WorldWideScience

Sample records for blood diseases

  1. Blood and Lymph Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in direct contact with the external environment, the circulatory system acts as a transport system for these cells. Two distinct fluids move through the circulatory system: blood and lymph. Blood carries oxygen and nutrients ...

  2. High blood pressure and eye disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features ... are sent to the brain. Causes High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina. The higher the blood ...

  3. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  4. Iron in Parkinson disease, blood diseases, malaria and ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Nowik, I.

    1998-12-01

    The concentration of iron in Substantia nigra, the part of the brain which is involved in Parkinson disease, has been found by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) to be ~ 160 μg/g wet tissue and ~ 670 μg/g dry weight, both in control and Parkinson samples. All the iron observed by MS in these samples is ferritin-like iron. In several blood diseases, large amounts of ferritin-like iron have been observed in red blood cells. Desferral removed iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. The iron compound in the malarial pigment of human blood infected by P. falciparum was found to be hemin-like, whereas the pigment iron in rats infected by P. berghei was different from any known iron porphyrin.

  5. Iron in Parkinson disease, blood diseases, malaria and ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauminger, E.R.; Nowik, I. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    1998-12-15

    The concentration of iron in Substantia nigra, the part of the brain which is involved in Parkinson disease, has been found by Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) to be {approx} 160 {mu}g/g wet tissue and {approx} 670 {mu}g/g dry weight, both in control and Parkinson samples. All the iron observed by MS in these samples is ferritin-like iron. In several blood diseases, large amounts of ferritin-like iron have been observed in red blood cells. Desferral removed iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. The iron compound in the malarial pigment of human blood infected by P. falciparum was found to be hemin-like, whereas the pigment iron in rats infected by P. berghei was different from any known iron porphyrin.

  6. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Remember Clinical Trials What is high blood pressure? Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against ... filtering units called nephrons. [ Top ] How does high blood pressure affect the kidneys? High blood pressure can damage ...

  7. "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Your ... a condition that also increases the chance of heart disease and stroke. High blood pressure is especially common ...

  8. When Blood Cells Bend: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe When Blood Cells Bend Understanding Sickle Cell Disease For people who don’t suspect they ... Cells Bend Wise Choices Links Living with Sickle Cell Disease See a sickle cell disease expert regularly. ...

  9. INFECTIOUS-DISEASE TESTING FOR BLOOD-TRANSFUSIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DESFORGES, JF; ATHARI, F; COOPER, ES; JOHNSON, CS; LEMON, SM; LINDSAY, KL; MCCULLOUGH, J; MCINTOSH, K; ROSS, RK; WHITSETT, CF; WITTES, J; WRIGHT, TL

    1995-01-01

    Objective.-To provide physicians and other transfusion medicine professionals with a current consensus on infectious disease testing for blood transfusions. Participants.-A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member consensus panel representing the fields of hematology, infectious disease, transfusion medic

  10. [Cytokines in the treatment of blood diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robak, T

    1995-01-01

    Cytokines are a class of signal peptides which represent a major communication network in living organism. Over the last decade, the discovery, cloning and purification of hematopoietic cytokines (interleukins, hematopoietic growth factors) has increased our understanding of the regulation, proliferation, differentiation and function of hematopoietic cells. More recently, the large scale production of the recombinant forms of these molecules has enabled to treat the patients with pharmacologic doses of cytokines. The therapeutic activity of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) has been demonstrated in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia and other chronic myeloproliferative syndromes. IFN-gamma is useful in the prevention of infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease. Erythropoietin (EPO) was the first hematopoietic growth factor available for clinical use, initially to treat anaemia in renal failure patients. The next cytokines introduced into the clinic were granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF). They are used successfully in haematological malignant disorders to stimulate granulopoiesis after chemotherapy or bone marrow transplantation and to help mobilise marrow stem cells for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Interleukin (IL)-1, -2, -3, -4, -6 and -11 have been tested in clinical trials. However, the value of these agents remains to be established. PMID:7544526

  11. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  12. Increased blood carboxyhaemoglobin concentrations in inflammatory pulmonary diseases

    OpenAIRE

    H. Yasuda; Yamaya, M; Yanai, M; Ohrui, T; Sasaki, H

    2002-01-01

    Background: Exhaled carbon monoxide has been reported to increase in inflammatory pulmonary diseases and to be correlated with blood carboxyhaemoglobin (Hb-CO) concentration. A study was undertaken to determine whether arterial blood Hb-CO increases in patients with inflammatory pulmonary diseases.

  13. Blood donation and cardiovascular disease. Addressing the healthy donor effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peffer, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the possible protective effect of frequent blood donation on cardiovascular disease was studied. Previous research has shown that high iron stores could have damaging effects on developing cardiovascular disease, and that blood donation lowers iron stores. Lowering iron stores throug

  14. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  15. Disease-specific classification using deconvoluted whole blood gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Oh, William K.; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Blood-based biomarker assays have an advantage in being minimally invasive. Diagnostic and prognostic models built on peripheral blood gene expression have been reported for various types of disease. However, most of these studies focused on only one disease type, and failed to address whether the identified gene expression signature is disease-specific or more widely applicable across diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of 46 whole blood gene expression datasets covering a wide range of diseases and physiological conditions. Our analysis uncovered a striking overlap of signature genes shared by multiple diseases, driven by an underlying common pattern of cell component change, specifically an increase in myeloid cells and decrease in lymphocytes. These observations reveal the necessity of building disease-specific classifiers that can distinguish different disease types as well as normal controls, and highlight the importance of cell component change in deriving blood gene expression based models. We developed a new strategy to develop blood-based disease-specific models by leveraging both cell component changes and cell molecular state changes, and demonstrate its superiority using independent datasets. PMID:27596246

  16. Computational Biorheology of Human Blood Flow in Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2013-01-01

    Hematologic disorders arising from infectious diseases, hereditary factors and environmental influences can lead to, and can be influenced by, significant changes in the shape, mechanical and physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), and the biorheology of blood flow. Hence, modeling of hematologic disorders should take into account the multiphase nature of blood flow, especially in arterioles and capillaries. We present here an overview of a general computational framework based on diss...

  17. Pediatric Blood Pressure and Adult Preclinical Markers of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Costan G.; Kylie J. Smith

    2016-01-01

    A high blood pressure level in adults is considered the single most important modifiable risk factor for global disease burden, especially those of cardiovascular (CV) origin such as stroke and ischemic heart disease. Because blood pressure levels have been shown to persist from childhood to adulthood, elevations in pediatric levels have been hypothesized to lead to increased CV burden in adulthood and, as such, might provide a window in the life course where primordial and primary prevention...

  18. Peripheral blood derived cells and angiogenesis in cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Post, S

    2009-01-01

    Patients suffering from myocardial infarction (MI), atherosclerosis and Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia type 1 (HHT-1) all have diseased and dysfunctional blood vessels. Cardiovascular repair in these diseases occurs not only locally, but also peripheral blood (progenitor) cells and cytokines/growth factors positively contribute to repair of malfunctioning tissue. In this thesis several aspects of cardiovascular repair have been explored. First, we show that in MI patients relatively la...

  19. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  20. Noninvasive blood flow tests in vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinmetz, O.K.; Cole, C W

    1993-01-01

    Noninvasive testing is now routine for assessing vascular conditions. Many noninvasive tests are available for obtaining physiologic and anatomic information that is both precise and reproducible. This paper discusses noninvasive testing with plethysmography, Doppler ultrasonography, and duplex scanning for carotid artery occlusive disease, deep venous thrombosis, and peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

  1. Changing blood flow in peripheral artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Borne, P. van den

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally and it is predicted this will remain to increase throughout 2030 to an estimated 23,3 million patients per year. This trend is accompanied by a steep increase in healthcare costs, making it a great health and socio-economic burden. The underlying pathology of CVD is often atherosclerosis, characterized by the development of atherosclerotic plaques in middle- and larger-sized arteries. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a dise...

  2. Peripheral blood and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes in Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Richens, E R; Thorp, C M; Bland, P W; Gough, K R

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes from 44 patients with Crohn's disease showed no difference in the proportions of T- and B-cells from those in 38 healthy controls. Analysis revealed no disturbances in relation to duration or to activity of disease or to drug treatment. Lymphocytes from 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis also showed normal proportions of T- and B-cells. Lymphocytes taken from gut lymph nodes were studied in five patients with Crohn's disease. On comparison with peri...

  3. Diagnosis of Carrion’s Disease by Direct Blood PCR in Thin Blood Smear Negative Samples

    OpenAIRE

    del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Silva Caso, Wilmer; Tinco Valdez, Carmen; Pons, Maria J.; del Valle, Luis J.; Oré, Verónica Casabona; Michelena, Denisse Champin; Mayra, Jorge Bazán; Gavidea, Víctor Zavaleta; Vargas, Martha; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    Bartonella bacilliformis is the etiologic agent of Carrion's disease. This disease has two well established phases, the most relevant being the so called Oroya Fever, in which B. bacilliformis infect the erythrocytes resulting in severe anemia and transient immunosuppression, with a high lethality in the absence of adequate antibiotic treatment. The presence of B. bacilliformis was studied in 113 blood samples suspected of Carrion’s disease based on clinical criteria, despite the absence of a...

  4. Cerebellar blood flow in methylmercury poisoning (Minamata disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We looked at regional cerebellar blood flow in patients with Minamata disease (MD) using technetium-99 m ethyl cysteinate dimer (99m-Tc-ECD). We carried out single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on 15 patients with MD (eight men, seven women, aged 51-78 years, mean 70.5 years) and 11 control subjects (eight men, three women, aged 62-80 years, mean 72.5 years). Regional blood flow was measured in the superior, middle, and inferior portions of the cerebellar hemispheres, and the frontal, temporal and occipital cerebral lobes. The degree of cerebellar atrophy was assessed on MRI. There were significant differences in regional blood flow in all parts of the cerebellum between patients and control, but no significant decrease was observed in the cerebrum. Blood flow was lower in the inferior cerebellum than in the other parts. Even in patients without cerebellar atrophy, flow was significantly decreased regional blood flow in the inferior part. (orig.)

  5. Management of high blood pressure in peripheral arterial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Arterial hypertension (HTA) is a promoter of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in association with other atherosclerotic risk factors factors. Systolic HTA is the most frequently noted form in such disease, secondary to marked increase in large artery siffness. The existence of PAD confers on the hypertensive patient a very high cardiovascular (CV) risk, requiring an intensive global therapeutical approach. Treating HTA is one of such beneficial actions. The optimal blood pressure (BP) to...

  6. The dormant blood microbiome in chronic, inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, Marnie; Bester, Janette; Kell, Douglas B; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-07-01

    Blood in healthy organisms is seen as a 'sterile' environment: it lacks proliferating microbes. Dormant or not-immediately-culturable forms are not absent, however, as intracellular dormancy is well established. We highlight here that a great many pathogens can survive in blood and inside erythrocytes. 'Non-culturability', reflected by discrepancies between plate counts and total counts, is commonplace in environmental microbiology. It is overcome by improved culturing methods, and we asked how common this would be in blood. A number of recent, sequence-based and ultramicroscopic studies have uncovered an authentic blood microbiome in a number of non-communicable diseases. The chief origin of these microbes is the gut microbiome (especially when it shifts composition to a pathogenic state, known as 'dysbiosis'). Another source is microbes translocated from the oral cavity. 'Dysbiosis' is also used to describe translocation of cells into blood or other tissues. To avoid ambiguity, we here use the term 'atopobiosis' for microbes that appear in places other than their normal location. Atopobiosis may contribute to the dynamics of a variety of inflammatory diseases. Overall, it seems that many more chronic, non-communicable, inflammatory diseases may have a microbial component than are presently considered, and may be treatable using bactericidal antibiotics or vaccines. PMID:25940667

  7. Moessbauer studies of blood diseases: thalassemia and malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 57F Moessbauer studies of blood samples obtained from patients with thalassemia large amounts of iron, yielding a well defined spectrum, different from that obtained in oxy - or deoxy-hemoglobin, were found. The additional iron component was identified as due to ferritin - the iron storage protein. The amounts of ferritin-like iron were comparable to those of hemoglobin iron and were especially large in reticulocytes. Desferral was found to remove ferritin-like iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. In malaria, a parasite induced blood disease, the iron containing compound in the malarial pigment in rats infected by Plasmodium berghei was found to be trivalent high spin, different from any known iron porphyrin, yet was found to be similar to hemin in human blood cells infected by P. falciparum. The difference in the spectra obtained in RBC infected with drug sensitive and drug resistance strains and the effect of medication on the spectra is discussed. (author)

  8. Disease Management to Promote Blood Pressure Control Among African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Troyen; Spettell, Claire; Villagra, Victor; Ofili, Elizabeth; McMahill-Walraven, Cheryl; Lowy, Elizabeth J.; Daniels, Pamela; Quarshie, Alexander; Mayberry, Robert

    2010-01-01

    African Americans have a higher prevalence of hypertension and poorer cardiovascular and renal outcomes than white Americans. The objective of this study was to determine whether a telephonic nurse disease management (DM) program designed for African Americans is more effective than a home monitoring program alone to increase blood pressure (BP) control among African Americans enrolled in a national health plan.

  9. Computational biorheology of human blood flow in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2014-02-01

    Hematologic disorders arising from infectious diseases, hereditary factors and environmental influences can lead to, and can be influenced by, significant changes in the shape, mechanical and physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), and the biorheology of blood flow. Hence, modeling of hematologic disorders should take into account the multiphase nature of blood flow, especially in arterioles and capillaries. We present here an overview of a general computational framework based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) which has broad applicability in cell biophysics with implications for diagnostics, therapeutics and drug efficacy assessments for a wide variety of human diseases. This computational approach, validated by independent experimental results, is capable of modeling the biorheology of whole blood and its individual components during blood flow so as to investigate cell mechanistic processes in health and disease. DPD is a Lagrangian method that can be derived from systematic coarse-graining of molecular dynamics but can scale efficiently up to arterioles and can also be used to model RBCs down to the spectrin level. We start from experimental measurements of a single RBC to extract the relevant biophysical parameters, using single-cell measurements involving such methods as optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy and micropipette aspiration, and cell-population experiments involving microfluidic devices. We then use these validated RBC models to predict the biorheological behavior of whole blood in healthy or pathological states, and compare the simulations with experimental results involving apparent viscosity and other relevant parameters. While the approach discussed here is sufficiently general to address a broad spectrum of hematologic disorders including certain types of cancer, this paper specifically deals with results obtained using this computational framework for blood flow in malaria and sickle cell anemia. PMID:24419829

  10. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    OpenAIRE

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury...

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow in SPECT pattern in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our work was to compare the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in SPECT examination in Parkinson's disease with (17 cases) and without (7 cases) dementia and in various clinical stages of the disease. The patients underwent SPECT examination 5-40 min after intravenous application of HMPAO (Ceretec, Amersham) with 740 Mbq (20 mCi) pertechnate 99mTc. SPECT was performed with a Siemens Diacam single-head rotating gamma camera coupled to a high resolution collimator and Icon computer system provided by the manufacturer. The results were defined in relative values of ROI in relation to cerebellum. Patients with Parkinson's disease showed hypoperfusion in cerebral lobes and in deep cerebral structures including the basal ganglia. Regional perfusion deficit in SPECT was seen with and without associated dementia and already in early stage of the disease. Parkinson's disease is provoked by the lesions of dopaminergic neurons of the central nervous system leading to domination of extrapyramidal symptoms. There are many indications that also the neurotransmitters associated with cognitive functions as acetylcholine demonstrate some abnormalities. However, only in some cases of Parkinson's disease dementia is the dominating symptom. Our results of regional cerebral blood flow testify that in Parkinson's disease the dysfunction of the central nervous system is more diffuse than has previously been suggested. (author)

  12. Discovery of Novel Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease from Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jintao; Pan, Genhua; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Belshaw, Robert; Li, Xinzhong

    2016-01-01

    Blood-based biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease would be very valuable because blood is a more accessible biofluid and is suitable for repeated sampling. However, currently there are no robust and reliable blood-based biomarkers for practical diagnosis. In this study we used a knowledge-based protein feature pool and two novel support vector machine embedded feature selection methods to find panels consisting of two and three biomarkers. We validated these biomarker sets using another serum cohort and an RNA profile cohort from the brain. Our panels included the proteins ECH1, NHLRC2, HOXB7, FN1, ERBB2, and SLC6A13 and demonstrated promising sensitivity (>87%), specificity (>91%), and accuracy (>89%). PMID:27418712

  13. Blood-derived topical therapy for ocular surface diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Nishant G; Jeng, Bennie H

    2016-01-01

    Human serum-derived and plasma-derived therapies have become increasingly popular in the treatment of ocular surface disorders, with mounting clinical and scientific evidence suggesting good safety and efficacy profiles. These therapies may be considered for various ocular surface conditions, such as dry eye syndrome and persistent epithelial defect, when conservative management does not suffice. The costly and inconvenient process of obtaining the blood-derived products is the barrier to their more widespread use. Some blood-derived therapies, such as umbilical cord serum-derived and platelet-derived plasma preparations, may be more viable options since these therapies can be made readily available to patients. In this review, the existing literature on the safety and efficacy of blood-derived products, such as autologous serum tears, in the treatment of ocular surface diseases is discussed. Issues relevant to the production of autologous serum tears are also described. PMID:26178904

  14. Blood flow changes in Alzheimer's disease induced by lactate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Lactate, as metabolite of the glycolysis is a source of energy of the nerves. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed the neuroprotective effect of lactate and improvement of brain function after ischaemic injury. Intravenous infusion of lactate increases the global cerebral blood flow (CBF). In Alzheimer disease (AD) characteristic regional blood flow abnormalities and in the cerebrospinal fluid abnormal lactate levels were detected. Since disturbed CBF and vasoregulation was found in AD the effect of intravenous Na-lactate on CBF and related metabolic parameters was examined in order to assess the CBF response in the AD brain. In twenty (14 woman, 6 man, age ± SD.: 74 ± 7 years) patients with Alzheimer's disease (DSM IV, MMT.:13 ± 6) self-control study was performed. rCBF SPECT (99mTc-HMPAO) investigations were fulfilled during 5 mg/kg body weight 0.5 M Na-lactate infusion and in control state (0.9 % saline infusion) one week apart. The rCBF changes visually and by statistical parametric mapping were analyzed. ECG, blood pressure, heart rate, venous blood pH, pCO2, bicarbonate, serum lactate and cortisol level were measured before and after the SPECT investigation. Acute panic inventory and anxiety rating scales were used to access the psychiatric effect of lactate. The serum lactate levels increased in average from 0.8 mmol/L to 4.6 mmol/L, and 6.1 mmol/L 10 and 20 minutes after lactate infusion respectively. Compensatory changes were found in the venous blood pH, pCO2 and bicarbonate levels. Significant psychiatric symptoms and blood pressure and heart rate increase were not observed. The serum cortisol level remained unchanged. At the baseline investigation all of the patients have bilateral temporal or parietal hypoperfused areas in 8 patients with other additional localization of abnormalities. In 12 patients the global cerebral blood flow increased, in 8 decreased rCBF was detected by visual evaluation. According to the SPM analysis the

  15. Cerebral blood flow mapping in children with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cerebral blood flow mapping system was applied to the evaluation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 21 patients with sickle cell cerebrovascular disease, by means of a Picker xenon computed tomographic (CT) scanner. Results indicate that (1) xenon CT is a safe and reliable procedure in children with cerebrovascular diseases; (2) CBF in the gray matter of children seems to be higher than in previously reported data obtained with use of isotopes; and (3) regional CBF can be altered significantly by changing the size of the region of interest (ROI). The term regional CBF probably has to be carefully defined in xenon CT flow mapping. Correlation with anatomy by means of CT or magnetic resonance imaging and comparison with the ROI of the contralateral side and/or adjacent sections is important

  16. Aggressive blood pressure control for chronic kidney disease unmasks moyamoya!

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, T. Keefe; Halabi, Carmen M.; Siefken, Philp; Karmarkar, Swati; Leonard, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive crises in children or adolescents are rare, but chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for occurrence. Vesicoureteral reflux nephropathy is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and is associated with hypertension. Aggressive blood pressure (BP) control has been shown to delay progression of CKD and treatment is targeted for the 50th percentile for height when compared with a target below the 90th percentile for the general pediatric hypertensive patient. We pres...

  17. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation,; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  18. Cerebral blood flow changes in Parkinson's disease associated with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dementia is one of the main non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and it is diagnosed in about 30% of cases. Its aetiology remains unclear and contributing factors are controversial. Dementia may be more common in old patients with severe motor symptoms and mild cognitive impairment. Clinico-pathological studies show the association between dementia in PD and the age-related group of dementias, such as AD and VaD. A valuable aid in the assessment of dementia in PD is cerebral blood flow (CBF) brain SPECT scanning. It shows three different patterns of rCBF reduction, including frontal lobe hypoperfusion, iu Alzheimer-likel type of hypoperfusion and multiple, vascular defects. The heterogeneity of rCBF reduction may reflect the multifactorial pathophysiology of dementia in PD. It may result from concomitant AD pathology, cerebrovascular disease, destruction of nigro-striato-frontal projection or may be a distinct disease of different aetiology. (author)

  19. Diagnosis of Carrion's disease by direct blood PCR in thin blood smear negative samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana del Valle Mendoza

    Full Text Available Bartonella bacilliformis is the etiologic agent of Carrion's disease. This disease has two well established phases, the most relevant being the so called Oroya Fever, in which B. bacilliformis infect the erythrocytes resulting in severe anemia and transient immunosuppression, with a high lethality in the absence of adequate antibiotic treatment. The presence of B. bacilliformis was studied in 113 blood samples suspected of Carrion's disease based on clinical criteria, despite the absence of a positive thin blood smear, by two different PCR techniques (using Bartonella-specific and universal 16S rRNA gene primers, and by bacterial culture. The specific 16S rRNA gene primers revealed the presence of 21 B. bacilliformis and 1 Bartonella elizabethae, while universal primers showed both the presence of 3 coinfections in which a concomitant pathogen was detected plus Bartonella, in addition to the presence of infections by other microorganisms such as Agrobacterium or Bacillus firmus. These data support the need to implement molecular tools to diagnose Carrion's disease.

  20. Peripheral blood lymphocytes DNA in patients with chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliy I Reshetnyak; Tatyana I Sharafanova; Ludmila U Ilchenko; Elena V Golovanova; Gennadiy G Poroshenko

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND Viral replication in blood cells with nucleuses may lead to the damage of lymphocytes genetic apparatus and the beginning of immunopathological reactions.AIM Of this investigation is to reveal the damage to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL)DNA in the patients with chronic liver diseases.MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen-ninepatients with chronic liver diseases (37 patients with chronic viral hepatitis, 2 patients with liver cirrhosis of mixed etiology (alcohol + virus G),30 women with primary biliary cirrhosis-PBC)were examined. The condition of DNA structure of PBL-was measured by the fluorescenceanalysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) technique with modification. Changes of fluorescence (in %) reflected the DNA distractions degree (thepresence of DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights).RESULTS AND CONCLUSION . The quantity of DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sightsin DNA in all patients with chronic viral hepatitis .didnt differ from the control group,excluding the patients with chronic hepatitis (CH) C + G. Patients with HGV and TTV monoinfection had demonstrated the increase of the DNA single-stranded breaks PBL quantity.This fact may be connected with hypothesisabout the viruses replication in white blood cells discussed in the literature. Tendency to increase quantity of DNA PBL damages in the patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) accordingly to the alkaline phosphatase activity increase was revealed. Significant decrease of the DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights in the PBC patients that were treated with prednison was demonstrated. Probably, the tendency to increase the quantity of DNA singlestranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights in lymphocytes of the PBC patients was depended on the surplus of the blood bile acid content.

  1. Determinants of resting cerebral blood flow in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Adam M; Borzage, Matthew T; Choi, Soyoung; Václavů, Lena; Tamrazi, Benita; Nederveen, Aart J; Coates, Thomas D; Wood, John C

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell disease and results from an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is increased in patients with sickle cell disease to compensate for their anemia, but adequacy of their oxygen delivery has not been systematically demonstrated. This study examined the physiological determinants of CBF in 37 patients with sickle cell disease, 38 ethnicity matched control subjects and 16 patients with anemia of non-sickle origin. Cerebral blood flow was measured using phase contrast MRI of the carotid and vertebral arteries. CBF increased inversely to oxygen content (r(2)  = 0.69, P Brain oxygen delivery, the product of CBF and oxygen content, was normal in all groups. Brain composition, specifically the relative amounts of grey and white matter, was the next strongest CBF predictor, presumably by influencing cerebral metabolic rate. Grey matter/white matter ratio and CBF declined monotonically until the age of 25 in all subjects, consistent with known maturational changes in brain composition. Further CBF reductions were observed with age in subjects older than 35 years of age, likely reflecting microvascular aging. On multivariate regression, CBF was independent of disease state, hemoglobin S, hemoglobin F, reticulocyte count and cell free hemoglobin, suggesting that it is regulated similarly in patients and control subjects. In conclusion, sickle cell disease patients had sufficient oxygen delivery at rest, but accomplish this only by marked increases in their resting CBF, potentially limiting their ability to further augment flow in response to stress. Am. J. Hematol. 91:912-917, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27263497

  2. Investigations of significance of blood smear results in diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Potkonjak Aleksandar; Lako Branislav; Belić Branislava; Milošević Nikolina; Stevančević Ognjen; Cincović Marko; Lako Bjanka

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic examination of stained smears of peripheral blood is of vital significance in the speedy diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases, in particular during the stage of infection when the cause is present in the blood, or blood cells. It is sometimes possible to make a definitive diagnosis of an infectious or parasitic disease following an examination of a stained smear of the peripheral blood. Since microscopic examinations of a peripheral blood smear are applied increasi...

  3. Effect of total leucocyte count on whole blood filterability in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Alderman, M J; Ridge, A; Morley, A A; Ryall, R. G.; Walsh, J A

    1981-01-01

    An abnormal filterability of whole blood through micropore membranes in vitro has been reported in peripheral vascular disease and has been thought to indicate abnormal red cell deformability. Blood from 68 patients with symptomatic peripheral vascular disease of varying severity and from 32 age-matched controls without a history of peripheral vascular disease was studied by the technique of whole blood filtration. In agreement with earlier findings, whole blood filterability was significantl...

  4. Anaemia and other blood diseases induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing interest in the effects of radiation on blood formation is explained not only by the fact that haemopoietic tissue can be damaged in the event of accidents, but also by the fact that depression of medullary haemopoiesis is often a limiting factor in radiotherapy for various malignant diseases, in particular leukosis. The degree of cell alteration in the peripheral blood resulting from different types of exposure to ionizing radiation depends to a large extent on the lifetime of the cells since in irradiation it is primarily the balance between utilization and production of new cells that is disrupted. In animals that survive exposure to lethal doses of radiation a notable drop in the number of erythrocytes has been observed between the 10th and 30th days after irradiation. The most pronounced anaemia usually appears between the 15th and 20th days. In animals that do not survive a significant drop in the number of erythrocytes takes place the day before or the day on which death occurs. The decrease in the number of red blood cells is due mainly to a drop in their production, to increased destruction of erythrocytes and to haemorrhage

  5. Nanomedicine for the management of lung and blood diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Denis B

    2009-04-01

    Nanotechnology provides a broad range of opportunities to develop new solutions for clinical problems. For the pulmonary field, nanotechnology promises better delivery of drugs and nucleic acid-based therapeutics to disease sites. Administration of therapeutics via inhalation provides the opportunity for direct delivery to the lung epithelium, the lining of the respiratory tract. By appropriate selection of particle size, deep lung delivery can be obtained with control of phagocytic uptake, the removal of particles by resident macrophages. Nanotechnology can also help in pulmonary therapies administered by intravenous and oral routes through targeting specific cell types and controlling bioavailability and release kinetics. In the hematology field, nanotechnology can counter multiple drug resistance in leukemia by blocking drug efflux from cancer cells, and provide effective delivery of siRNA into lymphocytes to block apoptosis in sepsis. Controlling the surface properties of materials on devices such as valves and stents promises improved biocompatibility by inhibition of thrombosis, the formation of blood clots, and regulating cell adhesion and activation. Nanoparticle-based thrombolytic agents have the potential to improve the effectiveness of clot removal. Treatment of both lung and blood diseases is also likely to benefit from nano-scaffold-based methods for controlling the differentiation and proliferation of stem and progenitor cells. PMID:19331540

  6. Dyslipidemia and Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene L. Bowman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blood-brain barrier (BBB dysfunction may have a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Modifiable factors associated with BBB function may have therapeutic implication. This study tested the hypothesis that dyslipidemia is associated with BBB impairment in mild-to-moderate AD. Methods. Thirty-six subjects with AD were followed for 1 year. Fasting CSF and plasma were collected with clinical assessments at baseline and 12 months. BBB impairment was defined as CSF albumin index ≥9. Independent t-tests and linear regression assessed the relationship between plasma lipoproteins and BBB integrity. Results. Dyslipidemia was prevalent in 47% of the population, and in 75% of those with BBB impairment. Subjects with BBB impairment had significantly higher mean plasma triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol (TG, P=0.007; HDL, P=0.043. Plasma triglycerides explained 22% of the variance in BBB integrity and remained significant after controlling for age, gender, ApoE-4 genotype, blood pressure, and statin use. Conclusion. Dyslipidemia is more prevalent in AD subjects with BBB impairment. Plasma triglyceride and HDL cholesterol may have a role in maintaining BBB integrity in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Myelodysplastic syndrome. A blood disease of high risk to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is reviewed on its classification, diagnosis, therapy, prognosis, patho-physiology, causes and relation to radiation, mainly from radiation biology aspect. MDL is a cryptogenic, progressive and refractory blood disease with abnormal morphology and dysfunction of cells of bone marrow and peripheral blood and often results in leukemia. Epidemiology shows that radiation is a potent cause of MDL as well as chemotherapy to malignant diseases and that in Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, leukemia risk is linearly correlated with their exposed dose. In Hiroshima survivors, the excessive relative risk of MDL per Sv (ERR1Sv) is preliminarily reported to be as high as 13 and MDL patients is reportedly increasing in Chernobyl. T-lymphocytes from MDL patients are found more sensitive to X-ray in the micronucleus assay. However, direct causal gene(s) are obscure now. Cause and pathology of MDL are expected solved by future elucidation of gene expression concerned with radiation response and DNA repair, and of subsequent change of functional protein products. (K.H.)

  8. Exaggerated Exercise Blood Pressure Response and Future Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzemos, Nikolaos; Lim, Pitt O; Mackenzie, Isla S; MacDonald, Thomas M

    2015-11-01

    Exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise predicts future hypertension. However, there is considerable lack of understanding regarding the mechanism of how this abnormal response is generated, and how it relates to the future establishment of cardiovascular disease. The authors studied 82 healthy male volunteers without cardiovascular risk factors. The participants were categorized into two age-matched groups depending on their exercise systolic BP (ExSBP) rise after 3 minutes of exercise using a submaximal step test: exaggerated ExSBP group (hyper-responders [peak SBP ≥ 180 mm Hg]) and low ExSBP responder group (hypo-responders [peak SBP Forearm venous occlusion plethysmography and intra-arterial infusions of acetylcholine (ACh), N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and norepinephrine (NE) were used to assess vascular reactivity. Proximal aortic compliance was assessed with ultrasound, and neurohormonal blood sampling was performed at rest and during peak exercise. The hyper-responder group exhibited a significantly lower increase in forearm blood flow (FBF) with ACh compared with the hypo-responder group (ΔFBF 215% [14] vs 332.3% [28], mean [standard error of the mean]; P<.001), as well as decreased proximal aortic compliance. The vasoconstrictive response to L-NMMA was significantly impaired in the hyper-responder group in comparison to the hypo-responder group (ΔFBF -40.2% [1.6] vs -50.2% [2.6]; P<.05). In contrast, the vascular response to SNP and NE were comparable in both groups. Peak exercise plasma angiotensin II levels were significantly higher in the hyper-responder group (31 [1] vs 23 [2] pg/mL, P=.01). An exaggerated BP response to exercise is related to endothelial dysfunction, decreased proximal aortic compliance, and increased exercise-related neurohormonal activation, the constellation of which may explain future cardiovascular disease. PMID:26235814

  9. Cerebral blood flow in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been studied by the xenon-133 (133Xe) inhalation method in 16 children with suspected sickle cell cerebrovascular disease. Abnormalities consisting of decreases in total, hemispheral, or regional CBF were found in 17 of 26 studies. Eleven studies performed immediately after stroke, transient ischemic attack, or depression of state of alertness showed abnormalities. In addition to confirming regional cerebrovascular insufficiency in children with stroke due to major cerebral artery occlusion, the method detected diffuse decrease in CBF in children with stupor, coma, and seizures who had normal angiographic findings. In contrast, six of seven studies obtained after exchange transfusion or during maintenance on hypertransfusion therapy showed normal findings. The difference between results in patients with acute neurologic disturbances and those receiving transfusion therapy was statistically significant (P less than .005). The data indicate that the 133Xe method reliably demonstrates cerebrovascular impairment in sickle cell disease. They also suggest that CBF changes in patients with sickle cell disease can be reversed by exchange transfusion and by hypertransfusion therapy. The 133Xe CBF method may be useful for following up children with sickle cell disease who are at high risk for recurrent stroke

  10. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio García-Erce, Fernando Gomollón, Manuel Muñoz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient, febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion, which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC units] independently of the patient’s tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a “one-by-one” administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols

  11. Possible Correlation of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases with Rh type and ABO Blood Group System

    OpenAIRE

    Tyagi, Surabhi; Tyagi, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Background: Screening of blood is mandatory for transfusion transmitted diseases and is routinely done in the blood banks. As blood is the major source transmission of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus & many other diseases the hazards can be minimised by effective donor selection and screening.

  12. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using positron emission tomography and 15O-steady state method, cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen consumption and oxygen extraction fraction were measured in patients with embolic occlusion and in those with thrombotic occlusion in the carotid system. By the study of patients with embolic occlusion, we evaluated ischemic threshold of CBF for infarction to be 16 ml/100 ml/min. The area of 'penumbra' could be estimated in regions with CBF value just above this threshold. In the patients with thrombotic occlusive lesion, we clarified that the efficiency of the collateral circulation was mainly related to the grade of peripheral atherosclerosis. These findings must be helpful to develop better strategy for treatment of cerebral ischemic disease. (author)

  13. Cerebral blood flow and metabolic abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review I summarize observations of PET and SPECT studies about cerebral blood flow and metabolic abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In very early AD flow or metabolism reduces first in the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus. This reduction may arise from functional deafferentation caused by primary neural degeneration in the remote area of the entorhinal cortex that is the first to be pathologically affected in AD. Then medial temporal structures and parietotemporal association cortex show flow or metabolic reduction as disease processes. The reason why flow or metabolism in medial temporal structures shows delay in starting to reduce in spite of the earliest pathological affection remains to be elucidated. It is likely that anterior cingulate gyrus is functionally involved, since attention is the first non-memory domain to be affected, before deficits in language and visuospatial functions. However few reports have described involvement in the anterior cingulate gyrus. Relationship between cerebral blood flow or metabolism and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype has been investigated. Especially, the APOEε4 allele has been reported to increase risk and to lower onset age as a function of the inherited dose of the ε4 allele. Reduction of flow or metabolism in the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus has been reported even in presymptomatic nondemented subjects who were cognitively normal and had at least a single ε4 allele. On the contrary the relation of ε4 allele to the progression rate of AD has been controversial from neuroimaging approaches. PET and SPECT imaging has become to be quite useful for assessing therapeutical effects of newly introduced treatment for AD. Recent investigations observed significant regional flow increase after donepezil hydrochloride treatment. Most of these observations have been made by applying computer assisted analysis of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection or statistical parametric mapping

  14. Blood pressure control, drug therapy, and kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Gabriel; Greene, Tom; Agodoa, Lawrence Y; Cheek, DeAnna; Junco, George; Dowie, Donna; Lash, James; Lipkowitz, Michael; Miller, Edgar R; Ojo, Akinlou; Sika, Mohammed; Wilkening, Beth; Toto, Robert D

    2005-07-01

    The African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension examined the effect on renal function decline of 2 blood pressure (BP) goals (low mean arterial pressure [MAP] disease (ESRD), death, or GFR decline by 50% or 25 mL/min per 1.73 m2. This report examines the effect of the BP intervention separately in the 3 drug groups. The BP effect was similar among the drug groups for either GFR slope or the main clinical composite. However, the BP effect differed significantly among the drug groups for the composite of ESRD or death (P=0.035) and ESRD alone (P=0.021). Higher event rates for amlodipine patients assigned to the usual BP goal (0.087 per patient-year for ESRD or death and 0.064 per patient-year for ESRD) were seen compared with the remaining groups of the factorial design (range, 0.041 to 0.050 for ESRD or death; and range, 0.027 to 0.036 for ESRD). The low BP goal was associated with reduced risk of ESRD or death (risk reduction 51%; 95% confidence interval, 13% to 73%) and ESRD (54%; 8% to 77%) for amlodipine patients, but not for patients assigned to the other drug groups. These secondary analyses suggest a benefit of the low BP goal among patients assigned to amlodipine, but they must be interpreted cautiously. PMID:15897360

  15. Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in autoimmune disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes, cultured with Con A, can be inhibited by ionizing radiation. Lymphocytes from patients with conditions associated with autoimmunity, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and polymyositis, are more radiosensitive than those from healthy volunteers or patients with conditions not associated with autoimmunity. Nuclear material isolated from the lymphocytes of patients with autoimmune diseases is, on average, lighter in density than the nuclear material from most healthy controls. This difference in density is not related to increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation but the degree of post-irradiation change in density (lightening) is proportional to the initial density, i.e. more dense nuclear material always shows a greater upward shift after radiation. The recovery of pre-irradiation density of nuclear material, 1 h after radiation exposure, taken as an indication of DNA repair, correlates with the radiosensitivity of lymphocyte proliferation (Con A response); failure to return to pre-irradiation density being associated with increased sensitivity of proliferative response. These results require extension but, taken with previously reported studied of the effects of DNA methylating agents, support the idea that DNA damage and its defective repair could be important in the aetio-pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. (author)

  16. The variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Risk, uncertainty or safety in the use of blood and blood derivatives?

    OpenAIRE

    Liras, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    It has been long since French physician Jean-Baptiste Denys carried out the first successful blood transfusion to a human being. Using bird feathers as canules, sheep blood was transfused to a young man. The patient died soon after Denys' treatment and Denys was accused of murder. In the XXI century, known as the biotechnology century, we face new challenges in Medicine. New emerging and reemerging diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) or "mad cow disease" and its human variant (v...

  17. Blood-based biomarkers of microvascular pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ewers, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) is a genetically complex and chronically progressive neurodegenerative disorder with molecular mechanisms and neuropathologies centering around the amyloidogenic pathway, hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein, and neurofibrillary degeneration. While cerebrovascular changes have not been traditionally considered to be a central part of AD pathology, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that they may, in fact, be a characteristic feature of the AD brain as well. In particular, microvascular abnormalities within the brain have been associated with pathological AD hallmarks and may precede neurodegeneration. In vivo assessment of microvascular pathology provides a promising approach to develop useful biological markers for early detection and pathological characterization of AD. This review focuses on established blood-based biological marker candidates of microvascular pathology in AD. These candidates include plasma concentration of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) that are increased in AD. Measures of endothelial vasodilatory function including endothelin (ET-1), adrenomedullin (ADM), and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), as well as sphingolipids are significantly altered in mild AD or during the predementia stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), suggesting sensitivity of these biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis. In conclusion, the emerging clinical diagnostic evidence for the value of blood-based microvascular biomarkers in AD is promising, however, still requires validation in phase II and III diagnostic trials. Moreover, it is still unclear whether the described protein dysbalances are early or downstream pathological events and how the detected systemic microvascular alterations relate to cerebrovascular and neuronal pathologies in the AD brain.

  18. Women and Heart Disease | Healthy Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Women and Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Photos: ... still underestimate their own personal risk of getting heart disease.” "Having even one risk factor can double a ...

  19. Oligo-2',5'-adenylate synthetase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes in various diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, N; Kotake, S.; Hirose, S; Ohno, S; Yasuda, I.; Sagawa, A; Ishikawa, K.; Minagawa, T

    1984-01-01

    Interferon induces oligo-2',5'-adenylate synthetase in cells. In various diseases, interferon was detectable in the circulation or was produced spontaneously from peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes. The oligo-2',5'-adenylate synthetase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes was examined in various diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, and Behcet's disease. The activity of this enzyme was significantly increased in system...

  20. The variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Risk, uncertainty or safety in the use of blood and blood derivatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liras, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    It has been long since French physician Jean-Baptiste Denys carried out the first successful blood transfusion to a human being. Using bird feathers as canules, sheep blood was transfused to a young man. The patient died soon after Denys' treatment and Denys was accused of murder. In the XXI century, known as the biotechnology century, we face new challenges in Medicine. New emerging and reemerging diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) or "mad cow disease" and its human variant (vCJD), challenge the biosafety aspects of a widely extended and extremely useful technique, that is, the perfusion of blood, of its derived components and of other pharmacological products obtained from plasma. To face these new challenges we need innovative prevention strategies. PMID:18573217

  1. Red blood cell deformability and aggregation in chronic venous disease patients with varicose veins

    OpenAIRE

    Karolina Słoczyńska; Mariusz Kózka; Henryk Marona

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Red blood cells’ (RBC) rheological properties are disturbed in chronic venous disease (CVD). The aim of the study was to compare deformability and aggregation of erythrocytes taken from the varicose vein and the antecubital vein of patients with chronic venous disease.Materials and Methods: Blood samples were taken from twelve CVD patients presenting clinical, aetiological, anatomical and pathological elements (CEAP) stages II and III. Blood was sampled from varicose veins and a...

  2. Contribution of blood platelets to vascular pathology in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wei Zhang,1,2 Wei Huang,1 Fang Jing11Department of Pharmacology, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Molecular Therapy and Pharmaceutical Innovation, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In the clinical setting, nearly 98% AD patients have CAA, and 75% of these patients are rated as severe CAA. It is characterized by the deposition of the β-amyloid peptide (mainly Aβ40 in the walls of cerebral vessels, which induces the degeneration of vessel wall components, reduces cerebral blood flow, and aggravates cognitive decline. Platelets are anuclear cell fragments from bone marrow megakaryocytes and their function in hemostasis and thrombosis has long been recognized. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that platelet activation can also mediate the onset and development of CAA. First, platelet activation and adhesion to a vessel wall is the initial step of vascular injury. Activated platelets contribute to more than 90% circulating Aß (mainly Aβ1-40, which in turn activates platelets and results in the vicious cycle of Aβ overproduction in damaged vessel. Second, the uncontrolled activation of platelets leads to a chronic inflammatory reaction by secretion of chemokines (eg, platelet factor 4 [PF4], regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted [RANTES], and macrophage inflammatory protein [MIP-1α], interleukins (IL-1 β, IL-7, and IL-8, prostaglandins, and CD40 ligand (CD40L. The interaction of these biological response modulators with platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes establishes a localized inflammatory response that contributes to CAA formation. Finally, activated platelets are the upholder of fibrin clots, which are structurally abnormal and resistant to degradation

  3. The blood supply of normal and diseased navicular bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast medium was used to fill the sesamoidian canal through the coffin joint as well as the arterial blood supply to the navicular bone in 90 navicular bone-coffin bone specimens. The radiological examinations of the arterial blood supply was done with a new technique (fine-focus) which allows enlargements of up to 200 fold. The material was divided into the following 4 groups on radiological and pathomorphological grounds: 1. normal navicular bones (46), 2. navicular bones with changed sesamoidian canals (33), 3. navicular bones with central collapse (9) and 4. navicular bones after a penetrating injury (2). The characteristic radiological picture of the arterial blood vessel distribution is described for each group. By comparing and differentiating the radiological arterial blood supply of the different groups, it can be concluded that the blood supply to the navicular bone changes with radiological and patho-morphological changes

  4. Gene Expression Patterns in Peripheral Blood Correlate with the Extent of Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sinnaeve, Peter R; Donahue, Mark P.; Grass, Peter; Seo, David; Vonderscher, Jacky; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Kraus, William E.; Sketch, Michael; Nelson, Charlotte; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Granger, Christopher B.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic and local inflammation plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, but the relationship of whole blood gene expression changes with coronary disease remains unclear. We have investigated whether gene expression patterns in peripheral blood correlate with the severity of coronary disease and whether these patterns correlate with the extent of atherosclerosis in the vascular wall. Patients were selected according to their coronary artery disea...

  5. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Kim, Ceonne; Adhikari, Anima; Gray, Kayla E; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Little, Jane A; Gurkan, Umut A

    2016-07-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  6. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  7. CFD simulation of blood flow inside the corkscrew collaterals of the Buerger’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifi, Alireza; Charjouei Moghadam, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Buerger’s disease is an occlusive arterial disease that occurs mainly in medium and small vessels. This disease is associated with Tobacco usage. The existence of corkscrew collateral is one of the established characteristics of the Buerger’s disease. Methods: In this study, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of blood flow within the corkscrew artery of the Buerger’s disease is conducted. The geometry of the artery is constructed based on the actual corkscrew arte...

  8. Red blood cell aggregation, aggregate strength and oxygen transport potential of blood are abnormal in both homozygous sickle cell anemia and sickle-hemoglobin C disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tripette, Julien; Alexy, Tamas; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Mougenel, Daniele; Beltan, Eric; Chalabi, Tawfik; Chout, Roger; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hue, Olivier; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Connes, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that red cell aggregation and the ratio of hematocrit to blood viscosity, an index of the oxygen transport potential of blood, might considerably modulate blood flow dynamics in the microcirculation. The findings of this study indicate that patients with sickle cell disease and those with sickle cell hemoglobin C disease have low ratios of hematocrit to blood viscosity as compared to normal controls. This may play a role in tissue hypoxia and clinical status of these ...

  9. Orthostatic Hypotension (Low Blood Pressure) and Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  10. Application of 51Cr-RBC life span study and surface counting in blood diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article summarized the RBC life span and liver, spleen surface counting in 274 cases of blood diseases. Whole blood labelling of 51Cr labelled auto or normal O type blood was used. The results showed that there was a shortening of the apparent survival time with different magnitude in various blood diseases, therefore it can be used for understanding the severity of hemolytic anemia, detection of latent hemolysis and also the investigation of the destruction and survival of RBC in other blood diseases. The surface counting of spleen, liver and precordium denoted that the S/P, S/L ratio was highest in hyperspleenism, consecutively various hemolytic anemia and cirrhosis of liver, hence this test can be used as an indication for splenectomy

  11. STUDIES ON BLOOD GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE PROTEIN LEVEL OF CHILDREN IN KESHAN DISEASE AND KASHIN-BECK DISEASE AREAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭武红; 种晓红; 杨占田; 翟连榜; 王立新; 徐光禄

    2002-01-01

    Objective To oberve the change in blood glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) protein levels of residents in the low-selenium (Se) area by contrasting the blood GSH-Px protein level of the children in the Keshan disease area with those in the Kashin-Beck disease and non-endemic areas. Methods GSH-Px protein levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The Se content and GSH-Px activity were assayed by the 2,3-diaminonaphthalene spectrofluorimetric method and glutathione reductase-coupled method respectively. Results ①The blood Se content and GSH-Px protein level of children in Keshan disease area (Moding) were significantly lower than those in Xi'an non-endemic area, however, there was no significant difference when compared with the low-Se non-endemic area; ②The blood Se content, GSH-Px activity and GSH-Px protein level of children in the Kashin-Beck disease area (Yulin) were significantly lower than those of children in two non-endemic areas and in the Keshan disease area; ③The blood Se content and GSH-Px activity were positively correlated to the GSH-Px protein level respectively. Conclusion These results indicate that the blood GSH-Px protein level is decreased in the low-Se residents. The Se status not only affects the GSH-Px activity but also regulate the GSH-Px protein level.

  12. Blood pressure 2 years after a chronic disease management intervention study

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe, Sheldon; Vincent, Lloyd; Wentworth, Joan; Hildebrandt, Denise; Kiss, Alexander; Perkins, Nancy; Hartman, Susan; Ironstand, Laurie; Hoppe, Jacquie; Hunter, Katie; Pylypchuk, George

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To follow blood pressure change over time in participants who had participated in a 1- year chronic disease management program focused on blood pressure reduction. The expectation was that blood pressure would return back to the baseline once the study was completed. Study design. Prospective, single-arm observational study. Methods. Study participants were Status Indians living on-reserve with type 2 diabetes and persistent hypertension who had participated in the DREAM3 study. B...

  13. Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Catherine N; Reynell, Clare; Gesslein, Bodil;

    2014-01-01

    that neuronal activity and the neurotransmitter glutamate evoke the release of messengers that dilate capillaries by actively relaxing pericytes. Dilation is mediated by prostaglandin E2, but requires nitric oxide release to suppress vasoconstricting 20-HETE synthesis. In vivo, when sensory input...... increases blood flow, capillaries dilate before arterioles and are estimated to produce 84% of the blood flow increase. In pathology, ischaemia evokes capillary constriction by pericytes. We show that this is followed by pericyte death in rigor, which may irreversibly constrict capillaries and damage the...

  14. Features of ambulatory blood pressure in 540 patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the features and influencing factors of ambulatory blood pressure in chronic kidney disease(CKD)patients.Methods A total of 540 CKD patients from May 2010 to May 2012 in our department

  15. A study of the cerebral blood flow pattern and cognitive deficit in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral blood flow pattern in Parkinson's disease was examined by 123I-IMP SPECT to determine whether the deficit in cognitive function is reflected in it. The patient group with Parkinson's disease showed deterioration in intelligence (Minimental state examination, Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices) and frontal lobe test (the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test). Though the uptake ratio of prefrontal area/occipital area in 123I-IMP SPECT study varied widely in the Parkinson's disease group compared to the normal control group, there was no significant difference in the mean. Selective depletion of frontal lobe blood flow was not confirmed in this study. There was no correlation between cerebral blood flow pattern and cognitive functions including frontal lobe function and intelligence. We concluded that the deficit in cognitive function was not reflected in the cerebral blood flow pattern in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  16. Relationship of blood pressure variability and angiotensinogen T235M polymorphism with Binswanger’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    位慧芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the relationship of blood pressure variability(BPV) and angiotensinogen(AGT) T235M polymorphism with Binswanger’s disease(BD). Methods Totally 122 cases with BD and 108 cases with essential hypertension had been enrolled. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was used to get the data

  17. Brazilian actual conditions of the blood irradiation practice in graft-versus-host disease prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfusion of blood and cellular components containing viable lymphocytes can result in Graft-Versus Host Disease (GVHD) in immuno compromised patients. It can be prevented by irradiation, prior to transfusion, of blood components. This work presents an overview of the Brazilian reality and suggests policies to optimise GVHD prevention. (author). 4 refs

  18. The role of oxidized albumin in blood cell aggregation disturbance in burn disease

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Grigory Ya; Egorihina, Marpha N

    2013-01-01

    The burn disease is found to be accompanied by increasing of the level of oxidized proteins of blood serum. We studied the influence of albumin oxidation rate on aggregation of platelets and erythrocytes, disaggregation of erythrocytes. The changes of blood cells aggregation associated with oxidation rate of albumin were found. Possible mechanisms of these effects are discussed.

  19. Neurofilament Light Chain in Blood and CSF as Marker of Disease Progression in Mouse Models and in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacioglu, Mehtap; Maia, Luis F; Preische, Oliver; Schelle, Juliane; Apel, Anja; Kaeser, Stephan A; Schweighauser, Manuel; Eninger, Timo; Lambert, Marius; Pilotto, Andrea; Shimshek, Derya R; Neumann, Ulf; Kahle, Philipp J; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Neumann, Manuela; Maetzler, Walter; Kuhle, Jens; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    A majority of current disease-modifying therapeutic approaches for age-related neurodegenerative diseases target their characteristic proteopathic lesions (α-synuclein, Tau, Aβ). To monitor such treatments, fluid biomarkers reflecting the underlying disease process are crucial. We found robust increases of neurofilament light chain (NfL) in CSF and blood in murine models of α-synucleinopathies, tauopathy, and β-amyloidosis. Blood and CSF NfL levels were strongly correlated, and NfL increases coincided with the onset and progression of the corresponding proteopathic lesions in brain. Experimental induction of α-synuclein lesions increased CSF and blood NfL levels, while blocking Aβ lesions attenuated the NfL increase. Consistently, we also found NfL increases in CSF and blood of human α-synucleinopathies, tauopathies, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results suggest that CSF and particularly blood NfL can serve as a reliable and easily accessible biomarker to monitor disease progression and treatment response in mouse models and potentially in human proteopathic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27292537

  20. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Georg B; Munroe, Patricia B; Rice, Kenneth M; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D; Chasman, Daniel I; Smith, Albert V; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A; Jackson, Anne U; Peden, John F; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C; Fox, Ervin R; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D G; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Steinle, Nanette I; Grobbee, Diederick E; Arking, Dan E; Kardia, Sharon L; Morrison, Alanna C; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Beilby, John P; Lawrence, Robert W; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J Hunter; Bis, Joshua C; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette R; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R; Bornstein, Stefan R; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B; Hunt, Steven C; Sun, Yan V; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Thomas J; Burton, Paul R; Soler Artigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K; Rudock, Megan E; Heckbert, Susan R; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R G; Wain, Louise V; Morken, Mario A; Swift, Amy J; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J L; van Gilst, Wiek H; Janipalli, Charles S; Mani, K Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Oostra, Ben A; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M V Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Casas, Juan P; Mohlke, Karen L; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Cooper, Richard S; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C; Harris, Tamara B; Morris, Richard W; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J; Johnson, Toby

    2011-10-01

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or  ≥90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  1. The Emergence of Blood and Blood Vessels in the Embryo and Its Relevance to Postnatal Biology and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Tiffany M.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    Blood and blood vessels develop in parallel within mammalian systems, and this temporal and spatial association has led to the confirmation of an endothelial origin of hematopoiesis. The extraembryonic yolk sac and aorto-gonado-mesonephros (AGM) region both contain a specialized population of endothelial cells ("hemogenic endothelium") that function to produce hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, which then differentiate to provide the full complement of blood cells within the developing embryo and furthermore in the adult system. Therefore, this population has great therapeutic potential in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. This chapter reviews the development of the vascular and hematopoietic systems, characterization and function of the hemogenic endothelium within embryonic and embryonic stem cell (ES cell) models, and speculate on the presence of such a population within the adult system. In order to harness this endothelial subtype for clinical application, we must understand both the normal functions of these cells and the potential for misregulation in disease states.

  2. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease latest unknown in struggle to restore faith in blood supply.

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, P.

    1996-01-01

    There was considerable medical interest in a recent Toronto conference on prion disease--and in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in particular--because of the recent tainted-beef controversy in Britain. Although there is no proven link between a newly recognized variant form of CJD and "mad cow disease," and no evidence that CJD can be spread through the blood supply, the theoretical risk has scientists scrambling to understand how the disease is spread and policymakers struggling with the tho...

  3. Abundant genetic overlap between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases indicates shared molecular genetic mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole A Andreassen

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases, but the nature of these associations is not well understood. We used genome-wide association studies (GWAS to investigate shared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases. We analyzed data from GWAS (n~200,000 individuals, applying new False Discovery Rate (FDR methods, to investigate genetic overlap between blood lipid levels [triglycerides (TG, low density lipoproteins (LDL, high density lipoproteins (HDL] and a selection of archetypal immune-mediated diseases (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, psoriasis and sarcoidosis. We found significant polygenic pleiotropy between the blood lipids and all the investigated immune-mediated diseases. We discovered several shared risk loci between the immune-mediated diseases and TG (n = 88, LDL (n = 87 and HDL (n = 52. Three-way analyses differentiated the pattern of pleiotropy among the immune-mediated diseases. The new pleiotropic loci increased the number of functional gene network nodes representing blood lipid loci by 40%. Pathway analyses implicated several novel shared mechanisms for immune pathogenesis and lipid biology, including glycosphingolipid synthesis (e.g. FUT2 and intestinal host-microbe interactions (e.g. ATG16L1. We demonstrate a shared genetic basis for blood lipids and immune-mediated diseases independent of environmental factors. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into dyslipidemia and immune-mediated diseases and may have implications for therapeutic trials involving lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory agents.

  4. Relationship of blood folate, vitamin B12 levels with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the relationship of blood folate, vitamin B12 (Vit. B12) with coronary artery disease and the mechanism, whole blood folate, plasma folate and Vit. B12 in 94 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) were measured and compared with normal controls. The relationship of folate, Vit. B12 levels with the number of coronary vessel stenosis was also studied. Homocysteine(Hcy) and lipid levels in 57 subjects randomly selected were measured and the correlation of whole blood folate, plasma folate and Vit. B12 with Hcy and lipid levels was analyzed. The results showed that whole blood folate, plasma folate and Vit. B12 concentrations in CHD patients were significantly lower than those in normal controls. There were no significant differences in whole blood folate, plasma folate and Vit. B12 levels between patients with different number of coronary vessel stenosis. There was negative correlation of whole blood folate, plasma folate and Vit. B12 with Hcy, but no significant correlation was found with lipid. The results demonstrated that low blood folate and Vit. B12 levels were associated with the coronary heart disease, and that high plasma Hcy caused by deficiency of folate and Vit. B12 may be an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. (authors)

  5. Gastric emptying, postprandial blood pressure, glycaemia and splanchnic flow in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahair, Laurence G; Kimber, Thomas E; Flabouris, Katerina; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine gastric emptying, blood pressure, mesenteric artery blood flow, and blood glucose responses to oral glucose in Parkinson’s disease. METHODS: Twenty-one subjects (13 M, 8 F; age 64.2 ± 1.6 years) with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease (Hoehn and Yahr score 1.4 ± 0.1, duration of known disease 6.3 ± 0.9 years) consumed a 75 g glucose drink, labelled with 20 MBq 99mTc-calcium phytate. Gastric emptying was quantified with scintigraphy, blood pressure and heart rate with an automated device, superior mesenteric artery blood flow by Doppler ultrasonography and blood glucose by glucometer for 180 min. Autonomic nerve function was evaluated with cardiovascular reflex tests and upper gastrointestinal symptoms by questionnaire. RESULTS: The mean gastric half-emptying time was 106 ± 9.1 min, gastric emptying was abnormally delayed in 3 subjects (14%). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure fell (P Parkinson’s disease, gastric emptying is related to autonomic dysfunction and a determinant of the glycaemic response to oral glucose.

  6. Storage time of transfused blood and disease recurrence after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perioperative blood transfusion and subsequent development of postoperative infectious complications may lead to poor prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. It has been suggested that the development of postoperative infectious complications may be related to the storage time of...... the transfused blood. Therefore, we studied the relationship between blood storage time and the development of disease recurrence and long-term survival after colorectal cancer surgery. METHODS: Preoperative and postoperative data were prospectively recorded in 740 patients undergoing elective...... transfused patients (P = 0.004). The survival of patients receiving blood exclusively stored < 21 days was 2.5 years. For patients receiving any blood stored > or = 21 days, survival was 3.7 years (P = 0.12). Among patients with curative resection (n = 532), the hazard ratio of disease recurrence was 1.5 (95...

  7. Investigations of significance of blood smear results in diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkonjak Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic examination of stained smears of peripheral blood is of vital significance in the speedy diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases, in particular during the stage of infection when the cause is present in the blood, or blood cells. It is sometimes possible to make a definitive diagnosis of an infectious or parasitic disease following an examination of a stained smear of the peripheral blood. Since microscopic examinations of a peripheral blood smear are applied increasingly rarely in clinical practice, due to the development of other methods for the diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases in dogs, as well as the lack of knowledge of the morphology of the numerous causes that can be present in the blood, we carried out an investigation into the presence and spread of infections whose causes can be present in dog blood. The investigations covered 100 dogs from which peripheral blood smears were taken and then stained with a Giemsa solution according to the standard protocol and examined under a microscope with an immersion lens. The examination of peripheral blood smears stained according to Giemsa resulted in the identification of the presence of an Ehrlichia spp. morula in a neutrophil granulocyte in one dog. The presence of hemotropic mycoplasmas was established in erythrocytes of eleven dogs, while the presence of the protozoa Babesia canis in erythrocytes was identified in five dogs included in the investigations. A microscopic examination of dog peripheral blood smears stained according to Giemsa was shown as a speedy, practical, simple, and inexpensive method for making a definitive etiological diagnosis of these infections, and it should be included regularly in standard protocols for the diagnostics of infectious and parasitic diseases.

  8. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  9. CFD simulation of blood flow inside the corkscrew collaterals of the Buerger’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Alireza; Charjouei Moghadam, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Buerger’s disease is an occlusive arterial disease that occurs mainly in medium and small vessels. This disease is associated with Tobacco usage. The existence of corkscrew collateral is one of the established characteristics of the Buerger’s disease. Methods: In this study, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of blood flow within the corkscrew artery of the Buerger’s disease is conducted. The geometry of the artery is constructed based on the actual corkscrew artery of a patient diagnosed with the Buerger’s disease. The blood properties are the same as the actual blood properties of the patient. The blood flow rate is taken from the available experimental data in the literature. Results: The local velocity patterns, pressure and kinematic viscosity distributions in different segments of the corkscrew collateral artery was demonstrated and discussed for the first time for this kind of artery. The effects of non-Newtonian consideration for the blood viscosity behavior were investigated in different segments of the artery. Moreover, the variations of the blood flow patterns along the artery were investigated in details for each segment. Conclusion: It was found that the flow patterns were affected by the complex geometry of this artery in such a way that it could lead to the presence of sites that were prone to the accumulation of the flowing particles in blood like nicotine. Furthermore, due to the existence of many successive bends in this artery, the variations of kinematic viscosity along this artery were significant, therefore the non-Newtonian behavior of the blood viscosity must be considered. PMID:27340623

  10. A Case of Vertical Transmission of Chagas Disease Contracted via Blood Transfusion in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A Fearon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is endemic in many countries in Latin America, where infected bugs of the Triatominea subfamily carry the parasite in the gut and transmit it to humans through fecal contamination of a bite. However, vertical transmission and transmission through blood transfusion and organ transplantation is well documented. Increasing immigration from endemic countries to North America has prompted blood operators, including Canadian Blood Services and Hema Quebec, to initiate blood donor testing for Chagas antibody. In the present report, an unusual case of vertical transmission from a mother, most likely infected through blood transfusion, and detected as part of a concurrent seroprevalence study in blood donors is described.

  11. Observations on serial radionuclide blood-flow studies in Paget's disease: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-four symptomatic patients with symoptoms of active Paget's disease of bone were evaluated, during the course of their therapy, a total of 71 times (24 baseline and 47 follow-up examinations) by serial alkaline phosphatase levels (AP), Tc-99m MDP bone scans, and radionuclide blood-flow studies. The flow study correlated with disease activity in all of the baseline studies and in at least 85% of the follow-up studies. In five patients (seven follow-up studies) the changes in local blood flow correctly anticipated the eventual rise or fall of AP. In comparison with the bone scan, the changes in blood flow preceded the bone-scan alterations or were more reliable indicators of disease activity in 12 of the 13 follow-up studies in which the results of the two examinations disagreed. We conclude that the radionuclide flow study provides useful additional clinical information in the management of Paget's disease

  12. Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, and risk of vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, N; Gao, P; Seshasai, S R Kondapally;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainties persist about the magnitude of associations of diabetes mellitus and fasting glucose concentration with risk of coronary heart disease and major stroke subtypes. We aimed to quantify these associations for a wide range of circumstances. METHODS: We undertook a meta...... markers. HRs for coronary heart disease were higher in women than in men, at 40-59 years than at 70 years and older, and with fatal than with non-fatal disease. At an adult population-wide prevalence of 10%, diabetes was estimated to account for 11% (10-12%) of vascular deaths. Fasting blood glucose......-analysis of individual records of diabetes, fasting blood glucose concentration, and other risk factors in people without initial vascular disease from studies in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration. We combined within-study regressions that were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure...

  13. Radiological Diagnosis of Recirculatory Congenital Heart Disease with Increased Pulmonary Blood Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of patients with congenital diseases is increasing therefore early diagnosis of these diseases is of crucial importance. Radiological diagnostics of recirculatory congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow, i.e. atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricle septal defect (VSD), ductus arteriosus (Botalli) persistence (DAP) and atrioventricular communication (AVC) have been analysed. Recirculatory congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow (ASD, VSD, DAP)radiologically causes similar lung, lung roots and pulmonary arterial changes. After the radiomorphological and radiofunctional examination of chest organs the following symptoms of the disease were defined: all the patients had hypervolemy, enlarged structural lungs roots, enlarged pulmonary arterial arch. These radiofunctional symptoms help to differentiate congenital heart diseases case by case. (author). 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. Positron emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease: The relationship between regional cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease has demonstrated the importance of the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic activity. In acute stroke it has been found that within the first hours after the onset of symptoms cerebral blood flow in the affected area is more depressed than cerebral oxygen utilisation. This relative preservation of oxygen utilisation results from an increase in the oxygen extraction ratio far above its normal value. However, the oxygen extraction fraction subsequently falls in the following days indicating the transition from a situation of possibly reversible ischaemia to irreversible infarction. In patients with carotid occlusive disease an increase in the oxygen extraction ratio has been observed only in very few cases. It has been shown, however, that at an earlier stage the relationship between CBF and CBV (as CBF/CBV-ratio) provides a sensitive measure of diminished perfusion pressure which could be helpful for the selection of patients for EC-IC bypass surgery. In patients with sickle cell anaemia it has been found that oxygen delivery to the brain is maintained by an increase in cerebral blood flow, whereas the oxygen extraction ratio is not increased despite the presence of a low oxygen affinity haemoglobin. Preliminary observations in classical migraine suggest an ischaemic situation during the attack. (orig.)

  15. DJ-1 isoforms in whole blood as potential biomarkers of Parkinson disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiangmin; Cook, Travis J.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Leverenz, James B.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cain, Kevin C.; Pan, Catherine; Edgar, John Scott; Goodlett, David R.; Racette, Brad A.; Checkoway, Harvey; Montine, Thomas J.; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a multifunctional protein that plays an important role in oxidative stress, cell death, and synucleinopathies, including Parkinson disease. Previous studies have demonstrated that total DJ-1 levels decrease in the cerebrospinal fluid, but do not change significantly in human plasma from patients with Parkinson disease when compared with controls. In this study, we measured total DJ-1 and its isoforms in whole blood of patients with Parkinson disease at various stages, Alzheimer diseas...

  16. Interarm Difference in Blood Pressure: Reproducibility and Association with Peripheral Vascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jesper Mehlsen; Niels Wiinberg

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the interarm difference in blood pressure and its use as an indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were included from consecutive patients referred from their general practitioner to our vascular laboratory for possible PAD aged 50 years or older without known cardiac disease, renal disease, or diabetes mellitus. 824 patients (453 women) with mean age of 72 years (range: 50–101) were included. 491 patients had a diagnosis of hypertension and ...

  17. Classification of peripheral occlusive arterial diseases based on symptoms, signs and distal blood pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, K H; Noer, Ivan; Paaske, William; Sager, P

    1980-01-01

    Systolic blood pressures at toe and ankle were measured in 459 consecutive patients with occlusive arterial disease. Fifty-eight per cent had intermittent claudication with arterial disease of all degrees of severity. Seventeen per cent complained of rest pain having toe systolic pressures below 30...... occlusive arterial disease which was located distally on the legs. A classification in three groups is suggested: (1) ischemia only during exercise; (2) ischemia at rest with or without ulcerations: and (3) diabetics with chronic ulcerations....

  18. Association between α-synuclein blood transcripts and early, neuroimaging-supported Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locascio, Joseph J; Eberly, Shirley; Liao, Zhixiang; Liu, Ganqiang; Hoesing, Ashley N; Duong, Karen; Trisini-Lipsanopoulos, Ana; Dhima, Kaltra; Hung, Albert Y; Flaherty, Alice W; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Hayes, Michael T; Wills, Anne-Marie; Shivraj Sohur, U; Mejia, Nicte I; Selkoe, Dennis J; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Dong, Xianjun; Marek, Ken; Zheng, Bin; Ivinson, Adrian; Hyman, Bradley T; Growdon, John H; Sudarsky, Lewis R; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Ravina, Bernard; Scherzer, Clemens R

    2015-09-01

    There are no cures for neurodegenerative diseases and this is partially due to the difficulty of monitoring pathogenic molecules in patients during life. The Parkinson's disease gene α-synuclein (SNCA) is selectively expressed in blood cells and neurons. Here we show that SNCA transcripts in circulating blood cells are paradoxically reduced in early stage, untreated and dopamine transporter neuroimaging-supported Parkinson's disease in three independent regional, national, and international populations representing 500 cases and 363 controls and on three analogue and digital platforms with P Parkinson's disease of 2.45 compared to individuals in the highest quartile. Disease-relevant transcript isoforms were low even near disease onset. Importantly, low SNCA transcript abundance predicted cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson's disease during up to 5 years of longitudinal follow-up. This study reveals a consistent association of reduced SNCA transcripts in accessible peripheral blood and early-stage Parkinson's disease in 863 participants and suggests a clinical role as potential predictor of cognitive decline. Moreover, the three independent biobank cohorts provide a generally useful platform for rapidly validating any biological marker of this common disease. PMID:26220939

  19. Gene expression patterns in peripheral blood correlate with the extent of coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Sinnaeve

    Full Text Available Systemic and local inflammation plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, but the relationship of whole blood gene expression changes with coronary disease remains unclear. We have investigated whether gene expression patterns in peripheral blood correlate with the severity of coronary disease and whether these patterns correlate with the extent of atherosclerosis in the vascular wall. Patients were selected according to their coronary artery disease index (CADi, a validated angiographical measure of the extent of coronary atherosclerosis that correlates with outcome. RNA was extracted from blood of 120 patients with at least a stenosis greater than 50% (CADi > or = 23 and from 121 controls without evidence of coronary stenosis (CADi = 0. 160 individual genes were found to correlate with CADi (rho > 0.2, P<0.003. Prominent differential expression was observed especially in genes involved in cell growth, apoptosis and inflammation. Using these 160 genes, a partial least squares multivariate regression model resulted in a highly predictive model (r(2 = 0.776, P<0.0001. The expression pattern of these 160 genes in aortic tissue also predicted the severity of atherosclerosis in human aortas, showing that peripheral blood gene expression associated with coronary atherosclerosis mirrors gene expression changes in atherosclerotic arteries. In conclusion, the simultaneous expression pattern of 160 genes in whole blood correlates with the severity of coronary artery disease and mirrors expression changes in the atherosclerotic vascular wall.

  20. Changing optical properties of blood serum proteins in case of oncological diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, G. P.; Petrusevich, Yu. M.; Boiko, A. V.; Ivanov, A. V.; Papish, E. A.; Khlapov, V. P.; Fedorova, K. V.

    2007-03-01

    Molecular methods of diagnostics of widespread diseases including oncological pathology on the base static and dynamic laser light scattering in serum blood solution are testified. Rayleigh - Debye laser light scattering method are used to measure molecular parameters of blood serum. Dynamical parameters of macromolecules can be measured by photon correlation spectroscopy method. We obtained that the parameter of intermolecular interaction B for serum blood solution of oncological patients is considerably less then B for serum blood solution of healthy persons and in a number of cases has even a negative value. The effective mass of scattering particles in serum water solutions for samples of oncology diseases patients increase in comparison to control samples. As follows from our experimental results, there is the difference between dynamic molecular parameters for control samples and ones with oncological pathology.

  1. Alzheimer’s disease: are blood and brain markers related? A systematic review:Blood and Brain Markers of Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Ali; Dobson, Richard James Butler; Sattlecker, Martina; Kiddle, Steven John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Peripheral protein biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) may helpidentify novel treatment avenues by allowing early diagnosis, recruitment toclinical trials, and treatment initiation. The purpose of this review was to deter-mine which proteins have been found to be differentially expressed in the ADbrain and whether these proteins are also found within the blood of ADpatients. Methods: A two-stage approach was conducted. The first stageinvolved conducting a systematic search to ide...

  2. What African Americans with Diabetes or High Blood Pressure Need to Know: Get Checked for Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Language URL What African Americans with Diabetes or High Blood Pressure Need to Know Page Content Get Checked for ... I be checked for kidney disease? Diabetes and high blood pressure can damage the kidneys and lead to kidney ...

  3. Automatic disease screening method using image processing for dried blood microfluidic drop stain pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Basant S; Roy, Mukesh; Ranjan, Priya; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines programmed automatic recognition of infection from samples of dried stains of micro-scale drops of patient blood. This technique has the upside of being low-cost and less-intrusive and not requiring puncturing the patient with a needle for drawing blood, which is especially critical for infants and the matured. It also does not require expensive pathological blood test laboratory equipment. The method is shown in this work to be successful for ailment identification in patients suffering from tuberculosis and anaemia. Illness affects the physical properties of blood, which thus influence the samples of dried micro-scale blood drop stains. For instance, if a patient has a severe drop in platelet count, which is often the case of dengue or malaria patients, the blood's physical property of viscosity drops substantially, i.e. the blood is thinner. Thus, the blood micro-scale drop stain samples can be utilised for diagnosing maladies. This paper presents programmed automatic examination of the dried micro-scale drop blood stain designs utilising an algorithm based on pattern recognition. The samples of micro-scale blood drop stains of ordinary non-infected people are clearly recognisable as well as the samples of micro-scale blood drop stains of sick people, due to key distinguishing features. As a contextual analysis, the micro-scale blood drop stains of patients infected with tuberculosis have been contrasted with the micro-scale blood drop stains of typical normal healthy people. The paper dives into the fundamental flow mechanics behind how the samples of the dried micro-scale blood drop stain is shaped. What has been found is a thick ring like feature in the dried micro-scale blood drop stains of non-ailing people and thin shape like lines in the dried micro-scale blood drop stains of patients with anaemia or tuberculosis disease. The ring like feature at the periphery is caused by an outward stream conveying suspended particles to the edge

  4. Infectious Prions in the Saliva and Blood of Deer with Chronic Wasting Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiason, Candace K.; Powers, Jenny G.; Dahmes, Sallie J.; Osborn, David A.; Miller, Karl V.; Warren, Robert J.; Mason, Gary L.; Hays, Sheila A.; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Seelig, Davis M.; Wild, Margaret A.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Spraker, Terry R.; Miller, Michael W.; Sigurdson, Christina J.; Telling, Glenn C.; Hoover, Edward A.

    2006-10-01

    A critical concern in the transmission of prion diseases, including chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids, is the potential presence of prions in body fluids. To address this issue directly, we exposed cohorts of CWD-naïve deer to saliva, blood, or urine and feces from CWD-positive deer. We found infectious prions capable of transmitting CWD in saliva (by the oral route) and in blood (by transfusion). The results help to explain the facile transmission of CWD among cervids and prompt caution concerning contact with body fluids in prion infections.

  5. Suppression of spleen pathological function by roentgenoendovascular occlussion in some blood systemic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that REO of splenic artery in thrombocytopenic purpura, hypoplastic and autoimmune hemolytic anemia manifests the same clinical effect as splenectomy. This treatment procedure may substitute splenectomy in a definite group of patients with above-mentioned blood systemic diseases or precede it as a preparation and prognosis stage. Stage-by-stage total embolization of splenic artery is a necessary technical method permitting to attain the necessary medical effect without risk of developing acute spleen infarction. At present REO is used in some blood diseases in patients with high risk of operation, particularly with active hemorrhagic syndrome of adrenal insufficiency, concomitant inflammatory processes

  6. Blood Thinners

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have some kinds of heart or blood vessel disease, or if you have poor blood flow to your brain, your doctor may recommend that you take a blood thinner. Blood thinners reduce the risk of heart ...

  7. Relationship between blood pressure values, depressive symptoms and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with cardiometabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jani, Bhautesh Dinesh; Cavanagh, Jonathan; Barry, Sarah J. E.; Der, Geoff; Sattar, Naveed; Mair, Frances S.

    2016-01-01

    We studied joint effect of blood pressure-BP and depression on risk of major adverse cardiovascular outcome in patients with existing cardiometabolic disease. A cohort of 35537 patients with coronary heart disease, diabetes or stroke underwent depression screening and BP was recorded concurrently. We used Cox’s proportional hazards to calculate risk of major adverse cardiovascular event-MACE (myocardial infarction/heart failure/stroke or cardiovascular death) over 4 years associated with ba...

  8. Implication of Cord Blood for Cell-Based Therapy in Refractory Childhood Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Since cord blood (CB) contains hematopoietic stem cells as well as a mixture of multipotent stem cells, CB has the ability to give rise to hematopoietic, epithelial, endothelial and neural tissues. Recently, the application of cell-based therapy using CB has expanded its clinical utility, particularly, by using autologous CB in children with refractory diseases. This review focuses clinical and pre-clinical application of CB cell-based therapy for inherited metabolic diseases as well as tissu...

  9. Huntington's disease biomarker progression profile identified by transcriptome sequencing in peripheral blood

    OpenAIRE

    Mastrokolias, Anastasios; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Goeman, Jelle J.; van Duijn, Erik; Roos, Raymund AC; Roos C. van der Mast; van Ommen, GertJan B.; Johan T den Dunnen; 't Hoen, Peter AC; van Roon-Mom, Willeke MC

    2015-01-01

    With several therapeutic approaches in development for Huntington's disease, there is a need for easily accessible biomarkers to monitor disease progression and therapy response. We performed next-generation sequencing-based transcriptome analysis of total RNA from peripheral blood of 91 mutation carriers (27 presymptomatic and, 64 symptomatic) and 33 controls. Transcriptome analysis by DeepSAGE identified 167 genes significantly associated with clinical total motor score in Huntington's dise...

  10. Peripheral blood lymphocyte appearance in a case of I cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Meer, W. van der; Jakobs, B; Bocca, G.; Smeitink, J.; Schuurmans, S.; de Keijzer, M H

    2001-01-01

    In general, peripheral blood smears are performed to obtain information with regard to various morphological features as an aid in the diagnosis of infection or malignancy. This report presents a patient with I cell disease (inclusion cell disease), a fatal lysosomal storage disorder caused by a defect in an enzyme responsible for the transfer of mannose-6-phosphate ligands to precursor lysosomal enzymes. As a consequence, most lysosomal enzymes are transported outside the cell instead of bei...

  11. Progression of kidney disease in type 2 diabetes – beyond blood pressure control: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Chatha Maninder P; Daoud Tarek M; Kramer Holly J; Leehey David J; Isreb Majd A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The risk factors for progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) have not been fully elucidated. Although uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) is known to be deleterious, other factors may become more important once BP is treated. Methods All patients seen in the outpatient clinics of our hospital between January 1993 and September 2002 with type 2 DM and clinical evidence of CKD were evaluated. Progression of kidney disease was evaluated by ra...

  12. Immuno phenotype of blood lymphocytes in radiation-associated Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immuno phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied in Hodgkin's disease including patients exposed to radionuclides of the characteristic Chernobyl pattern. The group of patients under study has been characterized by decreasing T- and NK-cell immunity, such a decrease being more pronounced in radiation-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma. The data obtained as well as the evidence of Epstein-Barr virus activation could explain the aggressiveness of the disease in such patients and the difficulties in their treatment

  13. Multifunctional role of green blood therapy to cure for many diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Kumar Singhal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Juice of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., Poaceae grass is termed as green blood. Wheatgrass is a variety of grass that is used like a herbal medicine for its therapeutic and nutritional properties. The aim of this study is to concise the health benefits of green blood therapy. As wheatgrass juice (WGJ bears a close resemblance to the "hemoglobin" in our blood, the juice is called as "green blood" and the therapy using it is called as "green blood therapy". The WGJ is a complete food and contains carbohydrates, proteins, all essential minerals, and vitamins. Wheatgrass therapy is recommended for patients suffering from chronic diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, Parkinson′s disease, joint pains, TB, constipation, hypertension, diabetes, bronchitis, insomnia, eczema, sterility, hemorrhage, obesity, and flatulence. It is also useful in the treatment of cancer. The WGJ is immediately absorbed into the bloodstream and gives energy. On an empty stomach, it is assimilated into blood in about 20 min. The energy lasts throughout the day. It is practically a fountain of youth and found to have numerous health benefits. This review is concluded that the WGJ has higher degree of curative index and this can be last alternative therapy when the all therapy will fail.

  14. Correlation between "ABO" blood group phenotypes and periodontal disease: Prevalence in south Kanara district, Karnataka state, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurpur Prakash Pai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The correlation between certain systemic diseases and ABO blood group is a well-documented fact. The association between periodontal disease and ABO blood group is not studied in relation to a specific geographic location. Here is a study conducted on a group of patients belonging to South Kanara district of Karnataka state. Materials and Methods: A total of 750 subjects aged between 30and 38 years belonging to South Kanara district were selected on random basis. The study subjects were segregated into healthy/mild gingivitis, moderate/severe gingivitis, and periodontitis group, based on Loe and Silness index and clinical attachment loss as criteria. The study group was further categorized and graded using Ramfjord′s periodontal disease index. Blood samples were collected to identify ABO blood group. Results: Prevalence of blood group O was more in South Kanara district, followed by blood groups B and A, and the least prevalent was AB. The percentage distribution of subjects with blood groups O and AB was more in healthy/mild gingivitis group (group I and moderate/severe gingivitis group (group II, while subjects with blood groups B and A were more in periodontitis group III. There was increased prevalence of subjects with blood groups O and AB with healthy periodontium, while subjects with blood groups B and A showed inclination toward diseased periodontium. Conclusion: There is a correlation existing between periodontal disease and ABO blood group in this geographic location. This association can be due to various blood group antigens acting as receptors for infectious agents associated with periodontal disease. This broad correlation between periodontal disease and ABO blood group also points toward susceptibility ofthe subjects with certain blood groups to periodontal disease.

  15. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Davey Smith, George; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimäki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. Methods and results We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with established associations with HDL-C, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). For each trait, we constructed two scores. The first was unrestricted, including all independent SNPs associated with the lipid trait identified from a prior meta-analysis (threshold P < 2 × 10−6); and the second a restricted score, filtered to remove any SNPs also associated with either of the other two lipid traits at P ≤ 0.01. Mendelian randomization meta-analyses were conducted in 17 studies including 62,199 participants and 12,099 CHD events. Both the unrestricted and restricted allele scores for LDL-C (42 and 19 SNPs, respectively) associated with CHD. For HDL-C, the unrestricted allele score (48 SNPs) was associated with CHD (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.70), per 1 mmol/L higher HDL-C, but neither the restricted allele score (19 SNPs; OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.42, 1.98) nor the unrestricted HDL-C allele score adjusted for triglycerides, LDL-C, or statin use (OR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.44, 1.46) showed a robust association. For triglycerides, the unrestricted allele score (67 SNPs) and the restricted allele score (27 SNPs) were both associated with CHD (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.11 and 1.61; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.59, respectively) per 1-log unit increment. However, the unrestricted triglyceride score adjusted for HDL-C, LDL-C, and statin use gave an OR for CHD of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.75). Conclusion The genetic findings support a causal effect of triglycerides on CHD risk, but a causal role for HDL-C, though possible, remains less certain. PMID:24474739

  16. DJ-1 isoforms in whole blood as potential biomarkers of Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiangmin; Cook, Travis J.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Leverenz, James B.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Hu, Shu-Ching; Cain, Kevin C.; Pan, Catherine; Edgar, John Scott; Goodlett, David R.; Racette, Brad A.; Checkoway, Harvey; Montine, Thomas J.; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a multifunctional protein that plays an important role in oxidative stress, cell death, and synucleinopathies, including Parkinson disease. Previous studies have demonstrated that total DJ-1 levels decrease in the cerebrospinal fluid, but do not change significantly in human plasma from patients with Parkinson disease when compared with controls. In this study, we measured total DJ-1 and its isoforms in whole blood of patients with Parkinson disease at various stages, Alzheimer disease, and healthy controls to identify potential peripheral biomarkers of PD. In an initial discovery study of 119 subjects, 7 DJ-1 isoforms were reliably detected, and blood levels of those with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modifications were discovered to be altered in late-stage Parkinson disease. This result was further confirmed in a validation study of another 114 participants, suggesting that, unlike total DJ-1 levels, post-translationally modified isoforms of DJ-1 from whole blood are candidate biomarkers of late-stage Parkinson disease. PMID:23233873

  17. Vasoactive enzymes and blood flow responses to passive and active exercise in peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Meegan A.; Høier, Birgitte; Walker, Philip J.;

    2016-01-01

    than CON (1.04 ± 0.19 vs 0.50 ± 0.06 AU, P = 0.02), with no differences for other enzymes. Leg blood flow during exercise was correlated with prostacyclin synthase (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Elevated NADPH oxidase indicates that oxidative stress may be a primary cause of low nitric oxide availability......Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterised by impaired leg blood flow, which contributes to claudication and reduced exercise capacity. This study investigated to what extent vasoactive enzymes might contribute to altered blood flow in PAD (Fontaine stage II). Methods: We...... compared femoral artery blood flow during reactive hyperaemia, leg-extension exercise and passive leg movement, and determined the level of vasoactive enzymes in skeletal muscle samples from the vastus lateralis in PAD (n = 10, 68.5 ± 6.5 years) and healthy controls (CON, n = 9, 62.1 ± 12.3 years). Leg...

  18. Hemoglobin Targets and Blood Transfusions in Hemodialysis Patients without Symptomatic Cardiac Disease Receiving Erythropoietin Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Robert N.; Curtis, Bryan M.; Parfrey, Patrick S.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Optimal hemoglobin targets for chronic kidney disease patients receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents remain controversial. The effects of different hemoglobin targets on blood transfusion requirements have not been well characterized, despite their relevance to clinical decision-making.

  19. Red blood cell cluster separation from digital images for use in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hidalgo, Manuel; Guerrero-Peña, F A; Herold-García, S; Jaume-I-Capó, Antoni; Marrero-Fernández, P D

    2015-07-01

    The study of cell morphology is an important aspect of the diagnosis of some diseases, such as sickle cell disease, because red blood cell deformation is caused by these diseases. Due to the elongated shape of the erythrocyte, ellipse adjustment and concave point detection are applied widely to images of peripheral blood samples, including during the detection of cells that are partially occluded in the clusters generated by the sample preparation process. In the present study, we propose a method for the analysis of the shape of erythrocytes in peripheral blood smear samples of sickle cell disease, which uses ellipse adjustments and a new algorithm for detecting notable points. Furthermore, we apply a set of constraints that allow the elimination of significant image preprocessing steps proposed in previous studies. We used three types of images to validate our method: artificial images, which were automatically generated in a random manner using a computer code; real images from peripheral blood smear sample images that contained normal and elongated erythrocytes; and synthetic images generated from real isolated cells. Using the proposed method, the efficiency of detecting the two types of objects in the three image types exceeded 99.00%, 98.00%, and 99.35%, respectively. These efficiency levels were superior to the results obtained with previously proposed methods using the same database, which is available at http://erythrocytesidb.uib.es/. This method can be extended to clusters of several cells and it requires no user inputs. PMID:25216490

  20. Blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein function is not impaired in early Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, A. L.; van Berckel, B. N. M.; Lubberink, M.; Luurtsema, G.; Lammertsma, A. A.; Leenders, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    The cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown. Genetic susceptibility and exposure to environmental toxins contribute to specific neuronal loss in PD. Decreased blood-brain barrier (BBB) P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux function has been proposed as a possible causative link between toxin exposure an

  1. Microplate hybridization for Borna disease virus RNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, S; Takahashi, H; Nakaya, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Iwahashi, K.; Kazamatsuri, H; Iritani, S; Kuroki, N.; Ikeda, K.; Ikuta, K.

    1997-01-01

    We developed a simple and sensitive microplate hybridization procedure with which to identify Borna disease virus cDNA in amplified products from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The mean values for the positive PCR products were significant compared with those for any of the negative products, indicating that this method can be applied to rapidly diagnose a large number of clinical specimens.

  2. Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists enhance white blood cell aggregation in patients with ischaemic heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, A B; Pringle, T. H.; McNeill, G P; Tavendale, R; Belch, J J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, calcium channel blockers and long acting nitrates on white blood cell (WBC) aggregation were studied in patients with ischaemic heart disease. WBC aggregation was significantly increased by beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (P = 0.011) but was unaffected by either calcium channel blockers or long acting nitrates. Enhanced WBC aggregation promotes microvascular occlusion and damage.

  3. Nicholas Metropolis Award Talk for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Work in Computational Physics: Computational biophysics and multiscale modeling of blood cells and blood flow in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry

    2011-03-01

    Computational biophysics is a large and rapidly growing area of computational physics. In this talk, we will focus on a number of biophysical problems related to blood cells and blood flow in health and disease. Blood flow plays a fundamental role in a wide range of physiological processes and pathologies in the organism. To understand and, if necessary, manipulate the course of these processes it is essential to investigate blood flow under realistic conditions including deformability of blood cells, their interactions, and behavior in the complex microvascular network. Using a multiscale cell model we are able to accurately capture red blood cell mechanics, rheology, and dynamics in agreement with a number of single cell experiments. Further, this validated model yields accurate predictions of the blood rheological properties, cell migration, cell-free layer, and hemodynamic resistance in microvessels. In addition, we investigate blood related changes in malaria, which include a considerable stiffening of red blood cells and their cytoadherence to endothelium. For these biophysical problems computational modeling is able to provide new physical insights and capabilities for quantitative predictions of blood flow in health and disease.

  4. Longitudinal Patterns of Change in Systolic Blood Pressure and Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruski-Ivleva, Natalia; Viera, Anthony J; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul; Avery, Christy L; Schneider, Andrea L C; Couper, David; Kucharska-Newton, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Elevated blood pressure in midlife contributes significantly to the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, patterns of blood pressure increase may differ among individuals and may result in differential risk. Our goal was to examine the contribution of longitudinal patterns of blood pressure change to incidence of heart failure, coronary heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular disease mortality. Latent class growth models were used to identify patterns of change in blood pressure across 4 clinical examinations (1987-1998) among 9845 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort participants (mean age, 53.7 [SD 5.7] years). Patterns of change in systolic blood pressure included slowly and steeply increasing, a decreasing and a sustained elevated blood pressure. Changes in diastolic and mid-blood pressure (½ systolic+½ diastolic) were less pronounced. The association of blood pressure pattern group membership with incidence of clinical outcomes was examined in follow-up from the fourth clinical examination (1996-1998) to December 31, 2011, using Poisson regression models adjusted for demographic and metabolic characteristics, and hypertension medication use. A gradient of rates of all events was observed across the identified patterns. Associations were attenuated after adjustment for covariates. Cumulative systolic blood pressure load, rather than the temporal pattern of change in systolic blood pressure itself, plays a role in determining the risk of cardiovascular disease, in particular, of heart failure and cardiovascular disease mortality, independent of blood pressure level measured at one point in time. PMID:27045024

  5. Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Shashi; Killinger, James; Overby, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Children with sickle cell disease have a very high risk of lifelong neurologic morbidity and mortality. Cerebrovascular accidents are a known complication in children with sickle cell disease. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a constellation of acute neurologic findings increasingly recognized in pediatric critical care population with evidence of vasogenic edema on brain imaging possibly due to cerebral vascular endothelial cell dysfunction. This report, for the first time, describes a young adult with sickle cell disease who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following blood transfusion. PMID:22899796

  6. Disparate estimates of hypertension control from ambulatory and clinic blood pressure measurements in hypertensive kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Velvie; Rahman, Mahboob; Lipkowitz, Michael; Toto, Robert; Miller, Edgar; Faulkner, Marquetta; Rostand, Stephen; Hiremath, Leena; Sika, Mohammed; Kendrick, Cynthia; Hu, Bo; Greene, Tom; Appel, Lawrence; Phillips, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring provides unique information about day-night patterns of blood pressure (BP). The objectives of this article were to describe ABP patterns in African Americans with hypertensive kidney disease, to examine the joint distribution of clinic BP and ABP, and to determine associations of hypertensive target organ damage with clinic BP and ABP. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the African American Study of Kidney Disease Cohort Study. Masked hypertension was defined by elevated daytime (>or= 135/85 mm Hg) or elevated nighttime (>or= 120/70 mm Hg) ABP in those with controlled clinic BP (disease, in large part because of increased nighttime BP. Whether lowering nighttime BP improves clinical outcomes is unknown but should be tested given the substantial burden of BP-related morbidity in this population. PMID:19047584

  7. CHANGES OF INTERCELLULAR COOPERATION IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD IN TREATED PATIENTS WITH CARDIOLOGIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Korichkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study changes of intercellular cooperation in peripheral blood induced by treatment in patients with arterial hypertension (HT, ischemic heart disease (IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. 610 patients were involved into the study, including 250 patients with HT of stages I-III (50 untreated patients, 150 patients with IHD and 210 patients with CHF of stages I-III. All patients were treated except 50 hypertensive ones. 80 healthy patients (40 men, 40 women were included into control group. Blood smears of patients were evaluated (Romanovsky's stain. A number of leukocyte, autorosettes and autorosettes with erythrocyte lysis was calculated. The cellular association consisting of a neutrophil, monocyte or eosinocyte with 3 or more erythrocytes skintight to their surface defined as autorosettes. Erythrocytes number and hemoglobin level determined in peripheral blood.Results. Single autorosettes in peripheral blood were observed in patients of control group and in untreated patients with HT. Treated patients with HT, IHD and CHF had increased number of autorossets and autorosettes with erythrocytes lysis. This phenomenon resulted in reduction of erythrocytes number and hemoglobin level in peripheral blood.Conclusion. Treated patients with cardiologic diseases had changes in intercellular cooperation. It should be considered at intensive and long term therapy.

  8. Problems in cerebral blood flow calculation using xenon-133 in patients with pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used the end-tidal concentration of xenon-133 (air curve) to estimate the profile of its arterial concentration in calculating cerebral blood flow. We examined the effects of pulmonary disease and artificial ventilation on the air curve and the calculated cerebral blood flow. We studied the relation between arterial and end-tidal xenon activities in 19 subjects, of whom 15 had pulmonary dysfunction. The t 1/2 of the declining phases of the arterial and air curves were used to express their shapes. The mean +/- SD reference t 1/2 from 15 normal volunteers was 26.8 +/- 8.4 seconds. The mean +/- SD t 1/2 s of the air and arterial curves from the 15 patients with pulmonary dysfunction were 10.4 +/- 2.9 and 33.8 +/- 10.9 seconds. The degree of pulmonary dysfunction (expressed as the pulmonary shunt percentage) correlated with distortion of the air curve. Substituting the arterial for the air curve, mean calculated cerebral blood flow (as the initial slope index) increased from 40 to 61 for the 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The degree of underestimation of cerebral blood flow using the air curve correlated with the pulmonary shunt percentage. Our work confirms the problems of estimating cerebral blood flow in subjects with pulmonary dysfunction

  9. Huntington's disease biomarker progression profile identified by transcriptome sequencing in peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrokolias, Anastasios; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Goeman, Jelle J; van Duijn, Erik; Roos, Raymund A C; van der Mast, Roos C; van Ommen, GertJan B; den Dunnen, Johan T; 't Hoen, Peter A C; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-10-01

    With several therapeutic approaches in development for Huntington's disease, there is a need for easily accessible biomarkers to monitor disease progression and therapy response. We performed next-generation sequencing-based transcriptome analysis of total RNA from peripheral blood of 91 mutation carriers (27 presymptomatic and, 64 symptomatic) and 33 controls. Transcriptome analysis by DeepSAGE identified 167 genes significantly associated with clinical total motor score in Huntington's disease patients. Relative to previous studies, this yielded novel genes and confirmed previously identified genes, such as H2AFY, an overlap in results that has proven difficult in the past. Pathway analysis showed enrichment of genes of the immune system and target genes of miRNAs, which are downregulated in Huntington's disease models. Using a highly parallelized microfluidics array chip (Fluidigm), we validated 12 of the top 20 significant genes in our discovery cohort and 7 in a second independent cohort. The five genes (PROK2, ZNF238, AQP9, CYSTM1 and ANXA3) that were validated independently in both cohorts present a candidate biomarker panel for stage determination and therapeutic readout in Huntington's disease. Finally we suggest a first empiric formula predicting total motor score from the expression levels of our biomarker panel. Our data support the view that peripheral blood is a useful source to identify biomarkers for Huntington's disease and monitor disease progression in future clinical trials. PMID:25626709

  10. Blood Dendritic Cells: Canary in the Coal Mine to Predict Chronic Inflammatory Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodie eMiles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of risk factors for chronic inflammatory diseases are unknown. This makes personalized medicine for assessment, prognosis, and choice of therapy very difficult. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that low-grade subclinical infections may be an underlying cause of many chronic inflammatory diseases and thus may contribute to secondary outcomes (e.g. cancer. Many diseases are now categorized as inflammatory-mediated diseases that stem from a dysregulation in host immunity. There is a growing need to study the links between low-grade infections, the immune responses they elicit, and how this impacts overall health. One such link explored in detail here is the extreme sensitivity of myeloid dendritic cells (mDC in peripheral blood to chronic low-grade infections and the role that these mDCs play in arbitrating the resulting immune responses. We find that emerging evidence supports a role for pathogen-induced mDCs in chronic inflammation leading to increased risk of secondary clinical disease. The mDCs that are elevated in the blood as a result of low-grade bacteremia often do not trigger a productive immune response, but can disseminate the pathogen throughout the host. This aberrant trafficking of mDCs can accelerate systemic inflammatory disease progression. Conversely, restoration of DC homeostasis may aid in pathogen elimination and minimize dissemination. Thus it would seem prudent when assessing chronic inflammatory disease risk to consider blood mDC numbers, and the microbial content (microbiome and activation state of these mDCs. These may provide important clues (the canary in the coal mine of high inflammatory disease risk. This will facilitate development of novel immunotherapies to eliminate such smoldering infections in atherosclerosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and pre-eclampsia.

  11. Molecular matching of red blood cells is superior to serological matching in sickle cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Cobianchi da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of DNA methods to provide a means to precisely genotypically match donor blood units for the antigen-negative type of 35 sickle cell disease patients<. METHODS: Red blood cell units were investigated for ABO, D, C, c, E, e, K, Fyª, Fy b, Jkª, Jk b, S, s, Diª and RH variants by performing a molecular array (Human Erythrocyte Antigen BeadChipTM, BioArray Solutions, polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of patient samples and donor units that had been serologically matched based on the ABO, Rh and K phenotypes and the presence of antibodies. RESULTS: Matches for 21 of 35 sickle cell disease patients presented discrepancies or mismatches for multiple antigens between the genotype profile and the antigen profile of their serologically-matched blood units. The main discrepancies or mismatches occurred in the RH, FY, JK and MNS systems. Eight Rh alloimmunized patients presented RHD and RHCE variants that had not been serologically identified. According to these results better matches were found for the patients with genotyped units and the patients benefited as shown by better in vivo red blood cell survival. CONCLUSION: Molecular matching is superior to serological matching in sickle cell disease patients, decreasing the risk of transfusion reactions, especially delayed transfusion reactions to existing alloantibodies and preventing alloimmunization.

  12. Oscillometric blood pressure measurement: a simple method in screening for peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels; Bruce, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Blood pressure at the ankle level is a reliable indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the ankle brachial index (ABI) is a useful non-invasive screening tool for the early detection of atherosclerosis. In the first part of the study, systolic blood pressures obtained by oscillometry and...... PAD was sufficiently high in subjects over the age of 60 years to warrant screening. The ankle brachial index based on measurements with an oscillometric device was shown reliable in the exclusion of PAD, thereby fulfilling an important criterion for the use in screening....

  13. Management of High Blood Pressure in Those without Overt Cardiovascular Disease Utilising Absolute Risk Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing blood pressure has a continuum of adverse risk for cardiovascular events. Traditionally this single measure was used to determine who to treat and how vigorously. However, estimating absolute risk rather than measurement of a single risk factor such as blood pressure is a superior method to identify who is most at risk of having an adverse cardiovascular event such as stroke or myocardial infarction, and therefore who would most likely benefit from therapeutic intervention. Cardiovascular disease (CVD risk calculators must be used to estimate absolute risk in those without overt CVD as physician estimation is unreliable. Incorporation into usual practice and limitations of the strategy are discussed.

  14. Study of 25 cases of exchange transfusion by reconstituted blood in hemolytic disease of newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to review and establish the practice of exchange transfusion (ET with reconstituted blood in neonates and to observe fall of bilirubin and its comparison with related studies. Twenty-five neonates diagnosed as hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN were selected for this study, in which exchange transfusion was carried out as one of the treatments for hyperbilirubinemia. Out of the 25 cases, 15 were of Rhesus (Rh HDN, while ABO and other blood groups constituted 6 and 4 HDN cases respectively. First, the neonates′ and mother′s blood samples were subjected to relevant investigations. After that, for neonates having Rh HDN, O Rh negative cells suspended in AB plasma were given, O Rh positive cells suspended in AB plasma were given to ABO HDN; and O positive cells, which were indirect Coomb′s cross-matched compatible with neonates′ and mother′s serum / plasma, suspended in AB plasma were given to the neonates having HDN because of other blood group antibodies. The exchange transfusion (ET was carried out taking all aseptic precautions by Push-Pull technique with double-volume exchange transfusion method. The average post-exchange fall in serum indirect bilirubin was (52.01% in all 25 cases, which was found to be more significant than the previous studies. Looking into the superiority of the exchange transfusion in HDN by reconstituted blood, the reconstituted blood can be modified and supplied as per the requirement and conditions.

  15. Magnetic separation-based blood purification: a promising new approach for the removal of disease-causing compounds?

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, I K; Schlegel, A A; Graf, R.; Stark, W J; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies report promising results regarding extracorporeal magnetic separation-based blood purification for the rapid and selective removal of disease-causing compounds from whole blood. High molecular weight compounds, bacteria and cells can be eliminated from blood within minutes, hence offering novel treatment strategies for the management of intoxications and blood stream infections. However, risks associated with incomplete particle separation and the biological consequences of par...

  16. Interarm difference in blood pressure: reproducibility and association with peripheral vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the interarm difference in blood pressure and its use as an indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were included from consecutive patients referred from their general practitioner to our vascular laboratory for possible PAD aged 50 years or older without known cardiac disease, renal disease, or diabetes mellitus. 824 patients (453 women) with mean age of 72 years (range: 50-101) were included. 491 patients had a diagnosis of hypertension and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) was present in 386 patients. Systolic blood pressure was 143 ± 24 mmHg and 142 ± 24 mmHg on the right and left arm, respectively (P = 0.015). The interarm difference was greater in patients with hypertension (P = 0.002) and PAD (P 20 mmHg. This study confirmed the presence of a systematic but clinically insignificant difference in systolic blood pressure between arms. The interarm difference was larger in hypertension and PAD. Consistent lateralisation is present for differences ≥20 mmHg and an interarm difference >25 mmHg is a reliable indicator of PAD in the legs. PMID:24616810

  17. Extracellular Nucleic Acids in Blood of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa E. Muravlyova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of extracellular nucleic acids and acid-soluble precursors of nucleic acids in blood of patients with different forms and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD were evaluated. The significant increase of the content of extracellular RNA and acid-soluble precursors of nucleic acids in plasma of patients with COPD was detected. The decrease of extracellular RNA in plasma of patients with COPD worsening was diagnosed. Extracellular DNA in plasma and red blood cells of patients didn’t change significantly. The article examines the mechanisms of extracellular nucleic acids increase in blood of COPD patients, studies the possible role of extracellular RNA in development of coagulation disorders in COPD patients. The further research of the role of extracellular nucleic acids and their precursors in COPD progression is required

  18. Studies of cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of 25 patients with Parkinson's disease were studied. The rCBF was measured with the intra-arterial Xe-133 injection method. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Sixty four % of Parkinson's disease patients showed ventricular dilation, and 76% of Parkinson's disease patients showed cortical atrophy on the CT scan, but we had to allow for the effects of the natural aging process on these results. 2) No correlation was recognized either between cerebral atrophy and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between cerebral atrophy and the duration of Parkinson's disease. 3) In Parkinson's disease patients, the mean rCBF was lower than that of normal control subjects. The difference was even more remarkable in older patients. Only 40% of Parkinson's disease patients showed hyperfrontal pattern. 4) There was no correlation either between the mean rCBF and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between the mean rCBF and the duration of Parkinson's disease. There was no significant difference between the mean rCBF of Parkinson's disease patients receiving levodopa and that of untreated patients. 5) The mean rCBF decreased in patients with cerebral atrophy on the CT scan. 6) Parkinson's disease patients with intellectual impairment showed cerebral atrophy and a remarkable decrease of the mean rCBF. 7) The effect of aging on cerebral atrophy on the CT scan had to be allowed for, but judging from the decrease of the mean rCBF, the cerebral cortex is evidently involved in Parkinson's disease. 8) The rCBF decline in Parkinson's disease patients may be related with the diminished cortical metabolic rate due to a remote effect of striatal dysfunction and a disturbance of mesocortical dopaminergic pathways. (J.P.N.)

  19. Association of depressive symptoms with circadian blood pressure alterations in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrano, Davide L; Pisciotta, Maria S; Lo Monaco, Maria R; Onder, Graziano; Laudisio, Alice; Brandi, Vincenzo; La Carpia, Domenico; Guglielmo, Mauro; Nacchia, Antonio; Fusco, Domenico; Ricciardi, Diego; Bentivoglio, Anna R; Bernabei, Roberto; Zuccalà, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    To assess whether among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) depression, a common non-motor symptom associated with reduced survival, is associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia. We enrolled 125 subjects with PD consecutively admitted to a geriatric day hospital. All participants underwent comprehensive evaluation, fasting blood sampling, and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The percent reduction in nocturnal blood pressure (dipping) was calculated. Depressive symptoms were assessed through the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS); a score ≥5 identified moderate to severe symptoms. Among participants (mean age 72.7 ± 7.8 years, 32 % women) 61 subjects (49 %) presented with a GDS score ≥ 5. When compared with other participants, subjects with a GDS score ≥ 5 had reduced adjusted levels of percent systolic (-2.6 ± 2.7 vs. 4.7 ± 2.5; p = 0.003), diastolic (0.6 ± 2.8 vs. 7.4 ± 2.6; p = 0.007), and mean blood pressure dipping (-0.7 ± 2.6 vs. 6.8 ± 2.5; p = 0.002). In separate logistic regression models, depressive symptoms were associated with reduced systolic (OR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.89; 0.98), diastolic (OR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.90; 0.99), and mean blood pressure dipping (OR 0.93; 95 % CI 0.89; 0.98), after adjusting for potential confounders. Depressive symptoms are prevalent, and independently associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia among patients with Parkinson's disease. This might explain the remarkable incidence of sudden death, as well as the association of depressive symptoms with reduced survival reported in these patients. The finding of depressive symptoms in subjects with Parkinson's disease should therefore prompt assessment of cardiovascular autonomic function. PMID:26338815

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow in Parkinson's disease by 123I-IMP SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was evaluated in 63 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p-123I-iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP) as a tracer. Evaluation of the SPECT images was performed in accordance with the rCBF quantification method using a microsphere model. Patients in stage IV demonstrated significantly lower rCBF than those in stage II at the frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital regions and in the thalamus and cerebellum. Subjects with mental symptoms demonstrated decreased rCBF in every region in the brain. The present study indicates that clinical exacerbation and manifestation of dementia and other psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease are associated with decreased blood flow in various brain regions. (author)

  1. Multiplex method for initial complex testing of antibodies to blood transmitted diseases agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavchenko, Alexander G; Nechitaylo, Oleg V; Filatov, Pavel V; Ersh, Anna V; Gureyev, Vadim N

    2016-10-01

    Initial screening of donors and population at high risk of infection with blood transmitted diseases involves a number of analyses using monospesific diagnostic systems, and therefore is expensive labor- and time-consuming process. The goal of this work is to construct a multiplex test enabling to carry out rapid initial complex testing at a low price. The paper describes a kit making it possible to detect simultaneously antibodies to six agents of the most significant blood transmitted diseases: HIV virus, hepatitis B and C viruses, cytomegalovirus, T. pallidum and T. gondii in blood products. The kit comprises multiplex dot-immunoassay based on plane protein arrays (immune chips) using colloidal gold conjugates and silver development. It provides an opportunity to carry out complex analysis within 70min at room temperature, and there is no need of well-qualified personnel. We compared laboratory findings of the kit with monospecific kits for ELISA produced by two Russian commercial companies. Dot-assay results correlate well with data obtained using commercial kits for ELISA. Furthermore, multiplex analysis is quicker and cheaper in comparison with ELISA and can be carried out in non-laboratory conditions. The kit for multiplex dot-immunoassay of antibodies to blood transmitted agents can significantly simplify initial complex testing. PMID:27497868

  2. Mosaic Loss of Chromosome Y in Blood Is Associated with Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumanski, Jan P; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Rasi, Chiara; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Davies, Hanna; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Campion, Dominique; Dufouil, Carole; Pasquier, Florence; Amouyel, Philippe; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Kilander, Lena; Lind, Lars; Forsberg, Lars A

    2016-06-01

    Men have a shorter life expectancy compared with women but the underlying factor(s) are not clear. Late-onset, sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) is a common and lethal neurodegenerative disorder and many germline inherited variants have been found to influence the risk of developing AD. Our previous results show that a fundamentally different genetic variant, i.e., lifetime-acquired loss of chromosome Y (LOY) in blood cells, is associated with all-cause mortality and an increased risk of non-hematological tumors and that LOY could be induced by tobacco smoking. We tested here a hypothesis that men with LOY are more susceptible to AD and show that LOY is associated with AD in three independent studies of different types. In a case-control study, males with AD diagnosis had higher degree of LOY mosaicism (adjusted odds ratio = 2.80, p = 0.0184, AD events = 606). Furthermore, in two prospective studies, men with LOY at blood sampling had greater risk for incident AD diagnosis during follow-up time (hazard ratio [HR] = 6.80, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 2.16-21.43, AD events = 140, p = 0.0011). Thus, LOY in blood is associated with risks of both AD and cancer, suggesting a role of LOY in blood cells on disease processes in other tissues, possibly via defective immunosurveillance. As a male-specific risk factor, LOY might explain why males on average live shorter lives than females. PMID:27231129

  3. Components of the Complete Blood Count as Risk Predictors for Coronary Heart Disease: In-Depth Review and Update

    OpenAIRE

    Madjid, Mohammad; Fatemi, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, and several inflammatory biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein, have been used to predict the risk of coronary heart disease. High white blood cell count is a strong and independent predictor of coronary risk in patients of both sexes, with and without coronary heart disease. A high number of white blood cells and their subtypes (for example, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils) are associated with the presence of coronary heart di...

  4. Tattoos and transfusion-transmitted disease risk: implications for the screening of blood donors in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    NISHIOKA Sérgio de A.; Gyorkos, Theresa W.; MacLean, J D

    2002-01-01

    Having a tattoo has been associated with serological evidence of hepatitis B and C viruses, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infections and syphilis; all of these are known to be transmissible by blood transfusion. These associations are of higher magnitude for individuals with nonprofessionally-applied tattoos and with two or more tattoos. Tattoos are common among drug addicts and prisoners, conditions that are also associated with transfusion-transmitted diseases. We examined the imp...

  5. Structural Analysis of a Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Binding to Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Leuthold, Mila M.; Dalton, Kevin P; Hansman, Grant S.

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a member of the Caliciviridae family (Lagovirus genus). RHDV is highly contagious and attaches to epithelial cells in the digestive or respiratory tract, leading to massive lesions with high mortality rates. A new variant of RHDV (termed RHDVb) recently has emerged, and previously vaccinated rabbits appear to have little protection against this new strain. Similar to human norovirus (Caliciviridae, Norovirus genus), RHDV binds histo-blood group antig...

  6. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Membrane Fluidity and Disease Outcome in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gloudina M Hon; Hassan, Mogamat S.; van Rensburg, Susan J.; Abel, Stefan; Erasmus, Rajiv T; Matsha, Tandi

    2011-01-01

    Immune cell membrane lipids are important determinants of membrane fluidity, eicosanoid production and phagocytosis and fatty acid metabolic abnormalities have been reported in immune cells from patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between peripheral blood mononuclear cell membrane fluidity, permeability status, and disease outcome as measured by the Kurtzke expanded disability status scale. Phospholipids, fatty acids and cholesterol comp...

  7. Infrared Imaging of Nitric Oxide-Mediated Blood Flow in Human Sickle Cell Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbach, Alexander M; Hans C Ackerman; Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph M.; Littel, Patricia L.; Seamon, Catherine; Footman, Eleni; Chi, Amy; Zorca, Suzana; Krajewski, Megan L.; Cuttica, Michael J.; Machado, Roberto F; Cannon, Richard O.; Kato, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important pathophysiologic manifestation of sickle cell disease (SCD), a condition that increases risk of pulmonary hypertension and stroke. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) imaging would detect changes in cutaneous blood flow reflective of vascular function. We performed IR imaging and conventional strain gauge plethysmography in twenty-five adults with SCD at baseline and during intra-arterial infusions of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh)...

  8. Non-arterial assessment of blood gas status in patients with chronic pulmonary disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Elborn, J. S.; Finch, M B; Stanford, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Assessment of blood gas status is important in the management of patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Arterial puncture is often painful and may damage the arterial wall. Measurement of oxygen saturation by transcutaneous oximetry offers a non-invasive alternative to arterial methods but does not allow assessment of partial pressure of carbon dioxide. We have examined the value of oximetry and dorsal hand venous carbon dioxide as an alternative to arterial puncture. Transcutaneous oxygen ...

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) RNA loads in peripheral blood correlates with disease severity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Juan; Gomez Ana M; Khokhar Shama; Bhoj Vijay G; Tagliabue Claudia; Chang Michael L; Kiener Peter A; Revell Paula A; Ramilo Octavio; Mejias Asuncion

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection is usually restricted to the respiratory epithelium. Few studies have documented the presence of RSV in the systemic circulation, however there is no consistent information whether virus detection in the blood correlates with disease severity. Methods Balb/c mice were inoculated with live RSV, heat-inactivated RSV or medium. A subset of RSV-infected mice was treated with anti-RSV antibody 72 h post-inoculation. RSV RNA loads were...

  10. Extracellular Nucleic Acids in Blood of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa E. Muravlyova; Vilen B. Molotov-Luchanskiy; Dmitriy A. Klyuyev; Ryszhan E. Bakirova; Ludmila A. Demidchik; Evgeniya A. Kolesnikova

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of extracellular nucleic acids and acid-soluble precursors of nucleic acids in blood of patients with different forms and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were evaluated. The significant increase of the content of extracellular RNA and acid-soluble precursors of nucleic acids in plasma of patients with COPD was detected. The decrease of extracellular RNA in plasma of patients with COPD worsening was diagnosed. Extracellular DNA in plasma and red bloo...

  11. Optical force on diseased blood cells: Towards the optical sorting of biological matter

    KAUST Repository

    Gongora, Juan Sebastian Totero

    2015-05-01

    By employing a series of massively parallel ab-initio simulations, we study how optical forces act on biological matter subject to morphological disease. As a representative case study, we here consider the case of Plasmodium falciparum on red blood cells (RBC) illuminated by a monochromatic plane wave. Realistic parameters for the geometry and the refractive index are then taken from published experiments. In our theoretical campaign, we study the dependence of the optical force on the disease stage for different incident wavelengths. We show that optical forces change significantly with the disease, with amplitude variation in the hundreds of pN range. Our results open up new avenues for the design of new optical systems for the treatment of human disease. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Optical force on diseased blood cells: Towards the optical sorting of biological matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Juan Sebastian Totero; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    By employing a series of massively parallel ab-initio simulations, we study how optical forces act on biological matter subject to morphological disease. As a representative case study, we here consider the case of Plasmodium falciparum on red blood cells (RBC) illuminated by a monochromatic plane wave. Realistic parameters for the geometry and the refractive index are then taken from published experiments. In our theoretical campaign, we study the dependence of the optical force on the disease stage for different incident wavelengths. We show that optical forces change significantly with the disease, with amplitude variation in the hundreds of pN range. Our results open up new avenues for the design of new optical systems for the treatment of human disease.

  13. Optical force on diseased blood cells: towards the optical sorting of biological matter

    CERN Document Server

    Gongora, Juan Sebastian Totero

    2016-01-01

    By employing a series of massively parallel ab-initio simulations, we study how optical forces act on biological matter subject to morphological disease. As a representative case study, we here consider the case of Plasmodium Falciparum on red blood cells (RBC) illuminated by a monochromatic plane wave. Realistic parameters for the geometry and the refractive index are then taken from published experiments. In our theoretical campaign, we study the dependence of the optical force on the disease stage for different incident wavelengths. We show that optical forces change significantly with the disease, with amplitude variation in the hundreds of pN range. Our results open up new avenues for the design of new optical systems for the treatment of human disease.

  14. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Andreotti, F.; Di Ricco, G.; Marini, C.; Rindi, M.; Biagini, A.; Milne, E.N.; Giuntini, C.

    1988-07-01

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions.

  15. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions

  16. Tattoos and transfusion-transmitted disease risk: implications for the screening of blood donors in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio de A. Nishioka

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Having a tattoo has been associated with serological evidence of hepatitis B and C viruses, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infections and syphilis; all of these are known to be transmissible by blood transfusion. These associations are of higher magnitude for individuals with nonprofessionally-applied tattoos and with two or more tattoos. Tattoos are common among drug addicts and prisoners, conditions that are also associated with transfusion-transmitted diseases. We examined the implications of these associations for the screening of blood donors in Brazil. Numbers of individuals who would be correctly or unnecessarily deferred from blood donation on the basis of the presence of tattoos, and on their number and type, were calculated for different prevalence situations based on published odds ratios. If having a tattoo was made a deferral criterion, cost savings (due to a reduced need for laboratory testing and subsequent follow-up would accrue at the expense of the deferral of appropriate donors. Restricting deferral to more `at-risk' sub-groups of tattooed individuals would correctly defer less individuals and would also reduce the numbers of potential donors unnecessarily deferred. Key factors in balancing cost savings and unnecessary deferrals include the magnitude of the pool of blood donors in the population, the prevalence of individuals with tattoos and the `culture' of tattoos in the population. Tattoos can therefore be an efficient criterion for the screening of blood donors in certain settings, a finding that requires corroboration from larger population-based studies.

  17. CXCL5 polymorphisms are associated with variable blood pressure in cardiovascular disease-free adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beitelshees Amber L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Leukocyte count has been associated with blood pressure, hypertension, and hypertensive complications. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in the CXCL5 gene, which encodes the neutrophilic chemokine ENA-78, are associated with blood pressure in cardiovascular disease (CVD-free adults and that these polymorphisms are functional. Methods and results A total of 192 community-dwelling participants without CVD or risk equivalents were enrolled. Two CXCL5 polymorphisms (−156 G > C (rs352046 and 398 G > A (rs425535 were tested for associations with blood pressure. Allele-specific mRNA expression in leukocytes was also measured to determine whether heterozygosity was associated with allelic expression imbalance. In −156 C variant carriers, systolic blood pressure (SBP was 7 mmHg higher than in −156 G/G wild-type homozygotes (131 ± 17 vs. 124 ± 14 mmHg; P = 0.008. Similarly, diastolic blood pressure (DBP was 4 mmHg higher in −156 C variant carriers (78 ± 11 vs. 74 ± 11 mmHg; P = 0.013. In multivariate analysis of SBP, age, sex, body mass index, and the −156 G > C polymorphism were identified as significant variables. Age, sex, and the −156 G > C SNP were further associated with DBP, along with white blood cells. Allelic expression imbalance and significantly higher circulating ENA-78 concentrations were noted for variant carriers. Conclusion CXCL5 gene polymorphisms are functional and associated with variable blood pressure in CVD-free individuals. The role of CXCL5 as a hypertension- and CVD-susceptibility gene should be further explored.

  18. Related research of blood glucose, blood lipid and serum cystatin C and lower-extremity arterial disease in type 2 diabetic mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Zeng; Jie Ou; Yun-Mei He; Chun-Yu Cai

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the relationship between levels of blood glucose, blood lipid and serum cystatin C and lower-extremity arterial disease in type 2 diabetic mellitus so as to provide the basis for the prevention and treatment of the disease.Methods:A total of 240 cases of patients with type 2 diabetic mellitus receiving physical examinations in our hospital from March 2014 to March 2015 were selected and divided into three groups. The control group was consisted of type 2 diabetes patients without lower-extremity arterial disease, the observation group 1 included type 2 diabetes patients with mild or moderate lower-extremity arterial disease, and the observation group 2 was formed by type 2 diabetes patients with severe lower-extremity arterial disease. Each group contained 80 cases. Then, the heights, weights, waist and hip circumferences of patients in the three groups were determined and the body mass index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were calculated; the fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting insulin (FINS), insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), 2 h postprandial blood glucose (2 h PG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HBA1c) in two groups were detected; and the levels of serum total cholesterol(TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apolipoprotein B (apoB) and cystatin C (CysC) in two groups were also tested.Results:Compared with the control group, the WHR, FBG, HOMA-IR, 2 h PG, HBA1c, LDL-C, apoB and CysC all increased significantly, and the differences were statistically significant. Besides, there were statistically significances existing between the observation groups 1 and 2. What’s more, the serum levels of TC, HDL-C, TG and apoA1 in the observation groups were not significantly different from those of the control group.Conclusions: There is a close relationship between blood glucose, blood lipid, serum cystatin C level and lower-extremity arterial

  19. High blood pressure: the foundation for epidemic cardiovascular disease in African populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard S; Amoah, Albert G B; Mensah, George A

    2003-01-01

    High-blood pressure is a powerful independent risk factor for death from heart disease and stroke. It is also a common clinical condition affecting more than 600 million persons worldwide and seen in nearly all populations. Although reliable, large-scale, population-based data on high blood pressure in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are limited, recent studies provide important and worrisome findings in both epidemiology and clinical outcomes. Although overall hypertension prevalence is between 10%-15%, prevalence rates as high as 30%-32% have been reported in middle-income urban and some rural areas. Importantly, hypertension awareness, treatment, and control rates as low as 20%, 10%, and 1%, respectively have also been found. Stroke has been by far the most common clinical sequela. In most SSA settings, hypertension control assumes a relatively low priority and little experience exists in implementing sustainable and successful programs for drug treatment. Rapid urbanization and transition from agrarian life to the wage-earning economy of city life continue to fuel increases in average blood pressure levels and prevalence of hypertension. Although the true burden of high blood pressure in sub-Saharan Africa remains largely unmeasured, compelling preliminary evidence suggests that it is the foundation for epidemic cardiovascular disease in Africa and already contributes substantively to death and disability from stroke, heart failure, and kidney failure in this region. Success in limiting this epidemic in SSA will depend heavily on the implementation of sustainable and aggressive population-based programs for high blood pressure awareness, prevention, treatment, and control. It will be critical to obtain investments in improved surveillance and program-relevant research to provide the evidence base for policy development and effective hypertension prevention and control. PMID:13677414

  20. Neuroinvasion in Prion Diseases: The Roles of Ascending Neural Infection and Blood Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Sisó

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prion disorders are infectious, neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and animals. Susceptibility to some prion diseases such as kuru or the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and scrapie in sheep and goats is influenced by polymorphisms of the coding region of the prion protein gene, while other prion disorders such as fatal familial insomnia, familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease in humans have an underlying inherited genetic basis. Several prion strains have been demonstrated experimentally in rodents and sheep. The progression and pathogenesis of disease is influenced by both genetic differences in the prion protein and prion strain. Some prion diseases only affect the central nervous system whereas others involve the peripheral organs prior to neuroinvasion. Many experiments undertaken in different species and using different prion strains have postulated common pathways of neuroinvasion. It is suggested that prions access the autonomic nerves innervating peripheral organs and tissues to finally reach the central nervous system. We review here published data supporting this view and additional data suggesting that neuroinvasion may concurrently or independently involve the blood vascular system.

  1. Blood levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in patients with neurological diseases.

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    Christoph A Mayer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The brain-specific astroglial protein GFAP is a blood biomarker candidate indicative of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with symptoms suspicious of acute stroke. Comparably little, however, is known about GFAP release in other neurological disorders. In order to identify potential "specificity gaps" of a future GFAP test used to diagnose intracerebral hemorrhage, we measured GFAP in the blood of a large and rather unselected collective of patients with neurological diseases. METHODS: Within a one-year period, we randomly selected in-patients of our university hospital for study inclusion. Patients with ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack and intracerebral hemorrhage were excluded. Primary endpoint was the ICD-10 coded diagnosis reached at discharge. During hospital stay, blood was collected, and GFAP plasma levels were determined using an advanced prototype immunoassay at Roche Diagnostics. RESULTS: A total of 331 patients were included, covering a broad spectrum of neurological diseases. GFAP levels were low in the vast majority of patients, with 98.5% of cases lying below the cut-off that was previously defined for the differentiation of intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. No diagnosis or group of diagnoses was identified that showed consistently increased GFAP values. No association with age and sex was found. CONCLUSION: Most acute and chronic neurological diseases, including typical stroke mimics, are not associated with detectable GFAP levels in the bloodstream. Our findings underline the hypothesis that rapid astroglial destruction as in acute intracerebral hemorrhage is mandatory for GFAP increase. A future GFAP blood test applied to identify patients with intracerebral hemorrhage is likely to have a high specificity.

  2. Impact of Ambient Air Pollution on the Differential White Blood Cell Count in Patients with Chronic Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Brüske, Irene; Hampel, Regina; Socher, Martin M.; Rückerl, Regina; Schneider, Alexandra; Heinrich, Joachim; Oberdörster, Günter; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Peters, Annette

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies report associations between particulate air pollution and increased mortality from pulmonary diseases.To examine whether the exposure to ambient gaseous and particulate air pollution leads to an alteration of the differential white blood cell count in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases like chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma.

  3. Decreased cerebral blood flow and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease. A multicenter HMPAO-SPECT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for evaluating the severity and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Eighty-four AD patients were included. At entry, 99mTc-HMPAO-SPECT, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Mental Function Impairment Scale (MENFIS), and the Raven Colored Progression Matrix (RCPM) were performed for all 84 patients. During the follow-up periods, two individual MMSE evaluations in 34 patients, two MENFIS evaluations in 30 patients, and two RCPM evaluations in 20 patients were performed. Based on the regions of decreased cerebral blood flow demonstrated on three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) images of SPECT, the cases were classified as type A (no decrease), type B (decreased blood flow in the parietal or temporal lobe), type C (decreased blood flow in the frontal lobe and parietal or temporal lobe), type Pc (decreased blood flow in posterior cingulate gyrus only), and ''other types''. The types of decreased blood flow, scores on neuropsychological evaluations, and symptom progression were analyzed. The MENFIS, MMSE, and RCPM scores were poorest in type C patients at entry. The degree of decrease of these scores during the follow-up periods was also greatest in type C. The greatest difference between patients with and without rapid progression in SPECT data of the mild AD patients (MMSE score≥24) was in the frontal lobe. Decreased blood flow in the frontal lobe of AD patients is correlated not only with reduced cognitive function at the time of the evaluation but with rapid progression in the subsequent clinical course. (author)

  4. Blood dendritic cell frequency declines in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and is associated with motor symptom severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ciaramella

    Full Text Available The role of inflammation in Parkinson's Disease (PD is well appreciated, but its underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Our objective was to determine whether dendritic cells (DC, a unique type of migratory immune cells that regulate immunological response and inflammation have an impact on PD. In a case-control study including 80 PD patients and 80 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, the two main blood subsets of plasmacytoid and myeloid DC were defined by flow cytometry analysis. Clinical evaluation of subjects consisting of cognition and depression assessment was performed using the Mini Mental State Examination and the Beck Depression Inventory. The severity of motor symptoms was measured using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Part III. Comparison between patient and control DC measures and their relationships with clinical assessments were evaluated.The following main results were obtained: 1 the level of circulating DC (mainly the myeloid subset was significantly reduced in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls; 2 after controlling for depressive and cognitive characteristics, the frequency of myeloid DC was confirmed as one of the independent determinants of PD; 3 the number of both myeloid and plasmacytoid DC was negatively associated with motor symptom severity. Overall, the decline of blood DC, perhaps due to the recruitment of immune cells to the site of disease-specific lesions, can be considered a clue of the immune alteration that characterizes PD, suggesting innovative exploitations of DC monitoring as a clinically significant tool for PD treatment. Indeed, this study suggests that reduced peripheral blood DC are a pathologically-relevant factor of PD and also displays the urgency to better understand DC role in PD for unraveling the immune system contribution to disease progression and thus favoring the development of innovative therapies ideally based on immunomodulation.

  5. Blood dendritic cell frequency declines in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and is associated with motor symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramella, Antonio; Salani, Francesca; Bizzoni, Federica; Pontieri, Francesco E; Stefani, Alessandro; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Assogna, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Bossù, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation in Parkinson's Disease (PD) is well appreciated, but its underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Our objective was to determine whether dendritic cells (DC), a unique type of migratory immune cells that regulate immunological response and inflammation have an impact on PD. In a case-control study including 80 PD patients and 80 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, the two main blood subsets of plasmacytoid and myeloid DC were defined by flow cytometry analysis. Clinical evaluation of subjects consisting of cognition and depression assessment was performed using the Mini Mental State Examination and the Beck Depression Inventory. The severity of motor symptoms was measured using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Part III. Comparison between patient and control DC measures and their relationships with clinical assessments were evaluated.The following main results were obtained: 1) the level of circulating DC (mainly the myeloid subset) was significantly reduced in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls; 2) after controlling for depressive and cognitive characteristics, the frequency of myeloid DC was confirmed as one of the independent determinants of PD; 3) the number of both myeloid and plasmacytoid DC was negatively associated with motor symptom severity. Overall, the decline of blood DC, perhaps due to the recruitment of immune cells to the site of disease-specific lesions, can be considered a clue of the immune alteration that characterizes PD, suggesting innovative exploitations of DC monitoring as a clinically significant tool for PD treatment. Indeed, this study suggests that reduced peripheral blood DC are a pathologically-relevant factor of PD and also displays the urgency to better understand DC role in PD for unraveling the immune system contribution to disease progression and thus favoring the development of innovative therapies ideally based on immunomodulation. PMID:23776473

  6. Evaluation of MR angiography and blood flow measurement in abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the characteristics of blood flow measurement with MR Angiography (MRA) to evaluate the status of vascular stenoses, two or three dimensional time-of-flight MRA and velocity-encoded cine MR were performed in the 230 segments of 35 patients, with abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. In 11 of these 35 patients digital subtraction angiography was additionally underwent, and the stenotic findings was compared with MRA. There were 17 segments in which the velocity could not be measured, because the blood flow exceeded the upper limit of peak-encoded velocity (VENC) which was set at 120 cm/sec. Therefore, it is necessary to set the upper limit of VENC at higher than 120 cm/sec. There were 11 stenotic findings in DSA and 20 stenotic findings in MRA. Pulsatility Index (PI=(max velocity-min. velocity)/average velocity) were used for evaluating the blood flow waveform, and there were significant difference between the 11 stenotic findings of DSA and the others'. In summery, MRA was considered as useful examination to assess the degree of the vascular stenoses in abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. (author)

  7. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

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    Christina Rose Kyrtsos

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain.

  8. Evaluation of MR angiography and blood flow measurement in abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabuchi, Kenji [Dokkyo Univ. School of Medicine, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    To assess the characteristics of blood flow measurement with MR Angiography (MRA) to evaluate the status of vascular stenoses, two or three dimensional time-of-flight MRA and velocity-encoded cine MR were performed in the 230 segments of 35 patients, with abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. In 11 of these 35 patients digital subtraction angiography was additionally underwent, and the stenotic findings was compared with MRA. There were 17 segments in which the velocity could not be measured, because the blood flow exceeded the upper limit of peak-encoded velocity (VENC) which was set at 120 cm/sec. Therefore, it is necessary to set the upper limit of VENC at higher than 120 cm/sec. There were 11 stenotic findings in DSA and 20 stenotic findings in MRA. Pulsatility Index (PI=(max velocity-min. velocity)/average velocity) were used for evaluating the blood flow waveform, and there were significant difference between the 11 stenotic findings of DSA and the others'. In summery, MRA was considered as useful examination to assess the degree of the vascular stenoses in abdominal and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. (author)

  9. Hemorheological risk factors of acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crisis in children with sickle cell disease. : Blood rheology in sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarre, Yann; Romana, Marc; Waltz, Xavier; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Tressières, Benoît; Divialle-Doumdo, Lydia; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Petras, Marie; Broquere, Cedric; Maillard, Frederic; Tarer, Vanessa; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    International audience BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effects of blood rheology on the occurrence of acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crises in children with sickle cell anemia and hemoglobin SC disease. DESIGN AND METHODS: To address this issue, steady-state hemorheological profiles (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability, aggregation properties) and hematologic parameters were assessed in 44 children with sickle cell anemia and 49 children with hemoglobin SC ...

  10. The variation profile of blood components indicates the degree of severity in psoriasis as inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the changes occurring in blood cells and hemoglobin concentration in 158 subjects recruited. For the study comprised (44) psoriatic males and (35) psoriatic females. The blood sample analyses, microscopically. White blood cells shows higher count while neutrophils and lymphocytes showed a marked enhancement in psoriatic samples. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured by Western Green method. ESR in psoriatic male patients mean 31+-10 hgmm/hr opposed to 9.5+-4.1 hgmm/hr in healthy males and in female psoriatic patients mean 34+-12 hgmm/hr against 15+-3 hgmm/hr healthy females was noted. Elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate was observed in psoriatic patients. The mean hemoglobin level (cyanide method) in psoriatic male was 12+-1.2 g/dl opposed to 15.2+-1.3 g/dl in healthy males while in psoriatic females it was 11.1+-1.4 g/dl as opposed to 14+-1.6 g/dl in healthy females. Hemoglobin shows reduced concentration in psoriatic patients. The marked changes in white blood sells, Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and hemoglobin concentration indicates psoriasis as inflammatory disease. (author)

  11. Brazilian situation of blood component irradiation practice for the prevention of transfusion associated Graft-versus-Host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is a usually complication of transfusion of blood component containing T lymphocytes what recently has also involved immunocompetent patient. Gamma irradiation of cellular blood components has been the mainstay against TA-GVHD, nevertheless there is little information in the literature about current transfusion medicine practices regarding gamma irradiation of blood products. This work presents an overview of the Brazilian reality and suggests policies to optimize TA-GVHD prevention. (Author)

  12. Correlation between arterial and venous blood gas analysis parameters in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Novović Miloš; Topić Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Arterial blood gas (ABG) analyses have an important role in the assessment and monitoring of the metabolic and oxygen status of patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Arterial puncture could have a lot of adverse effects, while sampling of venous blood is simpler and is not so invasive. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether venous blood gas (VBG) values of pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), partial o...

  13. Climate change could threaten blood supply by altering the distribution of vector-borne disease: an Australian case-study

    OpenAIRE

    Hilary J. Bambrick; Woodruff, Rosalie E.; Hanigan, Ivan C

    2009-01-01

    Background: Climate change is expected to promote more intense and prolonged outbreaks of vector-borne disease, and alter the geographic boundaries of transmission. This has implications for the safety and supply of fresh blood products around the world. In Australia, a recent outbreak of dengue fever caused a prolonged regional shortage in the supply of fresh blood products. Objective: To highlight the potential for climate change to affect the safety and supply of blood globally through its...

  14. Climate change could threaten blood supply by altering the distribution of vector-borne disease: an Australian case-study

    OpenAIRE

    Hilary J. Bambrick; Woodruff, Rosalie E.; Hanigan, Ivan C

    2009-01-01

    Background Climate change is expected to promote more intense and prolonged outbreaks of vector-borne disease, and alter the geographic boundaries of transmission. This has implications for the safety and supply of fresh blood products around the world. In Australia, a recent outbreak of dengue fever caused a prolonged regional shortage in the supply of fresh blood products. Objective To highlight the potential for climate change to affect the safety and supply of blood globally through its i...

  15. The investigation of cytokine level in peripheral blood of patients with thyroid eye disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect the level of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and insulin-lide growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in patients with thyroid eye disease and to seek the relationship between serum level and the outbreak as well as the condition variety. Methods: To measure the level of serum IL-6 and IGF-1 by radioimmunoassay in 30 patients with thyroid eye disease after their clinical expression and activity score have been assessed, 30 patients with hyperthyroidism but without ophthalmopathy, 30 healthy subjects. Results: The level of serum IL-6 and IGF-1 in patients with thyroid eye disease were higher than that of patients with hyperthyroidism but without ophthalmopathy (t=4.20, t=4.00, P<0.01) and healthy subjects (t=4.20, t=4.05, P<0.01). IL-6 and IGF-1 levels tend to elevate with the increase of severity of eye disease. There were significant differences among them. Conclusion: The leve of IL-6, IGF-1 and the cause of thyroid eye disease are closely related, and IL-6 and IGF-1 levels in peripheral blood might reflect the severity of eye disease. (authors)

  16. Common Aging Signature in the Peripheral Blood of Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongbo; Han, Guangchun; Wang, Jiajia; Zeng, Fan; Li, Yuanming; Shao, Shaoju; Song, Fuhai; Bai, Zhouxian; Peng, Xing; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Shi, Xiangqun; Lei, Hongxing

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the two most dominant forms of dementia in elderly people. Due to the large overlap between AD and VaD in clinical observations, great controversies exist regarding the distinction and connection between these two types of senile dementia. Here for the first time, we resort to the gene expression pattern of the peripheral blood to compare AD and VaD objectively. In our previous work, we have demonstrated that the dysregulation of gene expression in AD is unique among the examined diseases including neurological diseases, cancer, and metabolic diseases. In this study, we found that the dysregulation of gene expression in AD and VaD is quite similar to each other at both functional and gene levels. Interestingly, the dysregulation started at the early stages of the diseases, namely mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). We have also shown that this signature is distinctive from that of peripheral vascular diseases. Comparison with aging studies revealed that the most profound change in AD and VaD, namely ribosome, is consistent with the accelerated aging scenario. This study may have implications to the common mechanism between AD and VaD. PMID:26099307

  17. Predominance of Th1 cytokine in peripheral blood and pathological tissues of patients with active untreated adult onset Still's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, D; Lan, J; Lin, F.; Hsieh, T; Wen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the type 1 T helper (Th1)/type 2 T helper (Th2) balance in the peripheral blood (PB) and pathological tissues of patients with active untreated adult onset Still's disease (AOSD).

  18. Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and changes in cerebral blood flow : The Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Pieternella H.; Muller, Majon; Vincken, Koen L.; Westerink, Jan; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Doevendans, PAFM

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin and hematocrit are important determinants of blood viscosity and arterial oxygen content and may therefore influence cerebral blood flow (CBF). We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations of hemoglobin and hematocrit with CBF in 569 patients with manifest arterial disease (me

  19. Home blood pressure monitor use in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaojing; Shafi, Salman; Negrete, Andrea; Davis, William N; Sarac, Erdal; Negrete, Alejandro M; Negrete, Hilmer

    2016-10-01

    Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) is recommended in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension (HTN). However, little is known about the use and pattern of HBPM in CKD patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in an out-patient nephrology clinic. A total of 285 patients participated in the study. Of all patients, 66% reported using HBPM. Self-reported compliance with BP medications (93.9% vs. 85.1%, p 0.03), exercise >3 days/week (45.9 vs. 26.3%, p helpful in managing hypertension (85.4%). Most common reason for not using HBPM was lack of advice by a physician (43.4%). HBPM use is common in patients with CKD and HTN. HBPM users are more likely to follow life-style and dietary modifications for blood pressure control. PMID:27104796

  20. Phagocytic activity of peripheral blood and crevicular phagocytes in health and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neutrophils constitute the main phagocytic cell system in mammalian host defense against an infecting agent. Abnormalities in leukocyte number and function are associated with increased susceptibility to periodontal diseases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the in vitro phagocytic properties of crevicular and peripheral blood neutrophils in healthy and periodontitis subjects. Patients and Methods: A total of 30 subjects, that is, 10 patients in each of the following three groups: healthy controls, chronic periodontitis (CP, and localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP, were included in the study. The neutrophils were isolated from the peripheral blood and gingival crevice and tested for phagocytosis of Candida albicans. The percentage of leukocytes with ingested C. albicans was determined by light microscopy. Results: A significant reduction in the phagocytic activity of crevicular fluid polymorphonuclear neutrophils (CF-PMN of LAP subjects (mean: 54.3±7(P< 0.001 was observed, compared to healthy controls (mean: 74.2±9 and chronic periodontitis subjects (mean: 69±9(P=0.352. The mean percentage of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs with phagocytosis of opsonized C. albicans in LAP patients was significantly reduced (mean: 74.9±5(P< 0.0068 compared to the phagocytic activity of neutrophils from controls (mean:82.1±3 and chronic periodontitis subjects (mean: 82.0±5(P=0.970. There was no significant reduction in the phagocytic activity of CF PMNs (mean: 69±9 (P=0.35 and peripheral blood PMNs (mean: 82.5(P=0.97 in the chronic periodontitis group when compared to the control group. Conclusion: The phagocytic activity of both crevicular and peripheral neutrophils in subjects with periodontitis is altered, increasing the susceptibility to periodontitis. Thus individual susceptibility may be an additional and important modifying factor in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

  1. CSF and Blood Levels of GFAP in Alexander Disease1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jany, Paige L.; Agosta, Guillermo E.; Benko, William S.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Keller, Stephanie R.; Köehler, Wolfgang; Mar, Soe; Naidu, Sakkubai; Marie Ness, Jayne; Renaud, Deborah L.; Salsano, Ettore; Schiffmann, Raphael; Simon, Julie; Vanderver, Adeline; Eichler, Florian; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alexander disease is a rare, progressive, and generally fatal neurological disorder that results from dominant mutations affecting the coding region of GFAP, the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein, the major intermediate filament protein of astrocytes in the CNS. A key step in pathogenesis appears to be the accumulation of GFAP within astrocytes to excessive levels. Studies using mouse models indicate that the severity of the phenotype correlates with the level of expression, and suppression of GFAP expression and/or accumulation is one strategy that is being pursued as a potential treatment. With the goal of identifying biomarkers that indirectly reflect the levels of GFAP in brain parenchyma, we have assayed GFAP levels in two body fluids in humans that are readily accessible as biopsy sites: CSF and blood. We find that GFAP levels are consistently elevated in the CSF of patients with Alexander disease, but only occasionally and modestly elevated in blood. These results provide the foundation for future studies that will explore whether GFAP levels can serve as a convenient means to monitor the progression of disease and the response to treatment. PMID:26478912

  2. Tight junctions at the blood brain barrier: physiological architecture and disease-associated dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luissint Anny-Claude

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Blood–brain barrier (BBB, present at the level of the endothelium of cerebral blood vessels, selectively restricts the blood-to-brain paracellular diffusion of compounds; it is mandatory for cerebral homeostasis and proper neuronal function. The barrier properties of these specialized endothelial cells notably depend on tight junctions (TJs between adjacent cells: TJs are dynamic structures consisting of a number of transmembrane and membrane-associated cytoplasmic proteins, which are assembled in a multimolecular complex and acting as a platform for intracellular signaling. Although the structural composition of these complexes has been well described in the recent years, our knowledge about their functional regulation still remains fragmentary. Importantly, pericytes, embedded in the vascular basement membrane, and perivascular microglial cells, astrocytes and neurons contribute to the regulation of endothelial TJs and BBB function, altogether constituting the so-called neurovascular unit. The present review summarizes our current understanding of the structure and functional regulation of endothelial TJs at the BBB. Accumulating evidence points to a correlation between BBB dysfunction, alteration of TJ complexes and progression of a variety of CNS diseases, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and brain tumors, as well as neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. Understanding how TJ integrity is controlled may thus help improve drug delivery across the BBB and the design of therapeutic strategies for neurological disorders.

  3. Estimating the future burden of cardiovascular disease and the value of lipid and blood pressure control therapies in China

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Warren; Peneva, Desi; Li, Jim Z; Liu, Larry Z.; Liu, Gordon; Gao, Runlin; Lakdawalla, Darius N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lifestyle and dietary changes reflect an ongoing epidemiological transition in China, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) playing an ever-increasing role in China’s disease burden. This study assessed the burden of CVD and the potential value of lipid and blood pressure control strategies in China. Methods We estimated the likely burden of CVD between 2016 and 2030 and how expanded use of lipid lowering and blood pressure control medication would impact that burden in the next 15 yea...

  4. Similar blood-borne DNA methylation alterations in cancer and inflammatory diseases determined by subpopulation shifts in peripheral leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H; Zheng, T.; Chen, B; Hong, G; Zhang, W.; Shi, T; Li, S.; Ao, L; Wang, C.; Guo, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although many DNA methylation (DNAm) alterations observed in peripheral whole blood/leukocytes and serum have been considered as potential diagnostic markers for cancer, their origin and their specificity for cancer (e.g., vs inflammatory diseases) remain unclear. Methods: From publicly available datasets, we identified changes in the methylation of blood-borne DNA for multiple cancers and inflammatory diseases. We compared the identified changes with DNAm difference between myelo...

  5. FREE RADICAL-RELATED DISEASES: THE PREDICTIVE VALUE OF BIOMARKERS IN THE UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Perrone

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in preterm newborns healthcare, the incidence of neonatal pathologies and disabilities still remain unacceptable high. The deficiency of antioxidant systems and the high free radicals (FRs production may cause several neonatal diseases, such as Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD, Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC, Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA, Periventricular Leukomalacia (PVL and Intraventricular Hemorrhage (IVH, representing facets of the ‘Free Radical-Related Diseases’ (FRD. The aim of this study is to verify the association between FRD and blood levels of reliable oxidative stress (OS biomarkers in preterm newborns. We enrolled 178 preterm newborns born consecutively at the General Hospital “Santa Maria alle Scotte” in Siena, between 23 and 34 weeks (30,36±2.97 of gestational age, with birth-weight from 430 to 2890 grams (1453±593. After birth, we evaluated in the cord blood the markers of potential risk of OS (Non Protein-Bound Iron, NPBI and the markers of FR damage (Total Hydroperoxides, TH; Advanced Oxidation Protein Products, AOPP. For each newborn, we assessed the presence or absence of the following diseases, considering as FRD the presence of one at least: ROP, BPD, NEC, PDA, PVL, IVH. The univariate logistic regression showed a significant association between FRD and OS related markers. Risk assessment of FRD was higher in newborns with higher values of each OS marker: respectively TH (OR=1.013, p=0,000, AOPP (OR=1.017, p=0,036, NPBI (OR=1.077, p=0.039. Perinatal OS exposure is linked to the main diseases of prematurity. The evaluation of OS biomarkers in preterm newborns through the analysis of umbilical cord blood, can be useful and predictive for early identification of infants at risk for FRD in order to devise appropriate and timely prevention and treating strategies.

  6. Radionuclide and macromicroangiographic study of pulmonary ventilation and blood flow in chronic pulmonary nonspecific diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of ventilation and perfusion in 105 patients with chronic pulmonary nonspecific diseases using radiopneumography with 133Xe. A simultaneous macro-microangiographic study was made of the pulmonary artery on specimens taken after lobectomy in 35 patients with bronchiectasia in the lower lobe. Assymetry of the distribution of ventilation and perfusion is typical of patients with bronchiectasia. It manifests itself in a significant decrease in the viable pulmonary capacity and the blood flow in the affected zone. A simultaneous compensatory rise of a perfusion was recorded. Simultaneous anatomostructural radionuclide studies make it possible to understand more deeply the essence of a pathological process

  7. Clinical laboratory experience of blood CRIM testing in infantile Pompe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha S. Bali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cross-reactive immunological material (CRIM status is an important prognostic factor in patients with infantile Pompe disease (IPD being treated with enzyme replacement therapy. Western blot analysis of cultured skin fibroblast lysates has been the gold standard for determining CRIM status. Here, we evaluated CRIM status using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC protein. For 6 of 33 patients (18% CRIM status determination using PBMC was either indeterminate or discordant with GAA genotype or fibroblast CRIM analysis results. While the use of PBMCs for CRIM determination has the advantage of a faster turnaround time, further evaluation is needed to ensure the accuracy of CRIM results.

  8. [The determinant role of an accurate medicosocial approach in the prognosis of pediatric blood diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppet, M

    2005-01-01

    The care of infancy and childhood blood diseases implies a comprehensive medicosocial approach. This is a prerequisite for regular follow-up, for satisfactory compliance to treatment and for optimal patient's quality of life. Different modalities of medicosocial approach have been developed in the pediatric department (firstly in the Hospital Saint Pierre and than in the Children's University Hospital HUDERF). The drastic importance of a recent reform of the increased family allowances is briefly presented. The author underlines the determinant role of an accurate global approach, in which the patient and the family are surrounded by a multidisciplinary team, including social workers. PMID:16454232

  9. Red blood cell abnormalities and the pathogenesis of anemia in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgatzakou, Hara T; Antonelou, Marianna H; Papassideri, Issidora S; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2016-08-01

    Anemia is the most common hematologic complication in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is ascribed to decreased erythropoietin production, shortened red blood cell (RBC) lifespan, and inflammation. Uremic toxins severely affect RBC lifespan; however, the implicated molecular pathways are poorly understood. Moreover, current management of anemia in ESRD is controversial due to the "anemia paradox" phenomenon, which underlines the need for a more individualized approach to therapy. RBCs imprint the adverse effects of uremic, inflammatory, and oxidative stresses in a context of structural and functional deterioration that is associated with RBC removal signaling and morbidity risk. RBCs circulate in hostile plasma by raising elegant homeostatic defenses. Variability in primary defect, co-morbidity, and therapeutic approaches add complexity to the pathophysiological background of the anemic ESRD patient. Several blood components have been suggested as biomarkers of anemia-related morbidity and mortality risk in ESRD. However, a holistic view of blood cell and plasma modifications through integrated omics approaches and high-throughput studies might assist the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies that will target the underlying pathophysiologic processes of ESRD anemia. PMID:26948278

  10. Mitochondrial Alterations in Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Cells from Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbarba, A; Abate, G; Prandelli, C; Marziano, M; Buizza, L; Arce Varas, N; Novelli, A; Cuetos, F; Martinez, C; Lanni, C; Memo, M; Uberti, D

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, evidences of mitochondrial defects in AD peripheral cells are still inconclusive. Here, some mitochondrial-encoded and nuclear-encoded proteins, involved in maintaining the correct mitochondria machine, were investigated in terms of protein expression and enzymatic activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from AD and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients and healthy subjects. In addition mitochondrial DNA copy number was measured by real time PCR. We found some differences and some similarities between AD and MCI patients when compared with healthy subjects. For example, cytochrome C and cytochrome B were decreased in AD, while MCI showed only a statistical reduction of cytochrome C. On the other hand, both AD and MCI blood cells exhibited highly nitrated MnSOD, index of a prooxidant environment inside the mitochondria. TFAM, a regulator of mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, was decreased in both AD and MCI patients' blood cells. Moreover also the mitochondrial DNA amount was reduced in PBMCs from both patient groups. In conclusion these data confirmed peripheral mitochondria impairment in AD and demonstrated that TFAM and mtDNA amount reduction could be two features of early events occurring in AD pathogenesis. PMID:26881032

  11. Meta-analysis of peripheral blood apolipoprotein E levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peripheral blood Apolipoprotein E (ApoE levels have been proposed as biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD, but previous studies on levels of ApoE in blood remain inconsistent. This meta-analysis was designed to re-examine the potential role of peripheral ApoE in AD diagnosis and its potential value as a candidate biomarker. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, and BIOSIS previews for case-control studies measuring ApoE levels in serum or plasma from AD subjects and healthy controls. The pooled weighted mean difference (WMD and 95% confidence interval (CI were used to estimate the association between ApoE levels and AD risk. RESULTS: Eight studies with a total of 2250 controls and 1498 AD cases were identified and analyzed. The pooled WMD from a random-effect model of AD participants compared with the healthy controls was -5.59 mg/l (95% CI: [-8.12, -3.06]. The overall pattern in WMD was not varied by characteristics of study, including age, country, assay method, publication year, and sample type. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis supports a lowered level of blood ApoE in AD patients, and indicates its potential value as an important risk factor for AD. Further investigation employing standardized assay for ApoE measurement are still warranted to uncover the precise role of ApoE in the pathophysiology of AD.

  12. Methylation analysis of multiple genes in blood DNA of Alzheimer's disease and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannorella, Pierpaola; Stoccoro, Andrea; Tognoni, Gloria; Petrozzi, Lucia; Salluzzo, Maria Grazia; Ragalmuto, Alda; Siciliano, Gabriele; Haslberger, Alexander; Bosco, Paolo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Migliore, Lucia; Coppedè, Fabio

    2015-07-23

    We collected blood DNA from 120 late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and 115 healthy matched controls and analysed the methylation levels of genes involved in amyloid-beta peptide production (PSEN1 and BACE1), in DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B), and in one-carbon metabolism (MTHFR), searching for correlation with age and gender, with biomarkers of one-carbon metabolism (plasma homocysteine, and serum folate and vitamin B12 levels), and with disease status (being healthy or having AD). We also evaluated the contribution of the APOE ϵ4 allele, the major late-onset AD genetic risk factor, to the studied gene methylation levels. All the genes showed low mean methylation levels (<5%) in both AD and control DNA, no difference between groups, and no correlation with the studied biomarkers, except for MTHFR that showed methylation levels ranging from 5% to 75%, and correlation with circulating biomarkers of one-carbon metabolism. However, mean MTHFR methylation levels were similar between groups (31.1% in AD and 30.7% in controls, P=0.58). Overall, present data suggest that none of the studied regions is differently methylated in blood DNA between AD and control subjects. PMID:26079324

  13. A case of graft-versus-host disease following irradiated fresh blood transfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported a case of a fatal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) which developed in a 65-year-old, male patient which was considered to have been induced by irradiated fresh blood donated by his son after a coronary bypass surgery. Fresh blood was obtained from his relatives, and a 15 Gy irradiation was performed before transfusion. The diagnosis of acute GVHD was made by clinical symptoms and histological examinations of the skin and the bone marrow. He died of sepsis on the 19th post-operative day. The HLA typing of the lymphocytes, revealed that the patient had A 2, A 24, Bw 52, Bw 62, Cw 4, DR 2, and his son had A 24, Bw 52, DR 2. A 24 and Bw 52 were homogeneous making his son histocompatible with one of the patient's haplotype. This might well be attributable to the occurrence of GVHD in this case, meaning that 15 Gy irradiation was not sufficient for the prevention of this disease. (author)

  14. Blood pressure variability and cardiovascular autonomic control during hemodialysis in peripheral vascular disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) are at higher risk of mortality. The main objectives of this work were to investigate the hypothesis of an association between the PVD and an altered control system on peripheral resistance in response to volume depletion induced by HD treatment; and to investigate whether HD induced increase of pulse pressure (PP) is associated with PVD. Continuous blood pressure (BP) was recorded during HD treatment at the beginning and at the end of HD. The overhydration condition was evaluated by means of whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy, measured before each HD treatment. BP variability, heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity were then analyzed. Patients affected by PVD reported a prevalence of peripheral local control as shown by higher values of very low frequency in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) variability and a reduced cardiac baroreflex with respect to patients not affected by this pathology. HD treatment induced a significant increase of PP and LF% in DBP series in PVD patients only. Our results suggested that differences in BP variability and PP changes could be related not only to an underlying vascular disease, but also to an alteration in autonomic control. (paper)

  15. Efficient Quantitative Analysis of Carboxyalkylpyrrole Ethanolamine Phospholipids: Elevated Levels in Sickle Cell Disease Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junhong; Wang, Hua; Hrinczenko, Borys; Salomon, Robert G

    2016-07-18

    γ-Hydroxy-α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, generated by oxidative damage of polyunsaturated phospholipids, form pyrrole derivatives that incorporate the ethanolamine phospholipid (EP) amino group such as 2-pentylpyrrole (PP)-EP and 2-(ω-carboxyalkyl)pyrrole (CAP)-EP derivatives: 2-(ω-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP)-EP, 2-(ω-carboxypropyl)pyrrole (CPP)-EP, and 2-(ω-carboxyheptyl)pyrrole (CHP)-EP. Because EPs occur in vivo in various forms, a complex mixture of pyrrole-modified EPs with different molecular weights is expected to be generated. To provide a sensitive index of oxidative stress, all of the differences in mass related to the glycerophospholipid moieties were removed by releasing a single CAP-ethanolamine (ETN) or PP-ETN from each mixture by treatment with phospholipase D. Accurate quantization was achieved using the corresponding ethanolamine-d4 pyrroles as internal standards. The product mixture obtained by phospholipolysis of total blood phospholipids from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients was analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The method was applied to measure CAP-EP and PP-EP levels in blood plasma from clinical monitoring of SCD patients. We found uniformly elevated blood levels of CEP-EP (63.9 ± 9.7 nM) similar to mean levels in blood from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients (56.3 ± 37.1 nM), and 2-fold lower levels (27.6 ± 3.6 nM, n = 5) were detected in plasma from SCD patients hospitalized to treat a sickle cell crisis, although mean levels remain higher than those (12.1 ± 10.5 nM) detected in blood from healthy controls. Plasma levels of CPP-EPs from SCD clinic patients were 4-fold higher than those of SCD patients hospitalized to treat a sickle cell crisis (45.1 ± 10.9 nM, n = 5 versus 10.9 ± 3.4 nM, n = 6; p < 0.002). PP-EP concentration in plasma from SCD clinic patients is nearly 4.8-fold higher than its level in plasma samples from SCD patients hospitalized to treat a sickle cell crisis (7.06 ± 4.05 vs 1.48 ± 0.92 nM; p < 0.05). Because

  16. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE): a DNA finger printing technique to study the genetic diversity of blood disease bacterium of banana

    OpenAIRE

    HADIWIYONO; JAKA WIDADA; SITI SUBANDIYAH; MARK FEGAN

    2011-01-01

    Hadiwiyono, Widada J, Subandiyah S, Fegan F (2011) Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE): a DNA finger printing technique to study the genetic diversity of blood disease bacterium of banana. Biodiversitas 12: 12-16. Blood disease bacterium (BDB) is the most important pathogen of bananas in Indonesia. In some field, the disease incidence reaches over 80%. Epidemiologically, the disease is similar to moko disease in South America and bugtok disease in the Philippines caused by Ralstonia solan...

  17. Are Blood-Based Protein Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease also Involved in Other Brain Disorders?:A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Chiam, Justin Tao Wen; Dobson, Richard James Butler; Kiddle, Steven John; Sattlecker, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers are urgently needed for both early and accurate diagnosis and prediction of disease progression. Past research has studied blood-based proteins as potential AD biomarkers, revealing many candidate proteins. To date only limited effort has been made to investigate the disease specificity of AD candidate proteins and whether these proteins are also involved in other neurodegenerative or psychiatric conditions.Objective: This review seeks to determ...

  18. Usual blood pressure, peripheral arterial disease, and vascular risk: cohort study of 4.2 million adults

    OpenAIRE

    Emdin, Connor A; Anderson, Simon G.; Callender, Thomas; Conrad, Nathalie; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Mohseni, Hamid; Woodward, Mark; Rahimi, Kazem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the subgroup specific associations between usual blood pressure and risk of peripheral arterial disease, and to examine the relation between peripheral arterial disease and a range of other types of vascular disease in a large contemporary cohort. Design Cohort study. Setting Linked electronic health records from 1990 to 2013 in the United Kingdom. Participants 4 222 459 people aged 30-90 years, registered at a primary care practice for at least one year and with a blo...

  19. MRI-based blood oxygen saturation measurements in infants and children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Vessel oxygen saturation can be determined with MR oximetry using an in vivo measurement of signal decay (T2) and the calibration curve relating T2 to blood oxygen saturation (%HbO2), where: 1/T2=1/T2O+K (1-%HbO2/100)2 and K is a constant parameter which correlates with measured fibrinogen levels. The ability to noninvasively measure %HbO2 in cardiac chambers and vessels has enormous potential in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Objective: The purpose of the study was to prospectively characterize the T2-%HbO2 relationship in infants where T2-%HbO2 is the realtionship between T2 and %HbO2 (blood oxygen saturation) expressed by the equation given above, and to determine whether adult values for K and T2O (where T2O is the T2 of fully oxygenated blood) can be extrapolated to pediatric patients with CHD. A second objective was to apply this method to calculate the %HbO2 in vivo using MR imaging in infants with CHD. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with CHD undergoing cardiac catheterization (9 male; 6 female), median age 8 months, were recruited for the calibration study. T2O and K were measured directly from blood samples, compared with the values estimated from adult population statistics, and plotted against hematocrit and fibrinogen, respectively. In four studies of infants with CHD, T2 measurements were converted to %HbO2 using the calibration curve. Results: The T2-%HbO2 relationship in infants correlated with the adult calibration statistics (1/T2O vs. hematocrit, r=0.77; K vs. fibrinogen, r=0.61). Our initial in vivo studies demonstrated that the MR oximetry reflected the expected oxygen saturations. Conclusion: Adult values for T2-%HbO2 calibration can be used to measure blood oxygen saturation in vivo in children with CHD. (orig.)

  20. [Quantification of D-dimer and soluble fibrin in blood plasma of people with ischemic heart disease and hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovskoĭ, E V; Kolesnikova, I N; Lugovskaia, N E; Litvinova, L M; Gritsenko, P G; Gogolinskaia, G K; Liashko, E D; Kostiuchenko, E P; Remizovskiĭ, G A; Pedchenko, V N; Komisarenko, S V

    2004-01-01

    The method of D-dimer quantification in the human blood plasma has been developed using monoclonal antibodies 111-3b and II-4d. The method has been verified on the blood plasma of the patients with ischemic heart disease with and without stenocardia and with hypertension. The results showed that at ischemic heart disease with and without stenocardia and at hypertension the quantities of D-dimer in the blood plasma were generally less than the highest normal level 500 ng/ml (64.3%, 76.2% and 95%, correspondingly). The semiquantitative measurements of soluble fibrin levels in blood plasmas of the patients with ischemic heart disease and hypertension have been performed. It has been shown that the quantity of soluble fibrin at these diseases range greatly from PAAG with SDS showed that the soluble fibrin at these diseases had the mo- lecular mass of the fibrin (ogen). Thus the soluble fibrin in blood plasmas analysed consisted mainly of fibrin desAA oligomers (may be with fibrinogen incorporation) which are not stabilized by the factor XIIIa. PMID:16350758

  1. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Jain Garg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30-40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30 and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25 or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28 with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE. After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, p93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting seropositive individuals at risk of developing cardiomyopathy.

  2. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases. PMID:10739333

  3. Biodistribution of Infused Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells in Alzheimer's Disease-Like Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, Jared; Darlington, Donna; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sawmiller, Darrell R; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs), a prolific source of non-embryonic or adult stem cells, have emerged as effective and relatively safe immunomodulators and neuroprotectors, reducing behavioral impairment in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke. In this report, we followed the bioavailability of HUCBCs in AD-like transgenic PSAPP mice and nontransgenic Sprague-Dawley rats. HUCBCs were injected into tail veins of mice or rats at a single dose of 1 × 10(6) or 2.2 × 10(6) cells, respectively, prior to harvesting of tissues at 24 h, 7 days, and 30 days after injection. For determination of HUCBC distribution, tissues from both species were subjected to total DNA isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the gene for human glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our results show a relatively similar biodistribution and retention of HUCBCs in both mouse and rat organs. HUCBCs were broadly detected both in the brain and several peripheral organs, including the liver, kidney, and bone marrow, of both species, starting within 7 days and continuing up to 30 days posttransplantation. No HUCBCs were recovered in the peripheral circulation, even at 24 h posttransplantation. Therefore, HUCBCs reach several tissues including the brain following a single intravenous treatment, suggesting that this route can be a viable method of administration of these cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26414627

  4. Three dimensional cerebral blood flow in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional local cerebral blood flow values were measured in 28 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease without dementia and 17 control subjects, by means of xenon enhanced CT method using low concentration cold xenon and autoradiographic strategy. The results demonstrated that local cerebral perfusion in the patients with Parkinson's disease decreased with close correlations with aging and severity of the clinical symptoms and signs. Stepwise multiregression analysis revealed that mean CBF values and 1-CBF values through thalamus and white matter decreased primarily depending on aging and degree of brain atrophy, whereas 1-CBF values through basal ganglia decreased depending on severity of disease. The spatial distributions of 1-CBF were maintained normally and symmetrically even in the severely affected cases or in those with hemiparkinsonism, therefore hyperfrontalities were well preserved in all of the patients. Acute intravenous administration of L-DOPA gave rise to a diffuse increase in 1-CBF only in the patients and the increment was more prominent in patients severely affected than in those mildly affected. It was concluded that reduction of 1-CBF in the basal ganglia and cortex may be attributed to hypometabolism in the mesostriatal and mesocortical dopaminergic system. (author)

  5. Blood amyloid beta levels in healthy, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease individuals: replication of diastolic blood pressure correlations and analysis of critical covariates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Ruiz

    Full Text Available Plasma amyloid beta (Aβ levels are being investigated as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In AB128 cross-sectional study, a number of medical relevant correlates of blood Aβ40 or Aβ42 were analyzed in 140 subjects (51 Alzheimer's disease patients, 53 healthy controls and 36 individuals diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. We determined the association between multiple variables with Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels measured in three different blood compartments called i Aβ directly accessible (DA in the plasma, ii Aβ recovered from the plasma matrix (RP after diluting the plasma sample in a formulated buffer, and iii associated with the remaining cellular pellet (CP. We confirmed that diastolic blood pressure (DBP is consistently correlated with blood DA Aβ40 levels (r=-0.19, P=0.032. These results were consistent in the three phenotypic groups studied. Importantly, the observation resisted covariation with age, gender or creatinine levels. Observed effect size and direction of Aβ40 levels/DBP correlation are in accordance with previous reports. Of note, DA Aβ40 and the RP Aβ40 were also strongly associated with creatinine levels (r=0.599, P<<0.001 and to a lesser extent to urea, age, hematocrit, uric acid and homocysteine (p<0.001. DBP and the rest of statistical significant correlates identified should be considered as potential confounder factors in studies investigating blood Aβ levels as potential AD biomarker. Remarkably, the factors affecting Aβ levels in plasma (DA, RP and blood cell compartments (CP seem completely different.

  6. Alloimmunization is associated with older age of transfused red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Payal C.; Deal, Allison M.; Pfaff, Emily R.; Qaqish, Bahjat; Hebden, Leyna M.; Park, Yara A.; Ataga, Kenneth I.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a significant clinical complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It can lead to difficulty with cross-matching for future transfusions and may sometimes trigger life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the association of clinical complications and age of RBC with alloimmunization in patients with SCD followed at a single institution from 2005 to 2012. One hundred and sixty six patients with a total of 488 RBC transfusions were evaluated. Nineteen patients (11%) developed new alloantibodies following blood transfusions during the period of review. The median age of RBC units was 20 days (interquartile range: 14–27 days). RBC antibody formation was significantly associated with the age of RBC units (P = 0.002), with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% CI: 1.71–7.11) for a RBC unit that was 7 days old and 9.8 (95% CI: 2.66–35.97) for a unit that was 35 days old, 28 days after the blood transfusion. No association was observed between RBC alloimmunization and acute vaso-occlusive complications. Although increased echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was associated with the presence of RBC alloantibodies (P = 0.02), TRV was not significantly associated with alloimmunization when adjusted for patient age and number of transfused RBC units. Our study suggests that RBC antibody formation is significantly associated with older age of RBCs at the time of transfusion. Prospective studies in patients with SCD are required to confirm this finding. PMID:25963831

  7. Potential Large Animal Models for Gene Therapy of Human Genetic Diseases of Immune and Blood Cell Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Thomas R.; Adler, Rima L.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mutations involving the cellular components of the hematopoietic system—red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets—manifest clinically as anemia, infection, and bleeding. Although gene targeting has recapitulated many of these diseases in mice, these murine homologues are limited as translational models by their small size and brief life span as well as the fact that mutations induced by gene targeting do not always faithfully reflect the clinical manifestations of such mutatio...

  8. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate in cats with chronic kidney disease undergoing chemical restraint during hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Karine Kleine Figueiredo dos Santos; Daniel Paulino Junior; Julio César Cambraia Veado; Juliana de Abreu Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Dialysis is one of the used methods for treatment of Acute Renal Injury (ARI) and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) to replace the function of the kidneys when refers to blood depuration. Hemodialysis removes toxins accumulated in the body directly from the blood, being a useful alternative therapy for dogs and cats with CKD in advanced stages. Because of the difficulty on handling the patient feline, this procedure requires sedation. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the safety o...

  9. Peripheral blood T lymphocyte changes in multiple sclerosis: a marker of disease progression rather than of relapse?

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, A J; Brazil, J; Whelan, C A; Martin, E A; Hutchinson, M.; Feighery, C

    1986-01-01

    A serial study of peripheral blood T lymphocytes in 27 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis and 11 healthy controls was carried out over a 12 month period. This showed that contrary to many previous reports, relapses were not consistently associated with reduced numbers of peripheral blood suppressor T lymphocytes or any other T cells. Persistently low T cells numbers, including both the helper and suppressor T cell subsets, were, however, associated with disease activity as m...

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopy of blood plasma for diagnosis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, David H; Rosendahl, Scott; Bandilla, Dirk; Maes, Olivier C; Chertkow, Howard M; Schipper, Hyman M

    2009-01-01

    There are currently no accepted blood-based biomarkers of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Augmented oxidative stress has been implicated in both neural and peripheral AD tissues. In this study, we determined whether short-wavelength near-infrared (NIR) spectrophotometry of blood plasma differentiates mild sporadic AD from normal aging. NIR analysis was conducted on 75 microl plasma samples from 19 AD, 27 amnestic MCI, and 17 normal elderly control (NEC) persons using an optical fiber-coupled, holographic grating-based NIR spectrograph. Five spectral bands associated with heme, R-CH, R-OH, H2O, and R-NH functional groups were sensitive to oxidative modification in pre-clinical studies and were pre-selected to develop a logistic regression model for sample classification. This model differentiated AD from NEC samples with a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 77%. Fifteen and twelve MCI patients were classified with the NEC and AD groups, respectively. The spectra were not influenced by age, gender, exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors or vitamin E, or sample storage time. The NIR data further implicate oxidative stress in the systemic pathophysiology of sporadic AD and differentiate mild (and possibly pre-clinical) AD from NEC individuals with moderate-high accuracy. The procedure is minimally-invasive, rapid, relatively-inexpensive, and may provide a useful biological marker of sporadic AD. PMID:19363272

  11. Nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery: Overcoming blood-brain barrier to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Cláudia; Praça, Catarina; Ferreira, Raquel; Santos, Tiago; Ferreira, Lino; Bernardino, Liliana

    2016-08-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a vital boundary between neural tissue and circulating blood. The BBB's unique and protective features control brain homeostasis as well as ion and molecule movement. Failure in maintaining any of these components results in the breakdown of this specialized multicellular structure and consequently promotes neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In several high incidence pathologies such as stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) the BBB is impaired. However, even a damaged and more permeable BBB can pose serious challenges to drug delivery into the brain. The use of nanoparticle (NP) formulations able to encapsulate molecules with therapeutic value, while targeting specific transport processes in the brain vasculature, may enhance drug transport through the BBB in neurodegenerative/ischemic disorders and target relevant regions in the brain for regenerative processes. In this review, we will discuss BBB composition and characteristics and how these features are altered in pathology, namely in stroke, AD and PD. Additionally, factors influencing an efficient intravenous delivery of polymeric and inorganic NPs into the brain as well as NP-related delivery systems with the most promising functional outcomes will also be discussed. PMID:27208862

  12. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and renal disease in young subjects with type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S K; Chase, H P; Icaza, G; Rothman, R L; Osberg, I; Carmain, J A

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) was evaluated in 150 teenage and young adults with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) to define high-risk subjects who are likely to develop early diabetic nephropathy. Their age range was 16-28 years with diabetes of 3.5-25.8 years duration. All subjects had office blood pressure (BP) measured, wore an ABP monitor for 24 h, and collected two or more timed urine samples for albumin excretion rates (AERs). Eighty-six subjects had no elevation of AER ( 200 micrograms/min). Age, gender, duration of diabetes, and single office BP readings were similar in the four groups (p > 0.05, logistic regression). All 24-h ABP parameters were significantly higher in subjects with diabetes having AER values greater than 7.6 micrograms/min when compared with healthy age- and gender-matched nondiabetic controls (p 140/90) were significantly related with AERs (p or = 140/90) are associated with diabetic renal disease. PMID:9334907

  13. Amyloidosis, synucleinopathy, and prion encephalopathy in a neuropathic lysosomal storage disease: the CNS-biomarker potential of peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomew J Naughton

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS IIIB is a devastating neuropathic lysosomal storage disease with complex pathology. This study identifies molecular signatures in peripheral blood that may be relevant to MPS IIIB pathogenesis using a mouse model. Genome-wide gene expression microarrays on pooled RNAs showed dysregulation of 2,802 transcripts in blood from MPS IIIB mice, reflecting pathological complexity of MPS IIIB, encompassing virtually all previously reported and as yet unexplored disease aspects. Importantly, many of the dysregulated genes are reported to be tissue-specific. Further analyses of multiple genes linked to major pathways of neurodegeneration demonstrated a strong brain-blood correlation in amyloidosis and synucleinopathy in MPS IIIB. We also detected prion protein (Prnp deposition in the CNS and Prnp dysregulation in the blood in MPS IIIB mice, suggesting the involvement of Prnp aggregation in neuropathology. Systemic delivery of trans-BBB-neurotropic rAAV9-hNAGLU vector mediated not only efficient restoration of functional α-N-acetylglucosaminidase and clearance of lysosomal storage pathology in the central nervous system (CNS and periphery, but also the correction of impaired neurodegenerative molecular pathways in the brain and blood. Our data suggest that molecular changes in blood may reflect pathological status in the CNS and provide a useful tool for identifying potential CNS-specific biomarkers for MPS IIIB and possibly other neurological diseases.

  14. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Nisha Jain; Soman, Kizhake V; Zago, Maria P; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R; Wiktorowicz, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30-40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, psurvival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting seropositive individuals at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. PMID:26919708

  15. Analysis of relationship between blood lipid metabolism levels and hs-CRP levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the relationship between blood lipid metabolism levels and hs-CRP levels in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: The levels of plasma blood lipid (with biochemistry) and serum hs-CRP(with high-sensitive immuno turbidimetry) were determined in 96 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as 68 normal controls. Results: The plasma blood lipid levels in 96 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were significantly lower than those in 68 controls, plasma TC and LDL-C levels were not much difference (P>0.05), plasma HDL-C level was significantly difference (P<0.05), but TG and Lp (a) levels were very prominently difference (P<0.01). And the plasma hs-CRP level was significantly increased also (P<0.01). The close relationship was between blood lipid and hs-CRP levels. Conclusion: The study of relationship between blood lipid levels and hs-CRP levels in patients with COPD was helpful for understand the disease process as well as possible mechanisms. (authors)

  16. Dynamic CT imaging of intrahepatic arterial blood flow in patients with chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using dynamic CT, the parenchymal hemodynamics of the livers was studied in patients with chronic liver disease. Dynamic CT was performed on 34 patients: 8 cases of chronic inactive hepatitis (CIH), 15 cases of chronic active hepatitis (CAH) and 11 cases of liver cirrhosis (LC). After rapid intravenous administration of contrast medium (61.2% iopamidol, 20 ml), 25 consecutive scans of the liver and spleen were performed and imaged on a single slice. The single scan time was one sec. Then, the following program was performed: 15 scans at 2 sec intervals, 7 scans at 15 sec intervals and 3 scans at 20 sec intervals. The fit curve for a single pass of the medium was obtained from the analysis of time-density curves in the right and left lobes of the liver and the spleen using a gamma variate function and the least square method. Three parameters were measured on the fit curve: the peak time (PT) was defined as the time to peak enhancement, the total volume component (TVC) was defined as the area beneath the curve between the rise point and the PT point for each lobe of the liver, and the arterial flow volume component (AVC) was defined as the area beneath the curve between the rise point and the PT point of the spleen. AVC in the right liver lobe did not significantly differ between groups, but significantly differed in the manner of CIH< CAH< LC (p<0.05) in the left lobe of the liver. The ratio of intrahepatic arterial blood flow to total hepatic blood flow (AVC/TVC) did not significantly differ between groups in the right lobe. In the left liver lobe, however, AVC/TVC significantly differed in the manner of CIH≤CAH< LC (p<0.01), and was significantly higher in LC patients than in CIH or CAH patients. These results suggest that the ratio of intrahepatic arterial blood flow in the left liver lobe increases as chronic liver disease progresses. (author)

  17. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.B. Ehret (Georg); P. Munroe (Patricia); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); M. Bochud (Murielle); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); M.D. Tobin (Martin); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); S.J. Hwang; V. Pihur (Vasyl); P. Vollenweider (Peter); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); N. Amin (Najaf); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); A. Teumer (Alexander); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J. Hua Zhao (Jing); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); S.C. Heath (Simon); S. Sõber (Siim); A. Parsa (Afshin); J. Luan; P. Arora (Pankaj); A. Dehghan (Abbas); F. Zhang (Feng); G. Lucas (Gavin); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Peden (John); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); S.H. Wild (Sarah); I. Rudan (Igor); W. Igl (Wilmar); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); A.N. Parker (Alex); C. Fava (Cristiano); J.C. Chambers (John); E.R. Fox (Ervin); M. Kumari (Meena); M. Jin Go (Min); P. van der Harst (Pim); W. Hong Linda Kao (Wen); M. Sjögren (Marketa); D.G. Vinay; M. Alexander (Myriam); Y. Tabara (Yasuharu); S. Shaw-Hawkins (Sue); P.H. Whincup (Peter); Y. Liu (Yongmei); G. Shi (Gang); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); B. Tayo (Bamidele); M. Seielstad (Mark); X. Sim (Xueling); K.-D. Hoang Nguyen; T. Lehtimäki (Terho); G. Matullo (Giuseppe); Y. Wu (Ying); T.R. Gaunt (Tom); N. Charlotte Onland-Moret; M.N. Cooper (Matthew); C. Platou (Carl); E. Org (Elin); R. Hardy (Rebecca); S. Dahgam (Santosh); J. Palmen (Jutta); V. Vitart (Veronique); P.S. Braund (Peter); T. Kuznetsova (Tatiana); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); A. Adeyemo (Adebowale); W. Palmas (Walter); H. Campbell (Harry); B. Ludwig (Barbara); M. Tomaszewski; I. Tzoulaki; N.D. Palmer (Nicholette); T. Aspelund (Thor); M. Garcia (Melissa); Y.-P.C. Chang (Yen-Pei); J.R. O´Connell; N.I. Steinle (Nanette); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); D.E. Arking (Dan); S.L. Kardia (Sharon); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); S.S. Najjar (Samer); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); D. Hadley (David); M.J. Brown (Morris); J. Connell (John); A. Hingorani (Aroon); I.N.M. Day (Ian); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); J.P. Beilby (John); R.W. Lawrence (Robert); R. Clarke; J. Hopewell; H. Ongen (Halit); A.W. Dreisbach (Albert); Y. Li (Yali); J. Hunter Young; J.C. Bis (Joshua); M. Kähönen (Mika); J. Viikari (Jorma); N.R. Lee (Nanette); M-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); M. Olden (Matthias); C. Pattaro (Cristian); J.A. Hoffman Bolton (Judith); A. Köttgen (Anna); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); V. Mooser (Vincent); N. Chaturvedi (Nish); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); M. Islam (Muhammad); T.H. Jafar (Tazeen); S.R. Kulkarni (Smita); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); L. Groop (Leif); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); J. Kettunen (Johannes); P. Howard (Philip); A. Taylor (Andrew); S. Guarrera (Simonetta); F. Ricceri (Fulvio); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); A.B. Weder (Alan); S.C. Hunt (Steven); Y.V. Sun (Yan); R.N. Bergman (Richard); F.S. Collins (Francis); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); L.J. Scott (Laura); H.M. Stringham (Heather); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); M. Perola (Markus); E. Vartiainen (Erkki); S.-M. Brand; J.A. Staessen (Jan); Y.A. Wang (Ying); P.R. Burton (Paul); M. Soler Artigas (Maria); Y. Dong (Yanbin); H. Snieder (Harold); H. Zhu (Haidong); K. Lohman (Kurt); M.E. Rudock (Megan); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); K.L. Wiggins (Kerri); A. Doumatey (Ayo); D. Shriner (Daniel); G. Veldre (Gudrun); M. Viigimaa (Margus); S. Kinra (Sanjay); D. Prabhakaran (Dorairaj); V. Tripathy (Vikal); C.D. Langefeld (Carl); A. Rosengren (Annika); D.S. Thelle (Dag); A. Maria Corsi (Anna); A. Singleton (Andrew); T. Forrester (Terrence); G. Hilton (Gina); C.A. McKenzie (Colin); T. Salako (Tunde); N. Iwai (Naoharu); Y. Kita (Yoshikuni); T. Ogihara (Toshio); T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); T. Okamura (Tomonori); H. Ueshima (Hirotsugu); S. Umemura (Satoshi); S. Eyheramendy (Susana); T. Meitinger (Thomas); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); Y. Shin Cho (Yoon); H.-L. Kim; J.S. Sehmi (Joban); B. Hedblad (Bo); P. Nilsson (Peter); G. Davey-Smith (George); A. Wong (Andrew); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Stancáková (Alena); L.J. Raffel (Leslie); J. Yao (Jie); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); W.T. Longstreth Jr; T.H. Mosley (Thomas); S. Seshadri (Sudha); N.R.G. Shrine (Nick); L.V. Wain (Louise); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.J. Swift (Amy); J. Laitinen (Jaana); I. Prokopenko (Inga); P. Zitting (Paavo); S.E. Humphries (Steve); J. Danesh (John); A. Rasheed (Asif); A. Goel (Anuj); A. Hamsten (Anders); H. Watkins (Hugh); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); C.S. Janipalli (Charles); K. Radha Mani; C. Yajnik (Chittaranjan); A. Hofman (Albert); F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E. Lakatta (Edward); M. Orrù (Marco); A. Scuteri (Angelo); M. Ala-Korpela (Mika); A.J. Kangas (Antti); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); P. Soininen (Pasi); T. Tukiainen (Taru); P. Würtz (Peter); R. Twee-Hee Ong (Rick); M. Dörr (Marcus); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); P. Galan (Pilar); S. Hercberg (Serge); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D. Zelenika (Diana); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); M. Mangino (Massimo); T.D. Spector (Timothy); G. Zhai (Guangju); J.F. Meschia (James F.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); P. Sharma (Pankaj); J. Terzic (Janos); M.V. Kranthi Kumar; M. Denniff (Matthew); E. Zukowska-Szczechowska (Ewa); L.E. Wagenknecht (Lynne); F. Gerald R. Fowkes; F.J. Charchar (Fadi); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter); C. Hayward (Caroline); X. Guo (Xiuqing); C. Rotimi (Charles); M.L. Bots (Michiel); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); O. Polasek (Ozren); P.J. Talmud (Philippa); F. Nyberg (Fredrik); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laan (Maris); K. Hveem (Kristian); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); J.P. Casas (Juan); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); P. Vineis (Paolo); O. Raitakari (Olli); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); E. Shyong Tai; M. Laakso (Markku); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); R.W. Morris (Richard); A. Dominiczak (Anna); M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Marmot (Michael); T. Miki (Tetsuro); D. Saleheen; G.R. Chandak (Giriraj); J. Coresh (Josef); G. Navis (Gerjan); V. Salomaa (Veikko); B.-G. Han; J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); O. Melander (Olle); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A.F. Wright (Alan); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M. Farrall (Martin); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); R. Elosua (Roberto); N. Soranzo (Nicole); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); D. Altshuler (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); C. Gieger (Christian); P. Meneton (Pierre); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); N.J. Wareham (Nick); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); R. Rettig (Rainer); M. Uda (Manuela); D.P. Strachan (David); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A.L. Hartikainen; J.S. Beckmann (Jacques); E. Boerwinkle (Eric); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); M. Boehnke (Michael); M.G. Larson (Martin); M.R. Järvelin; B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher); P. Elliott (Paul); D. Levy (Daniel); M. Caulfield (Mark); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); L.S. Adair (Linda); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); I. Barroso (Inês)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBlood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140mmg Hg systolic blood pressure ≥90mmg Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are

  18. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sober, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Peden, John F.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C.; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjogren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Khanh-Dung Hoang Nguyen, [No Value; Lehtimaki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Li, Yali; Young, J. Hunter; Bis, Joshua C.; Kahonen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A. Hoffman; Koettgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Graessler, Juergen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Ine S.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K.; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stancakova, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Longstreth, W. T.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G.; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Wurtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Doerr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. V. Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien Y.; Tai, E. Shyong; Cooper, Richard S.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Harris, Tamara B.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Johnson, Toby

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait(1) influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (>= 140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or >= 90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure)(2). Even small increments in blood pressure are

  19. Biomechanics of red blood cells in human spleen and consequences for physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor V; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George E; Buffet, Pierre A; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra

    2016-07-12

    Red blood cells (RBCs) can be cleared from circulation when alterations in their size, shape, and deformability are detected. This function is modulated by the spleen-specific structure of the interendothelial slit (IES). Here, we present a unique physiological framework for development of prognostic markers in RBC diseases by quantifying biophysical limits for RBCs to pass through the IES, using computational simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics. The results show that the spleen selects RBCs for continued circulation based on their geometry, consistent with prior in vivo observations. A companion analysis provides critical bounds relating surface area and volume for healthy RBCs beyond which the RBCs fail the "physical fitness test" to pass through the IES, supporting independent experiments. Our results suggest that the spleen plays an important role in determining distributions of size and shape of healthy RBCs. Because mechanical retention of infected RBC impacts malaria pathogenesis, we studied key biophysical parameters for RBCs infected with Plasmodium falciparum as they cross the IES. In agreement with experimental results, surface area loss of an infected RBC is found to be a more important determinant of splenic retention than its membrane stiffness. The simulations provide insights into the effects of pressure gradient across the IES on RBC retention. By providing quantitative biophysical limits for RBCs to pass through the IES, the narrowest circulatory bottleneck in the spleen, our results offer a broad approach for developing quantitative markers for diseases such as hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia, and malaria. PMID:27354532

  20. Factors Associated with Blood Culture Contamination in the Emergency Department: Critical Illness, End-Stage Renal Disease, and Old Age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jan Chang

    Full Text Available Blood culture contamination in emergency departments (ED that experience a high volume of patients has negative impacts on optimal patient care. It is therefore important to identify risk factors associated with blood culture contamination in EDs.A prospectively observational study in a university-affiliated hospital were conducted between August 2011 and December 2012. Positive monomicrobial and negative blood cultures drawn from adult patients in the ED were analyzed to evaluate the possible risk factors for contamination. A total of 1,148 positive monomicrobial cases, 391 contamination cases, and 13,689 cases of negative blood culture were identified. Compared to patients with negative blood cultures, patients in triage levels 1 and 2 (Incidence Rate Ratio, IRR = 2.24, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD (IRR = 2.05, and older patients (IRR: 1.02 per year were more likely to be associated with ED blood culture contamination.Critical patients (triage levels 1 and 2, ESRD patients, and older patients were more commonly associated with blood culture contamination in the ED. Further studies to evaluate whether the characteristics of skin commensals contribute to blood culture contamination is warranted, especially in hospitals populated with high-risk patients.

  1. Aggregation of mononuclear and red blood cells through an {alpha}4{beta}1-Lu/basal cell adhesion molecule interaction in sickle cell disease. : Mononuclear and sickle red blood cell interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chaar, Vicky; Picot, Julien; Renaud, Olivier; Bartolucci, Pablo; Nzouakou, Ruben; Bachir, Dora; Galactéros, Frédéric; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline; El Nemer, Wassim

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal interactions between red blood cells, leukocytes and endothelial cells play a critical role in the occurrence of the painful vaso-occlusive crises associated with sickle cell disease. We investigated the interaction between circulating leukocytes and red blood cells which could lead to aggregate formation, enhancing the incidence of vaso-occlusive crises. DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood samples from patients with sickle cell disease (n=25) and healthy subjects (n=5) were analyz...

  2. B cells and platelets harbor prion infectivity in the blood of deer infected with chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiason, Candace K; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Hays, Sheila A; Powers, Jenny; Osborn, David A; Dahmes, Sallie J; Miller, Karl V; Warren, Robert J; Mason, Gary L; Telling, Glenn C; Young, Alan J; Hoover, Edward A

    2010-05-01

    Substantial evidence for prion transmission via blood transfusion exists for many transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases. Determining which cell phenotype(s) is responsible for trafficking infectivity has important implications for our understanding of the dissemination of prions, as well as their detection and elimination from blood products. We used bioassay studies of native white-tailed deer and transgenic cervidized mice to determine (i) if chronic wasting disease (CWD) blood infectivity is associated with the cellular versus the cell-free/plasma fraction of blood and (ii) in particular if B-cell (MAb 2-104(+)), platelet (CD41/61(+)), or CD14(+) monocyte blood cell phenotypes harbor infectious prions. All four deer transfused with the blood mononuclear cell fraction from CWD(+) donor deer became PrP(CWD) positive by 19 months postinoculation, whereas none of the four deer inoculated with cell-free plasma from the same source developed prion infection. All four of the deer injected with B cells and three of four deer receiving platelets from CWD(+) donor deer became PrP(CWD) positive in as little as 6 months postinoculation, whereas none of the four deer receiving blood CD14(+) monocytes developed evidence of CWD infection (immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis) after 19 months of observation. Results of the Tg(CerPrP) mouse bioassays mirrored those of the native cervid host. These results indicate that CWD blood infectivity is cell associated and suggest a significant role for B cells and platelets in trafficking CWD infectivity in vivo and support earlier tissue-based studies associating putative follicular B cells with PrP(CWD). Localization of CWD infectivity with leukocyte subpopulations may aid in enhancing the sensitivity of blood-based diagnostic assays for CWD and other TSEs. PMID:20219916

  3. TT virus and hepatitis G virus infections in Korean blood donors and patients with chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mee Juhng Jeon; Jong Hee Shin; Soon Pal Suh; Yong Chai Lim; Dong Wook Ryang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalences of TTV and HGV infections among blood donors and patients with chronic liver disease in Korea, to investigate the association of TTV and HGV infections with blood transfusion, and to assess the correlation between TTV and HGV viremia and hepatic damage.METHODS: A total of 391 serum samples were examined in this study. Samples were obtained from healthy blood donors (n= 110), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive donors (n=112), anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV)-positive donors (n=69), patients with type B chronic liver disease (n=81), and patients with type C chronic liver disease (n= 19).TTV DNA was detected using the hemi-nested PCR. HGV RNA was tested using RT-PCR. A history of blood transfusion and serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were also determined.RESULTS: TTV DNA was detected in 8.2 % of healthy blood donors, 16.1% of HBsAg-positive donors, 20.3 % of antiHCV-positive donors, 21.0 % of patients with type B chronic liver disease, and 21.1% of patients with type C chronic liver disease. HGV RNA was detected in 1.8 % of healthy blood donors, 1.8 % of HBsAg-positive donors, 17.4 % of anti-HCV-positive donors, 13.6% of patients with type B chronic liver disease, and 10.5% of patients with type C chronic liver disease. The prevalence of TTV and HGV infections in HBV- or HCV-positive donors and patients was significantly higher than in healthy blood donors (P<0.05),except for the detection rate of HGV in HBsAg-positive donors which was the same as for healthy donors. There was a history of transfusion in 66.7% of TTV DNA-positive patients and 76.9% of HGV RNA-positive patients (P<0.05). No significant increase in serum ALT and AST was detected in the TTV- or HGV-positive donors and patients.CONCLUSION: TTV and HGV infections are more frequently found in donors and patients infected with HBV or HCV than in healthy blood donors. However, there is no significant

  4. Regional cerebral blood flow patterns in extremely elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical and pathologic features in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients differ depending on the age of onset. The aim of our study was to compare the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns of younger, elderly, and extremely elderly patients with AD with that of controls to characterize the rCBF patterns in extremely elderly patients with AD. Single photon emission CT (SPECT) was performed in 113 patients with probable AD, including 34 younger (<70 years), 41 elderly (70-84 years), and 38 extremely elderly (≥85 years) patients divided according to age at examination. The SPECT data were analyzed using three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP). No significant differences regarding gender, duration of disease, education, and Mini-Mental State Examination score were found among the groups. As compared with controls, younger and elderly AD demonstrated significant reduction of rCBF in the temporo-parietal areas, posterior cingulate cortices and precunei, which is considered to be a characteristic rCBF pattern in AD. On the other hand, the extremely elderly AD group demonstrated significant reduction of rCBF in the frontal and medial temporal areas, in addition to the temporo-parietal areas, posterior cingulate cortices and precunei, but the reductions were milder than in those in younger and elderly AD groups. The extremely elderly patients with AD showed atypical rCBF patterns in AD compared to younger and elderly patients with AD. Our data suggest that pathological features in extremely elderly AD may be different from those in younger and elderly AD and that diseases different from AD, such as senile dementia of the neurofibrillary tangle type may be clinically diagnosed as extremely elderly AD. (author)

  5. Low-dose cyclophosphamide effectively mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells in patients with autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Norbert; Lisenko, Katharina; Pavel, Petra; Bruckner, Thomas; Ho, Anthony D; Wuchter, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    For patients with severe and refractory autoimmune diseases, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been established as a considerable therapeutic option in recent years. In this retrospective single-center analysis, we assessed the feasibility and efficacy of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) mobilization and collection in 35 patients with refractory autoimmune disease (AID). The mobilization data of 15 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), 11 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and 9 patients with other AID were analyzed. Stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide chemotherapy 2 × 2 g/m(2) (n = 16) or 1 × 2 g/m(2) (n = 17) and G-CSF followed by PBSC collection was performed between 1999 and 2015. Leukapheresis was performed in 16 inpatients and 19 outpatients. All patients reached their collection goal and no collection failures were observed. The median PBSC collection result was 12.2 (SSc), 8.0 (MS), and 8.2 (other AID) × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg, respectively. Twenty-five of 35 (71%) patients achieved a sufficient collection with one leukapheresis session, while 6 patients (17%) required two and 4 patients (11%) required three or more leukapheresis sessions. No correlation of the collected PBSC number was observed regarding age, body weight, diagnosis, disease duration, skin sclerosis, or previous cyclophosphamide. Mobilization chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide 2 × 2 g/m(2) and 1 × 2 g/m(2) delivered comparable mobilization results with leukapheresis on day 13 or 14. In summary, we demonstrate that PBSC collection is safe and feasible in patients with AID. Mobilization chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide 1 × 2 g/m(2) and 2 × 2 g/m(2) is equally effective in those patients. PMID:26381040

  6. Severe proliferative retinopathy is associated with blood hyperviscosity in sickle cell hemoglobin-C disease but not in sickle cell anemia. : Sickle cell disease and retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lemaire, Clément; Lamarre, Yann; Lemonne, Nathalie; Waltz, Xavier; Chahed, Sadri; Cabot, Florence; Botez, Ioana; Tressieres, Benoit; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    International audience Little is known about the impact of blood rheology on the occurrence of retinopathy in sickle cell disease (SCD). Fifty-nine adult SCD patients in steady-state condition participated to the study: 32 with homozygous SCD (sickle cell anemia; SCA) and 27 with sickle cell hemoglobin-C disease (SCC). The patients underwent retinal examination and were categorized according to the classification of Goldberg: 1) no retinopathy (group 1), 2) non-proliferative or proliferati...

  7. Impact of graft versus host disease on outcome of allogeneic peripherial blood stem cell transplantation for leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎美章

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the impact of the occurrence and severity of acute and chronic graft versus host disease(GVHD)on the long-term outcome of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation(allo-PBSCT)for leukemia.Methods A total of 231 patients with leukemia,who underwent allo-HSCT in Changhai Hospital from Jan1st,2001 to Dec 31th,2011,were retrospectively analyzed.The overall survival(OS),disease-free survival

  8. Effect of dialysis on cerebral blood flow in depressive end-stage renal disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients with depressive symptoms during dialysis. Fourteen patients with ESRD underwent Tc-99m ethylcysteinate dimer (Tc-99m ECD) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and were evaluated the severity of depressive mood at pre-dialytic period and at least 6 months after dialysis initiation. rCBF was analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in brain SPECT image. The responder was defined as a decrease of ≥25% in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score from baseline HDRS score. Pre-dialysis brain SPECT did not show any rCBF differences between responders and non-responders. The follow-up brain SPECT revealed a significant higher perfusion in left middle temporal gyrus of responder group when compared with non-responder (hemisphere coordinate X, Y, Z; -58, -2, -16, peak Z=3.36, p=0.046). In responder, a significant increase in rCBF was found in right parahippocampal gyrus (hemisphere coordinate X, Y, Z; 30, -40, -14, peak Z=3.51, p=0.043). In non-responder, there were significant decreases in rCBF in left superior frontal gyrus (hemisphere coordinate X, Y, Z; -22, 30, 42, peak Z=3.86, p=0.032) and right orbitofrontal cortex (hemisphere coordinate X, Y, Z; 10, 58, -6, peak Z=3.81, p=0.046). The present findings showed the characteristic patterns of rCBF changes in depressive ESRD patients having maintenance dialysis. Further investigations in brain blood flow and glucose metabolism are needed to elucidate the effect of dialysis itself and the difference of according to dialysis modality in patients having depression and ESRD. (author)

  9. Dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of Legionnaires' disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis P C de Jager

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVE: Absolute lymphocytopenia is recognised as an important hallmark of the immune response to severe infection and observed in patients with Legionnaires' disease. To explore the immune response, we studied the dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of LD. METHODS AND RESULTS: EDTA-anticoagulated blood was obtained from eight patients on the day the diagnosis was made through detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen in urine. A second blood sample was obtained in the subacute phase. Multiparametric flow cytometry was used to calculate lymphocyte counts and values for B-cells, T-cells, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Expression of activation markers was analysed. The values obtained in the subacute phase were compared with an age and gender matched control group. Absolute lymphocyte count (×10⁹/l, median and range significantly increased from 0.8 (0.4-1.6 in the acute phase to 1.4 (0.8-3.4 in the subacute phase. B-cell count showed no significant change, while T-cell count (×10⁶/l, median and range significantly increased in the subacute phase (495 (182-1024 versus 979 (507-2708, p = 0.012 as a result of significant increases in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts (374 (146-629 versus 763 (400-1507, p = 0.012 and 119 (29-328 versus 224 (107-862, p = 0.012. In the subacute phase of LD, significant increases were observed in absolute counts of activated CD4+ T-cells, naïve CD4+ T-cells and memory CD4+ T-cells. In the CD8+ T-cell compartment, activated CD8+ T-cells, naïve CD8+ T-cell and memory CD8+ T-cells were significantly increased (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The acute phase of LD is characterized by absolute lymphocytopenia, which recovers in the subacute phase with an increase in absolute T-cells and re-emergence of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These observations are in line with the suggested role for T-cell activation in the immune response to LD.

  10. Red blood cell membrane concentration of cis-palmitoleic and cis-vaccenic acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although previous studies have suggested associations between plasma palmitoleic acid and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including blood pressure, inflammation, and insulin resistance, little is known about the relation of palmitoleic acid and CHD. This ancillary study of the Physicians'...

  11. IFNγ production in peripheral blood of early Lyme disease patients to hLFAαL (aa326-345

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wormser Gary P

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that outer surface protein A (OspA of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto contains a T helper 1 (Th1 cell epitope that could play a role in an autoimmune response to hLFA1. Methods We used two peptides, hLFAαL (aa326-345 and Borrelia burgdorferi OspAB31 (aa164-183, as stimulating antigens to measure Th1 proinflammatory IFNγ cytokine production in peripheral blood of Lyme disease patients presenting with EM without history of arthritis, as well as in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. Results IFNγ responses to hLFA1 peptide were observed in 11 of 19 Lyme disease patients and in 3 of 15 healthy controls. In contrast, only 2 of 19 of the Lyme disease patients and none of the controls responded to the homologous OspAB31 peptide. Conclusions IFNγ was produced in response to stimulation with peptide hLFAαL (aa326-345 in peripheral blood of 58% of patients with early Lyme disease without signs of arthritis, as well as in peripheral blood of 20% of healthy individuals, but not in response to stimulation with the homologous OspAB31 (aa164-183 peptide (p

  12. DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY A OZONE IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES OF ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Kytikova, Oxana; Gvozdenko, Tatyana; Vitkina, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    We have assessed DNA damage by using various therapeutic concentrations of ozone in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (in vitro). The results of this work demonstrate that ozone induces DNA damage. It was also noticed, that there is a clear dose-dependent increase in DNA damage.

  13. Nurse-led care interventions for high blood pressure control: Implications for non-communicable disease programs in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Katende

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Nurses play a significant role in the control of high blood pressure when they employ effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of hypertension. Adapting effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of non-communicable diseases could improve patient outcomes in Uganda.

  14. CONTENTS OF THYROID HORMONES, CYTOKINES AND α2-MACROGLOBULIN IN BLOOD SERA AND IN CULTURE SUPERNATES OF BLOOD CELLS FROM THE GRAVES DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zorina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We had investigated levels of TTG, T4, TNFα, IL-6, IFNγ, and α2-MG in blood serum and supernates of short-term blood cultures in the patients with verified Graves disease before treatment and after reaching of euthyroid status, as compared with healthy controls. We have revealed that initial blood concentrations of free Т4 in the patients were increased, along with decrease in TSH, higher IL-6, IFNγ levels, as well as concentrations of α2-MG which participates in cytokine transport and synthesis. Thiamazole treatment normalized the hormonal profile and reduced blood levels of IL-6, IFNγ and α2-MG, however, without complete normalization, along with increase of serum TNFα contents. It was shown, that the patients before treatment had decreased in vitro response of cells to the mitogenic stimulation as shown by decreased induction of TNFα and IFNγ production, along with, increased spontaneous IFNγ levels. When reaching euthyroid state after Thiamazole administration, we observed an increased spontaneous IFNγ synthesis, decreased IL-6 production in resting cultures. In mitogen-stimulated cell cultures from the treated patients, IFNγ contents became normal, however, TNFα secretion remained lower than in controls. The α2-MG levels in supernates were stable and significantly lower, than in serum. We may presume that thyrotoxicosis treatment with Thiamazole causes stabilization of the endocrine state, however, being not sufficient for normalized production of cytokines, as well as α2-MG, with its regulatory and transporter functions, thus promoting recurrence of disease and reactivation of autoimmune events. 

  15. Unrelated Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation(HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Sickle Cell Disease; Thalassemia; Anemia; Granuloma; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chediak Higashi Syndrome; Osteopetrosis; Neutropenia; Thrombocytopenia; Hurler Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease; Fucosidosis

  16. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, Phttp://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. PMID:27091900

  17. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Liao, Yihua [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McDermott, Mary M. [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  18. Cerebral blood flow mapping using stable xenon-enhanced CT in sickle cell cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerebral blood flow (CBF) of 25 patients with sickle cell cerebrovascular disease (SCCVD) was examined using a xenon-CT flow mapping method. Brain CT and MR findings were correlated with those of the xenon-CT flow studies. CBF defects on xenon-CT correlated reasonably well with the areas of cortical infarctions on the MR images, but in 27% of the cases, flow defects were slightly larger than the areas of infarctions on the MR images. In deep watershed or basal ganglia infarctions, abnormal CBF was noted about the cerebral cortex near infarctions in 72% of the patients, regardless of infarction sizes on the MR images. However, decreased CBF was recognized in 4 of the 9 children whose MR images were virtually normal. Thus, the extent of flow depletion cannot be predicted accurately by MR imaging alone. Xenon-CT flow mapping proved a safe and reliable procedure for evaluation of the CBF of patients with SCCVD. Although this study is preliminary, it may have a potential in selecting patients for hypertransfusion therapy, as a noninvasive test and for following children with SCCVD during their therapy. Careful correlation of results of CBF with those of MR imaging or of CT is important for objective interpretations of flow mapping images. (orig.)

  19. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo. PMID:27089941

  20. Common DNA methylation alterations of Alzheimer's disease and aging in peripheral whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongdong; Guo, Zheng; Guo, You; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Cheng, Jun; Wang, Chenguang; Hong, Guini

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common aging-related neurodegenerative illness. Recently, many studies have tried to identify AD- or aging-related DNA methylation (DNAm) biomarkers from peripheral whole blood (PWB). However, the origin of PWB biomarkers is still controversial. In this study, by analyzing 2565 DNAm profiles for PWB and brain tissue, we showed that aging-related DNAm CpGs (Age-CpGs) and AD-related DNAm CpGs (AD-CpGs) observable in PWB both mainly reflected DNAm alterations intrinsic in leukocyte subtypes rather than methylation differences introduced by the increased ratio of myeloid to lymphoid cells during aging or AD progression. The PWB Age-CpGs and AD-CpGs significantly overlapped 107 sites (P-value = 2.61×10−12) and 97 had significantly concordant methylation alterations in AD and aging (P-value nervous system development, neuron differentiation and neurogenesis. More than 60.8% of these 97 concordant sites were found to be significantly correlated with age in normal peripheral CD4+ T cells and CD14+ monocytes as well as in four brain regions, and 44 sites were also significantly differentially methylated in different regions of AD brain tissue. Taken together, the PWB DNAm alterations related to both aging and AD could be exploited for identification of AD biomarkers. PMID:26943045

  1. Blood-brain barrier proteomics: towards the understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Yannis; Gosselet, Fabien; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Cecchelli, Roméo

    2014-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulates the passage of endogenous and exogenous compounds and thus contributes to the brain homeostasis with the help of well-known proteins such as tight junction proteins, plasma membrane transporters and metabolic barrier proteins. In the last decade, proteomics have emerged as supplementary tools for BBB research. The development of proteomic technologies has provided several means to extend knowledge on the BBB and to investigate additional routes for the bypass of this barrier. Proteomics approaches have been used in vivo and also using in vitro BBB models to decipher the physiological characteristics and, under stress conditions, to understand the molecular mechanisms of brain diseases. This work has demonstrated that both quantitative global and targeted proteomics approaches are powerful and provide significant information on the brain microvessel endothelium. However, current knowledge is only partial and it is necessary to increase the studies using proteomics tools that will provide additional information concerning brain pathologies or BBB metabolism. Highly sensitive, accurate and specific protein quantification by quantitative targeted proteomics appears as an essential methodology for human BBB studies. PMID:25446619

  2. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  3. Transplantation of mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells for peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng YANG; Yanxiang WU; Hongmei WANG; Yifeng XU; Bo XU; Xin LU; Yibin ZANG; Fa WANG; Yue ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess the clinical efficacy, safety, and feasibility of autologous transplantation of mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) for patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) of the lower extremity. Methods A total of 152 patients with PAOD of the lower extremity were enrolled into this non-controlled observational study from November 2003 to March 2006. All patients received subcutaneous injections of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, 450600 μg/day) for 5 days in order to mobilize stem/progenitor cells; their PBMNCs were collected and transplanted by multiple intramuscular injections into ischemic limbs. Patients were followed up for at least 12 weeks. Results At 12 weeks, primarymanifestations,including lower limb pain and coldness, were significantly improved in 137 (90.1%) of the patients; limb ulcers improved or healed in 46 (86.8%) of the 53 patients, while 25 of the 48 (47.9%) patients with limb gangrene remained steady or improved. Ankle-brachial index (ABI) improved in 33 (22%) of the cases, and TcPO2 increased in 45 (30%) of the cases. Angiography before treatment, and at 12 weeks after treatment, was performed in 10 of the patients and showed formation of new collateral vessels. No severe adverse effects or complications specifically related to cell transplantation were observed. Conclusion Autologous transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBMNCs might be a safe and effective treatment for lower limb ischemic disorder.(J Geriatr Cardiol 2006; 3:178-80.)

  4. Dynamic quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2012-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometric techniques to quantitatively image sickle red blood cells (RBCs) [1] in a noncontact label-free manner, and measure the nanometer-scale fluctuations in their thickness as an indication of their stiffness. The technique can simultaneously measure the fluctuations for multiple spatial points on the RBC and thus yields a map describing the stiffness of each RBC in the field of view. Using this map, the local rigidity regions of the RBC are evaluated quantitatively. Since wide-field digital interferometry is a quantitative holographic imaging technique rather than one-point measurement, it can be used to simultaneously evaluate cell transverse morphology plus thickness in addition to its stiffness profile. Using this technique, we examine the morphology and dynamics of RBCs from individuals who suffer from sickle cell disease, and find that the sickle RBCs are significantly stiffer than healthy RBCs. Furthermore, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish various classes of sickle RBCs, including sickle RBCs with visibly-normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs.

  5. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine functional changes in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were determined using 0-15 positron emission tomography in 10 PD patients and five age-matched healthy volunteers. There was a tendency among PD patients towards a decreased CBF and CMRO2 in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. These values were significantly lower in the frontal cortex in the PD group than the control group. There was no difference in OEF between the groups. A more decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was observed in patients staged as severer on the scale of Hoehn and Yahr. There was no correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesis. A decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was associated with mental disorders, such as depression, hallucination, and dementia. These results may provide an important clue for the understanding of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway and the relationship between PD and dementia. (N.K.)

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer's disease. Comparison between short and long-term donepezil therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment with donepezil improves cognitive function of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) when compared to a placebo-controlled group. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of AD patients in short-term and long-term treatment with donepezil. rCBF was measured by N-isopropyl-p-123I-iodoamphetamine (IMP) autoradiography method. CBF measurements were performed in 17 AD patients before treatment and after 3 months (short-term therapy) and 1 year (long-term therapy). Regions of interest were set at cerebral cortex and cerebellar hemisphere. We used absolute CBF and relative CBF expressed as ratio to cerebellar CBF. Significant increases in relative rCBF were noted in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes at the end of short-term therapy. rCBF was decreased after the long-term therapy, whereas rCBF was still increased to a slight extent, as compared with the pre-treatment levels. Absolute rCBF showed minimal change and a tendency to decline. Relative rCBF significantly increased in the short-term donepezil therapy, while following the long-term therapy, rCBF decreased to the pre-treatment level. (author)

  7. Study on the relationship between red blood cell immunity and lipid peroxidation in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the relationship between red blood cell immunity and lipid peroxidation in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease. Methods: The red blood cell C3b receptor (RBC-C3bR) and red blood cell immune complex rosette (RBC-ICR) were measured in 42 patients with hand-foot-mouth disease as well as in 35 controls. The serum levels of MDA, SOD and GSH-PX were also measured with colorimetry in these subjects. Results: RBC-ICRR and MDA levels were significantly higher in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease than those in controls(P<0.01), while the RBC-C3bR, SOD, GSH-PX levels were significantly lower in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease than those in controls (P<0.01). RBC-C3bR was negatively correlated with MDA (r=-0.5014, P<0.05), but RBC-ICR was positively correlated with MDA (r=0.5942, P<0.01). Conclusion: The lowered red cell immune function was closely associated with the lipid peroxidation injury in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease. (authors)

  8. Raman spectroscopy for a rapid diagnosis of sickle cell disease in human blood samples: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Antonio Carlos Bueno; Silveira, Landulfo; Yanai, Ana Leticia Sant'Anna; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been proposed as a tool for diagnosis of human blood diseases aiming a quick and accurate diagnosis. Sickle cell disease arises in infancy and causes a severe anemia; thus, an early diagnosis may avoid pathological complications such as vasoocclusion, hemolytic anemia, retinopathy, cardiovascular disease, and infections. This work evaluated spectral differences between hemoglobin S (HbS) and hemoglobin A (HbA) to be used in a diagnostic model based on principal components analysis. Blood samples of patients with a previous diagnosis of sickle cell disease were hemolyzed with water, centrifuged, and the pellet was collected with a pipette. Near-infrared Raman spectra (830 nm, 200 mW) were obtained from these samples, and a model based on principal components analysis and Mahalanobis distance were used to discriminate HbA from HbS. Differences were found in the spectra of HbS and HbA, mainly in the 882 and 1,373 cm(-1) (valine, HbA) and 1,547 and 1,622 cm(-1) (glutamic acid, HbS). The spectral model could correctly discriminate 100% of the samples in the correspondent groups. Raman spectroscopy was able to detect the subtle changes in the polypeptide chain (valine and glutamic acid substitution) due to the sickle cell disease and could be used to discriminate blood samples with HbS from HbA with minimum sample preparations (hemolysis with water and centrifugation). PMID:25217409

  9. Study of the effect of 131I treatment of graves disease on the number of peripheral blood leucocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of 131I treatment of Graves disease on the number of peripheral blood leucocytes. Methods: The Graves disease patients were divided into groups according to the 131I dosage taken, peripheral blood leucocytes were measured before and after the taking of 131I. Results: On the 4th day after taking 131I, the absolute value of leucocyte, neutrophil, Lymphocyte were decreased, the number of neutrophil was significantly decreased (P 131I(P 131I. Conclusion: 131I treatment of Graves disease can reduce the number of leucocytes, especially neutrophil, in a short time (about one week), it is related with the dosage of 131I. After a week, they can nearly return to the primary level. Some medicine which can increase the number of leucocytes should be used when the patient taking 131I

  10. The Prognostic Role of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width in Coronary Artery Disease: A Review of the Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Bujak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell distribution width (RDW is a measure of red blood cell volume variations (anisocytosis and is reported as part of a standard complete blood count. In recent years, numerous studies have noted the importance of RDW as a predictor of poor clinical outcomes in the settings of various diseases, including coronary artery disease (CAD. In this paper, we discuss the prognostic value of RDW in CAD and describe the pathophysiological connection between RDW and acute coronary syndrome. In our opinion, the negative prognostic effects of elevated RDW levels may be attributed to the adverse effects of independent risk factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and vitamin D3 and iron deficiency on bone marrow function (erythropoiesis. Elevated RDW values may reflect the intensity of these phenomena and their unfavorable impacts on bone marrow erythropoiesis. Furthermore, decreased red blood cell deformability among patients with higher RDW values impairs blood flow through the microcirculation, resulting in the diminution of oxygen supply at the tissue level, particularly among patients suffering from myocardial infarction treated with urgent revascularization.

  11. A Family Cluster of Chagas Disease Detected through Selective Screening of Blood Donors: A Case Report and Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Mongeau-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD is a protozoan infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted by triatomine insect vectors in parts of Latin America. In a nonendemic country, such as Canada, spread can still occur via vertical transmission, and infected blood or organ donations. The Canadian Blood Services and Héma-Québec have both implemented selective screening of blood donors for CD based on risk factors. In 2011, Héma-Québec identified two seropositive ‘at-risk’ Chilean siblings who had donated blood in Montreal, Quebec. They were referred to the JD MacLean Centre for Tropical Diseases (Montreal, Quebec for confirmatory testing (T cruzi excreted-secreted antigen ELISA, polymerase chain reaction and/or radioimmunoprecipitation assay and follow-up. Screening of the rest of the family revealed two other seropositive family members (the mother and sister. While their geographical history in Chile suggests vectorial transmission, this family cluster of CD raises the possibility of vertical transmission. Congenital infection should always be considered among CD-positive mothers and pregnant women. With blood donor screening, Canadian physicians will increasingly see patients with CD and should know how to manage them appropriately. In addition to the case presentation, the authors review the transmission, screening and clinical management of CD in a nonendemic context.

  12. A family cluster of Chagas disease detected through selective screening of blood donors: A case report and brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeau-Martin, Guillaume; Ndao, Momar; Libman, Michael; Delage, Gilles; Ward, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is a protozoan infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted by triatomine insect vectors in parts of Latin America. In a nonendemic country, such as Canada, spread can still occur via vertical transmission, and infected blood or organ donations. The Canadian Blood Services and Héma-Québec have both implemented selective screening of blood donors for CD based on risk factors. In 2011, Héma-Québec identified two seropositive 'at-risk' Chilean siblings who had donated blood in Montreal, Quebec. They were referred to the JD MacLean Centre for Tropical Diseases (Montreal, Quebec) for confirmatory testing (T cruzi excreted-secreted antigen ELISA, polymerase chain reaction and/or radioimmunoprecipitation assay) and follow-up. Screening of the rest of the family revealed two other seropositive family members (the mother and sister). While their geographical history in Chile suggests vectorial transmission, this family cluster of CD raises the possibility of vertical transmission. Congenital infection should always be considered among CD-positive mothers and pregnant women. With blood donor screening, Canadian physicians will increasingly see patients with CD and should know how to manage them appropriately. In addition to the case presentation, the authors review the transmission, screening and clinical management of CD in a nonendemic context. PMID:26236358

  13. Simple blood tests as predictive markers of disease severity and clinical condition in patients with venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Oguz; Yavuz, Celal; Kankilic, Nazim; Demirtas, Sinan; Tezcan, Orhan; Caliskan, Ahmet; Mavitas, Binali

    2016-09-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is a progressive inflammatory disease. Because of its inflammatory nature, several circulating markers were investigated for predicting disease progression. We aimed to investigate simple inflammatory blood markers as predictors of clinical class and disease severity in patients with CVI. Eighty patients with CVI were divided into three groups according to clinical class (grade 1, 2 and 3) and score of disease severity (mild, moderate and severe). The basic inflammatory blood markers [neutrophil, lymphocyte, mean platelet volume (MPV), white blood cell (WBC), platelet, albumin, D-dimer, fibrinogen, fibrinogen to albumin ratio, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio] were investigated in each group. Serum neutrophil, lymphocyte, MPV, platelet count, D-dimer and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio levels were similar among the groups (P > 0.05). Although the serum WBC levels were significant in the clinical severity groups (P < 0.05), it was useless to separate each severity class. However, albumin, fibrinogen and the fibrinogen to albumin ratio were significant predictors of clinical class and disease severity. Especially, the fibrinogen to albumin ratio was detected as an independent indicator for a clinical class and disease severity with high sensitivity and specificity (75% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity for clinical class and 90% sensitivity and 88.3% specificity for disease severity). Serum fibrinogen and albumin levels can be useful parameters to determine clinical class and disease severity in patients with CVI. Moreover, the fibrinogen to albumin ratio is a more sensitive and specific predictor of the progression of CVI. PMID:26650463

  14. [Evaluation of NMR relaxation method as a diagnostic tool for donor blood analysis and patients with hematologic diseases and burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangardt, M G; Popova, O V; Shmarov, D A; Kariakina, N F; Papish, E A; Kozinets, G I

    2002-08-01

    Diagnostic value of the NMR-relaxation method in the blood plasma was estimated in the patients with different pathologies. The time of hydrogen nuclei longitudinal relaxation (T1) in the health donors of the blood, in the patients with oncopathology (hemoblastoses) and in the cases with anemia and burning disease were investigated. The time of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) was measured by automated NMR-relaxometer "Palma" (Russia). The working frequency was equal to 35 MHz, the temperature was 45 +/- 0.1 degrees C. For the single measurement 0.2 ml of blood obtained from heparinized venous blood 1.5 hours after its taking was used. The time of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) was shown to be 1.78 +/- 0.02 in the health donors, 1.70 +/- 0.06 s in cases with anemia, 1.97 +/- 0.48 c in patients with leucosis, 2.40 +/- 0.12 s in patients with burns. The sensitivity and the specificity of diagnostics of leucosis based upon the results of the only single T1 measurement in blood plasma were concluded to be 75%. It proves the significant T1 change both in patients with anemia and burning disease of the II-III degree. However it is evidently insufficient for selective use of NMR-relaxation blood plasma (serum) in the diagnostics of anemia and leucosis. The data obtained prove also the possibility of use of NMR-relaxation blood plasma (serum) for control of the hemostasis state during treatment or remission. PMID:12362635

  15. Generation process of methemoglobin at combined effect of irradiation and sodium nitrite to oxyhaemoglobin of blood of asiderotic iron-deficiency anemia diseased

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of reaction of nitride oxidation (concentration of nitride in protein solution 0.8 mM) of oxyhaemoglobin solution of donor blood and blood of asiderotic iron-deficiency anemia diseased persons during gamma-irradiation in exposure doses 70 nC/(kg*c) and 40 nC/(kg*c). As a result haemoglobin of asiderotic iron-deficiency anemia diseased persons more sensitive to influence of radiochemical factor than blood protein of donors

  16. There is no Gradient of TSH Receptor Antibody Activity Between Thyroidal and Peripheral Venous Blood in Patients with Graves' Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyrotropin binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) and thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) activities were measured in the thyroidal and peripheral venous blood samples at the time of subtotal thyroidectomy from twenty one patients with Graves' disease prepared for surgery with antithyroid drugs. There was no difference in TBII and TSAb activities between thyroidal and peripheral blood samples. These findings were regarded that while intrathyroidal lymphocytes are major site of thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) production, similar levels are found in thyroidal and peripheral veins and that this in vive study cannot exactly ascertain the TRAb producing site.

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow in Parkinson's disease measured with N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) SPECT studies were performed on 21 patients (13 females; 45-73 yrs) with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 10 age-matched normal controls (39-69 yrs). Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was quantitatively measured by the arterial blood sampling method. When compared with normal controls, global CBF, and rCBF in the frontal cortex and in the basal ganglia were reduced 22.1% (p123I-IMP SPECT imaging is useful for evaluation and follow-up of patients with PD. (author)

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis of systolic blood pressure in children with sickle cell disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallav Bhatnagar

    Full Text Available In pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD patients, it has been reported that higher systolic blood pressure (SBP is associated with increased risk of a silent cerebral infarction (SCI. SCI is a major cause of neurologic morbidity in children with SCD, and blood pressure is a potential modulator of clinical manifestations of SCD; however, the risk factors underlying these complications are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to identify genetic variants that influence SBP in an African American population in the setting of SCD, and explore the use of SBP as an endo-phenotype for SCI. We conducted a genome-wide meta-analysis for SBP using two SCD cohorts, as well as a candidate screen based on published SBP loci. A total of 1,617 patients were analyzed, and while no SNP reached genome-wide significance (P-value<5.0 x 10(-8, a number of suggestive candidate loci were identified. The most significant SNP, rs7952106 (P-value=8.57 x 10(-7, was in the DRD2 locus on chromosome 11. In a gene-based association analysis, MIR4301 (micro-RNA4301, which resides in an intron of DRD2, was the most significant gene (P-value=5.2 x 10(-5. Examining 27 of the previously reported SBP associated SNPs, 4 SNPs were nominally significant. A genetic risk score was constructed to assess the aggregated genetic effect of the published SBP variants, demonstrating a significant association (P=0.05. In addition, we also assessed whether these variants are associated with SCI, validating the use of SBP as an endo-phenotype for SCI. Three SNPs were nominally associated, and only rs2357790 (5' CACNB2 was significant for both SBP and SCI. None of these SNPs retained significance after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, our results suggest the importance of DRD2 genetic variation in the modulation of SBP, and extend the aggregated importance of previously reported SNPs in the modulation of SBP in an African American cohort, more specifically in children with SCD.

  19. Circadian variations in blood pressure in health and disease: implications for patient management

    OpenAIRE

    Slaughter, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Atul R Chugh1, John H Loughran1, Mark S Slaughter21Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, 2Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USAAbstract: Traditionally, blood pressure measurements have been performed in office settings and have provided the basis for all diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. However, the development of a clinically relevant 24-hour blood pressure monitoring system has added greatly to the ability of blood pressure values...

  20. An Interferon Signature in the Peripheral Blood of Dermatomyositis Patients is Associated with Disease Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Baechler, Emily C.; Bauer, Jason W.; Slattery, Catherine A; Ortmann, Ward A.; Espe, Karl J; Novitzke, Jill; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K; Behrens, Timothy W.; Reed, Ann M

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown increased expression of interferon (IFN)-regulated genes in the peripheral blood cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. A similar interferon signature has been observed in affected muscle tissue from patients with dermatomyositis (DM), but it has not yet been determined if this signature extends to the peripheral blood in DM. We performed global gene expression profiling of peripheral blood cells from adult and juvenile DM patients and healthy controls....

  1. Biochemical characterization of blood plasma of coronary artery disease patients by in vitro high-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anu Malik; Uma Sharma; R Lakshmy; Rajiv Narang; Naranamanglam R Jagannathan

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the biochemical profile of blood plasma of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and angiographically normal subjects (controls) to determine biomarkers for their differentiation. In this double blind study, 5 mL venous blood was drawn before angiography from CAD patients (n=60) and controls (n=13) comprising angiography normal individuals. In vitro high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of these blood plasma samples was carried out at 400 MHz, and intensity data were analysed with partial least square discriminant analysis. Categorization of subjects as controls or CAD patients and the patients further as single vessel disease (SVD), double vessel disease (DVD) and triple vessel disease (TVD) was done at the end of the study based on their angiography reports. Raised levels of lipids, alanine (Ala) and isoleucine/leucine/valine (Ile/Leu/Val) were observed in CAD patients compared with controls. Partial least square discriminant analysis showed separation between controls vs CAD patients. TVD patients showed increased levels of Ile/Leu/Val and Ala compared with controls and SVD. Alanine, Ile/Leu/Val, and LDL/VLDL appear as possible biomarkers for distinguishing between controls and patients with SVD and TVD. A metabolic adaptation of myocardium may play a role in raising the Ala level.

  2. Three-dimensional color Doppler reconstruction of intracardiac blood flow in patients with different heart valve diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, R; Glombitza, G; Vahl, C F; Meinzer, H P; Hagl, S

    2000-12-15

    An improved perception of the magnitude and dynamics of intracardiac flow disturbances has been made possible by the advent of 3-dimensional (3-D) color Doppler, a new diagnostic procedure developed at our institution. This study describes the new insights derived from 3-D reconstruction of color Doppler flow patterns in patients with different heart valve diseases. The color Doppler flow data from 153 multiplanar transesophageal or transthoracic echocardiographic examinations has been obtained from 133 patients with heart valve disease; 73 patients had mitral regurgitation, 15 had mitral stenosis, 18 had aortic regurgitation, 26 had aortic stenosis, and 21 patients had tricuspid regurgitation. Four patients had pulmonary regurgitation associated with mitral valve disease. The 3-D reconstructions of color Doppler flow signals were accomplished by means of the "Heidelberg Raytracing model," developed at our institution. The 3-D color Doppler reconstructions were obtained in all patients. The 3-D images revealed for the first time the complex spatial distribution of the blood flow abnormalities in the heart chambers caused by different heart valve diseases. New patterns of intracardiac blood flow disturbances were observed and classified. Three-dimensional color Doppler provides a unique noninvasive method that can be easily applied for studying intracardiac blood flow disturbances in clinical practice. PMID:11113410

  3. Study on Blood Coagulant/Fibrinolytic Activity at Plasma andMonocytic Levels in Coronary Heart Disease Patients withBlood-Stasis Syndrome of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To explore and compare the changes of coagulant/fibrinolytic activity in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with Blood Stasis Syndrome of TCM and evaluate the roles of these changes. Methods: Eighty patients of CHD were divided into two groups by Syndrome Differentiation of TCM, the Blood-Stasis (BS) group (30 cases) and the non-Blood-Stasis (NBS) group (50 cases, including 27 cases of Phlegm-Dampness Syndrome and 23 cases of Qi-Stagnation Syndrome); and 20 healthy persons were enrolled as normal control group. Tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and its inhibitor (PAI-1) in plasma and in human peripheral blood monocyte cell (PBMC), as well as the procoagulant activity (PCA) in PBMC were measured by chromogenic substrate method. Results: The plasma PAI-1 activity and PCA of PBMC in the BS group were significantly higher than those in the NBS group and the normal control group (P<0.01). PAI-1 activity of PBMC in the two groups of CHD patients was higher than those in the normal control group significantly (P<0.01), but no significant difference was found between the BS group and the NBS group (P>0.05). The difference of plasma t-PA activity between the two groups of CHD was insignificant. The PBMC t-PA activity in the BS group was lower than that in the NBS and normal control groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: In the CHD patients with BS, the PBMC PCA was increased and the fibrinolytic activity at both plasma and monocyte levels lowered significantly, these changes in coagulant/fibrinolytic activity may be the important pathologic factors in forming BS which suggests that CHD patients with BS were in the prothrombotic state.

  4. Fusion Antibody for Alzheimer’s Disease with Bi-Directional Transport Across the Blood-Brain Barrier and Abeta Fibril Disaggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Boado, Ruben J.; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yun; Xia, Chun-Fang; Pardridge, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of monoclonal antibody therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier is an obstacle to the diagnosis or therapy of CNS disease with antibody drugs. The immune therapy of Alzheimer’s disease attempts to disaggregate the amyloid plaque of Alzheimer’s disease with an anti-Abeta monoclonal antibody. The present work is based on a 3-step model of immune therapy of Alzheimer’s disease: (1) influx of the anti-Abeta monoclonal antibody across the blood-brain barrier in the blood to brain direc...

  5. Buccal Cell Cytokeratin 14 Correlates with Multiple Blood Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifert, Wayne R; Nguyen, Tori; Rembach, Alan; Martins, Ralph; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie; Masters, Colin L; Ames, David; Rowe, Christopher C; Macaulay, S Lance; François, Maxime; Fenech, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may reflect early stages of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our hypothesis was that cytokeratin 14 (CK14) expression could be used with blood-based biomarkers such as homocysteine, vitamin B12, and folate to identify individuals with MCI or AD from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) flagship study of aging. Buccal cells from 54 individuals were analyzed by a newly developed method that is rapid, automated, and quantitative for buccal cell CK14 expression levels. CK14 was negatively correlated with plasma Mg²⁺ and LDL, while positively correlated with vitamin B12, red cell hematocrit/volume, and basophils in the MCI group and positively correlated with insulin and vitamin B12 in the AD group. The combined biomarker panel (CK14 expression, plasma vitamin B12, and homocysteine) was significantly lower in the MCI (p = 0.003) and AD (p = 0.0001) groups compared with controls. Receiver-operating characteristic curves yielded area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.829 for the MCI (p = 0.002) group and 0.856 for the AD (p = 0.0003) group. These complex associations of multiple related parameters highlight the differences between the MCI and AD cohorts and possibly an underlying metabolic pathology associated with the development of early memory impairment. The changes in buccal cell CK14 expression observed in this pilot study supports previous results suggesting the peripheral biomarkers and metabolic changes are not restricted to brain pathology alone in MCI and AD and could prove useful as a potential biomarker in identifying individuals with an increased risk of developing MCI and eventually AD. PMID:26402008

  6. Old diseases and contemporary crisis. Inherited blood disorders in the Sultanate of Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudevin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    This contribution draws on ethnographic research conducted in Oman on inherited blood disorders (IBD). By interpreting results from population genomics studies that trace mutation processes over centuries of human activities, lay-representations of IBD often consider them historical evidence. The perceived spread of IBD in Oman may thus provide unusual historical depth in a country where past conflicts have been erased from historiography and representations of time are politically prescribed. Through the notions of crisis and diversification, this contribution shows how IBD's chronicity challenges the healthcare system and became a national issue, politically labelled as urgent. The paper casts light on several aspects of contemporary Omani society: it first addresses the dynamics of disease taxonomies - although biomedically described in the early twentieth century, IBD were not individualized within local nosologies until the 1970s. Secondly, it shows how biomedical knowledge about IBD led to diversification within the healthcare system, through the introduction of clinical genetics, genomics, and community genetics. Thirdly, it attempts to broach modalities of the biopower exerted by the Omani regime over its citizens: IBD are targeted by various public health measures that jeopardize patients' autonomy by aiming to control their bodies through their matrimonial behaviour. In addition, two aspects of the intersections between Omani social hierarchy and IBD are noteworthy: the creation of a patients' association that constitutes a potential disturbance of the social order; and the way IBD mutations traced by genomics are considered direct historical documents that challenge representations of the recently crafted 'Omanity' in a context of regional concern regarding national identities' durability. PMID:23898837

  7. Dynamics of ceruloplasmin amd of some blood parameters in piglets suffering from acute radiation disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin (CP) were followed up after treatment with gamma rays of 60Co with a dose of 4 Ey (dose power 0.68 Ey/min) in the blood serum of male piglets of an average life weight of 18+-3 kg. CP level from 217 E/l raised to 376 E/l on the 16th hour after radiation and on the 16th day decreased to 296 e/l. Moreover, serum copper increased from 25 μmol/l to 42.3 μmol/l on the 16th hour following irradiation but on the 14th day its level dropped to 32.5 μmol/l. Erythrocyte and leucocyte count decreased from 5.83x1012/l and 19.94x1012/l to 2.47x1012/l and 2.0x109/l, respectively. Besides, serum albumin decreased, but α-and β-globulins increased. Examination of ailing piglets showed a paraclinical pattern of an inflammatory process by acute radiation disease. CP as an antioxidant participates in reactions with toxic radiacals on radiation. By the rising of its level on radiation it again was characterized as an acute-phase protein. Serum CP was determined according to the method of Ravin using as substrate P-phenylendiamine dihydrochloride; serum copper - by the test of Boehringer Mannheim; serum proteins were studied electrophoretically on agarose gels using veronal buffer, pH 8.6

  8. Polonium 210Po activities in human blood of patients with ischaemic heart disease from Gdansk in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of polonium 210Po in human blood samples is presented and discussed in this paper. The human blood samples were collected from patients of Medical University of Gdansk with ischaemic heart disease (morbus ischaemicus cordis, MIC). The polonium concentrations in analyzed human blood samples are very differentiated. 210Po is of particular interest in public health and although is present in the environment in extremely low amounts, it is easily bioaccumulated to the human body. The study shows that the amount of 210Po that is incorporated into the human body depends on the food habits and some difference in its levels could be observed between smokers and non-smokers. (author)

  9. Lymphoblastic lymphoma and leukemic blood profile in a red-tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) with concurrent inclusion body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilliger, Lionel; Selleri, Paolo; Frye, Fredric L

    2011-01-01

    An adult male wild-caught true red-tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor), imported from Surinam, was presented for anorexia, extreme lethargy, and coelomic swelling in the cranial third of the body, in the anatomic location of the thymus. The snake died a few minutes after blood sampling via cardiocentesis. Hematology revealed anemia and extreme leukocytosis (820 × 10(3)/ml) characterized by a predominance (95%) of lymphocytes. Necropsy revealed enlargement of most of the visceral organs. Histology confirmed lymphoblastic lymphoma with a leukemic blood profile and diffuse infiltration of some of the heart, thymus, bone marrow, kidney, spleen, lung, and liver. Several large intracytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusion bodies surrounded by narrow clear "halos" were identified within gastric mucosal cells, proximal and distal convoluted tubule epithelial cells, and splenic cells. The final diagnosis was lymphoblast lymphoma with a leukemic blood profile and concurrent inclusion body disease. PMID:21217051

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging-based computational modelling of blood flow and nanomedicine deposition in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Shaolie S; Zhang, Yongjie; Fu, Xiaoyi; Brunner, Gerd; Singh, Jaykrishna; Hughes, Thomas J R; Shah, Dipan; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is generally attributed to the progressive vascular accumulation of lipoproteins and circulating monocytes in the vessel walls leading to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. This is known to be regulated by the local vascular geometry, haemodynamics and biophysical conditions. Here, an isogeometric analysis framework is proposed to analyse the blood flow and vascular deposition of circulating nanoparticles (NPs) into the superficial femoral artery (SFA) of a PAD patient. The local geometry of the blood vessel and the haemodynamic conditions are derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed at baseline and at 24 months post intervention. A dramatic improvement in blood flow dynamics is observed post intervention. A 500% increase in peak flow rate is measured in vivo as a consequence of luminal enlargement. Furthermore, blood flow simulations reveal a 32% drop in the mean oscillatory shear index, indicating reduced disturbed flow post intervention. The same patient information (vascular geometry and blood flow) is used to predict in silico in a simulation of the vascular deposition of systemically injected nanomedicines. NPs, targeted to inflammatory vascular molecules including VCAM-1, E-selectin and ICAM-1, are predicted to preferentially accumulate near the stenosis in the baseline configuration, with VCAM-1 providing the highest accumulation (approx. 1.33 and 1.50 times higher concentration than that of ICAM-1 and E-selectin, respectively). Such selective deposition of NPs within the stenosis could be effectively used for the detection and treatment of plaques forming in the SFA. The presented MRI-based computational protocol can be used to analyse data from clinical trials to explore possible correlations between haemodynamics and disease progression in PAD patients, and potentially predict disease occurrence as well as the outcome of an intervention. PMID:25878124

  11. Prevalence of celiac disease among blood donors in São Paulo: the most populated city in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Lage Alencar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is a permanent enteropathy caused by the ingestion of gluten, which leads to an immunemediated inflammation of the small intestine mucosa. The prevalence of celiac disease varies among different nations and ethnic backgrounds, and its diversity is determined by genetic and environmental factors. São Paulo city is one of the largest cities in the world, with a vast population and an important history of internal migratory flow from other Brazilian regions, as well as immigration from other, primarily European, countries, resulting in significant miscegenation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of adults with undiagnosed celiac disease among blood donors of São Paulo by collecting information on the ancestry of the population studied. METHODS: The prevalence of celiac disease was assessed by screening for positive IgA transglutaminase and IgA endomysium antibodies in 4,000 donors (volunteers in the Fundação Pró-Sangue Blood Center of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. The antibody-positive subjects were asked to undergo a small bowel biopsy. RESULTS: Of the 4,000 subjects, twenty-four had positive tests, although both antibody tests were not always concordant. For example, ten subjects were positive for IgA tissue transglutaminase only. In twenty-one positive patients, duodenal biopsies were performed, and the diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed in fourteen patients (Marsh criteria modified by Oberhuber. In this group, 67% claimed to have European ancestry, mainly from Italy, Portugal and Spain. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease is at least 1:286 among supposedly healthy blood bank volunteers in São Paulo, Brazil.

  12. Prevalence, clinical staging and risk for blood-borne transmission of Chagas disease among Latin American migrants in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Jackson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration of Latin Americans to the USA, Canada and Europe has modified Chagas disease distribution, but data on imported cases and on risks of local transmission remain scarce. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors for Chagas disease, staged the disease and evaluated attitudes towards blood transfusion and organ transplant among Latin American migrants in Geneva, Switzerland. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cross-sectional study included all consecutive Latin American migrants seeking medical care at a primary care facility or attending two Latino churches. After completing a questionnaire, they were screened for Chagas disease with two serological tests (Biomérieux ELISA cruzi; Biokit Bioelisa Chagas. Infected subjects underwent a complete medical work-up. Predictive factors for infection were assessed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis.1012 persons (females: 83%; mean age: 37.2 [SD 11.3] years, Bolivians: 48% [n = 485] were recruited. 96% had no residency permit. Chagas disease was diagnosed with two positive serological tests in 130 patients (12.8%; 95%CI 10.8%-14.9%, including 127 Bolivians (26.2%; 95%CI 22.3%-30.1%. All patients were in the chronic phase, including 11.3% with cardiac and 0.8% with digestive complications. Predictive factors for infection were Bolivian origin (OR 33.2; 95%CI 7.5-147.5, reported maternal infection with T. cruzi (OR 6.9; 95%CI 1.9-24.3, and age older than 35 years (OR 6.7; 95%CI 2.4-18.8. While 22 (16.9% infected subjects had already donated blood, 24 (18.5% and 34 (26.2% considered donating blood and organs outside Latin America, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Chagas disease is highly prevalent among Bolivian migrants in Switzerland. Chronic cardiac and digestive complications were substantial. Screening of individuals at risk should be implemented in nonendemic countries and must include undocumented migrants.

  13. Coronary vasomotor and blood flow responses to isoflavone-intact soy protein in subjects with coronary heart disease or risk factors for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Carolyn M.; Hayward, Christopher S.; Mason, Mark J.; Ilsley, Charles D.; Collins, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Animal data suggest favourable coronary vasomotor actions of isoflavones however the effects of isoflavones on the human coronary circulation are undetermined. We therefore investigated the effects of short-term isoflavone-intact soy protein ingestion on basal coronary arterial tone and stimulated vasoreactivity and blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) or risk factors for CHD. Seventy-one subjects were randomised, double-blind, to isoflavone-intact so...

  14. Positive selection during the evolution of the blood coagulation factors in the context of their disease-causing mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Rallapalli, P. M.; Orengo, C A; Studer, R. A.; Perkins, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII–FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during verte...

  15. Assessment of Red Blood Cell Parameters and Peripheral Smear at Different Temperatures in Case of Cold Agglutination Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, V.

    2014-01-01

    Cold agglutination disease (CAD) is characterized by an auto-antibody which is able to agglutinate red blood cells (RBCs) at temperatures lower than that of the body, and subsequently to activate the complement system responsible for lysis of RBCs. Patients show hemolytic anemia of varying degrees of severity, which arise or worsen upon exposure to low temperatures. We describe a case who presented with fever and symptoms of asthenia. His investigations yielded bizarre RBC parameters which le...

  16. Creation of an iliac arteriovenous shunt lowers blood pressure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Faul, John

    2014-01-28

    Vasodilators are used with caution in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We have developed a device for percutaneous arteriovenous shunt creation in the iliac region to increase cardiac output and oxygen delivery for patients with COPD. Although this device does not cause significant blood pressure changes in normotensive patients with COPD, we hypothesized that arteriovenous shunt creation might cause vasodilator effects in hypertensive patients because of a reduction in vascular resistance.

  17. Premature Centromere Division of Metaphase Chromosomes in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: Relation to Gender and Age

    OpenAIRE

    Živković, Lada; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Plećaš-Solarović, Bosiljka; Djelić, Ninoslav; Ocić, Gordana; Smiljković, Predrag; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Smith, Mark A.; Bajić, Vladan

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal alterations are a feature of both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examined if premature centromere division (PCD), a chromosomal instability indicator increased in AD, is correlated with aging or, instead, represents a de novo chromosomal alteration due to accelerating aging in AD. PCD in peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined in sporadic AD patients and gender and age-matched unaffected controls. Metaphase nuclei were analyzed for chromosomes showing PCD, X ch...

  18. Hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn due to maternal red blood cell alloantibodies in the Malay population

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Nazri Hassan; Noor Haslina Mohd Noor; Shah Reza Johan Noor; Salamah Ahmad Sukri; Rapiaah Mustafa; Hans Van Rostenberghe Luc Aster

    2014-01-01

    Background: Maternal red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization may lead to production of harmful antibodies that result in hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn (HDFN). There is insufficient data on the prevalence of HDFN due to RBC alloantibodies in the Malay neonatal population. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of HDFN in the Malay neonatal population due to clinically significant RBC alloantibodies. Subjects and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in Transf...

  19. Association of tibia lead and blood lead with end-stage renal disease: A pilot study of African-Americans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association between body lead burden and kidney disease remains controversial. Fifty-five African-American end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cases and 53 age- and sex-matched African-American controls without known renal disease were recruited from Tulane University-affiliated dialysis clinics and out-patient clinics, respectively. Blood lead was measured via atomic absorption spectrophotometry and tibia lead (a measure of body lead) was measured via 109Cd-based K shell X-ray fluorescence. Median blood lead levels were significantly higher among ESRD cases (6 μg/dL) compared to their control counterparts (3 μg/dL; P<0.001). Although no participants had overt lead poisoning (blood lead ≥25 μg/dL), seven cases but no controls had blood lead levels above 10 μg/dL (P=0.006). The median tibia lead level was 17 micrograms of lead per gram of bone mineral (μg/g) and 13 μg/g among ESRD cases and their control counterparts, respectively (P=0.134). Four ESRD cases (7%), but no controls, had a tibia lead level above 40 μg/g (P=0.115) while a similar proportion of cases and controls had tibia lead between 20 and 39 μg/g (33% and 32%, respectively; P=0.726). After adjustment for potential confounders, the odds ratios of ESRD associated with a tibia lead ≥20 μg/g and each four-fold higher tibia lead (e.g., 5-20 μg/g) were 1.55 (95% CI: 0.55, 4.41) and 1.88 (95% CI: 0.53, 6.68), respectively. These findings support the need for prospective cohort studies of body lead burden and renal disease progression

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Assessment of Hyperemic Fractional Microvascular Blood Plasma Volume in Peripheral Arterial Disease: Initial Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Bas Versluis; Marjolein H G Dremmen; Nelemans, Patty J; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Geert-Willem Schurink; Tim Leiner; Walter H Backes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METH...

  1. Mitochondrial Alterations in Peripheral Mononuclear Blood Cells from Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Delbarba, A.; Abate, G; Prandelli, C; Marziano, M.; Buizza, L.; Arce Varas, N.; Novelli, A.; Cuetos, F.; Martinez, C.; C. Lanni; Memo, M.; Uberti, D.

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, evidences of mitochondrial defects in AD peripheral cells are still inconclusive. Here, some mitochondrial-encoded and nuclear-encoded proteins, involved in maintaining the correct mitochondria machine, were investigated in terms of protein expression and enzymatic activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from AD and Mild Cognitive Impair...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-based computational modelling of blood flow and nanomedicine deposition in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Shaolie S.; Zhang, Yongjie; Fu, Xiaoyi; Brunner, Gerd; Singh, Jaykrishna; Hughes, Thomas J.R.; Shah, Dipan; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is generally attributed to the progressive vascular accumulation of lipoproteins and circulating monocytes in the vessel walls leading to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. This is known to be regulated by the local vascular geometry, haemodynamics and biophysical conditions. Here, an isogeometric analysis framework is proposed to analyse the blood flow and vascular deposition of circulating nanoparticles (NPs) into the superficial femoral artery (SFA)...

  3. Optical characterization of red blood cells from individuals with sickle cell trait and disease in Tanzania using quantitative phase imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, JaeHwang; Matemba, Lucas E.; Lee, KyeoReh; Kazyoba, Paul E.; Yoon, Jonghee; Massaga, Julius J; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common across Sub-Saharan Africa. However, the investigation of SCD in this area has been significantly limited mainly due to the lack of research facilities and skilled personnel. Here, we present optical measurements of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from healthy individuals and individuals with SCD and sickle cell trait in Tanzania using the quantitative phase imaging technique. By employing a quantitative phase imaging unit (QPIU), an existing microscope in...

  4. Circulating thrombopoietin levels in normal healthy blood donors and in aplastic anemia patients in relation to disease severity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the key hematopoietic growth factor regulating the production of platelets from bone marrow megakaryocytes and maintaining platelet hemostasis. This study was done to find any relationship between the levels of thrombopoietin and the severity of disease in patients with aplastic anemia. Materials and Methods: Serum samples were collected from 52 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of aplastic anemia and 45 normal healthy blood donors of both sexes over a pe...

  5. Genome-wide peripheral blood leukocyte DNA methylation microarrays identified a single association with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, R Alan; Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Pedersen, Natalia; Opekun, Antone; Bronsky, Jiri; Munkholm, Pia; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Andersen, PaalSkytt; Melegh, Bela; Ferry, George; Jess, Tine; Kellermayer, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance rates and epidemiologic data implicate that environmental changes and epigenetic factors may play a pathogenic role in IBD. DNA methylation (the methylation of ...... cytosines within CpG dinucleotides) is an epigenetic modification, which can respond to environmental influences. We investigated whether DNA methylation might be connected with IBD in peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) DNA by utilizing genome-wide microarrays.......Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance rates and epidemiologic data implicate that environmental changes and epigenetic factors may play a pathogenic role in IBD. DNA methylation (the methylation of...

  6. Glutathione redox cycle in small intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood of pediatric celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesnać Stojiljković

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The celiac disease is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder caused by gluten from wheat, rye or barley. In genetically predisposed persons, gluten induces the immune-mediated inflammation of small intestinal mucosa. Histological lesions include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hypertrophy and villous atrophy, resulting in malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The only treatment for celiac patients is a permanent gluten-free diet (GFD. Reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress are strongly associated with the celiac disease. Glutathione (GSH is a main detoxifier of endogenous and exogenous ROS in the intestine. In order to explain the role of glutathione redox cycle in celiac patients, we examined the activities of GSH-related antioxidant (AO enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione reductase (GR, as well as the concentration of GSH in small intestinal biopsies and peripheral blood of children affected by the celiac disease. The concentration of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH as markers of oxidative damage was measured in the same samples. The results clearly demonstrate a significant malfunction of GSH redox cycle with a concomitant decrease in the capacity to regenerate GSH and detoxify LOOH in celiac patients, even after several years of GFD. The oral administration of GSH and a diet rich in natural antioxidants, as well as appropriate dietary supplements, could be of great benefit to the patients.A doença celíaca é uma desordem gastrointestinal causada pelo glúten proveniente do trigo, centeio ou cevada. Em pessoas geneticamente predispostas, o glúten induz uma inflamação imune da mucosa do intestino delgado. As lesões histológicas incluem linfocitose intraepitelial, hipertrofia de criptas e atrofia vilosa, resultando em malabsorção de micro- e macronutrientes. O único tratamento para os pacientes celíacos é a restrição permanente de glúten na dieta (GFD.Espécies reativas de oxigênio (ROS e o

  7. Autologous cord blood harvesting in North Eastern Italy: ethical questions and emerging hopes for curing diabetes and celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parco S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Parco, Fulvia VascottoInstitute for Maternal and Child Health, IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, ItalyBackground: The Friuli Venezia Giulia (FVG, a region of North Eastern Italy, has passed legislation (Decree No 2324/2010 to regulate the banking of umbilical cord blood samples for personal, autologous, or family-directed use, and to implement the Agreement of the State-Regions Permanent Conference (Decree No 62/CSR/2010. This paper aims to identify the formalities and the reasons why families collect and bank their cord blood in foreign banks for both personal and private use.Methods: To this end, at the Institute for Maternal and Child Health of Trieste (the regional capital city of the FVG, Italy, which assists about 1800 pregnant women a year, 129 questionnaires, drafted from January 2010 to December 2011 and concerning the granting of authorization to export samples, were examined.Results: The collected data showed that 75% of involved families had resorted to anonymous public collection, which is available to anyone with therapeutic needs, and provided compatibility and hematologic protocols recognized by the scientific and international community (main indications: leukemia, hemoglobinopaties, and inherited hematologic and immunologic disorders. Conversely, 25.0% requested private storage at a foreign bank for personal or family-dedicated use. The principal motivation by disease was for treatment for diabetes (22.4% and celiac disease (19.7% (a multiorgan disease for which the FVG region has provided safeguards by approving a specific law granting support to families; Decree No 561/2007. For these two types of disease we found that information was received from the internet and not from general medical physicians, with a significant difference found using the χ2 test (P < 0.01.Conclusion: The indication of treating these diseases with cord blood stem cell transplantation appears to be well grounded and encouraging, and has recently

  8. Whole blood DNA aberrant methylation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma shows association with the course of the disease: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertas Dauksa

    Full Text Available Pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage in the progression of the disease, thus reducing the survival chances of the patients. Non-invasive early detection would greatly enhance therapy and survival rates. Toward this aim, we investigated in a pilot study the power of methylation changes in whole blood as predictive markers for the detection of pancreatic tumors. We investigated methylation levels at selected CpG sites in the CpG rich regions at the promoter regions of p16, RARbeta, TNFRSF10C, APC, ACIN1, DAPK1, 3OST2, BCL2 and CD44 in the blood of 30 pancreatic tumor patients and in the blood of 49 matching controls. In addition, we studied LINE-1 and Alu repeats using degenerate amplification approach as a surrogate marker for genome-wide methylation. The site-specific methylation measurements at selected CpG sites were done by the SIRPH method. Our results show that in the patient's blood, tumor suppressor genes were slightly but significantly higher methylated at several CpG sites, while repeats were slightly less methylated compared to control blood. This was found to be significantly associated with higher risk for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Additionally, high methylation levels at TNFRSCF10C were associated with positive perineural spread of tumor cells, while higher methylation levels of TNFRSF10C and ACIN1 were significantly associated with shorter survival. This pilot study shows that methylation changes in blood could provide a promising method for early detection of pancreatic tumors. However, larger studies must be carried out to explore the clinical usefulness of a whole blood methylation based test for non-invasive early detection of pancreatic tumors.

  9. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  10. Effectiveness of treatment with donepezil hydrochloride and changes in regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the relationship between the effects of donepezil hydrochloride (donepezil) and cerebral blood flow, and to evaluate the usefulness of cerebral blood flow imaging in assessing and predicting treatment effectiveness. The subjects were 29 outpatients (12 men and 17 women; age 50-82 years; mean age 69.2 years), who had received a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Efficacy was evaluated before donepezil administration; after 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months of drug administration; and at 1 year after completion of administration using the Japanese version of the Alzheimer's disease assessment scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog), as a measure of cognitive function. The ADAS-cog has been frequently used to evaluate cognitive function in AD patients. Patients whose ADAS-cog scores improved by 3 or more points during the observation period were classified as responders, and those with no improvement were classified as nonresponders. 123I-iofetamine (IMP) was used for single photon emission computed tomography cerebral blood flow scintigraphy. On the basis of ADAS-cog score improvement, 22 of the 29 patients were responders (7 men and 15 women; age 50-82 years; mean age 69.0 years) and seven were nonresponders (5 men and 2 women; age 61-80 years; mean age 70.0 years). The results indicate that a difference in cerebral blood flow responsiveness after 1 month of treatment distinguishes responders from nonresponders. After 1 month, blood flow was significantly decreased in all regions of nonresponders, whereas significant increases in blood flow were seen in the anterior frontal lobe and parietal lobe of responders. At that time point, blood flow in the basal ganglion differed significantly between the two groups, indicating that this difference in responsiveness after 1 month of treatment may distinguish responders from nonresponders. In cognitive function testing, the group that exhibited a complete response showed improvement

  11. CFD simulation of blood flow inside the corkscrew collaterals of the Buerger’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Sharifi

    2016-03-01

    Results: The local velocity patterns, pressure and kinematic viscosity distributions in different segments of the corkscrew collateral artery was demonstrated and discussed for the first time for this kind of artery. The effects of non-Newtonian consideration for the blood viscosity behavior were investigated in different segments of the artery. Moreover, the variations of the blood flow patterns along the artery were investigated in details for each segment. Conclusion: It was found that the flow patterns were affected by the complex geometry of this artery in such a way that it could lead to the presence of sites that were prone to the accumulation of the flowing particles in blood like nicotine. Furthermore, due to the existence of many successive bends in this artery, the variations of kinematic viscosity along this artery were significant, therefore the non-Newtonian behavior of the blood viscosity must be considered.

  12. Red blood cell calcium homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low cell calcium level is essential for preservation of red blood cell (RBC) membrane deformability and survival. RBCs from patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) demonstrate reduction in membrane deformability, possibly as a result of increased RBC cellular calcium level. To evaluate calcium homeostasis in RBCs from patients with ESRD, we measured cell calcium level, basal and calmodulin-stimulated calcium-stimulated Mg-dependent ATPase (CaATPase) activity, and calcium 45 efflux were measured before and after hemodialysis. The in vitro effect of uremic plasma and of urea on CaATPase activity of normal RBCs was tested, and 45Ca influx into RBCs of patients undergoing hemodialysis also was determined. A morphologic evaluation of red cells from patients with ESRD was performed with a scanning electron microscope. RBC calcium level in patients (mean +/- SEM 21.2 +/- 2.8 mumol/L of cells; n = 28) was higher than in controls (4.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/L of cells; n = 24; p less than 0.001). Hemodialysis had no effect on cell calcium level. Both basal and calmodulin-stimulated RBC CaATPase activities in patients with ESRD (n = 9) were reduced by approximately 50% (p less than 0.01), but after hemodialysis, enzyme activity returned to normal. 45Ca efflux from calcium-loaded cells, which was 2574.0 +/- 217.0 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours before hemodialysis, increased to 3140.7 +/- 206.8 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours after hemodialysis (p less than 0.005). In vitro incubation of normal RBCs with uremic plasma depressed CaATPase activity, but incubation with urea had no effect. RBCs of patients with ESRD revealed increased 45Ca influx, 7.63 +/- 1.15 mumol/L of cells per hour versus 4.61 +/- 0.39 mumol/L of cells per hour (p less than 0.025). RBCs of patients revealed a high incidence of spherocytosis and echynocytosis, which correlated with a high cell calcium level (r = 0.894, p less than 0.01)

  13. Characteristic patterns of cerebral blood perfusion and cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinsons disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinsons disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that represents cognitive impairment as well as motor symptoms. Even in the early stages of PD, cognitive alterations can be demonstrated by careful neuropsychological test. The purposes of this study are to investigate the pattern of cognitive impairment and the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT in patients with PD. One hundred and twenty two patients with PD and 35 control subjects participated in this study. Patients with PD who had dementia clinically or K-MMSE score below 25 points or with severe motor dysfunction to interfere with the tests were also excluded. They were all matched for age (61±10 vs 61±8), education periods (8.8±4.9 vs 8.8±4.5), and K-MMSE score (27±1.6 vs 27±1.5). All subjects were evaluated using the Seoul Neuropsychological Screening Battery (SNSB) and Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT with SPM software to measure rCBF. Patients with PD performed worse in digit span backward, Rey Complex Figure Test, visual memory, semantic fluency, stroop test, and alternating hand movement test(p<0.05) compared with control group. On SNSB test, 100 patients (82.0%) showed some abnormalities. Eighty-six patients (70.5%) showed frontal dysfunction, 47 (38.5%) memory impairment, 33 (27.0%) language dysfunction, 25 (20.5%) attention deficit and 22 (18.3%) visuospatial dysfunction in the order of frequency. Eight patients with PD showed single memory domain MCI and 28 single non-memory domain MCI (20 frontal dysfunction). Multiple domain MCI was found in 64 patients with PD. SPM analysis of the SPECT image revealed multiple perfusion deficit in the both frontal, temporal, both limbic lobes, Lt. parietal and Lt. Putamen. It is concluded that abnormalities of cognitive function be detected very commonly in patients with PD. MCI in PD patients is most frequently involved in the item of frontal lobe function. SPECT image might be helpful to explain cognitive impairment in some PD patients

  14. Lymphocytes from the site of disease but not blood lymphocytes indicate the cause of arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, D K; da Roza, D; Schulzer, M

    1985-01-01

    The [3H]thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial effusions and from peripheral blood. The stimulating antigens were crude preparations of those micro-organisms that are related to the enteritis and the non-gonococcal urethritis that precipitate reactive arthritis. Salmonella, shigella, and campylobacter antigens stimulated synovial but not peripheral blood lymphocytes in eight cases of enteric reactive arthriti...

  15. Peripheral blood microRNAs: A novel tool for diagnosing disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ziqiang; Lu, Yanqin; Han, Jinxiang

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral blood microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding small RNAs present in blood. Because of their size, abundance, tissue specificity, and relative stability in peripheral circulation, they offer great promise of becoming a novel noninvasive biomarker. However, the mechanism by which they are secreted, their biological function, and the reason for the existence of extracellular miRNAs are largely unclear. This article describes advances in the study of the mechanism of origin and bi...

  16. Autotransfusion of UV-irradiated blood for obliterating vascular diseases in the lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott's autotransfusion of UV-irradiated blood was performed in 163 inoperable patients, including 141 patients with obliterating atherosclerosis and 22 patients with endarteritis. Good clinical effect was produced that was particularly apparent in patients with obliterating atherosclerosis. Assessment of the effects of autotransfusion of US-irradiated blood on microcirculation, peripheral circulation, hemostasis and humoral immunity in the two samples confirmed the method's efficiency

  17. Correlation between arterial and venous blood gas analysis parameters in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novović Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Arterial blood gas (ABG analyses have an important role in the assessment and monitoring of the metabolic and oxygen status of patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Arterial puncture could have a lot of adverse effects, while sampling of venous blood is simpler and is not so invasive. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether venous blood gas (VBG values of pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2, partial oxygen pressure (PO2, bicarbonate (HCO3, and venous and arterial blood oxygen saturation (SO2 can reliably predict ABG levels in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD. Methods. Forty-seven patients with a prior diagnosis of COPD were included in this prospective study. The patients with acute exacerbation of this disease were examined at the General Hospital EMS Department in Prijepolje. ABG samples were taken immediately after venous sampling, and both were analyzed. Results. The Pearson correlation coefficients between arterial and venous parameters were 0.828, 0.877, 0.599, 0.896 and 0.312 for pH, PCO2, PO2, HCO3 and SO2, respectively. The statistically significant correlation between arterial and venous pH, PCO2 and HCO3, values was found in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD (p<0.001. Conclusion. When we cannot provide arterial blood for analysis, venous values of the pH, Pv,CO2 and HCO3 parameters can be an alternative to their arterial equivalents in the interpretation of the metabolic status in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD, while the values of venous Pv,O2 and Sv,O2 cannot be used as predictors in the assessment of oxygen status of such patients.

  18. Chromatographic profiles of blood plasma free oligosaccharides in patients with cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. U. Pismenetskaya

    2015-03-01

    approaches allowed predicting a range of glycan structures for each of the main peaks of HPLC profiles of plasma free oligosaccharides and managing ways for their future experimental analysis. In the case of cardiovascular disorders, HPLC profiles of FOS revealed a changing pattern of heterogeneity, depending on the severity of the disease. Three main enlarged glycan species in the netral fraction and one peak in the charged fraction distinguished the FOS of the patients from those of the healthy volunteers. It has been revealed that the neutral marker peaks were represented by polimannose glycans with 5–7 mannose residues and 1–2 residues of N-acetylglucosamine, and one of the major peaks of the charged fraction – by two-antennary complex N-glycan with two sialic acid residues. The study of free oligosaccharides of blood plasma is a new field of glycobiology allowing an evaluation of an organism state at the level of the cell organelle functional status and openning up broad prospects for finding early diagnostic and prognostic markers of cardiac insufficiency.

  19. Cerebral blood flow and liver function in patients with encephalopathy due to acute and chronic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Schroeder, T; Ranek, L

    1989-01-01

    the patients, without any differences between patients with acute or chronic liver diseases or the different degrees of hepatic encephalopathy. In conclusion, a marked reduction of the CBF was seen in hepatic encephalopathy, irrespective of the etiology of the disease.......The purpose of the present investigation was to study changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in hepatic encephalopathy, to ascertain whether this was related to the changes in liver function and whether these changes gave any prognostic information. CBF, determined by the intravenous xenon-133 method......, and liver functions, assessed by the prothrombin index, bilirubin concentration, and the galactose elimination capacity, were studied in patients with acute fulminant liver failure and in patients with encephalopathy due to chronic liver diseases--that is, cirrhosis of various etiologies. The CBF...

  20. Commentary on “Alzheimer’s disease drug development and the problem of the blood-brain barrier”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The perspective by Dr. William Pardridge entitled “Alzheimer’s Disease Drug Discovery and the Problem of the Blood-Brain Barrier” makes a strong case for the imbalance in resource distribution to the drug-discovery and brain drug delivery processes, where the latter received less than 1% of the investment of the former. My own calculations are consistent with this striking imbalance. Dr. Pardridge predicts that current trials of passive immunity against β-amyloid peptide will likely fail, whereas past trials of active immunization exhibited trial-ending side effects, in part because of disruption of the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. To bring an assessment of the physiology of the blood-brain barrier and the brain delivery of drugs to the fore, several changes are needed in the way we perceive the problem, train our young scientists, organize research efforts, and incentivize reaching our common goals of effective drug therapy for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19751923

  1. Dengue viral RNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells are associated with disease severity and preexisting dengue immune status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anon Srikiatkhachorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with dengue viruses (DENV causes a wide range of manifestations from asymptomatic infection to a febrile illness called dengue fever (DF, to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. The in vivo targets of DENV and the relation between the viral burden in these cells and disease severity are not known. METHOD: The levels of positive and negative strand viral RNA in peripheral blood monocytes, T/NK cells, and B cells and in plasma of DF and DHF cases were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: Positive strand viral RNA was detected in monocytes, T/NK cells and B cells with the highest amounts found in B cells. Viral RNA levels in CD14+ cells and plasma were significantly higher in DHF compared to DF, and in cases with a secondary infection compared to those undergoing a primary infection. The distribution of viral RNA among cell subpopulations was similar in DF and DHF cases. Small amounts of negative strand RNA were found in a few cases only. The severity of plasma leakage correlated with viral RNA levels in plasma and in CD14+ cells. CONCLUSIONS: B cells were the principal cells containing DENV RNA in peripheral blood, but overall there was little active DENV RNA replication detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Secondary infection and DHF were associated with higher viral burden in PBMC populations, especially CD14+ monocytes, suggesting that viral infection of these cells may be involved in disease pathogenesis.

  2. The appearance of Paget's disease on a 99mTc-HMPAO labelled white blood cell scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A 73 year old female presented with pyrexia of unknown origin despite the use of antibiotics. She recently had a colonoscopic stent inserted to resolve a large bowel obstruction secondary to stage IV sigmoid colon cancer. The procedure complicated by a perforation of the sigmoid colon and the need for Hartmann's procedure. Urine and blood cultures v both clear however the white cell count was elevated. X rays of the chest and abdomen and CT of the abdomen and pe showed no sites of infection. A 99mTc-HMPAO labelled white blood cell scan was performed to localise the site of infection. The whole body and SPECT images showed patchy uptake consistent with the known liver metastases. Reduced bone marrow uptake was seen in the left hemipelvis and a patchy appearance in the right hemipelvis. The appearance of osteomyelitis could not be confirmed and a bone scan was performed. The blood pool images demonstrated hyperaemia in the region of the upper sacrum and superior iliac crests. The delayed images confirmed the presence of Paget's disease involving the right and left iliac crests and the sacrum. CT confirmed these findings. This case demonstrates that conditions such as Paget's disease, which displaces the marrow, may cause reduced uptake on a labelled white cell scan. The cause may be confirmed with other techniques, such as bone scans and x ray.

  3. The Role of the Midmolecular Peptides in the Blood Cell Aggregation in Acute Periods of a Burn Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egorikhina M.N.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the effect of midmolecular peptide (MMP concentration on platelet and erythrocyte aggregation in severe burned patients. Materials and Methods. The investigation was carried out on 34 blood samples of healthy people and 30 blood samples of severe burned patients. There was determined the level of MMP, as well as that of creatinine, and urea. The “Amicon Ultra-4” microcentrifuge tubes were used to isolate MMP. Results. The level increase of average mass molecules isolated from the blood plasma of patients in an acute period of a burn disease has been stated to cause a progressive increase of platelet aggregation of healthy donors. The erythrocyte aggregation increase in such conditions is observed only in very high MMP concentrations. Creatinine and urea do not practically effect the ADP-induced platelet aggregation and the erythrocyte aggregation of healthy donors, and even decrease spontaneous thrombocyte aggregation in very high concentrations occur in an acute renal insufficiency. Conclusion. One of the reasons of platelet aggregation decrease under the influence of chemosorption in a burn disease can be the decrease of the MMP concentration in response to chemosorption.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow using 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT in Parkinson's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow were measured in 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 12 normal persons using 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT. Reconstructed images were interpreted qualitatively and were compared with those findings of CT. For the quantitative analysis, six pairs of region of interest matched with the perfusion territories of large cerebral arteries and cerebellar hemisphere were determined. From the count values, indices showing the degree of asymmetry between right and left cerebral or cerebellar hemisphere, cerebral asymmetry index (ASI) and percent index of cerebellar asymmetry (PIA), and an index showing change of each region, region to cerebellum ratio (RCR) were obtained. ASI of normal persons and patients were 0.082 ± 0.033 and 0.108 ± 0.062, respectively and PIA were -0.4 ± 0.7% and -0.7 ± 1.0%, respectively, which showed no statistically significant difference between normal persons and patients. Among 10 RCR's, those of both regions of basal ganglia and both regions of anterior cerebral artery were significantly reduced. We concluded that the most significant reduction of regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Parkinson's disease was observed in the regions of basal ganglia and in the regions of anterior cerebral artery, and the degree of change in hemispheric blood flow was similar in both hemisphere.

  5. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted. PMID:27245647

  6. Effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Chagas' heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Haline; Teixeira, Maxelle Martins; de Sousa, Rodrigo Cunha; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Correia, Dalmo; Rodrigues Junior, Virmondes; Levy, Bruce David; de Paula Rogério, Alexandre

    2016-04-15

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). In some patients with Chagas disease, symptoms progress to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Endogenously, inflammation is resolved in the presence of lipid mediators such as aspirin-triggered RvD1 (AT-RvD1) which has anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution effects. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, the effects of AT-RvD1 on T. cruzi antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Chagas heart disease. The levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 increased in PBMCs from cardiac-form Chagas patients in stage B1 (patients with fewer heart abnormalities) stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to those in non-stimulated PBMCs. AT-RvD1 reduced the IFN-γ concentrations in PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to stimulated with T. cruzi antigen cells. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in no observable changes in TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 levels. AT-RvD1 significantly decreased the percentage of necrotic cells and caused a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of T. cruzi antigen-stimulated PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease. These findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 modulates the immune response in Chagas disease patients and might have potential to be used as an alternative approach for slowing the development of further heart damage. PMID:26927755

  7. Peripheral blood minimal residual disease may replace bone marrow minimal residual disease as an immunophenotypic biomarker for impending relapse in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeijlemaker, W; Kelder, A; Oussoren-Brockhoff, Y J M; Scholten, W J; Snel, A N; Veldhuizen, D; Cloos, J; Ossenkoppele, G J; Schuurhuis, G J

    2016-03-01

    As relapses are common in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), early relapse prediction is of high importance. Although conventional minimal residual disease (MRD) measurement is carried out in bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB) would be an advantageous alternative source. This study aims to investigate the specificity of leukemia-associated immunophenotypes used for MRD detection in blood samples. Consistency of PB MRD as compared with BM MRD was determined in flow cytometric data of 205 paired BM and PB samples of 114 AML patients. A significant correlation was found between PB and BM MRD (r=0.67, Pconsolidation therapy. As PB MRD appeared to be an independent predictor for response duration, the highly specific PB MRD assay may have a prominent role in future MRD assessment in AML. PMID:26373238

  8. STUDY OF SEX RATIO, ABO AND Rh BLOOD GROUPS DISTRIBUTION IN SOME HAEMATOLOGICAL AND LYMPHATIC DISEASES IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Farhud

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Associations of some hematological and lymphatic diseases with sex and ABO and Rh blood groups were studied in 2579 patients, compared with a control group of 126332 individuals, by the use of clinical as well as laboratory findings, in Tehran. Highly significant increase of male/female ratio is shown in acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, aplastic anaemia and paroxismal nocturnal haematuria. Idiopathic thrombocy’topoenic purpura shows a decrease of this ration. In chronic myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, group 0 has the highest incidence, followed by groups A and B, and group AB has the lowest incidence. Between various diseases, the highest frequency of blood group A was went observed in Hodgkin’s disease, and the lowest in NHL. Group B had highest frequency within PNH patients and the lowest in NHL. Group 0 had the highest In AML patients there is a significant decrease of Rh negative patient 17.15%. The highest incidence of Rh negative was among the SA patients (18.18% and the lowest in MM (3.70%.

  9. Analysis of cognitive function and regional cerebral blood flow in Parkinson's disease by 123I-IMP SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have found that the uptake of a radioisotope is reduced in the frontal or parietooccipital lobe on SPECT scans of patients with Parkinson's disease accompanied by cognitive impairment. The present study investigated the relationship between the results of SPECT imaging and those of cognitive function tests in patients with Parkinson's disease accompanied by cognitive impairment. Thirty patients with Parkinson's disease served as subjects, including 9 men and 21 women with an average of 66.1 years. Patients underwent 123I-IMP SPECT and various cognitive function tests (Japanese alphabet pick-up test, Stroop test, Hasegawa's dementia screening scale, Raven color matrix, and course cube-combination test). Next, three neurologists with no knowledge of the patient's clinical symptoms were asked to analyze the reduced uptake on SPECT scans as follows: frontal lobe, parietooccipital lobe, frontal and parietooccipital lobes, diffused reduction, and no reduced uptake. The results of SPECT imaging and each cognitive function test were compared. Reduced uptake in the frontal and parietooccipital lobes and diffused reduction correlated with decreases in cognitive function. Cognitive impairment is not notable when cortical blood flow is partially reduced, but is notable when cortical blood flow is widely reduced. (author)

  10. The diagnostic utility of stabilized blood for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA by RT-qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S. Fontél, Kristina; Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham;

    In Europe, clinical signs indicative of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), would immediately lead to collection of blood and relevant organ material for further laboratory examination for this vesicular disease virus. Today, the first line system for detection of virus in the sample material is real t...... time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic utility of stabilized blood for detection of FMDV RNA in this system....

  11. Impaired blood pressure response to exercise in patients with coronary artery disease: possible contribution of attenuated reflex vasoconstriction in non-exercising muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Okamatsu, S; Takeshita, A; Nakamura, M.

    1989-01-01

    Eighteen patients with coronary artery disease were divided into two groups according to whether their blood pressure decreased (eight, group 1) or increased (10, group 2) in response to treadmill exercise testing. Age and the extent and distribution of coronary artery disease were similar in the two groups. At rest, blood pressure, pulmonary artery wedge pressure, cardiac index, forearm vascular resistance, and oxygen consumption were similar in the two groups. During supine leg exercise on ...

  12. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants associate with prevalent kidney but not prevalent cardiovascular disease in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Langefeld, Carl D.; Divers, Jasmin; Nicholas M. Pajewski; Hawfield, Amret T.; Reboussin, David M.; Bild, Diane E.; Kaysen, George A.; Kimmel, Paul L; Raj, Dominic; Ricardo, Ana C.; Wright, Jackson T; Sedor, John R.; Rocco, Michael V.; Freedman, Barry I.

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 coding variants are strongly associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in African Americans. Here APOL1 association was tested with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR), and prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in 2,571 African Americans from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), a trial assessing effects of systolic blood pressure reduction on renal and CVD outcomes. Logist...

  13. The diagnostic utility of stabilized blood for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA by RT-qPCR

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fontél, Kristina; Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham; Lohse, Louise

    2014-01-01

    In Europe, clinical signs indicative of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), would immediately lead to collection of blood and relevant organ material for further laboratory examination for this vesicular disease virus. Today, the first line system for detection of virus in the sample material is real time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic utility of stabilized blood for detection of FMDV RNA in this system.

  14. New red blood cell and reticulocyte parameters and reference values for healthy individuals and in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia S. Scherer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of local references values has been well described in the literature; this is because the characteristics of the population may influence the laboratory tests. Objective: To establish the reference range for traditional and extended red blood cell parameters and reticulocyte indices in order to investigate its application in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Materials and methods: 249 blood donors (125 males and 124 females were selected to establish the reference values. The hemodialysis sample consisted of 62 patients with terminal CKD (48 male and 14 female. All analyzes were performed using the Sysmex XE-5000 automated hematology analyzer. Results: Differences between reference values was observed in relation to gender: red blood cells (RBC, hemoglobin (HGB, hematocrit (HCT, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, percentage of hyperchromic red blood cells (%HYPER, percentage of microcytosis (%MICRO, percentage of macrocytosis (%MACRO, absolute reticulocyte count (RET, reticulocyte hemoglobin content (RET-He, immature reticulocyte fraction (IFR, low fluorescence reticulocytes (LFR, medium fluorescence reticulocytes (MFR, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (HFR. Individuals with CKD presented RBC, HGB, HCT, MCHC, red cell distribution width expressed as coefficient of variation (RDW-CV, percentage of hypochromic red blood cells (%HYPO, percentage of reticulocytes (RET%, RET (female group, IFR, LFR, MFR, and HFR results compatible with the anemic state, which can be observed in 91.8% of patients. All studied parameters were in the area under the curve (AUC > 0.4. In male group, %HYPO (AUC: 0.806 and IFR (AUC: 0.762 presented higher AUC values, while female group presented %HYPO (AUC: 0.806, %HYPER (AUC: 0.815, and IFR (AUC: 0.660. Conclusion: The medical advancement, the development of new techniques and hematological parameters have revealed important information about functional integrity of

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma exerts systemic effects on the peripheral blood myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: an indicator of disease severity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) isolated from tumor bearing animals or from individuals with solid tumors display functional abnormalities and the DC impairment has emerged as one mechanism for tumor evasion from the control of the immune system. Ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic cancer, is recognized as a very aggressive cancer type with a mortality that almost matches the rate of incidence. We examined the systemic influence ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exerted on levels of peripheral blood DCs and inflammatory mediators in comparison to the effects exerted by other pancreatic tumors, chronic pancreatitis, and age-matched controls. All groups examined, including PDAC, had decreased levels of myeloid DCs (MDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (PDC) and enhanced apoptosis in these cells as compared to controls. We found elevated levels of PGE2 and CXCL8 in subjects with PDAC, and chronic pancreatitis. Levels of these inflammatory factors were in part restored in PDAC after tumor resection, whereas the levels of DCs were impaired in the majority of these patients ~12 weeks after tumor removal. Our results prove that solid pancreatic tumors, including PDAC, systemically affect blood DCs. The impairments do not seem to be tumor-specific, since similar results were obtained in subjects with chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, we found that PDAC patients with a survival over 2 years had significant higher levels of blood DCs compared to patients with less than one year survival. Our findings points to the involvement of inflammation in the destruction of the blood MDCs and PDCs. Furthermore, the preservation of the blood DCs compartment in PDAC patients seems to benefit their ability to control the disease and survival

  16. TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR Β IN BLOOD SERUM AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Surkova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Progressive obstruction and lung tissue remodeling comprise an important feature of the airways in COPD patients. The main processes involved in tissue remodeling in COPD are protease/antiprotease, oxidant/antioxidant imbalances, like as inflammatory and fibrotic events that contribute to development or progression of disease. TGFβ is a multifunctional growth factor that regulates synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins, primarily collagen and fibronectin, thus inducing fibrosis of respiratory ways. The aim of our study was to determine levels of TGFβ in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of COPD patients. All the patients with COPD had increased levels of TGFβ in serum, as compared with subjects without COPD (p < 0.01, but there was no difference in TGFβ concentration between patients at different stages of disease. Increased phagocytic activity of blood monocytes was found in 81% of COPD patients, as compared to controls. Phagocytosis of apoptotic T­cells and bacterial infection of monocytes leads to increased secretion of TGFβ and it may cause higher levels of TGF β in peripheral blood. TGFβ concentration in BALF of patients at stage III of disease was higher than in the patients at stage II (p < 0.05. The level of TGFβ in BALF directly correlates with number of alveolar macrophages (r = 0.39; р = 0.03. These data indicate that TGFβ is involved in chemotaxis of macrophages in COPD patients’ airways. We conclude that increased secretion of TGFβ by peripheral blood monocytes may be a result of their high phagocytic activity. Hence, TGFβ mediates interactions between the two main components underlying lung tissue remodeling, i.e. fibrosis of respiratory airways, and development of emphysema in COPD.

  17. Environmental temperature affects prevalence of blood parasites of birds on an elevation gradient: implications for disease in a warming climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzel Zamora-Vilchis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising global temperature is predicted to expand the distribution of vector-borne diseases both in latitude and altitude. Many host communities could be affected by increased prevalence of disease, heightening the risk of extinction for many already threatened species. To understand how host communities could be affected by changing parasite distributions, we need information on the distribution of parasites in relation to variables like temperature and rainfall that are predicted to be affected by climate change. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined relations between prevalence of blood parasites, temperature, and seasonal rainfall in a bird community of the Australian Wet Tropics along an elevation gradient. We used PCR screening to investigate the prevalence and lineage diversity of four genera of blood parasites (Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon and Trypanosoma in 403 birds. The overall prevalence of the four genera of blood parasites was 32.3%, with Haemoproteus the predominant genus. A total of 48 unique lineages were detected. Independent of elevation, parasite prevalence was positively and strongly associated with annual temperature. Parasite prevalence was elevated during the dry season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low temperatures of the higher elevations can help to reduce both the development of avian haematozoa and the abundance of parasite vectors, and hence parasite prevalence. In contrast, high temperatures of the lowland areas provide an excellent environment for the development and transmission of haematozoa. We showed that rising temperatures are likely to lead to increased prevalence of parasites in birds, and may force shifts of bird distribution to higher elevations. We found that upland tropical areas are currently a low-disease habitat and their conservation should be given high priority in management plans under climate change.

  18. [THE COMPARISON OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND MARROW IN CHILDREN OF THE FIRST YEAR OF LIFE WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUCOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaur, G A; Riger, T O; Popov, A M; Nasedkina, T V; Kustanovich, A M; Solodovnikov, A G; Streneva, O V; Shorikov, E V; Tsvirenko, S V; Saveliev, L I; Fechina, L G

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of minimal residual disease is an important prognostic factor under acute lymphoblastic leucosis in children and adults. In overwhelming majority of research studies bone marrow is used to detect minimal residual disease. The comparative characteristic of detection of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood and bone marrow was carried out. The prognostic role of occurrence of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood and bone marrow under therapy according protocol MLL-Baby was evaluated. The analysis embraced 142 pair samples from 53 patients with acute lymphoblastic leucosis and various displacements of gene MLL younger than 365 days. The minimal residual disease was detected by force of identification of chimeric transcripts using polymerase chain reaction in real-time mode in 7 sequential points of observation established by protocol of therapy. The comparability of results of qualitative detection of minimal residual disease in bone marrow and peripheral blood amounted to 84.5%. At that, in all 22 (15.5%) discordant samples minimal residual disease was detected only in bone marrow. Despite of high level of comparability of results of detection of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood and bone marrow the occurrence of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood at various stages of therapy demonstrated no independent prognostic significance. The established differences had no relationship with sensitivity of method determined by value of absolute expression of gene ABL. Most likely, these differences reflected real distribution of tumor cells. The results of study demonstrated that application of peripheral blood instead of bone marrow for monitoring of minimal residual disease under acute lymphoblastic leucosis in children of first year of life is inappropriate. At the same time, retention of minimal residual disease in TH4 in bone marrow was an independent and prognostic unfavorable factor under therapy of acute lymphoblastic

  19. Short-term effects of air pollution: a panel study of blood markers in patients with chronic pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frampton Mark

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing evidence indicates that ambient air pollution is associated with exacerbation of chronic diseases like chronic pulmonary disease. A prospective panel study was conducted to investigate short-term changes of blood markers of inflammation and coagulation in response to daily changes in air pollution in Erfurt, Germany. 12 clinical visits were scheduled and blood parameters were measured in 38 male patients with chronic pulmonary disease during winter 2001/2002. Additive mixed models with random patient intercept were applied, adjusting for trend, weekday, and meteorological parameters. Hourly data on ultrafine particles (UFP, 0.01-0.1 μm, accumulation mode particles (ACP, 0.1-1.0 μm, PM10 (particulate matter 2], carbon monoxide [CO], and sulphur dioxide [SO2] were collected at a central monitoring site and meteorological data were received from an official network. For each person and visit the individual 24-hour average of pollutants immediately preceding the blood withdrawal (lag 0 up to day 5 (lag1-4 and 5-day running means were calculated. Results Increased levels of fibrinogen were observed for an increase in one interquartile range of UFP, PM10, EC, OC, CO, and NO revealing the strongest effect for lag 3. E-selectin increased in association with ACP and PM10 with a delay of one day. The ACP effect was also seen with the 5-day-mean. The pattern found for D-dimer was inconsistent. Prothrombin fragment 1+2 decreased with lag 4 consistently for all particulate pollutants. Von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF showed a consistent decrease in association with almost all air pollutants with all lags except for lag 0. No associations were found for C-reactive protein, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, serum amyloid A and factor VII. Conclusion These results suggest that elevated concentrations of air pollution are associated with changes in some blood markers of inflammation and coagulation in patients with

  20. Passage of dietary antigens into the blood of children with coeliac disease. Quantification and size distribution of absorbed antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, S; Foged, N; Høst, A;

    1987-01-01

    The uptake of ovalbumin (OA) from egg and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) from cow's milk into the blood was investigated for seven hours after a test meal in five children with coeliac disease on a gluten free diet and after gluten challenge, and in five children with normal jejunal mucosa. Ovalbumin was...... fractionation in combination with ELISA, either in high MW fractions, or at the Mr of native OA and BLG, respectively. In one control degradation products (about 17 kD) of BLG were detectable in serum. The serum concentrations of OA and BLG were increased on gluten challenge in four or five coeliac children...

  1. Effects of Intensified Vasodilatory Antihypertensive Treatment on Renal Function, Blood supply and Oxygenation in Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khatir, Dinah Sherzad; Pedersen, Michael; Ivarsen, Per;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Progression of Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may result from tissue hypoxia induced by small artery structural narrowing, with increased renal vascular resistance (RVR) and impaired blood supply. We investigated whether vasodilating therapy (VT) is superior to non-vasodilating therapy...... increased by 39% (P<0.01) while RVR remained unchanged. Cortical and medullary R2* values were not affected by VT and nonVT. After 18 months GFR decline was similar in the two groups (3.0 vs. 3.3 ml/min/1.73 m2). Conclusions: In CKD, long-term VT reduced both peripheral and RVR, but was not associated with...

  2. Increased plasma noradrenaline concentration in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease: relation to haemodynamics and blood gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christensen, N J; Kok-Jensen, A;

    1980-01-01

    . Plasma noradrenaline (NA) concentration averaged 0.51 ng/ml and was inversely correlated to arterial oxygen saturation and mixed venous oxygen saturation, and positively correlated to arterial carbon dioxide tension and mean pulmonary arterial pressure. Oxygen inhalation did not change plasma NA...... present. Plasma adrenaline concentration was normal. The results point to enhanced sympathetic nervous activity in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease, probably caused by the deranged blood gases. The pulmonary haemodynamic changes and increased pulse rate may, at least partly, be due to...

  3. Trace element determination in fingernails, hair and blood serum in patients with Crohn's disease using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of trace elements and electrolyte concentrations in blood serum, hair and fingernails of 16 patients with Crohn's disease was carried out by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis. In the serum a significant decline in the zinc content could be registered, while the remaining trace elements remained in the normal range. The parenteral nutrition also showed a zinc deficiency. There was, however, also an iron deficiency. The studies of the hair and fingernails gave the following results: Rubidium and antimony in the normal range; zinc, selenium, iron and cobalt below normal values. (orig./PW)

  4. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group on research in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Roberta G; Pearson, Gail D; Barst, Robyn J; Child, John S; del Nido, Pedro; Gersony, Welton M; Kuehl, Karen S; Landzberg, Michael J; Myerson, Merle; Neish, Steven R; Sahn, David J; Verstappen, Amy; Warnes, Carole A; Webb, Catherine L

    2006-02-21

    The Working Group on research in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) was convened in September 2004 under the sponsorship of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the Office of Rare Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, to make recommendations on research needs. The purpose of the Working Group was to advise the NHLBI on the current state of the science in ACHD and barriers to optimal clinical care, and to make specific recommendations for overcoming those barriers. The members of the Working Group were chosen to provide expert input on a broad range of research issues from both scientific and lay perspectives. The Working Group reviewed data on the epidemiology of ACHD, long-term outcomes of complex cardiovascular malformations, issues in assessing morphology and function with current imaging techniques, surgical and catheter-based interventions, management of related conditions including pregnancy and arrhythmias, quality of life, and informatics. After research and training barriers were discussed, the Working Group recommended outreach and educational programs for adults with congenital heart disease, a network of specialized adult congenital heart disease regional centers, technology development to support advances in imaging and modeling of abnormal structure and function, and a consensus on appropriate training for physicians to provide care for adults with congenital heart disease. PMID:16487831

  5. Amylase - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylase is an enzyme that helps digest carbohydrates. It is made in the pancreas and the glands ... saliva. When the pancreas is diseased or inflamed, amylase releases into the blood. A test can be ...

  6. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  7. High Blood Pressure Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... facts about high blood pressure [PDF-255K] . High Blood Pressure in the United States About 70 million ...

  8. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day ... DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing ...

  9. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Barakat-Haddad

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis reve...

  10. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells: Rational for Use as a Neuroprotectant in Ischemic Brain Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadar Arien-Zakay

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cells for reparative medicine was first proposed more than three decades ago. Hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow, peripheral blood and human umbilical cord blood (CB have gained major use for treatment of hematological indications. CB, however, is also a source of cells capable of differentiating into various non-hematopoietic cell types, including neural cells. Several animal model reports have shown that CB cells may be used for treatment of neurological injuries. This review summarizes the information available on the origin of CB-derived neuronal cells and the mechanisms proposed to explain their action. The potential use of stem/progenitor cells for treatment of ischemic brain injuries is discussed. Issues that remain to be resolved at the present stage of preclinical trials are addressed.

  11. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  12. Mammary blood supply in various diseases as evidenced by color Doppler sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Color dopplerosonography, traditional sonography, and mammography without contrast staining, as well as physical and pathomorphologic methods were used in examinations of the mammary glands of 76 women aged 18 to 65. Characteristic features of the blood supply to the gland were detected, and differential diagnostic criteria defined on the basis of these findings, to simplify differentiation between malignant and benign nodular formations and the diffuse changes in the mamma

  13. Ectopic fat storage in heart, blood vessels and kidneys in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Montani, Jean-Pierre; Carroll, Joan F; Dwyer, Terry M.; Antic, Vladan; Yang, Zhihong; Abdul G Dulloo

    2005-01-01

    In humans and most animal models, the development of obesity leads not only to increased fat depots in classical adipose tissue locations but also to significant lipid deposits within and around other tissues and organs, a phenomenon known as ectopic fat storage. The purpose of this review is to explore the possible locations of ectopic fat in key target-organs of cardiovascular control (heart, blood vessels and kidneys) and to propose how ectopic fat storage can play a role in the pathogenes...

  14. Detection of acute osteomyelitis with indium-111 labeled white blood cells in a patient with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A young patient with sickle cell disease (SCD) and multiple hospitalizations for crisis was admitted because of suspected osteomyelitis. Initial laboratory work, radiographs, and bone images were not contributory. An In-111 white blood cell (WBC) study demonstrated two areas of increased radionuclide uptake consistent with osteomyelitis. One of these had associated soft tissue infection. No other areas of active osteomyelitis were visualized, in spite of the presence of several additional infection sites. Imaging with In-111 WBC is probably not justified for routine diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in areas free of previous disease, where conventional bone images are highly efficient. In-111 WBC imaging, however, may be helpful in detecting osteomyelitis in selected patients with SCD in whom Tc-99m bone images and radiographs are usually abnormal and difficult to interpret due to previous bone infarcts. Localization of the infection focus is very important in choosing the aspiration site for bacteriologic studies. A negative study, however, should be interpreted cautiously

  15. Optical characterization of red blood cells from individuals with sickle cell trait and disease in Tanzania using quantitative phase imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, JaeHwang; Lee, KyeoReh; Kazyoba, Paul E; Yoon, Jonghee; Massaga, Julius J; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common across Sub-Saharan Africa. However, the investigation of SCD in this area has been significantly limited mainly due to the lack of research facilities and skilled personnel. Here, we present optical measurements of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from healthy individuals and individuals with SCD and sickle cell trait in Tanzania using the quantitative phase imaging technique. By employing a quantitative phase imaging unit (QPIU), an existing microscope in a clinic is transformed into a powerful quantitative phase microscope providing measurements on the morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties of individual cells. The present approach will open up new opportunities for cost-effective investigation and diagnosis of several diseases in low resource environments.

  16. The rheological properties of blood and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Pierzchała

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is an important public health concern, which affects around 2–4% of the population. Left untreated, it causes a decrease not only in quality of life, but also of life expectancy. Despite the fact that knowledge about the mechanisms of development of cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA is still incomplete, observations confirm a relationship between sleep disordered breathing and the rheological properties of blood. One possible consequence of an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease may be a rise in mortality in OSA patients. Continuously improved research methods are allowing for an increasingly more accurate understanding of the significance of observed changes. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 2, 206–210

  17. Relationship of blood pressure with some cardiovascular disease risk factors in a rural population of Plateau State, North Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil N Okeahialam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is associated with certain cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors which vary from one place to the other depending on community sophistication. We decided to obtain the situation as it affects this rural Nigerian community to be in an evidence-based position to initiate individual and group prevention strategies. Design: Cross-sectional population survey. Materials and Methods: We surveyed for CVD risk factors among subjects 15 years and above in this rural community using a questionnaire requesting personal, medical and anthropometric information. One in three of them were randomly assigned to laboratory investigations. Results: Of the 840 subjects studied, 25% were males. The population mean age was 45.5 (18.2 standard deviation (SD, with 1.8% smokers and 4.1% using alcohol. Systolic blood pressure (SBP correlated with age, body mass index (BMI, total cholesterol (TC and uric acid (UA; while diastolic blood pressure (DBP correlated with age, BMI, TC, UA and atherogenic index (AI. SBP and DBP improved with exercise but not salt intake. The local seasonings used in cooking had no impact on blood pressure. Conclusion: To reduce cardiovascular morbidity in this and probably other rural sub-Saharan African communities, BMI, TC, UA and salt intake in diet should be targeted for reduction. Physical activity should be encouraged. Interestingly, these fall into the sphere of healthy lifestyle which should be encouraged and re-inforced.

  18. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate in cats with chronic kidney disease undergoing chemical restraint during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Kleine Figueiredo dos Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis is one of the used methods for treatment of Acute Renal Injury (ARI and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD to replace the function of the kidneys when refers to blood depuration. Hemodialysis removes toxins accumulated in the body directly from the blood, being a useful alternative therapy for dogs and cats with CKD in advanced stages. Because of the difficulty on handling the patient feline, this procedure requires sedation. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the safety of anesthesia in dogs and cats with CKD undergoing dialysis. The present study aimed to evaluate two different protocols of chemical restraint in cats with CKD and the effect of these on systolic blood pressure (SBP and heart rate (HR, since the procedure of extracorporeal circulation leads the patient to a hypotensive frame. Twelve adult cats were used, with an average weight of 4 kg, CKD, underwent two anesthetic protocols: Group GP (n = 6 using propofol, and group GCM (n = 6 using ketamine-midazolam association for the implantation procedure of central venous catheter (CVC and hemodialysis. Cats in GP as well as the GCM group showed statistical difference in the change in SBP and HR only from baseline compared to the other time points evaluated. The two protocols maintained SBP and HR within physiological values.

  19. Mathematical modeling of bone marrow - peripheral blood dynamics in the disease state based on current emerging paradigms, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afenya, Evans K; Ouifki, Rachid; Camara, Baba I; Mundle, Suneel D

    2016-04-01

    Stemming from current emerging paradigms related to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, an existing mathematical model is expanded and used to study cell interaction dynamics in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The proposed mathematical model is described by a system of nonlinear differential equations with delay, to quantify the dynamics in abnormal hematopoiesis. The steady states of the model are analytically and numerically obtained. Some conditions for the local asymptotic stability of such states are investigated. Model analyses suggest that malignancy may be irreversible once it evolves from a nonmalignant state into a malignant one and no intervention takes place. This leads to the proposition that a great deal of emphasis be placed on cancer prevention. Nevertheless, should malignancy arise, treatment programs for its containment or curtailment may have to include a maximum and extensive level of effort to protect normal cells from eventual destruction. Further model analyses and simulations predict that in the untreated disease state, there is an evolution towards a situation in which malignant cells dominate the entire bone marrow - peripheral blood system. Arguments are then advanced regarding requirements for quantitatively understanding cancer stem cell behavior. Among the suggested requirements are, mathematical frameworks for describing the dynamics of cancer initiation and progression, the response to treatment, the evolution of resistance, and malignancy prevention dynamics within the bone marrow - peripheral blood architecture. PMID:26877072

  20. Relationship of blood pressure with some cardiovascular disease risk factors in a rural population of Plateau State, North Central Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeahialam, Basil N.; Ogbonna, Chikaike; Joseph, Dele E.; Chuhwak, Evelyn K.; Isiguzoro, Ikechukwu O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is associated with certain cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors which vary from one place to the other depending on community sophistication. We decided to obtain the situation as it affects this rural Nigerian community to be in an evidence-based position to initiate individual and group prevention strategies. Design: Cross-sectional population survey. Materials and Methods: We surveyed for CVD risk factors among subjects 15 years and above in this rural community using a questionnaire requesting personal, medical and anthropometric information. One in three of them were randomly assigned to laboratory investigations. Results: Of the 840 subjects studied, 25% were males. The population mean age was 45.5 (18.2) standard deviation (SD), with 1.8% smokers and 4.1% using alcohol. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) correlated with age, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol (TC) and uric acid (UA); while diastolic blood pressure (DBP) correlated with age, BMI, TC, UA and atherogenic index (AI). SBP and DBP improved with exercise but not salt intake. The local seasonings used in cooking had no impact on blood pressure. Conclusion: To reduce cardiovascular morbidity in this and probably other rural sub-Saharan African communities, BMI, TC, UA and salt intake in diet should be targeted for reduction. Physical activity should be encouraged. Interestingly, these fall into the sphere of healthy lifestyle which should be encouraged and re-inforced. PMID:26229231

  1. Liver function in Huntington's disease assessed by blood biochemical analyses in a clinical setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Marie Borch; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Nielsen, Jørgen E.;

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurological disorder caused by a CAG repeat elongation in the huntingtin gene. In addition to motor-, psychiatric- A nd cognitive dysfunction, peripheral disease manifestations in the form of metabolic changes and cellular...... indicated by the Unified Huntington's disease rating scale-Total Functional Capacity Score (UHDRS-TFC). For gamma-glutamyl transferase, elevated levels were more frequent in the manifest groups than in both the HD gene-expansion negative controls and premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers. Finally, the...... premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers and controls, using a clinically applied panel of LFTs. Here, we demonstrate that the level of alkaline phosphatase is increased in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers compared to premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers and correlate with increased disease severity...

  2. Women and Heart Disease | Healthy Blood Pressure | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brings leading celebrities together in fashions created by America's top designers for women's heart health. Celebrity participants ... However, data on increasing rates of overweight and obesity, important risk factors for heart disease in younger ...

  3. High Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease in Children: A Guide for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign up for our FREE magazine, Kidney Living Organ Donation & Transplantation Be an Organ Donor Living Donation Donor ... Giving Primary menu Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate Search Search Header ...

  4. Elucidating Nature’s Solutions to Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases and Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Hannah V.; Martin, Sandra L.; Horwitz, Barbara A.; Yan, Lin; Bailey, Shannon M.; Podrabsky, Jason; Storz, Jay F.; Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wong, Renee P.; Lathrop, David A

    2012-01-01

    Evolution has provided a number of animal species with extraordinary phenotypes. Several of these phenotypes allow species to survive and thrive in environmental conditions that mimic disease states in humans. The study of evolved mechanisms that responsible for these phenotypes may provide insights into the basis of human disease and guide the design of new therapeutic approaches. Examples include species that tolerate acute or chronic hypoxemia like deep-diving mammals and high-altitude inh...

  5. Longitudinal transcriptomic dysregulation in the peripheral blood of transgenic Huntington’s disease monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Kocerha, Jannet; Liu, Yuhong; Willoughby, David; Chidamparam, Kumaravel; Benito, Joseph; Nelson, Kate; Xu, Yan; Chi, Tim; Engelhardt, Heidi; Moran, Sean; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Li, Shi-Hua; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Larkin, Katherine; Neumann, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Background Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion in the polyglutamine (polyQ) region of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The clinical features of HD are characterized by cognitive, psychological, and motor deficits. Molecular instability, a core component in neurological disease progression, can be comprehensively evaluated through longitudinal transcriptomic profiling. Development of animal models amenable to longitudinal examination enables d...

  6. Radiographic evaluation of destructive periodontal disease in blue mink in relation to age and blood morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne Sofie; Andersen, Thomas Holmen; Eriksen, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    bone loss and tooth loss. There was a high prevalence of destructive periodontal disease among blue mink included in this study. Mild to moderate periodontal disease (defined by less than 50% alveolar bone loss related to 1 or more teeth) affected 73.7% of young mink (age = 7 mo) and 67.9% of older...... animals (age &GE; 19 mo). Severe periodontal disease (defined by more than 50% bone loss related to one or more teeth) was not detected in mink aged 7 mo, but affected 15.3% of mink aged 19 mo and 39.6% of mink aged 31 mo. The positive relationship between age and periodontal disease was statistically...... in the mink was related to and possibly caused by destructive periodontal disease. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of periodontal disease between the 2 genotypes and age was found to be the only statistical predictor of poor production results (P < 0.01) in blue mink....

  7. Radiographic evaluation of destructive periodontal disease in blue mink in relation to age and blood morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Anne Sofie; Andersen, Thomas Holmen; Eriksen, Thomas; Kortegaard, Hanne E.; Dietz, Hans Henrik; Chriél, Mariann

    2005-01-01

    animals (age &GE; 19 mo). Severe periodontal disease (defined by more than 50% bone loss related to one or more teeth) was not detected in mink aged 7 mo, but affected 15.3% of mink aged 19 mo and 39.6% of mink aged 31 mo. The positive relationship between age and periodontal disease was statistically...... bone loss and tooth loss. There was a high prevalence of destructive periodontal disease among blue mink included in this study. Mild to moderate periodontal disease (defined by less than 50% alveolar bone loss related to 1 or more teeth) affected 73.7% of young mink (age = 7 mo) and 67.9% of older...... in the mink was related to and possibly caused by destructive periodontal disease. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of periodontal disease between the 2 genotypes and age was found to be the only statistical predictor of poor production results (P < 0.01) in blue mink....

  8. Circulating thrombopoietin levels in normal healthy blood donors and in aplastic anemia patients in relation to disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thrombopoietin (TPO is the key hematopoietic growth factor regulating the production of platelets from bone marrow megakaryocytes and maintaining platelet hemostasis. This study was done to find any relationship between the levels of thrombopoietin and the severity of disease in patients with aplastic anemia. Materials and Methods: Serum samples were collected from 52 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of aplastic anemia and 45 normal healthy blood donors of both sexes over a period of 2 years, and TPO was estimated by using commercially available TPO-specific-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The median TPO level of 1190 pg/ml (range 625-7651 pg/ml in aplastic anemia patients was significantly higher than the median TPO level of 121.1 pg/ml (81.25-237.7 pg/ml in normal healthy blood donors (P = 0.000. No significant difference was observed in TPO levels of male and female patients (P = 0.453. The median TPO concentrations observed in very severe aplastic anemia, severe aplastic anemia, and nonsevere aplastic anemia were 2765 pg/ml (range 625-6451 pg/ml, 1190 pg/ml (range 672.1-7651 pg/ml, and 1111.5 pg/ml (range 761.1-2289.2 pg/ml, respectively. TPO in patients of very severe aplastic anemia was significantly higher than patients of nonsevere aplastic anemia (P = 0.043, with no significant relation among rest of the groups. Discussion: TPO levels in aplastic anemia patients were significantly higher than in healthy blood donors; however, in aplastic anemia patients TPO levels were significantly higher only in patients with very severe disease.

  9. Modeling of the blood flow in the lower extremities for dynamic diffuse optical tomography of peripheral artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, A.; Hoi, J. W.; Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Shrikhande, G.; Dayal, R.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is caused by a reduction of the internal diameters of the arteries in the upper or lower extremities mainly due to atherosclerosis. If not treated, its worsening may led to a complete occlusion, causing the death of the cells lacking proper blood supply, followed by gangrene that may require chirurgical amputation. We have recently performed a clinical study in which good sensitivities and specificities were achieved with dynamic diffuse optical tomography. To gain a better understanding of the physiological foundations of many of the observed effects, we started to develop a mathematical model for PAD. The model presented in this work is based on a multi-compartment Windkessel model, where the vasculature in the leg and foot is represented by resistors and capacitors, the blood pressure with a voltage drop, and the blood flow with a current. Unlike existing models, the dynamics induced by a thigh-pressure-cuff inflation and deflation during the measurements are taken into consideration. This is achieved by dynamically varying the resistances of the large veins and arteries. By including the effects of the thigh-pressure cuff, we were able to explain many of the effects observed during our dynamic DOT measurements, including the hemodynamics of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes. The model was implemented in MATLAB and the simulations were normalized and compared with the blood perfusion obtained from healthy, PAD and diabetic patients. Our preliminary results show that in unhealthy patients the total system resistance is sensibly higher than in healthy patients.

  10. Blood-Brain Barrier and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: A Limit to the Therapy of CNS Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Anna Lisa; da Ros, Martina; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Facchini, Ludovica; Stival, Alessia; Becciani, Sabrina; Guidi, Milena; Favre, Claudio; de Martino, Maurizio; Genitori, Lorenzo; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, represents an ongoing challenge. In Central Nervous System (CNS) the achievement of therapeutic concentration of chemical agents is complicated by the presence of distinct set of efflux proteins, such as ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters localized on the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). The activity of ABC transporters seems to be a common mechanism that underlies the poor response of CNS diseases to therapies. The molecular characterization of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2), as an ABC transporter conferring multidrug resistance (MDR), has stimulated many studies to investigate its activity on the BBB, its involvement in physiology and CNS diseases and its role in limiting the delivery of drugs in CNS. In this review, we highlight the activity and localization of BCRP on the BBB and the action that this efflux pump has on many conventional drugs or latest generation molecules used for the treatment of CNS tumors and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26584727

  11. Optimal blood pressure in patients with peripheral artery disease following endovascular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Haruki; Ura, Nobuyuki; Hata, Shinya; Moniwa, Norihito; Hasegawa, Koichi; Takizawa, Hideki; Tanaka, Shigemichi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the associations between blood pressure (BP) and event incidence to define optimal BP after endovascular therapy (EVT) in patients who underwent EVT. BP was monitored every 6 months for 5 years, and the patients were divided into two groups by average BP: ≥ 140/90 mmHg and  7.0% was significantly higher among those who did not achieve target BP in the restenosis group (42.9%) than in the other group (10.8%) (p EVT. PMID:26440772

  12. Anesthetic issues and perioperative blood pressure management in patients who have cerebrovascular diseases undergoing surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellish, W Scott

    2006-11-01

    Patients who have cerebrovascular disease and vascular insufficiency routinely have neurosurgical and nonneurosurgical procedures. Anesthetic priorities must provide a still bloodless operative field while maintaining cardiovascular stability and renal function. Patients who have symptoms or a history of cerebrovascular disease are at increased risk for stroke, cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebral anoxia. Type of surgery and cardiovascular status are key concerns when considering neuroprotective strategies. Optimization of current condition is important for a good outcome; risks must be weighed against perceived benefits in protecting neurons. Anesthetic use and physiologic manipulations can reduce neurologic injury and assure safe and effective surgical care when cerebral hypoperfusion is a real and significant risk. PMID:16935193

  13. T cells in peripheral blood after gluten challenge in coeliac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, R. P.; VAN HEEL, D A; Tye-Din, J A; Barnardo, M; Salio, M; Jewell, D P; Hill, A. V. S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Current understanding of T cell epitopes in coeliac disease (CD) largely derives from intestinal T cell clones in vitro. T cell clones allow identification of gluten peptides that stimulate T cells but do not quantify their contribution to the overall gluten specific T cell response in individuals with CD when exposed to gluten in vivo.

  14. Longitudinal observations on circadian blood pressure variation in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, T.; Strandgaard, S.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2008-01-01

    /non-dipper status prospectively in a study on dosage of enalapril in progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3-5. METHODS: In 34 patients, 24-h ambulatory BP (A&D TM2421) was measured at baseline and every 4 months for 1 year or until the need for renal replacement therapy. For each BP recording patients...

  15. An unusual white blood cell scan in a child with inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porn, U; Howman-Giles, R; O'Loughlin, E; Uren, R; Chaitow, J

    2000-10-01

    Technetium-99m-labeled leukocyte (WBC) imaging is a valuable screening method for inflammatory bowel disease, especially in children, because of its high rate of sensitivity, low cost, and ease of preparation. A 14-year-old girl is described who had juvenile arthritis and iritis complicated by inflammatory bowel disease. She was examined for recurrent abdominal pain. A Tc-99m stannous colloid WBC scan was performed, and tracer accumulation was seen in the small bowel in the region of the distal ileum on the initial 1-hour image. Delayed imaging at 3 hours also revealed tracer accumulation in the cecum and ascending colon, which was not seen on the early image. A biopsy of the colon during endoscopy showed no evidence of active inflammation in the colon. The small bowel was not seen. Computed tomography revealed changes suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease in the distal ileum. The appearance on the WBC study was most likely a result of inflammatory bowel disease involving the distal ileum, with transit of luminal activity into the large bowel. PMID:11043720

  16. Purine Bases in Blood Plasma of Patients with Chronic Pulmonary Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa E. Muravluyova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the study of purine bases and intermediates of purine catabolism in plasma of patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis and idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. Decrease of adenine and hypoxantine in plasma of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia was registered. Increase of guanine in plasma of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was established.

  17. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Life Threatening Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-23

    Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Graft Versus Host Disease; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Hypersensitivity Vasculitis; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Giant Cell Arteritis; Pure Red Cell Aplasia; Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Takayasu Arteritis

  18. Why are the neurodegenerative disease-related pathways overrepresented in primary HIV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a genome-wide perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Li; Conceicao Viviane; Gupta Priyanka; Saksena Nitin K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We demonstrate for the first time that the genome-wide profiling of HIV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HIV-patients free of neurologic disease show overrepresentation of neurodegenerative pathways (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, Huntington’s and Prion Disease, etc.) in genome-wide microarray analysis, which suggests that this genome-wide representation of neurodegenerative diseases-related pathways in PBMCs could possibly be a subcellular manifestation of ne...

  19. Blood and urine levels of heavy metal pollutants in female and male patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sponder M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael Sponder,1 Monika Fritzer-Szekeres,2 Rodrig Marculescu,2 Martina Mittlböck,3 Maria Uhl,4 Birgit Köhler-Vallant,5 Jeanette Strametz-Juranek1 1Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 2Department of Medical-Chemical Laboratory Analysis, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 3Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Intelligent Systems, Section for Clinical Biometrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 4Department of Pollutants and Human, Environment Agency Austria, Vienna, Austria; 5Department of Inorganic Analysis, Environment Agency Austria, Vienna, Austria Background: Heavy metal pollutants such as cadmium (Cd, lead (Pb, and mercury (Hg are rarely the subjects of cardiovascular research although they have been suspected for decades to negatively impact the circulatory system. Methods: Apart from detailed anamnestic data, urinary levels of Cd and full blood levels of Pb and Hg were measured in 53 female (mean age: 68.04±7.03 years and 111 male (mean age: 60.68±11.43 years nonsmoking or never-smoking patients with angiographically verified and precisely quantified coronary artery disease (CAD. Results: Although Cd was quantifiable in 68.3% of subjects, only 34.1% of these patients exceeded the critical 1 µg/L Human Biomonitoring (HBM-I level. Median Pb (20 µg/L and Hg (0.55 µg/L levels were lower than the HBM-I, as well as reference levels of Pb. Wine consumption was the main source for Pb, fish and wine consumption for Hg, and previous nicotine abuse for Cd. There was no correlation between Cd, Pb, or Hg and severity of CAD although severity correlated positively with atherosclerosis parameters (uric acid, creatinine, triglycerides, blood urea nitrogen, C-reactive protein and negatively with high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusion: Cd levels detected in CAD patients were high compared to German and European reference levels but it could not be proven that urine

  20. Optimal design and uncertainty quantification in blood flow simulations for congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison

    2009-11-01

    Recent work has demonstrated substantial progress in capabilities for patient-specific cardiovascular flow simulations. Recent advances include increasingly complex geometries, physiological flow conditions, and fluid structure interaction. However inputs to these simulations, including medical image data, catheter-derived pressures and material properties, can have significant uncertainties associated with them. For simulations to predict clinically useful and reliable output information, it is necessary to quantify the effects of input uncertainties on outputs of interest. In addition, blood flow simulation tools can now be efficiently coupled to shape optimization algorithms for surgery design applications, and these tools should incorporate uncertainty information. We present a unified framework to systematically and efficient account for uncertainties in simulations using adaptive stochastic collocation. In addition, we present a framework for derivative-free optimization of cardiovascular geometries, and layer these tools to perform optimization under uncertainty. These methods are demonstrated using simulations and surgery optimization to improve hemodynamics in pediatric cardiology applications.

  1. Healing of ulcers on the feet correlated with distal blood pressure measurements in occlusive arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Lassen, N A

    1980-01-01

    (SPPH) as measured with a photocell. Thirty-two patients (35 feet with ulcerations) had diabetes mellitus. The treatment was conservative. In 42 feet the ulcers healed after an average period of 5.8 months; in 24 feet major amputation became necessary after an average of 4.3 months. The frequency of...... cases (9%) healed. Of the 11 cases with SDBP of 20 to 29 mmHg seven cases (64%) healed and of the 33 cases with SDBP of30 mmHg or above all cases (100%) healed. There was no significant difference between the 35 diabetic feet and the 31 non-diabetic feet as regards the healing rates, although infection...... and peripheral neuropathy were frequent in the diabetic group. The data show that the systolic digital blood pressure is a particularly valuable prognostic parameter....

  2. Higher frequency of secretor phenotype in O blood group – its benefits in prevention and/or treatment of some diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Salih Jaff

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Salih JaffPathology Department, Hawler Medical University (Formerly Salahaddin University, Erbil, Kurdistan Region, IraqAbstract: ABO blood groups and secretor status are important in clinical and forensic medicine and in relation to some diseases. There are geographic and racial differences in their frequencies, but the frequency of secretor status in different ABO blood group systems has not been determined yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was mainly to determine this point. Blood and saliva from 762 randomly selected apparently healthy adult individuals (480 men and 282 women were examined to determine their ABO and Rhesus blood groups by standard conventional methods, and their secretor status by using Lewis blood grouping and/or hemagglutination inhibition test of saliva. Results showed that 76.1% of the study population were ABH blood group antigens secretors and 23.9% were nonsecretors. The frequencies of secretor status in different ABO blood groups were 70.1% in group A, 67.8% in group B, 67.9% in group AB, and 88.3% in group O. In conclusion, blood group O individuals have significantly higher frequency of secretor status than non-O blood group individuals. This finding would be beneficial to them, protecting them, at least partially, from certain malignancies or allowing them to have less aggressive disease, and this finding might be useful in enhancing further studies and research in this direction.Keywords: blood group O, ABO blood groups, secretor phenotype, frequency, malignancies, prevention and/or treatment

  3. Can cerebral blood flow measurement predict clinical outcome in the acute phase in patients with artherosclerotic occlusive carotid artery disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been thought that the clinical course of patients with acute carotid occlusive disease depends on their collateral cerebral blood flow (CBF) and duration of ischemia. However, there have been few clinical reports to prove this hypothesis. Therefore, we performed CBF study in patients with artherosclerotic carotid occlusive disease in the very acute phase, and precisely assessed the prognosis of those patients under intensive medical therapy. This prospective study included a total of 44 patients (72±13 years) who were admitted to our hospital between April, 2007 and December, 2008. To evaluate their initial CBF, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were performed within 6 hours after the onset. All patients included in this study were medically treated and were periodically followed up by neurological and radiological examination. Moreover, in patients with reduced CBF (ipsilateral CBF/contralateral CBF x 100: %CBF <80%), dobutamine-induce hyperdynamic therapy was performed. Multivariate analysis was performed to detect significant predictors for the occurrence of further cerebral infarction. Multivariate analysis showed that the occurrence of further infarction was associated with older age and smaller %CBF. Of 44 patients, 21 experienced further cerebral infarction within 10 days after onset. Fourteen out of 15 patients with %CBF <60% developed cerebral infarction. This study showed that the prognosis of the patients with artherosclerotic carotid occlusive disease in the acute phase is associated with their initial residual CBFs. It may be difficult to stop the developed cerebral infarction in those patients with %CBF <60% despite intensive medical therapy. (author)

  4. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  5. Rapid whole-blood flow cytometry assay for diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Gorman, M R; Corrochano, V

    1995-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by defective killing of intracellular microorganisms due to mutations in one of the four known components of the NADPH oxidase system. This system is responsible for the generation of superoxide and related antimicrobial oxidants. Diagnosis of CGD requires the demonstration of an abnormal oxidase system in the leukocytes of affected patients. Recently, several flow cytometry-based procedures which measure various reactive oxygen intermediat...

  6. High blood pressure during pregnancy is associated with future cardiovascular disease: an observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Tooher, Jane; Chiu, Christine L; Yeung, Kristen; Lupton, Samantha J; Thornton, Charlene; Makris, Angela; O'Loughlin, Aiden; Hennessy, Annemarie; Lind, Joanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to determine if having a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP) is a risk factor for future cardiovascular disease (CVD), independent of age and body mass index (BMI). Design Data were sourced from the baseline questionnaire of the 45 and Up Study, Australia, an observational cohort study. Setting Participants were randomly selected from the Australian Medicare Database within New South Wales. Participants A total of 84 619 women were eligible for this study, of w...

  7. Expression of RNAs Coding for Metal Transporters in Blood of Patients with Huntington’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Szeliga, Monika; Różycka, Aleksandra; Jędrak, Paulina; Barańska, Sylwia; Janik, Piotr; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated elevated levels of iron (Fe) in brains of patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). Striatal cells carrying mutated Huntingtin presented increased sensitivity to cadmium (Cd) toxicity, decreased sensitivity to manganese (Mn) toxicity and deficits in Mn uptake. The hypothesis arose that the observed alterations result from the altered expression and/or activity of proteins engaged in the transport of these metals, that is: transferrin (TF), transferrin receptor ...

  8. Elevated Blood Pressure and Serum γ -Glutamyltransferase as Significant Characteristics of Smokers With Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Noborisaka, Yuka; Ishizaki, Masao; Yamazaki, Michiko; Honda, Ryumon; Yamada, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Smoking is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, it is speculated that only a small subset of sensitive smokers develop CKD. Objectives: We aimed to reveal the characteristics of such smokers sensitive to the renal effects of smoking with respect to cardiovascular (CV) risk factors associated with smoking and/or CKD. Patients and Methods: Renal functions and CVD risk factors were assessed in middle-aged male workers. The patients were comprised of 336 nonsmokers...

  9. Glutathione redox cycle in small intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood of pediatric celiac disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vesnać Stojiljković; SnežAna Pejić; Jelena Kasapović; Ljubicać Gavrilović; Stanimirć Stojiljković; Draganć Nikolić; SnežAna B. Pajović

    2012-01-01

    The celiac disease is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder caused by gluten from wheat, rye or barley. In genetically predisposed persons, gluten induces the immune-mediated inflammation of small intestinal mucosa. Histological lesions include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hypertrophy and villous atrophy, resulting in malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The only treatment for celiac patients is a permanent gluten-free diet (GFD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative s...

  10. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 A49G polymorphism and autoimmune blood diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Aktürk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4 is expressed on T lymphocytes, and inhibits the T-cell responses. In animal models, it has been shown that complete CTLA-4 deficiency was lethal due to massive infiltration of tissues by polyclonally proliferating lymphocytes. CTLA-4 A49G polymorphism, which has been suggested to reduce the inhibitory function of the CTLA-4 molecule, was found to be associated with various autoimmune diseases in recent studies. Material and Methods: In this study, we evaluated the frequency of CTLA-4 A49G polymorphism in 46 patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, 62 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, and 150 healthy individuals. Results: Allele frequencies and genotype distributions were similar in both ITP and AIHA patients compared to healthy individuals. In subgroup analysis, however, we found that in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL patients with AIHA (n=4, all patients had CTLA-4 A49G polymorphism (3 had AG, 1 had GG. There was no significant statistical association between G allele and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or AIHA.Conclusion: These data suggest that CTLA-4 A49G polymorphism does not contribute to the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative diseases itself, nor does it increase the risk of autoimmune complications in patients with lymphoproliferative disease.

  11. Multiplex infectious disease microarrays: STAT serology on a drop of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Baker, Steve; Raha, Sandeep; Wong, Yuen-Yee; Ciebiera, Kathy

    2009-06-01

    New and resurgent viral and antibiotic-resistant bacterial diseases are being encountered worldwide. The US CDC now ranks hospital acquired infections among the top 10 leading causes of death in the US, costing $20 billion annually. Such nosocomial infections presently affect 5% - 10% of hospitalized patients leading to 2 million cases and 99,000 deaths annually. Until now, assays available to mount comprehensive surveillance of infectious disease exposure by biosecurity agencies and hospital infection control units have been too slow and too costly. In earlier clinical studies we have reported proteomic microarrays combining 13 autoimmune and 26 viral and bacterial pathogens that revealed correlations between autoimmune diseases and antecedent infections. In this work we have expanded the array to 40 viruses and bacteria and investigated a suspected role of human endogenous retroviruses in autoimmune neuropathies. Using scanning laser imaging, and fluorescence color multiplexing, serum IgG and IgM responses are measured concurrently on the same array, for 14 arrays (patient samples) per microscope slide in 15 minutes. Other advantages include internal calibration, 10 μL sample size, increased laboratory efficiency, and potential factor of 100 cost reduction.

  12. A study of eosinophil count in nasal and blood smear in allergic respiratory diseases in a rural setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic respiratory disorders are fairly common visiting cases in pediatrics outpatient department (OPD. With an appropriate history and detailed examination, diagnosis may not be problematic. Routine investigation may not contribute much to the final diagnosis but may help in ruling out other possibilities. This study was done to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of blood or nasal eosinophilia in subjects suffering from allergic respiratory disorders and also to assess the feasibility of nasal cytogram which is a simple, economical and reliable investigation in allergic respiratory disorders. This is a prospective clinical correlation study of patients attending outpatient department. 100 subjects aged between 2-18 years of either sex were selected for the estimation of eosinophil count in nasal and peripheral smear in allergic respiratory disorders. All allergic respiratory cases based on eosinophillia. The nasal and blood eosinophilia were compared with each other and clinical findings of allergic rhinitis with or without asthma were studied. In this study peak age incidence was seen between 11-18 years and it was more common in males. Rhinorrhoea, pale mucosa and nasal obstruction were common findings in allergic rhinitis with bronchial asthma. Nasal eosinophilia was seen in 52.4% and 64.9% of cases of allergic rhinitis and allergic rhinitis with asthma respectively. Blood eosinophilia was seen in 54% and 56.8% of cases of allergic rhinitis with asthma respectively. Nasal cytogram which is a simple, economical and non- invasive procedure can be used as an alternative to invasive peripheral smear eosinophilia as both are equally efficacious in diagnosing allergic respiratory diseases.

  13. Neuropsychiatric disease relevance of circulating anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies depends on blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, C; Stepniak, B; Schneider, A; Papiol, S; Tantra, M; Begemann, M; Sirén, A-L; Pardo, L A; Sperling, S; Mohd Jofrry, S; Gurvich, A; Jensen, N; Ostmeier, K; Lühder, F; Probst, C; Martens, H; Gillis, M; Saher, G; Assogna, F; Spalletta, G; Stöcker, W; Schulz, T F; Nave, K-A; Ehrenreich, H

    2014-10-01

    In 2007, a multifaceted syndrome, associated with anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies (NMDAR-AB) of immunoglobulin-G isotype, has been described, which variably consists of psychosis, epilepsy, cognitive decline and extrapyramidal symptoms. Prevalence and significance of NMDAR-AB in complex neuropsychiatric disease versus health, however, have remained unclear. We tested sera of 2817 subjects (1325 healthy, 1081 schizophrenic, 263 Parkinson and 148 affective-disorder subjects) for presence of NMDAR-AB, conducted a genome-wide genetic association study, comparing AB carriers versus non-carriers, and assessed their influenza AB status. For mechanistic insight and documentation of AB functionality, in vivo experiments involving mice with deficient blood-brain barrier (ApoE(-/-)) and in vitro endocytosis assays in primary cortical neurons were performed. In 10.5% of subjects, NMDAR-AB (NR1 subunit) of any immunoglobulin isotype were detected, with no difference in seroprevalence, titer or in vitro functionality between patients and healthy controls. Administration of extracted human serum to mice influenced basal and MK-801-induced activity in the open field only in ApoE(-/-) mice injected with NMDAR-AB-positive serum but not in respective controls. Seropositive schizophrenic patients with a history of neurotrauma or birth complications, indicating an at least temporarily compromised blood-brain barrier, had more neurological abnormalities than seronegative patients with comparable history. A common genetic variant (rs524991, P=6.15E-08) as well as past influenza A (P=0.024) or B (P=0.006) infection were identified as predisposing factors for NMDAR-AB seropositivity. The >10% overall seroprevalence of NMDAR-AB of both healthy individuals and patients is unexpectedly high. Clinical significance, however, apparently depends on association with past or present perturbations of blood-brain barrier function. PMID:23999527

  14. Chronic kidney disease, 24-h blood pressure and small vessel diseases are independently associated with cognitive impairment in lacunar infarct patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the relationships between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cognitive impairment (CI) have been highlighted, the etiology of CI in CKD remains uncertain. Subjects comprised 224 consecutive patients with symptomatic lacunar infarction who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Diurnal blood pressure (BP) patterns were categorized into three groups: dippers, non-dippers and risers. Lacunar infarcts (LIs), including both symptomatic and silent and diffuse white matter lesions (WMLs), were graded into three grades according to their degree. The results of kidney function were evaluated using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), categorized into three groups: stage 1, >60; stage 2, 30-60; and stage 3, -1 per 1.73 m2. There were 44 patients with CI. Confluent WMLs, including WML 2 and WML 3, were found in 36 patients (81.8%), and multiple lacunae including LI 2 and LI 3 were found in 30 patients (68.1%) with CI. Age >75 years (odds ratio (OR), 5.5; P-1 per 1.73 m2 (OR, 2.9; P-1 per 1.73 m2 (OR, 23.8; P75 years (OR, 4.1; P-1 per 1.73 m2 (OR, 3.7; P-1 per 1.73 m2 (OR, 8.7; P<0.05) were independently associated with WML grade 3. Extensive small vessel diseases, CKD and non-dipping status were independently associated with CI. CKD appears to mainly contribute to vascular CI, whereas possibilities of overlapping with other mechanisms such as degenerative CI cannot be excluded. Strict night time BP control and renoprotective treatment may be warranted to prevent CI. (author)

  15. Loss of T Follicular Helper Cells in the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, David A; Wang, Hongbo; Aurora, Mukta; MacMillan, Margaret L; Holtan, Shernan G; Bergerson, Rachel; Cao, Qing; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Cooley, Sarah; Brunstein, Claudio; Miller, Jeffery S; Wagner, John E; Blazar, Bruce R; Verneris, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    B cell antihost antibody production plays a central role in chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). T follicular helper (TFH) cells drive B cell responses and are implicated in this process. Given differences in cGVHD incidence between umbilical cord blood (UCB) and adult donor transplant recipients, we evaluated TFH cell reconstitution kinetics to define graft source differences and their potential pathogenic role in cGVHD. Although we observed significantly fewer TFH cells in the blood of UCB recipients (versus matched related donors [MRD]) early after transplantation, by 1 year the numbers of TFH cells were similar. Additionally, at both early (day 60) and late (1 year) time points, TFH cell phenotype was predominantly central memory cells in both cohorts. TFH cells were functional and able to produce multiple cytokines (INF-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17, and IL-21) after stimulation. In contrast to mouse models, where an enhanced frequency of splenic TFH cells contributes to cGVHD, patients with cGVHD showed significantly depleted circulating TFH cells after both UCB and MRD transplantation. Low numbers of TFH cells early after UCB transplantation could directly contribute to less cGVHD in this cohort. Additionally, systemic therapy (including steroids and calcineurin inhibitors) may contribute to decreases in TFH cells in patients with cGVHD. These data provide further evidence supporting the importance of TFH cells in cGVHD pathogenesis. PMID:26806586

  16. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique

  17. Combined Effect of Blood Cadmium and Lead Levels on Coronary Heart Disease Prediction Risk in Korean Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hye-Min; Cho, Doo-Yeoun; Kim, Min-Young; Yang, Sung-Won; Seo, Young-Seok; Kim, Kyu-Nam

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the combined effects of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) on 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk calculated using the Framingham risk score. The heavy metal data set of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2008-2010) was analyzed. The 10-year CHD risk was significantly associated with the log-transformed blood Cd and Pb levels in Korean men. For the highest quartile of Cd and Pb, the odds ratio (OR) of the intermediate risk and beyond for CHD (10-year risk ≥10%) compared to the lowest quartile was 6.870 (Cd, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.58-10.30) and 3.127 (Pb, 95% CI: 2.09-4.69) after adjusting for confounders, respectively. The adjusted OR of the intermediate risk and beyond for CHD (10-year risk ≥10%) in the fourth quartile of both Cd and Pb was 12.2 (95% CI: 8.0-18.5) compared to the reference group (first and second quartiles of Cd and Pb). However, the association between log-transformed blood Cd and Pb and the 10-year CHD risk was not significant in Korean women. PMID:26586853

  18. Fourier analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data in patients with congenital heart diseases, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical usefulness of Fourier analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data was evaluated in 18 subjects with normal cardiac functions and 14 patients with complex cardiac anomalies (ten with tetralogy of Fallot, two with tricuspid atresia (TA), one with double-outlet right ventricle (DORV), and one with Ebstein's anomaly (EA)). Using global ventricular time-activity curves, the phase and amplitude at fundamental frequency were calculated, and emptying patterns of the left and right ventricles (LV, RV) were evaluated by phase difference [D(phase)=RV phase minus LV phase] and amplitude ratio of RV to LV [R(amp)]. In patients with TOF, mean values of D (phase) and R(amp) were 25.3+-10.5 degrees and 13.5+-0.49 respectively and significantly larger than those of normal subjects (p<0.001). D (phase) became larger in inverse proportion to the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow and there was an inverse linear correlation between these two variables (r=-0.830, p<0.01). On visual interpretation of functional images, the dynamic property of hypoplastic ventricles could be easily estimated in patients with TA or DORV. In a case with EA, the atrialized RV was shown clearly as a hypokinetic, atrial phase area. This method is valuable for pathophysiologic investigation of diseases with complex cardiac anomalies. (author)

  19. Factor analysis of multi-gated cardiac blood-pool data in patients with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to examine the usefulness of factor analysis in multi-gated cardiac blood-pool scintigraphic studies of 83 patients with various congenital heart diseases. In ventricular and atrial septal defects, two factors, including the first factor for ventricular components and the second factor for atrial and great vessel components, were extracted when Qp/Qs was comparatively small, being similar to normal subjects. In ventricular septal defect associated with higher Qp/Qs, however, the left and right ventricles were extracted as separate factors, thus providing three factors, including atrial and great vessel components. There was a significant positive correlation between Qp/Qs values and delayed ejection phase in both the left and right ventricular factors. In atrial septal defect associated with higher Qp/Qs, the right ventricle was divided into septal and free wall components, and the left ventricle was extracted as the same components as right ventricular septal component. In comparing two dynamic pattern curves of ventricular factors, there was no significant difference between delayed ejection phase and Qp/Qs values, although ejection phase tended to be prolonged in right ventricular free wall factors than both right ventricular septal and left ventricular factors. All patients with Ebstein's malformation had atrial factors in the inflow portion of the right ventricle, allowing clear distinction between the atrialized right ventricle and functional right ventricle. These results suggest that factor analysis may have a potential in analyzing multi-gated blood pool scintigraphic data in various congenital heart diseases. (N.K.)

  20. Interleukin-6 in peripheral blood and inflammatory sites in Behçet's disease

    OpenAIRE

    K. Hamzaoui; Hamzaoui, A; Kahan, A; Hamza, M; Chabbou, A.; Kh. Ayed

    1992-01-01

    Interleukin-6, a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine, might be involved in Behçet's disease (BD) pathological pathways. We investigated IL-6 levels in sera and synovial fluids collected from BD patients. The IL-6 production was also studied in vivo, by measuring its activity in culture supernatants of PBMC and alveolar macrophages, stimulated or not with LPS. The patients with BD were compared to RA patients and healthy controls. High IL-6 levels were observed in sera, synovial fluid and LPS sti...

  1. Altered Peripheral Blood Monocyte Phenotype and Function in Chronic Liver Disease: Implications for Hepatic Recruitment and Systemic Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Gadd

    Full Text Available Liver and systemic inflammatory factors influence monocyte phenotype and function, which has implications for hepatic recruitment and subsequent inflammatory and fibrogenic responses, as well as host defence.Peripheral blood monocyte surface marker (CD14, CD16, CD163, CSF1R, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, HLA-DR, CD62L, SIGLEC-1 expression and capacity for phagocytosis, oxidative burst and LPS-stimulated TNF production were assessed in patients with hepatitis C (HCV (n = 39 or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD (n = 34 (classified as non-advanced disease, compensated cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls (n = 11 by flow cytometry.The selected markers exhibited similar monocyte-subset-specific expression patterns between patients and controls. Monocyte phenotypic signatures differed between NAFLD and HCV patients, with an increased proportion of CD16+ non-classical monocytes in NAFLD, but increased expression of CXCR3 and CXCR4 in HCV. In both cohorts, monocyte CCR2 expression was reduced and CCR4 elevated over controls. CD62L expression was specifically elevated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and positively correlated with the model-for-end-stage-liver-disease score. Functionally, monocytes from patients with decompensated cirrhosis had equal phagocytic capacity, but displayed features of dysfunction, characterised by lower HLA-DR expression and blunted oxidative responses. Lower monocyte TNF production in response to LPS stimulation correlated with time to death in 7 (46% of the decompensated patients who died within 8 months of recruitment.Chronic HCV and NAFLD differentially affect circulating monocyte phenotype, suggesting specific injury-induced signals may contribute to hepatic monocyte recruitment and systemic activation state. Monocyte function, however, was similarly impaired in patients with both HCV and NAFLD, particularly in advanced disease, which likely contributes to the increased

  2. The effects of radioiodine therapy on peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with Graves' disease. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of Graves' disease patients with radioactive iodide (131I) is becoming the standard therapy in an increasing group of cases but can induce alterations in immune response, like increasing levels of thyroid autoantibodies, and, in part, exacerbation of ophthalmopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the changes in peripheral blood (PB) lymphocyte subpopulations after 131I treatment of patients with Graves' disease. The study was carried out in a group of 30 patients with Graves' disease (23 f; 7 m) 49.5±10.0 years of age, 26 with different subjective ocular signs like gritty sensation, increased lacrimation, orbital pain, and exophthalmos. PB lymphocyte subsets were analysed by cytofluorometry, serum concentration of TSH and fT4 were evaluated before and 6 weeks after radioiodine treatment. After 131I treatment a significant increase in CD3+, CD4+, CD3+HLA-DR+ and a decrease in CD19+ percentages of lymphocyte subsets were found in comparison with the initial evaluation. No significant changes in percentage of CD8+ and NK (CD3-CD16+ CD56+) cells were observed during this study. A significant increase in TSH and a slight decrease in fT4 concentration concentration took place in the 6th week after 131I application. The patients without subjective improvement of ocular signs during the therapy initially had a percentage of CD3+, CD8+ lymphocytes which was significantly lower compared with those with regression of ocular signs observed after 131I treatment. The changes in PB lymphocyte subsets caused by 131I treatment of Graves' disease confirm the involvement of acquired cellular immunity after radiation damage of the thyroid gland. The decreased initial percentage of CD8+ and CD3+ lymphocytes could help make a prediction of ocular symptoms persisting after radioiodine treatment in some patients with ophthalmopathy. (author)

  3. Astrocytic modulation of Blood Brain Barrier: Perspectives on Parkinson´s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo eCabezas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available TThe blood–brain barrier (BBB is a tightly regulated interface in the Central Nervous System that regulates the exchange of molecules in and out from the brain thus maintaining the CNS homeostasis. It is mainly composed of endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes that create a neurovascular unit with the adjacent neurons. Astrocytes are essential for the formation and maintenance of the BBB by providing secreted factors that lead to the adequate association between the cells of the BBB and the formation of strong tight junctions. Under neurological disorders, such as chronic cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, Epilepsy, Alzheimer and Parkinson´s Diseases, a disruption of the BBB takes place, involving a lost in the permeability of the barrier and phenotypical changes in both the endothelial cells and astrocytes. In this aspect, it has been established that the process of reactive gliosis is a common feature of astrocytes during BBB disruption, which has a detrimental effect on the barrier function and a subsequent damage in neuronal survival. In this review we discuss the implications of astrocyte functions in the protection of the BBB, and in the development of Parkinson´s disease and related disorders. Additionally, we highlight the current and future strategies in astrocyte protection aimed at the development of restorative therapies for the BBB in pathological conditions.

  4. Peripheral blood involvement in patients with follicular lymphoma: a rare disease manifestation associated with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Baseggio, Lucile; Feugier, Pierre; Callet-Bauchu, Evelyne; Karlin, Lionel; Seymour, John F; Lebras, Laure; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Offner, Fritz; Dumas, Olivier; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Ffrench, Martine; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Berger, Françoise; Coiffier, Bertrand; Felman, Pascale; Salles, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    Follicular Lymphoma (FL) is the second most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtype and its course is heterogeneous. At diagnosis, some patients with FL manifest a detectable leukaemic phase (FL-LP), but this feature has been seldom described and is poorly characterized. Among 499 patients diagnosed with FL in Lyon-Sud hospital, 37 (7·4%) had characteristic FL-LP (by cytological blood smears and flow cytometric analysis). In addition, 91/1135 FL patients from the PRIMA study presented FL-LP at study entry. In order to evaluate the outcome of this Lyon-Sud cohort, FL-LP patients were matched with 111 newly diagnosed FL without LP according to the Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (FLIPI) score, age and treatment. Presence of FL-LP was associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0·004 and P = 0·031, respectively). Presence of FL-LP and high FLIPI score remained independent prognostic factors in a Cox model for time to progression (TTP). A number of circulating lymphoma cells (CLC) >4 × 10(9) /l was the most significant predictor for a shorter TTP in this Cox model. The prognostic impact of FL-LP on TTP was validated in the PRIMA cohort (P = 0·0004). In conclusion, FL-LP is a rare event associated with shorter PFS and patients with CLC >4 × 10(9) /l have a poorer outcome. These patients should be monitored carefully to consider alternative therapeutic options. PMID:24274024

  5. Association between Blood Dioxin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease in an Endemic Area of Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yuan Huang

    Full Text Available Dioxin is an industrial pollutant related to various diseases, but epidemiological data on its effects on the kidney are limited. Therefore, we conducted a study to evaluate the association between dioxin exposure and chronic kidney disease (CKD and identify the related factors.We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study and recruited participants from an area where the residents were exposed to dioxin released from a factory. We defined a "high dioxin level" as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs ≥ 20 pg WHO98-TEQDF/g lipid in the serum and defined CKD as having an estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR ≤ 60 mL/min/1.73m2 or a diagnosis of CKD by a physician. The renal function was assessed between 2005 and 2010, and we excluded those who had had kidney diseases before the study started. Comparisons between patients of CKD and those who did not have CKD were made to identify the risk factors for CKD.Of the 2898 participants, 1427 had high dioxin levels, and 156 had CKD. In the univariate analyses, CKD was associated with high dioxin levels, age, gender, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and high insulin and uric acid levels. After adjusting for other factors, we found high dioxin levels (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-2.99, female gender (AOR = 1.74, 95%CI: 1.20-2.53, hypertension (AOR = 1.68, 95%CI: 1.17-2.42, high insulin levels (AOR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.26-3.61, high uric acid levels (AOR = 4.25, 95% CI: 2.92-6.20, and older age (AOR = 4.66, 95% CI: 1.87-11.62 for 40-64 year and AOR = 26.66, 95% CI: 10.51-67.62 for age ≥ 65 year were independent predictors of CKD.A high dioxin level was associated with an increased prevalence of CKD. Therefore, the kidney function of populations with exposure to dioxin should be monitored.

  6. Peripheral Blood Based Discrimination of Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease from Non-IBD Colitis by Genome-Wide Gene Expression Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Ferenc Sipos; Orsolya Galamb; Barnabás Wichmann; Tibor Krenács; Kinga Tóth; Katalin Leiszter; Györgyi Műzes; Tamás Zágoni; Zsolt Tulassay; Béla Molnár

    2011-01-01

    A molecular diagnostic assay using easily accessible peripheral blood would greatly assist in the screening and diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). Transcriptional profiles in blood/biopsy samples from 12 UC (6/12), 9 CD (5/9), 6 non-inflammatory bowel disease (non-IBD) colitis (6/0), and 11 healthy (11/11) patients were assessed by Affymetrix HGU133Plus2.0 microarrays. Prediction analysis of microarrays, discriminant and ROC analyses were performed, the results wer...

  7. Blood Pressure Matters: Keep Hypertension in Check

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuff, or an automatic device may measure the pressure. Blood pressure is given as 2 numbers. The first ... described above. High Blood Pressure NIHSeniorHealth: High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease Heart and Vascular Diseases ...

  8. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality: A cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntner, Paul; Whittle, Jeff; Lynch, Amy I.; Colantonio, Lisandro D.; Simpson, Lara M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Levitan, Emily B.; Whelton, Paul K; Cushman, William C.; Louis, Gail T.; Davis, Barry R.; Oparil, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Variability of blood pressure (BP) across outpatient visits is frequently dismissed as random fluctuation around a patient’s underlying BP. Objective: Examine the association between visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Design Prospective cohort study Setting Post-hoc analysis of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Participants 25,814 ALLHAT participants. Measurements VVV of SBP was defined as the standard deviation (SD) across BP measurements obtained at 7 visits conducted from 6 to 28 months following ALLHAT enrollment. Participants free of cardiovascular disease events during the first 28 months of follow-up were followed from the month 28 study visit through the end of active ALLHAT follow-up. Outcomes included fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure. Results There were 1194 cases of fatal CHD or non-fatal MI, 1948 deaths, 606 cases of stroke and 921 cases of heart failure during follow-up. After multivariable adjustment including mean SBP, the hazard ratio comparing participants in the highest versus lowest quintile of SD of SBP (≥14.4 mmHg versus <6.5 mmHg) was 1.30 (1.06–1.59) for fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, 1.58 (1.32–1.90) for all-cause mortality, 1.46 (1.06–2.01) for stroke, and 1.25 (0.97–1.61) for heart failure. Higher VVV of DBP was also associated with cardiovascular disease events and mortality. Limitations Long-term outcomes were not available. Conclusions Higher VVV of SBP is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Future studies should examine whether reducing VVV of BP lowers this risk. Primary funding source National Institutes of Health PMID:26215765

  9. Sodium, blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease: further evidence supporting the American Heart Association sodium reduction recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelton, Paul K; Appel, Lawrence J; Sacco, Ralph L; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Antman, Elliott M; Campbell, Norman; Dunbar, Sandra B; Frohlich, Edward D; Hall, John E; Jessup, Mariell; Labarthe, Darwin R; MacGregor, Graham A; Sacks, Frank M; Stamler, Jeremiah; Vafiadis, Dorothea K; Van Horn, Linda V

    2012-12-11

    Recent reports of selected observational studies and a meta-analysis have stirred controversy and have become the impetus for calls to abandon recommendations for reduced sodium intake by the US general population. A detailed review of these studies documents substantial methodological concerns that limit the usefulness of these studies in setting, much less reversing, dietary recommendations. Indeed, the evidence base supporting recommendations for reduced sodium intake in the general population remains robust and persuasive. The American Heart Association is committed to improving the health of all Americans through implementation of national goals for health promotion and disease prevention, including its recommendation to reduce dietary sodium intake to <1500 mg/d. PMID:23124030

  10. Fibrinogen function is impaired in whole blood from patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Johansson, Pär I.; Bochsen, Louise;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have haemostatic abnormities associated with bleeding and thrombo-embolic events. The haemostatic abnormalities are not fully understood, but recent studies indicate that elevated haematocrit and fibrinogen function may be of...... importance. The aim of this study was to characterise the haemostatic profile and examine the potential role of haematocrit on clot formation and strength in CCHD patients. Furthermore to examine whether CCHD patients with history of haemoptysis have diminished fibrinogen function compared to those without...... haemoptysis. METHODS: In a prospective study 75 adult CCHD patients had haematocrit, platelet count, and plasma fibrinogen concentration examined. Furthermore thrombelastography(TEG) as well as TEG Functional Fibrinogen(TEG FF) assay evaluating fibrinogen function(FLEV) was performed. Data were compared with...

  11. Abnormalities in rCBF [regional cerebral blood flow] and computed tomography in patients with Alzheimer's disease and in controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pattern of abnormal distribution of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cerebral blood flow tracer 99m-technetium-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (99Tcm-HMPAO) was investigated in 14 patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (AD) who subsequently had post-mortem confirmation, and also in 14 elderly control subjects. These abnormalities were compared with computed tomography (CT) scans to investigate the degree to which the focal SPECT deficits were due to atrophy. Results show that SPECT imaging with 99Tcm-HMPAO and CT scanning both have a higher incidence of abnormality in AD patients than in controls and that the difference between patients and controls is greater with SPECT than with CT. Frontal SPECT and CT abnormalities in moderate/severe Alzheimer's disease occur as frequently as temporal/occipital abnormalities but the latter are rare in control subjects. Around 50% of SPECT deficits occur in CT normal brain regions, showing that atrophy is not the sole cause of SPECT deficits. (author)

  12. Evaluation of left ventricular function in patients with ischemic heart disease by isoproterenol infusion stress blood pool scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findings of isoproterenol infusion stress blood pool scintigraphy with Tc-99m-O4 (ISP-SG) were compared with those of exercise stress scintigraphy (EX-SG) in 10 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), 9 with vasospastic angina (VA), and 7 normal controls (NC). EX-SG showed an increased left ventricular enddiastolic volume (EDV) and an unchanged left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) in CAD and VA patients. By contraries, EDV was unchanged and EF was increased in NC. ISP-SG showed the same results as those by EX-SG in CAD patients; it showed an unchanged EDV, a decreased left ventricular endsystolic volume, and an increased EF in both VA patients and NC. Both types of SG showed regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA) in CAD patients; however, ISP-SG showed normal wall motion in all VA patients, although RWMA was seen on EX-SG in some of them. The results indicate that ISP-SG may be helpful in the evaluation of left ventricular function when the execution of EX-SG is impossible, and in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease complicated by coronary spasm. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and blood glucose%慢性阻塞性肺疾病和血糖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高惠丽; 姚婉贞

    2008-01-01

    To analyze Chinese and foreign advancement documents recently published for the association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD) and blood glucose. COPD and asthma influenced differently with glucose. COPD patients are discussed with changes such as inflammatory factor,erythrocyte alterations,glucose metabolism, hypoxemia, dyscrasia ect. Hyperglycaemia more emerges with in COPD patients than other patients. Hyperglycaemia is a risk factor of acute exacerbation COPD.%分析近期发表的中外文献,研究慢性阻塞性肺疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)和血糖的相互关系.COPD和支气管哮喘对血糖的不同影响.COPD患者中炎症因子、红细胞改变、葡萄糖的代谢、低氧血症和恶液质等改变进行论证,阐明COPD易出现高血糖.高血糖是COPD急性加重的独立危险因素之一.

  14. A Highly Similar Mathematical Model for Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Qi; Wang, Jisheng; Xiang, Hu; Ge, Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity(CBFV) is an important parameter for study of cerebral hemodynamics. However, a simple and highly similar mathematical model has not yet been established for analyzing CBFV. To alleviate this issue, through TCD examination in 100 geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease (46 males and 54 females), we established a representative eighth-order Fourier function Vx(t) that simulates the CBFV. The measured TCD waveforms were compared to those derived from Vx(t), an illustrative Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was employed to determine the validity. The results showed that the TCD waves could been reconstructed for patients with different CBFVs by implementing their variable heart rates and the formulated maximum/minimum of Vx(t). Comparisons between derived and measured TCD waveforms suggest that the two waveforms are very similar. The results confirm that CBFV can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function. This function Vx(t) can be used extensively for a prospective study of cerebral hemodynamics in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease.

  15. Right ventricular emptying perfomance in congenital heart disease assessed by temporal Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The right ventricular (RV) emptying performance in patients with congenital heart diseases was investigated by temporal Fourier analysis of multigated cardiac blood-pool studies on a pixel-by-pixel basis. In 15 normal subjects, no significant differences were detected between the mean values of phase of left ventricle (LV) and RV. In patients with ventricular septal defect (VSD), cases with minimal interventricular left-to-right (L-to-R) shunt without pulmonary hypertension (PH) showed normal phase and amplitude images, and cases with moderate or large L-to-R shunt with hyperkinetic PH showed delay of RV phase compared to LV, however, in a case of Eisenmenger type VSD, as well as in patients with primary PH, RV phase lag was not detected. In patients with mild pulmonary stenosis with intact ventricular septum, phase and amplitude images were normal. A case with moderate pulmonary artery stenosis showed mild delay of RV phase. Distinct phase lag of RV was shown in patients with tetralogy of Fallot. Evaluation of RV emptying performance by temporal Fourier analysis is highly valuable for pathophysiologic investigation of congenital heart disease

  16. The study on regional brain blood flow in the patients with Parkinson's disease using 99Tcm-ECD SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes of brain blood floe in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to investigate the clinical characteristics of the patients with PD correlate with rCBF. Methods: Regional cerebral perfusion was investigated using SPECT in 34 patients with PD . The mean ages of the patients were 56.61±11.04 Years old. The course of disease in most patients was from 1 to over 20 years. Results: 94.1 per cent of patients (32/3) had a significant decrease of rCBF in the basal ganglia, frontal lobes, temporal lobes and thalamus. Parietal and occipital cortex were involved in some patients. The decrease of rCBF in the basal ganglia is unilateral in most patients with PD. There were over 3 brain regions that Conclusion: According to our results, patients with PD had decreased rCBF in the basal ganglia, frontal and temporal cortices. These may reflect a fundamental feature of clinical neuropathophysiology in PD. 99Tcm-ECD SPECT imaging is helpful to the diagnosis of PD and may help investigate the potential pathophysiology of PD. (authors)

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy

  18. HIGH-DOSE CHEMOTHERAPY WITH AUTOLOGOUS PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELL SUPPORT IN CHILDREN WITH MALIGNANT DISEASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-wen; TANG Suo-qin; YANG Guang; GAO Xiao-ning; FENG Chen; YU Fang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the potential effectiveness and toxicity of this therapy in children with advanced neuroblastoma on day--3(BM). Treatment regimens followed by autologous PBSC infusion were performed in 19 children with neuroblastoma (n=12) or malignant lymphoma (n=7) for consolidation treatment. There were thirteen males and six females,with a median age of 6.4 years (raging 3.5~13 years). Results: The median period of achieving ANC >0.5×109/L,WBC>1.0×109/L, and platelet >20×109/L after infusion of PBSCs were 21 d, 17 d, and 33 d respectively. Stomatitis occurred in 16 children (86%), and twelve had gastrointestinal toxicity (64%). Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 14 (74%)children. Fifteen patients (79%) survived. Ten patients (53%) are alive in CR. These patients are alive for a median of 639days and disease-free for 909 d after transplantation. Four cases (21%) relapsed, and four cases (21%) died. Conclusion:CEM or BM regimen followed by autologous PBSCT infusion is safe and feasible, and has significant effects in children with advanced neuroblastoma or malignant lymphoma.

  19. Peripheral blood T cell activation after radioiodine treatment for graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis produces a rise in thyroid autoantibodies in the first three months after treatment, but little is known of its effects on T cells. We have therefore followed the changes in T cells subsets in sequential samples from 23 patients with Graves' disease treated with radioiodine, using dual-colour flow cytometry. In the first month after treatment there was a significant rise in activated T cells, identified by the markers HLA-DR (Ia) and CDW 26/Ta1 (P<0.025 in both case). CD45RO-positive T cells, which are the prime population containing memory cells, also increased (P<0.025), but there was no change in CD45R-positive, resting cells or in the CD4/CD8 (helper to cytotoxic/suppressor) ratio. Vicia villosa-binding T cells, containing the contra-suppressor population, showed a more variable response, but the trend was to an overall increase from pre-treatment values (P<0.025). The change did not appear to be related to antithyroid drugs treatment, since they were seen irrespective of whether patients convinced such therapy. These results suggest that T cell activation and enhanced contra-suppressor activity may in part be responsible for the rise in autoantibodies after radioiodine therapy

  20. Peripheral blood T cell activation after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Teng; Stark, R.; Borysiewicz, L.K.; Weetman, A.P. (Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge Clinical School, Level 5, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (UK)); Munro, A.J. (Department of Clinical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); McHardy Young, S. (Department of Medicine, Central Middlesex Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis produces a rise in thyroid autoantibodies in the first three months after treatment, but little is known of its effects on T cells. We have therefore followed the changes in T cell subsets in sequential samples from 23 patients with Graves' disease treated with radioiodine, using dualcolour flow cytometry. In the first month after treatment there was a significant rise in activated T cells, identified by the markers HLA-DR(la) and CDw26/Tal (p<0.025 in both cases). CD45RO-positive T cells, which are the primed population containing memory cells, also increased (p<0.025), but there was no change in CD45R-positive, resting T cells or in the CD4 to CD8 (helper to cytotoxic/suppressor) ratio. Vicia villosa-binding T cells, containing the contrasuppressor population, showed a more variable response, but the trend was to an overall increase from pre-treatment values (p<0.025). The changes did not appear to be related to antithyroid drug treatment, since they were seen irrespective of whether patients continued such therapy. These results suggest that T cell activation and enhanced contrasuppressor activity may in part be responsible for the rise in autoantibodies after radioiodine. The T cell changes could also contribute to the worsening of ophthalmopathy seen in some radioiodine-treated patients. (author).

  1. First pass and gated blood pool in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty patients with chronic obstructive lung disease were studied. The spirometry demonstrated predominantly reduction of vital capacity with signs of pulmonary hyperinflation. Obstruction of the proximal and distal airways was also noted. Total pulmonary resistance and static lung compliance were increased in the majority of these patients. Hypoxemia was present in the entire group, with no carbon dioxide retention. Various degrees of pulmonary artery dilatation were detected on the radioisotopic examination, suggesting pulmonary hypertension, confirmed by the increased mean pulmonary transit time. Regional disturbance of myocardial motility of the right ventricle was observed in 90% of the patients, being severe in 15%. The end-systolic volume was increased in 95% of the patients and the end-diastolic in 55%. These changes represent an initial functional disturbance, which does not allow to draw conclusions about reduction of the cardiac output or the ejection fraction. Left ventricular motility was normal in 85% of the patients, reduced in 15% and severely reduced in only one patient. Left ventricular volume was discrete or moderately increased in six patients (20%). The ejection fraction was decreased in one patient (5%). The increased ejection fraction observed in three patients is likely a consequence of a rise in the ejected volume by a normal myocardium. The aorta was elongated in 75% of the patients. Taking into consideration the patients' age, it could be concluded that aortosclerosis with structural changes of its caliber is the cause of the elongation. (author)

  2. Human Blood and Mucosal Regulatory T Cells Express Activation Markers and Inhibitory Receptors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Lord

    Full Text Available FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are critical for preventing intestinal inflammation. However, FOXP3+ T cells are paradoxically increased in the intestines of patients with the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn's disease (CD. We determined whether these FOXP3+ cells in IBD patients share or lack the phenotype of such cells from patients without IBD.We quantified and characterized FOXP3+ Treg populations, as well as FOXP3- CD4+ T cells, in the lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL of intestine surgically resected from patients with and without IBD, and in the blood of controls or Crohn's patients with or without disease activity.In all samples, a similar fraction of FOXP3+ cells expressed the "natural" Treg (nTreg marker Helios, suggesting that, in IBD, these cells are not entirely "induced" Tregs (iTregs derived from activated effector T cells. Helios+ and Helios- FOXP3+ T cells demonstrated similar expression of maturation markers, activation markers, and inhibitory molecules between IBD patients and controls, while FOXP3- cells paradoxically expressed more of the inhibitory receptors CD39, CTLA4, and PD-1 in inflamed mucosa. Greater expression of activation markers was also seen in both Helios+ and Helios- Tregs, relative to FOXP3- cells, in both IBD patients and controls, indicating that Tregs are effectively activated by antigen in IBD.Extensive immunophenotyping revealed that Helios+ and Helios- mucosal Tregs exist at a similar frequency, and have a similar expression of inhibitory molecules and activation markers in patients with IBD as in healthy controls.

  3. The effect of peripheral blood lymphocyte stimulation on zeta chain expression and IL-2 production in Hodgkin's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydecka, I; Boćko, D; Kosmaczewska, A; Ciszak, L; Morilla, R

    2001-01-01

    It has been reported that peripheral blood T cells and NK cells express reduced levels of the T-cell receptor signal-transducing zeta chain in Hodgkin's disease (HD). The zeta chain has emerged as a key subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor, which plays a central role in the signal-transducing events leading to T and NK-cell activation. We were interested in determining whether the low zeta chain expression in HD could be corrected by anti-CD3, anti-CD3-rIL-2 ex vivo stimulation. Zeta chain expression was analysed by dual immunofluorescence on permeabilized cells before and after 72 hours of culture. The IL-2 concentration in the culture supernatants was measured by ELISA. Zeta chain was significantly reduced on unstimulated CD4+, CD8+ and CD56+ cells from patients in active disease compared with normal subjects. In patients in complete remission, the values were normal except for CD8+ cells, on which zeta expression remained significantly reduced. Stimulation with anti-CD3 did not change zeta expression. Co-stimulation with rIL-2 increased but did not normalize the proportions of CD4+/zeta+, CD8+/zeta+and CD56+/zeta+cells and IL-2 production in active disease. Stimulation of cells from patients in clinical remission with anti-CD3+rIL-2 increased the proportion of CD8+zeta+cells and normalized IL-2 production levels. Considering the pivotal role of CD3-zeta in immune response, our data suggest that successful immunotherapy approaches in active HD should consider inclusion of other potent cytokines, as well as genetically engineered tumour vaccines. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign www.bjcancer.com PMID:11355944

  4. The effects of anticholinergic drugs on regional cerebral blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in previously untreated patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2) were measured using the steady-state 15O technique and positron emission tomography (PET) in six previously untreated patients with Parkinson's disease before and after trihexyphenidyl (THP) treatment. The patients comprised of 4 men and 2 women with Hoehn-Yahr stage II-III. Their ages at the onset of the study ranged from 46 to 57 years (mean±SD, 51.8±3.7) and the duration of the illness ranged from 10 to 48 months (mean±SD, 28.8±15.5). The PET study, assessments of the disability and cognitive function were undergone twice. The first time assessments were done was when the patients were not receiving any drugs, and the second time was one to three months after administration of 6 mg THP. All patients showed clinical improvement after THP treatment. The mean disability score of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale decreased from 35.1 (SD±11.3) to 25.7 (SD±11.6). The cognitive function assessed by Hasegawa's dementia rating scale-revised, Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, were not significantly different before and after the THP treatment. After the THP treatment, rCBF and rCMRO2 decreased significantly in the striatum (about 15%) and all cerebral cortices (about 10%) on both sides contralateral and ipsilateral to the predominantly symptomatic limbs. We conclude that an anticholinergic THP decreases the rCBF and rCMRO2 significantly in the cerebral cortices without cognitive impairment in early untreated patients with Parkinson's disease. (author)

  5. Similar Source of Differential Blood mRNAs in Lung Cancer and Pulmonary Inflammatory Diseases: Calls for Improved Strategy for Identifying Cancer-Specific Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Guini; Chen, Beibei; Li, Hongdong; Zhang, Wenjing; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Shan; Shi, Tongwei; Ao, Lu; Guo, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies try to identify cancer diagnostic biomarkers by comparing peripheral whole blood (PWB) of cancer samples and healthy controls, explicitly or implicitly assuming that such biomarkers are potential candidate biomarkers for distinguishing cancer from nonmalignant inflammation-associated diseases. Methods Multiple PWB gene expression profiles for lung cancer/inflammation-associated pulmonary diseases were used for differential mRNAs identification and comparison and for pr...

  6. Hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn due to maternal red blood cell alloantibodies in the Malay population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazri Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maternal red blood cell (RBC alloimmunization may lead to production of harmful antibodies that result in hemolytic disease of fetus and newborn (HDFN. There is insufficient data on the prevalence of HDFN due to RBC alloantibodies in the Malay neonatal population. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of HDFN in the Malay neonatal population due to clinically significant RBC alloantibodies. Subjects and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in Transfusion Medicine Unit, Hospital Universitiy Sains Malaysia over one year period from January to December 2009. A total of 5163 Malay pregnant women who attended labor room for delivery were collected and analyzed prospectively. The blood samples were subjected to the standard immunohematological procedure for RBC antibody screening and identification using reagents of Diamed-ID Gel microtyping system. All the newborns with RBC alloantibody were investigated for the evidence of HDFN. Results: Thirty (0.58% women were found to have clinically significant RBC alloantibodies. Most of the alloantibodies belonged to Rhesus (Rh system (56.7% where anti-E (33.3% was the most common followed by anti-D (10.0%. Rh antibodies were the main cause of HDFN in fourteen (0.27% neonates. Anti-D and anti-c were identified to cause moderate to very severe HDFN . Conclusions: With the low prevalence of clinically significant RBC alloantibodies and HDFN, routine antenatal antibody screening practice may not be advised as a routine practice at present, preferably reserved for those women of RhD negative or with history of HDFN, significantly of those attributed to anti-c.

  7. Evaluation of the cardiac performance in patients with coronary arterty disease by the pulmonary blood volume change in exercise testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the cardiac performance was studied by the change of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) during the exercise testing in 17 normal subjects (group N), 18 patients with angina pectoris (group A) and 25 with both old myocardial infarction and angina pectoris (group M). The exercise testing was performed by bicycle ergometer in supine position. Blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output measured by dye dilution method, left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) by multi-gate method, pulmonary artery pressure by Swan-Ganz catheter and PBV was measured during exercise. PBV was estimated by the radioactivity of the systemically administered Tc-99m labeled RBC in the lung field. ROI was adjusted over the right upper and lower lung field. And also the effect of the nitroglycerin was examined. In the result, (1) EF at the peak exercise increased in group N but decreased in Groups A and M. (2) Increased pulmonary artery diastolic pressure at the peak exercise (PAd at exercise) was remarkably higher in groups A and M than group M. (3) PBV was unchanged in group N; however, increased 9.6% in group A and 10.9% in group M. (4) Increased rate of PBV revealed good correlation with ΔEF (r=-0.68, p<0.01) and PAd at exercise (r=0.83, p<0.01), and was considered as the pulmonary congestion due to left ventricular dysfunction. (5) After the sublingual administration of nitroglycerin, the increased PAd and PBV at the peak exercise was suppressed. Particularly, it was remarkable in group A. Thus it was concluded that the noninvasive measurement of PBV during exercise could suggest the extent of the pulmonary congestion and was very useful for evaluation of the cardiac performance in coronary artery disease. (author)

  8. Differences in abundances of cell-signalling proteins in blood reveal novel biomarkers for early detection of clinical Alzheimer's disease.

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    Mateus Rocha de Paula

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In November 2007 a study published in Nature Medicine proposed a simple test based on the abundance of 18 proteins in blood to predict the onset of clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease (AD two to six years before these symptoms manifest. Later, another study, published in PLoS ONE, showed that only five proteins (IL-1, IL-3, EGF, TNF- and G-CSF have overall better prediction accuracy. These classifiers are based on the abundance of 120 proteins. Such values were standardised by a Z-score transformation, which means that their values are relative to the average of all others. METHODOLOGY: The original datasets from the Nature Medicine paper are further studied using methods from combinatorial optimisation and Information Theory. We expand the original dataset by also including all pair-wise differences of z-score values of the original dataset ("metafeatures". Using an exact algorithm to solve the resulting Feature Set problem, used to tackle the feature selection problem, we found signatures that contain either only features, metafeatures or both, and evaluated their predictive performance on the independent test set. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to show that a specific pattern of cell signalling imbalance in blood plasma has valuable information to distinguish between NDC and AD samples. The obtained signatures were able to predict AD in patients that already had a Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI with up to 84% of sensitivity, while maintaining also a strong prediction accuracy of 90% on a independent dataset with Non Demented Controls (NDC and AD samples. The novel biomarkers uncovered with this method now confirms ANG-2, IL-11, PDGF-BB, CCL15/MIP-1; and supports the joint measurement of other signalling proteins not previously discussed: GM-CSF, NT-3, IGFBP-2 and VEGF-B.

  9. 24 hr non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate monitoring in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eStübner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-motor symptoms are now commonly recognized in Parkinson’s Disease (PD and can include dysautonomia. Impairment of cardiovascular autonomic function can occur at any stage of PD but is typically prevalent in advanced stages or related to (anti-parkinsonian drugs and can result in atypical blood pressure (BP readings and related symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension (OH and supine hypertension. OH is usually diagnosed with a head-up-tilt test (HUT or an (active standing test (also known as Schellong test in the laboratory, but 24 hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM in a home setting may have several advantages, such as providing an overview of symptoms in daily life alongside pathophysiology as well as assessment of treatment interventions. This, however, is only possible if ABPM is administrated correctly and an autonomic protocol (including a diary is followed. which will be discussed in this review. A 24hr ABPM does not only allow the detection of OH, if it is present, but also the assessment of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction during and after various daily stimuli, such as postprandial and alcohol dependent hypotension, as well as exercise and drug induced hypotension. Furthermore, information about the circadian rhythm of BP and heart rate (HR can be obtained and establish whether or not a patient has a fall of BP at night (i.e. ‘dipper’ vs. non-‘dipper’. The information about nocturnal BP may also allow the investigation or detection of disorders such as sleep dysfunction, nocturnal movement disorders and obstructive sleep apnea, which are common in PD. Additionally, a 24hr ABPM should be conducted to examine the effectiveness of OH therapy. This review will outline the methodology of 24 hr ABPM in PD, summarize findings of such studies in PD and briefly consider common daily stimuli that might affect 24 Hr ABPM.

  10. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and blood pressure response during exercise in healthy children and adolescents: the European Youth Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Niels C; Grøntved, Anders; Wedderkopp, Niels; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Kristensen, Peter L; Andersen, Lars B; Froberg, Karsten

    2010-10-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) response during exercise independently predicts future hypertension. Subjects with higher BP in childhood also have elevated BP later in life. Therefore, the factors related to the regulation of exercise BP in children needs to be well understood. We hypothesized that physiological cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors would influence BP response during exercise in children and adolescents. This is a cross-sectional study of 439 Danish third-grade children and 364 ninth-grade adolescents. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured with sphygmomanometer during a maximal aerobic fitness test. Examined CVD risk factors were high-density lipoprotein (HDL)- and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglyceride, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and aerobic fitness. A random effect model was used to test the hypotheses. In boys, HOMA-IR score and BMI were positively related to SBP response during exercise (β = 1.03, P = 0.001, and β = 0.58, P = 0.017, respectively). The effects sizes of HOMA-IR score and BMI and the significance levels only changed slightly (β = 0.91, P = 0.004, and β = 0.43, P = 0.08, respectively) when the two variables were added in the same model. A significant positive association was observed between aerobic fitness and SBP response in girls (β = 3.13 and P = 0.002). HOMA-IR score and BMI were found to be positively related to the SBP response in male children and youth. At least partly, adiposity and insulin sensitivity seem to influence exercise SBP through different mechanisms. The positive relationship observed between aerobic fitness and SBP response in girls remains unexplainable for us, although post hoc analyses revealed that it was the case in the ninth graders only. PMID:20634358

  11. Long term effects of radiation of T and B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of patients with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total lymphocyte counts, and the percentage of T and B lymphocytes and monocytes in untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease were not significantly different from those observed in normal donors. At the completion of radiotherapy, the mean total lymphocyte count of 503/mm3 was 4 SD below the mean for normal controls. Although a group of 26 patients in continuous complete remission from 12 to 111 months after radiation treatment regained normal total numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes, they exhibited a striking T lymphocytopenia and B lymphocytosis. Concomitantly, there was a significant increase of null (neither T nor B) lymphocytes. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and tetanus toxoid before treatment was significantly impaired. 1 to 10 yr after completion of treatment, there seemed to be little or no recovery of these responses. The capacity of peripheral blood lymphocytes to respond to allo-antigens on foreign lymphocytes in vitro (mixed lymphocyte reaction) was normal in nine untreated patients. However, the mixed lymphocyte reaction was markedly impaired during the first 2 yr after treatment. There was a partial and progressive restoration of the mixed lymphocyte reaction during the next 3 yr, and normal responses were observed in patients in continuous complete remission for 5 yr or more. The in vivo response to dinitrochlorobenzene was also examined. 88 percent (15/17) of patients initially sensitive to dinitrochlorobenzene were anergic to the allergen at the completion of a course of radiotherapy, but nine of these regained their hypersensitivity response during the 1st yr after treatment. The restoration of cell mediated immune functions after radiotherapy is time dependent and its kinetics may differ for various T-cell functions

  12. International study to evaluate PCR methods for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in blood samples from Chagas disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro G Schijman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A century after its discovery, Chagas disease still represents a major neglected tropical threat. Accurate diagnostics tools as well as surrogate markers of parasitological response to treatment are research priorities in the field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of PCR methods in detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA by an external quality evaluation. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: An international collaborative study was launched by expert PCR laboratories from 16 countries. Currently used strategies were challenged against serial dilutions of purified DNA from stocks representing T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTU I, IV and VI (set A, human blood spiked with parasite cells (set B and Guanidine Hidrochloride-EDTA blood samples from 32 seropositive and 10 seronegative patients from Southern Cone countries (set C. Forty eight PCR tests were reported for set A and 44 for sets B and C; 28 targeted minicircle DNA (kDNA, 13 satellite DNA (Sat-DNA and the remainder low copy number sequences. In set A, commercial master mixes and Sat-DNA Real Time PCR showed better specificity, but kDNA-PCR was more sensitive to detect DTU I DNA. In set B, commercial DNA extraction kits presented better specificity than solvent extraction protocols. Sat-DNA PCR tests had higher specificity, with sensitivities of 0.05-0.5 parasites/mL whereas specific kDNA tests detected 5.10(-3 par/mL. Sixteen specific and coherent methods had a Good Performance in both sets A and B (10 fg/µl of DNA from all stocks, 5 par/mL spiked blood. The median values of sensitivities, specificities and accuracies obtained in testing the Set C samples with the 16 tests determined to be good performing by analyzing Sets A and B samples varied considerably. Out of them, four methods depicted the best performing parameters in all three sets of samples, detecting at least 10 fg/µl for each DNA stock, 0.5 par/mL and a sensitivity between 83.3-94.4%, specificity of 85

  13. International Study to Evaluate PCR Methods for Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in Blood Samples from Chagas Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijman, Alejandro G.; Bisio, Margarita; Orellana, Liliana; Sued, Mariela; Duffy, Tomás; Mejia Jaramillo, Ana M.; Cura, Carolina; Auter, Frederic; Veron, Vincent; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Hijar, Gisely; Zulantay, Inés; Lucero, Raúl Horacio; Velazquez, Elsa; Tellez, Tatiana; Sanchez Leon, Zunilda; Galvão, Lucia; Nolder, Debbie; Monje Rumi, María; Levi, José E.; Ramirez, Juan D.; Zorrilla, Pilar; Flores, María; Jercic, Maria I.; Crisante, Gladys; Añez, Néstor; De Castro, Ana M.; Gonzalez, Clara I.; Acosta Viana, Karla; Yachelini, Pedro; Torrico, Faustino; Robello, Carlos; Diosque, Patricio; Triana Chavez, Omar; Aznar, Christine; Russomando, Graciela; Büscher, Philippe; Assal, Azzedine; Guhl, Felipe; Sosa Estani, Sergio; DaSilva, Alexandre; Britto, Constança; Luquetti, Alejandro; Ladzins, Janis

    2011-01-01

    Background A century after its discovery, Chagas disease still represents a major neglected tropical threat. Accurate diagnostics tools as well as surrogate markers of parasitological response to treatment are research priorities in the field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of PCR methods in detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA by an external quality evaluation. Methodology/Findings An international collaborative study was launched by expert PCR laboratories from 16 countries. Currently used strategies were challenged against serial dilutions of purified DNA from stocks representing T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTU) I, IV and VI (set A), human blood spiked with parasite cells (set B) and Guanidine Hidrochloride-EDTA blood samples from 32 seropositive and 10 seronegative patients from Southern Cone countries (set C). Forty eight PCR tests were reported for set A and 44 for sets B and C; 28 targeted minicircle DNA (kDNA), 13 satellite DNA (Sat-DNA) and the remainder low copy number sequences. In set A, commercial master mixes and Sat-DNA Real Time PCR showed better specificity, but kDNA-PCR was more sensitive to detect DTU I DNA. In set B, commercial DNA extraction kits presented better specificity than solvent extraction protocols. Sat-DNA PCR tests had higher specificity, with sensitivities of 0.05–0.5 parasites/mL whereas specific kDNA tests detected 5.10−3 par/mL. Sixteen specific and coherent methods had a Good Performance in both sets A and B (10 fg/µl of DNA from all stocks, 5 par/mL spiked blood). The median values of sensitivities, specificities and accuracies obtained in testing the Set C samples with the 16 tests determined to be good performing by analyzing Sets A and B samples varied considerably. Out of them, four methods depicted the best performing parameters in all three sets of samples, detecting at least 10 fg/µl for each DNA stock, 0.5 par/mL and a sensitivity between 83.3–94.4%, specificity of 85–95

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume in peripheral arterial disease: initial findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten PAD patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. Patients underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the peripheral arteries, followed by one DCE MRI examination of the musculature of the calf. Healthy control subjects were examined twice on different days to determine normative values and the interreader and interscan reproducibility of the technique. The MRI protocol comprised dynamic imaging of contrast agent wash-in under reactive hyperemia conditions of the calf musculature. Using pharmacokinetic modeling the hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume (V(p, unit: % of the anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was calculated. RESULTS: V(p was significantly lower for all muscle groups in PAD patients (4.3±1.6%, 5.0±3.3% and 6.1±3.6% for anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, respectively compared to healthy control subjects (9.1±2.0%, 8.9±1.9% and 9.3±2.1%. Differences in V(p between muscle groups were not significant. The coefficient of variation of V(p varied from 10-14% and 11-16% at interscan and interreader level, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Using DCE MRI after contrast-enhanced MR angiography with gadofosveset enables reproducible assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. V(p was lower in PAD patients than in healthy controls, which reflects a promising functional (hemodynamic biomarker for the

  15. Quantitative measurement of regional myocardial blood flow in patients with coronary artery disease by intravenous injection of 13N-ammonia in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of myocardial blood flow with 13N-ammonia, a technique previously employed successfully in animal experiments, was introduced into clinical use to study patients with coronary artery disease. This advance has become possible by the development of a high resolution gated scan positron emission tomographic (PET) scanner equipped with a real time decay correction mechanism, HEADTOME-IV. The information obtainable includes myocardial size and wall motion as well as the absolute quantity of blood flow in various myocardial regions. The technique is simple but requires continuous arterial blood withdrawal for calculation of the arterial input function time integral. The alternative to this technique, i.e. the computation of intra left ventricular blood pool activity by PET is also discussed. (orig.)

  16. Effects of dermatan sulfate derivatives on platelet surface P-selectin expression and protein C activity in blood of inflammatory bowel disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Sheng-Li; Du, Hai-Yan; Chi, Yan-Qing; Cui, Hui-Fei; Cao, Ji-Chao; Geng, Mei-yu; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of dermatan sulfate (DS) derivatives on platelet surface P-selectin expression and blood activated protein C (APC) activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to clarity the anti-inflammatory mechanism of DS derivatives.

  17. The added value of peripheral blood cell morphology in the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases--part 2: illustrative cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potasman, I; Prokocimer, M

    2008-11-01

    The previous review dealt with the diagnostic yield of peripheral blood smear examination with regard to diagnosis of infectious diseases. In addition to the clinical data, it can provide information of major clinical significance. At times, it can even replace additional, costly and time-consuming diagnostic modalities. The following clinical vignettes, which are discussed briefly, support these arguments. PMID:19103816

  18. Isolation of Bartonella henselae DNA from the Peripheral Blood of a Patient with Cat Scratch Disease up to 4 Months after the Cat Scratch Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Arvand, Mardjan; Schäd, Susanne G.

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a girl with cervical lymphadenitis and a persistent primary lesion of cat scratch disease (CSD). Bartonella henselae DNA was isolated from plasma samples collected 3 and 4 months after the cat scratch, indicating that recurrent and long-term shedding of Bartonella DNA into peripheral blood may occur in typical CSD.

  19. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training and Irbesartan on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Marquis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The present pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of an aerobic exercise training (AET program alone or combined with an antihypertensive agent (irbesartan to reduce blood pressure (BP and enhance heart rate variability (HRV in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

  20. What African Americans with Diabetes or High Blood Pressure Need to Know: Get Checked for Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... m our online catalog. Alternate Language URL What African Americans with Diabetes or High Blood Pressure Need to ... is the #1 cause of kidney failure among African Americans. High blood pressure is the #2 cause. African ...

  1. Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Blood-Borne Transmitted Infections among Male Patients with Antisocial Personality Disorder

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    Hamza Yıldız

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the patients who have antisocial personality disorder (ASPD and the healthy individuals in terms of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs and Blood-Borne Transmitted Infections (BTIs prevalences. Methods: This study is a prospective, single-center, open-label, non-randomized controlled clinical study. There were two groups in the study. The patient group consistsed of 100 males who were diagnosed as ASPD with a clinical interview form. The control group consisted of 98 healthy males who did not have any psychiatric disorder. Dermatologic examination was performed, and clinical findings were recorded. Results: The mean age of the patient group was 21.96±2.40 (range 20-37 years. The mean age of the control group was 24.20±2.88 (21-36 years. The most common disease was gonorrhea (25% followed by genital wart (11%, molluskum contagiosum (5%, HBsAg (4%, and HSV-2 seropositivity (4% in the patients group. In the control group, HSV-2 seropositivity (4.08%, genital wart (3.06%, molluskum contagiosum (3.06%, and gonorrhe (1.02% were commonly seen in the control group. STDs and/or BVTIs were found more common in the patients group (82% than that in the control group (45.91% (X2=30.62, p=0.000. Conclusions: The patients with ASPD are at greater risk than normal population to catch a STDs or BTIs because of their lower educational levels and riskier behaviors. This condition entertains a risk in the general population and the patients themselves.

  2. Comparison of myocardial blood flow induced by adenosine triphosphate and dipyridamole in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been used increasingly to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) and assess risk for this disease. This study compared absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve index (MFR) with ATP and dipyridamole (DIP) in patients with CAD. MBF was quantified by 15O-H2O PET in 21 patients with CAD (17 male, 4 female), aged 55 to 81 years. MBF was measured at rest, during intravenous injection of ATP (0.16 mg/kg/min), and again after DIP infusion (0.56 mg/kg). Regions of interest were drawn in nonischemic and ischemic segments based on findings from thallium-201 (201Tl) scintigraphy and coronary angiography (CAG). Absolute MBF values and indexes of MFR were calculated in nonischemic and ischemic segments. Intravenous injection of ATP and DIP significantly increased MBF in nonischemic (2.4±0.9 and 2.1±0.8 ml/g/min, respectively; p<0.01, for both) and in ischemic segments (1.3±0.4 and 1.5±0.4 ml/g/min, respectively; p<0.01, for both). There was a significant difference in MBF values between ATP and DIP in nonischemic segments (p<0.05), which was not observed in ischemic segments. In nonischemic segments, ATP produced higher MFR than DIP (2.1±0.8 and 1.8±0.7, respectively; p<0.05), while no significant difference was observed in ischemic segments (1.5±0.6 and 1.7±0.3, respectively). ATP produced a greater hyperemia than DIP between the ischemic and nonischemic myocardium in patients with CAD. ATP is as effective as DIP for the diagnosis of CAD. (author)

  3. Validation of an automated ELISA system for detection of antibodies to Aleutian mink disease virus using blood samples collected in filter paper strips

    OpenAIRE

    Knuuttila, Anna; Aronen, Pirjo; Eerola, Majvor; Gardner, Ian A; Virtala, Anna-Maija K; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Background Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is the cause of a chronic immune complex disease, Aleutian disease (AD), which is common in mink-producing countries. In 2005, implementation of an AMDV eradication programme in Finland created a need for an automated high-throughput assay. The aim of this study was to validate an AMDV-VP2 -recombinant antigen ELISA, which we developed earlier, in an automated assay format for the detection of anti-AMDV antibodies in mink blood and to determine th...

  4. Correlative assessment of cerebral blood flow obtained with perfusion CT and positron emission tomography in symptomatic stenotic carotid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve patients with ICA stenosis underwent dynamic perfusion computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies at rest and after acetazolamide challenge. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps on perfusion CT resulted from a deconvolution of parenchymal time-concentration curves by an arterial input function (AIF) in the anterior cerebral artery as well as in both anterior choroidal arteries. CBF was measured by [15O]H2O PET using multilinear least-squares minimization procedure based on the one-compartment model. In corresponding transaxial PET scans, CBF values were extracted using standardized ROIs. The baseline perfusion CT-CBF values were lower in perfusion CT than in PET (P>0.05). CBF values obtained by perfusion CT were significantly correlated with those measured by PET before (P<0.05) and after (P<0.01) acetazolamide challenge. Nevertheless, the cerebrovascular reserve capacity was overestimated (P=0.05) using perfusion CT measurements. The AIF selection relative to the side of carotid stenosis did not significantly affect calculated perfusion CT-CBF values. In conclusion, the perfusion CT-CBF measurements correlate significantly with the PET-CBF measurements in chronic carotid stenotic disease and contribute useful information to the evaluation of the altered cerebral hemodynamics. (orig.)

  5. Preliminary study of abnormal increase of postexercise systolic blood pressure in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于宗良; 杨向军; 王国强; 高美雯; 李勋; 惠杰; 蒋廷波; 宋建平; 刘志华; 蒋文平

    2003-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to evaluate the diagnostic value of abnormal increase of postexercise systolic blood pressure (SBP) for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with or without hypertension. Methods Treadmill exercise testing (TET) was conducted in 88 patients (40 CAD patients, 48 control subjects)with or without hypertension, each of whom underwent selective coronary angiography (CAG). The abnormal increase of postexercise SBP was defined as 10mmHg higher than earlier periods during the recovery phase (6 minutes)of exercise testing. Results The abnormal increase of postexercise SBP had higher sensitivity, specificity,and accuracy for detecting CAD than those of ST - segment depression in patients with or without hypertension. Its accuracy increased with the severity of CAD while decreased in patients with hypertension, and the increase value of SBP had a positive correlation with the extent of coronary artery lesion. The combination of ST - segment depression and abnormal increase of postexercise SBP diagnosed CAD most accurately in patients with hypertension. Conclusions Abnormal increase of postexercise SBP may be a useful index for diagnosing CAD.

  6. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI of the skeletal muscle during ischemia in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to compare calf muscle Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) response during ischemia in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and age-matched non-PAOD subjects. Materials and methods: PAOD patients with symptoms of intermittent calf claudication and an age-matched control group underwent T2*-weighted single-shot multi-echo planar imaging on a whole-body MR scanner at 1.5 T. The muscle BOLD signal in the calf was acquired during 60 sec of baseline and 240 sec of ischemia induced by cuff compression. T2* time courses in four calf muscles were evaluated. Results: significant differences in the mean T2* values were noted after 150 sec of measurement (p < 0.05). Patients with PAOD revealed a significantly reduced BOLD signal decrease compared to an age-matched control group. Conclusion: potential cause for this observation may be changes in the structure and/or the metabolic turnover of the muscle in PAOD patients. (orig.)

  7. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI of the skeletal muscle during ischemia in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potthast, Silke [Unispital Basel, Inst. fuer Radiologie (Switzerland); Schulte, A. [Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany). Clinic for Radiation Therapy and Radiooncology; Kos, S.; Bilecen, D. [Unispital Basel, Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Aschwanden, M. [Unispital Basel (Switzerland). Angiologie

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to compare calf muscle Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) response during ischemia in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and age-matched non-PAOD subjects. Materials and methods: PAOD patients with symptoms of intermittent calf claudication and an age-matched control group underwent T2*-weighted single-shot multi-echo planar imaging on a whole-body MR scanner at 1.5 T. The muscle BOLD signal in the calf was acquired during 60 sec of baseline and 240 sec of ischemia induced by cuff compression. T2* time courses in four calf muscles were evaluated. Results: significant differences in the mean T2* values were noted after 150 sec of measurement (p < 0.05). Patients with PAOD revealed a significantly reduced BOLD signal decrease compared to an age-matched control group. Conclusion: potential cause for this observation may be changes in the structure and/or the metabolic turnover of the muscle in PAOD patients. (orig.)

  8. Structure and Ligand-Binding Mechanism of a Cysteinyl Leukotriene-Binding Protein from a Blood-Feeding Disease Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Willy; Pham, Van; Nardone, Glenn; Gittis, Apostolos; Silva-Cardoso, Lívia; Atella, Georgia C; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2016-07-15

    Blood-feeding disease vectors mitigate the negative effects of hemostasis and inflammation through the binding of small-molecule agonists of these processes by salivary proteins. In this study, a lipocalin protein family member (LTBP1) from the saliva of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, is shown to sequester cysteinyl leukotrienes during feeding to inhibit immediate inflammatory responses. Calorimetric binding experiments showed that LTBP1 binds leukotrienes C4 (LTC4), D4 (LTD4), and E4 (LTE4) but not biogenic amines, adenosine diphosphate, or other eicosanoid compounds. Crystal structures of ligand-free LTBP1 and its complexes with LTC4 and LTD4 reveal a conformational change during binding that brings Tyr114 into close contact with the ligand. LTC4 is cleaved in the complex, leaving free glutathione and a C20 fatty acid. Chromatographic analysis of bound ligands showed only intact LTC4, suggesting that cleavage could be radiation-mediated. PMID:27124118

  9. Analysis of depression and anxiety state and changes of regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the incidence of depression and anxiety state and the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with Graves' disease (GD). Methods: Twenty-one GD patients underwent rCBF SPECT imaging, and their mental state was evaluated by Zung self-rating depression scale (SDS) and Zung self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) respectively. Results: Total scores obtained from SDS and SAS were both significantly greater in the GD group than that in the control group (tSDS=7.26, tSAS=5.35, P3, FT4 and TSH levels. In SPECT imaging, GD group had decreased uptake of radioactivity in frontal lobs, temporal lobs, basal ganglia and thalamus mainly. There was also no significant correlation between the decrease of rCBF and SDS or SAS scores. Conclusions: The psychiatric symptoms in GD group are more significant than normal controls, rCBF of GD group decreases mainly in bilateral frontal lobes, temporal lobes, basal ganglia and thalamus. (authors)

  10. High blood pressure medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007484.htm High blood pressure medicines To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treating high blood pressure will help prevent problems such as heart disease, ...

  11. Blood Clotting and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Current Issue First Edition Abstracts Blood Advances A peer-reviewed, online only, open access journal with a ... If you find that you are interested in learning more about blood diseases and disorders, here are ...

  12. Blood Sugar and Fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperglycemia) can be a sign of the disease diabetes mellitus. High blood sugar levels can eventually damage ... treated with the same medications used to treat diabetes. There is no simple blood test for insulin ...

  13. Symptoms of Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... Blood Disorders Bone Marrow Examination Blood disorders can cause various symptoms in almost any area of the ...

  14. The relationship between the regional cerebral blood flow and the cognitive function and anosmia in patients with Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the olfactory area and the cognitive function and anosmia in patient with Parkinson disease (PD) and in those with Alzheimer disease (AD). Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) III, mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Hasegawa dementia scale-revised (HDS-R), clinical dementia rating (CDR), Beck depression inventory (BDI) were employed in this study. The subjects included 56 PD patients (average age 71.4±9.69 years), 23 AD patients (average age 73.3±7.12 years), 12 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (average age 72.5±6.89 years), and 9 age-matched controls (NC) (average age 73.8±6.61 years). Next we intravenously injected 1 ampule of thiamine propyldisulphide (Alinamin) and confirmed anosmia. In addition, we performed 123I-iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (SEE methods) and statistically determined rCBF of the olfactory area based on the basis of the Z scores of the interest area. Anosmia was detected in approximately 40% of the PD and AD patients. The HDS-R and MMSE scores were significantly higher in patients with anosmia than in those without anosmia; the CDR scores were significantly higher in the former than in the latter. Further, the incidence of anosmia in PD patients and AD patients with MCI increased with an increase in the CDR scores. In order to determine the rCBF of the olfactory area of the PD and AD patients. As to rCBF of the olfactory area, we examined left and right Z scores of hippocampus, parahippocampus, amygdala, and uncus at Talairach level 3 and the scores of the Brodmann area 28, 34, 35, and 36 at Talairach level 5. In patients with anosmia, the Z scores were significantly high in cases with anosmia in all areas except the right Brodmann area 34 in PD patients and the right Brodmann area 28 and bilateral the Brodmann area 34 of both sides in AD patients. Some parts of the olfactory area are closely related

  15. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE: a DNA finger printing technique to study the genetic diversity of blood disease bacterium of banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HADIWIYONO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hadiwiyono, Widada J, Subandiyah S, Fegan F (2011 Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE: a DNA finger printing technique to study the genetic diversity of blood disease bacterium of banana. Biodiversitas 12: 12-16. Blood disease bacterium (BDB is the most important pathogen of bananas in Indonesia. In some field, the disease incidence reaches over 80%. Epidemiologically, the disease is similar to moko disease in South America and bugtok disease in the Philippines caused by Ralstonia solanacearum race 2. However, BDB is different in phenotype and genotype from the two diseases. Previously BDB was limited in South Sulawesi since 1920s – 1980s and recently was reported in 27 of 30 provinces in Indonesia. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE is a genomic DNA fingerprinting method, which employs rare cutting restriction endonucleases to digest genome prior to electrophoresis using specialized condition to separate of large DNA fragments. The results showed that PFGE analysis was a discriminative tool to study the genetic diversity of BDB. Based on the PFGE analysis, BDB isolates obtained from different localities in Yogyakarta and Central Java were quit diverse.

  16. Correlated regions of cerebral blood flow with clinical parameters in Parkinson's disease. Comparison using 'Anatomy' and 'Talairach Daemon' software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assign the anatomical names of functional activation regions in the brain, based on the probabilistic cyto-architectonic atlas by Anatomy 1.7 from an analysis of correlations between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and clinical parameters of the non-demented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 8. We evaluated Anatomy 1.7 of SPM toolbox compared to 'Talairach Daemon' (TD) Client 2.4.2 software. One hundred and thirty-six patients (mean age 60.0±9.09 years; 73 women and 63 men) with non-demented PD were selected. Tc-99m-HMPAO brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans were performed on the patients using a two-head gamma-camera. We analyzed the brain image of PD patients by SPM8 and found the anatomical names of correlated regions of rCBF perfusion with the clinical parameters using TD Client 2.4.2 and Anatomy 1.7. The SPM8 provided a correlation coefficient between clinical parameters and cerebral hypoperfusion by a simple regression method. To the clinical parameters were added age, duration of disease, education period, Hoehn and Yahr (H and Y) stage and Korean mini-mental state examination (K-MMSE) score. Age was correlated with cerebral perfusion in the Brodmann area (BA) 6 and BA 3b assigned by Anatomy 1.7 and BA 6 and pyramis in gray matter by TD Client 2.4.2 with p<0.001 uncorrected. Also, assigned significant correlated regions were found in the left and right lobules VI (Hem) with duration of disease, in left and right lobules VIIa crus I (Hem) with education, in left insula (Ig2), left and right lobules VI (Hem) with H and Y, and in BA 4a and 6 with K-MMSE score with p<0.05 uncorrected by Anatomy 1.7, respectively. Most areas of correlation were overlapped by two different anatomical labeling methods, but some correlation areas were found with different names. Age was the most significantly correlated clinical parameter with rCBF. TD Client found the exact anatomical name by the peak

  17. Analysis of cognitive function and regional cerebral blood flow in Parkinson's disease by 123I-IMP SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the relationship between alterations of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cognitive impairment in parkinsonian patients, I studied 41 patients with Parkinson's disease (19 men and 22 women) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (123I-IMP). I evaluated cognitive function with the Mini-Mental State examination (MMS), the Hasegawa's Dementia Scale (HDS), the Kana-pick up test (KT), and the figure drawing test (FDT). I evaluated motor impairment with the Hoehn and Yahr stage. SPECT scanning was performed with a rotating digital gamma camera TOSHIBA 901-A. A semiquantitative method of assessing regional tracer uptake was used. Regions of interest (ROI: 3x3 pixels, 15.9x15.9 mm2) were drawn on the cerebellar hemispheres, cortical regions (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital), and basal ganglia bilaterally. The RI count index was expressed as a ratio of activity in each ROI to mean counting rate over cerebellar regions. I considered the RI count index as the index of rCBF in each ROI. There were strong positive correlations between MMS and rCBF of frontal, parietal and occipital lobes (p<0.001). There were positive correlations between HDS and rCBF of frontal (p<0.01), parietal (p<0.001) and occipital lobes (p<0.01). There were positive correlations between KT and rCBF of frontal (p<0.01) and occipital (p<0.05) lobes. There were no correlations between FDT and rCBF. There were negative correlations between the Hoehn and Yahr stage and MMS (p<0.001), HDS (p<0.001), KT (p<0.001) and FDT (p<0.05). There seemed to be a relationship between cognitive function and rCBF of frontal, parietal and occipital cortex, between motor impairment and rCBF of frontal lobe and between cognitive and motor impairments in parkinsonian patients. These findings suggest that intellectual deterioration in Parkinson's disease may be caused by a specific mechanism different from Alzheimer's disease. (author)

  18. Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Index A-Z Blood Clots Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood that can be stationary (thrombosis) ... treated? What are blood clots? Blood clots are semi-solid masses of blood. Normally, blood flows freely through ...

  19. There is no Gradient of TSH Receptor Antibody Activity Between Thyroidal and Peripheral Venous Blood in Patients with Graves' Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chang Soon; Shong, Young Kee; Cho, Bo Youn; Koong, Sung Soo; Lee, Myung Hae; Lee, Myung Chul; Oh, Seung Keun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-03-15

    Thyrotropin binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) and thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) activities were measured in the thyroidal and peripheral venous blood samples at the time of subtotal thyroidectomy from twenty one patients with Graves' disease prepared for surgery with antithyroid drugs. There was no difference in TBII and TSAb activities between thyroidal and peripheral blood samples. These findings were regarded that while intrathyroidal lymphocytes are major site of thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) production, similar levels are found in thyroidal and peripheral veins and that this in vive study cannot exactly ascertain the TRAb producing site.

  20. Caffeine impairs myocardial blood flow response to physical exercise in patients with coronary artery disease as well as in age-matched controls

    OpenAIRE

    Namdar, M; Schepis, T; Koepfli, P; Gaemperli, O; Siegrist, P T; Grathwohl, R; Valenta, I; R. Delaloye; Klainguti, M; Wyss, C A; Lüscher, T F; Kaufmann, P A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed pharmacologically active substances. Its acute effect on myocardial blood flow is widely unknown. Our aim was to assess the acute effect of caffeine in a dose corresponding to two cups of coffee on myocardial blood flow (MBF) in coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBF was measured with (15)O-labelled H2O and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at rest and after supine bicycle exercise in controls (n = 15, mean a...

  1. Caffeine Impairs Myocardial Blood Flow Response to Physical Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease as well as in Age-Matched Controls

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Namdar; Tiziano Schepis; Pascal Koepfli; Oliver Gaemperli; Siegrist, Patrick T.; Renate Grathwohl; Ines Valenta; Raphael Delaloye; Michael Klainguti; Wyss, Christophe A.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed pharmacologically active substances. Its acute effect on myocardial blood flow is widely unknown. Our aim was to assess the acute effect of caffeine in a dose corresponding to two cups of coffee on myocardial blood flow (MBF) in coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBF was measured with (15)O-labelled H2O and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at rest and after supine bicycle exercise in controls (n = 15, mean a...

  2. Expression of Histo-Blood Group A Type 1, 2 and 3 Antigens in Normal Skin and Extramammary Paget’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Aki; Kimura, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Uede, Koji; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of histo-blood group A type 1, 2 and 3 antigens was investigated using immunohistochemistry in normal human skin and extramammary Paget’s disease (EMPD). We used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) Bioclone-A (BA) and AR-1, which react with histo-blood group A type 1/2, and type 3 antigens, respectively. We found that A type 1, 2 and 3 antigens were expressed in the upper layer of the epidermis. We also found that the duct cells of the eccrine glands expressed A type 1/2 antigens an...

  3. Local blood pressure associates with the degree of luminal stenosis in patients with atherosclerotic disease in the middle cerebral artery

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yuanliang; Peng, Wenjia; Teng, Zhongzhao; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Hong, Bo; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying atherosclerotic ischemic events within the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is unclear. High structural stress induced by blood pressure might be a potential aetiology as plaque rupture occurs when such mechanical loading exceeds its material strength. To perform reliable analyses quantifying the mechanical loading within a plaque, the local blood pressure is needed. However, data on MCA blood pressure is currently lacking. In this study, the arterial pressure proximal to...

  4. A Study of Blood Flow and of Aggregation of Blood Cells Under Conditions of Zero Gravity: Its Relevance to the Occlusive Diseases and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintenfass, L.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this program are: (1) to determine whether the size of red cell aggregates, kinetics and morphology of these aggregates are influenced by near-zero gravity; (2) whether viscosity, especially at low shear rate, is afflicted by near-zero gravity (the latter preventing sedimentation of red cells); (3) whether the actual shape of red cells changes; and (4) whether blood samples obtained from different donors (normal and patients suffering from different disorders) react in the same manner to near-zero gravity.

  5. Association of systolic blood pressure drop with intravenous administration of itraconazole in children with hemato-oncologic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyeong Jin Lee,1,* Bongjin Lee,2,* June Dong Park,2 Hyung Joo Jeong,2 Yu Hyeon Choi,2 Hee Young Ju,1 Che Ry Hong,1 Ji Won Lee,1 Hyery Kim,1 Dong In Suh,3 Kyung Duk Park,1 Hyoung Jin Kang,1 Hee Young Shin,1 Hyo Seop Ahn1 1Department of Pediatrics, Cancer Research Institute, 2Division of Pediatric Intensive Care, Department of Pediatrics, 3Division of Pulmonology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Although few adverse effects have been reported for itraconazole, a widely used antifungal therapy for febrile neutropenia, we found intravenous (IV itraconazole to be associated with serious cases of blood pressure (BP drop. We therefore evaluated the incidence and risk factors for BP drop during IV administration of the drug.Materials and methods: We reviewed the medical records of children with hemato-oncologic disease who were treated with IV itraconazole from January 2012 to December 2013. By analyzing systolic BP (SBP measurements made from 4 hours before through to 4 hours after itraconazole administration, we evaluated the changes in SBP and the risk factors for an SBP drop, especially clinically meaningful (≥20% drops.Results: Itraconazole was administered 2,627 times to 180 patients. The SBP during the 4 hours following itraconazole administration was lower than during the 4 hours before administration (104 [53.0–160.33 mmHg] versus 105 [59.8–148.3 mmHg]; P<0.001. The decrease in SBP was associated with the application of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT (P=0.012 and the use of inotropic (P=0.005 and hypotensive drugs (P=0.021. A clinically meaningful SBP drop was seen in 5.37% (141 out of 2,627 of the administrations, and the use of inotropics (odds ratio [OR] 6.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.22–13.92; P<0.001, reducing the dose of inotropics (OR 8.08; 95% CI 1.39–46.94; P=0

  6. Acute post-exercise change in blood pressure and exercise training response in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti M Kiviniemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that acute post-exercise change in blood pressure (BP may predict exercise training responses in BP in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Patients with CAD (n=116, age 62±5 years, 85 men underwent BP assessments at rest and during 10-min recovery following a symptom-limited exercise test before and after the 6-month training intervention (one strength and 3-4 aerobic moderate-intensity exercises weekly. Post-exercise change in systolic BP (SBP was calculated by subtracting resting SBP from lowest post-exercise SBP. The training-induced change in resting SBP was -2±13 mmHg (p=0.064, ranging from -42 to 35 mmHg. Larger post-exercise decrease in SBP and baseline resting SBP predicted a larger training-induced decrement in SBP (β=0.46 and β=-0.44, respectively, p<0.001 for both. Acute post-exercise decrease in SBP provided additive value to baseline resting SBP in the prediction of training-induced change in resting SBP (R squared from 0.20 to 0.26, p=0.002. After further adjustments for other potential confounders (sex, age, baseline body mass index, realized training load, post-exercise decrease in SBP still predicted the training response in resting SBP (β=0.26, p=0.015. Acute post-exercise change in SBP was associated with training-induced change in resting SBP in patients with CAD, providing significant predictive information beyond baseline resting SBP.

  7. Aminoquinolone WR6026 as a feasible substitute for gentian violet in Chagas' disease prophylaxis in preserved blood for transfusional purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraes-Souza Helio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for a colorless, nontoxic and efficient drug to prevent transfusion-associated Chagas' disease (TACD has been underway unsuccessfully since 1953 when gentian violet was preconized and to date is still being used as the only in vitro trypanocidal agent. The recent findings of aminoquinolone "WR6026" as a trypanocidal agent, led the authors to study the metabolism of red cells stored with this compound, the main objective of which was to define its applicability in TACD control. Ten units of human whole blood collected in CPDA-1 were divided into two equal satellite bags. One had "WR6026" (final concentration 62.5µg/mL added and the other was used as a control, both were stored at 4ºC. At baseline, day 7, 14, 21 and 28, samples were taken for the following measurements: adenosine triphosphate (ATP, hemoglobin, electrolytes (sodium and potassium, gases (pO2 and pCO2 and osmotic fragility. The results of tests and control were analyzed through parametric t-student test. The results were similar in both groups throughout the experiment except for the level of ATP on day 14, which presented significantly higher values in the tests when compared with the controls (p = 0.012. It was concluded that WR6026 does not interfere in the preservation and probably the viability of the erythrocytes also until day 28 of storage. Consequently the authors suggest that WR6026 could emerge as a colorless substitute for gentian violet in the control of TACD in endemic areas.

  8. Clinical significance of regional cerebral blood volume and flow-to-volume ratio in ischemic cerebrovascular disease measeured by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and flow-to-volume ratio (rCBF/rCBV) were evaluated for clinical significance in comparison to rCBF and findings in X-ray CT (XCT) and radionuclide (RNA) and contrast angiography (CAG). A total of 109 cases were studied within 90 days after cerebrovascular ischemic attack. CBV SPECT was performed following CBF SPECT with I-123-IMP and RNA with Tc-99m-RBC, and processed for subtraction of I-123 contamination fraction. CBF/CBV images was obtained as the count ratio of CBF to CBV image at the same slice-level. Parametric rCBV and rCBF/rCBV were estimated as the count ratio of the focus to the contralateral normal region of interest. Image findings were scored by visual judgement. Student's t-test was applied for statistical analysis with a significance level of p=0.01. The rCBV-ratio was inversely proportional to rCBF/rCBV-ratio, and was different between the two groups with high and low score on flip-flop perfusion in RNA and among three groups with different postictal neurological course. The ratio was the highest for the group of improved course. The rCBF/rCBV-ratio was possibly correlated to rCBF-ratio, and was different between the two groups with high and low score on low density area in XCT, early perfusion in RNA and arterial stenosis in CAG. In the group of improved course, the ratio was different between the second and the third postictal week's duraiton. These results, therefore, suggest that rCBV-ratio reflects collateral perfusion, and is valuable for assessing postictal prognosis in cerebrovascular disease, and that rCBF/rCBV-ratio may reflect regional oxygen extraction fraction, and is valuable for speculating cerebral perfusion reserve. (author)

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin ...

  10. Estimated aortic blood pressure based on radial artery tonometry underestimates directly measured aortic blood pressure in patients with advancing chronic kidney disease staging and increasing arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Rasmus K; Peters, Christian D; Khatir, Dinah S;

    2016-01-01

    /min/1.73 m(2)) and 41 controls without renal disease undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. BP in the ascending aorta was measured through the angiography catheter and simultaneously estimated using radial tonometry. The mean difference between estimated central and aortic SBP was -13.2 (95...

  11. Combined SPECT imaging of regional cerebral blood flow (99mTc-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime, HMPAO) and blood volume (99mTc-RBC) to assess regional cerebral perfusion reserve in patients with cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 53 patients with cerebrovascular disease (CDV), regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and blood volume (CBV) were imaged by SPECT within one session. Slice division (CBF:CBV) yielded distribution of regional cerebral perfusion reserve (CPR). Semiquantitative evaluation was obtained from manually set ROIs by interhemispherical ratios (for CBF, CBV and CPR), using 2 SD from a normal group (n=10) as a threshold. Sensitivity was 59% for CBF, 94% for CBV and 83% for CPR. Combined sensitivity was 98%. Establishing three constellations for CBF, CBV and CPR, regionally normal CBFs but quantitatively increased CBVs (+69%) and decreased CPRs (-31%) were found in relatively early stages of CVD. Very advanced cases showed decreased CBFs (-65%), CBVs (-40%), CPRs (-49%) and a surrounding penumbra. In 87% (46/53 patients), such rheologically postulated constellations could be demonstrated. We conclude that combined CBF and CBV SPECT, assisted by CPR images, is a promising tool to detect CVD and to assess its individual regional severity. (orig.)

  12. Metformin Changes the Relationship between Blood Monocyte Toll-Like Receptor 4 Levels and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease-Ex Vivo Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zwolak

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 contributes to the development of NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and MetS (metabolic syndrome. It is unclear whether anti-diabetic metformin affects TLR4 expression on blood monocytes, thereby protecting or improving inflammatory parameters. Therefore, we investigated TLR4 in patients with NAFLD meeting different sets of MetS criteria and linked the results with the disease burden.70 subjects were characterized and divided into three groups: (I healthy individuals, (II nonobese with NAFLD and without MetS, and (III prediabetic, obese with NAFLD and MetS. We determined the concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and monocyte TLR4 levels in fresh blood as well as in blood cultures with or without metformin supplementation.The characteristics of the study groups revealed a significant association between NAFLD and BMI, MetS and inflammatory parameters, and TLR4. In ex vivo studies, 100 μM of metformin decreased the TLR4 level by 19.9% (II group or by 35% (III group as well as IL-1β and TNFα production. A stepwise multiple regression analysis highlighted a strong effect of metformin on attenuation of the link between TLR4 and NAFLD, and TNFα.We concluded that, by attenuation of the blood monocyte TLR4 level, metformin reduced their inflammatory potential-critical after recruitment these cells into liver. However, this finding should be confirmed after in vivo metformin administration.

  13. Physical and mathematical aspects of blood-glucose- and insulin-level kinetics in patients with coronary heart disease and high risk of its development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, Tatyana P.; Malinova, Lidia I.; Malinov, Igor A.

    2001-05-01

    The intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed to estimate the kinetics of blood glucose and insulin levels. Glucose was injected in individual standardized dose (0.5 g. per 1 kg of body weight). Three groups of patients were checked up: 1) patients with coronary heart disease verified by cicatricial alterations in myocardium found by electrocardiographic and echocardiographic methods; 2) children of patients with transmural myocardial infarction practically healthy at the moment of study; 3) persons practically healthy at the moment of study without any indications on cardiovascular diseases and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus among all ancestors and relatives who frequently were long-livers. Last groups didn't differ by age and sex. Peripheral blood glucose level, immunoreactive and free insulin (tested by muscular tissue) were studied just before glucose injection (on an empty stomach) and 4 times after it. The received discrete data were approximated by high degree polynomials, the estimation of blood glucose and insulin time functions symmetric was performed. The deceleration of degradation of insulin circulating in peripheral blood and the time decrease of second phase of insulin secretion were analytically established. This fact proves the complicated mechanism of insulin alterations in atherosclerosis, consisting not only of insulin resistance of peripheral tissues but of decrease of plastic processes in insulin- generating cells.

  14. Phenobarbital and Phototherapy Combination Enhances Decline of Total Serum Bilirubin and May Decrease the Need for Blood Exchange Transfusion in Newborns with Isoimmune Hemolytic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud A.F. Kaabneh; Ghassan S. A. Salama; Ayoub G.A Shakkoury; Ibrahim M. H. Al-abdallah; Afrah Alshamari; Ruba A.A. Halaseh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of phenobarbital and phototherapy combination on the total serum bilirubin of the newborn infants with isoimmune hemolytic disease (IHD) and its impact on blood exchange transfusion rates. PATIENTS AND METHOD This single-blinded, prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted between March 2013 and December 2014 at the pediatric ward of two Military Hospitals in Jordan. A total of 200 full-term neonates with IHD were di...

  15. No Evidence to Suggest that the Use of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Confounds the Results of Two Blood-Based Biomarker Studies in Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chiam, Justin Tao Wen; Lunnon, Katie; Voyle, Nicola; Proitsi, Petroula; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel,; Nelson, Sally; Johnston, Caroline; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolakik, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Hodges, Angela; Lovestone, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is an urgent need to discover Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers that are both easily measured and reliable. Research into blood-based biomarkers for AD using transcriptomics and proteomics has been an attractive and promising area of research. However, to date researchers have not looked into the possibility of AD medication being a confounding factor in these studies. Objective: This study explored whether acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), the main class of AD med...

  16. Effect of Combined Treatment with Alpha Lipoic Acid and Acetyl-L-Carnitine on Vascular Function and Blood Pressure in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    McMackin, Craig J.; Widlansky, Michael E.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Huang, Alex L.; Weller, Susan; Holbrook, Monika; Gokce, Noyan; Hagen, Tory M.; Keaney, John F.; Vita, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species that may contribute to vascular dysfunction. Alpha-lipoic acid and acetyl-L-carnitine reduce oxidative stress and improve mitochondrial function. In a double blind, crossover study, we examined the effects of combined alpha-lipoic acid /acetyl-L-carnitine treatment and placebo (eight weeks per treatment) on vasodilator function and blood pressure in 36 subjects with coronary artery disease. Active treatment increased brachial artery diameter by 2.3...

  17. Decreased numbers of peripheral blood dendritic cells in patients with coronary artery disease are associated with diminished plasma Flt3 ligand levels and impaired plasmacytoid dendritic cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Van Brussel, Ilse; Van Vré, Emily A; De Meyer, Guido RY; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Bosmans, Johan M; Bult, Hidde

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: We investigate whether activation of circulating DCs or levels of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), haematopoietic growth factors important for dendritic cell (DC) differentiation, could account for reduced blood DC numbers in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Methods: Concentrations of Flt3L and GM-CSF were measured in plasma from CAD patients (n=15) and controls (n=12). Frequenc...

  18. Study on the relationship between the serum thrombopoietin (TPO) levels and blood platelet counts in patients with various kinds of liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the relationship between serum thrombopoietin (TPO) levels and thrombocytopenia in patients with various kinds of liver diseases. Methods: Serum TPO levels were determined with ELISA in 102 patients with various kinds of liver diseases (acute hepatitis n=9, chronic hepatitis n=80, hepatic cirrhosis n=13, etiology, HBV infection n=73, HBV + HEV n=13, HEV n=8, HCV n=6, autoimmune hepatitis n=2) and 30 controls. Results: The serum TPO levels in patients with various kinds of liver diseases were not significantly different from those in the controls (P>0.05). However, the blood platelet counts were significantly lower in all the patients (with the exception of the nine patients with acute hepatitis) than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: The lower TPO levels in patients with liver diseases could be only one of the many factors leading to thrombocytopenia. (authors)

  19. Increased percentage of CD8 CD28– suppressor lymphocytes in peripheral blood and skin infiltrates correlates with advanced disease in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Donata Urbaniak-Kujda; Katarzyna Kapelko-Słowik; Dariusz Wołowiec; Jarosław Dybko; Agnieszka Hałoń; Bo��ena Jaźwiec; Joanna Maj; Alina Jankowska-Konsur; Kazimierz Kuliczkowski

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: T cells with the CD8 CD28– phenotype are CD8 lymphocytes with regulatory function. Their increased numbers were observed in infections, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and in elderly healthy individuals. CD8 CD28– lymphocyte levels in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) has not yet been described. The aim of the study was to determine their levels in these patients’ peripheral blood and cutaneous infiltrates and their relation to the clinical stage of disease.Mat...

  20. Relationship of daily arterial blood pressure monitoring readings and arterial stiffness profile in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease combined with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoli N.A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine correlation between arterial blood pressure daily rhythm and daily profile of arterial stiffness in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and arterial hypertension. Materials et methods: Prospective investigation comprised 45 male patients with COPD and arterial hypertension. Individuals of 40 years younger and 80 years elder, patients with diabetes, stroke, angina pectoris, or heart infarction, vascular diseases, and exacerbation of chronic disease, bronchial and pulmonary diseases of other etiology were excluded from the analyses. Comparison group included 47 patients with essential arterial hypertension and without chronic respiratory diseases closely similar on general parameters with patients from main clinical series. Twenty-four-hour arterial blood pressure monitoring (ABPM and daily arterial stiffness monitoring were performed using BPLab® MnSDP-2 apparatus (Petr Telegin, Russian Federation. Results: Patients with COPD combined with arterial hypertension with raised arterial stiffness measures prevail over individuals in essential hypertension group. There is pathological alteration of the ABPM circadian rhythm and raised «Pressure load» values in raised arterial stiffness group. Conclusion: We found ABPM raised parameters in patients with COPD and arterial hypertension. It confirms necessity of ABPM in daily arterial stiffness assessment in patients with COPD.

  1. 冠心病患者血压和血脂及血糖达标率分析%Analysis of the rates of achieving goal blood pressure, blood sugar and blood lipid in patients with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳芳; 曹芳芳; 曹晓菁; 师树田; 刘飞; 王兆宏; 蒋志丽

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyse the rates of achieving goal blood pressure, blood glucose and blood lipid in patients with CAD which was diagnosed by coronary arteriography and to explore the relationships between CAD and rates of reaching guidelines of the three risk factors, respectively. Methods The levels of blood pressure, blood sugar and blood lipid on admission were analyzed retrospectively in 2916 cases of CAD, and the level of blood pressure was analyzed when they were discharged. Results With 130/80 mm Hg as the goal blood pressure,the rate of achieving goal blood pressure was 28. 4% on admission,and was 87.5% when they were discharged. With 140/90 mm Hg as the goal blood pressure, the rate of achieving goal blood pressure was 65.8% on admission,and was 90.0% when they were discharged. With >1.04 mmol/L as the goal HDL-C,the rate of achieving goal HDL-C was 23.0% on admission. With <2.59 mmol/L and 2.07 mmol/L as the goal LDL-C in high risk patients and very high risk patients respectively, the rates of achieving goal LDL-C were 54. 3% and 17.4% respectively. With <4. 14 mmol/L and <3.11 mmol/L as the goal TC in high risk and very high risk patients,respectively,the rates of achieving goal TC were 49.5% and 5.8% respectively. With 1.70 mmol/L as the goal TG,the rate of achieving goal TG was 58.0%. There were 538 diabetic patients with CAD,accounting for 18.5 % ,their rates of achieving goal fasting blood glucose was 1.9 %, 1138 cases had diabetes and impaired fasting blood glucose,accounting for 39.0% in CAD. Conclusion The rates of achieving goal blood pressure,fasting blood glucose and blood lipids in patients with CAD were low on admission. The results show that enhancing the rates of achieving goal blood pressure, goal fasting blood glucose and goal blood lipids is very important for secondary prevention of CAD.%目的 分析经冠状动脉造影诊断为冠心病患者的血压、血脂和血糖达标率情况,评价其3个危

  2. The added value of peripheral blood cell morphology in the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases--part 1: basic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokocimer, M; Potasman, I

    2008-11-01

    As automated blood cell analysers and sophisticated diagnostic technologies become widespread, requests for peripheral blood smear (PBS) examination--for the diagnosis of infectious diseases--diminish. Yet, PBS examination can provide rapid and invaluable information on infection--host susceptibility, aetiology, severity, and systemic impact. Besides direct visualisation of certain microorganisms (for example, Plasmodium, Ehrlichia), PBS examination may detect characteristic footprints left by various infections on the morphology of blood cells, thus yielding the cytologic clues of the disease (for example, Döhle bodies, haemophagocytosis). Additionally, PBS examination may disclose certain infection predisposing conditions (for example, May-Hegglin anomaly, hyposplenism), and several infection related haematological and systemic complications. Combined with a careful medical history and physical examination data, all this information may yield a speedy diagnosis, a rationalised diagnostic work-up, and timely initiation of treatment. The intention of the following review is to highlight the value of PBS, and recommend that PBS examination should be fostered in the diagnostic work-up of infectious diseases. PMID:19103815

  3. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier transport and CNS drug metabolism in diseased and control brain after intravenous L-DOPA in a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravenstijn Paulien GM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB functionality have been implicated in Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to investigate BBB transport of L-DOPA transport in conjunction with its intra-brain conversion, in both control and diseased cerebral hemispheres in the unilateral rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease. Methods In Lewis rats, at 14 days after unilateral infusion of rotenone into the medial forebrain bundle, L-DOPA was administered intravenously (10, 25 or 50 mg/kg. Serial blood samples and brain striatal microdialysates were analysed for L-DOPA, and the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA. Ex-vivo brain tissue was analyzed for changes in tyrosine hydroxylase staining as a biomarker for Parkinson's disease severity. Data were analysed by population pharmacokinetic analysis (NONMEM to compare BBB transport of L-DOPA in conjunction with the conversion of L-DOPA into DOPAC and HVA, in control and diseased cerebral hemisphere. Results Plasma pharmacokinetics of L-DOPA could be described by a 3-compartmental model. In rotenone responders (71%, no difference in L-DOPA BBB transport was found between diseased and control cerebral hemisphere. However, in the diseased compared with the control side, basal microdialysate levels of DOPAC and HVA were substantially lower, whereas following L-DOPA administration their elimination rates were higher. Conclusions Parkinson's disease-like pathology, indicated by a huge reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase as well as by substantially reduced levels and higher elimination rates of DOPAC and HVA, does not result in changes in BBB transport of L-DOPA. Taking the results of this study and that of previous ones, it can be concluded that changes in BBB functionality are not a specific characteristic of Parkinson's disease, and cannot account for the decreased benefit of L-DOPA at later stages of Parkinson's disease.

  4. The Role of the Midmolecular Peptides in the Blood Cell Aggregation in Acute Periods of a Burn Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Egorikhina M.N.; Levin G.Ya.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to study the effect of midmolecular peptide (MMP) concentration on platelet and erythrocyte aggregation in severe burned patients. Materials and Methods. The investigation was carried out on 34 blood samples of healthy people and 30 blood samples of severe burned patients. There was determined the level of MMP, as well as that of creatinine, and urea. The “Amicon Ultra-4” microcentrifuge tubes were used to isolate MMP. Results. The level increase of ave...

  5. Willingness to pay for eliminating the risk of being infected by blood-borne diseases in regular replacement treatment for patients with haemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Olofsson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia is a set of lifelong bleeding disorders linked to the X chromosome. Standard treatment for patients with severe hemophilia is intensive replacement therapy with intravenous injection of coagulation factor concentrates to prevent spontaneous recurrent joint bleed. In the 1980s, many hemophilia patients were infected with HIV and/or hepatitis C transmitted by plasma derived coagulation factor concentrates. In the future, new pathogens could appear and a risk remains that the current manufacturing methods will not be able to eliminate those.  The aim of the study is to estimate the value of eliminating the risk of being infected by blood-borne diseases in the treatment of hemophilia which could provide decision-makers with information on how much resource to spend on this purpose to be in line with societal preferences. Individual preferences for safety were elicited from a sample of 821 individuals from the Swedish general population using a web-based questionnaire. The preferences were estimated using the “chained approach” which combines the contingent valuation (CV and standard gamble (SG methods. The respondents were asked (1 to state their willingness-to-pay to avoid a temporary, non-fatal injury presented in a health state derived from the EQ-5D instrument, and (2 to choose between living with this injury with certainty or receive a treatment that could restore the respondent to full health immediately, but which entails a risk of being infected by a fatal, blood-borne disease. A value of a statistical life (VSL in the context of blood-borne diseases of SEK47 million was calculated by “chaining” the answers to the CV question and SG question, and from the VSL we derived a value of a QALY in the context of blood-borne diseases of SEK2.8 million. Using the current mean annual dose of factor concentrate of 268,000 international units (IU per patient in Sweden, the value of eliminating the risk of being infected by blood

  6. Large-Scale Exome-wide Association Analysis Identifies Loci for White Blood Cell Traits and Pleiotropy with Immune-Mediated Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Hill, W David; Kacprowski, Tim; Li, Jin; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Manichaikul, Ani; Mihailov, Evelin; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Pankratz, Nathan; Pazoki, Raha; Polfus, Linda M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Schurmann, Claudia; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Waterworth, Dawn M; Evangelou, Evangelos; Yanek, Lisa R; Burt, Amber; Chen, Ming-Huei; van Rooij, Frank J A; Floyd, James S; Greinacher, Andreas; Harris, Tamara B; Highland, Heather M; Lange, Leslie A; Liu, Yongmei; Mägi, Reedik; Nalls, Mike A; Mathias, Rasika A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Nikus, Kjell; Starr, John M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Wallentin, Lars; Bartz, Traci M; Becker, Lewis C; Denny, Joshua C; Raffield, Laura M; Rioux, John D; Friedrich, Nele; Fornage, Myriam; Gao, He; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Liewald, David C M; Rich, Stephen S; Uitterlinden, Andre; Bastarache, Lisa; Becker, Diane M; Boerwinkle, Eric; de Denus, Simon; Bottinger, Erwin P; Hayward, Caroline; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Lange, Ethan; Launer, Lenore J; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yingchang; Metspalu, Andres; O'Donnell, Chris J; Quarells, Rakale C; Richard, Melissa; Torstenson, Eric S; Taylor, Kent D; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Zonderman, Alan B; Crosslin, David R; Deary, Ian J; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Evans, Michele K; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kähönen, Mika; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Slater, Andrew J; Dehghan, Abbas; White, Harvey D; Ganesh, Santhi K; Loos, Ruth J F; Esko, Tõnu; Faraday, Nauder; Wilson, James G; Cushman, Mary; Johnson, Andrew D; Edwards, Todd L; Zakai, Neil A; Lettre, Guillaume; Reiner, Alex P; Auer, Paul L

    2016-07-01

    White blood cells play diverse roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Genetic association analyses of phenotypic variation in circulating white blood cell (WBC) counts from large samples of otherwise healthy individuals can provide insights into genes and biologic pathways involved in production, differentiation, or clearance of particular WBC lineages (myeloid, lymphoid) and also potentially inform the genetic basis of autoimmune, allergic, and blood diseases. We performed an exome array-based meta-analysis of total WBC and subtype counts (neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, basophils, and eosinophils) in a multi-ancestry discovery and replication sample of ∼157,622 individuals from 25 studies. We identified 16 common variants (8 of which were coding variants) associated with one or more WBC traits, the majority of which are pleiotropically associated with autoimmune diseases. Based on functional annotation, these loci included genes encoding surface markers of myeloid, lymphoid, or hematopoietic stem cell differentiation (CD69, CD33, CD87), transcription factors regulating lineage specification during hematopoiesis (ASXL1, IRF8, IKZF1, JMJD1C, ETS2-PSMG1), and molecules involved in neutrophil clearance/apoptosis (C10orf54, LTA), adhesion (TNXB), or centrosome and microtubule structure/function (KIF9, TUBD1). Together with recent reports of somatic ASXL1 mutations among individuals with idiopathic cytopenias or clonal hematopoiesis of undetermined significance, the identification of a common regulatory 3' UTR variant of ASXL1 suggests that both germline and somatic ASXL1 mutations contribute to lower blood counts in otherwise asymptomatic individuals. These association results shed light on genetic mechanisms that regulate circulating WBC counts and suggest a prominent shared genetic architecture with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27346689

  7. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if they have a history of: Abnormal cholesterol Diabetes Heart disease (coronary artery disease) High blood pressure ( hypertension ) Kidney disease involving hemodialysis Smoking Stroke ( cerebrovascular disease )

  8. Amyloid-β-Secondary Structure Distribution in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood Measured by an Immuno-Infrared-Sensor: A Biomarker Candidate for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabers, Andreas; Ollesch, Julian; Schartner, Jonas; Kötting, Carsten; Genius, Just; Hafermann, Henning; Klafki, Hans; Gerwert, Klaus; Wiltfang, Jens

    2016-03-01

    The misfolding of the Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide into β-sheet enriched conformations was proposed as an early event in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Here, the Aβ peptide secondary structure distribution in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma of 141 patients was measured with an immuno-infrared-sensor. The sensor detected the amide I band, which reflects the overall secondary structure distribution of all Aβ peptides extracted from the body fluid. We observed a significant downshift of the amide I band frequency of Aβ peptides in Dementia Alzheimer type (DAT) patients, which indicated an overall shift to β-sheet. The secondary structure distribution of all Aβ peptides provides a better marker for DAT detection than a single Aβ misfold or the concentration of a specific oligomer. The discrimination between DAT and disease control patients according to the amide I frequency was in excellent agreement with the clinical diagnosis (accuracy 90% for CSF and 84% for blood). The amide I band maximum above or below the decisive marker frequency appears as a novel spectral biomarker candidate of AD. Additionally, a preliminary proof-of-concept study indicated an amide I band shift below the marker band already in patients with mild cognitive impairment due to AD. The presented immuno-IR-sensor method represents a promising, simple, robust, and label-free diagnostic tool for CSF and blood analysis. PMID:26828829

  9. Pathophysiology of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri): early changes in blood and aspects of the immune Response after Injection of IHN Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Donald F.; Smith, Lynnwood

    1974-01-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were injected with infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus and various hematological and blood chemical changes were monitored over 9 days. The packed cell volume, hemoglobin, red blood cell count, and plasma bicarbonate were significantly depressed by day 4. Plasma chloride, calcium, phosphorus, total protein, and blood cell types did not change during the 9 days. Furthermore, plasma  LDH isozyme was significantly increased by the fourth day, and fish infected with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas salmonicida, and redmouth bacterium did not show specific LDH isozyme alterations. Acid-base alterations occurred at 10 C but not at 18 C. The acid-base imbalance and elevation of the  LDH isozyme were consistently associated with the early development of the disease.The immune response after injection of IHN virus was determined and protection from disease was tested by passive immunization. Actively immunized fish developed IHN-neutralizing antibodies within 54 days after injection of virus, and the antibodies were protective when juvenile fish were passively immunized and experimentally challenged with IHN virus.

  10. [Multiparameter analysis of the ergometric test. Significance of the failure of systolic blood pressure to decrease during recovery phase as an index of coronary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, G; Scaccianoce, G; Artale, S; Francaviglia, B; Platania, F; Circo, A

    1990-10-01

    Ergometric tests were performed in 27 patients who had previously undergone coronarography following instrumental findings and/or symptoms which seemed highly indicative of ischemic cardiopathy. The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic importance of the failure of systolic blood pressure to decrease during the third minute of the recovery phase of the test as an index of coronary disease. In particular, as reported by other studies, the ratio between systolic blood pressure at the third minute of recovery and maximum systolic blood pressure during the test was also assessed values above 0.7 were considered pathological. Sixteen out the 27 patients examined showed lesions which were hemodynamically significant, whereas 11 patients were free of lesions and 9 had previous myocardial necrosis. The level of the above ratio in subjects without significant coronary lesions was 0.66 +/- 0.05, whereas it was 0.85 +/- 0.04 (p less than 0.01) in patients with coronary disease. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative prognostic values were respectively 91.6%, 62%, 64.7% and 90.9%. In patients with lesions to the three main arteries both the sensitivity and the specificity were 100%. In the same patients, the ST criteria were 85.7%, 50%, 81.8% and 74.3%. PMID:2074932

  11. Lower blood glucose and variability are associated with earlier recovery from renal injury caused by episodic urinary tract infection in advanced type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Fang Chiu

    Full Text Available In our previous study, type 2 diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD patients with glomerular filtration rates of 9 days, Group B groups. The differences in the continuous and categorical variables of the two groups were assessed separately. The mean glucose levels and their variability (using the standard deviation and the coefficient of standard deviation were compared at the fasting, midday pre-meal, evening pre-meal, and evening post-meal time points during hospitalization. We have organized the manuscript in a manner compliant with the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statement.Acute kidney injury occurred within the two groups (p = 0.007 and p = 0.001, respectively. The early-morning blood glucose levels (149.7±44.0 mg/dL and average blood glucose levels (185.6±52.0 mg/dL were better in Group A (p = 0.01, p = 0.02. Group A patients also had lower glucose variability than Group B at the different time points (p<0.05. Group A also had earlier renal recovery. More relevant pathogens were identified from blood in Group B (p = 0.038.Early-morning fasting and mean blood glucose levels and their variability can be good indicators of severe infection and predictors of renal outcome in type 2 diabetic patients with CKD and UTI.

  12. Benzodiazepine receptor and cerebral blood flow in early Alzheimer's disease. SPECT study using 123I-Iomazenil and 123I-IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with early Alzheimer's disease. Imaging of BZR and measurement of CBF were performed by SPECT using 123I-Iomazenil (IMZ) and 123I-IMP respectively, in seven patients with early Alzheimer's disease and five patients with unilateral left cerebral infarction as controls. The values for the normal cerebral hemisphere (ratio to the contralateral cerebellum) in patients with cerebral infarction were adopted as control values. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, the CBF (ratio to cerebellum) decreased significantly in the frontal cortex and the parietal cortex compared with the control values. There was no significant difference in late IMZ SPECT counts (ratio to cerebellum) and washout (the ratio of late-to-early IMZ SPECT counts) between patients with Alzheimer's disease and the controls. However, the late IMZ SPECT counts and washout decreased in one patient with moderate dementia. There was a significant correlation between the severity of dementia and the late IMZ SPECT counts in the temporal cortex and the parietal cortex. These results suggest that benzodiazepine binding sites are relatively well preserved in patients with early Alzheimer's disease, and reduction of the CBF is caused by neuronal dysfunction rather than by neuronal loss. IMZ SPECT study is useful and necessary for clarifying the pathophysiological state in Alzheimer's disease. (author)

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow measured with N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine single-photon emission tomography in patients with Joseph disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in five Japanese patients who were clinically diagnosed as having Joseph disease, also called Machado-Joseph disease or Azorean disease, using N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) and single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Cerebellar atrophy was evaluated by a five-step rating scale as defined on X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). Compared with ten age-matched normal controls (mean cerebellar CBF ± SD: 66.9 ± 6.6 ml/100 g/min), rCBF in patients with Joseph disease was significantly decreased in the cerebellum (mean ± SD: 50.2 ± 7.3 ml/100 g/min). No significant relationship, however, was found between the decrease in rCBF in the cerebellum and the degree of cerebellar atrophy on X-CT. rCBF in the cerebellum was minimally decreased in one patient who had severe cerebellar atrophy and in two patients with moderate atrophy. These data may support the findings that Purkinje cells in the cerebellum are almost normal in Joseph disease, and that the granular and molecular layers remain intact in spite of cortical atrophy of the cerebellum. It is concluded that [123I]-IMP SPET is able to identify pathological and metabolic changes in the cerebellum that do not appear on X-CT or magnetic resonance imaging, and thus is useful for the diagnosis of Joseph disease. (orig.)

  14. Benzodiazepine receptor and cerebral blood flow in early Alzheimer`s disease. SPECT study using {sup 123}I-Iomazenil and {sup 123}I-IMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Shin; Koshi, Yasuhiko; Komiyama, Tasuku; Sakayori, Osamu; Komaba, Yuichi; Ohyama, Masashi; Mishina, Masahiro; Tsuganesawa, Toshikazu; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan). First Hospital

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with early Alzheimer`s disease. Imaging of BZR and measurement of CBF were performed by SPECT using {sup 123}I-Iomazenil (IMZ) and {sup 123}I-IMP respectively, in seven patients with early Alzheimer`s disease and five patients with unilateral left cerebral infarction as controls. The values for the normal cerebral hemisphere (ratio to the contralateral cerebellum) in patients with cerebral infarction were adopted as control values. In patients with Alzheimer`s disease, the CBF (ratio to cerebellum) decreased significantly in the frontal cortex and the parietal cortex compared with the control values. There was no significant difference in late IMZ SPECT counts (ratio to cerebellum) and washout (the ratio of late-to-early IMZ SPECT counts) between patients with Alzheimer`s disease and the controls. However, the late IMZ SPECT counts and washout decreased in one patient with moderate dementia. There was a significant correlation between the severity of dementia and the late IMZ SPECT counts in the temporal cortex and the parietal cortex. These results suggest that benzodiazepine binding sites are relatively well preserved in patients with early Alzheimer`s disease, and reduction of the CBF is caused by neuronal dysfunction rather than by neuronal loss. IMZ SPECT study is useful and necessary for clarifying the pathophysiological state in Alzheimer`s disease. (author).

  15. Infections Transmitted By the Transfusion of Blood and Blood Products

    OpenAIRE

    Tekin A.

    2011-01-01

    Especially viral hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) which were transmitted by the transfusion of blood and blood products have been an important public health problem for a long time on the world. Transfusion of blood and blood products is an ideal and an easiest and a simplest route for transmission of infectious diseases. It is known that many infectious agents, either bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal agents may be transmitted by the transfusion of blood and blood...

  16. Successful Unrelated Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in an X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease Patient with Disseminated BCG-induced Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao-Jen; Wang, Shih-Chung; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Kao, Jun-Kai; Chen, Ming; Liu, Chin-San

    2015-10-01

    A 19-month-old boy with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) received umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) from an unrelated donor after experiencing a life-threatening disseminated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin infection. After busulfan and cyclophosphamide conditioning, we performed a 5/6-matched UCBT. Engraftment and mixed chimerism was 100% in peripheral blood, and 100% of his neutrophils had normal oxidative burst activity on day 17. The patient is now 3 years old, free from infection, and growing well. To our knowledge, this is the second case of CGD treated with UCBT in Taiwan. His successful outcome illustrates that UCBT in a patient with CGD should be considered early if a human leukocyte antigen-matched donor is not available or the patient has just recovered from a severe infection. PMID:23680261

  17. Usefulness of PFR/TPFR score to discriminate hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertensive heart disease-using cardiac blood-pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to see whether it is possible to discriminate hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) with cardiac blood-pool imaging. Subjects were 20 normals, 21 HHD patients and 19 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) ones. Cardiac blood-pool imaging was carried out with 99mTc-labeled erythrocyte method to obtain ventricular volume curve and its differential curve for calculation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), 1/3LVEF, peak filling rate (PFR), time to peak filling rate (TPFR) and PFR/TPFR. LVEF and 1/3LVEF were found insignificant between the three groups. PFR was significantly lower in HCN group, TPFR was significantly prolonged in HCM and PFR/TPFR was significantly higher in HHD. PFR/TPFR was thus useful for discrimination. (K.H.)

  18. Dogs with hearth diseases causing turbulent high-velocity blood flow have changes in patelet function and von Willebrand factor multimer distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier; Falk, Bo Torkel; Haubro, Lotte; Pedersen, Lotte Gam; Pedersen, Henrik Duelund

    2005-01-01

    echocardiography were performed in all dogs. PFA100 closure times (the ability of platelets to occlude a hole in a membrane at high shear rates), platelet activation markers (plasma thromboxane B2 concentration, platelet surface P-selectin expression), platelet aggregation (in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma......The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate platelet function using in vitro tests based on both high and low shear rates and von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimeric composition in dogs with cardiac disease and turbulent high-velocity blood flow. Client-owned asymptomatic, untreated...... with 3 different agonists), and vWf multimers were analyzed. Cavaliers with moderate to severe MR and dogs with SAS had longer closure times and a lower percentage of the largest vWf multimers than did controls. Maximal aggregation responses were unchanged in dogs with SAS but enhaned in Cavaliers with...

  19. Association between blood cadmium levels and 10-year coronary heart disease risk in the general Korean population: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Pyo Myong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-occupational heavy metals are considered risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD. Several recent epidemiologic studies have evaluated the relationship between non-occupational cadmium exposure and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between non-occupational cadmium exposure and risk factors for CHD using the Framingham estimate of 10 year CHD risk. METHODS: The heavy metal dataset of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 2008 through 2010, a cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of 4,668 non-institutionalized Koreans, was analyzed. Subjects were stratified into seven age groups to minimize the effects of age. The log-transformed blood cadmium concentrations were compared with the Framingham estimate of 10 year CHD risk in each age stratum. RESULTS: The Framingham estimate of 10 year CHD risk was significantly associated with the log-transformed blood cadmium concentrations (p<0.05 in all age groups of Korean men, with the lowest regression coefficient (0.254 for men aged 20 to <35 years and the highest (3.354 for men aged 55 to <60 years; similar results, however, were not observed in Korean women. After adjusting for survey year, age, and urinary cotinine concentration, the log-transformed blood cadmium levels among men aged 20 to <35, 40 to <45, 50 to <55, and 60 to <65 years were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure (p<0.05, but not with total and high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Cadmium exposure, even at non-occupational levels, may be associated with CHD risk in men. Despite the declines in non-occupational cadmium exposure over the past several decades, more efforts are needed.

  20. Evaluation of lumbar sympathectomy impact on the clinical course, blood flow parameters and muscle perfusion in a group of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Occlusive arterial disease is a common disease. Frequently, at the time of diagnosis, disease severity prevents revascularization. The study evaluated lumbar sympathectomy influence on the clinical course, blood flow parameters and muscle perfusion. Material/Methods: Research group included 33 patients (13 women - 39.4 %, and 20 men - 60.6 %) aged from 47 to 81 (mean age 63.54 ± 8.63 years) treated for PAD and qualified to undergo lumbar sympathectomy. Physical examination, standard vascular tests (ankle-brachial, thigh-ankle and thigh-shin indices, maximum flow velocity, PI and RI in selected arteries), perfusion scintigraphy of lower limbs muscles at rest and on exertion were carried out before and 6 months after surgery. Results: Statistically significant increase of total walking distance (71.82 meters vs. 177.58 meters, p < 0.002) was detected. On the basis of participants feelings, the effect of treatment as a positive was declared by 30 of them, representing 90.9 % of the sample. Only 2 patients (6.1 %) identified treatment as not affecting their health condition, and 1 patient (3.0 %) reported worsening of symptoms after treatment. Standard vascular tests and perfusion scintigraphy did not reveal any significant changes. Conclusions: Lumbar sympathectomy in patients suffering from severe, atherosclerotic lower limb ischaemia brought positive effects such as increasing walking distance, decreasing rest pain or healing skin ulcers. This effect was not combined with improvement of muscle blood (ulcer healing). (authors)

  1. Coexpression of CD4 and CD8 on peripheral blood T cells and lamina propria T cells in inflammatory bowel disease by two colour immunofluorescence and flow cytometric analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Senju, M; Wu, K C; Mahida, Y R; Jewell, D P

    1991-01-01

    Using two colour immunofluorescence with fluorescein isothiocyanate and phycoerythrin labelled monoclonal antibodies and multiparameter flow cytometry, we investigated the coexpression of CD4 and CD8 antigens on peripheral blood lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes of patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease and normal control subjects. Both the absolute number and the proportion of peripheral blood CD4+, CD8+ cells in inflammatory bowel disease were small but significantly ...

  2. Cholesterol oxidation products are sensitive and specific blood-based biomarkers for Niemann-Pick C1 disease

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Forbes D.; Scherrer, David E.; Lanier, Michael H.; Langmade, S. Joshua; Molugu, Vasumathi; Gale, Sarah E.; Olzeski, Dana; Sidhu, Rohini; Dietzen, Dennis J.; Fu, Rao; Wassif, Christopher A.; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Marso, Steven P.; House, John; Vite, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by endolysosomal cholesterol accumulation. Previous studies implicating oxidative stress in NPC1 disease pathogenesis raised the possibility that non-enzymatic formation of cholesterol oxidation products could serve as disease biomarkers. We measured these metabolites in the plasma and tissues of the Npc1−/− mouse model and found several cholesterol oxidation products that were elevated in Npc1−...

  3. Study on the Relationship between Blood Stasis Syndrome and Clinical Pathology in 227 Patients with Primary Glomerular Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李深; 饶向荣; 王素霞; 张改华; 李晓玫; 戴希文; 陈可冀

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the severity of Chinese medicine(CM) bloodstasis syndrome(BSS) with clinical features and renal lesion indexes of the primary glomerular disease. Methods:An epidemiological survey was conducted to collect the data of 227 patients diagnosed as chronic primary glomerular diseases,and their severity of BSS were scored three days before renal biopsies were performed.The following clinical indexes were analyzed:age,course of glomerular diseases,24-h urine protein ration...

  4. Sickle Cell Disease Activates Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Induce Cathepsins K and V Activity in Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Platt, Manu O.; Sindhuja Surapaneni; Keegan, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disease that increases systemic inflammation as well as the risk of pediatric strokes, but links between sickle-induced inflammation and arterial remodeling are not clear. Cathepsins are powerful elastases and collagenases secreted by endothelial cells and monocyte-derived macrophages in atherosclerosis, but their involvement in sickle cell disease has not been studied. Here, we investigated how tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα) and circulating mononuclear cell adhe...

  5. Technetium-99m white blood cell imaging: False-negative result in salmonella osteomyelitis associated with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report a case of sickle cell anemia associated osteomyelitis where the Tc-99m white blood cell imaging was negative, and bone imaging showed increased uptake in the region in question. The reasons for the possible false-negative image are discussed

  6. Depressive symptoms and white blood cell count in coronary heart disease patients : Prospective findings from the Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivis, Hester E.; Kupper, Nina; Penninx, Brenda W.; Na, Beeya; de Jonge, Peter; Whooley, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression has been associated with elevated white blood cell (WBC) count - indicative of systemic inflammation - in cross-sectional studies, but no longitudinal study has evaluated whether depressive symptoms predict subsequent WBC count or vice versa. We sought to evaluate the bidirect

  7. Smoking, diabetes, blood hypertension: possible etiologic role for Peyronie’s disease? Analysis in 279 patients with a control group in Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Pavone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the proportion of patients with Peyronie’s Disease (PD and the possible association with its potential risk factors in the general population of the central and western Sicily in our weekly andrological outpatient clinic. Materials and methods: We recruited a sample of 279 consecutive patients consulting our andrological outpatient clinic. Two arms were created: the first one composed by PD patients (men with symptoms suggestive for PD, the second one composed by patients with other andrological diseases (control arm. For each patient we evaluated the age, cigarette smoking, diabetes, blood hypertension and erectile function. In the PD arm we administered validated questionnaires to determine the erectile function status by the International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF-5 and the pain status during erection by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. A univariate analysis was conducted using R software. Results: We enrolled 279 consecutive patients. The number of PD patients was 97 (34,7%. The univariate analysis showed a correlation between PD and cigarette smoking (p = 0.0242, blood hypertension (p < 0.001, erectile dysfunction (p < 0.001. No significant association was observed between diabetes and PD (p = 0.358. The median age of PD arm was 60 years and the median age of the control arm was 63,5 years; therefore the median age of PD arm resulted lower than the median age of the control arm (p = 0,031. Conclusions: Peyronie’s disease is more common than we might think; furthermore it can be diagnosed among young patients. According to our results, cigarette smoking and blood hypertension may be considered statically significant risk factors for developing PD. On the contrary diabetes seems not to be a risk factor for PD. According to our results PD should be sought also in young patients. Further studies are necessary to confirm that removing the indicated risk factors may reduce the incidence of PD.

  8. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells induces recovery of motor dysfunction in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chao Chen,1,* Jing Duan,1,* Aifang Shen,2,* Wei Wang,1 Hao Song,1 Yanming Liu,1 Xianjie Lu,1 Xiaobing Wang,2 Zhiqing You,1 Zhongchao Han,3,4 Fabin Han1 1Center for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, The Liaocheng People's Hospital, Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Liaocheng People's Hospital, Affiliated Liaocheng Hospital, Taishan Medical University, Shandong, People's Republic of China; 3The State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Hospital of Blood Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union of Medical College, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 4National Engineering Research Center of Cell Products, AmCellGene Co. Ltd., TEDA, Tianjin, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Human umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells (hUCB-MNCs were reported to have neurorestorative capacity for neurological disorders such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. This study was performed to explore if hUCB-MNC transplantation plays any therapeutic effects for Parkinson's disease (PD in a 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD. hUCB-MNCs were isolated from umbilical cord blood and administered to the striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. The apomorphine-induced locomotive turning-overs were measured to evaluate the improvement of motor dysfunctions of the rats after administration of hUCB-MNCs. We observed that transplanted hUCB-MNCs significantly improve the motor deficits of the PD rats and that grafted hUCB-MNCs integrated to the host brains and differentiated to neurons and dopamine neurons in vivo after 16 weeks of transplantation. Our study provided evidence that transplanted hUCB-MNCs play therapeutic effects in a rat PD model by differentiating to neurons and dopamine neurons. Keywords: hUCB-MNCs, Parkinson's disease, transplantation

  9. Comparison of Thyroid Blood Flow and Uptake Indices Using Technetium-99m Pertechnetate in Patients with Graves’ Disease and Euthyroid Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Javadi; Ali Mahmoud Pashazadeh; Iraj Nabipour

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate parameters of early blood flow (EBF) including duration of EBF, perfusion index (PI), uptake indexes 1 and 2 (UI1 and UI2) derived from dynamic thyroid scintigraphy in patients with Graves’ disease (GD), and euthyroid (EI). Maximum instant uptake and maximum uptake of the thyroid gland were also assessed. Methods: A total of 50 patients with GD and EI were included in this study. Each patient underwent two dynamic scans of 1-min...

  10. IFNγ production in peripheral blood of early Lyme disease patients to hLFAαL (aa326-345)

    OpenAIRE

    Wormser Gary P; Gomes-Solecki Maria JC; Dattwyler Raymond J

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background It has been proposed that outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto contains a T helper 1 (Th1) cell epitope that could play a role in an autoimmune response to hLFA1. Methods We used two peptides, hLFAαL (aa326-345) and Borrelia burgdorferi OspAB31 (aa164-183), as stimulating antigens to measure Th1 proinflammatory IFNγ cytokine production in peripheral blood of Lyme disease patients presenting with EM without history of arthritis, as well as in...

  11. Self-monitoring of blood glucose improved glycaemic control and 10-year coronary heart disease risk profile of type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ezenwaka Chidum; JonesLeCointe Altheia; Dimgba Agbai; Okali Fidelis; Skinner Teppany; Rodriguez Martina; Extavour Rian; Davis Verdine; Spencer Alida; Mayers Hasina

    2011-01-01

    Background The debate over the overall benefits of self-monitoring of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients is still continuing.We aimed to assess the difference in glycaemic control and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk levels of experimental type 2 diabetes patients provided with facilities for self-monitoring blood glucose and their counterparts without such facilities.Methods Sixty-one patients who had no prior experience in using glucometers were studied as intervention (n=30) and control (n=31) groups.The intervention group was trained in self-monitoring of blood glucose and documentation.Baseline blood glucose and fasting blood glucose were measured and the intervention patients were provided with glucometers and advised to self-monitor their fasting and postprandial blood glucose over six months.The 10-year CHD risk levels were determined with the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study-derived risk engine calculator.Results The age and diabetes duration were similar in the two groups (P >0.05).The majority of the patients were unemployed or retired females with only a primary level education.After 3 months,the haemogolbin A1c (HbA1c) levels of the control patients remained unchanged ((7.8±0.3)% vs.(7.9±0.4)%,P >0.05) whereas the HbA1c levels of the intervention patients were significantly reduced from the baseline at three ((9.6±0.3)% vs.(7.8±0.3)%,P <0.001) and six ((9.2±0.4)% vs.(7.5±0.3)%,P <0.001) months.Interestingly,while the 10-year CHD risk level of the control group remained unchanged after three months,that of the intervention group was remarkably reduced at three and six months from the baseline level ((7.4±1.3)% vs.(4.5±0.9)%,P=0.056).Conclusion Self-monitoring of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients significantly improved glycaemic control and the CHD risk profile,suggesting that type 2 diabetes patients will potentially benefit from inclusion of glucose meters and testing strips in their health-care package.

  12. Quantification of total apolipoprotein E and its specific isoforms in cerebrospinal fluid and blood in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Rezeli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A targeted mass spectrometric assay was developed for identification and quantification of apoE isoforms (apoE2, E3 and E4, and it was utilized for screening of samples from AD patients (n = 39 and patients with other neurodegenerative disorders (n = 38. The assay showed good linearity with LOQ corresponds to total apoE concentration of 0.8 and 40 ng/mL in CSF and plasma/serum, respectively. We identified apoE phenotypes with 100% accuracy in clinical samples. We found strong association between genotypes of the individuals and their apoE levels in blood; ϵ4 allele carriers had significantly lower apoE levels in blood than non-carriers.

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  14. Remnant Cholesterol, Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, and Blood Pressure as Mediators From Obesity to Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Smith, George Davey;

    2015-01-01

    lipoproteins, blood pressure, glucose, and C-reactive protein. METHODS AND RESULTS: Approximately 90 000 participants from Copenhagen were included in a Mendelian randomization design with mediation analyses. Associations were examined using conventional measurements of body mass index and intermediate...... pressure, and possibly also through elevated nonfasting glucose levels; however, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated C-reactive protein levels were not mediators in genetic analyses. The 3 intermediate variables that explained the highest excess risk of IHD from genetically determined...... obesity were low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with 8%, systolic blood pressure with 7%, and remnant cholesterol with 7% excess risk of IHD. Corresponding observational excess risks using conventional body mass index were 21%, 11%, and 20%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The increased IHD risk because of...

  15. Early reduction of Leishmania infantum-specific antibodies and blood parasitemia during treatment in dogs with moderate or severe disease

    OpenAIRE

    Solano-Gallego, Laia; Di Filippo, Laura; Ordeix, Laura; Planellas, Marta; Roura, Xavier; Altet, Laura; Martínez-Orellana, Pamela; Montserrat, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Leishmania infantum-specific antibodies are used extensively for the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment in canine leishmaniosis. Different views have been described for the measurement of L. infantum antibody levels for the monitoring of anti-leishmanial treatment. In addition, molecular techniques using blood are frequently employed in the clinical setting. However, there are not enough studies to prove the usefulness of PCR in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and in assessing t...

  16. Effects of renal artery stenting on renal function and blood pressure in patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张奇; 沈卫峰; 张瑞岩; 张建盛; 胡健; 张宪

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of percutaneous renal artery intervention on renal function and blood pressure in patients with renal artery stenosis. Methods Eighty-seven patients with severe uni- or bi-lateral renal artery stenosis (luminal diameter narrowing ≥70%) and clinical hypertension received renal artery stenting between January 2002 and December 2002. The changes in blood pressure and serum creatinine level and creatinine clearance (CCr) 48 hours after intervention and during 6 months of follow-up were assessed.Results Renal stenting was performed in 98 stenotic arteries of 87 patients, and the procedural success rate was 100%. Serum creatinine level was slightly elevated from (176±21) μmol/L to (179±11) μmol/L (P=0.15) 48 hours after the procedure, but significantly decreased to (149±15) μmol/L at 6 months (P<0.001). CCr was also greatly improved [(37±11) ml/min before versus (51±8) ml/min at 6 months, P<0.001]. During follow-up, 61% of the patients experienced a normal renal function. Despite conventional medical treatment, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were also significantly decreased after stenting [(163±23)/(96±13) mm Hg before versus (148±12)/(79±15) mm Hg at 6 months, all P<0.001], and hypertension was well controlled in 67% of the patients at 6 months ' follow-up.Conclusion Renal artery stenting has a high success rate and is effective in improving renal function and blood pressure for patients with severe renal artery stenosis.

  17. A study of eosinophil count in nasal and blood smear in allergic respiratory diseases in a rural setup

    OpenAIRE

    Naveen Kumar; Kiran Bylappa; Ramesh AC; Swetha Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Allergic respiratory disorders are fairly common visiting cases in pediatrics outpatient department (OPD). With an appropriate history and detailed examination, diagnosis may not be problematic. Routine investigation may not contribute much to the final diagnosis but may help in ruling out other possibilities. This study was done to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of blood or nasal eosinophilia in subjects suffering from allergic respiratory disorders and also to assess the feasibility o...

  18. Local blood pressure associates with the degree of luminal stenosis in patients with atherosclerotic disease in the middle cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanliang; Peng, Wenjia; Teng, Zhongzhao; Gillard, Jonathan H; Hong, Bo; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying atherosclerotic ischemic events within the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is unclear. High structural stress induced by blood pressure might be a potential aetiology as plaque rupture occurs when such mechanical loading exceeds its material strength. To perform reliable analyses quantifying the mechanical loading within a plaque, the local blood pressure is needed. However, data on MCA blood pressure is currently lacking. In this study, the arterial pressure proximal to the stenotic site in the MCA was measured in 15 patients scheduled for intervention. The relationships between these local measurements and pre-intervention and intra-intervention non-invasive arm measurements were assessed. The impact of luminal stenosis on the local blood pressure was quantified. Compared with the pre-intervention arm measurement, the intra-intervention arm pressure decreased significantly by 23.9 ± 11.8 and 9.3 ± 14.7 % at diastole and systole, respectively. The pressure proximal to the stenosis was much lower than the pre-intervention arm measurement (diastole: 65.3 ± 15.7 vs 82.0 ± 9.7, p pressure in the MCA in patients with stenosis pressure (22.8 ± 6.4 vs 11.1 ± 8.3, p = 0.01; unit: mmHg). However, diastolic pressure remained unaffected (69.2 ± 9.3 vs 62.8 ± 19.0, p = 0.58; unit: mmHg). In conclusion, the obtained results are helpful in understanding the local hemodynamic environment modulated by the presence of atherosclerosis. The local pressure measurements can be used for computational analysis to quantify the critical mechanical condition within an MCA lesion. PMID:27349223

  19. THE PROBLEMS OF PROVIDING INFECTIOUS DISEASE SAFETY FOR ORGAN AND TISSUE DONATION BY SCREENING BLOOD-BORNE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sh. Khubutiya; S. A. Solonin; M. A. Godkov

    2016-01-01

    It provided data on the prevalence, clinical signifi cance and methods of laboratory diagnostics for occult forms of blood-borne viral infections (BBVIs). It considered causes of such forms of infection and their signifi cance for clinical transplantation. We analyzed the existing algorithm of laboratory screening of a potential organ donor for BBVIs in Russia. It is shown that the current screening algorithm doesn’t allow detecting hidden forms of BBVIs.

  20. 晨峰性高血压临床意义及治疗%Morning blood pressure surge in cardiovascular diseases and new treatment strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑杨; 赵巍

    2012-01-01

    血压晨峰在近年来的高血压研究中受到越来越多的关注,多项研究证实血压晨峰与心脑血管病的发病及预后密切相关.现本文就血压晨峰的定义、临床意义及治疗策略做一简要综述.%Morning blood pressure surge( MBPS) has been recently studied more and more comprehensively and has been found to be associated with a variety of cardiovascular diseases, which should be taken into account in prevention and treatment of hypertension. In this context, we briefly reviewed the definition of MBPS, clinical association between MBPS and cardiovascular diseases and new treatment strategy on MBPS.