the quality of the blood components during storage. The safety of red cells and platelets is improved by replacement of plasma with preservative solutions, which results in the reduction of isoantibodies and plasma proteins. Automation of blood collection, separation of whole blood into components, and consecutive processing steps, such as preparation of platelet concentrate from multiple donations, improves the consistent composition of blood components. Physicians can better prescribe the number of transfusions and therewith reduce donor exposure and/or the risk of pathogen transmission. Pathogen reduction in cellular blood components is the latest development in improving the safety of blood transfusions for patients. Keywords: blood components, red cell concentrates, platelet concentrates, plasma, transfusion, safety 

  8. AN ANDROID APPLICATION FOR VOLUNTEER BLOOD DONORS

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan Turhan

    2015-01-01

    There is an expectation that the blood will always be there when it is really needed. Blood donor volunteers constitute the main supply source in an effective blood supply chain management. They feed blood stocks through their donation. In an emergency situation, if the stocks are insufficient, the only source of blood supply will be the people who come to the health center and donate the blood on a voluntary basis. It is certain that time is a very important component in such ...

  9. Gender disparity in organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Judith L

    2006-12-01

    Organ donation is affected by legal, cultural, religious, and racial factors, as well as by health considerations. Although organs in and of themselves are gender neutral and can be exchanged between the sexes, women account for up to two thirds of all organ donations. There are no clear reasons why women are more willing to undergo the risks of surgery than are men, nor is this gender disparity mirrored in the demand for donated organs. More men than women are recipients, and women are less likely to complete the necessary steps to receive donated organs. Internationally, ethical concern has been focused on possible human rights violations in the harvesting of organs from prisoners and, in poor countries, on the trafficking of organs from girls and women who are expected to financially help their families by selling their organs. PMID:17582366

  10. Organ Donation and Transplantation Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Organ Donation and Transplantation Statistics There are currently 121,678 people waiting for ... org/2015/view/v2_07.aspx Facts and statistics provided by the United States Renal Data System , ...

  11. Private donations for international development

    OpenAIRE

    Micklewright, John; Wright, Anna

    2003-01-01

    Charitable donations by private individuals and firms can help fund the Millennium Development Goals. What are the prospects for increasing donations for international development, whether from small-scale donors, the super-rich (as in the recent gifts by Bill Gates and Ted Turner), or the corporate sector? The Paper starts by reviewing how large are the sums currently given in OECD countries (including gifts of time) and the problems for development in competing with domestic causes. It then...

  12. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find that the diffusion of donations is driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the viability of candidates, possibly opposing candidates in response to local support. Our findings suggest that theories of complex contagions need refinement and that political campaigns should target multiple communities. PMID:27077742

  13. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traag, Vincent A

    2016-01-01

    Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find that the diffusion of donations is driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the viability of candidates, possibly opposing candidates in response to local support. Our findings suggest that theories of complex contagions need refinement and that political campaigns should target multiple communities. PMID:27077742

  14. [Gamete donation in an in vitro fertilization program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L Z

    1993-12-01

    Two cases of gamete donation in an IVF program were reported in this paper. In the first case the wife with recurrent abortions was found to have chromosomal abnormality, her karyotype was 45,XX,-14,-14 + rob (14 Q 14 Q). She became pregnant after IVF-ET with donated ova, and was delivered of a normal male baby on June 12, 1992. The baby's karyotype was normal. The blood group of both the husband and wife was O, while that of the baby was B. The baby suffered from icterus neonatorum as a result of ABO incompatibility but recovered quickly after treatment. Further DNA finger print analysis of the husband, wife and baby, combined with the history of egg donation IVF, proved the relationship of the parents with the baby. In the second case the husband's karyotype was 46,XY, t(4; 9) (4Q+; 9Q-). The wife had also history of recurrent abortions. Since 1989, the wife received sperm donation IUI 5 times in another hospital without success. IVF-ET with donated sperms was performed in November 1991 resulting in clinical pregnancy. She was delivered of a pair of twins, one male and one female on July 20, 1992. The possibilities of different types of gamete formation during meiosis in carriers of chromosomal balanced translocation were briefly discussed. Donation of oocytes could be realized only in an IVF program, which is also the only way to propagate for the family. However, IVF with donated sperms is indicated in women with blocked tubes besides the male factor or after repeated failures of other assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:8137642

  15. DONOR DEFERRAL PATTERN AMONG BLOOD DONORS IN BLOOD BANK OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL OF CHHATTISGARH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu P .

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3 Years retrospective study conducted on “Donor Deferral Pattern among Blood Donors in Blood Bank’’ of a Medical College Hospital of Chhattisgarh. This study shows the major possible causes of deferrals for donation of blood in northern Chhattisgarh. Donor’s detail information on the donor deferral including the cause of deferral was recorded in deferral register. Donors deferred were analyzed and computed for study on the bas ic of medical examination. In the study done f ro m A ugust 2012 to July 2015 a total of 18773 donors were registered and the screened. Out of these 18153 were male and 620 were female. Among the male, 1486 were deferred which makes 8.18% of the total registe red. Among female, 339 were deferred which makes 54.67% of the total registered. The maximum numbers of deferrals were due to low Hb (17.97% the second most important cause for deferral in this region happens to be alcohol/ganja intake (11.61%. The third leading cause is skin puncture or ear piercing (10.57%. This figure is mainly due to professional donors who frequent around the hospital very often. Interestingly forth cause is deferral is medication (7.39% mostly over the counter drugs. Other major c ause for deferrals in descending order are low BP (6.68%, fever and cold (6.30%, hypertension (5.64%, underweight (4.54%, Typhoid (4.05%, menstrual cycle (3.39% and donated <3 month (2.41%. The least percentage of cause of deferral was due to breast feeding (0.10%. It is because of very low percentage of female donation. Strict screening of donor is compulsory to achieve safe blood equally important is to increase the number of voluntary donations with minimum deferral. To achieve this it is necessa ry to study and analyze various causes for donor deferral & categorize them under temporary & Permanent, so that temporary deferral can be converted to donations. Proper medical examination and Strict deferral system of the blood donors in blood banks redu ces the

  16. Safe guard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Food irradiation has been endorsed by many national and international bodies as a safe and effective method for reducing post-harvest losses in food which also enhances food hygiene. Food irradiation technology, therefore, has enormous potential to increase international trade and to stabilize the price structure thus improving rural based agro-economy. 1 tab., 6 ills

  17. Improving kidney and live donation rates in Asia: living donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, S A H; Naqvi, S A A; Hashmi, A; Akhtar, F; Hussain, M; Ahmed, E; Zafar, M N; Abbas, Z; Jawad, F; Sultan, S; Hasan, S M

    2004-09-01

    Organ transplantation started with organs donated by living subjects. Increasing demands brought cadaveric organ donation. The brain-death law, mandatory for this procedure, is prevalent in all countries involved in organ transplantation except Pakistan. Spain is the leading country in cadaveric organ donation (32.5 pmp). Despite the sources of living and cadaveric organs, both heart-beating and non-heart-beating, the gap between the demand and supply has widened. An example is the United States, where the numbers of patients on the waiting list for kidney transplantation have risen from 30,000 in 1988 to more than 116,000 in 2001. This has caused a resurgence in living donors all over the world. These can be related, unrelated, spousal, marginal, or ABO-incompatible donors. Family apprehensions, medical care costs, and nonexistent social security can be barriers to this form of organ donation. Unrelated organ donation can open the doors to commercialism. To make this process more successful, transplantation should be made reachable by all sectors of the population. This is possible when transplantation is taken to the public sector institutions and financed jointly by the government and community. To increase living organ donation especially in Asian countries, which face barriers of low literacy rates, ignorance, and cultural and religious beliefs, more efforts are needed. Public awareness and education play an important role. Appreciation and supporting the donors is necessary and justified. It is a noble act and should be recognized by offering job security, health insurance, and free education for the donor's children. PMID:15518688

  18. Fatores associados à aptidão clínica para a doação de sangue: determinantes demográficos e socioeconômicos Factors associated to clinical aptness for blood donation: demographic and socioeconomic determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Brener

    2008-04-01

    technological advances and increasing demand for blood transfusions. However, despite investment to increase the number of blood donors, there is a chronic shortage of blood. The aim of this study was to compare demographic and social-economic characteristics comparing individuals that were considered eligible with temporarily and permanent non-eligible blood donors. A case-comparison study was carried out at the Blood Donation Center (Hemocentro of Belo Horizonte from a survey involving 3,527 candidates for blood donation. Comparisons stratified by gender were made for all characteristics. Multinomial logistic regression was used to verify the association between the variables and eligibility for blood donation. Candidates for blood donation were similar according to the socio-economic level and dissimilar according to gender, age and type of donation. For both genders, the following characteristics were statistically associated in respect to eligibility for blood donation: to be young (18 to 29 years, to have a stable relationship and employment and not to own an automobile. For men, the presence of less than two people per bedroom of their residence was also statistically significant. Distinct demographic and social-economic profiles were identified in relation to gender and eligibility category. Similar profiles were found between temporarily non-eligible and eligible candidates, especially among women. Therefore, adopting multiple strategies in blood donor recruitment is justified in order to make contact with the different groups.

  19. Public perception and attitude of saudis toward organ and tissue donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumah, Mohammed A; Abolfotouh, Mostafa A

    2011-03-01

    Biobanks depend on the willingness of people to contribute samples for both research and storage; however, the requirements to perform research on biobanked samples are different than the requirements for their use in organ transplants. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize public attitudes toward tissue and organ donation for transplantation and biobanking and (2) to identify significant predictors of these attitudes. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a total of 1051 adult subjects, all of whom accompanied their ill relatives to the outpatient clinics at King Abdulaziz Medical City. All subjects were given an interview questionnaire about their previous healthcare experiences and an attitude scale to assess their willingness to participate in organ donation for transplantation or tissue donation for research. A total of 64.7% of all participants reported having a positive attitude toward organ donation, and 68.8% of participants reported having a positive attitude toward biobanking. There was a significant and direct correlation between the attitude score related to organ donation and the attitude score related to tissue donation for research (r = 0.513, P organ donation or tissue donation for research was significantly more prevalent among females (P organ retention controversies (P = 0.036 and P = 0.001, respectively). Other significant predictors of positive attitudes toward only biobanking were a history of previous blood tests (P = 0.038) and the completion of secondary education (P organ donation and tissue biobanking. Attitudes about the 2 types of donations are related. Previous participation in health-related research and awareness of organ retention controversies are significant predictors of attitudes toward both types of donations. PMID:24850202

  20. Unequally Safe

    OpenAIRE

    Johanna Lacoe

    2013-01-01

    School safety is a critical issue for school staff and administrators, policymakers, and parents across the nation. Media coverage of school shootings, gang violence, and bullying at school and online highlight the increasing need to understand how safe students feel at school, and how school safety affects student outcomes. Policy efforts to promote safety often focus on reducing school violence and disorder, such as zero-tolerance disciplinary policies, the installation of metal detectors, ...

  1. Donation FAQs (Bone and Tissue Allografts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is there a difference between tissue and organ donation? In general, organ donors must be brain dead, which is defined ... very limited cases (approximately 20,000 per year), organ donation occurs when mechanical support (i.e., ventilators) can ...

  2. Proposal for the Donation of Equipment

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    CERN has been requested by the Japanese High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) to donate the UA1 Magnet for use within the T2K Experiment. The Finance Committee is invited to approve this donation.

  3. NHSBT consideration to ignore family override of consent to organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2016-02-01

    NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT), the agency responsible for allocating donated organs and maintaining the organ donor register, is considering proceeding with harvesting organs from a registered donor in spite of objections from the deceased's family, in order to raise the number of available organs. District nurses are witness to the need for an increase in the number of donated organs, given the care they provide to those waiting for transplant, and it is essential that district nurses inform this debate. In this article, the author discusses the NHSBT proposal and reviews the law of consent in relation to organ donation. PMID:26844605

  4. Willingness to Donate Human Samples for Establishing a Dermatology Research Biobank: Results of a Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Durdana; Schmitz, Arndt A.; Vonk, Richardus; Igney, Frederik H.; Döcke, Wolf-Dietrich; Schoepe, Stefanie; Sterry, Wolfram; Asadullah, Khusru

    2011-01-01

    There is a rising need for biomaterial in dermatological research with regard to both quality and quantity. Research biobanks as organized collections of biological material with associated personal and clinical data are of increasing importance. Besides technological/methodological and legal aspects, the willingness to donate samples by patients and healthy volunteers is a key success factor. To analyze the theoretical willingness to donate blood and skin samples, we developed and distribute...

  5. [The contribution of persuasion social psychology to the retention of donors: the impact of labelling the previous donation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callé, N; Plainfossé, C; Georget, P; Sénémeaud, C; Rasonglès, P

    2011-12-01

    The supply of blood cell products requires from the National French Blood Institute (Établissement Français du Sang - EFS) to rely upon regular blood donors. Contact with donors, tailored to individuals as much as possible, helps them to donate on a regular basis. Within the context of a research program conducted with the Psychology Department of the Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, persuasive theoretical models from social psychology have been tested. These models allow adapting messages according to the motivation of donors. The content is centred on the previous donation, differently labelled according to two types of labelling: functional labelling and social labelling. Functional labelling points out the efficiency of what "has been done" (the previous blood donation), whereas social labelling emphasizes the social value of the individual. Different types of mailing invitations have been sent to 1917 donors from the Normandy database, invited to three different blood collections. Every experimental letter worked better than the standard EFS letter (which was used as the "control" letter) in terms of effective blood donation after reception of the letter. Some of the letters are more efficient in motivating donors than other ones. The letters labelling the previous blood donation as functional (efficiency of the donation) appeared more efficient than those with social label (social value) in whichever motivation induced. PMID:22019610

  6. Avaliação da pré-triagem sorológica para o marcador do vírus da hepatite B (anti-HBc total em candidatos à doação de sangue no Estado do Acre, 2002 Evaluation of the sorologic pre-selection for the hepatitis B virus marker (total anti-HBc in candidates to blood donation in the state of Acre, 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita do Socorro Uchôa da Silva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo da pesquisa foi avaliar a pré-triagem sorológica para hepatite B (anti-HBc total em candidatos à doação de sangue, verificando a associação entre as variáveis sexo, faixa etária, escolaridade e naturalidade. Estudo transversal com dados retrospectivos, tendo como população-alvo candidatos à doação de sangue naturais dos municípios do interior do Acre, que procuraram o Centro de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Acre, no período de janeiro a dezembro de 2002. Dos 673 candidatos incluídos foi constatado reatividade ao anti-HBc total em 54,8%. Sendo observado maior reatividade ao anti-HBc total entre os candidatos do sexo masculino, faixa etária mais avançada e menor grau de escolaridade (pThe aim of this research was to evaluate previous serum screening for hepatitis B (total anti-HBc among blood donation candidates, verifying the link between the variables: gender, age, degree of education and native-born. A transverse study with retrospective data carried out on a target population, blood donation candidates from districts of the interior of Acre State, who came to the Acre Hematology and Hemoterapy Center during the period January to December, 2002. The research indicated reactivity in 54.8% of the total anti-HBc among the 673 candidates included. Greater reactivity of total anti-HBc was observed among males, older candidates and those with lower education levels (p<0.005. Previous serum screening for hepatitis B among blood donation candidates is a viable alternative, since it reduces cost and increases transfusional safety. Attracting female donors, youths and those who have higher education levels, would signify potential blood donors for HEMOACRE.

  7. Body donation in India: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant A. Rokade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of anatomy is inseparable from cadaveric dissection. However scarcity of cadavers is felt all over the world. Body donation is the preferred and major source of cadavers worldwide. It is defined as an informed and free act of giving one’s whole body after death for medical education and research. This article gives a brief review of history of body donation. It reveals the details about who can donate and who can accept the body along with procedure followed to donate body in India. It discusses the donors’ attitude behind body donation and factors preventing people from body donation. It deals with approach of various religions towards body donation. It discusses some important ways to overcome the scarcity of bodies in India and the world. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 173-177

  8. HEPATITIS B PREVALENCE AMONG BLOOD DONORS AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN MYSORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion is an essential element of a health care system. Safety of blood transfusion is of extreme importance in order to avoid any severe morbidity and mortality in the patient. By screening donated blood units, we get a clue of the prevalence of those infections among donor pop ulations and consequently the safety of collected donations. It also gives us an idea of the prevalence of the Transfusion transmissible infections ( TTIs in the community. OBJECTIVES : To find out the sero - prevalence of TTIs namely HBV (Hepatitis B in the blood donor population at MMC&RI, Mysore. To stratify sero prevalence of TTIs based on the age and sex of the donor population . METHODOLOGY: The present study was carried out in the Blood Bank , Mysore Medical College and Research Institute , Mysore during the period from November 2012 to May 2014 among 14075 blood donors. All the samples were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg by ELISA method . RESULTS : Out of a total of 14075 blood donors , a total of 103 tested positive for TTIs . 94.08% were males and remaining 5.92% were females. A majority of donors were voluntary donors (85.79% and a majority of the donors were between the age group of 18 - 39 years (78.17%. The prevalence rate of HBV in blood donors was 0.73%. The seroprevale nce in voluntary donors was 0.57% and in replacement donors was 1.75 % respectively. CONCLUSION : Voluntary blood donation is safe, compared to replacement as high prevalence of Hepatitis B is observed in replacement donors.

  9. Hepatitis B transmission by cell and tissue allografts: How safe is safe enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Alvarez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    More than 2 million human tissue transplants (bone, tendon, cartilage, skin, cornea, amniotic membrane, stem cells, heart valve, blood vessel, etc.), are performed worldwide every year. Cells and tissues are shared between countries which have different regulations and laboratory equipment and represent a risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission that has become a global safety concern. While the risk of transfusion-transmitted HBV infection from blood donations has been estimated, the rat...

  10. Safe cycling!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    The HSE Unit will be running a cycling safety campaign at the entrances to CERN's restaurants on 14, 15 and 16 May. Pop along to see if they can persuade you to get back in the saddle!   With summer on its way, you might feel like getting your bike out of winter storage. Well, the HSE Unit has come up with some original ideas to remind you of some of the most basic safety rules. This year, the prevention campaign will be focussing on three themes: "Cyclists and their equipment", "The bicycle on the road", and "Other road users". This is an opportunity to think about the condition of your bike as well as how you ride it. From 14 to 16 May, representatives of the Swiss Office of Accident Prevention and the Touring Club Suisse will join members of the HSE Unit at the entrances to CERN's restaurants to give you advice on safe cycling (see box). They will also be organising three activity stands where you can test your knowle...

  11. Another donation of computer equipment

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    On Thursday 27 February, CERN was pleased to donate computer equipment to a physics institute in the Philippines.   H.E. Leslie J. Baja and Rolf Heuer. Following donations of computer equipment to institutes in Morocco, Ghana, Bulgaria, Serbia and Egypt, CERN is to send 50 servers and 4 network switches to the National Institute of Physics at the University of the Philippines Diliman. CERN’s Director-General Rolf Heuer and the Ambassador of the Philippines to Switzerland and Lichtenstein, H.E. Leslie J. Baja, spoke of their enthusiasm for the project during an official ceremony. The equipment will be used for various high energy physics research programmes in the Philippines and for the University’s development of digital resources for science.

  12. Organ donation after circulatory death

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, Jeroen; Kalisvaart, Marit; Hoeven, M. van der; Epker, Jl; Haan, J; IJzermans, Jan; Grüne, Frank

    2016-01-01

    textabstractApproximately 17 million inhabitants live in the Netherlands. The number of potential organ donors in 1999 was the lowest in Europe with only 10 donors per million inhabitants. Medical associations, public health services, health insurance companies and the government had to find common solutions in order to improve organ allocation, logistics of donations and to increase the number of transplantations. After a prolonged debate on medical ethical issues of organ transplantation, a...

  13. What is the maximum time that a unit of red blood cells can be safely left out of controlled temperature storage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, Susan; Thomas, Stephen; Whitmore, Emma; McDonald, Carl P; Dorée, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Staves, Julie; Cardigan, Rebecca; Murphy, Michael F

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify and analyze the evidence base supporting the "30-minute" and "4-hour" rules in transfusion medicine. The 30-minute rule states that red blood cell (RBC) units left out of controlled temperature storage for more than 30 minutes should not be returned to storage for reissue; the 4-hour rule states that transfusion of RBC units should be completed within 4 hours of their removal from controlled temperature storage. Eligible studies were identified from searches (to October 2010) of a range of electronic databases (including The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the National Health Service Blood and Transplant's Transfusion Evidence Library) and contact with transfusion medicine and blood bank experts. Twenty-three studies were identified that measured the quality of the RBC unit (n = 19), bacterial contamination in the RBC unit (n = 4), or both (n = 2) after exposure to greater than 4 °C ± 2 °C from between 20 minutes to 42 days. The overall finding was that temperature exposure did not adversely affect the quality of the RBC units or result in significant bacterial contamination. However, the variation in the temperature of exposure, its duration, the amount of data reported by the individual studies, and the age of the studies (and thus their comparability to current clinical practice) make it difficult to draw significant conclusions. To reliably determine whether these time "rules" could be extended without an adverse risk to the RBC unit requires robust, modern studies using multiple combinations of blood, anticoagulant, and additive solutions with defined temperatures and times of exposure. PMID:22119493

  14. [Surgical evaluation of candidates for donation. Selection of the kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral Molina, Juan M; Luque Gálvez, Pilar; Agud Piqué, Anna; Alcover García, Juan B

    2005-01-01

    Living donation for kidney transplantation is being promoted due to the shortage of organs, the improved outcomes of living donor transplants and the evolution of immunosuppression regimens. The process of organ donation from a living donor affects not only medical-surgical features but also emotional, social and economic. Using kidneys from living donors involves a great responsibility in evaluation and selection. Candidates for donation undergo an extensive set of examinations in order to optimize selection and to plan surgery. Radiological evaluation is one of the most important features of the evaluation process and selection of the kidney; it shows precisely the renal vascular anatomy, which is decisive in the choice of the kidney and helps to optimize the process and diminish risks and complications during extraction and/or tronsplantation. The advantages on imaging tests allow to evaluate potential donors in a safely, fast and almost noninvasive matter. The aim of the process is to select the kidney with less likelihood of failure due to technical reasons, and always leave the best kidney for the donor. PMID:16138762

  15. Aspects of deceased organ donation in paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, J; Hasan, A

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation offers children in acute or chronic severe organ failure similar opportunities to adults. However, while the number who might benefit is relatively low, significantly fewer cadaveric donors exist for any given child compared with an adult. Incompatible organ size and relatively low donation rates mean that despite living parental donation and innovations to reduce donated organ size, children die before organs become available. The severity of the UK situation is compounded by restrictions on paediatric living donation, uncertainties over the application of brain death criteria, and ethical concerns about the use of donation after circulatory death. The UK Department of Health's Organ Donation Task Force suggested the means by which the adult donor pool might be increased, recommending that outstanding ethical and legal issues be resolved, but made no specific recommendations about children. PMID:22194438

  16. Drivers of Discretionary Firm Donations in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bandeira-de-Mello

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Discretionary firm donation is usually related to the stakeholder theory and corporate social performance. Although theoretical explanations for this social behavior are pervasive in related literature, empirical modeling remains underdeveloped. We developed an explanatory structural model of discretionary firm donation using firm and industry level indicators. Unlike previous research, we estimated the explanatory power of the construct we called stakeholder orientation. Our tentative model was tested on a Brazilian sample of 101 publicly traded donor firms, using data on firm donations to social projects and to political candidates in electoral campaigns. The main results suggest that discretionary donation seems to be a strategy for managing conflicting claims in highly stakeholder oriented firms; the characteristics of the firm are more important than industry effects in explaining firm donations; and large firms, showing slack resources, and with a less concentrated ownership structure tend to engage in discretionary donation more intensively.

  17. How safe is safe enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, were historically established with the objective to reduce the probability that persons be exposed to unacceptable doses due to normal operation or accident situations during transport of radioactive material. Based on the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (BSS), the definition, which was adopted for an unacceptable dose for an accident situation, is the excess of the maximum dose limits permissible in a single year for the occupational exposure of a worker in the BSS. Concerning the severity of accident situations, it has always be clearly stated that the objective of the tests for demonstrating ability to withstand accident conditions of transport was not to cover every accident condition, but solely most of them. The last available evaluations regarding the rate of accidents which are covered by the standardised accident conditions of transport defined in the IAEA Regulations give a range of about 80%, plus or minus 15% which depends on transport mode and studies. Consequently, slight variations in the capabilities of the packages to meet the specified performance would probably not have significant consequences on the protection level in case of accident. In the assessment of the compliance with the regulations, the tendency of experts, taking advantage of the enhanced performances of computer calculation codes, is to ask more and more calculations, with more and more accuracy, leading to more and more restrictions. Consequently, cost and delay are considerably increased without any evidence of an equivalent effect on the level of protection. This paper will initiate a reflection on the general objectives and principles when implementing the Regulations, in such a way that demonstrations remain cost effective, taking into account evolution of the techniques and a high level of safety

  18. Brain stem death and organ donation.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Organs for donation are in short supply in the United Kingdom, resulting in allegations that relatives of potential donors are not being asked for consent. Legislation on "required request" has been proposed to overcome this. The incidence, causes, complications, and patterns of organ donation in brain stem dead patients in one referral centre were studied over 12 months. Data were collected on all patients fulfilling criteria for brain stem death or considered suitable for donating organs af...

  19. TO SOME ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF ORGAN DONATION

    OpenAIRE

    M. Minina

    2010-01-01

    Organization of organ donation for transplantation is one of the most actual problems of Russian Transplantolo- gy. Organ shortage for transplantation is perceiving in Russia through the improvement of organizational system of organ donation. An analysis of efficiency of Russian Transplantology demonstrates that there are some parts in Russia showing very positive results in organ donation quite comparable to European data. But at the same time the potential of donor pool is realizing only pa...

  20. Charity, Publicity, and the Donation Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Cooter, Robert D; Broughman, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Many Americans donate little or nothing to charity. Our social environment is the cause, not human nature. Experiments show that people are generous when their contributions are observable by others. Taking advantage of this fact, we propose a small policy change to increase transparency and elicit generosity. Specifically, we propose that the IRS establish a voluntary donation registry to publicize the proportion of income that individuals donate to charity. Although participation would be v...

  1. Charity, Publicity, and the Donation Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Cooter, Robert D; Broughman, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Many Americans donate little or nothing to charity. Our social environment is the cause, not human nature. Experiments show that people are generous when their contributions are observable by others. Taking advantage of this fact, we propose a small policy change to increase transparency and elicit generosity. Specifically, we propose that the IRS establish a voluntary donation registry to publicize the proportion of income that individuals donate to charity. Although participation would ...

  2. The importance of education in the promotion of organ donation - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p253

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taise Ribeiro Morais

    2012-11-01

    .The profile of the opponent to organ donation is: man or woman over the age of 45 years, with low schooling, who does not know the concept of brain death and has a partner also against organ donation, is not conducive to blood donation and fears the manipulation of the body after death. The main reasons for not accepting the donation is the lack of knowledge of how to become a donor and the fear of misdiagnosis of death(7.Facing this reality, health professionals should act as educators, to modify public opinion regarding the misconceptions. However, unfavorable beliefs can be modified only if educators are well prepared for that, so that the population is prompted to participate in debates on organ transplants and legislation.Modifying the existing reality means developing programs planned and evaluated in an ongoing educational process, supported by theoretical background and scientifically recognized models, for all segments of the community, along with incorporating the knowledge of thanatology in the formation of health professionals, with better appreciation of religious principles, to avoid making an aggressive approach to the families of potential donors. The preparation of families should be taken into consideration, to prevent the false idea that death is being expected in order to save others’ lives, because every family wants their patient to have the opportunity to live. Therefore, the government is to be exhorted to realize that the lack of support to the practice of organ donation is a real problem, and to include educational activities regarding transplants in priority governmental programs and in public policies of health care.Since organ donation in Brazil depends exclusively on the family permission, campaigns that seek to increase the understanding of the concept of brain death among the population, and, most of all, to encourage people to express their desire to be a donor and to discuss their decision with family are important strategies to tackle this

  3. Doação de sangue: solidariedade mecânica versus solidariedade orgânica Donación de sangre: solidariedad mecánica versus solidariedad orgânica Blood donation: mechanic solidarity versus organic solidarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Suely May Rodrigues Pereima

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Reflete-se sobre doação de sangue em um hemocentro de Santa Catarina, abordando-a como solidariedade mecânica e orgânica. Discute-se a forma de viver na contemporaneidade com a Globalização e o culto à velocidade em um contexto impregnado por incertezas e adversidades. Vive-se num mundo acelerado, dificultando a convivência em sociedade, contribuindo para a fragilização de valores e atitudes que melhorem a qualidade de vida. Mesmo com as dificuldades vivenciadas no cotidiano da sociedade contemporânea, percebe-se na história da hemoterapia brasileira, ao se falar em doação de sangue, que atitudes e valores como a solidariedade vêm se transformando de forma sensível tendo-se a atualidade como pano de fundo Busca-se compreender a doação de sangue como solidariedade mecânica e orgânica.Reflexión sobre la donación de sangre en un homocentro de Santa Catarina, abordandola como solidaridad mecánica y orgánica. Se reflexiona sobre el modo de vida contemporáneo en la globalización y el culto a la velocidad en un contexto impregnado por la incertidumbre y la adversidad. Vivimos en un mundo acelerado, lo que dificulta la convivencia en sociedad, contribuyendo al debilitamiento de valores y actitudes que mejoren la calidad de vida. A pesar de las dificultades que la sociedad contemporánea experimenta en la vida cotidiana, se percibe en la historia de la hemoterapia brasileña, cuando se habla de donación de sangre, que actitudes y valores tales como la solidaridad se están transformando cada vez más de manera significativa en el contexto en que vivimos. En este estudio se trata de entender la donación de sangre como solidaridad mecánica y orgánica.The article offers a reflection of blood donation in an hemocenter of Santa Catarina, with a mechanic and organic solidarity approach. It discuss the way of life in contemporary globalization and the cult of speed in a context pervaded by uncertainties and adversities. People live

  4. Body donation in India: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Shrikant A. Rokade; Bahetee, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    The study of anatomy is inseparable from cadaveric dissection. However scarcity of cadavers is felt all over the world. Body donation is the preferred and major source of cadavers worldwide. It is defined as an informed and free act of giving one’s whole body after death for medical education and research. This article gives a brief review of history of body donation. It reveals the details about who can donate and who can accept the body along with procedure followed to donate body in I...

  5. Attitudes toward organ donation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; TIAN Hui; YIN Hang; LIU Hang; ZHANG Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    Background Organ transplantation represents an important advance in modern medical science,and it has benefited many patients with organ failure; however,the severe deficiency of organ sources has been a bottleneck that has limited the benefits -this technology can bring.The aim of this study was to show the results of a survey on Chinese people's awareness and attitudes toward organ donation.Methods We designed a questionnaire regarding organ donation consisting of 20 short questions,which were distributed to 10 groups.Most of the questions were multiple-choice; the core question related to people's attitudes to organ donation and the development of organ donation.The survey was held in the outpatient hall of Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital,a commercial district,and four professional colleges.Participants were randomly selected,and answered questions about gender,age,educational background,profession,and study major.Results In all,2930 valid responses were received.Male:female ratio was nearly 1:1.2 (mean age 38 years).Over 90.0% of participants knew about organ transplantation and which organs could be transplanted; more than 95.0% knew about organ donation,but the time they had been aware of it varied.Nearly 90.0% of the participants approved of deceased organ donation; 73.0% indicated they would like to donate their organs post mortem.Participants who knew more about organ failure and organ transplantation were more likely to support organ donation.College students were very positive about organ donation,though as they gain professional knowledge their attitudes may change.Altogether,65.3% of participants approved of living organ donation,which was obviously lower than the figure for deceased organ donation (P <0.05).In all,85.7% of participants approved of compensation to the deceased donor's family.To promote organ donation in China,62.9% of participants indicated that the public's knowledge about organ donation should be increased via the media

  6. Exploring Donation Decisions: Beliefs and Preferences for Organ Donation in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Melissa K.; White, Katherine M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored common beliefs and preferences for posthumous and living organ donation in Australia where organ donation rates are low and little research exists. Content analysis of discussions revealed the advantage of prolonging/saving life whereas disadvantages differed according to donation context. A range of people/groups perceived to…

  7. Is Sunscreen Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and scalp ...

  8. Prevalence and trends of transfusion transmitted infections among blood donors of blood bank attached to government hospital of South Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi H. Dobariya

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Prevalence of TTIs in the present study was lower as compare to other studies of the India. The reasons behind this finding may be better pre-donation counseling, better life style, higher proportion of voluntary blood donation (> 99% and high pre-donation deferral rate (11.17%. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(9.000: 4123-4127

  9. Blood donor behaviour in Greece: implications for health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chliaoutakis, J; Trakas, D J; Socrataki, F; Lemonidou, C; Papaioannou, D

    1994-05-01

    Blood donation behaviour was studied in 809 residents of the Greater Athens area to identify socio-economic and attitudinal factors and level of knowledge about blood donation related to donor behaviour. The sample was randomly selected and consisted of men and women aged 18-65, the legally defined age for donation. According to stepwise regression analysis, blood donation (40.8% of the study population) was found to be correlated with gender, place of birth, occupation and knowledge about donation. Donors were more likely to be men than women; students and military recruits than professionals and scientists; and those with higher knowledge scores regarding donation. In our factor analysis of the social attitudes related to blood donation, three factors emerged as important regarding donation: health-related incentives for the donor, structural incentives (organization of blood donation education and management of facilities) and the creation of social and economic incentives. With respect to the affective measures those who expressed feelings of guilt when presented with hypothetical, emotionally charged situations dramatizing the need for donor blood were more likely to be donors. The results of the data are discussed within a larger socio-cultural context and suggestions for health policy are made. PMID:8023195

  10. Drug Donations in Post-Emergency Situations

    OpenAIRE

    Autier, Philippe; Govindaraj, Ramesh; Gray, Robin; Lakshminarayanan, Rama; Nassery, Homira G.; Schmets, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to conduct situation analyses on drug donations in East Timor (post-conflict country), El Salvador and Gujarat State in India (both affected by earthquakes), and Mozambique (floods), applying criteria derived from the Interagency Guidelines for Drug Donations; to determine how and whether the implementation of the Guidelines has affected the processes an...

  11. Female College Students' Perceptions of Organ Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Kathleen; Baker, Kerrie

    2010-01-01

    The current process of organ donation in the U.S. relies on the premise of altruism or voluntary consent. Yet, human organs available for donation and transplant do not meet current demands. The literature has suggested that college students, who represent a large group of potential healthy organ donors, often are not part of donor pools. Before…

  12. Blood Groups in the Kashmir Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Rafiq A.Calcutti, Mohammed Khali Lone, Showket Ahmed,Bashir A.Shah, Neelofer Jan.

    2003-01-01

    Blood groups are genetically determined and exJ1ibit polymorphism, where different populationgroups have significant difference in the frequency of each blood group. This study wasconducted to determine the frequency of ABO and Rhesus D blood groups among the blooddO:lors. A total number of 1306 blood donors attended the donor centre at SKIMS MedicalCollege Hospital for blood donation in the year 2001-02. After each donation blood sampleswere collected in separate pilot hlbes for the estimati...

  13. Current knowledge and attitudes about organ donation and transplantation among Chinese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J X; Zhang, T M; Lim, F L; Wu, H C; Lei, T F; Yeong, P K; Xia, S J

    2006-11-01

    Current attitudes toward organ donation among university students in mainland China and the differences in attitudes between Chinese students in mainland China versus overseas are unknown. To address these issues, we conducted a cross-sectional survey using questionnaires among 922 Chinese undergraduates from mainland China and overseas regions of the world. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Student t tests, chi-square tests, and a logistic regression analysis. We found that blood donors showed significantly better awareness of heart, liver, lung, skin, and tendon donation among commonly transplanted organs/tissues. As to the willingness for cadaveric organ donation, 61.3% of respondents consented, 8.5% objected, and 30.3% answered "not sure." The percentage holding an organ donor card was 15.7% among students from Hong Kong; 3.0%, mainland China; 2.8%, Macau; 2.6%, Taiwan, and 4.0%, other regions of the world. In a logistic regression analysis, female students (odds ratio [OR], 2.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35 to 3.72) and blood donors (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.10 to 3.32) did, but age and study specialty (medical vs nonmedical) did not show significantly more positive attitudes toward cadaveric organ donation. Compared with students from mainland China, overseas Chinese students from various regions did not show significantly different attitudes toward cadaveric organ donation. In summary, blood donors among university students have a greater knowledge of transplantation and a more positive attitude toward organ donation. Since university students are an important source of blood donors in China, they will be a potential pool of organ donors in the future. PMID:17112824

  14. Artificial blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Suman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. Various manufacturers have products in clinical trials; however, no truly safe and effective artificial blood product is currently marketed. It is anticipated that when an artificial blood product is available, it will have annual sales of over $7.6 billion in the United States alone.

  15. 三级综合医院评审对规范安全输血的影响%Influence of the accreditation of third-grade class A comprehensive hospitals on the regulation of safe blood transfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵凤军; 赵秀荣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the process of accreditation of comprehensive third-grade class A hospitals was an effective way to regulate the safety of blood transfusion .Methods In August 2011 blood transfusion regularity was checked in the 73 nursing units of the hospital , nurses of different ranks were tested on related knowledge of blood transfusion , and problems were found .According to the problems , together with the disciplines of the accreditation of third-grade class A hospitals , a standard procedure was made and the nurses were trained and tested repeatedly .All the wards were checked and instructed for the application of the standard procedure and PDCA was used for further improvement .In April 2013 blood transfusion regularity was checked in the 73 nursing units again and nurses of different ranks were tested on the knowledge of blood transfusion.Results The related regularity of safe blood transfusion was improved , and the regularity and standard procedure were applied .With comparisons and contrasts of the two checks and tests of the nurses , most problems found in the check of August 2011 were solved and the safety standard was reached with the result , nurses’ degree of mastering knowledge about safety of blood transfusion was improved , which all had statistical significant differences (P <0.01).Conclusions With the building of third-grade class A comprehensive hospitals, the safety of blood transfusion is promoted , and the management of the hospital is improved and the safety of blood transfusion is guaranteed .%目的:探讨规范医院输血安全管理水平的有效方法。方法在2011年8月对全院73个护理单元进行输血规范检查并对不同层级护士进行输血相关知识测试后,进行总结,然后根据存在的问题,结合三级综合医院评审标准完善制度、制定规范流程,进行反复培训、考核,反复督导,并利用PDCA持续改进,2013年4月,再次对全院73个护理

  16. Teaching Kids About Using Medicine Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Teaching Kids About Using Medicine Safely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ...

  17. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... donate en -- Donate Today - 2016-08-donation-en.html Donate Today Diabetes touches everyone, and finding a ... urgent. Donate We Can Help - we-can-help.html Chat Online Chat Closed engagement en -- Need Type ...

  18. Safe Use of Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Use of Medicines Heath and Aging Safe Use of Medicines Introduction Read this booklet for practical ... Alice talk about medicine safety Related Publications Medicines: Use Them Safely Dietary Supplements Alzheimer's Disease Medications Fact ...

  19. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Traveling Safely with Medicines Planes, trains, cars – even boats ... your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you ...

  20. Choosing Safe Baby Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confusing, especially with all the new gadgets and features available (not to mention the many product recalls). ... Gates Choosing Safe Baby Products: Infant Seats & Child Safety Seats (Car Seats) Choosing Safe Baby Products: Playpens Choosing Safe ...

  1. 75 FR 23265 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Investigating the Causes of Post Donation Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... include PDI occurrences or deferrals that are due to: Travel (malaria, vCJD). Medical (history of diseases... and Use of Information Collection: Blood centers are required to use a health history screening... donation. However, the health history process is known to be error-prone and the reasons for those...

  2. How to increase living donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Connie L

    2011-04-01

    Living donation is the key to increasing access to successful solid organ transplantation worldwide. However, the means to expanding the number of living donors on a global scale are not known. Although there have been many suggestions for the best approach, cultural issues may limit the effectiveness of some strategies. Only a few ideas have been studied, and one in particular- outright payment to donors - may raise ethical issues that are difficult to surmount and might negatively alter altruistic behavior. With respect to the present environment, this article will describe some of the approaches that are being discussed to increase the number of living donors, with a particular focus on kidney transplantation. PMID:21210867

  3. Questionnaire-Related Deferrals in Regular Blood Donors in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Håkon Reikvam; Kjersti Svendheim; Anne S. Røsvik; Tor Hervig

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary donation is a key issue in transfusion medicine. To ensure the safety of blood transfusions, careful donor selection is important. Although new approaches to blood safety have dramatically reduced the risks for infectious contamination of blood components, the quality and the availability of blood components depend on the willingness to donate and the reliability of the information given by the donors about their own health, including risk behavior. As donors who are deferred by the...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 25,312 views 49:19 23. Stem Cells - ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 25,665 views 49:19 Susan Solomon: The ...

  6. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 25,496 views 49:19 Susan Solomon: The ...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 667 views 3:35 Bone Marrow/Stem Cell ... Jeff, peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 22,203 ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 22,464 views 3:28 Pain Control: Support for People with Cancer - Duration: 11:58. ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 26,239 views 49:19 23. Stem Cells - ...

  10. Seven Years Trends in Prevalence of Transfusion-Transmissible Viral Infections in Yazd blood Transfusion Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Javadzadeh Shahshahani, H; Vaziri, M.; Mansouri, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing blood supply safety is one of the most important goals of blood services in the world. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence rate and the trends of three main infections in whole blood donations and strategies for improving blood safety in Yazd blood transfusion center, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross sectional study, data on hepatitis B, C and HIV infection were extracted from Iranian Donor Database of blood donation from 2004 to 2010 in Yazd province. All...

  11. Shining a light on organ donation after death : on various aspects influencing organ donation

    OpenAIRE

    Gyllström Krekula, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The willingness to donate organs after death is widespread in our country, Sweden. Nevertheless, the donation rate is rather low and patients still die while waiting for an organ. One of the obstacles to organ donation is that people tend not to tell anyone about their decision. Consequently, the relatives of a potential donor are often unaware of the intention of the deceased and the decision is seldom found in the National Donor Registry. Adding to the complexity is the fact t...

  12. Public Opinion on Organ Donation After Death and Its Influence on Attitudes Toward Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijing, Luo; Wenzhao, Xie; Wei, Wei; Qiquan, Wan; Xuantong, Deng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND China officially launched a pilot program of organ donation after cardiac death to overcome the shortage of available organs since 2011. Voluntary organ donation by deceased citizens became the only source of transplant organs beginning January 1, 2015. To investigate public opinions on organ donation by deceased donors, and discuss the effect of these opinions on the willingness and attitude of the public regarding voluntary organ donation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We designed a questionnaire. The survey was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015 in Changsha City, and 417 valid questionnaires were recovered. RESULTS A total of 162 respondents explicitly expressed a willingness to donate organs, and 269 believed that the organ donors' relatives should be compensated. A total of 255 respondents thought it acceptable to complete the donation-consent form when receiving a driver's license. Among the respondents, 65.3% did not agree with the statement "My body is bestowed by my parents, and to donate my body parts would not display filial respect"; 88.9% agreed that "It is necessary to consider the willingness of my family"; 74.4% agreed that "Donated organs have not been fairly and appropriately used; the wealthy and celebrities have been favored"; and 61.4% agreed that "Organ donation laws and regulations are not well developed, and organ donations will result in unnecessary difficulties." More than 80% believed that organ donation and transplantation extend life. CONCLUSIONS Public opinions on organ donation after death are associated with various factors, including traditional values, religious beliefs, compensation mechanisms, donor registration, institutional credibility, and ideals. PMID:27535587

  13. Iron status in Danes updated 1994. I: prevalence of iron deficiency and iron overload in 1332 men aged 40-70 years. Influence Of blood donation, alcohol intake, and iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, N; Ovesen, L; Byg, K; Graudal, N

    1999-09-01

    Iron status, S-ferritin, and hemoglobin (Hb) were assessed in a population survey in 1994 (DAN-MONICA 10) comprising 1332 Caucasian Danish men equally distributed in age cohorts of 40, 50, 60 and 70 years. Blood donors (n=186) had lower S-ferritin, median 76 microg/l, than nondonors, median 169 microg/l (p300 microg/l) was 20%. S-ferritin in nondonors correlated with body mass index (r(s)=0.19, p=0.0001) and with alcohol intake (r(s)=0.26, p=0.0001). In the entire series, 28% of the subjects took supplemental iron (median 14 mg ferrous iron daily). Iron supplements had no influence on iron status. Nondonors (n=170) treated with acetylsalicylic acid had lower S-ferritin, median 136 microg/l, than nontreated, median 169 microg/l (p<0.001) and those treated with H(2)-receptor antagonists (n=30) had lower S-ferritin, median 142 microg/l, than nontreated, median 171 microg/l (p<0.04). Compared with the DAN-MONICA 1 iron status survey of Danish men in 1984, the prevalences of iron depletion and iron deficiency anemia are unchanged whereas the prevalence of iron overload has increased significantly. In Denmark, iron fortification of flour was abolished in 1987. This apparently had no negative effect on iron status in men. PMID:10525826

  14. The challenges of social marketing of organ donation: news and entertainment coverage of donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler R; Morgan, Susan E; Chewning, Lisa V

    2008-01-01

    While great strides have been made in persuading the public to become potential organ donors, actual behavior has not yet caught up with the nearly universally favorable attitudes the public expresses toward donation. This paper explores the issue by situating the social marketing of organ donation against a broader backdrop of entertainment and news media coverage of organ donation. Organ donation storylines are featured on broadcast television in medical and legal dramas, soap operas, and other television serials approximately four times per month (not including most cable networks), and feature storylines that promote myths and fears of the organ donation process. National news and other non-fictionalized coverage of organ donation are even more common, with stories appearing over twenty times a month on average. These stories tend to be one-dimensional and highly sensationalized in their coverage. The marketing of organ donation for entertainment essentially creates a counter-campaign to organ donation, with greater resources and reach than social marketers have access to. Understanding the broader environmental context of organ donation messages highlights the issues faced by social marketing campaigns in persuading the public to become potential donors. PMID:18935879

  15. Genes and gestation in Australian regulation of egg donation, surrogacy and mitochondrial donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Karinne

    2015-12-01

    This article considers genetic and legal relatedness for the purposes of Australian regulation of egg donation, surrogacy and parentage by examination of that regulation through the lens of mitochondrial (mt) donation. The article addresses whether mt donors would be a child's genetic parents following clinical use in that child's conception should mt donation be legalised for such use in Australia. It then considers how genetic and gestational relatedness are relevant in the discourse around legal parentage following egg donation and surrogacy and argues that the current approach is in need of reform so that intending parents of all children are deemed to be the resulting child's legal parents at birth. PMID:26939505

  16. Donation of CERN computing equipment to Pakistan

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    An official ceremony marking the eighth donation of CERN computing equipment to an outside institute, this time a university in Pakistan, took place on Monday, 2 March.     From left to right: Sajjad Mohsin, Dean at the COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, S. M. Junaid Zaidi, Rector of CIIT, Aumair Qayyum (CIIT) and Syed Ali Zahir Bukhari (CIIT).   On this occasion, 224 servers and 30 network hubs were donated to the CIIT (COMSATS Institute of Information Technology) in Islamabad, Pakistan, where they will be used by scientists working on the LHC’s ALICE experiment. For several years now, CERN has regularly donated computing equipment that no longer meets its highly specific requirements but is still more than adequate for less exacting environments. To date, a total of 1,149 servers and 79 hubs have been donated to eight countries, namely Bulgaria, Egypt, Ghana, Morocco, the Philippines, Senegal, Serbia and now P...

  17. ASPECTS REGARDING THE REVOCABLE CHARACTERE OF THE DONATION BETWEEN SPOUSES

    OpenAIRE

    Ramona Mihaela MOLDOVAN

    2009-01-01

    Unlike other donations, donations between spouses are essentially revocable, regardless of the form in which they were made. In this regard, the Civil code provides rules derogating from the general rules applicable to donations. Donation between spouses becomes irrevocable only by the death of the donor spouse, due to the fact that it is an exclusive and personal rights of the donor and may not be exercised by his heirs or creditors. The article also treats the problem regarding the donation...

  18. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To ... Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And ...

  19. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenblum, Amanda M.; Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X

    2012-01-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of regis...

  20. Campaigning for Organ Donation at Mosques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2016-09-01

    There is a trend of recruiting faith leaders at mosques to overcome religious barriers to organ donation, and to increase donor registration among Muslims. Commentators have suggested that Muslims are not given enough information about organ donation in religious sermons or lectures delivered at mosques. Corrective actions have been recommended, such as funding campaigns to promote organ donation, and increasing the availability of organ donation information at mosques. These actions are recommended despite published literature expressing safety concerns (i.e., do no harm) in living and end-of-life organ donation. Living donors require life-long medical follow-up and treatment for complications that can appear years later. Scientific and medical controversies persist regarding the international guidelines for death determination in end-of-life donation. The medical criteria of death lack validation and can harm donors if surgical procurement is performed without general anesthesia and before biological death. In the moral code of Islam, the prevention of harm holds precedence over beneficence. Moral precepts described in the Quran encourage Muslims to be beneficent, but also to seek knowledge prior to making practical decisions. However, the Quran also contains passages that demand honesty and truthfulness when providing information to those who are seeking knowledge. Currently, information is limited to that which encourages donor registration. Campaigning for organ donation to congregations in mosques should adhere to the moral code of complete, rather than selective, disclosure of information. We recommend as a minimal standard the disclosure of risks, uncertainties, and controversies associated with the organ donation process. PMID:26940813

  1. Iron status of regular voluntary blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahida Vilsu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our blood bank is a regional blood transfusion centre, which accepts blood only from voluntary donors. Aim: The aim is to study iron status of regular voluntary donors who donated their blood at least twice in a year. Materials and Methods: Prior to blood donation, blood samples of 220 male and 30 female voluntary donors were collected. Control included 100 each male and female healthy individuals in the 18- to 60-year age group, who never donated blood and did not have any chronic infection. In the study and control groups, about 10% subjects consumed non-vegetarian diet. After investigation, 85 males and 56 females having haemoglobin (Hb levels above 12.5 g/dl were selected as controls. Donors were divided into ≤10, 11-20, 21-50 and> 50 blood donation categories. Majority of the donors in> 50 donation category donated blood four times in a year, whereas the remaining donors donated two to three times per year. Haematological parameters were measured on fully automatic haematology analyzer, serum iron and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC by biochemical methods, ferritin using ELISA kits and transferrin using immunoturbidometry kits. Iron/TIBC ratio x 100 gave percentage of transferrin saturation value. Statistical Analysis: Statistical evaluation was done by mean, standard deviation, pair t -test, χ2 and anova ( F -test. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the iron profile of vegetarian and non-vegetarian subjects or controls and the donors donating < 20 times. Significant increase or decrease was observed in mean values of various haematological and iron parameters in donors who donated blood for> 20 times ( P < 0.001, compared to controls. Anaemia, iron deficiency and depletion of iron stores were more prevalent in female donors ( P < 0.05 compared to males and especially in those male donors who donated their blood for more than 20 times. Conclusion: Regular voluntary blood

  2. CERN servers donated to Ghana

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    Cutting-edge research requires a constantly high performance of the computing equipment. At the CERN Computing Centre, computers typically need to be replaced after about four years of use. However, while servers may be withdrawn from cutting-edge use, they are still good for other uses elsewhere. This week, 220 servers and 30 routers were donated to the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Ghana.   “KNUST will provide a good home for these computers. The university has also developed a plan for using them to develop scientific collaboration with CERN,” said John Ellis, a professor at King’s College London and a visiting professor in CERN’s Theory Group.  John Ellis was heavily involved in building the relationship with Ghana, which started in 2006 when a Ghanaian participated in the CERN openlab student programme. Since 2007 CERN has hosted Ghanaians especially from KNUST in the framework of the CERN Summer Student Progr...

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus test-seeking blood donors in a large blood bank in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalez, T; Sabino, E; Sales, N; Chen, YH; D. Chamone; Busch, M.; Murphy, E; Custer, B; McFarland, W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors are excluded from donation to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection. Persons donating to be tested for HIV may therefore deny risk behaviors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A random sample of donors completed a survey on motivations, knowledge, and attitudes on the screening process. Donors were considered test seekers if they agreed with two statements "I think that blood donation is a good, fast, and anonym...

  4. The investigation and analysis of current blood taking and supplying situations in Lu'an district and its corresponding strategies%六安地区采供血现状调查分析及应对策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张树新

    2011-01-01

    Objective :To investigate and analyze the current blood taking and supplying situations in Lu'an district systematically and supply corresponding strategies aiming at guaranteeing the safe and efficient blood supply. Methods: Based on the statistics of Lu'an district. The overall blood taking amounts, blood positive infection ratio, blood wasting ratio, clinical consumption amounts, the population and overall patient beddings from 2006 to 2009 were statistical analyzed. Results:The annual increase rate of blood taking was 18.2% in Lu'an, and the blood components transfusion was met to clinical requirement;the yearly amounts of machine blood platelet taking were pretty low, and it could not met the practical needs;blood positive rate and fat blood wasting ratios were steadily increased each year. The pressure of clinical blood consumption had increased continuously. Conclusions: In order to ensure safe and efficient blood supply, in addition to highly advertising blood donation and ensuring blood test accuracy, the health surveys should be earnestly carried out by related authorities prior to blood donation. The public education should be strengthened before blood donation, and the blood resources wasting should be minimized.%目的:调查分析六安地区采供血现状,预期六安地区采供血发展趋势,为保障临床血液安全有效供应提供应对策略.方法:对2006~2009年六安地区血液采集量、血液传染指标阳性率、血液报废率、临床用血量与六安市人口和医疗机构床位数进行统计分析.结果:六安地区血液采集平均年增长率约18.2%;临床已基本实现成分输血;机采血小板年采集量过低,远不能满足临床需求;血液检测阳性率、脂肪血浆报废率逐年上升;临床用血压力持续增大.结论:为确保临床血液安全有效供应,除加大献血者招募力度,保证检测的准确性外,还应认真做好献血前的健康征询工作,加

  5. Real-Time Blood Donor Management Using Dashboards Based on Data Mining Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhanam T

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study uses data mining modeling techniques to examine the blood donor classification and extending this to facilitate the development of realtime blood donor management using dashboards with blood profile and geo-location data. This enables decision makers the ability to manage and plan the blood donation activities based on key metrics. This capability provides the ability to plan effective targeted blood donation campaigns. The scoring algorithm implemented for the dashboard also helps in the optimized deployment of budget resources and budget allocation determination for blood donation campaigns.

  6. Moving blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelis, K

    1997-01-01

    Our internationally acclaimed journalist Sanguinia has returned safely from her historic assignment. Travelling from Homeric Greece to British Romanticism, she was witness to blood drinking, letting, bathing, and transfusion. In this report, she explores connections between the symbolic and the sadistic; the mythic and the medical--all in an effort to appreciate the layered meanings our culture has given to the movement of blood between our bodies. PMID:9407636

  7. Eligibility and Exclusion of Hemochromatosis Patients as Voluntary Blood Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Levstik, M; Adams, PC

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary hemochromatosis patients are excluded in many countries as voluntary blood donors. In 1991, changes in the Canadian Red Cross policy allowed healthy hemochromatosis patients to become voluntary donors.STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The medical histories of 208 hemochromatosis patients were evaluated for eligibility for blood donation from a large prospective database of hemochromatosis patients. A survey that determined the success or exclusion of 81 patients for blood donat...

  8. Choosing Safe Toys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Choosing Safe Toys KidsHealth > For Parents > Choosing Safe Toys Print A ... can contribute to hearing damage. continue The Right Toys at the Right Ages Always read labels to ...

  9. Use Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription ... all the medicines, vitamins, minerals, and herbs you use. Share this information with your doctor. Store your ...

  10. Donació de sang i educació per a la ciutadania: un projecte pedagògic Blood donation and education for citizenship: a teaching project Donación de sangre y educación para la ciudadanía: un proyecto pedagógico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Graell Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El projecte «Donació de Sang i Educació per a la Ciutadania» sorgeix del Banc de Sang i Teixits de Catalunya amb l’objectiu de generar una experiència educativa d’aprenentatge servei. Es proposa incrementar el número de donacions de sang perquè els joves prenguin consciència de la seva transcendència, desenvolupar el sentit que suposa aquesta acció, i que coneguin la tasca del Banc de Sang i Teixits. A partir de l’experiència de l’escola Valldemia s’expliquen els passos necessaris per dur a terme el projecte des del Banc de Sang i Teixits. En primer lloc, es formula una breu introducció on es contextualitza l’estudi; en segon terme, ’explica la metodologia que s’ha emprat per recollir la informació i organitzar-la, i en tercer lloc, es mostra l’experiència pròpiament, l’aplicació del projecte a l’escola Valldemia, amb una sistematització més teòrica ______________________________________________Le projet Don de sang et éducation à la citoyenneté est surgi de la Banque de sang et de tissus de Catalogne dans le but de créer une expérience éducative d’apprentissage service. Il propose d’augmenter le nombre des dons de sang afin que les jeunes prennent conscience de sa transcendance, développent le sens que suppose cette action, et découvrent la tâche de la Banque du sang et des tissus. À partir de l’expérience de l’école Valldemia, l’article explique les étapes nécessaires pour mener à terme le projet depuis la Banque du sang. En premier lieu, il formule une brève introduction dans laquelle il contextualise l’étude ; en deuxième lieu, il explique la méthodologie qui a été utilisée pour recueillir l’information et l’organiser ; en troisième lieu, il montre l’expérience proprement dite, l’application du projet à l’école Valldemia, où est présentée en même temps sa systématisation plus théoriqueThe Blood donation and Education for Citizenship project was set

  11. Will There Be Blood? Incentives and Displacement Effects in Pro-social Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Lacetera; Mario Macis; Robert Slonim

    2012-01-01

    We present evidence from nearly 14,000 American Red Cross blood drives and from a natural field experiment showing that economic incentives have a positive effect on blood donations without increasing the fraction of donors who are ineligible to donate. The effect increases with the incentive's economic value. However, a substantial proportion of the increase in donations is explained by donors leaving neighboring drives without incentives to attend drives with incentives; this displacement a...

  12. Effectiveness of confidential unit exclusion in screening blood donors of the regional blood bank in Londrina, Paraná State

    OpenAIRE

    Ingridt Hildegard Vogler; Mariza Saito; Adriana Aparecida Spinosa; Marilza Celina da Silva; Egberto Munhoz; Edna Maria Vissoci Reiche

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For transfusion purposes, blood donors must be accepted both in clinical and serological evaluations and must not have excluded their own donation using the confidential unit exclusion. AIMS: The objective of this study was to verify whether blood donors who choose self exclusion are more likely to be positive in serological tests than donors who do not. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was carried out of 51,861 consecutive whole blood donations from January 2004 to December 20...

  13. Legal briefing: organ donation and allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason

    2010-01-01

    This issue's "Legal Briefing" column covers legal developments pertaining to organ donation and allocation. This topic has been the subject of recent articles in JCE. Organ donation and allocation have also recently been the subjects of significant public policy attention. In the past several months, legislatures and regulatory agencies across the United States and across the world have changed, or considered changing, the methods for procuring and distributing human organs for transplantation. Currently, in the U.S., more than 100,000 persons are waiting for organ transplantation. In China, more than 1.5 million people are waiting. Given the chronic shortage of available organs (especially kidneys and livers) relative to demand, the primary focus of most legal developments has been on increasing the rate of donation. These and related developments are usefully divided into the following 12 topical categories: 1. Revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act. 2. Presumed Consent and Opt-Out. 3. Mandated Choice. 4. Donation after Cardiac Death. 5. Payment and Compensation. 6. Donation by Prisoners. 7. Donor Registries. 8. Public Education. 9. Other Procurement Initiatives. 10. Lawsuits and Liability. 11. Trafficking and Tourism. 12. Allocation and Distribution. PMID:21089996

  14. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Amanda M; Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X

    2012-08-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of registrants for 27 registries (68%). Most registries are nationally operated and government-owned. Registrations in five nations expire and require renewal. Some registries provide the option to make specific organ selections in the donation decision. Just over half of donor registries provide legally binding authorization to donation. In all national donor registries, except one, the proportion of adults (15+) registered is modest (donation decision mandatory to obtain a driver's license. Registered objections in non-donor registries are rare (organ donor registries worldwide necessitates public discourse and quality improvement initiatives, to identify and support leading practices in registry use. PMID:22507140

  15. Analyzing sociodemographic factors amongst blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenga Namgay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood transfusion is a fundamental and requisite part of any National Health Service for optimum management of emergency conditions like severe trauma shock and resuscitation with the optimum stock of its different components. The objective of the present study was to analyze the factors of knowledge of prospective blood donors that may influence their perception and awareness about blood donation. Materials and Methods: This population-based cross-sectional study was conducted at Gangtok in the state of Sikkim, India, on 300 subjects of the adult population selected by two-stage cluster sampling. The main outcome variables were the socioeconomic and demographic variables of knowledge of blood donation. By interview technique, using the pre-tested structured close-ended questionnaire, the principal investigator collected the data. Results: In our study population, 46% of the study population was found to have a high knowledge score. The knowledge about blood donation was found to be statistically significant with the occupational status and the education levels, both in the bivariate and in the multivariate analyses. Knowledge about blood donation was not significantly related to age, sex, marital status, religion, community status and per capita monthly family income. Conclusion: The study suggested that the perceptions toward voluntary blood donation could be influenced to a large extent by sociodemographic variables of knowledge among the general population.

  16. Dose-Modified Ifosfamide, Epirubicin, and Etoposide is a Safe and Effective Salvage Therapy with High Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization Capacity for Poorly Mobilized Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Akiko; Hyuga, Mizuki; Iwasaki, Makoto; Nakae, Yoshiki; Kishimoto, Wataru; Maesako, Yoshitomo; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A dose modified ifosfamide, epirubicin, and etoposide (IVE) regimen was prospectively assessed for its efficacy in mobilizing peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation. Two patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and two with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who were undergoing stem cell therapy were studied. All patients had a history of multiple treatments with insufficient stem cell mobilization. The dose modified IVE regimen consisted of ifosfamide 3 g/m(2) intravenously (IV) administered on days 1-2 in combination with epirubicin 50 mg/m(2) IV on day 1 and etoposide 200 mg/m(2) (100 mg/m(2) in two patients with complete remission) IV on days 1-3. The ifosfamide dosage was reduced to two-thirds of the original protocol. A substantial high yield of CD34(+) cells was achieved when patients were treated with a dose-modified IVE regimen, compared with that during the previous regimen (two with the ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide [ICE] regimen, one with high-dose cyclophosphamide and one with the original IVE regimen). Two patients who had refractory and residual disease received a 200 mg/m(2) dose of etoposide, which resulted in tumor reduction (one patient with complete remission and one with further reduction in tumor size). After the IVE regimen, all four patients had a sufficient yield of CD34(+) cells in total, which was available for stem cell transplantation. Hematological and non-hematological toxicities were comparable in all regimens. This single-center prospective study demonstrated that the dose-modified IVE regimen can be used as a safe treatment with high mobilizing efficacy in heavily pretreated lymphoma patients. PMID:27334858

  17. MAAP comparisons to SAFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Electric provided results for several boiling water reactor/4 (BWR/4) accident sequences using the SAFE computer code. MAAP-BWR 3.0B Revision 6, was exercised for the same sequences to compare against the SAFE results. Overall, the SAFE and MAAP results for the sequences analyzed show excellent agreement. There are some uncertainties as to the assumptions in the SAFE calculations and the initial conditions. However, given those uncertainties, MAAP and SAFE appear to agree quite well on the response of the reactor vessel for various accident sequences

  18. Donors with renal artery stenosis: Fit to donate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vemuru Sunil K Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney donation from hypertensive donors is now an accepted norm in live related kidney transplantation. The use of hypertensive donors with renal artery stenosis due to athero-sclerosis and fibromuscular dysplasia is still debated. The prime concern is about the deleterious effect of hypertension on the donor and the risk of recurrence of such lesions in the solitary kidney. Even as the response of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis to revascularisation is unpredictable, there is an improvement in blood pressure following revascularisation of kidneys with fibro-muscular dysplasia. The first use of such kidney donors was reported in 1984 and, since then, there have been a few reports of successful use of kidneys from donors with renal artery stenosis. We report here two interesting cases of successful transplantation of kidneys from live related kidney donors with hypertension due to renal artery stenosis who became normotensive with good graft function in the recipient. We conclude that moderately hypertensive donors with renal artery stenosis are fit to donate.

  19. Payment for egg donation and surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbock, Bonnie

    2004-09-01

    This article examines the ethics of egg donation. It begins by looking at objections to noncommercial gamete donation, and then takes up criticism of commercial egg donation. After discussing arguments based on concern for offspring, inequality, commodification, exploitation of donors, and threats to the family, I conclude that some payment to donors is ethically acceptable. Donors should not be paid for their eggs, but rather they should be compensated for the burdens of egg retrieval. Making the distinction between compensation for burdens and payment for a product has the advantages of limiting payment, not distinguishing between donors on the basis of their traits, and ensuring that donors are paid regardless of the number or quality of eggs retrieved. PMID:15365592

  20. Impact of a Bereavement and Donation Service incorporating mandatory 'required referral' on organ donation rates: a model for the implementation of the Organ Donation Taskforce's recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F; Cochran, D; Thornton, S

    2009-08-01

    In 2008 the Organ Donation Taskforce published its recommendations for increasing organ donation in the UK by 50% over 5 years. Bolton NHS Trust has addressed the problem of low rates of organ donation by amalgamating Bereavement and Donation Services and introducing a trigger to refer automatically all potential organ donors to the regional transplant donor co-ordinators. We audited the ability of the new service to deliver the aims and recommendations of the Organ Donation Taskforce. Following the changes in service provision the number of tissue donors rose from six in 2002 to 246 in 2007. In the same period solid organ donation rates remained unchanged. The introduction of an automatic trigger for referral of potential donors in 2007 resulted in 31 referrals and 11 successful multi-organ donors. The current service exceeds the aims of the Taskforce and offers the potential to meet UK organ donation targets without resorting to an 'opt out' system of presumed consent. PMID:19604184

  1. AN ANDROID APPLICATION FOR VOLUNTEER BLOOD DONORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Turhan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is an expectation that the blood will always be there when it is really needed. Blood donor volunteers constitute the main supply source in an effective blood supply chain management. They feed blood stocks through their donation. In an emergency situation, if the stocks are insufficient, the only source of blood supply will be the people who come to the health center and donate the blood on a voluntary basis. It is certain that time is a very important component in such situation. For this reason, the health care center should call the nearest available donor in order to ensure to get the service as quickly as possible. A smart phone application is developed to facilitate the identification of the nearest available blood donor volunteer and the communication with him/her in the emergency situations where the blood can’t be supplied through the blood banks’ stocks. In this paper this application will be presented.

  2. Hemodynamic Changes in Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rafiei

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Everyday, millions of people around the world go through phlebotomy, either to donate blood or for therapeutic intention. The most important worrisome adverse effects are hemodynamic alterations. In this study, hemodynamic changes following blood donation were assessed. Methods & Materials: Three hundred laborers who donated blood voluntarily were enrolled in this study. Blood pressure (BP and pulse rate were measured before the procedure, ten minutes afterwards, and one week following phlebotomy. Hemoglobin (Hgb and hematocrit (Hct were also determined prior to and one week after phlebotomy. Finally, results before and after donation were compared with each other. Results: 242 volunteers had normal BP and 58 were hypertensive. The mean systolic blood pressures (SBP before phlebotomy, ten minutes after the procedure, and one week later were 120, 117, and 122 mmHg, respectively. During the same periods of time, the mean of diastolic blood pressures (DBP were 77 , 78 and 78 mmHg , in order , while pulse rates on average were 80 , 82 and 76 beats/minute . None of the aforementioned changes were clinically significant. After one week, Hgb decreased by about 0.3 g/dl (P<0.001 and Hct declined on average of 1.7 (P<0.001. Forty six individuals had high DBP and one week after donation, their DBP was reduced by 7 mmHg. Age, body mass index and smoking did not have any significant effect on hemodynamic status. Conclusion: Hemodynamic changes in healthy blood donors were not clinically significant. It seems that DBP drops desirably in hypertensive individuals. This needs to be evaluated more carefully in future studies.

  3. Incentives for organ donation: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhotua, A

    2012-01-01

    Altruism still remains the main principle of organ donation worldwide. However, since the current practices has not met the demand for organs, new strategies should be found to encourage organ donation. Implementation of financial incentives in transplantation is a matter of debate among experts in the fields of transplantation, ethics, law, and economics. It should be acknowledged that donors incur many expenses while participating in the transplant process, which seems unfair. Various forms of incentives have been suggested and are currently used worldwide. This article describes current attitudes toward incentives for in transplantation used in different countries, arguing in favor as well as against them. PMID:22841275

  4. Indian ICU nurses' perceptions of and attitudes towards organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, Poreddi; Nagarajaiah; Ramachandra; Math, Suresh Bada

    Nurses play a significant role in identifying and securing potential organ donors in the clinical environment. Research among Indian nurses related to organ donation is sparse. The present study aimed to investigate nurses' attitudes towards organ donation. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was carried out among nurses (n=184) at a tertiary care centre. Data were collected through self-report questionnaire. A majority (81%) of the respondents were 'willing to sign the card' for organ donation; however, only 3.8% (n=7) of them actually 'signed the organ donation card'. There were significant associations found between intentions to sign the organ donation card and gender (x2=5.852; pethical, social, and religious issues, and advocacy in the area of organ donation. Furthermore, nurse administrators must take the initiative to develop guidelines clarifying the role of nurses in the organ donation and transplantation process to promote organ donation and improve rates. PMID:26153809

  5. Knowledge and Attitudes about Organ Donation among commerce college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Shah, Alpesh Patel, Vaibhav Ramanuj, Nitin Solanki

    2015-01-01

    Results: Among 200 students 87.5% had heard about organ donation; 18.5% students’ relatives had donated one or more organ; 46.5% students would be willing to donate organs of a brain dead relative; 62.5% respondents like to donate their own organ; and 43.5% students were aware of parliamentary law in India regarding organ donation in case of brain death. Conclusion: Awareness of organ donation was high and some want to become donors. Multi-sectoral approach (e.g, electronic and print media, religious scholars, doctors and teachers should be used to promote awareness of organ donation. Further studies are needed to motivate the general population for organ donation."

  6. Eye Donation and Corneal Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who We Are What We Do Cornea Donation Volunteer Leadership Board of Directors Committees Staff Find an Eye ... Who We Are What We Do Cornea Donation Volunteer Leadership Board of Directors Committees Staff Find an Eye ...

  7. The results of nucleic acid testing in remunerated and non-remunerated blood donors in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalibatas, Vytenis; Kalibatienė, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Background In Lithuania, governmentally covered remuneration for whole blood donations prevails. Donors may choose to accept or reject the remuneration. The purpose of this study was to compare the rate of nucleic acid testing (NAT) discriminatory-positive markers for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in seronegative, first-time and repeat, remunerated and non-remunerated donations at the National Blood Centre in Lithuania during the period from 2005 to 2010. Materials and methods All seronegative whole blood and blood component donations were individually analysed by NAT for HIV-1, HBV and HCV. Only discriminatory-positive NAT were classified. The prevalence of discriminatory-positive NAT per 100,000 donations in the donor groups and the odds ratios comparing the remunerated and non-remunerated donations were determined. Results Significant differences were observed for HBV NAT results: 47.42 and 26.29 per 100,000 remunerated first-time and repeat donations, respectively, compared to 10.6 and 3.58 per 100,000 non-remunerated first-time and repeat, seronegative donations, respectively. The differences were also significant for HCV NAT results: 47.42 and 51.99 for remunerated first-time and repeat donations, respectively, compared to 2.12 and 0 per 100,000 non-remunerated first-time and repeat, seronegative donations, respectively. No seronegative, discriminatory-positive NAT HIV case was found. The odds of discriminatory HBV and HCV NAT positive results were statistically significantly higher for both first-time and repeat remunerated donations compared to first-time and repeat non-remunerated donations. Discussion First-time and repeat remunerated seronegative donations were associated with a statistically significantly higher prevalence and odds for discriminatory-positive HBV and HCV NAT results compared to first-time and repeat non-remunerated donations at the National Blood Centre in Lithuania. PMID

  8. Introduction to Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization and Blood Safety in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Abolghasemi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nCurrently, in Iran blood transfusion is an integral part of the national health system and blood donation is voluntary and non­remu­nerated and blood and its components may not be a source of profit. In 1974 and following establishment of Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization (IBTO all blood transfusion activities from donor recruitment to production of blood com­po­nents and delivery of blood and blood products were centralized. The activities of IBTO are followed the laws and regu­la­tions of Ministry of Health and criteria of Iran National Regulatory Authority. In order to meet the country's demand in 2007 IBTO collected about 1.7 millions units of blood from the population of 70 millions. In 1979 coincided with the Is­lamic revolution the number of  blood units collected throughout the country were 124,000 units or 3.4 unit per 1000 popu­la­tion whereas after about 30 years this increased to about 25 unit per 1000 population. With improving the pool of vol­un­tary donors, IBTO has been successful in excluding "family replacement" donation since 2007 and reached to 100% volun­tary and nonremunerated blood donation. Currently more than 92% of blood donors in Iran are male and contribution of fe­male in blood donation is less than 8%. Although all donated blood in Iran screened for HBsAg since 1974, screening of blood units for HIV and HCV started since 1989 and 1996, respectively. The frequency of HBV infection in blood do­nors showed a significant decline from 1.79% in 1998 to 0.4% in 2007. The overall frequency of HCV and HIV infection are 0.13% and 0.004% respectively.

  9. Transfusions of blood and blood products and viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wróblewska

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfusions of blood and blood products are commonly used in medicine, but being biological materials they carry a risk of transmitting infections--viral, bacterial, parasitic, as well as prions. Laboratory tests used for screening of donated blood for viral infections at present cannot detect all infectious units. Criteria for selection of blood donors therefore must be very strict, while methods of inactivation of viruses and laboratory assays for detection of their presence must be improved. Indications for blood transfusion should be restricted.

  10. From fresh heterologous oocyte donation to autologous oocyte banking

    OpenAIRE

    Stoop, D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Today, oocyte donation has become well established, giving rise to thousands of children born worldwide annually. The introduction of oocyte cryopreservation through vitrification allows the introduction of egg banking, improving the efficiency and comfort of oocyte donation. Moreover, the vitrification technique can now enable autologous donation of oocytes to prevent future infertility. Methods: We evaluated fresh heterologous oocyte donation in terms of obstetrical and perina...

  11. Awareness of Religious Leaders’ Fatwa and Willingness to Donate Organ

    OpenAIRE

    Afzal Aghaee, M.; Dehghani, M.; M SADEGHI; Khaleghi, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is believed that religious leaders’ positive attitude towards organ donation can be an effective factor in Muslims’ inclination to donate organs. Objective: To assess the knowledge of freshmen students in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences about religious leaders’ fatwa on organ donation and its effect on their willingness to donate organs. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on 400 freshmen of various medical disciplines, selected using a simple rando...

  12. ALTRUISM AND OWNERSHIP: JUSTIFYING PAYMENT FOR ORGAN DONATION

    OpenAIRE

    Voo, Teck Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Organ donation is traditionally based on the notion of making a gift based on altruism. An important aspect of ‘altruistic gifting’ is commitment to a solidaristic approach to meeting transplant needs. In line with this, people are encouraged to donate their organs at death to a common pool for collective provision, or donate a live organ to another freely. Given a chronic organ shortage, proposals have been made to change this system to increase donation. Proposals include introducing some o...

  13. AWARENESS OF EYE DONATION IN POPULATION OF CENTRAL INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Neera; Charudatt; Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Corneal problems cause a significant proportion of blindness in India. Once corneal opacity is established, restoration of their vision is possible only through transplantation of cornea from donated eyes. Eye donations are dependent on people willing to pledge their eyes. PURPOSE: To determine “awareness of eye donation" and knowledge regarding eye donation and factors affecting in an adult population of northern India. METHODS: 550 Subjects who accompanied patients atten...

  14. Safe havens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Eleven safe havens exist in Europe providing offshore banking and low taxes. Ten of these states are very small while Switzerland is moderately small. All 11 countries are richer than their large neighbors. It is shown that causality is from small to safe haven to wealth, and that theoretically...... equilibriums are likely to exist where a certain regulation is substantially lower in a small country than in its big neighbor. This generates a large capital inflow to the safe havens. The pool of funds that may reach the safe havens is shown to be huge. It is far in excess of the absorptive capacity of the...... safe havens, but it still explains, why they are rich. Microstates offer a veil of anonymity to funds passing through, and Switzerland offers safe storage of funds....

  15. 76 FR 18631 - National Donate Life Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... organ and tissue donation. More than 110,000 individuals are now on the national waiting list for organ... the decision to be an organ and tissue donor. I encourage all Americans to say yes to donation by... considering organ donation, Americans should consult their family members, doctor, or faith leader about...

  16. 78 FR 20217 - National Donate Life Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... commitment to one another. During National Donate Life Month, we renew the call for organ and tissue donation... the facts about organ and tissue donation, consider signing up for their State's registry, and talk to... hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-07921 Filed 4-3-13; 8:45 am] Billing...

  17. Tainted blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleuran, Ida; Sheikh, Zainab Afshan; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    study of the historical rise and current workings of safety practices in the Danish blood system. Here, we identify a strong focus on contamination in order to avoid 'tainted blood', at the expense of working with risks that could be avoided through enhanced blood monitoring practices. Of further...... significance to this focus are the social dynamics found at the heart of safety practices aimed at avoiding contamination. We argue that such dynamics need more attention, in order to achieve good health outcomes in transfusion medicine. Thus, we conclude that, to ensure continuously safe blood systems, we...... need to move beyond the bifurcation of the social and medical aspects of blood supply as two separate issues and approach social dynamics as key medical safety questions....

  18. Wisconsin's Donated Food Distribution Program Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Bureau for Food and Nutrition Services.

    This handbook describes the following aspects of the operation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Donated Food Distribution Program in Wisconsin: (1) who can participate; (2) how Wisconsin gets commodities; (3) what types of commodities are available; (4) distribution and billing procedures; (5) commodity storage; (6) commodity processing; (7)…

  19. Gamete donation: ethical implications for donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenfield, Francoise

    1999-01-01

    The interests of gamete donors have only recently been recognized in assisted reproduction; traditionally, the interests of the patients (typically a couple) and the prospective child are paramount. However, assisted reproduction would not be possible without donors, and the simple utilitarian view would be to place their interests first to maximize the availability of the practice. There are several ethical issues on both sides of the donor--recipient equation, some of which are mutual and others are in conflict. For example, the word 'donation' implies there is no payment. Informed consent for donation is essential if the autonomy of the donor is to be respected, and includes information about the results of screening. This is a sensitive issue, especially when pathology is found in a donor who is not being screened for his or her own immediate benefit. Counselling may result in donors refusing to take part, but may also lead to selection by the person recruiting the donors, sometimes as a consequence of examining the motivation of the donor. In this case, the main problem is the ethical basis of the selection process. Other aspects of gamete donation may lead to a conflict of interests between the donor, the recipients and even the prospective child, particularly in terms of anonymity and the information that is made available about the specific circumstances of donation. Implications and support counselling are essential tools in achieving an acceptable balance for all parties involved. PMID:11844334

  20. [Basic ethical aspects of living organ donation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, E; Mayer, J

    2003-06-01

    A characteristic feature of transplanting organs from living donors is that not only patients in need for treatment but also healthy individuals are submitted to medical interventions. Ethical considerations in this field have to deal with the question of property attributes of the human body and conflicts with traditional medical principles. Altruistic organ donation, appreciated by Christianity as a sign of charity, is indeed contradictory to the classic maxim of medical ethics "primum nihil nocere, " meaning "first of all, do not harm." The autonomous choice of a potential donor has to be balanced thoroughly against his personal physical and psychological risks. Apart from organ donation with altruistic motives, commercial incentives or payment for organ donation, which are increasingly under discussion in many nations, need profound ethical reflection. Organ selling does not lead to long-term economic benefit for individual donors in developing countries and is associated with a decline in health. A market system of organ sales would foster exploitation of the poor, and it is substantially doubtful whether autonomy and self determination are valid under circumstances of poverty and coercion. Commodification of the human body risks viewing persons as marketable objects. The human body,however, is an integral element of an individual's personality and not a resource to be removed. It is therefore fundamental that the social good of altruism is preserved as the major principle in organ donation. PMID:12883802

  1. Personality and motivation for body donation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, Sophie; Eisinga, Rob; Venbrux, Eric; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Gerrits, Peter O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examines the relationship between motivation for body donation to science and personality characteristics using a body donor survey (N = 759) conducted by the University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG) in The Netherlands. The survey expands on anthropological studies that sugg

  2. Normative consent and organ donation: a vindication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Ben

    2011-06-01

    In an earlier article, I argued that David Estlund's notion of 'normative consent' could provide justification for an opt-out system of organ donation that does not involve presumptions about the deceased donor's consent. Where it would be wrong of someone to refuse their consent, then the fact that they have not actually given it is irrelevant, though an explicit denial of consent (as in opting out) may still be binding. My argument has recently been criticised by Potts et al, who argue that such a policy would involve taking organs from people whose organs should not be taken and would be a recipe for totalitarianism. The present response seeks to rebut both the ethical and political objections. I argue that people can indeed be under a moral obligation to donate their organs, even if they are not technically dead at the time and their donation does not save anyone else's life. Moreover, I argue that an opt-out system-unlike mandatory donation-is not totalitarian because it preserves the right of individuals to act morally wrongly, by opting out when they have no good moral reason to do so. The policy I propose is neither immoral nor totalitarian. PMID:21429959

  3. National Organ and Tissue Donation Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wisconsin Wyoming Go Sign Up to be an Organ Donor By registering to become an organ donor, one person may save the lives of up ... Human Services organdonor.gov U.S. Government Information on Organ Donation and Transplantation ... You've selected to sign up in the a state state donor registry Online registration happens on a state level. ...

  4. Donation after cardio-circulatory death liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hieu Le Dinh; Arnaud de Roover; Abdour Kaba; Séverine Lauwick; Jean Joris; Jean Delwaide; Pierre Honoré

    2012-01-01

    The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ supply and following the request of potential DCD families.Since then,DCD organ procurement and transplantation activities have rapidly expanded,particularly for nonvital organs,like kidneys.In liver transplantation (LT),DCD donors are a valuable organ source that helps to decrease the mortality rate on the waiting lists and to increase the availability of organs for transplantation despite a higher risk of early graft dysfunction,more frequent vascular and ischemia-type biliary lesions,higher rates of re-listing and re-transplantation and lower graft survival,which are obviously due to the inevitable warm ischemia occurring during the declaration of death and organ retrieval process.Experimental strategies intervening in both donors and recipients at different phases of the transplantation process have focused on the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury and already gained encouraging results,and some of them have found their way from pre-clinical success into clinical reality.The future of DCD-LT is promising.Concerted efforts should concentrate on the identification of suitable donors (probably Maastricht category Ⅲ DCD donors),better donor and recipient matching (high risk donors to low risk recipients),use of advanced organ preservation techniques (oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion,normothermic machine perfusion,venous systemic oxygen persufflation),and pharmacological modulation (probably a multi-factorial biologic modulation strategy) so that DCD liver allografts could be safely utilized and attain equivalent results as DBD-LT.

  5. Infectivity of blood products from donors with occult hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allain, Jean-Pierre; Mihaljevic, Ivanka; Gonzalez-Fraile, Maria Isabel;

    2013-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is identified in 1:1000 to 1:50,000 European blood donations. This study intended to determine the infectivity of blood products from OBI donors.......Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is identified in 1:1000 to 1:50,000 European blood donations. This study intended to determine the infectivity of blood products from OBI donors....

  6. Changes in electrolytes and blood gas after transfusion of irradiated MAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to investigate the changes in recipient serum electrolytes and arterial blood gas after irradiated blood transfusion. We measured electrolytes and arterial blood gas before and after the transfusion during elective surgery in 55 patients. The mean blood loss was 1,477 g and the mean transfused blood unit of irradiated Mannitol-Adenine-Phosphate (MAP) was 5.9 units. Potassium concentration increased from 3.8 to 4.2 mEq·l-1. A total of 187 units, which had been stored for 12.3±3.5 days after donation and for 5.1±3.8 days after irradiation, was used. There was a significant correlation between the storage period from the day of irradiation and the potassium concentration of the supernatant (r=0.56, p<0.0001). This study recommends that a safe transfusion rate of irradiated blood should be determined because the high potassium concentration of irradiated blood may lead to lethal complications in case of rapid transfusion. (author)

  7. Changes in electrolytes and blood gas after transfusion of irradiated MAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyao, Hideki; Katayama, Akinori; Okamoto, Yumi; Koyama, Kaoru; Kawasaki, Jun; Kawazoe, Taro [Saitama Medical School, Kawagoe (Japan). Saitama Medical Center

    2001-09-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the changes in recipient serum electrolytes and arterial blood gas after irradiated blood transfusion. We measured electrolytes and arterial blood gas before and after the transfusion during elective surgery in 55 patients. The mean blood loss was 1,477 g and the mean transfused blood unit of irradiated Mannitol-Adenine-Phosphate (MAP) was 5.9 units. Potassium concentration increased from 3.8 to 4.2 mEq{center_dot}l{sup -1}. A total of 187 units, which had been stored for 12.3{+-}3.5 days after donation and for 5.1{+-}3.8 days after irradiation, was used. There was a significant correlation between the storage period from the day of irradiation and the potassium concentration of the supernatant (r=0.56, p<0.0001). This study recommends that a safe transfusion rate of irradiated blood should be determined because the high potassium concentration of irradiated blood may lead to lethal complications in case of rapid transfusion. (author)

  8. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) ... Medicine Clinics 225,676 views 6:18 Alicia's bone marrow donation - Duration: 8:33. ... Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 15:50. Dartmouth-Hitchcock 2,764 views ...

  10. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  11. Radioimmunoassay of serum β2-microglobulin in donor's blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serum β2-microglobulin (β2-MG) was tested by radioimmunoassay in 149 donors' and 54 healthy volunteers' blood. The results were 203 +- 33.0 nmol/l and 176 +- 26.2 nmol/l, respectively. There was significant difference statistically between them (P2-MG content. In order to increase the quality of donated blood and to keep the health of blood donor, it is suggested that the high content of serum β2-MG is the indicator of too frequent blood donating. The results also showed that the content of β2-MG in donor's blood is not a normal reference value

  12. A move to presumed consent would increase the number of organ donors and their willingness to donate

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-i-Font, Joan; Rudisill, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    According to NHS Blood and Transplant, there are over 10,000 people in the UK that are in need of an organ transplant, with many often waiting for years for an organ to become available. Looking at organ donation rates across 22 countries, Joan Costa Font and Caroline Rudisill have found that those countries that have ‘opt-out’ legislation have higher rates of organ donation. Moving to such a system in the UK would lead to health and quality of life benefits for both the organ recipient and f...

  13. Blood transfusion economics in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriopoulos, J E; Michail-Merianou, V; Gitona, M

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the organizational structure and the economic impact of blood donation and transfusion in Greece and discusses some alternative aspects of its financing and its costing policy. The cost of blood transfusion is rising in Greece and amounts to nearly 15 billion drachmas per year due to the constant increase in demand and consequently, the price of each unit of blood. The production and distribution of blood on national scale involves meeting the demand for 500.000 units. Blood is mostly given by the friends and relatives of patients (55%) and by voluntary blood donation (30%). Approximately 50% of the blood produced is used in surgery, 20% for cases of beta-thalassaemia, 10% for emergencies and 20% for internal medicine cases. The blood transfusion system is totally funded by the state budget and the value to users is free of charge. The way in which blood is collected and processed differs from one geographical area to another and the unit cost depends on the size of the department concerned, ranging from 60-150 $. The need to control costs and restrain expenditure, in conjunction with guarantees of sufficiency and quality, makes it essential that measures should be taken to introduce economies of scale and encourage competition among blood providers, for increased production, components preparation and rational usage of blood. The introduction of a costing policy becomes necessary in this effort to achieve cost-containment techniques. PMID:8581182

  14. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... twice as bad. Woman: Alright, that's for high blood pressure. Doctor: Okay. Woman: I take a half ... we can't feel, so people with high blood pressure--we really can't feel that, and ...

  15. [How Much Blood and What Components does the Patient need Intra- and Perioperatively?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, M U; Meyer, F

    2016-02-01

    By the optimised availability of less expensive and safe red cell packs and other blood products over the last 20 years, numerous surgical interventions have become possible without any demand for comments on the precise need. However, a number of publications indicates that blood transfusion may also induce disadvantageous effects on the postoperative course by immunomodulation, which requires a rather restrictive indication for transfusion. Furthermore, demographic development leads to a decrease in that portion of the population with the potential for blood donation accompanied simultaneously by an increase of the percentage of older patients with more need of blood products during medical treatment. This makes blood-sparing measures necessary. In addition, costs for red cell packs have increased, in particular, for the generally compatible blood group 0 - an extra amount for rhesus negative blood. The present narrative review highlights, therefore, important news from the clinical transfusion medicine, immunohaematology and haemostaseology and their impact on daily transfusion practice. In this context, "blood management" is considered as one of the very effective blood-sparing measures, which focusses especially i) on the substitution of iron in case of depressed preoperative haemoglobin as well as ii) to elucidate disorders of coagulation by structured medical history and, subsequently, to balance possible need by a specific plan for substitution. Simultaneously, prospective studies are initiated to investigate how far the transfusion trigger of a patient can be lowered down to a still appropriate level. As far as consolidated findings are already available, they are described with regard to the single blood components and taking into account the cross-sectional guidelines of the "Bundesärztekammer" (Federal Physicians Chamber). Finally, initial evidence is provided characterising patient- and blood donor-specific, blood group-dependent features of a

  16. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  17. Umbilical cord blood: a guide for primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul L; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Hesse, Brett

    2011-09-15

    Umbilical cord blood stem cell transplants are used to treat a variety of oncologic, genetic, hematologic, and immunodeficiency disorders. Physicians have an important role in educating, counseling, and offering umbilical cord blood donation and storage options to patients. Parents may donate their infant's cord blood to a public bank, pay to store it in a private bank, or have it discarded. The federal government and many state governments have passed laws and issued regulations regarding umbilical cord blood, and some states require physicians to discuss cord blood options with pregnant women. Five prominent medical organizations have published recommendations about cord blood donation and storage. Current guidelines recommend donation of umbilical cord blood to public banks when possible, or storage through the Related Donor Cord Blood Program when a sibling has a disease that may require a stem cell transplant. Experts do not currently recommend private banking for unidentified possible future use. Step-by-step guidance and electronic resources are available to physicians whose patients are considering saving or donating their infant's umbilical cord blood. PMID:21916391

  18. Rising trends of HCV infection over a period of 4 years among blood donors in central India: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to find out the sero-prevalence of Hepatitis C infection among blood donors. Materials and Methods: All collected blood bags were screened for anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies (HCV Ab; MicroELISA 3rd generation, J. Mitra during the study period of 4 years and data were analyzed. Results: A total of 28621 blood donors were screened for transfusion transmissible infections (TTIs in which 80 donors were positive for Hepatitis C infection, constituted 11% of total sero-reactive donors. In 2009, only 10 cases were sero-reactive while in 2012, 36 cases were sero-reactive for Hepatitis C infection. Conclusions: Hepatitis C infection among blood donors are in rising trends in this study area. Voluntary donors are safer than replacement donors as they have very low sero-prevalence. As these blood donors represent the highly selective community of a general population in most of the countries. So the actual sero-prevalence of hepatitis C infection may be more in the general population. Promoting HCV screening, voluntary blood donation, diagnosis and treatment among blood donors are very important measures to control the transmission of HCV infection, decrease sero-reactive cases and ensure safe blood collection.

  19. Defining embryo donation: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Building families through the adoption of children has been supported by human society throughout history. The ethical appropriateness of patients donating embryos to other patients for family building, or for research, is well established and is affirmed by this Committee. The use of the term ''adoption'' for embryos is inaccurate and should be avoided. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee statement by the same name, last published in 2013 (Fertil Steril 2013;99:1846-7). PMID:27001380

  20. Directed donation and ownership of human organs.

    OpenAIRE

    Pattinson, Shaun D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of donation of organs from deceased donors for transplantation into a specified recipient. It argues that proper account should be taken of the principles underlying the Human Tissue Act 2004, which grant the donor a form of proprietary control. Three hypothetical scenarios are then used to draw out the implications of these principles for existing regulatory policy and the common law response to excised human organs. The paper concludes that the law should be un...

  1. Donate Food to Free Your Boss | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the third year in a row, NCI at Frederick is participating in the Feds Feed Families campaign, which aims to stock food banks during the summer when donations are often limited. The 2016 campaign runs through August 31. This year, the Office of Scientific Operations (OSO) has decided to send the campaign off with a twist. Rich Folkers, public affairs specialist, Office of Scientific Operations, came up with the idea for a "lock-in" event.

  2. Assessing Acceptability of Short Message Service Based Interventions towards Becoming Future Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All blood bank services, especially those of developing countries, face a major shortfall of blood donations due to lack of voluntary blood donors. Our study aims to evaluate the acceptability of Short Message Service based interventions towards becoming voluntary blood donors among medical university students of Karachi, Pakistan. Methods. A total of 350 medical students were approached in medical universities of Karachi, Pakistan, using a nonprobability convenient sampling technique. Data collectors administered a self-made questionnaire to each participant using an interview based format. All data was recorded and analyzed on SPSS 16. Results. 350 participants, having a mean age of 21.47 ± 1.36, were included in our study with 30.6% (107/350 being males and 69.4% (243/350 being females. 93.4% (327/350 of participants agreed that donating blood was healthy, but only 26% had donated blood in the past with 79.1% donating voluntarily. 65.7% (230/350 of the participants agreed to take part in Short Message Service based behavioral interventions to become voluntary blood donors with 69.7% (244/350 also agreeing that Short Message Service reminders will promote them to donate blood more often. Conclusion. With university students willing to become voluntary blood donors, Pakistani blood banks can carry out Short Message Service based interventions to encourage them to donate blood.

  3. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... take medicine safely, people can vastly lower the quality of their lives and in some extreme cases, ... the other one standing on my head, you know, it really gets to be difficult. Announcer: Some ...

  4. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or eating breakfast. By communicating with our health care providers and by accepting a greater responsibility in our own health care, we can learn to take our medicines safely.

  5. Removing Hair Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Removing Hair Safely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... methods of hair removal. back to top Laser Hair Removal In this method, a laser destroys hair ...

  6. The first safe country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaela Puggioni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dublin II Regulation makes the first safe country of refuge solelyresponsible for refugees and asylum seekers. In the case of Italy, thefirst responsible country has not been acting responsibly.

  7. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or eating breakfast. By communicating with our health care providers and by accepting a greater responsibility in our own health care, we can learn to take our medicines safely.

  8. Safe Kids Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kids safe around water Get the facts Text Camping Checklist 7 things to consider before the adventure ... Age Safety by Risk Safety Issues Get Your Car Seat Checked Safety Tips Safety Laws Tools For ...

  9. Can donated media placements reach intended audiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer; Polonec, Lindsey

    2013-09-01

    Donated media placements for public service announcements (PSAs) can be difficult to secure, and may not always reach intended audiences. Strategies used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) to obtain donated media placements include producing a diverse mix of high-quality PSAs, co-branding with state and tribal health agencies, securing celebrity involvement, monitoring media trends to identify new distribution opportunities, and strategically timing the release of PSAs. To investigate open-ended recall of PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, CDC conducted 12 focus groups in three U.S. cities with men and women either nearing age 50 years, when screening is recommended to begin, or aged 50-75 years who were not in compliance with screening guidelines. In most focus groups, multiple participants recalled exposure to PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, and most of these individuals reported having seen SFL PSAs on television, in transit stations, or on the sides of public buses. Some participants reported exposure to SFL PSAs without prompting from the moderator, as they explained how they learned about the disease. Several participants reported learning key campaign messages from PSAs, including that colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 years and screening can find polyps so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Donated media placements can reach and educate mass audiences, including millions of U.S. adults who have not been screened appropriately for colorectal cancer. PMID:23720533

  10. Stay Safe Programme

    OpenAIRE

    MacIntyre, Deirdre; Carr, Alan.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. This child abuse prevention study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Stay Safe Programme in training unscreened 7 and 10 year old children in personal safety skills. Subsidiary aims were to evaluate the programme's impact on children's self-esteem and parents' and teachers' knowledge and attitudes of relevance to child abuse and protection. Method. Changes in safety knowledge and skills and self-esteem of 339 children who participated in the Stay Safe Program...

  11. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Sannino, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter interactions according to which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the interaction strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies towards a finite constant value of the coupling. The net effect is to partially offset direct detection constraints without affecting thermal freeze-out at higher energies. High-energy collider and indirect annihilation searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter.

  12. Selling blood and gametes during tough economic times: insights from Google search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jonathan A.; Ngo, Tin C.; Rothman, Cathy; Breyer, Benjamin; Eisenberg, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To use Google Insights search volume and publicly available economic indicators to test the hypothesis that sperm, egg, and blood donations increase during economic downturns and to demonstrate the feasibility of using Google search volume data to predict national trends in actual sperm, egg, and blood donations rates. Materials and methods Cross-correlation statistical analysis comparing Google search data for terms relating to blood, egg, and sperm donations with various economic indicators including the S&P 500 closing values, gross domestic product (GDP), the U.S. Index of Leading Indicators (U.S. Leading Index), gross savings rate, mortgage interest rates, unemployment rate, and consumer price index (CPI) from 2004–2011. A secondary analysis determined the Pearson correlation coefficient between Google search data with actual sperm, egg, and blood donation volume in the U.S. as measured by California Cryobank, the National Assisted Reproductive Technology Surveillance System, and the National Blood Collection and Utilization Survey, respectively. Significance of cross-correlation and Pearson correlation analysis as indicated by p value. Results There were several highly significant cross-correlation relationships between search volume and various economic indicators. Correlation between Google search volume for the term “sperm donation,” “egg donation,” and “blood donation” with actual number of sperm, egg and blood donations in the United States demonstrated Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.2 (p > 0.10), −0.1 (p > 0.10), and 0.07 (p > 0.10), respectively. Temporal analysis showed an improved correlation coefficient of 0.9 (p economic downturns. This finding suggests gamete and bodily fluid donations are influenced by market forces like other commodities. Google search may be useful for predicting blood donation trends but is more limited in predicting actual semen and oocyte donation patterns. PMID:26432967

  13. Awareness of Cornea Donation of Registered Tissue Donors in Nanjing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Chu; Lin-nong Wang; Hao Yu; Ru-yang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the current cornea donation awareness of tissue donors in the city of Nanjing,China. Methods Altogether 2000 registered tissue donors in the Red Cross Eye Bank of Nanjing by the end of 2010 and 2000 control residents of Nanjing in February to June 2011 were randomly selected to par-ticipate in our field questionnaire survey. The questionnaire consisted of questions regarding the understand-ing of cornea donation,the attitude toward cornea donation,and attitude toward legislation and free dona-tion. The awareness of cornea donation between the registered tissue donors and residents was compared. Related factors of the willingness to donate corneas and to become a tissue donor were evaluated with uni-variate and multiple logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 1867 (response rate: 93.4%) tissue donors and 1796 (response rate: 89.8%; ef-fective questionnaires: 1697) residents participated in this survey. For the questions about the knowledge of cornea donation,90.3% tissue donors (residents: 78.9%) knew that donated corneas could be used for transplantations; 71.2% tissue donors (residents: 47.6%) knew that the appearance would not be destroyed after cornea donation; 70.7% tissue donors (residents: 20.0%) knew the formalities to become a cornea do-nor. For attitude toward cornea donation,82.2% tissue donors (residents: 45.1%) were willing to donate corneas or eyeballs after death; 84.0% tissue donors (residents: 30.2%) had discussed with their families about donation; 85.1% tissue donors (residents: 24.8%) supported their families' or friends' cornea donation. For attitude toward legislation and free donation,88.3% tissue donors (residents: 61.3%) approved of legis-lation to regular cornea donation; 72.2% tissue donors (residents: 38.8%) thought that cornea or organ do-nation should be gratis. The difference between two groups was significant (P<0.001). However,some tissue donors did not know cornea donation well,some even opposed the

  14. Individuals' decision to co-donate or donate alone: an archival study of married whole body donors in Hawaii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Anteby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cadavers are crucial to numerous aspects of health care, including initial and continuing training of medical doctors and advancement of medical research. Concerns have periodically been raised about the limited number of whole body donations. Little is known, however, about a unique form of donation, namely co-donations or instances when married individuals decide to register at the same time as their spouse as whole body donors. Our study aims to determine the extent of whole body co-donation and individual factors that might influence co-donation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We reviewed all records of registrants to the University of Hawaii Medical School's whole body donation program from 1967 through 2006 to identify married registrants. We then examined the 806 married individuals' characteristics to understand their decision to register alone or with their spouse. We found that married individuals who registered at the same time as their spouse accounted for 38.2 percent of married registrants. Sex differences provided an initial lens to understand co-donation. Wives were more likely to co-donate than to register alone (p = 0.002. Moreover, registrants' main occupational background had a significant effect on co-donations (p = 0.001. Married registrants (regardless of sex in female-gendered occupations were more likely to co-donate than to donate alone (p = 0.014. Female-gendered occupations were defined as ones in which women represented more than 55 percent of the workforce (e.g., preschool teachers. Thus, variations in donors' occupational backgrounds explained co-donation above and beyond sex differences. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to secure whole body donations have historically focused on individual donations regardless of donors' marital status. More attention needs to be paid, however, to co-donations since they represent a non-trivial number of total donations. Also, targeted outreach efforts to male and female members of

  15. The evaluation of blood donor deferral causes in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, N.; Khoza, S.; Van Hulst, M.; Postma, M.J.; Mvere, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Donor selection is one of the first steps in blood donation aimed at improving the safety of blood and blood products. It is the only line of protection for donors and against certain infections for which testing is not performed. There is paucity of published data on reasons for donor d

  16. Blood safety measures and the role of central blood institute in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenji Tadokoro

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Japanese Blood Programme Japanese Red Cross Blood Service is the sole conductor of blood service in Japan. It collects 5.3 million volun-tary non-remunerated donations from 127 million popu-lations and distributes 18 million units ( one unit = 200 ml,2 million Liter) blood matching the medical needs.A part of plasma is supplied to the JRCBS fractionation center and other 3 commercial manufacturers for pro-duction of plasma derivatives.

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Bukurije Zhubi; Zana Baruti-Gafurri; Ymer Mekaj; Mimoza Zhubi; Idriz Merovci; Iliriane Bunjaku; Valdete Topciu; Emine Devoli-Disha

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzym...

  18. Improving health profile of blood donors as a consequence of transfusion safety efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Tran, Trung Nam; Hjalgrim, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    ,110,329 blood donors were followed for up to 35 years from first computer-registered blood donation to death, emigration, or December 31, 2002. Standardized mortality and incidence ratios expressed relative risk of death and cancer comparing blood donors to the general population. RESULTS: Blood donors had an...... selection criteria for blood donation. Blood donors recruited in more recent years exhibited a lower relative mortality than those who started earlier. CONCLUSION: Blood donors enjoy better than average health. Explicit and informal requirements for blood donation in Scandinavia, although mostly of a simple......BACKGROUND: Transfusion safety rests heavily on the health of blood donors. Although they are perceived as being healthier than average, little is known about their long-term disease patterns and to which extent the blood banks' continuous efforts to optimize donor selection has resulted in...

  19. DETERMINANTS OF KNOWLEDGE AND MOTIVATION TOWARDS ORGAN DONATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Shortage of organs is a global problem in which Asia lags behind the rest of the world. A huge gap exists between patients who need organ transplants and potential donors. The organ donation rate from dead bodies in India is estimated to be a minuscule 0.05 per million people. There are various barriers which prevent people from donating organs to the needy. Socio-cultural barriers are one among them where in lack of awareness and motivation to donate organs are important determinants. OBJECTIVES: 1 To study the determinants of knowledge regarding organ donation and motivation to donate organs in a selected student population in Bellary and 2 To find independent predictors of knowledge levels and motivation towards organ donation. METHODOLOGY: A cross sectional survey was conducted in a setting of degree colleges of Bellary city. A stratified random sampling technique was adopted to select the colleges and students within the sections. Information was collected using face to face interviews based on a structured, pre-tested questionnaire. Data were entered into an electronic database and analysis was done to ascertain the determinants of knowledge levels and motivation of organ donation using SPSS version 16.0.1 (SPSS, 2007. RESULTS: In this study 125 students (43% achieved an adequate knowledge score for Organ Donation, The field of education; income group and region from which they hail were found to have a significant association with knowledge scores of organ donation. In this study 125 students (43% people expressed a high motivation to donate. Higher the age group, Perceived allowance of organ donation in religion and the adequate knowledge levels were significantly associated with the motivation to donate. By multi-logistic regression, type of branch chosen in education emerged as significant independent predictor of knowledge status of respondents and higher the age group, adequate knowledge scores and perceived allowance of organ

  20. Addressing Consent Issues in Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Kim J; Weinstein, Michael S; Fiester, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Given the widening gap between the number of individuals on transplant waiting lists and the availability of donated organs, as well as the recent plateau in donations based on neurological criteria (i.e., brain death), there has been a growing interest in expanding donation after circulatory determination of death. While the prevalence of this form of organ donation continues to increase, many thorny ethical issues remain, often creating moral distress in both clinicians and families. In this article, we address one of these issues, namely, the challenges surrounding patient and surrogate informed consent for donation after circulatory determination of death. First we discuss several general concerns regarding consent related to this form of organ donation, and then we address additional issues that are unique to three different patient categories: adult patients with medical decision-making capacity or potential capacity, adult patients who lack capacity, and pediatric patients. PMID:26225503

  1. Organ donation, policy and legislation: With special reference to the Dutch organ Donation Act

    OpenAIRE

    Coppen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Next of kin decisive on organ donation Changing the donor registration systems is not expected to result in more donor organs. We better try to solve the bottlenecks in the donation process within hospitals and to reduce the number of refusals by next of kin, as NIVEL research shows, based on which study Remco Coppen took his doctor’s degree on 3 September at Tranzo, Tilburg university in the Netherlands In the Netherlands, about 1300 people are on the waiting list for a donor organ, but ther...

  2. The Science and Social Necessity of Deceased Organ Donation

    OpenAIRE

    Francis L. Delmonico

    2011-01-01

    Successful deceased organ donation requires a reproducible – consistent (scientific) system that evaluates the potential for organ donation and determines objectively whether the national system is achieving its goals. The science of organ donation also pertains to the determination of death. We are a common humanity that dies similarly – a humanity whose ultimate criterion of life resides in the function of the human brain. The recent brain death law of Israel encouragingly enables a determi...

  3. Psychosocial variables associated with willingness to donate organs.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, R.S.; Shepherd, C H

    1989-01-01

    Questionnaires were administered to 108 university psychology students to investigate attitudes and behaviour related to organ donation. Three groups (committed, uncommitted and opposed) were identified. A multivariate analysis of variance showed that, compared with uncommitted donors, committed donors felt better informed about organ donation, had discussed donation more often with family members and knew more people who had signed donor cards. The subjects in the opposed group and those in ...

  4. Medical students′ perception on eye donation in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Meghachandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneal transplantation remains a major treatment option for restoring sight among those suffering from corneal blindness. The number of corneal transplants done is far less than the actual requirement in India. This is largely due to the inadequate numbers of corneas collected. Medical students can be involved in the motivation of patients and relatives to pledge their eyes and to do grief counseling for donating eyes. The aim of the study was to assess the perception and willingness of 180 first-year medical students towards eye donation in Delhi. They were administered a pretested semi-structured questionnaire on eye donation. Data were analyzed using Epi-Info software package 6.04 version. The majority (99.4% of students knew that eyes can be donated after death but only 41.1% knew that the ideal time of donation was within six hours of death. Most participants (87.2% were willing to donate eyes. Nobility in the act of eye donation was the main motivational force for eye donation according to 85.5% of students. Perceived reasons for not pledging eyes by the people were: lack of awareness (32.7%, objection by family members (27.7%, unsuitability to donate because of health problem (17.7% and the unacceptable idea to separate the eye from the body (15.5%. Mass media such as television, newspapers, magazines and posters were important sources of information on eye donation. Perceived reasons for not donating eyes need to be considered while creating awareness about eye donation in the community.

  5. The Safe Lambda Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, William

    2009-01-01

    Safety is a syntactic condition of higher-order grammars that constrains occurrences of variables in the production rules according to their type-theoretic order. In this paper, we introduce the safe lambda calculus, which is obtained by transposing (and generalizing) the safety condition to the setting of the simply-typed lambda calculus. In contrast to the original definition of safety, our calculus does not constrain types (to be homogeneous). We show that in the safe lambda calculus, there is no need to rename bound variables when performing substitution, as variable capture is guaranteed not to happen. We also propose an adequate notion of beta-reduction that preserves safety. In the same vein as Schwichtenberg's 1976 characterization of the simply-typed lambda calculus, we show that the numeric functions representable in the safe lambda calculus are exactly the multivariate polynomials; thus conditional is not definable. We also give a characterization of representable word functions. We then study the ...

  6. Altruism and reward: motivational compatibility in deceased organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voo, Teck Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Acts of helping others are often based on mixed motivations. Based on this claim, it has been argued that the use of a financial reward to incentivize organ donation is compatible with promoting altruism in organ donation. In its report Human Bodies: Donation for Medicine and Research, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics uses this argument to justify its suggestion to pilot a funeral payment scheme to incentivize people to register for deceased organ donation in the UK. In this article, I cast a sceptical eye on the above Nuffield report's argument that its proposed funeral payment scheme would prompt deceased organ donations that remain altruistic (as defined by and valued the report). Specifically, I illustrate how this scheme may prompt various forms of mixed motivations which would not satisfy the report's definition of altruism. Insofar as the scheme produces an expectation of the reward, it stands diametrical to promoting an 'altruistic perspective'. My minimal goal in this article is to argue that altruism is not motivationally compatible with reward as an incentive for donation. My broader goal is to argue that if a financial reward is used to incentivize organ donation, then we should recognize that the donation system is no longer aiming to promote altruism. Rewarded donation would not be altruistic but it may be ethical given a persistent organ shortage situation. PMID:24547770

  7. EYE DONATION: PERCEPTION AND PROMOTING FACTORS AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Singh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are 2 million corneal blind in India with a big gap between corneal demand and supply. The Govt. of Haryana by launching Nehru Drishti Yojna has taken a big step to eliminate corneal blindness from Haryana. Medical students are from a different educational background with a scientific base and thus have a pivotal role play in becoming as role models and mass educators. Objective: To assess the perception of medical students regarding eye donation. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among medical students of MMIMSR, Mullana, Ambala. A pretested, semi-structured questionnaire was used for collecting the necessary information after getting informed consent. The data was statistically analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 software. Results: 96% of the students knew about corneal donation though only 67% were willing for eye donation. Nobility was the major inspiring force for eye donation.13% reported, objection by family and 3.2% reported religious factors as restrictions for eye donation. There were many misconceptions regarding eye donation.27% thought that eye donation would result in delay in funeral arrangements. Conclusion: There is an imperative need to emphasize undergraduate teaching to evade myths concerning eye donation and promote eye donation.

  8. What Is Being Done to Increase Organ Donation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuher, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The need for organs greatly outnumbers the amount of organs donated for transplantation. This is true for all countries around the world. Many organizations globally have been created to solve this problem. Spain has been very successful with its drive to increase organ donation. Educational campaigns are a great tool being utilized by all countries and the medical communities to promote a positive perception of organ donation. These campaigns include using the television industry, raising money for travel expenses, and education seminars. This article looks at the different groups and programs aimed at increasing organ donation. PMID:27254645

  9. UK policy initiatives and the effect on increasing organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Bethany; Parkin, Matthew Sw

    Organ donation has developed since the Human Tissue Act 1961, and even since the Human Tissue Act 2004, which replaced it. Given the demand for organ transplants, there have been various attempts to increase the number of people on the Organ Donation Register, including awareness campaigns and celebrity endorsement. However, as the UK-wide strategy Taking Organ Transplantation to 2020 indicates, increasing the number of donations will require more than simply increasing the number of registered donors. This article reviews the changes in policies relating to organ donation and the associated issues. PMID:27019167

  10. Donation after cardiac death in abdominal organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, David J; Guy, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the field of donation after cardiac death, focusing on the history, ethicolegal issues, clinical outcomes, best practices, operative techniques, and emerging strategies to optimize utilization of this resource. Donation after cardiac death is one effective way to decrease the organ shortage and has contributed the largest recent increase in abdominal organ allografts. Currently, donation after cardiac death organs confer an increased risk of ischemic cholangiopathy after liver transplant and of delayed graft function after kidney transplant. As this field matures, risk factors for donation after cardiac death organ transplant will be further identified and clinical outcomes will improve as a result of protocol standardization and ongoing research. PMID:22678860

  11. Microbes and blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion medicine has been constantly evolving through the years with improved technologies that enhance the capability of identifying existing and newer emerging transfusion transmissible infections (TTI. In spite of the efforts made by blood banks the risk of TTI remains. This article deals with the various steps involved in ensuring blood safety, i.e. donor selection, role of screening donated blood for known and emerging infections, issues and assessment of threat posed by the risk, methodologies employed for testing and possible suggestions to improve transfusion services. While the threat of TTI remains, with a concerted effort of private and government organisations, and co-operation from the diagnostic companies, it is possible to raise the levels of blood safety. A surveillance system is also essential to identify any new agents that might pose a threat in a geographic area and to include them too in the screening process.

  12. Blood donor incentives: A step forward or backward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasemi Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic increase in blood usage and critical seasonal blood shortages are faced by various countries. Countries which previously reached 100% voluntary nonremunerated donation have been led to offer different kinds of incentives to recruit blood donors and meet their blood demands. In some cases, these incentives are considered monetary and are in complete contrast with International standards like World Health Organization (WHO. It seems that attitudes toward sole dependency on nonremunerated voluntary blood donation have been changed in recent years and experts in some developed countries are reevaluating partial reliance on paid donation. On the other hand, besides the effects of such incentives on blood safety, several economic and psychological studies have shown that incentives have discouraging effects on pro-social behaviors like blood donation and will reduce the number of blood donors in long term. With regard to the results of such studies, it seems that implementing incentive-based blood donor recruitment programs to meet blood requirements by some countries is becoming a challenge for blood banks.

  13. Laboratory and Genetic Assessment of Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Kiss, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Over 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the US. Between 200 to 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. This amount represents approximately 25% of the average iron stores in men and almost 75% of the iron stores in women. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion, especially in frequent blood donors (e. g., more than 2 times per year). In large epidemiologic s...

  14. [Which place for physicians in blood supply?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danic, B; Pelletier, B

    2013-05-01

    Historically, blood transfusion has been divised, enhanced and organized by physicians. The special status of blood led to ensure that collection of blood and its components were placed under the supervision of a physician. Throughout its history, blood transfusion organization in France has established an exclusive exercise of the collection of blood and its components entrusted to doctors, thus creating the concept of "medicine of donation". This view is changing, and programmed exercise of this activity by nurses led to question about this profession perimeter, its necessary evolution, and finally about the place of physicians in blood supply. PMID:23537956

  15. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... back twice as bad. Woman: Alright, that's for high blood pressure. Doctor: Okay. Woman: I take a half a ... that we can't feel, so people with high blood pressure--we really can't feel that, and so ...

  16. Take Your Medicines Safely

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... twice as bad. Woman: Alright, that's for high blood pressure. Doctor: Okay. Woman: I take a half a ... we can't feel, so people with high blood pressure--we really can't feel that, and so ...

  17. Improvements for international medicine donations: a review of the World Health Organization Guidelines for Medicine Donations, 3rd edition

    OpenAIRE

    Cañigueral-Vila, Nuria; Chen, Jennifer C.; Frenkel-Rorden, Lindsey; Laing, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Some humanitarian and development organizations respond to major natural disasters and emergencies by donating medicines. Many provide medicines on a routine basis to support health systems, particularly those run by Faith-Based Organizations. Although such donations can provide essential medicines to populations in great need, inappropriate donations also take place, with burdensome consequences. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed the interagency Guidelines for Medicine Donati...

  18. What's not wrong with conditional organ donation?

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, T

    2003-01-01

    In a well known British case, the relatives of a dead man consented to the use of his organs for transplant on the condition that they were transplanted only into white people. The British government condemned the acceptance of racist offers and the panel they set up to report on the case condemned all conditional offers of donation. The panel appealed to a principle of altruism and meeting the greatest need. This paper criticises their reasoning. The panel's argument does not show that condi...

  19. Organ donation: a significant marketing challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Roberta N

    2007-01-01

    Unlike most health care markets, the organ donation market is one where patients are the marketers, prospective donors are the customers, and no payment is allowed in the exchange process. The assumption that altruistic behavior by donors would satisfy the need for organs has proven woefully untrue. As a result, those needing organs have resorted to relying on unwilling or impoverished donors, to having to promote themselves on websites which have achieved success for only small numbers of patients, or to waiting for organs which they may never receive. This remains a still unsolved marketing challenge. PMID:19042535

  20. Future-safe Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Formosa, Saviour; Duca, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The above cutout could become a reality if a Category 3 storm lashes Malta with 178 to 208 km per hour winds. The chances are minimal but too probable to ignore, since 1995 a similar storm formed close to the Maltese Islands followed by others in 1996, 2006, 2011. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/future-safe-malta/

  1. Medications: Using Them Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the medicine should be taken with or without food how the medicine should be stored how long the medicine can be stored safely before it needs to be discarded common side effects or reactions interactions with other medications your child may be taking what happens if ...

  2. Keeping Food Safe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-27

    This CDC Kidtastics podcast discusses things kids and parents can do to help prevent illness by keeping food safe.  Created: 5/27/2009 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/27/2009.

  3. Safely Giving Birth

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2008-01-01

    In this column, the editor of the Journal of Perinatal Education discusses the growing challenge of assuring a safe birth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote, support, and protect normal birth.

  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fundraising & Local Events Matching Gift Fundraising Events Donate Stocks Give by Phone 1-800-DIABETES (800-342- ... Promotions that Give Back Donate Your Collectibles Donate Stocks About Us Who We Are Careers Contact Us ...

  5. Significance of irradiation of blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many reports of fatal GVHD occurring in non-immunocompromised patients after blood transfusion have been published in Japan. One explantation is that transfused lymphocytes were simulated and attack the recipient organs recognized as HLA incompatible. That is so called 'one-way matching'. To reduce the risk of post-transfusion GVHD, one of the most convenient methods is to irradiate the donated blood at an appropriate dose for inactivation of lymphocytes. Because no one knows about the late effect of irradiated blood, it is necessary to make the prospective safety control. (author)

  6. Defining the vital condition for organ donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamperetti Nereo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The issue of organ donation and of how the donor pool can or should be increased is one with significant practical, ethical and logistic implications. Here we comment on an article advocating a paradigm change in the so-called "dead donor rule". Such change would involve the societal and legal abandonment of the above rule and the introduction of mandated choice. In this commentary, we review some of the problems associated with the proposed changes as well as the problems associated with the current model. We emphasize the continuing problems with the definition of death and the physiological process of dying; we discuss the difficulties associated with a dichotomous view of death; we review the difficulties with non-beating heart donation and emphasize the current limitations of society's understanding of these complex issues. We conclude that public education remains the best approach and that such education should not be merely promotion of a particular ideology but honest debate of what is socially and morally acceptable and appropriate given the changes in vital organ support technology and the need to respect patient autonomy.

  7. Willingness to donate: an interview study before liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, M; Papachristou, C.; Danzer, G; Klapp, B; Frommer, J

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The introduction of the living donation in organ transplantation introduces important new psychological conflicts and ethical questions in the transplantation process. Operation related risks, as well as dependencies in the family structure, generate considerable pressure on potential donors. The aim of the study was to reconstruct the determinants of willingness to donate before transplantation.

  8. Attitudes to cadaveric organ donation in Irish preclinical medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin C

    2011-06-01

    There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation. It has been shown that the attitude of healthcare professionals can improve the rates of organ donation, and that educational programs aimed at improving both attitudes and knowledge base of professionals can have positive outcomes. Although there has been research carried out on this topic, there has been none in Ireland. Anatomy dissection can be a stressor to medical students-we investigate the attitudes of Irish students to organ donation and how they change with exposure to anatomy dissection. A questionnaire was administered to first year students in the School of Medicine in University College Dublin, Ireland, three times over a nine-week period at the commencement of classes in an academic year. The attitudes of the students were positive throughout regarding organ donation by a stranger, a family member, or themselves. There was, however, a significant decrease in support for the donation of a family member\\'s organs in a minority of students. Irish students\\' attitudes to postmortem organ donation are positive and are not changed by exposure to the dissecting room. There is support for the donation of organs, and willingness among students to donate their own organs and support donation by family members.

  9. 7 CFR 226.5 - Donation of commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Donation of commodities. 226.5 Section 226.5... of commodities. (a) USDA foods available under section 6 of this Act, section 416 of the Agricultural... the Department shall be made available to each State. (b) The value of such commodities donated...

  10. An Empirical Exploration of Selected Policy Options in Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenow, Daniel J.; Youngs, George A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Presents findings from a mail survey of 414 persons regarding organ transplantation and donation policy issues. Gauged three measures of support for organ donation: donor card commitment, required request of next-of-kin support, and weak presumed consent support. High levels of support exist for organ donor cards and the next-of-kin law. Little…

  11. Should We Be “Nudging” for Cadaveric Organ Donations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg

    2012-01-01

    Originaltitel: Getting the purpose of mandated choice wrong - Is Increasing Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs really what we want to nudge?......Originaltitel: Getting the purpose of mandated choice wrong - Is Increasing Supply of Donated Cadaver Organs really what we want to nudge?...

  12. Using Standardized Patients to Educate Medical Students about Organ Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Thomas Hugh; Anker, Ashley E.; Soriano, Rainier; Friedman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Medical students at Mount Sinai School of Medicine participated in an intervention designed to promote knowledge and improved communication skills related to cadaveric organ donation. The intervention required students to interact with a standardized patient for approximately 10 minutes and respond to questions posed about organ donation in a…

  13. 7 CFR 3015.53 - Valuation of donated services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Valuation of donated services. 3015.53 Section 3015....53 Valuation of donated services. (a) Volunteer services. Unpaid services provided to a recipient by... labor market. In either case, a reasonable amount for fringe benefits may be included in the...

  14. Voluntary Body Donation: The Gift that Lives on Forever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritha, S.; Rao, M. Vittoo; Sumangala; Supriya, G.; Kumar, Praveen

    2012-10-01

    Body donation is a gracious act, Shankarcharaya firmly believed in concept of Body Donation or Organ Donation and said Iddham sharirum paropakarum i.e. the body is for use of others and death is not the end, it is the beginning. Anatomy is important basic subject for medicalstudents, both U.G. & P.G. Best method of Anatomy learning is by dissection on human cadavers, which remains principle teaching tool. Human cadavers for purpose of study are a scarcity with mushrooming of medical institutions in this country. Unclaimed bodies are no more origin of cadavers. Whole Body donation is the need of the hour. A Voluntary Body Donation is defined as the act of giving oneís Body after death for Medical research and education. In this article a survey was done in S.V.S. Medical & Dental Colleges Faculty members and medical exhibition visitors which include lawyers, engineers, teachers and others during the year of 2010. The body donation including organ donation and various factors such as age, religion, culture and donorís attitude are discussed. Body donation provides the students and medical researchers with unparalleled opportunities to study the human body. Computers nor books cannot totally replace body dissection in learning the anatomy.

  15. Live Kidney Donation: a plea for the laparoscopic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.F.M. Kok (Niels)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn Chapter One we described the development of live kidney donation. Currently, live donor kidney transplantation is the best solution to attack the persistent organ shortage in the Western World. Because of this shortage live kidney donation is still interesting over fifty years afte

  16. Factors in enhancing blood safety by nucleic acid technology testing for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatakrishna Shyamala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades through an awareness of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI, a majority of countries have mandated serology based blood screening assays for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Hepatitis C virus (HCV, and Hepatitis B virus (HBV. However, despite improved serology assays, the transfusion transmission of HIV, HCV, and HBV continues, primarily due to release of serology negative units that are infectious because of the window period (WP and occult HBV infections (OBI. Effective mode of nucleic acid technology (NAT testing of the viruses can be used to minimize the risk of TTIs. This review compiles the examples of NAT testing failures for all three viruses; analyzes the causes for failure, and the suggestions from retrospective studies to minimize such failures. The results suggest the safest path to be individual donation testing (ID format for highest sensitivity, and detection of multiple regions for rapidly mutating and recombining viruses. The role of blood screening in the context of the donation and transfusion practices in India, the donor population, and the epidemiology is also discussed. World wide, as the public awareness of TTIs increases, as the recipient rights for safe blood are legally upheld, as the possibility to manage diseases such as hepatitis through expensive and prolonged treatment becomes accessible, and the societal responsibility to shoulder the health costs as in the case for HIV becomes routine, there is much to gain by preventing infections than treating diseases.

  17. Automated nucleic acid amplification testing in blood banks: An additional layer of blood safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Chigurupati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A total of 30 million blood components are transfused each year in India. Blood safety thus becomes a top priority, especially with a population of around 1.23 billion and a high prevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV in general population. Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT in blood donor screening has been implemented in many developed countries to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted viral infections (TTIs. NAT takes care of the dynamics of window period of viruses and offers the safest blood pack for donation. Aims: The aim of this study is to show the value of NAT in blood screening. Settings and Design: Dhanavantari Blood Bank, Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh, India. Subjects and Methods: Over a period of 1 year from January 2012 to December 2012, a total number of 15,000 blood donor samples were subjected to tests for HIV, HBV, and HCV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method and 8000 ELISA nonreactive samples were subjected for NAT using multiplex polymerase chain reaction technology. Results: Of the 15,000 donors tested, 525 were seroreactive. In 8000 ELISA negative blood samples subjected to NAT, 4 donor samples were reactive for HBV. The NAT yield was 1 in 2000. Conclusions: NAT could detect HIV, HBV, and HCV cases in blood donor samples those were undetected by serological tests. NAT could interdict 2500 infectious donations among our approximate 5 million annual blood donations.

  18. ABO and Rh-D blood group frequency and distribution: a tertiary care hospital experience

    OpenAIRE

    Pandu Rangarao Sanagapati; Sudhir Kumar Vujhini

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to determine the frequency and distribution of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood groups in blood donors of tertiary care hospital-attached blood bank. Methods: This study was conducted among the blood donors of Hyderabad Telangana State (India), who donated blood during the period from July 2013 to December 2014. ABO and Rh blood grouping was performed by forward blood grouping (cell grouping) using test tube agglutination method using antisera A, antisera B...

  19. Microelectromechanical safe arm device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM)

    2012-06-05

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus and methods for operating, for preventing unintentional detonation of energetic components comprising pyrotechnic and explosive materials, such as air bag deployment systems, munitions and pyrotechnics. The MEM apparatus comprises an interrupting member that can be moved to block (interrupt) or complete (uninterrupt) an explosive train that is part of an energetic component. One or more latching members are provided that engage and prevent the movement of the interrupting member, until the one or more latching members are disengaged from the interrupting member. The MEM apparatus can be utilized as a safe and arm device (SAD) and electronic safe and arm device (ESAD) in preventing unintentional detonations. Methods for operating the MEM apparatus include independently applying drive signals to the actuators coupled to the latching members, and an actuator coupled to the interrupting member.

  20. Safe use of nanomaterials

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials  is on the increase worldwide, including at CERN. The HSE Unit has established a safety guideline to inform you of the main requirements for the safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials at CERN.   A risk assessment tool has also been developed which guides the user through the process of evaluating the risk for his or her activity. Based on the calculated risk level, the tool provides a list of recommended control measures.   We would therefore like to draw your attention to: Safety Guideline C-0-0-5 - Safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials; and Safety Form C-0-0-2 - Nanomaterial Risk Assessment   You can consult all of CERN’s safety rules and guidelines here. Please contact the HSE Unit for any questions you may have.   The HSE Unit