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Sample records for blood dendritic cells

  1. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important for...... internalization of CD91-targeted antigens to be presented on the dendritic cell surface for T-cell stimulation. Despite their overlap in functionality, the expression of CD91 and CD163 has never been compared and the expression of CD163 in the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage is not yet characterized. CD163...... expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...

  2. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  3. Thrombin regulates the function of human blood dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombin is the key enzyme in the coagulation cascade and activates endothelial cells, neutrophils and monocytes via protease-activated receptors (PARs). At the inflammatory site, immune cells have an opportunity to encounter thrombin. However little is known about the effect of thrombin for dendritic cells (DC), which are efficient antigen-presenting cells and play important roles in initiating and regulating immune responses. The present study revealed that thrombin has the ability to stimulate blood DC. Plasmacytoid DC (PDC) and myeloid DC (MDC) isolated from PBMC expressed PAR-1 and released MCP-1, IL-10, and IL-12 after thrombin stimulation. Unlike blood DC, monocyte-derived DC (MoDC), differentiated in vitro did not express PAR-1 and were unresponsive to thrombin. Effects of thrombin on blood DC were significantly diminished by the addition of anti-PAR-1 Ab or hirudin, serine protease inhibitor. Moreover, thrombin induced HLA-DR and CD86 expression on DC and the thrombin-treated DC induced allogenic T cell proliferation. These findings indicate that thrombin plays a role in the regulation of blood DC functions

  4. HIV-1 Infection of Placental Cord Blood Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    FOLCIK, RENEE M.; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Li, Yuan; GUO, CHANG-JIANG; Douglas, Steven D.; STARR, STUART E.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), have been implicated as the initial targets of HIV infection in skin and mucosal surfaces. DC can be generated in vitro from blood-isolated CD14+ monocytes or CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells in the presence of various cytokines. In this study, we investigated whether monocytes obtained from placental cord blood are capable of differentiation into dendritic cells when cultured with a combination of cytokines—granulocyte...

  5. In-Vitro differentiation of mature dendritic cells from human blood monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Gieseler; Dirk Heise; Afsaneh Soruri; Peter Schwartz; J. Hinrich Peters

    1998-01-01

    Representing the most potent antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DC) can now be generated from human blood monocytes. We recently presented a novel protocol employing GM-CSF, IL-4, and IFN-γ to differentiate monocyte-derived DC in vitro. Here, such cells are characterized in detail. Cells in culture exhibited both dendritic and veiled morphologies, the former being adherent and the latter suspended. Phenotypically, they were CD1a-/dim, CD11a+, CD11b++, CD11c+, CD14dim/-, CD16a-/dim, CD...

  6. The blood-brain barrier induces differentiation of migrating monocytes into Th17-polarizing dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Igal; Kébir, Hania; Bernard, Monique; Wosik, Karolina; Dodelet-Devillers, Aurore; Cayrol, Romain; Arbour, Nathalie; Prat, Alexandre

    2008-03-01

    Trafficking of antigen-presenting cells into the CNS is essential for lymphocyte reactivation within the CNS compartment. Although perivascular dendritic cells found in inflammatory lesions are reported to polarize naive CD4+ T lymphocytes into interleukin-17-secreting-cells, the origin of those antigen-presenting cells remains controversial. We demonstrate that a subset of CD14+ monocytes migrate across the inflamed human blood-brain barrier (BBB) and differentiate into CD83+CD209+ dendritic cells under the influence of BBB-secreted transforming growth factor-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We also demonstrate that these dendritic cells secrete interleukin-12p70, transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-6 and promote the proliferation and expansion of distinct populations of interferon-gamma-secreting Th1 and interleukin-17-secreting Th17 CD4+ T lymphocytes. We further confirmed the abundance of such dendritic cells in situ, closely associated with microvascular BBB-endothelial cells within acute multiple sclerosis lesions, as well as a significant number of CD4+ interleukin-17+ T lymphocytes in the perivascular infiltrate. Our data support the notion that functional perivascular myeloid CNS dendritic cells arise as a consequence of migration of CD14+ monocytes across the human BBB, through the concerted actions of BBB-secreted transforming growth factor-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. PMID:18156156

  7. Changes in dendritic cells and dendritic cell subpopulations in peripheral blood of recipients during acute rejection after kidney transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Linlin; Liu Yong; Wu Junjie; Xu Xiuhong; Liu Fen; Feng Lang; Xie Zelin

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in transplantation immunology show that the balance between dendritic cells (DCs) and their subsets can maintain stable immune status in the induction of tolerance after transplantation.The aim of this study was to investigate if DCs and DC subpopulations in recipient peripheral blood are effective diagnostic indicators of acute rejection following kidney transplantation.Methods Immunofluorescent flow cytometry was used to classify white blood cells (WBCs),the levels of mononuclear cells and DCs (including the dominant subpopulations,plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and myeloid DC (mDC)) in peripheral blood at 0,1,7,and 28 days and 1 year after kidney transplantation in 33 patients.In addition,the blood levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 were monitored before and after surgery.Fifteen healthy volunteers served as normal controls.Patients were undertaking hemodialysis owing to uremia before surgery.Results The total number of DCs,pDC,and mDC in peripheral blood and the pDC/mDC ratio were significantly lower in patients than controls (P <0.05).Peripheral DCs suddenly decreased at the end of day 1,then gradually increased through day 28 but remained below normal levels.After 1 year,levels were higher than before surgery but lower than normal.The mDC levels were higher in patients with acute rejection before and 1 day after surgery (P <0.005).There was no significant difference in IL-10 and IL-12 levels between patients with and without acute rejection.Conclusion The changes in DCs and DC subpopulations during the acute rejection period may serve as effective markers and referral indices for monitoring the immune state,and predicting rejection and reasonably adjusting immunosuppressants.

  8. Radioresistance of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate radiation sensitivity of dendritic cells in comparison with lymphocytes. T lymphocytes captured from peripheral blood were irradiated by 0 Gy, 10 Gy, 30 Gy. Apoptosis was measured by flowcytometry for staining of annexin V 4 hours after irradiation. Immature and mature dendritic cells processed from blood hematopoietic stem cell were irradiated by 0 Gy, 10 Gy, 30 Gy, 100 Gy respectively and apoptosis was measured by flowcytometry with time differences as 4h, 24h and 48h after irradiation. Morphometric analysis by percent nucleus was measured in three cell groups, also. Lymphocytes showed radiation sensitivity by increasing apoptotic fraction according to radiation dose. However, both mature and immature dendritic cells showed consistent fraction of apoptosis in spite of increasing radiation dose. Percent nucleus ratio is significantly higher in lymphocytes than that of mature or immature dendritic cells. Stimulation of T-cell by dendritic cells was not changed after irradiation. Dendritic cells showed radioresistance which was associated with small size of nucleus in comparison with lymphocytes and this result would be used as a basal data of radio-labelling for the cellular trafficking studies in nuclear medicine fields

  9. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ling-ling; ZHANG Zhe; ZHENG Jie-sheng; SHENG Ji-fang; LIU Ke-zhou

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed at developing a simple and easy way to generate dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) in vitro. Methods: PBMCs were isolated directly from white blood cell rather than whole blood and purified by patching methods (collecting the attached cell and removing the suspension cell). DCs were then generated by culturing PBMCs for six days with 30 ng/ml recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and 20 ng/ml recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) in vitro. On the sixth day, TNF-alpha (TNFα) 30 ng/ml was added into some DC cultures, which were then incubated for two additional days. The morphology was monitored by light microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy, and the phenotypes were determined by flow cytometry. Autologous mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR) were used to characterize DC function after TNFα or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulations for 24 h. Results: After six days of culture, the monocytes developed significant dendritic morphology and a portion of cells expressed CD 1 a, CD80 and CD86, features of DCs. TNFα treatment induced DCs maturation and up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD83. Autologous MLR demonstrated that these DCs possess potent T-cell stimulatory capacity. Conclusion: This study developed a simple and easy way to generate DCs from PBMCs exposed to rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4. The DCs produced by this method acquired morphologic and antigenic characteristics of DCs.

  10. Enumeration of blood dendritic cells in patients with multiple myeloma at presentation and through therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Simon J; Franklin, Ian M; Campbell, John D M

    2008-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterised by excess bone marrow plasma cells, serum and/or urine paraprotein, immune paraesis, renal failure and lytic bone lesions. Dendritic cells (DC) are key players in the adaptive and innate immune responses, but reside in tissues, so are difficult to quantify in vivo. By enumerating the blood DC pool, we aim to examine the influence of MM disease and accompanying therapy on the DC system. We have shown, using the BDCA DC detection kit, that blood pDC and mDC numbers are suppressed at diagnosis in MM, and uniquely, monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) and patients with plasmacytoma. B-cell numbers were also significantly reduced in MM, MGUS and patients with plasmacytoma (pnumber of mDC1 or pDC seen in the blood of patients with MM. The number of blood mDC1 improved transiently following auto hemopoietic stem cell transplantation, as numbers returned to within the normal range at engraftment and were maintained until D100. The number of blood mDC1 in patients taking thalidomide was also significantly higher than at relapse. These studies suggest that the defects in the B cell and blood DC pool is present in MGUS and plasmacytoma as well as patients with MM and can recover following therapy. PMID:19052974

  11. Production of dendritic cells and cytokine-induced killer cells from banked umbilical cord blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood (UCB is considered to be a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. All UCB banks have recently become interested in the isolation and storage of HSCs for the treatment of hematological diseases. However, UCB was also recently confirmed as a source of immune cells for immunotherapy such as dendritic cells (DCs and cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs. This study aimed to exploit this source of immune cells in banked UCB samples. After collection of UCB samples, mononuclear cells (MNCs containing stem cells, progenitor cells, and mature cells were isolated by Ficoll-Hypaque-based centrifugation. The MNCs were subjected to freezing and thawing according to a previously published protocol. The banked MNCs were used to produce DCs and CIKs. To produce DCs, MNCs were induced in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with GM-CSF (50 ng/ml and IL-4 (40 ng/ml for 14 days. To produce CIKs, MNCs were induced in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, IL-3, and GMC-SF for 21 and ndash;28 days. Both DCs and CIKs were evaluated for their phenotypes and functions according to previously published protocols. The results showed that banked UCB samples can be successfully used to produce functional DCs and CIKs. These samples are valuable sources of immune cells for immunotherapy. The present results suggest that banked UCB samples are useful not only for stem cell isolation, but also for immune cell production. [Biomed Res Ther 2015; 2(11.000: 402-408

  12. Decreased numbers of peripheral blood dendritic cells in patients with coronary artery disease are associated with diminished plasma Flt3 ligand levels and impaired plasmacytoid dendritic cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Van Brussel, Ilse; Van Vré, Emily A; De Meyer, Guido RY; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Bosmans, Johan M; Bult, Hidde

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: We investigate whether activation of circulating DCs or levels of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), haematopoietic growth factors important for dendritic cell (DC) differentiation, could account for reduced blood DC numbers in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Methods: Concentrations of Flt3L and GM-CSF were measured in plasma from CAD patients (n=15) and controls (n=12). Frequenc...

  13. The induction of dendritic cell from human peripheral blood and its biological characteristics observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To establish the method of inducing and proliferating dendritic cells (DC) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro and analyze its biological characteristics. Method: After the post-mobilization treatment PBMCs were collected and cultured for 2 hours and then the floating cells were removed. Cytokines including IL-4, GM-CSF and TNF-α were added into the fresh medium. After 8 days culture, phenotypes were analyzed by FACS. The level of IL-12 in the supernatant was detected by ELISA. The induced DCs were also co-cultured with naive T cells derived from cord blood. Its stimulating index was detected by 3H-TdR assay. Results: The mobilized adherent PBMCs cultured in the above medium highly expressed differential antigens (CD1a:89.1%, CD40:99.8%, CD80:95.1%, CD83:45.7%, HLA-DR:97.6%). Nevertheless, the induced DC can secrete IL-12 and effectively stimulate naive T cells to proliferate (SI = 6.92). Conclusion: It is an applicable method by using mobilized blood as a source after adherent treatment and being cultured in the above medium containing cytokines to generate DCs with high purity and special functions. Moreover, CD34+ purification is not necessary in the process

  14. Antitumor activities of human dendritic cells derived from peripheral and cord blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Kun Zhang; Jun Li; Hai-Bin Chen; Jin-Lun Sun; Yao-Juan Qu; Juan-Juan Lu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To observe the biological specialization of humanperipheral blood dendritic cells (DC) and cord blood derivedDC and its effects on effector cells killing humanhepatocarcinoma cell line BEL-7402 in vitro.METHODS: The DC biological characteristics were detectedwith immunohistochemical and MTT assay. Two antitumorexperimental groups are: peripheral blood DC and cordblood DC groups. Peripheral blood DC groups used LAKcells as the effector cells and BEL-7402 as target cells, whilecord blood DC groups used CTL induced by tumor antigentwice pulsed DC as effector cells and BEL-7402 as targetcells, additional peripheral blood DC and cord blood DC areadded to observe its stimulating activities to effector cells.The effector's cytotoxicity to tumor cells were detected withneutral red colorimetric assay at two effector/target ratios of5:1 and 10: 1.RESULTS: Peripheral blood DC and cord blood DC highlyexpressed HLA-ABC, HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, CD54 and S-100protein. The stimulating activities to lymphocyteproliferation were compared between experimental groups(DC added) and control group (no DC added). In sixexperiment subgroups, the DC/lymphocyte ratio wassequentially 0.25: 100, 0.5: 100, 1: 100, 2: 100, 4: 100 and 8:100, A values(x± s) were 0.75396± 0.009, 0.84916± 0.010,0.90894± 0.012, 0.98371 ± 0.007, 1.01299 ± 0.006 and 1.20384± 0.006 in peripheral blood DC groups and 0.77650 ± 0.005,0.83008± 0.007, 0.92725 ± 0.007, 1.05990 ± 0.010, 1.15583 ±0.011, 1.22983 ± 0.011 in cord blood DC groups. A value was0.59517 ± 0.005 in control group. The stimulating activitieswere higher in experimental groups than in control group ( P< 0.01 ), which were increased when the DC concentrationwas enlarged ( P < 0.01 ). Two differently derived DCs hadthe same phenotypes and similar stimulating activities ( P >0.05). In peripheral blood DC groups, the cytotoxicity (x ±s) of the LD groups (experimental groups) and L groups(control group) was 58.16% ± 2.03% (5: 1), 46.18% ±2

  15. Dysfunction of peripheral blood dendritic cells from patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Sheng Wang1; Li-He Xing; Ming-Xu Liu; Cnuan-Lin Zhu; Hui-Gang Liu; Hui- Fen Wang; Zhou-Yun Lei

    2001-01-01

    AIM To identify the property of dendritic cella (DCs) of peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC) in patlents with chronic HBV infection. METHODS Twenty patients with persistent HBV infectlon were included in this study, 10 healthy subjects being used as a control group. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of T cell-depleted populations were incubated and induced into mature dendritic cells in the RPMI-1640 medium in the presence of cytokines GMCSF, IL-4, FLt-3, TNF-α and 100 mL@ L-1 of fetal calf serum for a total of 10 - 12 days. The expressions of surface markers on DCs were evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. ELISA method was used to determine the cytokine levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10 in the supernatant produced by DCs. For detection of the stimulatory capacity of DCs to T cell proliferation,mytomycin C-treated DC were incubated with allogenic T cells. RESULTS A typical morphology of mature DCs from healthy subjects and HBV-infected patients was induced in in vitro incubation, but the proliferation ability and cellular number of DCs from HBV-infected patients significantly decreased compared with healthy individuals. In particular, the expression levels of HLADR, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on DC surface from patients were also lower than that from healthy individuals (0.46 vs 0.92 for HLA-DR, 0.44 vs 0.88 for CD80 and 0.44 vs 0. 84 for CD86, P< 0.05). The stimulatory capacity and production of IL-12 of DCs from patients in allogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR) significantly decreased, but the production level of nitric oxide (NO) by DCa simultaneously increased compared with healthy subjects (86± 15 vs 170±22 μmoI@L 1, P<0.05). CONCLUSION The patients with chronic HBV infection have the defective function and immature phenotype of dendritic cells, which may be associated with the inability of efficient presentation of HBV antigens to host immune system for the clearance of HBV.

  16. Lethal effect of mononuclear cells derived from human umbilical cord blood differentiating into dendritic cells after in vitro induction of cytokines on neuroblastoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenghai Qu; Jianxin Zuo; Lirong Sun; Xindong Qu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cell is the most major antigen presenting cell of organism. It is proved in recent studies that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells induced and cultured in vitro by recombinant human granuIocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhG-MCSF) and recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhlL-4) can generate a great many dendritic cells and promote the lethal effect of T cells on human neuroblastoma, but it is unclear that whether the lethal effect is associated with the most proper concentration of dendritic cells.OBJ ECTIVE: To investigate the lethal effect of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells induced in vitro by cytokines differentiating into dendritic cells on human neuroblastoma, and its best concentration range.DESIGN: Open experiment.SETTING: Department of Pediatrics, the Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University.MATERIALS: The study was carried out in the Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory (Laboratory for the Department of Pediatrics of the Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University) during September 2005 to May 2006.Human umbilical cord blood samples were taken from the healthy newborn infants of full-term normal delivery during October to November 2005 in the Medical School Hospital of Qingdao University, and were voluntarily donated by the puerperas. Main instruments: type 3111 CO2 incubator (Forma Scientific, USA), type 550 ELISA Reader (Bio-Rad, USA). Main reagents: neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH (Shanghai Institute of Life Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences), RPMI-1640 culture fluid and fetal bovine serum (Hyclone), rhlL-4 (Promega, USA), rhG-MCSF (Harbin Pharmaceutic Group Bioengineering Co. Ltd), rat anti-human CD1a monoclonal antibody and FITC-labeled rabbit anti-rat IgG (Xiehe Stem cell Gene Engineering Co. Ltd).METHODS: ① Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells obtained with attachment methods differentiated into human umbilical cord blood dendritic cells, presenting typical morphology of

  17. Microbial Carriage State of Peripheral Blood Dendritic cells (DCs) in Chronic Periodontitis Influences DC Differentiation, Atherogenic Potential†

    OpenAIRE

    Carrion, Julio; Scisci, Elizabeth; Miles, Brodie; Sabino, Gregory J.; Zeituni, Amir E.; Gu, Ying; Bear, Adam; Genco, Caroline A.; Brown, David L.; Cutler, Christopher W

    2012-01-01

    The low grade oral infection chronic periodontitis (CP) has been implicated in coronary artery disease risk, but the mechanisms are unclear. Here, a pathophysiological role for blood dendritic cells (DCs) in systemic dissemination of oral mucosal pathogens to atherosclerotic plaques was investigated in humans. The frequency and microbiome of CD19−BDCA-1+DC-SIGN+ blood myeloid DCs (mDCs) were analyzed in CP subjects with, or without existing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and in healthy control...

  18. Differential induction from X-irradiated human peripheral blood monocytes to dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which plays an essential role in the immune system. To clarify the influences of ionizing radiation on the differentiation to DCs, we focused on human peripheral blood monocytes and investigated whether X-irradiated monocytes can differentiate into DCs. The non-irradiated monocytes and 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were induced into immature DCs (iDCs) and mature DCs (mDCs) with appropriate cytokine stimulation, and the induced cells from each monocyte expressed each DC-expressing surface antigen such as CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR. However, the expression levels of CD40 and CD86 on the iDCs derived from the 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were higher than those of iDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. Furthermore, the mDCs derived from 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes had significantly less ability to stimulate allogeneic T cells in comparison to the mDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. There were no significant differences in the phagocytotic activity of the iDCs and cytokines detected in the supernatants conditioned by the DCs from the non-irradiated and irradiated monocytes. These results suggest that human monocytes which are exposed to ionizing radiation can thus differentiate into DCs, but there is a tendency that X-irradiation leads to an impairment of the function of DCs. (author)

  19. Blood dendritic cell frequency declines in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and is associated with motor symptom severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ciaramella

    Full Text Available The role of inflammation in Parkinson's Disease (PD is well appreciated, but its underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Our objective was to determine whether dendritic cells (DC, a unique type of migratory immune cells that regulate immunological response and inflammation have an impact on PD. In a case-control study including 80 PD patients and 80 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, the two main blood subsets of plasmacytoid and myeloid DC were defined by flow cytometry analysis. Clinical evaluation of subjects consisting of cognition and depression assessment was performed using the Mini Mental State Examination and the Beck Depression Inventory. The severity of motor symptoms was measured using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Part III. Comparison between patient and control DC measures and their relationships with clinical assessments were evaluated.The following main results were obtained: 1 the level of circulating DC (mainly the myeloid subset was significantly reduced in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls; 2 after controlling for depressive and cognitive characteristics, the frequency of myeloid DC was confirmed as one of the independent determinants of PD; 3 the number of both myeloid and plasmacytoid DC was negatively associated with motor symptom severity. Overall, the decline of blood DC, perhaps due to the recruitment of immune cells to the site of disease-specific lesions, can be considered a clue of the immune alteration that characterizes PD, suggesting innovative exploitations of DC monitoring as a clinically significant tool for PD treatment. Indeed, this study suggests that reduced peripheral blood DC are a pathologically-relevant factor of PD and also displays the urgency to better understand DC role in PD for unraveling the immune system contribution to disease progression and thus favoring the development of innovative therapies ideally based on immunomodulation.

  20. Blood dendritic cell frequency declines in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and is associated with motor symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramella, Antonio; Salani, Francesca; Bizzoni, Federica; Pontieri, Francesco E; Stefani, Alessandro; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Assogna, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Bossù, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation in Parkinson's Disease (PD) is well appreciated, but its underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Our objective was to determine whether dendritic cells (DC), a unique type of migratory immune cells that regulate immunological response and inflammation have an impact on PD. In a case-control study including 80 PD patients and 80 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, the two main blood subsets of plasmacytoid and myeloid DC were defined by flow cytometry analysis. Clinical evaluation of subjects consisting of cognition and depression assessment was performed using the Mini Mental State Examination and the Beck Depression Inventory. The severity of motor symptoms was measured using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Part III. Comparison between patient and control DC measures and their relationships with clinical assessments were evaluated.The following main results were obtained: 1) the level of circulating DC (mainly the myeloid subset) was significantly reduced in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls; 2) after controlling for depressive and cognitive characteristics, the frequency of myeloid DC was confirmed as one of the independent determinants of PD; 3) the number of both myeloid and plasmacytoid DC was negatively associated with motor symptom severity. Overall, the decline of blood DC, perhaps due to the recruitment of immune cells to the site of disease-specific lesions, can be considered a clue of the immune alteration that characterizes PD, suggesting innovative exploitations of DC monitoring as a clinically significant tool for PD treatment. Indeed, this study suggests that reduced peripheral blood DC are a pathologically-relevant factor of PD and also displays the urgency to better understand DC role in PD for unraveling the immune system contribution to disease progression and thus favoring the development of innovative therapies ideally based on immunomodulation. PMID:23776473

  1. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H;

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-a and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was prospecti......In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-a and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was...

  2. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H;

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was prospecti......In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high) , was...

  3. Effect of ovarian hormones on maturation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewardana, Viskam; Sugiura, Kikuya; Wijesekera, Daluthgamage Patsy H; Hatoya, Shingo; Nishimura, Toshiya; Kanegi, Ryoji; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Inaba, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Previously, we reported that ovarian hormones affect the immune response against E. coli isolated from the dogs affected with pyometra. In order to investigate mechanisms underlying the immune modulation, we examined the effects of ovarian hormones on the generation of dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cell. DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMOs) using a cytokine cocktail. Both estrogen receptor and progesterone receptors were expressed by the PBMOs and immature DCs. When various ovarian hormones were added to the culture for the DC differentiation, progesterone significantly decreased the expression of DC maturation markers, such as CD1a, CD80 and CD86, on mature DCs. Conversely, the addition of estrogen to the cultures increased the expression of CD86, but not other maturation makers. Furthermore, DCs differentiated in the presence of progesterone did not stimulate allogeneic mononuclear cells in PB. Taken together, these results indicate that progesterone diminishes the maturation of DCs, leading to decreased immune responses against invading pathogens. PMID:25715707

  4. Blood Dendritic Cells: Canary in the Coal Mine to Predict Chronic Inflammatory Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodie eMiles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of risk factors for chronic inflammatory diseases are unknown. This makes personalized medicine for assessment, prognosis, and choice of therapy very difficult. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that low-grade subclinical infections may be an underlying cause of many chronic inflammatory diseases and thus may contribute to secondary outcomes (e.g. cancer. Many diseases are now categorized as inflammatory-mediated diseases that stem from a dysregulation in host immunity. There is a growing need to study the links between low-grade infections, the immune responses they elicit, and how this impacts overall health. One such link explored in detail here is the extreme sensitivity of myeloid dendritic cells (mDC in peripheral blood to chronic low-grade infections and the role that these mDCs play in arbitrating the resulting immune responses. We find that emerging evidence supports a role for pathogen-induced mDCs in chronic inflammation leading to increased risk of secondary clinical disease. The mDCs that are elevated in the blood as a result of low-grade bacteremia often do not trigger a productive immune response, but can disseminate the pathogen throughout the host. This aberrant trafficking of mDCs can accelerate systemic inflammatory disease progression. Conversely, restoration of DC homeostasis may aid in pathogen elimination and minimize dissemination. Thus it would seem prudent when assessing chronic inflammatory disease risk to consider blood mDC numbers, and the microbial content (microbiome and activation state of these mDCs. These may provide important clues (the canary in the coal mine of high inflammatory disease risk. This will facilitate development of novel immunotherapies to eliminate such smoldering infections in atherosclerosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and pre-eclampsia.

  5. Incomplete activation of peripheral blood dendritic cells during healthy human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bella, S; Giannelli, S; Cozzi, V; Signorelli, V; Cappelletti, M; Cetin, I; Villa, M L

    2011-05-01

    Successful pregnancy relies on the adaptation of immune responses that allow the fetus to grow and develop in the uterus despite being recognized by maternal immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central to the control of immune tolerance, and their state of activation at the maternal-decidual interface is critical to the feto-maternal immunological equilibrium. So far, the involvement of circulating DCs has been investigated poorly. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether, during healthy human pregnancy, peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) undergo changes that may be relevant to the adaptation of maternal immune responses that allow fetal tolerance. In a cross-sectional study, we analysed PBDCs by six-colour flow cytometry on whole blood samples from 47 women during healthy pregnancy progression and 24 non-pregnant controls. We demonstrated that both myeloid and plasmacytoid PBDCs undergo a state of incomplete activation, more evident in the third trimester, characterized by increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production but lacking human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR up-regulation. To investigate the contribution of soluble circulating factors to this phenomenon, we also performed culture experiments showing that sera from pregnant women added to control DCs conditioned a similar incomplete activation that was associated with reduced DC allostimulatory capacity, supporting the in vivo relevance of our findings. We also obtained evidence that the glycoprotein hormone activin-A may contribute to DC incomplete activation. We suggest that the changes of PBDCs occurring during late pregnancy may aid the comprehension of the immune mechanisms operated by the maternal immune system to maintain fetal tolerance. PMID:21352205

  6. Functional canine dendritic cells can be generated in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and contain a cytoplasmic ultrastructural marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibisch, C; Pradal, G; Bach, J M; Lieubeau, B

    2005-03-01

    For physiological and practical reasons the dog is a large animal model used increasingly to study the pathogenesis of human diseases and new therapeutic approaches, in particular for immune disorders. However, some immunological resources are lacking in this model, especially concerning dendritic cells. The aim of our study was to develop an efficient method to generate dendritic cells (DC) in vitro from dog peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to characterize their functional, structural and ultrastructural properties. PBMC were cultured in vitro with IL-4 and GM-CSF. After 1 week of culture, a great proportion of non-adherent cells displayed typical cytoplasmic processes, as evidenced both by optical and electron microscopy. Cytometric analysis revealed the presence of 41.7+/-24.6% CD14+ cells expressing both CD11c and MHC class II molecules. Allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions confirmed the ability of these cultures to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic lymphocytes as already reported as a characteristic of DC in other species. In addition, we describe for the first time the presence in canine DC of cytoplasmic periodic microstructures (PMS) that could represent ultrastructural markers of canine DC. In conclusion, our study provides an easy method to generate DC from PBMC in sufficient numbers for immunological in vitro investigations in dogs, a pre-clinical model for many human diseases. PMID:15847807

  7. Closed system generation of dendritic cells from a single blood volume for clinical application in immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, M; van Zanten, J; Hospers, GAP; Setroikromo, A; de Jong, MA; de Leij, LFMH; Mulder, NH

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) used for clinical trials should be processed oil a large scale conforming to current good manufacturing practice (cGM P) guidelines. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of immature DC in a closed-systern. Aphereses were performed with th

  8. Liver accumulation of Plasmodium chabaudi-infected red blood cells and modulation of regulatory T cell and dendritic cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia M Medeiros

    Full Text Available It is postulated that accumulation of malaria-infected Red Blood Cells (iRBCs in the liver could be a parasitic escape mechanism against full destruction by the host immune system. Therefore, we evaluated the in vivo mechanism of this accumulation and its potential immunological consequences. A massive liver accumulation of P. c. chabaudi AS-iRBCs (Pc-iRBCs was observed by intravital microscopy along with an over expression of ICAM-1 on day 7 of the infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Phenotypic changes were also observed in regulatory T cells (Tregs and dendritic cells (DCs that were isolated from infected livers, which indicate a functional role for Tregs in the regulation of the liver inflammatory immune response. In fact, the suppressive function of liver-Tregs was in vitro tested, which demonstrated the capacity of these cells to suppress naive T cell activation to the same extent as that observed for spleen-Tregs. On the other hand, it is already known that CD4+ T cells isolated from spleens of protozoan parasite-infected mice are refractory to proliferate in vivo. In our experiments, we observed a similar lack of in vitro proliferative capacity in liver CD4+ T cells that were isolated on day 7 of infection. It is also known that nitric oxide and IL-10 are partially involved in acute phase immunosuppression; we found high expression levels of IL-10 and iNOS mRNA in day 7-infected livers, which indicates a possible role for these molecules in the observed immune suppression. Taken together, these results indicate that malaria parasite accumulation within the liver could be an escape mechanism to avoid sterile immunity sponsored by a tolerogenic environment.

  9. Chemokine regulation in response to beryllium exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to beryllium (Be) induces a delayed-type hypersensitivity immune reaction in the lungs of susceptible individuals, which leads to the onset of Be sensitivity and Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). Although some mechanistic aspects of CBD have begun to be characterized, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Be activates the host immune response. To gain insight into the cellular response to Be exposure, we have performed global microarray analysis using a mixture of peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells (PBMC/DCs) from a non-CBD source to identify genes that are specifically upregulated in response to BeSO4 stimulation, compared to a control metal salt, Al2(SO4)3. We identified a number of upregulated immunomodulatory genes, including several chemokines in the MIP-1 and GRO families. Using PBMC/DCs from three different donors, we demonstrate that BeSO4 stimulation generally exhibits an increased rate of both chemokine mRNA transcription and release compared to Al2(SO4)3 exposure, although variations among the individual donors do exist. We show that MIP-1α and MIP-1β neutralizing antibodies can partially inhibit the ability of BeSO4 to stimulate cell migration of PBMC/DCs in vitro. Finally, incubation of PBMC/DCs with BeSO4 altered the binding of the transcription factor RUNX to the MIP-1α promoter consensus sequence, indicating that Be can regulate chemokine gene activation. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which Be stimulation of PBMC/DCs can modulate the expression and release of different chemokines, leading to the migration of lymphocytes to the lung and the formation of a localized environment for development of Be disease in susceptible individuals

  10. In vitro generation of functional dendritic cells differentiated from CD34 negative cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yo Seph; Shin, Changsik; Hwang, Han Sung; Zenke, Martin; Han, Dong Wook; Kang, Young Sun; Ko, Kisung; Do, Yoonkyung; Ko, Kinarm

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells that play a crucial role in the initiation of an immune response. As DC-based therapeutic applications is increasing, large-scale DC production is required for transplantation. Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been shown to contain a rare and precious population of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which can give rise to DCs. The CD34 antigen has been widely used as a cell surface marker to identify HSCs. In this study, we used CD34 antibody to isolate CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells and compared the ability to differentiate into DCs. We used a two-step method combined with the magnetic bead sorting system to isolate CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells from human UCB. Analysis of cellular properties and functionality using a migration assay and T cell proliferation assay revealed no significant differences between CD34(+) cells and CD34(-) cells in their ability to generate DCs. PMID:25976739

  11. The role of hepatocyte growth factor in the differentiation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to find out the effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the development of dendritic cells (DC) from the peripheral monocytes. The study was carried out in Black Sea Technical Hospital, Trabzon, Turkey between 2003-2004. Seven different cytokines combinations were employed to assess phenotypical and functional differences of DCs from the peripheral monocytes in serum free culture media. Peripheral monocytes were incubated in media with cytokines for 5 days. The tumor necrosis factor-aplha (TNF-alpha) was added to the cell culture on day 5 and incubated for another 2 days. Surface and co-stimulating molecules on the cells were assessed by flowcytometry. The functional capacity of the DCs was evaluated on day 7 by purified protein derivative loading and subsequent lymphoproliferation test using methyl tetrazolium staining. On the 5th day of incubation DC development was observed in all cytokine groups, but cells were superior in cultures maintained in the presence of interleukin-4 combinations with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or with GM-CSF+HGF. Moreover, the expression of surface and co-stimulating molecules increased significantly after incubation with TNF-alpha. The effect of PPD loaded-DCs on proliferation of lymphocytes was more striking in HGF containing groups. It was concluded that HGF supplemented cultures exert some additive effects in relation to function of monocyte-derived DCs. But HGF alone does not seem to augment monocyte-derived DC proliferation and maturation significantly. (author)

  12. Effects of dendritic cells from cord blood CD34+ cells on human hepatocarcinoma cell line BEL-7402 in vitro and in SCID mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Jing Su; Hai-Bin Chen; Jin-Kun Zhang; Lan Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop a cancer vaccine of dendritic cells derived from human cord blood CD34+ cells and to investigate its cytotoxicity on human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in sever combined immunodeficiency (SCTD) mice.METHODS: Lymphocytes from cord blood or peripheral blood were primed by DCs, which were derived from cord blood and pulsed with whole tumor cell lysates. Nonradiative neutral red uptake assay was adopted to detect the cytotoxicity of primed lymphocytes on human hepatocarcinoma cell line BEL-7402 in vitro. The anti-tumor effect of primed lymphocytes in vivo was detected in SCID mice, including therapeutic effect and vaccination effect.RESULTS: The cytotoxicity of DC vaccine primed lymphocytes from cord blood or peripheral blood on human hepatocarcinoma cell line BEL-7402 was significantly higher than that of unprimed lymphocytes in vitro (44.09% vs 14.69%,47.92% vs 19.44%, P<0.01). There was no significant difference between the cytotoxicity of primed lymphocytes from cord blood and peripheral blood (P>0.05). The tumor growth rate and tumor size were smaller in SCID mice treated or vaccinated with primed lymphocytes than those with unprimed lymphocytes. SCID mice vaccinated with primed lymphocytes had a lower tumor incidence (80%vs 100%, P<0.05) and delayed tumor latent period compared with mice vaccinated with unprimed lymphocytes (11 d vs 7 d, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Vaccine of cord blood derived-DCs has an inhibitory activity on growth of human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in SCID mice. The results also implicate the potential role of cord blood derived-DC vaccine in clinical tumor immunotherapy.

  13. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma exerts systemic effects on the peripheral blood myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: an indicator of disease severity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) isolated from tumor bearing animals or from individuals with solid tumors display functional abnormalities and the DC impairment has emerged as one mechanism for tumor evasion from the control of the immune system. Ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic cancer, is recognized as a very aggressive cancer type with a mortality that almost matches the rate of incidence. We examined the systemic influence ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exerted on levels of peripheral blood DCs and inflammatory mediators in comparison to the effects exerted by other pancreatic tumors, chronic pancreatitis, and age-matched controls. All groups examined, including PDAC, had decreased levels of myeloid DCs (MDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (PDC) and enhanced apoptosis in these cells as compared to controls. We found elevated levels of PGE2 and CXCL8 in subjects with PDAC, and chronic pancreatitis. Levels of these inflammatory factors were in part restored in PDAC after tumor resection, whereas the levels of DCs were impaired in the majority of these patients ~12 weeks after tumor removal. Our results prove that solid pancreatic tumors, including PDAC, systemically affect blood DCs. The impairments do not seem to be tumor-specific, since similar results were obtained in subjects with chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, we found that PDAC patients with a survival over 2 years had significant higher levels of blood DCs compared to patients with less than one year survival. Our findings points to the involvement of inflammation in the destruction of the blood MDCs and PDCs. Furthermore, the preservation of the blood DCs compartment in PDAC patients seems to benefit their ability to control the disease and survival

  14. [Dendritic Cells Promote the Proliferation of Peripheral Blood CRTH2 Cells (CD4(+)CD294(+)Th2) and Help B Cells to Secrete Immunoglobulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fa-Qing; Li, Juan; Li, Ju-Heng; Tang, Mei-Qin; Cheng, Xiao-Hui; Huang, Ying-Cai; Li, Hui-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Objective:To investigate the promotive effect of dendritic cells(DCs) on proliferation of CRTH2 (CD4(+)CD294(+)Th2) cells and the influence of CRTH2 cells on secretion of immunoglobulin from B cells so as to provide a new approach for amplification and sorting of Th2 cells. Methods:DCs were induced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, then the loaded-BCGV-Ag-DCs were cocultured with T cells, and the mixed lymphocyte reaction(MLR) was performed by CCK8 method. The phenotypes of DCs and CRTH2 cells were detected by flow cytometry. CRTH2 cells sorted by MACS were co-cultured with B cells for 5 days to detect the secretion of immunoglobulin. Results:The subsets and absolute number CRTH2 cells were significantly increased by loaded-BCGV-Ag-DCs. The levels of IgG, IgA and IgE were higher increased in supernatant of CRTH2 and B cell co-culture system than that in control group or that in transwell group(Pcells can be greatly promoted by loaded-BCGV-Ag-DCs, and the CRTH2 cells can help B cells to secrete IgG, IgA and IgE. PMID:27531793

  15. The effect of Propionibacterium acnes on maturation of dendritic cells derived from acne patients' peripherial blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Juszkiewicz-Borowiec

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris which is the most common cutaneous disorder. It has a proinflammatory activity and takes part in immune reactions modulating the Th1/Th2 cellular response. The exposure of dendritic cells (DCs to whole bacteria, their components, cytokines or other inflammatory stimuli and infectious agents induces differentiation from immature DCs into antigen-presenting mature DCs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the capability of P. acnes to induce the maturation of DCs. We stimulated monocyte derived dendritic cells (Mo-DCs from acne patients with various concetrations of heat-killed P. acnes (10(6-10(8 bacteria/ml cultured from acne lesions. The results showed an increase in CD80+/CD86+/DR+ and CD83+/CD1a+/DR+ cells percentage depending on the concetration of P. acnes. The expression of CD83 and CD80 (shown as the mean fluorescence intensity - MFI increased with higher concetrations of P. acnes. There were also significant correlations between MFI of CD83, CD80, CD86 and concetration of P. acnes. The study showed that P. acnes in the concetration of 10(8 bacteria/ml is most effective in the induction of Mo-DCs maturation. Futher studies concerning the influence on the function of T cells are needed.

  16. The Influence of IFN-α on Blood Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chongyang Wu; Liansheng Zhang; Ye Chai; Feixue Song; Pengyun Zeng; Lijuan Li; Lingling Yue; Bin Xiong

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the mechanism of IFN on CML.METHODS Samples of 15 CML patients and 10 healthy controls were studied. The flow cytometry was performed to identify circulating pDCs. The concentration of IFN-α in serum and that in the supematant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)cultured after stimulation with CpG ODN2216 were examined both in CML patients and in the healthy controls RESULTS There was significant reduction in the number of circulating pDCs, serum concentration of IFN-α and the capacity of IFN-α producing PBMCs in CML patients compared with those in healthy control individuals (P < 0.001). After the active treatment with IFN-α and hydroxyurea, the quantity and function of pDCs were increased in stabilized patients, especially the function of pDCs in 2 patients achieving major cytogenetic.response (MCR). The proportion and function of pDCs and the serum levels of IFN were inversely correlated with both WBC and age of the patients with CML, and positively correlated with the state of the illness.dysfunction of circulating pDCs. The active treatment with IFN in CML patients may be related to the restoration of pDCs.

  17. Dendritic Cells and Liver Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Adeeb H.; Aloman, Costica

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a relative rare population of specialized antigen presenting cells that are distributed through most lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and play a critical role in linking the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The liver contains a heterogeneous population of dendritic cells that may contribute to liver inflammation and fibrosis through a number of mechanisms. This review summarizes current knowledge on the development and characterization of liver dendritic cel...

  18. An alternative flow cytometry strategy for peripheral blood dendritic cell enumeration in the setting of repetitive GM-CSF dosing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Rita S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enumeration of circulating peripheral blood dendritic cells (DCs is complicated by the absence of a unique cell surface marker expressed on all DC subsets and by the use of various biological adjuvants to modulate the DC compartment, including granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF. Common methods employ a cocktail of antibodies, typically including anti-CD14, to define a lineage negative, MHC class II positive, putative DC population. Reported flow cytometry protocols include highly variable gating strategies and DC identification criteria. Increasing appreciation of DC pleiomorphism, GM-CSF biology, and recognition of CD14 expression in some DC subsets led us to consider an alternative lineage cocktail to improve identification of the circulating DC pool. Methods Standard whole blood staining with appropriate fluorochrome conjugated antibodies to MHC class II and either standard CD14 containing, or an alternate CD66acde containing, lineage cocktail was performed on samples obtained from normal donors and breast cancer patients before and after administration of dose-dense, cytotoxic chemotherapy with daily GM-CSF hematopoetic growth factor support. Putative DCs were enumerated by standard flow cytometry. Data set differences were evaluated using two tailed Mann-Whitney or Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Cellular morphology was examined in cell-sorted populations from post GM-CSF samples. Results Use of either antibody cocktail defined comparably sized lineage negative, MHC class II positive populations in normal donors and at baseline in cancer patients. However, selection of lineage negative subsets with increasing MHC class II expression levels yielded larger putative DC populations identified with the alternate cocktail. Both cocktails yielded highly reproducible data. Use of the alternate cocktail: 1 yielded a putative DC population, post GM-CSF that was more homogenous and consistent with DCs, 2 resulted

  19. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan; Claesson, Mogens; Nielsen, Hans; Rosenberg, Jacob

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction of......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....... responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior to...

  20. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Nielsen, Hans J; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction of......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....... responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior to...

  1. Dendritic cells in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-12-01

    The lungs are constantly exposed to antigens, most of which are non-pathogenic and do not require the induction of an immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are situated at the basolateral site of the lungs and continuously scan the environment to detect the presence of pathogens and subsequently initiate an immune response. They are a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells that exert specific functions. Compelling evidence is now provided that DCs are both sufficient and necessary to induce allergic responses against several inhaled harmless allergens. How various DC subsets exactly contribute to the induction of allergic asthma is currently a subject of intense investigation. We here review the current progress in this field. PMID:24455765

  2. Cytokine-Mediated Loss of Blood Dendritic Cells During Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Acute Infectious Mononucleosis: Implication for Immune Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkar, Archana; Smith, Corey; Hislop, Andrew; Tellam, Nick; Dasari, Vijayendra; Hogquist, Kristin A; Wykes, Michelle; Moss, Denis J; Rickinson, Alan; Balfour, Henry H; Khanna, Rajiv

    2015-12-15

    Acute infectious mononucleosis (IM) is associated with altered expression of inflammatory cytokines and disturbed T-cell homeostasis, however, the precise mechanism of this immune dysregulation remains unresolved. In the current study we demonstrated a significant loss of circulating myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) during acute IM, a loss correlated with the severity of clinical symptoms. In vitro exposure of blood DCs to acute IM plasma resulted in loss of plasmacytoid DCs, and further studies with individual cytokines showed that exposure to interleukin 10 could replicate this effect. Our data provide important mechanistic insight into dysregulated immune homeostasis during acute IM. PMID:26080368

  3. Analysis of peripheral blood dendritic cells as a non-invasive tool in the follow-up of patients with chronic hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    Crosignani, Andrea; Riva, Antonio; Della Bella, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has a high propensity to establish chronic infections. Failure of HCV-infected individuals to activate effective antiviral immune responses is at least in part related to HCV-induced impairment of dendritic cells (DCs) that play a central role in activating T cell responses. Although the impact of HCV on DC phenotype and function is likely to be more prominent in the liver, major HCV-induced alterations are detectable in peripheral blood DCs (pbDCs) that represent the ...

  4. Can dendritic cells see light?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  5. Generation of Immune Inhibitory Dendritic Cells and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abediankenari Saeid

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Variety of positive as well as negative regulatory signals are provided by antigen presenting cell in particular by dendritic cells. In this research, we studied the capacity of dendritic cells to expand antigen-specific T regulatory cells.We also investigated the role of TGF-beta in induction inhibitory functions of dendritic cells in mixed leukocyte reactions.Dendritic cells were generated from blood CD14+ monocytes with granulocyte-Monocyte colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4 with or without TGF-beta (TGF-β-GM-DC or GM-DC. CD4+ T cell were isolated to assess lymphocyte proliferation by lymphocyte transformation test assay and the ratio of CD4+FOXp3+ CD25+ T cells were determined by fluorescene-activated cell sorter. T cell proliferation responses in GM-DC showed a significance antigen-specific proliferative response comparing with TGFβ-GM -DC. T Cell proliferation was inhibited in co-culture system containing DC-treated TGF-β. It can be suggested that the expsansion of T regulatory by TGF-β-GM-DC provides a means for antigen specific control of unwanted immune reactions.

  6. Blood coagulation factor XII drives adaptive immunity during neuroinflammation via CD87-mediated modulation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Kerstin; Pankratz, Susann; Asaridou, Chloi-Magdalini; Herrmann, Alexander M; Bittner, Stefan; Merker, Monika; Ruck, Tobias; Glumm, Sarah; Langhauser, Friederike; Kraft, Peter; Krug, Thorsten F; Breuer, Johanna; Herold, Martin; Gross, Catharina C; Beckmann, Denise; Korb-Pap, Adelheid; Schuhmann, Michael K; Kuerten, Stefanie; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ruppert, Clemens; Nolte, Marc W; Panousis, Con; Klotz, Luisa; Kehrel, Beate; Korn, Thomas; Langer, Harald F; Pap, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Wiendl, Heinz; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Meuth, Sven G

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses represent the underlying cause of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence implicated the crosstalk between coagulation and immunity in CNS autoimmunity. Here we identify coagulation factor XII (FXII), the initiator of the intrinsic coagulation cascade and the kallikrein-kinin system, as a specific immune cell modulator. High levels of FXII activity are present in the plasma of MS patients during relapse. Deficiency or pharmacologic blockade of FXII renders mice less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a model of MS) and is accompanied by reduced numbers of interleukin-17A-producing T cells. Immune activation by FXII is mediated by dendritic cells in a CD87-dependent manner and involves alterations in intracellular cyclic AMP formation. Our study demonstrates that a member of the plasmatic coagulation cascade is a key mediator of autoimmunity. FXII inhibition may provide a strategy to combat MS and other immune-related disorders. PMID:27188843

  7. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by mRNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA. PMID:27236804

  8. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  9. Fast generation of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bøgh, Marie; Claesson, M H; Pedersen, A W

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen presenting cells capable of inducing immune responses. DC are widely used as vaccine adjuvant in experimental clinical settings. DC-based vaccines are normally generated using a standard 8day DC protocol (SDDC). In attempts to shorten the vaccine production...

  10. Detection of plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) content in peripheral blood and renal tissue of children with henoch-schonlein purpura and its clinical value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Mei Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) content in peripheral blood and renal tissue of children with henoch-schonlein purpura and its clinical value.Methods:30 cases of henoch-schonlein purpura children with renal damage were enrolled in HSPN group, 30 cases of henoch-schonlein purpura children without renal damage were enrolled in NHSPN group, and 30 cases of healthy volunteers were enrolled in the control group. Then contents of pDC, Th2 cell, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 in peripheral blood as well as contents of pDC, Th17 cell, IL-17, IL-21 and IL-23 in renal tissue of three groups were detected.Results: (1) pDC contents in peripheral blood of HSPN group and NHSPN group were lower than those of control group and the decrease of pDC contents in peripheral blood of HSPN group was more obvious; CD304 contents in renal tissue of HSPN group and NHSPN group were higher than those of control group and the increase of CD304 contents in renal tissue of HSPN group was more obvious; (2) Th2 cell as well as IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 contents in peripheral blood of HSPN group and NHSPN group were higher than those of control group and the increase of related indexes in peripheral blood of HSPN group was more obvious; Th17 cell as well as IL-17, IL-21 and IL-23 contents in kidney tissue of HSPN group were higher than those of NHSPN group; (3) in peripheral blood, pDC content was negatively correlated with Th2 cell level as well as IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 contents, and in renal tissue, pDC content was positively correlated with Th17 cell level as well as IL-17, IL-21 and IL-23 contents. Conclusions:Abnormal pDC content correlates with the pathogenesis of henoch-schonlein purpura, pDC content decreases in peripheral blood and will result in enhancement of Th2 cell function, and pDC content increases in kidney and will result in enhancement of Th17 cell function.

  11. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Sabine; Ronchese, Franca

    2013-01-01

    The elicitation of efficient antitumor immune responses requires the optimal activation of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs). Our comparison of the effect of various immunostimulatory treatments on DCs revealed that the best predictor of the success of immunotherapy is not the activation of existing DC populations, but the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived DC in tumor-draining lymph nodes.

  12. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. Effects of Epstein-Barr virus on the development of dendritic cells derived from cord blood monocytes: an essential role for apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Juan Wang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a ubiquitous human γ-herpes virus, which can adapt and evade host immune defense. Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the initiation and maintenance of immune responses. This study investigated the effects of EBV on cord blood monocytes derived DCs (CBDC. METHODS: Monocytes were isolated from cord blood and cultured in medium containing recombinant IL-4 and GM-CSF to induce DCs development. B95-8 supernatant was added in monocytes culture medium for EBV infection at day 0. Phenotypic characterization of DCs, apoptotic cells, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP were detected by flow cytometry. The morphology was observed by Hoechst 33258 staining and TUNEL staining, the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP was detected by Western blotting assay and caspase 3, 8 and 9 activity was measured. RESULTS: Phenotypic characterization of DCs was changed in EBV-treated group. Chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation were observed in EBV induced CBDC apoptosis. In addition, caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 activation were enhanced in the EBV-treated group. This was accompanied by the loss of MMP. Furthermore, XIAP expression was down-regulated in the EBV-treated group and compared to mock-infected group. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that EBV could inhibit CBDC phenotypic differentiation, and induce CBDC apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner with involvement of the mitochondrial pathway. This might help EBV to evade host immune responses to establish persistent infection.

  6. Evaluation of an optimized protocol using human peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic cells for the in vitro detection of sensitizers: Results of a ring study in five laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Hendrik; Gerlach, Silke; Spieker, Jochem; Ryan, Cindy; Bauch, Caroline; Mangez, Claire; Winkler, Petra; Landsiedel, Robert; Templier, Marie; Mignot, Aurelien; Gerberick, Frank; Wenck, Horst; Aeby, Pierre; Schepky, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a delayed T-cell mediated allergic response associated with relevant social and economic impacts. Animal experiments (e.g. the local lymph node assay) are still supplying most of the data used to assess the sensitization potential of new chemicals. However, the 7th amendment to the EU Cosmetic Directive have introduced a testing ban for cosmetic ingredients after March 2013. We have developed and optimized a stable and reproducible in vitro protocol based on human peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic cells to assess the sensitization potential of chemicals. To evaluate the transferability and the predictivity of this PBMDCs based test protocol, a ring study was organized with five laboratories using seven chemicals with a known sensitization potential (one none-sensitizer and six sensitizers, including one pro-hapten). The results indicated that this optimized test protocol could be successfully transferred to all participating laboratories and allowed a correct assessment of the sensitization potential of the tested set of chemicals. This should allow a wider acceptance of PBMDCs as a reliable test system for the detection of human skin sensitizers and the inclusion of this protocol in the toolbox of in vitro methods for the evaluation of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. PMID:25868915

  7. Siglec-1-positive plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in human peripheral blood: A semi-mature and myeloid-like subset imbalanced during protective and autoimmune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Theresa R; Taddeo, Adriano; Winter, Oliver; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Mälzer, Julia-Nora; Domingo, Cristina; Biesen, Robert; Alexander, Tobias; Thiel, Andreas; Radbruch, Andreas; Hiepe, Falk; Gerl, Velia

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a central role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) as IFN-α producers and promoters of T-cell activation or tolerance. Here, we demonstrated by flow-cytometry and confocal microscopy that Siglec-1, a molecule involved in the regulation of adaptive immunoresponses, is expressed in a subset of semi-mature, myeloid-like pDCs in human blood. These pDCs express lower BDCA-2 and CD123 and higher HLA-DR and CD11c than Siglec-1-negative pDCs and do not produce IFN-α via TLR7/TLR9 engagement. In vitro, Siglec-1 expression was induced in Siglec-1-negative pDCs by influenza virus. Proportions of Siglec-1-positive/Siglec-1-negative pDCs were higher in SLE than in healthy controls and correlated with disease activity. Healthy donors immunized with yellow fever vaccine YFV-17D displayed different kinetics of the two pDC subsets during protective immune response. PDCs can be subdivided into two subsets according to Siglec-1 expression. These subsets may play specific roles in (auto)immune responses. PMID:26674280

  8. Renal dendritic cells: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Velázquez, Peter; Dustin, Michael L.; Peter J Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Discovery into the role of renal dendritic cells (rDCs) in health and disease of the kidney is rapidly accelerating. Progress in deciphering DC precursors and the heterogeneity of monocyte subsets in mice and humans are providing insights into the biology of rDCs. Recent findings have extended knowledge of the origins, anatomy, and function of the rDC network at steady-state and during periods of injury to the renal parenchyma. This brief review highlights these new findings and provides an u...

  9. NG2, a common denominator for neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier alteration, and oligodendrocyte precursor response in EAE, plays a role in dendritic cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Giovanni; Errede, Mariella; Girolamo, Francesco; Morando, Sara; Ivaldi, Federico; Panini, Nicolò; Bendotti, Caterina; Perris, Roberto; Furlan, Roberto; Virgintino, Daniela; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Uccelli, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    In adult CNS, nerve/glial-antigen 2 (NG2) is expressed by oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and is an early marker of pericyte activation in pathological conditions. NG2 could, therefore, play a role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease associated with increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory infiltrates, and CNS damage. We induced EAE in NG2 knock-out (NG2KO) mice and used laser confocal microscopy immunofluorescence and morphometry to dissect the effect of NG2 KO on CNS pathology. NG2KO mice developed milder EAE than their wild-type (WT) counterparts, with less intense neuropathology associated with a significant improvement in BBB stability. In contrast to WT mice, OPC numbers did not change in NG2KO mice during EAE. Through FACS and confocal microscopy, we found that NG2 was also expressed by immune cells, including T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs). Assessment of recall T cell responses to the encephalitogen by proliferation assays and ELISA showed that, while WT and NG2KO T cells proliferated equally to the encephalitogenic peptide MOG35-55, NG2KO T cells were skewed towards a Th2-type response. Because DCs could be responsible for this effect, we assessed their expression of IL-12 by PCR and intracellular FACS. IL-12-expressing CD11c+ cells were significantly decreased in MOG35-55-primed NG2KO lymph node cells. Importantly, in WT mice, the proportion of IL-12-expressing cells was significantly lower in CD11c+ NG2- cells than in CD11c+ NG2+ cells. To assess the relevance of NG2 at immune system and CNS levels, we induced EAE in bone-marrow chimeric mice, generated with WT recipients of NG2KO bone-marrow cells and vice versa. Regardless of their original phenotype, mice receiving NG2KO bone marrow developed milder EAE than those receiving WT bone marrow. Our data suggest that NG2 plays a role in EAE not only at CNS/BBB level, but also at immune response level, impacting on DC activation and

  10. Isolation of Human Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Merry; Jardine, Laura; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes with antigen-processing and antigen-presenting functions. DCs can be divided into distinct subsets by anatomical location, phenotype and function. In human, the two most accessible tissues to study leukocytes are peripheral blood and skin. DCs are rare in human peripheral blood (Nestle et al., J Immunol 151:6535-6545, 1993). These factors led to the extensive use of skin DCs as the "prototype" migratory DCs in human studies. In this chapter, we detail the protocols to isolate DCs and resident macrophages from human skin. We also provide a multiparameter flow cytometry gating strategy to identify human skin DCs and to distinguish them from macrophages. PMID:27142012

  11. Characterization of CD8+ T-Cell Responses in the Peripheral Blood and Skin Injection Sites of Melanoma Patients Treated with mRNA Electroporated Autologous Dendritic Cells (TriMixDC-MEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphné Benteyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melanoma patients with mRNA electroporated dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL stimulates T-cell responses against the presented tumor-associated antigens (TAAs. In the current clinical trials, melanoma patients with systemic metastases are treated, requiring priming and/or expansion of preexisting TAA-specific T cells that are able to migrate to both the skin and internal organs. We monitored the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells infiltrating the skin at sites of intradermal TriMixDC-MEL injection (SKILs and within the circulation of melanoma patients treated in two clinical trials. In 10 out of fourteen (71% patients screened, CD8+ T cells recognizing any of the four TAA presented by TriMixDC-MEL cellular vaccine were found in both compartments. In total, 30 TAA-specific T-cell responses were detected among the SKILs and 29 among peripheral blood T cells, of which 24 in common. A detailed characterization of the antigen specificity of CD8+ T-cell populations in four patients indicates that the majority of the epitopes detected were only recognized by CD8+ T cells derived from either skin biopsies or peripheral blood, indicating that some compartmentalization occurs after TriMix-DC therapy. To conclude, functional TAA-specific CD8+ T cells distribute both to the skin and peripheral blood of patients after TriMixDC-MEL therapy.

  12. Dendritic Cells for Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems, more specifically the negative selection algorithm, have previously been applied to intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on a novel concept in immunology, the Danger Theory. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells and key to the activation of the human signals from the host tissue and correlate these signals with proteins know as antigens. In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion based on time-windows. The whole population of DCs asynchronously correlates the fused signals with a secondary data stream. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form the DC Algorithm (DCA), which is implemented using an immune inspired framework, libtissue. This system is used to detect context switching for a basic machine learning dataset and to detect outgoing portscans in real-time. Experimental results show a significant difference between an outgoing portscan and normal traffic.

  13. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami eRadunskaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual's antigen specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic-cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy.

  14. Dendritic cells in lung immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Peter C; MacDonald, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) lie at the heart of the innate immune system, specialised at recognising danger signals in many forms including foreign material, infection or tissue damage and initiating powerful adaptive immune and inflammatory responses. In barrier sites such as the lung, the instrumental role that DCs play at the interface between the environment and the host places them in a pivotal position in determining the severity of inflammatory disease. The past few years has seen a significant increase in our fundamental understanding of the subsets of DCs involved in pulmonary immunity, as well as the mechanisms by which they are activated and which they may use to coordinate downstream inflammation and pathology. In this review, we will summarise current understanding of the multi-faceted role that DCs play in the induction, maintenance and regulation of lung immunopathology, with an emphasis on allergic pulmonary disease. PMID:27256370

  15. 树突状细胞提呈凋亡癌细胞抗原的实验研究%Degeneration of Dendritic Cells from Human Peripheral Blood and Acquirement Antigen from Apoptotic Hepatochlangioma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴刚; 韩本立; 裴雪涛

    2000-01-01

    Objective:To eastablish the efficient presentation of antigen from apoptotic cells by human DC from peripheral blood. Methods: using recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colonystimulating factor(GM- CSF) and interleukin 4 (IL- 4 ) we have established dendritic cells (DC)from peripheral blood monocyte that maintain the antigen capturing and processing capacity characteristic of immature dendritic cells in vivo. GM - CSF 50ng/ml , IL- 4 1 000ng/ml once two days(total four). on the 3 rd day of culture, immature DC and apoptotic hepatochlangioma cells were in coculture lasting 7 days. Results:these cells had typical dendritic morphology, express high levels of CD1a ,B7 and acquired antigen from apoptotic cells and induced an increased T cell stimulatory capacity in MLR. Conclusions:we have established DC from blood mononuclear tells using GM- CSF and IL- 4 and DC can be efficiently drived from apoptotic cells and can induce the increase of T cells obviously. It probably becomes an effective approach of antigen transduced with DC.%目的:建立从人外周血诱导扩增树突状细胞(DC)及吞噬凋亡小体负载抗原。方法:从正常人外周血分离获得单核细胞,加入50ng/ml rhGM-CSF,1000ng/ml rhIL-4,隔天一次,共4次,培养第三天,加入γ射线照射过的胆管癌细胞,再继续体外培养一周后,用树突细胞富集柱收集DC。结果:见DC高表达共刺激分子B7和CDh,表面具有典型不规则突起,DC还可捕捉凋亡小体、吞噬凋亡小体。负载抗原的DC其激发同种异体T淋巴细胞增殖的能力进一步增强。结论:用rhGM-CSF加rhIL-4能从人外周血诱导、扩增DC,此DC可以有效提呈凋亡胆管癌细胞的抗原,可望成为有效的肿瘤抗原装载DC的新途径。

  16. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  17. Artificial Dendritic Cells: Multi-faceted Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the crime scene investigators of the human immune system. Their function is to correlate potentially anomalous invading entities with observed damage to the body. The detection of such invaders by dendritic cells results in the activation of the adaptive immune system, eventually leading to the removal of the invader from the host body. This mechanism has provided inspiration for the development of a novel bio-inspired algorithm, the Dendritic Cell Algorithm. This algorithm processes information at multiple levels of resolution, resulting in the creation of information granules of variable structure. In this chapter we examine the multi-faceted nature of immunology and how research in this field has shaped the function of the resulting Dendritic Cell Algorithm. A brief overview of the algorithm is given in combination with the details of the processes used for its development. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the parallels between our understanding of the human immune system a...

  18. Dendritic cell-based in vitro assays for vaccine immunogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Vandebriel, Rob J.; Hoefnagel, Marcel H. N.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal in the induction of adaptive immune responses because they can activate naive T-cells. Moreover, they steer these adaptive immune responses by integrating various stimuli, such as from different pathogen associated molecular patterns and the cytokine milieu. Immature DC are very well capable of ingesting protein antigens, whereas mature DC are efficient presenters of peptides to naive T cells. Human DC can be readily cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear ...

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  20. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  1. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field. PMID:26892963

  2. Leishmania donovani Lipophosphoglycan : Modulation of Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Tejle, Katarina

    2006-01-01

    Leishmania donovani is a blood-borne tropicial parasite, which infects humans through bites by Phlebotomus sandflies. The parasite survives and multiplies inside macrophages in inner organs, and causes the deadly disease visceral leishmaniasis (Kala-Azar). Macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells involved in the initiation of immune responses. Immature DC are present in all tissues where they internalise and process antigen, in response to which they migr...

  3. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Gaspar; May, Janet S.; Soumi Sukla; Bruno Frederico; Michael B Gill; Smith, Christopher M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary We detect invading viruses with dendritic cells and eliminate them with lymphocytes. A key interaction is lymphocyte activation by dendritic cells presenting viral antigens. Not all viruses can be eliminated, and some that persist deliberately colonize lymphocytes and dendritic cells, such that parasitism and host defence co-exist within the same sites. Once established, these infections are very hard to eliminate. Therefore to vaccinate against them we must determine how infec...

  4. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  5. Skin Dendritic Cells in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    D’Arpa, N.; D’Amelio, L.; Accardo-Palumbo, A.; Pileri, D.; Mogavero, R.; Amato, G.; Napoli, B.; Alessandro, G.; Lombardo, C.; F. Conte

    2009-01-01

    The body's immunological response to burn injury has been a subject of great inquiry in recent years. Burn injury disturbs the immune system, resulting in a progressive suppression of the immune response that is thought to contribute to the development of sepsis. Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that possess the ability to stimulate naïve T cells.

  6. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Cayzer, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, and abstract model of DC behaviour is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm, the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory- based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an 'artificial DC'. Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of p...

  7. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Costantino ePitzalis

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerise Ags and present them polyvalently to B cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B...

  8. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B...

  9. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  10. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  11. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  12. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S; Munksgaard, Signe B; Zocca, Mai-Britt; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of...

  13. Natural antibodies sustain differentiation and maturation of human dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Donkova-Petrini, Vladimira; Carbonneil, Cédric; Misra, Namita; Lepelletier, Yves; Delignat, Sandrine; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Oksenhendler, Eric; Lévy, Yves; Debré, Marianne; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Hermine, Olivier; Kaveri, Srini V.

    2004-01-01

    The differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is governed by various signals in the microenvironment. Monocytes and DCs circulate in peripheral blood, which contains high levels of natural antibodies (NAbs). NAbs are germ-line-encoded and occur in the absence of deliberate immunization or microbial aggression. To assess the importance of NAbs in the milieu on DC development, we examined the status of DCs in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia, a disease characterized by pa...

  14. Dendritic Cell Protection from Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity Is Independent of Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu K. Tadagavadi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a very effective chemotherapeutic agent used against a wide range of solid tumors. A major adverse effect of cisplatin therapy is acute kidney injury (AKI. Neutrophils are reported to infiltrate and exacerbate injury in a wide range of sterile inflammatory models of tissue injury. Here, we studied the kinetics of neutrophil infiltration into kidneys and their role in cisplatin-mediated AKI. Mice treated with cisplatin showed an increase in circulating neutrophils 24 and 48 h after cisplatin administration. Cisplatin treatment caused an increase in kidney leukocytes with neutrophils accounting for the majority of the infiltrating leukocytes. The extent of neutrophil infiltration coincided with the severity of kidney injury and renal dysfunction. To examine the functional relevance of infiltrating neutrophils in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, we depleted neutrophils using a neutrophil-specific antibody (anti-Ly-6G. This antibody resulted in greater than 90% depletion of neutrophils in both the blood and kidney. Of note, depletion of neutrophils had no impact on the extent of cisplatin-induced AKI as compared to non-depleted mice. Earlier, we reported that dendritic cell depletion in CD11c-DTRtg mice causes exacerbation of AKI and a dramatic increase in renal neutrophils. Thus, we also examined the role of neutrophils in dendritic cell-depleted mice treated with cisplatin. Dendritic cell depletion exacerbated AKI in spite of neutrophil depletion. These data demonstrate that cisplatin nephrotoxicity is not mediated by neutrophils and that dendritic cells protect kidneys via neutrophil-independent mechanisms.

  15. Bacterial Probiotic Modulation of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Drakes, Maureen; Blanchard, Thomas; Czinn, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal dendritic cells are continually exposed to ingested microorganisms and high concentrations of endogenous bacterial flora. These cells can be activated by infectious agents and other stimuli to induce T-cell responses and to produce chemokines which recruit other cells to the local environment. Bacterial probiotics are of increasing use against intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. They act as nonpathogenic stimuli within the gut to regain immunologic quiescence. ...

  16. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Heiman, Maxwell G.; Shaham, Shai

    2009-01-01

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, whic...

  17. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: From Heart to Vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalinda Sorrentino; Silvana Morello; Aldo Pinto

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, formerly only attributed to the alterations of the stromal component, are now recognized as immune-based pathologies. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) are important immune orchestrators in heart and vessels. They highly produce IFN type I that promote the polarization of T cells towards a Th1 phenotype; however, pDCs can also participate to suppressive networks via the recruitment of T regulatory cells that downmodulate proinflammatory responses. pDCs populate the ...

  18. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  19. Anti tumor vaccination with hybrid dendritic-tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and the possibility of their use for cancer vaccination has renewed the interest in this therapeutic modality. Nevertheless, the ideal immunization protocol with these cells has not been described yet. In this paper we describe the preliminary results of a protocol using autologous tumor and allogeneic dendritic hybrid cell vaccination every 6 weeks, for metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. Thirty-five patients were enrolled between March 2001 and March 2003. Though all patients included presented with large tumor burdens and progressive diseases, 71% of them experienced stability after vaccination, with durations up to 19 months. Among RCC patients 3/22 (14%) presented objective responses. The median time to progression was 4 months for melanoma and 5.7 months for RCC patients; no significant untoward effects were noted. Furthermore, immune function, as evaluated by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens and by peripheral blood proliferative responses to tumor-specific and nonspecific stimuli, presented a clear tendency to recover in vaccinated patients. These data indicate that dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrid vaccination affects the natural history of advanced cancer and provide support for its study in less advanced patients, who should, more likely, benefit even more from this approach. (author)

  20. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell...... costimulatory molecules and hampered IL-12 production. These VD3-modulated DCs induce T cell tolerance in vitro using multiple mechanisms such as rendering T cells anergic, dampening of Th1 responses, and recruiting and differentiating regulatory T cells. Due to their ability to specifically target pathological...

  1. Direct ex vivo analysis of dendritic cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lars A Ormandy; Tim F Greten; Anatol F(a)rber; Tobias Cantz; Susanne Petrykowska; Heiner Wedemeyer; Monique H(o)rning; Frank Lehner; Michael P Manns; Firouzeh Korangy

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the phenotype and function of dendritic cells (DC) from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in order to understand their role in this disease.METHODS: Myeloid dendritic cells were enumerated in peripheral blood of HCC patients. CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression on naive and stimulated myeloid dendritic cells from peripheral blood were analyzed. Myeloid dendritic cells were isolated from peripheral blood and their function was tested. Phagocytosis was analyzed using FITC-dextran beads, peptide specific stimulation, the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells and secretion of cytokines upon poly dI:dC was tested.RESULTS: Myeloid dendritic cells were reduced in patients with HCC. No differences in CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR expression were found on naive and stimulated myeloid dendritic cells from HCC patients and healthy controls. Normal phagocytosis or stimulation of peptide specific T cells was observed in contrast to an impaired allo-stimulatory capacity and a reduced IL-12 secretion.CONCLUSION: Impaired IL-12 production of mDCs in patients could lead to an impaired stimulatory capacity of naive T cells suggesting that IL-12 directed therapies may enhance tumor specific immune responses in HCC patients.

  2. Dendritic Cells for SYN Scan Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems have previously been applied to the problem of intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on the function of Dendritic Cells (DCs). DCs are antigen presenting cells and key to activation of the human immune system, behaviour which has been abstracted to form the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA). In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion, asynchronously correlating the the fused data signals with a secondary data stream. Aggregate output of a population of cells, is analysed and forms the basis of an anomaly detection system. In this paper the DCA is applied to the detection of outgoing port scans using TCP SYN packets. Results show that detection can be achieved with the DCA, yet some false positives can be encountered when simultaneously scanning and using other network services. Suggestions are made for using adaptive signals to alleviate this uncovered problem.

  3. SKIN DENDRITIC CELLS: ACTIVATION, MATURATION AND MIGRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans’ cells (LC) are the dendritic cells (DC) of the epidermis and, as sentinels of the immune system, act as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune responses. When LC, and other DC, recognise an antigen or pathogen they mature and are stimulated to migrate to the lymph nodes, where they orchestrate immune responses. Pathogen derived toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, and chemical allergens, are recognised as being potentially harmful and stimulate LC to mobilise and mature. Cyt...

  4. Evaluation of two different dendritic cell preparations with BCG reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fol Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a key-role in the immune response against intracellular bacterial pathogens, including mycobacteria. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs are considered to behave as inflammatory cell populations. Different immunomagnetic methods (positive and negative can be used to purify monocytes before their in vitro differentiation and their culture behavior can be expected to be different. In this study we evaluated the reactivity of two dendritic cell populations towards the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG antigen. Monocytes were obtained from the blood of healthy donors, using positive and negative immunomagnetic separation methods. The expression of DC-SIGN, CD86, CD80, HLA-DR and CD40 on MoDCs was estimated by flow cytometry. The level of IL-12p70, IL-10 and TNF-α was measured by ELISA. Neither of the tested methods affected the surface marker expression of DCs. No significant alteration in immunological response, measured by cytokine production, was noted either. After BCG stimulation, the absence of IL-12, but the IL-23 production was observed in both cell preparations. Positive and negative magnetic separation methods are effective techniques to optimize the preparation of monocytes as the source of MoDCs for potential clinical application.

  5. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens

  6. Pathological Consequence of Misguided Dendritic Cell Differentiation in Histiocytic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Berres, Marie-Luise; Allen, Carl E.; Merad, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders represent a group of complex pathologies characterized by the accumulation of histiocytes, an old term for tissue-resident macrophages and dendritic cells. Langerhans cell histiocytosis is the most frequent of histiocytosis in humans and has been thought to arise from the abnormal accumulation of epidermal dendritic cells called Langerhans cells. In this chapter, we discuss the origin and differentiation of Langerhans cells and dendritic cells and present accumulated evi...

  7. Pulmonary dendritic cells: thinking globally, acting locally

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, Troy D.

    2010-01-01

    The phrase “think globally, act locally” was coined in the early 1970s and directed individuals to clean up their local environment with the ultimate goal of improving the health of the entire planet. Several recent studies indicate that similar considerations apply to the immune system, in which small numbers of leukocytes, such as pulmonary dendritic cells, can modify the local immune environment in the lung and promote a positive outcome for the organism.

  8. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state ...

  9. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chung-Ching; di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-01-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-de...

  10. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  11. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm: From Origin of the Cell to Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribi, Kamel; Denizon, Nathalie; Besançon, Anne; Farhi, Jonathan; Lemaire, Pierre; Sandrini, Jeremy; Truong, Catherine; Ghnaya, Habib; Baugier de Materre, Alix

    2016-08-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematological malignancy with an aggressive clinical course. It is grouped with acute myeloid leukemia-related precursor neoplasms in the 2008 World Health Organization classification. Most patients with BPDCN have skin lesions at diagnosis and subsequent or simultaneous involvement of the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and lymph nodes. Patients usually respond to initial chemotherapy but often relapse. Stem cell transplantation may improve survival. This neoplasm is derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and is characterized by the coexpression of the immunophenotypic markers CD4, CD56, CD123, blood dendritic cell antigen-2, blood dendritic cell antigen-4, CD2AP, and lineage(-). Atypical immunophenotype expression may be present, making diagnosis difficult. BPDCN is often associated with a complex karyotype, frequent deletions of tumor suppressor genes, and mutations affecting either the DNA methylation or chromatin remodeling pathways. A better understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of this neoplasm could open the way to new therapies targeting specific signaling pathways or involving epigenetics. PMID:27026248

  12. Functional Role of Dendritic Cells in Patients with Unstable Angina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dazhu; Sharma Ranjit; ZENG Qiutang

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the function of dendritic cells (DC) in patients with unstable angina, 10 mL of blood was drawn from 30 subjects. 15 patients diagnosed as having unstable angina and 15 healthy subjects were included in an observation and a control groups respectively. The mononuclear cells were separated from the peripheral blood and cultured in RPMI1640 supplemented with recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (rh GM-CSF) and recombinant human interleukin-4 (rh IL-4) to induce dendritic cells. The shape and ultrastructure of DC was examined with electronic microscope. The phenotype of DC was analyzed with FACS and the alloantigen presenting capacity of DC was evaluated by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). The expression rate of CD86 of DC in patients with unstable angina was (40.7±3.6) %, which was obviously higher than that of normal DC (29.6±2.5 %) (P<0.001). The capacity of the DCs in unstable angina patients to induce allogenic T cells (OD 2.73±1.10), was significantly higher than that of the normal DC (OD:0.9±0.21) (P<0.005). It is suggested that the function of DC in patients with unstable angina is increased, which may play an important role in the initiation of immune reaction in the plaque.

  13. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiWan; MarcelDupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation, they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo, studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):28-35.

  14. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wan; Marcel Dupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation,they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo,studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments.

  15. Dendritic Cells and Humoral Immunity in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate the innate and adaptive immune systems to induce tolerance and immunity. DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants in the regulation of immune responses. Our recent studies suggest that humoral and cellular immunity is regulated by different myeloid DC subsets with distinct intrinsic properties in humans. While antibody response is preferentially mediated by CD14+ dermal DCs, cytotoxic T cell response is preferentially mediated by Langerhans cells (LCs). Thus, mechanisms whereby DCs induce humoral and cellular immunity appear to be fundamentally distinct. In this review, we will focus on the role of DCs in the development of humoral immunity. We will also discuss the mechanisms whereby DCs induce CD4+ T cells associated with the help of B cell response, including T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, and why human LCs lack this ability. PMID:20309010

  16. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  17. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  18. Homophilic Protocadherin Cell-Cell Interactions Promote Dendrite Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molumby, Michael J; Keeler, Austin B; Weiner, Joshua A

    2016-05-01

    Growth of a properly complex dendrite arbor is a key step in neuronal differentiation and a prerequisite for neural circuit formation. Diverse cell surface molecules, such as the clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs), have long been proposed to regulate circuit formation through specific cell-cell interactions. Here, using transgenic and conditional knockout mice to manipulate γ-Pcdh repertoire in the cerebral cortex, we show that the complexity of a neuron's dendritic arbor is determined by homophilic interactions with other cells. Neurons expressing only one of the 22 γ-Pcdhs can exhibit either exuberant or minimal dendrite complexity, depending only on whether surrounding cells express the same isoform. Furthermore, loss of astrocytic γ-Pcdhs, or disruption of astrocyte-neuron homophilic matching, reduces dendrite complexity cell non-autonomously. Our data indicate that γ-Pcdhs act locally to promote dendrite arborization via homophilic matching, and they confirm that connectivity in vivo depends on molecular interactions between neurons and between neurons and astrocytes. PMID:27117416

  19. Homophilic Protocadherin Cell-Cell Interactions Promote Dendrite Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Molumby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth of a properly complex dendrite arbor is a key step in neuronal differentiation and a prerequisite for neural circuit formation. Diverse cell surface molecules, such as the clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs, have long been proposed to regulate circuit formation through specific cell-cell interactions. Here, using transgenic and conditional knockout mice to manipulate γ-Pcdh repertoire in the cerebral cortex, we show that the complexity of a neuron’s dendritic arbor is determined by homophilic interactions with other cells. Neurons expressing only one of the 22 γ-Pcdhs can exhibit either exuberant or minimal dendrite complexity, depending only on whether surrounding cells express the same isoform. Furthermore, loss of astrocytic γ-Pcdhs, or disruption of astrocyte-neuron homophilic matching, reduces dendrite complexity cell non-autonomously. Our data indicate that γ-Pcdhs act locally to promote dendrite arborization via homophilic matching, and they confirm that connectivity in vivo depends on molecular interactions between neurons and between neurons and astrocytes.

  20. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are...... considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug...... delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC....

  1. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  2. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948. ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  3. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  4. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  5. Characterization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells maturated with IFN-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, I M; Nikolajsen, K; Walter, M R; Buus, S; Gad, M; Claesson, M H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy. These cells can be generated from peripheral blood monocytes cultured with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). In order to obtain full functional capacity, maturation is required...

  6. Cutting edge: B220+CCR9- dendritic cells are not plasmacytoid dendritic cells but are precursors of conventional dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Elodie; Wong, June; Villadangos, José A

    2009-08-01

    Mouse lymphoid organs contain two major subsets of dendritic cells (DC) that differ in their phenotype and functions: conventional DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC). Recently, it has been proposed that differential expression of CCR9 could distinguish functionally distinct pDC subsets. We show that B220(+)CCR9(-) DC do not express classical pDC markers and have a developmental origin different from that of pDC. Furthermore, B220(+)CCR9(-) DC do not secrete IFN-alpha in response to CpG and, unlike pDC, can efficiently present exogenous Ags. Our results demonstrate that B220(+)CCR9(-) DC do not represent a subset of pDC. After in vivo transfer, these cells down-regulate B220 expression and convert into the two major cDC subsets, showing that they are a developmental stage of cDC differentiation. PMID:19570827

  7. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  8. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: From Heart to Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalinda Sorrentino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases, formerly only attributed to the alterations of the stromal component, are now recognized as immune-based pathologies. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs are important immune orchestrators in heart and vessels. They highly produce IFN type I that promote the polarization of T cells towards a Th1 phenotype; however, pDCs can also participate to suppressive networks via the recruitment of T regulatory cells that downmodulate proinflammatory responses. pDCs populate the vessel wall layers during pathological conditions, such as atherosclerosis. It is thus clear that a better identification of pDCs activity in cardiovascular diseases can not only elucidate pathological mechanisms but also lead to new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Measles Virus Induces Functional TRAIL Production by Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Lamouille, Barbara; Astier, Anne; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Servet-Delprat, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Measles virus infection induces a profound immunosuppression that can lead to serious secondary infections. Here we demonstrate that measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA and protein expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Moreover, measles virus-infected dendritic cells are shown to be cytotoxic via the TRAIL pathway. PMID:10590149

  10. Measles Virus Induces Functional TRAIL Production by Human Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Lamouille, Barbara; Astier, Anne; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Servet-Delprat, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Measles virus infection induces a profound immunosuppression that can lead to serious secondary infections. Here we demonstrate that measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA and protein expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Moreover, measles virus-infected dendritic cells are shown to be cytotoxic via the TRAIL pathway.

  11. Concomitant detection of IFNα signature and activated monocyte/dendritic cell precursors in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated subjects at early times after repeated local cytokine treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizza Paola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons alpha (IFNα are the cytokines most widely used in clinical medicine for the treatment of cancer and viral infections. Among the immunomodulatory activities possibly involved in their therapeutic efficacy, the importance of IFNα effects on dendritic cells (DC differentiation and activation has been considered. Despite several studies exploiting microarray technology to characterize IFNα mechanisms of action, there is currently no consensus on the core signature of these cytokines in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated individuals, as well as on the existence of blood genomic and proteomic markers of low-dose IFNα administered as a vaccine adjuvant. Methods Gene profiling analysis with microarray was performed on PBMC isolated from melanoma patients and healthy individuals 24 hours after each repeated injection of low-dose IFNα, administered as vaccine adjuvant in two separate clinical trials. At the same time points, cytofluorimetric analysis was performed on CD14+ monocytes, to detect the phenotypic modifications exerted by IFNα on antigen presenting cells precursors. Results An IFNα signature was consistently observed in both clinical settings 24 hours after each repeated administration of the cytokine. The observed modulation was transient, and did not reach a steady state level refractory to further stimulations. The molecular signature observed ex vivo largely matched the one detected in CD14+ monocytes exposed in vitro to IFNα, including the induction of CXCL10 at the transcriptional and protein level. Interestingly, IFNα ex vivo signature was paralleled by an increase in the percentage and expression of costimulatory molecules by circulating CD14+/CD16+ monocytes, indicated as natural precursors of DC in response to danger signals. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the identification of a well defined molecular signature as biomarker of IFNα administered as immune adjuvants, and

  12. Design of tumor-specific immunotherapies using dendritic cells - effect of bromelain on dendritic cell maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsen, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy using dendritic cells (DC) has shown promising results in clinical trials, but few relevant successes are recorded. Therefore, the choice of an appropriate DC population is critical for the outcome of this treatment. The DC used today in immunotherapy are often matured with a cytokine cocktail consisting of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and PGE2. These cells have deficits in their cytokine production, and also their migratory capacity in vivo needs improvement. After being introduced to br...

  13. Functional changes of dendritic cells in hypersensivity reactions to amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.F. Lima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of dendritic cell (DC involvement in responses to haptenic drugs is needed, because it represents a possible approach to the development of an in vitro test, which could identify patients prone to drug allergies. There are two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DC (pDC and myeloid DC (mDC. β-lactams form hapten-carrier conjugates and may provide a suitable model to study DC behavior in drug allergy reactions. It has been demonstrated that drugs interact differently with DC in drug allergic and non-allergic patients, but there are no studies regarding these subsets. Our aim was to assess the functional changes of mDC and pDC harvested from an amoxicillin-hypersensitive 32-year-old woman who experienced a severe maculopapular exanthema as reflected in interleukin-6 (IL-6 production after stimulation with this drug and penicillin. We also aim to demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this method for dendritic cell isolation followed by in vitro stimulation for studies of drug allergy physiopathology. DC were harvested using a double Percoll density gradient, which generates a basophil-depleted cell (BDC suspension. Further, pDC were isolated by blood DC antigen 4-positive magnetic selection and gravity filtration through magnetized columns. After stimulation with amoxicillin, penicillin and positive and negative controls, IL-6 production was measured by ELISA. A positive dose-response curve for IL-6 after stimulation with amoxicillin and penicillin was observed for pDC, but not for mDC or BDC suspension. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of this methodology to expand the knowledge of the effect of dendritic cell activation by drug allergens.

  14. Information Fusion for Anomaly Detection with the Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Tedesco, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system, providing the initial detection of pathogenic invaders. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform information fusion which directs immune responses. We have derived a Dendritic Cell Algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, by modelling the biological signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial immune system. We present algorithmic details in addition to experimental results, when the algorithm was applied to anomaly detection for the detection of port scans. The results show the Dendritic Cell Algorithm is sucessful at detecting port scans.

  15. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohey Eldin M El Shikh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerise Ags and present them polyvalently to B cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B cell receptors for Ag (BCRs. FDC-Fc-gamma-RIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6 and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal centre (GC reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses.

  16. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  17. Regulation of B cell function by plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gujer, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are early sentinels of pathogen exposure and central in the initiation and orchestration of adaptive immune responses. Apart from the prominent role of DCs in the activation of T cells, DCs have been shown to influence humoral B cell mediated responses. DCs are therefore important cells for regulating immune responses to vaccines. Many of the vaccines under development today are against pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV-1 that likely r...

  18. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-07-28

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin(-)Sca-1(+)Kit(+) cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte-related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  19. Information Fusion for Anomaly Detection with the Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe; Tedesco, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system, providing the initial detection of pathogenic invaders. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform information fusion which directs immune responses. We have derived a Dendritic Cell Algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, by modelling the biological signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial im...

  20. A novel cell subset: Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JiongKun; XING FeiYue

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports introduce a novel cell subset of DCs with antigenic phenotypes shared by both NK cells and B cells, but without surface markers of pDCs and T cells, appearing to be a chimera of NK cells and DCs, namely interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDCs). IKDCs not only secret type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ interferons to recognize and kill tumor cells effectively, but also express MHC-Ⅱ molecules to present antigens. Thus, IKDCs are considered as important immunosurveilance cells for tumors, providing a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  1. A novel cell subset:Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports introduce a novel cell subset of DCs with antigenic phenotypes shared by both NK cells and B cells, but without surface markers of pDCs and T cells, appearing to be a chimera of NK cells and DCs, namely interferon-producing killer dendritic cells(IKDCs).IKDCs not only secret type I and type II interferons to recognize and kill tumor cells effectively, but also express MHC-II molecules to present antigens.Thus, IKDCs are considered as important immunosurveilance cells for tumors, providing a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  2. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Maxwell G; Shaham, Shai

    2009-04-17

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, which act cooperatively at the time and place of anchoring. DEX-1 and DYF-7 contain, respectively, zonadhesin and zona pellucida domains, and DYF-7 self-associates into multimers important for anchoring. Thus, unlike other dendrites, amphid dendritic tips are positioned by DEX-1 and DYF-7 without the need for long-range guidance cues. In sequence and function, DEX-1 and DYF-7 resemble tectorins, which anchor stereocilia in the inner ear, suggesting that a sensory dendrite anchor may have evolved into part of a mechanosensor. PMID:19344940

  3. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André;

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...... still require optimization. An alternative technique for providing antigens to DC consists of the direct fusion of dendritic cells with tumor cells. These resulting hybrid cells may express both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules associated with tumor antigens and the...... appropriate co-stimulatory molecules required for T-cell activation. Initially tested in animal models, this approach has now been evaluated in clinical trials, although with limited success. We summarize and discuss the results from the animal studies and first clinical trials. We also present a new approach...

  4. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14+ monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant. PMID:18639521

  5. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14+ monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4+ T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant

  6. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:21295490

  7. Immunotherapy of hematological malignancies using dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Ann L R; Berneman, Zwi N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I

    2008-03-01

    The arsenal of therapeutic weapons against hematological malignancies is constantly growing. Unravelling the secrets of tumor immunobiology has allowed researchers to manipulate the immune system in order to stimulate tumor immunity or to bypass tumor-induced immunosuppression. An area of great interest is active specific immunotherapy where dendritic cell (DC)-based therapeutic vaccines for cancer have definitely grabbed the spotlight. DC are intensively investigated as cellular adjuvants to harness the immune system to fight off cancer by augmenting the number and effector functions of tumor-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In the present review we present a comprehensive synopsis and an update of the use of DC in hematological malignancies. In the future, more basic research as well as more clinical trials are warranted to fully establish the value of DC vaccination as an adjuvant therapy for modern hematological oncology. PMID:18390412

  8. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ma, Galina V. Shurin, Zhu Peiyuan, Michael R. Shurin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer.

  9. Characterization of a Phenotypically Unique Population of CD13+ Dendritic Cells Resident in the Spleen

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuang, Yan; Mwangi, Waithaka; Brown, Wendy C.; Davis, William C.; Hope, Jayne C.; Palmer, Guy H.

    2006-01-01

    Immature dendritic cells (DCs) resident in bovine spleens represent a distinct CD11a+ CD11c+ CD13+ CD172+ CD205+ population compared to those circulating in peripheral blood or trafficking via afferent lymph. Upon cytokine-induced maturation, splenic DCs both efficiently present antigen in the stimulation of allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation and recall antigen-specific responses.

  10. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposur...

  11. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma of the Abdomen: the Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Soon Jin; Song, Hye Jong [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that originates from follicular dendritic cells in lymphoid follicles. This disease usually involves the lymph nodes, and especially the head and neck area. Rarely, extranodal sites may be affected, including tonsil, the oral cavity, liver, spleen and the gastrointestinal tract. We report here on the imaging findings of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen that involved the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and colon. It shows as a well-defined, enhancing homogenous mass with internal necrosis and regional lymphadenopathy.

  12. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    OpenAIRE

    Till Sebastian Manuel Mathan; Carl Gustav Figdor; Sonja Ingrid Buschow

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells (APCs), making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this ...

  13. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells: From Molecules to Intercellular Communication Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mathan, Till S. M.; Figdor, Carl G.; Buschow, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells, making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this review ...

  14. Interstitial and Langerhans' dendritic cells in chronic periodontitis and gingivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Ramos Cury; Cristiane Furuse; Ana Elisa Amaro Rodrigues; José Alexandre Barbuto; Cavalcanti de Araújo; Ney Soares de Araújo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare quantitatively the distribution of dendritic cell subpopulations in chronic periodontitis and gingivitis. Fourteen biopsies from patients with chronic periodontitis and fifteen from patients with gingivitis were studied. An immunoperoxidase technique was used to quantify the number of Langerhans' cells (CD1a) and interstitial dendritic cells (factor XIIIa) in the oral and sulcular and junctional/pocket epithelia and in the lamina propria. A greater ...

  15. Baicalin induced dendritic cell apoptosis in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HuahuaZhang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the effects of Baicalin (BA, a major flavonoid constituent found in the herb Baikal skullcap, on dendritic cells (DCs. DCs were generated by culturing murine bone marrow cells for 6 days with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS was added on day 5 to stimulate DCs maturation. The expression levels of DC maturity markers (CD80/CD86 were assessed by flow cytometry using direct immunofluorescence method. Interleukin-12 (IL-12 levels in the culture supernatants were assayed by ELISA. Apoptosis of DCs was analyzed by flow cytometry after Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. The mitochondrial membrane potential changes were measured by using the J-aggregate forming lipophilic cation 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1. Exposure of DCs to BA (2-50 microM during bone marrow cell differentiation showed no effects on the up-regulation of CD80/CD86 expression on DCs in response to LPS stimulation, but reduced DCs recovery by inducing apoptosis, and significantly inhibited the release of IL-12 to culture supernatants. BA induced DC apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent way, and immature DCs were more sensitive for BA-induced apoptosis than mature DC. BA also induced mitochondrial membrane potential changes in DCs. These results demonstrate that BA induces selective apoptosis in immature DCs possibly through mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  16. Effect of Methamphetamine on expression of HIV coreceptors and CC-chemokines by dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Madhavan P.N.; Zainulabedin M Saiyed

    2010-01-01

    The United States is currently experiencing an entangled epidemic of HIV infection and use of different drugs of abuse, especially of methamphetamine (Meth). Blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) are the first line of defense against HIV-1 infection, and are the initial target of HIV-1 infection in injection drug users. DC-SIGN present on dendritic cells is the first molecule that facilitates HIV-1 infection independent of CD4 or HIV coreceptors. Chemokines are known to be HIV-1 suppres...

  17. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  18. Deciphering dendritic cell heterogenity in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël eChopin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These finding open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now set the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  19. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  20. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  1. Dendritic Cells, Viruses, and the Development of Atopic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Tam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are important residents of the lung environment. They have been associated with asthma and other inflammatory diseases of the airways. In addition to their antigen-presenting functions, dendritic cells have the ability to modulate the lung environment to promote atopic disease. While it has long been known that respiratory viral infections associate with the development and exacerbation of atopic diseases, the exact mechanisms have been unclear. Recent studies have begun to show the critical importance of the dendritic cell in this process. This paper focuses on these data demonstrating how different populations of dendritic cells are capable of bridging the adaptive and innate immune systems, ultimately leading to the translation of viral illness into atopic disease.

  2. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the pharyngeal region

    OpenAIRE

    HU, TENGPENG; Wang, Xinhua; Yu, Chang; YAN, JIAQIN; ZHANG, XUNDONG; Li, Ling; Li, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Jingjing; MA, WANG; Li, Wencai; Wang, Guannan; ZHAO, WUGAN; GAO, XIANZHENG; Zhang, Dandan

    2013-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a rare neoplasm arising most commonly from follicular dendritic cells in the lymph nodes. It is exceedingly rare in extranodal sites, particularly in the pharyngeal region. The present study reports 3 cases occurring in the pharyngeal region. Case 1 had tonsil and cervical lymph node involvement, while case 3 also had tonsil involvement. Cases 1 and 3 relapsed locally at 3 and 17 months after surgery, respectively. Case 2 was diagnosed with a tumor ...

  3. Dendritic Cells and Innate Immunity in Kidney Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuang, Quan; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes emerging concepts related to the roles of dendritic cells and innate immunity in organ transplant rejection. First, it highlights the primary role that recipient, rather than donor, dendritic cells have in rejection and reviews their origin and function in the transplanted kidney. Second, it introduces the novel concept that recognition of allogeneic non-self by host monocytes (referred to here as innate allorecognition) is necessary for initiating rejection by ...

  4. Effect of Ovarian Induction Using PMSG and HCG hormones on Uterus Dendritic Cells Population in NMRI mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed mohammadaryam Moazzeni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ovarian hyper-stimulation is widely used in IVF clinics. The main purpose of this method is to stimulate folliculogenesis and increase the number of oocytes in one cycle. Following ovarian hyper-stimulation, hormonal secretion of the ovary, particularly estradiol and progesterone dramatically increases. Immune cells especially dendritic cells have receptors for the estradiol and progesterone and play an important role in appropriate implantation and successful pregnancy. Increase in estradiol and progesterone concentrations following ovarian stimulation can affect the recruitment and frequency of immune cells particularly dendritic cells. Methods:To explore this issue, blood was collected from two groups of pregnant mice (with and without ovarian stimulation on the seventh day of pregnancy. The amounts of estradiol and progesterone were measured in the sera. The frequency and localization of dendritic cells in spleen and decidua were also investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results:The results of this study showed an increase of progesterone and estradiol concentrations and a decrease of frequency of dendritic cells in hyper-stimulated group compared to the control group. Conclusion:Considering the increase in progesterone and estrogen concentrations after ovarian induction and the presence of receptors for these hormones on dendritic cells, the changes in frequency of dendritic cells could be explained. Regarding the role of dendritic cells in embryo implantation and regulation of maternal immune response, it seems that their changes may decrease the rate of pregnancy success after IVF.

  5. Dendritic cell reprogramming by the hypoxic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Maria Carla; Varesio, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells central to the orchestration of innate and acquired immunity and the maintenance of self-tolerance. The local microenvironment contributes to the regulation of DC development and functions, and deregulated DC responses may result in amplification of inflammation, loss of tolerance, or establishment of immune escape mechanisms. DC generation from monocytic precursors recruited at sites of inflammation, tissue damage, or neoplasia occurs under condition of low partial oxygen pressure (pO(2), hypoxia). We reviewed the literature addressing the phenotypic and functional changes triggered by hypoxia in monocyte-derived immature (i) and mature (m) DCs. The discussion will revolve around in vitro studies of gene expression profile, which give a comprehensive representation of the complexity of response of these cells to low pO(2). The gene expression pattern of hypoxic DC will be discussed to address the question of the relationship with a specific maturation stage. We will summarize data relative to the regulation of the chemotactic network, which points to a role for hypoxia in promoting a migratory phenotype in iDCs and a highly proinflammatory state in mDCs. Current knowledge of the strict regulatory control exerted by hypoxia on the expression of immune-related cell surface receptors will also be addressed, with a particular focus on a newly identified marker of hypoxic DCs endowed with proinflammatory properties. Furthermore, we discuss the literature on the transcription mechanisms underlying hypoxia-regulated gene expression in DCs, which support a major role for the HIF/HRE pathway. Finally, recent advances shedding light on the in vivo influence of the local hypoxic microenvironment on DCs infiltrating the inflamed joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients are outlined. PMID:22901977

  6. Follicular dendritic cells emerge from ubiquitous perivascular precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautler, Nike Julia; Kana, Veronika; Kranich, Jan; Tian, Yinghua; Perera, Dushan; Lemm, Doreen; Schwarz, Petra; Armulik, Annika; Browning, Jeffrey L; Tallquist, Michelle; Buch, Thorsten; Oliveira-Martins, José B; Zhu, Caihong; Hermann, Mario; Wagner, Ulrich; Brink, Robert; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2012-07-01

    The differentiation of follicular dendritic cells (FDC) is essential to the remarkable microanatomic plasticity of lymphoid follicles. Here we show that FDC arise from ubiquitous perivascular precursors (preFDC) expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRβ-Cre-driven reporter gene recombination resulted in FDC labeling, whereas conditional ablation of PDGFRβ(+)-derived cells abolished FDC, indicating that FDC originate from PDGFRβ(+) cells. Lymphotoxin-α-overexpressing prion protein (PrP)(+) kidneys developed PrP(+) FDC after transplantation into PrP(-) mice, confirming that preFDC exist outside lymphoid organs. Adipose tissue-derived PDGFRβ(+) stromal-vascular cells responded to FDC maturation factors and, when transplanted into lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR)(-) kidney capsules, differentiated into Mfge8(+)CD21/35(+)FcγRIIβ(+)PrP(+) FDC capable of trapping immune complexes and recruiting B cells. Spleens of lymphocyte-deficient mice contained perivascular PDGFRβ(+) FDC precursors whose expansion required both lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and lymphotoxin. The ubiquity of preFDC and their strategic location at blood vessels may explain the de novo generation of organized lymphoid tissue at sites of lymphocytic inflammation. PMID:22770220

  7. Activated protein C modulates the proinflammatory activity of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Matsumoto,1,2* Yuki Matsushima,1* Masaaki Toda,1 Ziaurahman Roeen,1 Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza,1,5 Josephine A Hinneh,1 Etsuko Harada,1,3 Taro Yasuma,4 Yutaka Yano,4 Masahito Urawa,1,5 Tetsu Kobayashi,5 Osamu Taguchi,5 Esteban C Gabazza1 1Department of Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, 2BONAC Corporation, BIO Factory 4F, Fukuoka, 3Iwade Research Institute of Mycology, 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial activity of activated protein C in allergic diseases including bronchial asthma and rhinitis. However, the exact mechanism of action of activated protein C in allergies is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that pharmacological doses of activated protein C can modulate allergic inflammation by inhibiting dendritic cells. Materials and methods: Dendritic cells were prepared using murine bone marrow progenitor cells and human peripheral monocytes. Bronchial asthma was induced in mice that received intratracheal instillation of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. Results: Activated protein C significantly increased the differentiation of tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells and the secretion of type I interferons, but it significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-mediated maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in myeloid dendritic cells. Activated protein C also inhibited maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Activated protein C-treated dendritic cells were less effective when differentiating naïve CD4 T-cells from Th1 or Th2 cells, and the cellular effect of activated protein C was mediated by its receptors. Mice that received adoptive transfer of activated protein C

  8. Dendritic cell – regulatory T-cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Wojas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The one of the main modes of homeostasis protection is maintaining the balance between antimicrobial immunological reactions and mechanisms involved in immune response suppression. The interaction between dendritic and T cells plays a crucial role in inducing both an immune response and immunological tolerance. Dendritic cells are also able to affect the differentiation, migration, and activation of CD4 T cells using cell-to-cell contact and/or cytokine production. The proper cytokine microenvironment can influence the induction of FoxP3 transcription factor in T cells, determining the regulatory properties of these cells. However, it is still unclear what is more substantial for Treg induction: th e cytokines in the microenvironment, stimulation by a specific DC population, or the type of antigens presented by DC. Activated natural Treg as well as induced Treg cells use similar mechanisms to generate tolerance, for example by the production of such anti-inflammatory cytokines as TGF-β or IL-10 and by direct contact with target cells. Recently, some reports have described the possibility that Treg cells lose FoxP3 expression followed by loss of suppressive function directed against proliferating T lymphocytes.

  9. Evidence for local dendritic cell activation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Bregje

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease characterized by a seemingly exaggerated immune response against a difficult to discern antigen. Dendritic cells (DCs are pivotal antigen presenting cells thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis. Paradoxically, decreased DC immune reactivity was reported in blood samples from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients. However, functional data on lung DCs in sarcoidosis are lacking. We hypothesized that at the site of disease DCs are mature, immunocompetent and involved in granuloma formation. Methods We analyzed myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL and blood from newly diagnosed, untreated pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and healthy controls using 9-color flowcytometry. DCs, isolated from BAL using flowcytometric sorting (mDCs or cultured from monocytes (mo-DCs, were functionally assessed in a mixed leukocyte reaction with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Using Immunohistochemistry, location and activation status of CD11c+DCs was assessed in mucosal airway biopsies. Results mDCs in BAL, but not in blood, from sarcoidosis patients were increased in number when compared with mDCs from healthy controls. mDCs purified from BAL of sarcoidosis patients induced T cell proliferation and differentiation and did not show diminished immune reactivity. Mo-DCs from patients induced increased TNFα release in co-cultures with naïve allogeneic CD4+ T cells. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses revealed increased numbers of mature CD86+ DCs in granuloma-containing airway mucosal biopsies from sarcoidosis patients. Conclusion Taken together, these finding implicate increased local DC activation in granuloma formation or maintenance in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  10. Dendritic cells in inflammatory sinonasal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, P-P; Shi, L-L; Xu, K; Yao, Y; Liu, Z

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical in linking the innate and adaptive immune responses, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many immune and inflammatory diseases as well as the development of tumours. The role of DCs in the pathophysiology of lung diseases has been widely studied. However, the phenotype, subset and function of DCs in upper airways under physiological or pathological conditions remain largely undefined. Allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) are two important upper airway diseases with a high worldwide prevalence. Aberrant innate and adaptive immune responses have been considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of AR and CRS. To this end, understanding the function of DCs in shaping the immune responses in sinonasal mucosa is critical in exploring the pathogenic mechanisms underlying AR and CRS as well as in developing novel therapeutic strategies. This review summarizes the phenotype, subset, function and regulation of DCs in sinonasal mucosa, particularly in the setting of AR and CRS. Furthermore, this review discusses the perspectives for future research and potential clinical utility focusing on DC pathways in the context of AR and CRS. PMID:27159777

  11. Ion channels modulating mouse dendritic cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Nguyen, Thi Xuan; Duszenko, Michael; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lang, Florian

    2008-11-15

    Ca(2+)-mediated signal transduction pathways play a central regulatory role in dendritic cell (DC) responses to diverse Ags. However, the mechanisms leading to increased [Ca(2+)](i) upon DC activation remained ill-defined. In the present study, LPS treatment (100 ng/ml) of mouse DCs resulted in a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which was due to Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and influx of extracellular Ca(2+) across the cell membrane. In whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments, LPS-induced currents exhibited properties similar to the currents through the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels (CRAC). These currents were highly selective for Ca(2+), exhibited a prominent inward rectification of the current-voltage relationship, and showed an anomalous mole fraction and a fast Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. In addition, the LPS-induced increase of [Ca(2+)](i) was sensitive to margatoxin and ICAGEN-4, both inhibitors of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5, respectively. MHC class II expression, CCL21-dependent migration, and TNF-alpha and IL-6 production decreased, whereas phagocytic capacity increased in LPS-stimulated DCs in the presence of both Kv channel inhibitors as well as the I(CRAC) inhibitor SKF-96365. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated DCs occurs via Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels, is sensitive to Kv channel activity, and is in turn critically important for DC maturation and functions. PMID:18981098

  12. The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of bone marrow cell-derived immature dendritic cells (myeloid iDCs) in modulating the efficacy of retinal cell transplantation therapy was investigated. (1) In vitro, myeloid iDCs but not BMCs enhanced the survival and proliferation of embryonic retinal cells, and the expression of various neurotrophic factors by myeloid iDCs was confirmed with RT-PCR. (2) In subretinal transplantation, neonatal retinal cells co-transplanted with myeloid iDCs showed higher survival rate compared to those transplanted without myeloid iDCs. (3) CD8 T-cells reactive against donor retinal cells were significantly increased in the mice with transplantation of retinal cells alone. These results suggested the beneficial effects of the use of myeloid iDCs in retinal cell transplantation therapy

  13. Kicking off adaptive immunity: the discovery of dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katsnelson, Alla

    2006-01-01

    In 1973, Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn discovered an unusual looking population of cells with an unprecedented ability to activate naive T cells. Dubbed “dendritic cells,” these cells are now known as the primary instigators of adaptive immunity.

  14. Adoptively Transferred Dendritic Cells Restore Primary Cell-Mediated Inflammatory Competence to Acutely Malnourished Weanling Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hillyer, Lyn; Whitley, Charlene; Olver, Amy; Webster, Michelle; Steevels, Tessa; Woodward, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Immune depression associated with prepubescent malnutrition underlies a staggering burden of infection-related morbidity. This investigation centered on dendritic cells as potentially decisive in this phenomenon. C57BL/6J mice, initially 19 days old, had free access for 14 days to a complete diet or to a low-protein formulation that induced wasting deficits of protein and energy. Mice were sensitized by i.p. injection of sheep red blood cells on day 9, at which time one-half of the animals in...

  15. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; A. Brüstle; Xu, H. C.; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M.; Shaabani, N.; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V

    2014-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8+ T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that ...

  16. Decrease in Circulating Dendritic Cell Precursors in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Kretzschmar; Ilonka Rohm; Sebastian Schäller; Stefan Betge; Rudin Pistulli; Yevgeniya Atiskova; Hans-R. Figulla; Atilla Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis. Inflammation is important for initiation and progression of the disease. Dendritic cells (DCs) as antigen-presenting cells play an important role in the immune system. Therefore, we hypothesize that, in patients with PAD, DCPs might be reduced in blood due to their recruitment into the vascular wall and induce a proinflammatory response. The numbers of myeloid DCPs, plasmacytoid DCPs, and total DCPs were analyzed by...

  17. Complete response of metastatic renal cancer with dendritic cell vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dall'Oglio Marcos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma that presented involution following therapy with dendritic cells. CASE REPORT: Male, 51-year old patient underwent left radical nephrectomy in September 1999 due to renal cell carcinoma, evolved with recurrence of the neoplasia in January 2002, confirmed by resection of the lesion. A vaccine therapy based on dendritic cells was then performed during 5 months (4 applications. After this period, there was occurrence of new lesions, whose resection revealed areas of necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate. DISCUSSION: The outcome of renal cell carcinoma is influenced by prognostic factors that confer more aggressive tumor characteristics. However, in cases of recurrence, the systemic therapy with dendritic cells-based vaccine can be associated with a better outcome with regression of disease.

  18. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. Clinical Grade of Gerneration of Dendritic Cells for Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Duozhuang; TAO Si; CAO Yang; ZHOU Jianfeng; MA Ding; HUANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immumotherapy, aphereses were performed with the continuous flow cell separator and materials were derived from 10 leukemia patients that had achieved complete remission. Peripheral blood monocytes were cultured in vitro with GM-CSF, IL-4 for 6 days, then TNF-α (the TNF-α group) or TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2 (the cytokine mixture group) were added to promote maturation. Cell number was counted by hematology analyzer, and phenotype study (CD1a, CD14, CD83) was carried out by flow cytometry, and the function of DCs was examined by mixed lymphocyte reaction. The results showed that (0.70±0.13)×107/mL (the TNF-α group) and (0.79±0.04)×107/mL (the cytokine mixture group) DCs were generated respectively in peripheral blood obtained by leucapheresis. The phenotypes were as follows: CD1a+ (74.65±4.45)%, CD83+(39.50±4.16)%, CD14+(2.90±1.76)% in TNF-α group, and CD1a+ (81.86±5.87)%, CD83+ (81.65±6.36)%, CD14+ (2.46±1.68)% in the cytokine mixture group. It was concluded that leucapheresis may be a feasible way to provide large number of peripheral blood monocytes for DC generation, and combined administration of TNF-α, IL-1β,IL-6, and PGE2 may greatly promote maturity.

  20. Blood cell labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labelling of blood cells in vitro for subsequent in vivo studies was one of the earliest applications of radioactive tracers in clinical medicine and laid the foundations for many important contributions to the advancement of knowledge of human blood cell pathophysiology. The characteristics required for satisfactory clinical studies, the mechanisms of cell labelling, the problems of radiation or chemical damage to the labelled cells and some examples of modern clinical applications are described and discussed. (Author)

  1. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  2. [Prion diseases: what is the role of dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of transmissible prion diseases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachy, Véronique; Aucouturier, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are caused by the transconformation of a normal cellular protein, PrPc, into an infectious isoform, PrPsc, which ultimately triggers neuronal death. They are always fatal and, after transmission, they feature long incubation periods, during which prions accumulate in lymphoid tissues, infect nerves and progress to the central nervous system. In lymphoid organs, prions replicate and accumulate in follicular dendritic cells. Suppressing these cells slows down the neuro-invasion but does not totally abrogate it. This review examines the current knowledge in the roles of hematopoietic dendritic cells at different steps of the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Dendritic cells endocytose inoculated prions, permit their crossing of the intestinal epithelium and then migrate and transport them to lymphoid organs. They can carry prions to sites of neuroinvasion, and establish contacts with axons in peripheral lymph nodes or even after passage of the blood-brain barrier. However, results in the literature on the role of dendritic cells differ according to the host or the prion strain. PMID:20619164

  3. Microscopic examination and cytokine expression of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells following exposure to low pathogenic avian ionfluenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendritic cells (DC) function as professional antigen presenting cells, and act as sentinels of the immune system. They are a part of the primary immune response to pathogens and help bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses. They are believed to migrate from bone marrow into the blood stre...

  4. Nanostructured lipid carriers loaded with resveratrol modulate human dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, João P; Neves, Ana R; Silva, Andreia M; Barbosa, Mário A; Reis, M Salette; Santos, Susana G

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are promising targets for drug delivery, as they can induce immunity or tolerance. The current study aims to examine the potential of using nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) as delivery systems for human DC by evaluating nanoparticle internalization, cell labeling, and drug activity. NLC were formulated incorporating the fluorochrome fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-NLC) or the natural anti-inflammatory molecule resveratrol (rsv-NLC). Primary human DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes, and the innovative imaging flow cytometry technique was used to examine FITC-NLC internalization. The capacity of rsv-NLC to inhibit DC activation in response to proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) was investigated by conventional flow cytometry. A combination of imaging and conventional flow cytometry was used to assess NLC cytotoxicity. The results obtained indicate that both NLC formulations were stable over time, with mean diameter nuclear factor κ beta phosphorylation and significantly decrease the level of interleukin-12/23, both upregulated in response to TNF-α, while 10 µM free rsv were needed to promote a similar effect. Taken together, the results presented show that NLC are suitable carriers of fluorescent labels or bioactive molecules for human DCs, leading to inflammation modulation.

  5. Multivalent glycopeptide dendrimers for the targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. García-Vallejo; M. Ambrosini; A. Overbeek; W.E. van Riel; K. Bloem; W.W.J. Unger; F. Chiodo; J.G. Bolscher; K. Nazmi; H. Kalay; Y. van Kooyk

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most powerful type of antigen presenting cells. Current immunotherapies targeting dendritic cells have shown a relative degree of success but still require further improvement. One of the most important issues to solve is the efficiency of antigen delivery to dendritic cells

  6. Comparisons of immunological characteristics of placental monocyte-macrophage-derived dendritic-like cells in stimulating cord blood T lymphocytes in different periods of pregnancy%妊娠不同时期胎盘单核-巨噬细胞来源树突样细胞刺激脐血T淋巴细胞的特性比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯云华; 何敏; 季宁东; 张晓洁; 季晓辉

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To observe the differences of characteristics in activation and proliferation of cord blood lymphocytes stimulated by placenta-derived dendritic-like cells in different stages and further study the role of placenta] immune cells in pregnancy tolerance and labor onset. Methods: Mononuclear cells were separated mechanically from the mid-term placenta and late placenta. CD14+ cells were obtained by MACS and induced to differentiate into dendritic-like cells through the transebdothelial trafficking system. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze dendritic-like cell phenotype and ELISA assay was performed to detect the levels of IL-12,IL-10 in culture supernatant. CCK-8 assay was used to detect the ability of stimulating the proliferation of cord blood lymphocytes and flow cytometry was used to detect intracellular cytokine produced by stimulated cord blood T lymphocytes. Results:CD14+ monocyte-macrophage obtained from decidual tissue were inoculated into the endothelial monolayer,after two-way- induced culture, cells derived from full-term placenta had an appearance of dendritic morphology changes and highly expressed cell surface markers related to immune activation of dendritic cells,such as CD80,CD86;simultaneously,higher level of IL-12 and very low level of IL-10 were detected in the culture supernatant, and cells had strange ability of stimulating the cord blood lymphocytes proliferation. They could stimulate cord blood lymphocytes to differentiate into the cells that most of them producing IFN-"y and less of them producing IL-10. However,the induced cells derived from mid-term placenta,expressed low-level CD80 and CD86(P< 0.05),in the culture supernatant,higher level of IL-10 (P < 0.05) and very low level of IL-12 (P < 0.05) were detected. Cells had weaker ability in stimulating cord blood lymphocytes (P < 0.05),and stimulated cord blood lymphocytes to differentiate to form more cells producing IL-10(P < 0.05) and less cells producing IFN-7(P < 0

  7. Characterization of Virus-Responsive Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eugene; Amrute, Sheela B.; Abel, Kristina; Gupta, Gunjan; Wang, Yichuan; Miller, Christopher J.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are potent producers of alpha interferon (IFN-α) in response to enveloped viruses and provide a critical link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Although the loss of peripheral blood PDC function and numbers has been linked to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) progression in humans, a suitable animal model is needed to study the effects of immunodeficiency virus infection on PDC function. The rhesus macaque SIV model closely mimics human HIV ...

  8. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page Print this page Donating peripheral blood stem cells Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is a nonsurgical procedure to collect ... Donating bone marrow Donor experiences videos Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is one of two methods of ...

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor impairs the functional ability of dendritic cells through Id pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic cytokine that plays an important role in tumor growth and progression. Recent evidence suggests an alternate, albeit indirect, role of VEGF on host immune response to tumors. VEGF appears to diminish host immunity by altering the function of major antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) [D.I. Gabrilovich, T. Ishida, S. Nadaf, J.E. Ohm, D.P. Carbone, Antibodies to vascular endothelial growth factor enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy by improving endogenous dendritic cell function, Clin. Cancer Res. 5 (1999) 2963-2970, D. Gabrilovich, T. Ishida, T. Oyama, S. Ran, V. Kravtsov, S. Nadaf, D.P. Carbone, Vascular endothelial growth factor inhibits the development of dendritic cells and dramatically affects the differentiation of multiple hematopoietic lineages in vivo, Blood 92 (1998) 4150-4166, T. Oyama, S. Ran, T. Ishida, S. Nadaf, L. Kerr, D.P. Carbone, D.I. Gabrilovich, Vascular endothelial growth factor affects dendritic cell maturation through the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation in hemopoietic progenitor cells, J. Immunol. 160 (1998) 1224-1232.]. DCs are prime initiators of host immunity as they are known to activate both primary as well as secondary immune responses [J. Banchereau, F. Briere, C. Caux, J. Davoust, S. Lebecque, Y.J. Liu, B. Pulendran, K. Palucka, Immunobiology of dendritic cells, Ann. Rev. Immunol. 18 (2000) 767-811.]. However, the exact nature of how VEGF suppresses DC function is not fully clear. In this report, we show that DCs cultured in the presence of VEGF are less potent in stimulating antigen-specific T-cells. Furthermore, by using DCs derived from Id1-/- mice that are defective in Flt-1 signaling, we demonstrated that the inhibitory function of VEGF on DC function is most likely mediated by Flt-1. Thus, the role of VEGF in downregulating host immunity may highlight a unique role of VEGF in the pathogenesis of cancer

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms underlie maturational stage-specific glucocorticoid sensitivities of dendritic cells in mice and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Yun; Bender, Ingrid K.; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K.; Shin, Soon Cheon; Jewell, Christine M.; Cidlowski, John A; Schleimer, Robert P.; Lu, Nick Z.

    2013-01-01

    Mature, but not immature, dendritic cells are sensitive to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis.Mature, but not immature, dendritic cells express proapoptotic glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms.

  11. BCG-Induced Dendritic Cell Responses and Suppression of Interleukin-5 Production from T Cells in Atopic Asthmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Inseon S.; Lin, Xiang-Hua; Koh, Young-Ah; Cui, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) induces potent Th1 responses with the help of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-12 released from dendritic cells (DCs), and suppresses Th2-associated allergic reactions. However, there are still some controversies on therapeutic effects of BCG in asthmatics. This study investigated whether BCG administration to DCs suppresses IL-5 production from T cells in atopic asthmatics. DCs derived from peripheral blood of subjects were cultured with or without BCG and Dermatophag...

  12. Vaccines with dendritic cells in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that autologous D Cs pulsed with peptides specific for prostate specific Ag (PSA) or prostate-specific membrane Ag are capable of stimulating potent CT L in vitro. However there is evidence to believe that multiple tumour derived antigens would be more potent to elicit anti-tumour responses. Based on these observations a Phase I/II clinical trial in has been initiated. Autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC s) were transfected with mRNA from three prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, LNCaP and P C-3) and used for vaccination. Twenty patients have been enrolled and 19 have finished vaccination. Each patient received at least four weekly injections. Of them, 10 patients were vaccinated intranodally under ultrasonic guidance and 9 others received the vaccine intradermally. Safety and feasibility were evaluated. No evidence of toxicity and adverse events was observed. Immune response was measured as DTH and by vitro immunoassays including ELISPOT, T cell proliferation test and cytotoxicity test in pre- and post-vaccination peripheral blood samples. Twelve patients developed a specific immune response to tumour cells. Ten patients showed a significant decrease in log slope PSA. Patients with lower PSA tend to give a better response. The early clinical outcome was significantly related to immune responses (p<0.05). We conclude that the strategy of vaccinating with mRNA transfected D Cs functions to elicit cellular immune responses specific for antigens associated with prostate cancer cells and such responses may result in a clinical benefit for the patients

  13. Dendritic cells in asthma: a function beyond sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Rijt, Leonie

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to characterize the involvement of dendritic cells in the induction and maintenance of the secondary immune response leading to an eosinophilic airway inflammation as seen in asthma. Special attention was attributed to the mechanisms by which these cells accumulate in the airways of challenged mice, to their interaction with primed CD4+ T cells as well as to their functional contribution to primed T cell activation. These questions were addressed in a wel...

  14. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2-12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells "foamy DCs" and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  15. Anti - K562 cells effect mediated by dendritic cells derived from cord blood pulsed with exosomes%Exosomes致敏的脐血树突细胞介导的抗K562细胞作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卜宁; 李奇灵; 孙秉中; 张涛; 冯琦; 乔庆大

    2006-01-01

    目的分离K562细胞释放的exosomes,致敏脐血树突细胞(dendritic cell,DCs),观察其对细胞毒性T淋巴细胞(cytotoxic Tlymphocytes,CTLs)的激活效应.方法离心超滤和蔗糖密度梯度离心法分离K562细胞释放的exosomes,固相免疫电镜法(SPIEM)制备exosomes的HSP70、ICAM-1及ABL免疫电镜标本.常规方法从脐血单个核细胞诱导DCs并分离T细胞,将K562细胞来源的exosomes冲击或未冲击的DCs与T细胞共培养.MTT比色法检测体外细胞毒活性.结果K562细胞分泌的exosomes为直径50~100nm的膜性微囊.Exosomes致敏的脐血DCs激活CTLs的能力显著高于肿瘤冻融抗原致敏的DCs组,在效靶比为50:1时,两组CTLs对K562细胞的杀伤率为(68.4%vs35.3%,P<0.05).结论K562细胞分泌的exosomes负载脐血DCs后活化CTLs,有抗肿瘤活性.

  16. Comparison of murine hepatic accessory cells and splenic dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accessory cells are required for proliferation and antibody synthesis of B lymphocytes and proliferation of T lymphocytes in primary immune responses in vitro. The obligatory cells derived from the spleen are referred to as dendritic cells. Accessory cells were isolated from normal adult livers which were functionally interchangeable with splenic DC. Both hepatic accessory cells (AC) and splenic DC adhere firmly to plastic culture dishes or wells within 2 hr; but hepatic AC, unlike splenic DC, do not detach during 22 hr additional incubation. Hepatic AC, unlike splenic DC, are not lysed or inactivated by monoclonal antibody 33D1 and C'. Hepatic AC and splenic DC are similarly sensitive to irradiation in vivo and insensitive to irradiation in vitro. Hepatic AC are separated with cells which are predominantly phagocytic and FcR+ and contain nonspecific esterase. Both hepatic AC and splenic DC are suppressed or eliminated by activation of NK cells in vivo, a phenomenon prevented by prior elimination of NK cells

  17. Immune responses of dendritic cells after acquiring antigen from apoptotic hepatocholangioma cells caused by γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in antitumor responsiveness and therapeutic effects after dendritic cells (DCs) acquired antigen from apoptotic hepatocholangioma cells. Methods: DCs from blood mononuclear cells that maintain the characteristics of immaturity-anti-gen-capturing and-processing capacity were established in vitro by using granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4. Then, apoptosis in hepatocholangioma cells was induced with γ-radiation. The experimental groups included (1) co-culture of DCs, and apoptotic cancer cells and T cells; (2) co-culture of DCs necrotic cancer cells and T cells; (3) co-culture of DCs-cultured cancer cell and T cells. These cells were co-cultured for 7 days. DCs and T cell were enriched separately. Finally, antitumor response test was carried out. Results: These cells had typical dendritic morphology, expressed high levels of CD1a, B7 and acquired antigen from apoptotic cells caused by γ-rays and induced an increased T cell-stimulatory capacity in MLR. Conclusions: DCs obtained from blood mononuclear cells using GM-CSF and IL-4 and DCs can efficiently present antigen driven from apoptotic cells caused by γ-rays and induce T cells increasing obviously. It can probably become an effective approach of DC transduction with antigen

  18. Linking CD11b+ Dendritic Cells and Natural Killer T Cells to Plaque Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miche Rombouts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death and disability in our Western society. To investigate whether the dynamics of leukocyte (subpopulations could be predictive for plaque inflammation during atherosclerosis, we analyzed innate and adaptive immune cell distributions in blood, plaques, and lymphoid tissue reservoirs in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/− mice and in blood and plaques from patients undergoing endarterectomy. Firstly, there was predominance of the CD11b+ conventional dendritic cell (cDC subset in the plaque. Secondly, a strong inverse correlation was observed between CD11b+ cDC or natural killer T (NKT cells in blood and markers of inflammation in the plaque (including CD3, T-bet, CCR5, and CCR7. This indicates that circulating CD11b+ cDC and NKT cells show great potential to reflect the inflammatory status in the atherosclerotic plaque. Our results suggest that distinct changes in inflammatory cell dynamics may carry biomarker potential reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression. This not only is crucial for a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis but also bares therapeutic potential, since immune cell-based therapies are emerging as a promising novel strategy in the battle against atherosclerosis and its associated comorbidities. The cDC-NKT cell interaction in atherosclerosis serves as a good candidate for future investigations.

  19. Study, on the optimal conditions for the cryopreservation peripheral blood derived dendritic cells%人外周血树突状细胞低温保存的优化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李素萍; 杨宏友; 王震; 吕蓉; 郭晓婕; 方勤; 李敏; 刘忠

    2011-01-01

    目的 探寻冻存树突状细胞(DCs)优化的冷冻保护剂组合.方法 配制含不同浓度二甲基亚砜(DM-SO)的3种冷冻保护剂组合,A组:5%DMSO+6%羟乙基淀粉(HES)+4%人血清白蛋白(HAS);B组:10%DMSO+40%FCS;C组:12%DMSO+40%FCS,比较3组冷冻保护剂对人外周血CDl4单个核细胞诱导产生的成熟树突状细胞(mDCs)的冻存效果:采用两步法将mDCs冻存于-80℃冰箱过夜后转移至-196℃液氮气相中放置24 h,再将冻存的mDCs复苏后继续培养,并检测、比较冻存前后DC的形态、存活率、细胞表型及其对同种异体T细胞刺激活性的差异.结果 3组不同组合冷冻保护剂冷冻保存的mDCs复苏后其存活的细胞的形态没有发生明显改变,仍保留其成熟表型,并具备对T细胞的刺激活性.结论 3种不同浓度的DMSO冷冻保存mDCs,5%DMSO+6%HES+4%HSA组合更适宜.%Objective To establish a practical and efficient concentration of cryoprotective agents for the cryopreservation of dendritic cells (DCs) derived from peripheral blood.Methods Cryoprotective agents, dimethylsulfoxide( DMSO), hydroxyethyl starch (HES), human serum albumin(HSA) and fetal cow serum (FCS) were mixed in different concentrations.Group A consisted of 5% DMSO + 6% HES + 4% HSA; group B 10% DMSO + 40% FCS; group C 12% DMSO + 40% FCS.Mature DCs induced from human CD14 + monocytes were cooled with each of the three groups of different cryoprotective mixtures, in a -80℃ refrigerator overnight and then the cryovials were directly transferred into the vapourphase of liquid nitrogen and stored for 24 hours.Then the DCs were thawed and cultured.The morphology, viability, phenotype, and mixed lymphocyte reaction of the cryopreserved DCs were studied and compared to those before cryopreservation.Results Compared with control mDCs, the thawed mDCs showed no distinct change in morphological characteristics, mature phenotype and SI of DCs to T cells.Conclusion Biological properties of DCs

  20. Human cytotoxic T cells stimulated by antigen on dendritic cells recognize the N, SH, F, M, 22K, and 1b proteins of respiratory syncytial virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Cherrie, A H; Anderson, K.; Wertz, G W; Openshaw, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the human cytotoxic T-cell repertoire of nine adults to 9 of the 10 proteins of respiratory syncytial (RS) virus. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal adults were stimulated with RS virus in vitro. The resulting polyclonal cultures were tested for lysis of B-lymphoblastoid cell lines infected with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing each of nine individual RS virus proteins. The use of peripheral blood dendritic cells to present antigen gave more easily reproducible ...

  1. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in breast cancer bone dissemination

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) have been observed as breast cancer disseminates to the bone. The selective depletion of pDC in mice led to a total abrogation of bone metastasis as well as to an increase in TH1 antitumor response, suggesting that pDC may be considered as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer.

  2. Genetically modified dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 153-155. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cells * cancer vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  3. Genetically engineered dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2001), s. 475-478. ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cells * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.330, year: 2001

  4. Activation of human dendritic cells by gliadin and LPS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecharová, Barbara; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Roková, D.; Cinová, Jana; Šedivá, A.; Tlaskalová, Helena; Spíšek, R.; Tučková, Ludmila

    New York : Columbia University, 2006, s. 54-54. [International Celiac Disease Symposium /12./. New York (US), 09.11.2006-11.11.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/05/2245 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : dendritic cells * gliadin * peptides Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  5. Stimulation effects of gliadin to human dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecharová, Barbara; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Rožková, D.; Bártová, J.; Šedivá, A.; Tlaskalová, Helena; Spíšek, R.; Tučková, Ludmila

    Praha : Verlag, 2006, s. 93-93. [Meeting of European Mucosal Immunology Group /5./. Praha (CZ), 05.10.2006-07.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020210 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : dendritic cells * antigen * gliadin peptides Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  6. The dendritic density field of a cortical pyramidal cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann eCuntz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Much is known about the computation in individual neurons in the cortical column. Also, the selective connectivity between many cortical neuron types has been studied in great detail. But due to the complexity of this microcircuitry its functional role within the cortical column remains a mystery. Some of the wiring behavior between neurons can be interpreted directly from their particular dendritic and axonal shapes. Here, I describe the dendritic density field as one key element that remains to be better understood. I sketch an approach to relate dendritic density fields in general to their underlying potential connectivity schemes. As an example, I show how the characteristic shape of a cortical pyramidal cell appears as a direct consequence of connecting inputs arranged in two separate parallel layers.

  7. Follicular Dendritic Cells Emerge from Ubiquitous Perivascular Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Krautler, Nike Julia; Kana, Veronika; Kranich, Jan; Tian, Yinghua; Perera, Dushan; Lemm, Doreen; Schwarz, Petra; Armulik, Annika; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Tallquist, Michelle; Buch, Thorsten; Oliveira-Martins, José B.; Zhu, Caihong; Hermann, Mario; Wagner, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The differentiation of follicular dendritic cells (FDC) is essential to the remarkable microanatomic plasticity of lymphoid follicles. Here we show that FDC arise from ubiquitous perivascular precursors (preFDC) expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRβ-Cre-driven reporter gene recombination resulted in FDC labeling, whereas conditional ablation of PDGFRβ+-derived cells abolished FDC, indicating that FDC originate from PDGFRβ+ cells. Lymphotoxin-α-overexpressing pr...

  8. Redefining the role of dendritic cells in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Gomathinayagam Venkatesan; Ashita Uppoor; Naik, Dilip G.

    2013-01-01

    A properly functioning adaptive immune system signifies the best features of life. It is diverse beyond compare, tolerant without fail, and capable of behaving appropriately with a myriad of infections and other challenges. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required to explain how this remarkable system is energized and directed. DCs consist of a family of antigen presenting cells, which are bone-marrow-derived cells that patrol all tissues of the body with the possible exceptions of the brain and te...

  9. A novel and simple method for the generation of functional human dendritic cells from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 2 days: its application for induction of HIV-1-reactive CD4+ T cells in the hu-PBL SCID mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira eKodama

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Because dendritic cells (DCs play a critical role in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, they have been ideal candidates for cell-based immunotherapy of cancers and infections in humans. Generally, monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs were generated from purified monocytes by multiple steps of time-consuming physical manipulations for an extended period cultivation. In this study, we developed a novel, simple and rapid method for the generation of type-1 helper T cell (Th1-stimulating human DCs directly from bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. PBMCs were cultivated in the presence of 20 ng/ml of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 20 ng/ml of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and 1,000 U/ml of interferon-β (IFN-β for 24 hours followed by 24 hour maturation with a cytokine cocktail containing 10 ng/ml of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 10 ng/ml of IL-1β and 1 μg/ml of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The phenotype and biological activity of these new DCs for induction of allogeneic T cell proliferation and cytokine production were comparable to those of the MDDCs. Importantly, these new DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV-1 could generated HIV-1-reactive CD4+ T cell responses in humanized mice reconstituted with autologous PBMCs from HIV-1-negative donors. This simple and quick method for generation of functional DCs will be useful for future studies on DC-mediated immunotherapies.

  10. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  11. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). ... abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  12. Anti tumor vaccination with hybrid dendritic-tumour cells; Vacinacao antitumoral com celulas hibridas dendriticas tumorais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbuto, Jose Alexandre M.; Neves, Andreia R.; Ensina, Luis Felipe C.; Anselmo, Luciene B. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas. Dept. de Imunologia; Leite, Katia R.M.; Buzaid, Antonio C.; Camara Lopes, Luiz H. [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-09-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and the possibility of their use for cancer vaccination has renewed the interest in this therapeutic modality. Nevertheless, the ideal immunization protocol with these cells has not been described yet. In this paper we describe the preliminary results of a protocol using autologous tumor and allogeneic dendritic hybrid cell vaccination every 6 weeks, for metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. Thirty-five patients were enrolled between March 2001 and March 2003. Though all patients included presented with large tumor burdens and progressive diseases, 71% of them experienced stability after vaccination, with durations up to 19 months. Among RCC patients 3/22 (14%) presented objective responses. The median time to progression was 4 months for melanoma and 5.7 months for RCC patients; no significant untoward effects were noted. Furthermore, immune function, as evaluated by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens and by peripheral blood proliferative responses to tumor-specific and nonspecific stimuli, presented a clear tendency to recover in vaccinated patients. These data indicate that dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrid vaccination affects the natural history of advanced cancer and provide support for its study in less advanced patients, who should, more likely, benefit even more from this approach. (author)

  13. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  14. Two cases of extranodal follicular dendritic cell sarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王坚; 孔蕴仪; 陆洪芬; 许越香

    2003-01-01

    @@ Follicular dendritic cell (FDC) is an essential component of the nonlymphoid, nonphagocytic immunoaccessory reticulum cells of the peripheral lymphoid tissue.1 Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCs) are confined largely to the primary and secondary B-cell follicles, where they form a tight interlacing meshwork. They play a role in the capture and presentation of antigens, generation and regulation of immune complexes. FDCs can be recognized morphologically by their indistinct cellular borders, pale eosinophilic cytoplasm, round-to-ovoid nuclei with delicate nuclear membranes and clear-to-vesicular chromatin with inconspicuous or small nucleoli. FDCs are best identified through immunostaining using CD21, CD35, R4/23, KiM4, KiM4p and Ki-FDC1p.

  15. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease. PMID:20357073

  16. Dendritic Cell Responses to Surface Properties of Clinical Titanium Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kou, Peng Meng; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D; Babensee, Julia E.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play pivotal roles in responding to foreign entities during an innate immune response and initiating effective adaptive immunity as well as maintaining immune tolerance. The sensitivity of DCs to foreign stimuli also makes them useful cells to assess the inflammatory response to biomaterials. Elucidating the material property-DC phenotype relationships using a well-defined biomaterial system is expected to provide criteria for immuno-modulatory biomaterial design. Clinic...

  17. Follicular Dendritic Cells and Dissemination of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Manuelidis, Laura; Zaitsev, Igor; Koni, Pandelakis; Yun Lu, Zhi; Richard A Flavell; Fritch, William

    2000-01-01

    The contribution of immune system cells to the propagation of transmissible encephalopathies is not well understood. To determine how follicular dendritic cells (FDC) may act, we challenged lymphotoxin β null and wild-type (wt) controls with a Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent. There was only a small difference in incubation time to clinical disease even after peripheral challenge with low infectious doses (31 in a total of 410 days). Brain pathology with extensive microglial infiltration...

  18. Dendritic Cells for Real-Time Anomaly Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic Cells (DCs) are innate immune system cells which have the power to activate or suppress the immune system. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form an algorithm suitable for anomaly detection. We test this algorithm on the real-time problem of port scan detection. Our results show a significant difference in artificial DC behaviour for an outgoing portscan when compared to behaviour for normal processes.

  19. Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Atrophy in DBA/2J Glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Pete A.; Howell, Gareth R.; Barbay, Jessica M.; Braine, Catherine E.; Sousa, Gregory L.; John, Simon W. M.; Morgan, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is a complex disease affecting an estimated 70 million people worldwide, characterised by the progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and accompanying visual field loss. The common site of damage to retinal ganglion cells is thought to be at the optic nerve head, however evidence from other optic neuropathies and neurodegenerative disorders suggests that dendritic structures undergo a prolonged period of atrophy that may accompany or even precede soma loss and neuronal cel...

  20. Dendritic Cells for Real-Time Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic Cells (DCs) are innate immune system cells which have the power to activate or suppress the immune system. The behaviour of human of human DCs is abstracted to form an algorithm suitable for anomaly detection. We test this algorithm on the real-time problem of port scan detection. Our results show a significant difference in artificial DC behaviour for an outgoing portscan when compared to behaviour for normal processes.

  1. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine stimulates human monocyte-derived dendritic cell chemotaxis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-young LEE; Eun-ha SHIN; Yoe-sik BAE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) chemotaxis. Methods: Human DC were generated from peripheral blood monocytes by culturing them with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The effect of SPC on the DC chemotactic migration was measured by chemotaxis assay. Intracellular signaling event involved in the SPC-induced DC chemotaxis was investigated with several inhibitors for specific kinase. The expression of the SPC receptors was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: We found that SPC induced chemotactic migration in immature DC (iDC) and mature DC (mDC). In terms of SPC-induced signaling events, mitogen activated protein kinase activation and Akt activation in iDC and mDC were stimulated. SPC-induced chemotaxis was mediated by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and phosphoino-sitide-3-kinase, but not by calcium in both iDC and mDC. Although mDC express ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1, but not G protein-coupled receptor 4, iDC do not express any of these receptors. To examine the involvement of sphin-gosine-1-phosphate (SIP) receptors, we checked the effect of an SIP receptor antagonist (VPC23019) on SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. VPC23019 did not affect SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. Conclusion: The results suggest that SPC may play a role in regulating DC trafficking during phagocytosis and the T cell-stimulating phase, and the unique SPC receptor, which is different from SIP receptors, is involved in SPC-induced chemotaxis.

  2. Dendritic-Tumor Fusion Cell-Based Cancer Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeo Koido

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immunity. Therefore, various strategies have been developed to deliver tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) to DCs as cancer vaccines. The fusion of DCs and whole tumor cells to generate DC-tumor fusion cells (DC-tumor FCs) is an alternative strategy to treat cancer patients. The cell fusion method allows DCs to be exposed to the broad array of TAAs originally expressed by whol...

  3. Murine and Human Model Systems for the Study of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells are a population of innate immune cells that possess their own effector functions as well as numerous regulatory properties that shape the activity of other innate and adaptive cells of the immune system. Following their development from either lymphoid or myeloid progenitors, the function of dendritic cells is tightly linked to their maturation and activation status. Differentiation into specialized subsets of dendritic cells also contributes to the diverse immunologic functions of these cells. Because of the key role played by dendritic cells in the regulation of both immune tolerance and activation, significant efforts have been focused on understanding dendritic cell biology. This review highlights the model systems currently available to study dendritic cell immunobiology and emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages to each system in both murine and human settings. In particular, in vitro cell culture systems involving immortalized dendritic cell lines, ex vivo systems for differentiating and expanding dendritic cells from their precursor populations, and systems for expanding, ablating, and manipulating dendritic cells in vivo are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of these systems to our current understanding of the development, function, and immunotherapeutic applications of dendritic cells, and insights into how these models might be extended in the future to answer remaining questions in the field are discussed. PMID:25203775

  4. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Stefania Bruno; Cristina Grange; Marta Tapparo; Chiara Pasquino; Renato Romagnoli; Ennia Dametto; Antonio Amoroso; Ciro Tetta; Giovanni Camussi

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell co...

  5. A novel and simple method for the generation of functional human dendritic cells from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 2 days: its application for induction of HIV-1-reactive CD4+ T cells in the hu-PBL SCID mice

    OpenAIRE

    Akira eKodama; Reiko eTanaka; Mineki eSaito; Ansari, Aftab A.; Yuetsu eTanaka

    2013-01-01

    Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, they have been ideal candidates for cell-based immunotherapy of cancers and infections in humans. Generally, monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) were generated from purified monocytes by multiple steps of time-consuming physical manipulations for an extended period cultivation. In this study, we developed a novel, simple and rapid method for the generation of type-1 helper T cell (Th1)-stimulating huma...

  6. The Current Immune Function of Hepatic Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Willy Hsu; Shang-An Shu; Eric Gershwin; Zhe-Xiong Lian

    2007-01-01

    While only a small percentage of the liver as dendritic cells, they play a major role in the regulation of liver immunity. Four major types of dendritic cell subsets include myeloid CD8α-B220-, lymphoid CD8α+B220-,plasmacytoid CD8α-B220+, and natural killer dendritic cell with CD8α-B220-NK1.1+ phenotype. Although these subsets have slightly different characteristics, they are all poor na(i)ve T cell stimulators. In exchange for their reduced capacity for allostimulation, hepatic DCs are equipped with an enhanced ability to secrete cytokines in response to TLR stimulation. In addition, they have increased level of phagocytosis. Both of these traits suggest hepatic DC as part of the innate immune system. With such a high rate of exposure to the dietary and commensal antigens, it is important for the hepatic DCs to have an enhanced innate response while maintaining a tolerogenic state to avoid chronic inflammation. Only upon secondary infectivity does the hepatic DC activate memory T cells for rapid eradication of recurring pathogen. On the other hand, overly tolerogenic characteristics of hepatic DC may be responsible for the increase prevalence of autoimmunity or liver malignancies.

  7. Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by the crosstalk between epithelial cells and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Monica; Chieppa, Marcello; Salucci, Valentina; Avogadri, Francesca; Sonzogni, Angelica; Sampietro, Gianluca M; Nespoli, Angelo; Viale, Giuseppe; Allavena, Paola; Rescigno, Maria

    2005-05-01

    The control of damaging inflammation by the mucosal immune system in response to commensal and harmful ingested bacteria is unknown. Here we show epithelial cells conditioned mucosal dendritic cells through the constitutive release of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and other mediators, resulting in the induction of 'noninflammatory' dendritic cells. Epithelial cell-conditioned dendritic cells released interleukins 10 and 6 but not interleukin 12, and they promoted the polarization of T cells toward a 'classical' noninflammatory T helper type 2 response, even after exposure to a T helper type 1-inducing pathogen. This control of immune responses seemed to be lost in patients with Crohn disease. Thus, the intimate interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells may help to maintain gut immune homeostasis. PMID:15821737

  8. Immune Responses of Dendritic Cells Loaded with Antigens from Apoptotic Cholangiocarcinoma Cells Caused by γ-Irradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUGang; HANBenli; PEIXuetao

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the induction cytotoxic T cells(CTLs) with antitumor activity and therapeutic efficacy after dendritic cells(DCs) acquired antigen from apoptotic cholangiocarcinoma cells caused by γ-irradiation. Methods:DCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that maintain the antigen capturing and processing capacity charateristic of immature cells have been established in vitro, using granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Then, in cholangiocarcinoma cells apoptosis was induced by γ-irradiation. The experimental groups were as follows:(1)coculture of DCs and apoptotic cancer cells and T cells;(2)coculture of DCs and necrotic cancer cells and T cells;(3)coculture of DCs, cultured cancer cell and T cells. They are cocultured for 7 days.DCs and T cells were riched, isolated and their antitumor response was tested. Results:The cells had typical dendritic morphology, expressed high levels of CDla and B7, acquired antigen from apoptotic cells caused by γ-irradiation and induced an increased T cell stimulatory capacity in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR). Conclusion:DCs obtained from PBMCs using GM-CSF and IL-4 can efficiently present antigen derived from apoptotic cells caused by γ-irradiation and efficiently induce T cells.This strategy, therefore, may present an effective approach to transduce DCs with antigen.

  9. Dextromethorphan inhibits activations and functions in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN- γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF- κ B translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  10. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM, a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases.

  11. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren;

    2003-01-01

    for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity......During the last decade use of dendritic cells (DC) has moved from murine and in vitro studies to clinical trials as adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. Here they function as delivery vehicles for exogenous tumor antigens, promoting an efficient antigen presentation. The development of protocols...... and in selected patients to tumor regression. However, the majority of clinical trials are still in phase I, and interpretations are hampered by pronounced variation in study design related to technical aspects of DC preparation, treatment and schedule, monitoring of immune response, and clinically relevant...

  12. Colored visible light metamaterials based on random dendritic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Song, K; Liu, B Q; Zhao, X P

    2011-01-01

    Optical metamaterials(OMs) at visible wavelengths have been extensively developed. OMs reported presently are all composed of periodic structure, and fabricated by top-down approaches. Here, the colored visible light frequencies metamaterials composed of double layer array disordered and geometrical variational dendritic cells are demonstrated, fabricating by a novel bottom-up approach. The experiment demonstrated that the OMs composed of random silver dendritic cells caused the appearance of multiple transmission passbands at red and yellow light frequencies. The slab focusing experiment reveals a clear point image in the range of half-wavelength with an intensity of 5% higher than that of the light source. Proposed colored OMs will open a new way to prepare the cloak and the perfect lens suitable for optical frequency.

  13. Multiple modes of action potential initiation and propagation in mitral cell primary dendrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wei R; Shen, Gongyu Y; Shepherd, Gordon M;

    2002-01-01

    The mitral cell primary dendrite plays an important role in transmitting distal olfactory nerve input from olfactory glomerulus to the soma-axon initial segment. To understand how dendritic active properties are involved in this transmission, we have combined dual soma and dendritic patch recordi...

  14. Dendritic thickness: a morphometric parameter to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.D. Loopuijt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the dendritic morphology of retinal ganglion cells in wild-type mice we intracellularly injected these cells with Lucifer yellow in an in vitro preparation of the retina. Subsequently, quantified values of dendritic thickness, number of branching points and level of stratification of 73 Lucifer yellow-filled ganglion cells were analyzed by statistical methods, resulting in a classification into 9 groups. The variables dendritic thickness, number of branching points per cell and level of stratification were independent of each other. Number of branching points and level of stratification were independent of eccentricity, whereas dendritic thickness was positively dependent (r = 0.37 on it. The frequency distribution of dendritic thickness tended to be multimodal, indicating the presence of at least two cell populations composed of neurons with dendritic diameters either smaller or larger than 1.8 µm ("thin" or "thick" dendrites, respectively. Three cells (4.5% were bistratified, having thick dendrites, and the others (95.5% were monostratified. Using k-means cluster analysis, monostratified cells with either thin or thick dendrites were further subdivided according to level of stratification and number of branching points: cells with thin dendrites were divided into 2 groups with outer stratification (0-40% and 2 groups with inner (50-100% stratification, whereas cells with thick dendrites were divided into one group with outer and 3 groups with inner stratification. We postulate, that one group of cells with thin dendrites resembles cat ß-cells, whereas one group of cells with thick dendrites includes cells that resemble cat a-cells.

  15. The influence of infectious factors on dendritic cell apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kubicka-Sierszen, Agata; Grzegorczyk, Janina Ł.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens can have a negative influence on dendritic cells (DCs), causing their apoptosis, which prevents active presentation of foreign antigens. It results in a state of immunosuppression which makes the body susceptible to secondary infections. Infected immature DCs have lower expression of co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules, reduced ability to secrete cytokines and an inhibited maturation process and are incapable of effective antigen presentation and activation of T-lymphocytes. In so...

  16. Phenotypic Characterization of Five Dendritic Cell Subsets in Human Tonsils

    OpenAIRE

    Summers, Kelly L.; Hock, Barry D.; McKenzie, Judith L.; Hart, Derek N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of several antigens on the three currently defined tonsil dendritic cell (DC) subsets encouraged us to re-examine tonsil DCs using a new method that minimized DC differentiation and activation during their preparation. Three-color flow cytometry and dual-color immunohistology was used in conjunction with an extensive panel of antibodies to relevant DC-related antigens to analyze lin− HLA-DR+ tonsil DCs. Here we identify, quantify, and locate five tonsil DC subsets bas...

  17. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets to Design Novel Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchereau, Jacques; Klechevsky, Eynav; Schmitt, Nathalie; Morita, Rimpei; Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses that endow resistance to infection and tolerance to self. DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the quality of elicited immune responses. Different DC subsets display different receptors and surface molecules, and express different sets of cytokines/chemokines, all of which lead to distinct immunological outcomes. Recent findings on human DC subsets and their functional specialization have provided insights for the design of novel human vaccines. PMID:19769733

  18. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Interactions with Macaque Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Teleshova, Natalia; Derby, Nina; Martinelli, Elena; Pugach, Pavel; Calenda, Giulia; Robbiani, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes advances in the following areas: (1) dendritic cell (DC)-mediated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission, (2) role of DCs in innate and adaptive immunity against SIV, and (3) approaches to harness DC function to induce anti-SIV responses. The nonhuman primate (NHP) model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in rhesus macaques and other Asian NHP species is highly relevant to advance the understanding of virus–host interactions critical for transmis...

  19. Utilization of oncoprotein-pulsed dendritic cells as tumor vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 8 (2001), s. 463-466. ISSN 0171-5216 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526; GA MZd NC45011; GA ČR GA312/98/0826; GA ČR GA312/99/0542; GA ČR GA301/00/0114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : dendritic cells * tumor vaccines * oncoproteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2001

  20. Articulation and Clarification of the Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Twycross, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell algorithm (DCA) is inspired by recent work in innate immunity. In this paper a formal description of the DCA is given. The DCA is described in detail, and its use as an anomaly detector is illustrated within the context of computer security. A port scan detection task is performed to substantiate the influence of signal selection on the behaviour of the algorithm. Experimental results provide a comparison of differing input signal mappings.

  1. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are curr...

  2. Cell death induced by application of time-varying magnetic fields on nanoparticle-loaded dendritic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos-Campos, I; Torres, T E; Marquina, C; Tres, A; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To assess the capability of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to take Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), keeping their viability. To provoke cell death on these MNPs-loaded DCs using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF). Material & methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from normal blood and platelets removed by centrifugation. Immunoselected CD14+ cells were cultured for 5 days, and the resulting cell phenotype was determined against several markers using flow cytometry. Co-cultures of DCs and MNPs were done overnight. The amount of Fe3O4 nanoparticles incorporated by DCs was quantified by magnetization measurements. MNPs-loaded DCs were exposed to AMF for 30 min and then cell viability was measured using trypan blue and FACS (annexin-propidium iodide) protocols. Morphological changes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Results: No significant decrease in cell viability of MNP/loaded DCs was observed up to five days, as compared against control sam...

  3. Dendritic cell populations in patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lied GA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Gülen A Lied1,3,4,*, Petra Vogelsang2,*, Arnold Berstad1,4, Silke Appel2 1Institute of Medicine, 2Broegelmann Research Laboratory, The Gade Institute, University of Bergen, Norway; 3Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine; 4Section of Clinical Allergology, Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Self-reported hypersensitivity to food is a common condition and many of these patients have indications of intestinal immune activation. Dendritic cells (DCs are recognized as the most potent antigen-presenting cells involved in both initiating immune responses and maintaining tolerance. The aims of this study were to evaluate the DC populations with their phenotype and T cell stimulatory capacity in patients with food hypersensitivity and to study its relationship with atopic disease. Blood samples from 10 patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity, divided into atopic and nonatopic subgroups, and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy controls were analyzed by flow cytometry using the Miltenyi Blood Dendritic cells kit. Monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs were evaluated concerning their phenotype and T cell stimulatory capacity. DC populations and cell surface markers were not significantly different between patients and healthy controls, but moDCs from atopic patients expressed significantly more CD38 compared to moDCs from nonatopic patients. Moreover, lipopolysaccharide stimulated moDCs from atopic patients produced significantly more interleukin-10 compared to nonatopic patients. CD38 expression was correlated to total serum immunoglobulin E levels. These findings support the notion of immune activation in some patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity. They need to be confirmed in a larger cohort.Keywords: food hypersensitivity, atopy, dendritic cells, CD38

  4. Nectin-1 spots regulate the branching of olfactory mitral cell dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Inoue, Takahito; Maruo, Tomohiko; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Ieki, Nao; Mandai, Kenji; Kimura, Kazushi; Kayahara, Tetsuro; Wang, Shujie; Itoh, Yu; Sai, Kousyoku; Mori, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku; Takai, Yoshimi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Olfactory mitral cells extend lateral secondary dendrites that contact the lateral secondary and apical primary dendrites of other mitral cells in the external plexiform layer (EPL) of the olfactory bulb. The lateral dendrites further contact granule cell dendrites, forming dendrodendritic reciprocal synapses in the EPL. These dendritic structures are critical for odor information processing, but it remains unknown how they are formed. We recently showed that the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 constitutes a novel adhesion apparatus at the contacts between mitral cell lateral dendrites, between mitral cell lateral and apical dendrites, and between mitral cell lateral dendrites and granule cell dendritic spine necks in the deep sub-lamina of the EPL of the developing mouse olfactory bulb and named them nectin-1 spots. We investigated here the role of the nectin-1 spots in the formation of dendritic structures in the EPL of the mouse olfactory bulb. We showed that in cultured nectin-1-knockout mitral cells, the number of branching points of mitral cell dendrites was reduced compared to that in the control cells. In the deep sub-lamina of the EPL in the nectin-1-knockout olfactory bulb, the number of branching points of mitral cell lateral dendrites and the number of dendrodendritic reciprocal synapses were reduced compared to those in the control olfactory bulb. These results indicate that the nectin-1 spots regulate the branching of mitral cell dendrites in the deep sub-lamina of the EPL and suggest that the nectin-1 spots are required for odor information processing in the olfactory bulb. PMID:26169026

  5. Mobilization of Dendritic Cell Precursors in Patients With Cancer by Flt3 Ligand Allows the Generation of Higher Yields of Cultured Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin, Carlos E.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Lapointe, Rejean; Mixon, Arnold; Wunderlich, John R.; Caron, Dania; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hwu, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Summary Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Subcutaneous Flt3L administration has been shown to effectively manage some murine cancers and in humans, to lead to an increase in peripheral blood monocyte and dendritic cell (DC) counts. In the current study, we determined the effects of Flt3L therapy on patients with melanoma and renal cancer, and in particular, if Flt3L could be used either by enhancing the immunization of patients with melanoma to tumor antigen peptides in vivo, or by mobilizing DC precursors to allow the production of larger numbers of cultured DC. Flt3 ligand administration resulted in a 19-fold increase in DC counts in the peripheral blood of patients. The DC generated in vivo appeared only partially activated, expressing increased levels of CD86, CD33, and major histocompatibility complex class II, but no or low levels of CD80 and CD83. This partial activation may account for the lack of enhanced immune responses to melanoma antigens and absence of clinical responses in the patients even in combination with antigen immunization. Flt3 ligand administration did result, however, in a 7-fold increased yield of monocytes per liter of blood from leukapheresed patients. Dendritic cells were as readily generated from monocytes collected before and after Flt3L therapy, and they stimulated allogeneic T-cell proliferation in a mixed leukocyte reaction to a similar magnitude. Thus, the use of Flt3L may be an important method to mobilize DC precursors to allow patient therapy with larger numbers of cultured DC. PMID:12000870

  6. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  7. Targeting Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Improved Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Klechevsky, Eynav; Schmitt, Nathalie; Ni, Ling; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Zurawski, Sandra; Zurawski, Gerard; Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, SangKon

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) were discovered in 1973 by Ralph Steinman as a previously undefined cell type in the mouse spleen and are now recognized as a group of related cell populations that induce and regulate adaptive immune responses. Studies of the past decade show that, both in mice and humans, DCs are composed of subsets that differ in their localization, phenotype, and functions. These progresses in our understanding of DC biology provide a new framework for improving human health. In this review, we discuss human DC subsets in the context of their medical applications, with a particular focus on DC targeting. PMID:21277223

  8. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets in allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Maazi, Hadi; Lam, Jonathan; Lombardi, Vincent; Akbari, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are major type-I interferon producing cells that play important roles in antiviral immunity and tolerance induction. These cells share a common DC progenitor with conventional DCs and Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand is essential for their development. Several subsets of pDCs have been identified to date including CCR9+, CD9+ and CD2+ pDCs. Recently, three subsets of pDCs were described namely, CD8α−β−, CD8α+β− and CD8α+β+ subsets. Interestingly, CD8α+β− a...

  9. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation. PMID:27147029

  10. Xenopus laevis retinal ganglion cell dendritic arbors develop independently of visual stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Lom; Rebecca L. Rigel

    2004-01-01

    Newly formed neurons must locate their appropriate target cells and then form synaptic connections with these targets in order to establish a functional nervous system. In the vertebrate retina, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendrites extend from the cell body and form synapses with nearby amacrine and bipolar cells. RGC axons, however, exit the retina and synapse with the dendrites of midbrain neurons in the optic tectum. We examined how visual stimulation influenced Xenopus RGC dendritic arbo...

  11. Mycobacterium-Infected Dendritic Cells Disseminate Granulomatous Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Jeffrey S; Rayasam, Aditya; Schreiber, Heidi A; Fabry, Zsuzsanna; Sandor, Matyas

    2015-01-01

    The disappearance and reformation of granulomas during tuberculosis has been described using PET/CT/X-ray in both human clinical settings and animal models, but the mechanisms of granuloma reformation during active disease remains unclear. Granulomas can recruit inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) that can regulate local T-cell responses and can carry bacteria into the lymph nodes, which is crucial for generating systemic T-cell responses against mycobacteria. Here, we report that a subset of mycobacterium-infected iDCs are associated with bacteria-specific T-cells in infected tissue, outside the granuloma, and that this results in the formation of new and/or larger multi-focal lesions. Mycobacterium-infected iDCs express less CCR7 and migrate less efficiently compared to the non-infected iDCs, which may support T-cell capture in granulomatous tissue. Capture may reduce antigen availability in the lymph node, thereby decreasing systemic priming, resulting in a possible regulatory loop between systemic T-cell responses and granuloma reformation. T-cell/infected iDCs clusters outside the granuloma can be detected during the acute and chronic phase of BCG and Mtb infection. Our studies suggest a direct role for inflammatory dendritic cells in the dissemination of granulomatous inflammation. PMID:26515292

  12. Unique immunomodulatory effects of azelastine on dendritic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, S; Kietzmann, M; Stark, H; Bäumer, W

    2014-11-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis are among the most common inflammatory skin diseases in western countries, and antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DC) are key players in their pathophysiology. Histamine, an important mediator of allergic reactions, influences DC maturation and cytokine secretion, which led us to investigate the immunomodulatory potential of the well-known histamine H1 receptor antagonists: azelastine, olopatadine, cetirizine, and pyrilamine. Unlike other H1 antihistamines, azelastine decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-12 secretion from murine bone marrow-derived DC. This effect was independent of histamine receptors H1, H2, or H4 and may be linked to inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Moreover, only azelastine reduced proliferation of allogenic T cells in a mixed leukocyte reaction. We then tested topical application of the H1 antihistamines on mice sensitized against toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a model of Th2-mediated allergic contact dermatitis. In contrast to the in vitro results, all investigated substances were efficacious in reducing allergic ear swelling. Azelastine has unique effects on dendritic cells and T cell interaction in vitro. However, this did not translate into superior in vivo efficacy for Th2-mediated allergic dermatitis, possibly due to the effects of the antihistamines on other cell types involved in skin inflammation. Future research will have to clarify whether these properties are relevant to in vivo models of allergic inflammation with a different T cell polarization. PMID:25119779

  13. Dendritic cell podosome dynamics does not depend on the F-actin regulator SWAP-70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Götz

    Full Text Available In addition to classical adhesion structures like filopodia or focal adhesions, dendritic cells similar to macrophages and osteoclasts assemble highly dynamic F-actin structures called podosomes. They are involved in cellular processes such as extracellular matrix degradation, bone resorption by osteoclasts, and trans-cellular diapedesis of lymphocytes. Besides adhesion and migration, podosomes enable dendritic cells to degrade connective tissue by matrix metalloproteinases. SWAP-70 interacts with RhoGTPases and F-actin and regulates migration of dendritic cells. SWAP-70 deficient osteoclasts are impaired in F-actin-ring formation and bone resorption. In the present study, we demonstrate that SWAP-70 is not required for podosome formation and F-actin turnover in dendritic cells. Furthermore, we found that toll-like receptor 4 ligand induced podosome disassembly and podosome-mediated matrix degradation is not affected by SWAP-70 in dendritic cells. Thus, podosome formation and function in dendritic cells is independent of SWAP-70.

  14. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML Cells Spontaneously Differentiate into Dendritic-Cell Like Populations in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Shayan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML is a rare myelodysplastic/ myeloproliferative malignancy of early childhood, characterized by monocytosis, hepatosplenomegaly and an aggressive clinical course. Methods: In semi-solid culture JMML progenitor cells proliferate spontaneously into colony forming units. In order to study the mechanisms of proliferation and differentiation of JMML cells we developed a suspension culture system without additional exogenous growth factor supplement. Mononuclear cells (MNC from peripheral blood, bone marrow or spleen of 14 patients with JMML and 24 controls were studied. Findings: JMML cells expressed higher levels of the proliferation marker Ki67 (median 24% [7-39%] vs a median of 3.5% in controls. 90% of JMML cells were CD68-positive (vs 35% in controls and by day 7 all JMML samples contained CD1a- positive cells. Electron microscopy demonstrated cytoplasmic vesicular structures resembling multilamellar MHC II compare­timents, which together with the expression of CD1a - support a dendritic cell (DC-phenotype. Conclusion: Differentiation into CD1a-positive DC seems to be a frequent phenomenon in cultured JMML MNC, which in vivo may contribute to clinical characteristics such as skin and organ infiltration.

  15. Classification of dendritic cell phenotypes from gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolezzi Francesca

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of relevant genes for sample classification is a common task in many gene expression studies. Although a number of tools have been developed to identify optimal gene expression signatures, they often generate gene lists that are too long to be exploited clinically. Consequently, researchers in the field try to identify the smallest set of genes that provide good sample classification. We investigated the genome-wide expression of the inflammatory phenotype in dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Therefore, the prediction of the inflammatory phenotype in these cells may help with the selection of immune-modulating compounds. Results A data mining protocol was applied to microarray data for murine cell lines treated with various inflammatory stimuli. The learning and validation data sets consisted of 155 and 49 samples, respectively. The data mining protocol reduced the number of probe sets from 5,802 to 10, then from 10 to 6 and finally from 6 to 3. The performances of a set of supervised classification models were compared. The best accuracy, when using the six following genes --Il12b, Cd40, Socs3, Irgm1, Plin2 and Lgals3bp-- was obtained by Tree Augmented Naïve Bayes and Nearest Neighbour (91.8%. Using the smallest set of three genes --Il12b, Cd40 and Socs3-- the performance remained satisfactory and the best accuracy was with Support Vector Machine (95.9%. These data mining models, using data for the genes Il12b, Cd40 and Socs3, were validated with a human data set consisting of 27 samples. Support Vector Machines (71.4% and Nearest Neighbour (92.6% gave the worst performances, but the remaining models correctly classified all the 27 samples. Conclusions The genes selected by the data mining protocol proposed were shown to be informative for discriminating between inflammatory and steady-state phenotypes in dendritic cells. The

  16. Environmental alkylphenols modulate cytokine expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsing Hung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alkylphenols, such as nonylphenol (NP and 4-octylphenol (4-OP, have the potential to disturb immune system due to their weak estrogen-like activity, an effect with potential serious public health impact due to the worldwide distribution of these substances. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs can secrete large amounts of type I IFNs and are critical in immune regulation. However, there has been limited study about the influence of alkylphenols on the function of pDCs. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alkylphenols on pDC functions in vitro and in vivo and then further explored the involved signaling pathways and epigenetic changes. METHODS: Circulating pDCs from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with alkylphenols with or without CpG stimulation. Alkylphenol-associated cytokine responses, signaling events, histone modifications and viral activity were further examined. In NP-exposed mice, the effect of NP on splenic pDC function and allergic lung inflammation were also assessed. RESULTS: The results showed that NP increased the expression of TNF-α, but suppressed IL-10 production in the range of physiological doses, concomitant with activation of the MKK3/6-p38 signaling pathway and enhanced levels of acetylated histone 3 as well as histone 4 at the TNFA gene locus. Further, in CpG-stimulated pDCs, NP suppressed type I IFNs production, associated with down-regulation of IRF-7 and MKK1/2-ERK-Elk-1 pathways and led to the impaired anti-enterovirus 71 activity in vitro. Additionally, splenic pDCs from NP-exposed mice showed similar cytokine changes upon CpG stimulation under conditions relevant to route and level of exposure in humans. NP treatment also enhanced allergic lung inflammation in vivo. CONCLUSION: Alkylphenols may influence pDCs' functions via their abilities to induce expression of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and to suppress regulatory cytokines, including IL-10, IFN

  17. Follicular dendritic cells in lymph nodes after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDC), non lymphoid cells present in lymph follicles, are characterized by numerous cytoplasmic processes retaining antigen-antibody complexes. Their origin, nature and function are unknown. Mice inguinal lymph nodes after 4.5 or 7.5 Gy X-irradiation were depleted of lymphoid cells. Ultrastructural observations during the first few days post-irradiation show that FDC are unaltered and possess dendritic processes enveloping dense material. Furthermore, they show intense metabolic activity. A lamina densa, never observed so well-developed in other lymph node cells, was detected around the nuclear envelope. The localization of junctions between FDC was analysed. FDC preserve their typical cytoplasmic processes even if lymphoid cells are rare. The latter thus seem not to be responsible for the maintenance of FDC integrity or their development. The possible role of this for antibody production is discussed. Irradiated lymph nodes of lymphoid cells are highly convenient for studying FDC. Isolation of FDC from irradiated lymph organs would seem to be possible. (author)

  18. Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines: From the Bench to the Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Katz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition that the development of cancer is associated with acquired immunodeficiency, mostly against cancer cells themselves, and understanding pathways inducing this immunosuppression, has led to a tremendous development of new immunological approaches, both vaccines and drugs, which overcome this inhibition. Both “passive” (e.g. strategies relying on the administration of specific T cells and “active” vaccines (e.g. peptide-directed or whole-cell vaccines have become attractive immunological approaches, inducing cell death by targeting tumor-associated antigens. Whereas peptide-targeted vaccines are usually directed against a single antigen, whole-cell vaccines (e.g. dendritic cell vaccines are aimed to induce robust responsiveness by targeting several tumor-related antigens simultaneously. The combination of vaccines with new immuno-stimulating agents which target “immunosuppressive checkpoints” (anti-CTLA-4, PD-1, etc. is likely to improve and maintain immune response induced by vaccination.

  19. Immunotherapy using dendritic cells and cytokine-induced killer for kidney cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy using dendritic cells (DC) and cytokine-induced killer (CIK)in treatment of patients with kidney cancer. Methods: Sixty patients with kidney cancer were divided into 2 groups randomly: the control group and immunotherapy group. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were seperated from the patients who received immunotherapy first, then DC and CIK were induced and cultured with GM-CSF and IL4 in vitro. The immunotherapy group received DC four times and CIK twice at an interval of 14 days after routine treatment. The control group received only chemotherapy. T lymphocyte subtypes and NK cells in peripheral blood, the white cells and the values of liver and kidney biochemistry of two group of patients were analyzed and clinical efficacy were ob- served, so were side effects. Results: Clinical efficacy showed significant statistical difference between the two groups (P+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+ and NK cell in the immunotherapy group increased after treatment, which showed significant statistical difference compared with those before treatment(P value was 0.010, 0.026, 0.021, 0.016, respectively). Changes in cell immune indexes (CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+) in immunotherapy group and Control group showed significant statistical difference (P value was 0.001,0.023,0.012, respectively). Conclusion: Immunotherapy using dendritic cells and cytokine-induced killer combined with routine treatment can improve T lymphocyte subtypes and NK cell ratio in peripheral blood of the patients with kidney cancer, and may play an important role in the treatment of kidney cancer. It can enhance clinical efficacy in patients with kidney cancer and can improve prognosis. (authors)

  20. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucan is an activator of human and mouse dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Anna; Pérez-Gutierrez, Camino; Banchereau, Romain; Dutartre, Hélène; Lecine, Patrick; Dullaers, Melissa; Mello, Marielle; Salcedo, Suzana Pinto; Muller, Alexandre; Leserman, Lee; Levy, Yves; Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandy; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Klechevsky, Eynav; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, Sangkon; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4(+) T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:23166489

  1. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucan is an activator of human and mouse dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Martirosyan

    Full Text Available Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glucans showed neither toxicity nor immunogenicity compared to LPS and triggered antigen-specific CD8(+ T cell responses in vivo. These cyclic glucans also enhanced antigen-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses including cross-presentation by different human DC subsets. Brucella β 1,2 cyclic glucans increased the memory CD4(+ T cell responses of blood mononuclear cells exposed to recombinant fusion proteins composed of anti-CD40 antibody and antigens from both hepatitis C virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus cyclic glucans represent a new class of adjuvants, which might contribute to the development of effective antimicrobial therapies.

  2. A Skin Homing Molecule Defines the Langerhans Cell Progenitor in Human Peripheral Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Strunk, Dirk; Egger, Claudia; Leitner, Gerda; Hanau, Daniel; Stingl, Georg

    1997-01-01

    We have recently described a system for the generation of dendritic cells (DC) and Langerhans cells (LC) from defined CD34+ precursors purified from peripheral blood of healthy adult volunteers (1). This study has now been extended by the characterization of two distinct subpopulations of CD34+ cells in normal human peripheral blood as defined by the expression of the skin homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA). CD34+/CLA+ cells from normal peripheral blood were found t...

  3. Effect of X-ray on immunological function of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, by means of immunofluorescence label, flow cytometer, 3H-TdR incorporation and MTT analysis, the immune function of dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells derived from normal human peripheral blood were investigated after X irradiation in different doses. The results show that the expressions of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD40 moleculars of DCs were up-regulated after irradiation with different doses. DCs irradiated with 0.2 Gy could allow the restoration of CD4/CD8 proportion of T cells and the increase of T cell proliferation, as well as the cytotoxicity of CTL cells. It is suggested that DCs in vitro irradiated with 0.2 Gy could significantly improve the immune function and the 0.2 Gy is a reasonable dose in clinical therapy of DCs. (authors)

  4. Investigating evolutionary conservation of dendritic cell subset identity and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien-Phong eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types

  5. Cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by MHC class I in dendritic cell subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric eGutiérrez-Martínez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells have the unique ability to pick up dead cells carrying antigens in tissue and migrate to the lymph nodes where they can cross-present cell-associated antigens by MHC class I to CD8+ T cells. There is strong in vivo evidence that the mouse XCR1+ dendritic cells subset acts as a key player in this process. The intracellular processes underlying cross-presentation remain controversial and several pathways have been proposed. Indeed, a wide number of studies have addressed the cellular process of cross-presentation in vitro using a variety of sources of antigen and antigen presenting cells. Here we review the in vivo and in vitro evidence supporting the current mechanistic models and disscuss their physiological relevance to the cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by dendritic cells subsets

  6. 钙载体A23187快速诱导人外周血单核细胞成树突状细胞%Calcium Ionophore-treated Human Peripheral Blood Mononcytes Rapidly Acquire Activated Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴军; 王晓怀; 杨太成; 赖晃文; 杨传红; 王捷; 郑文岭

    2004-01-01

    目的探讨钙载体(calcium ionophore,CI)A23187对正常人外周血单核细胞来源的树突状细胞(Dendritic cell,DC)形态、表面分子表达及免疫功能的影响.方法分离健康献血者外周血单核细胞,分别加入:重组人粒/单集落刺激因子(rhGM-CSF) 100ng/ml、rhGM-CSF 100ng/ml +IL-4 50ng/ml、rhGM-CSF +A23187(钙载体,CI)各100ng/ml.体外培养40 h后,于光镜及电镜下观察细胞的形态、流式细胞仪检测细胞的表面标志、MTT比色法检测上述细胞对同种异体T细胞的刺激增殖作用.结果外周血单核细胞在GM-CSF+A23187各100ng/ml的条件下培养40h,就可看到典型的DC形态,其表面单核细胞的特征性标志CD14分子表达减少,HLA-DR、CD80、CD86及CD83分子的表达均明显增高,且具有明显刺激同种异体T细胞增殖的能力.结论外周血单核细胞在钙载体A23187及GM-CSF的共同作用下,40h就能获得成熟的DC.

  7. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  8. Regulation of intestinal immune system by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Chang, Sun-Young

    2015-02-01

    Innate immune cells survey antigenic materials beneath our body surfaces and provide a front-line response to internal and external danger signals. Dendritic cells (DCs), a subset of innate immune cells, are critical sentinels that perform multiple roles in immune responses, from acting as principal modulators to priming an adaptive immune response through antigen-specific signaling. In the gut, DCs meet exogenous, non-harmful food antigens as well as vast commensal microbes under steady-state conditions. In other instances, they must combat pathogenic microbes to prevent infections. In this review, we focus on the function of intestinal DCs in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. Specifically, we describe how intestinal DCs affect IgA production from B cells and influence the generation of unique subsets of T cell. PMID:25713503

  9. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking

  10. Regulatory T cells diminish transmission of HIV from Dendritic cells to conventional CD4+ T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Eugenia Moreno-Fernandez; Joedicke, Jara J; Claire Anne Chougnet

    2014-01-01

    Formation of immunological synapses between dendritic cells (DC) and conventional CD4+ T cells (Tcon) is critical for productive immune responses. However, when DCs are HIV-infected such synapses are critical to establish HIV infection. As regulatory T cells (Treg) control DC-Tcon interactions, we inquired whether Treg might interfere with DC to Tcon HIV transmission. We developed a model, using monocyte-derived DC infected with R5-HIV, and cultured with Tcon in the presence or absence of a...

  11. Xenopus laevis retinal ganglion cell dendritic arbors develop independently of visual stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Rigel

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Newly formed neurons must locate their appropriate target cells and then form synaptic connections with these targets in order to establish a functional nervous system. In the vertebrate retina, retinal ganglion cell (RGC dendrites extend from the cell body and form synapses with nearby amacrine and bipolar cells. RGC axons, however, exit the retina and synapse with the dendrites of midbrain neurons in the optic tectum. We examined how visual stimulation influenced Xenopus RGC dendritic arborization. Neuronal activity is known to be an important factor in shaping dendritic and axonal arborization. Thus, we reared tadpoles in dark and light environments then used rhodamine dextran retrograde labeling to identify RGCs in the retina. When we compared RGC dendritic arbors from tadpoles reared in dark and light environments, we found no morphological differences, suggesting that physiological visual activity did not contribute to the morphological development of Xenopus RGC dendritic arbors.

  12. Xenopus laevis Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Arbors Develop Independently of Visual Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lom

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly formed neurons must locate their appropriate target cells and then form synaptic connections with these targets in order to establish a functional nervous system. In the vertebrate retina, retinal ganglion cell (RGC dendrites extend from the cell body and form synapses with nearby amacrine and bipolar cells. RGC axons, however, exit the retina and synapse with the dendrites of midbrain neurons in the optic tectum. We examined how visual stimulation influenced Xenopus RGC dendritic arborization. Neuronal activity is known to be an important factor in shaping dendritic and axonal arborization. Thus, we reared tadpoles in dark and light environments then used rhodamine dextran retrograde labeling to identify RGCs in the retina. When we compared RGC dendritic arbors from tadpoles reared in dark and light environments, we found no morphological differences, suggesting that physiological visual activity did not contribute to the morphological development of Xenopus RGC dendritic arbors.

  13. Influence of lipid rafts on CD1d presentation by dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wei; Martaresche, Cecile; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Cédile, Oriane; Reynier-Vigouroux, Anne; Boucraut, Jose

    Our main objective was to analyze the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Valpha-14(-) and Valpha-14(+) T hybridomas by dendritic cells. We showed that activation of Valpha-14(+) hybridomas by dendritic cells or other CD1d-expressing cells was altered by disruption of lipid rafts with the...

  14. Resistivity and thickness effects in dendritic web silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, D. L.; Hwang, J. M.; Greggi, J.; Campbell, R. B.

    The decrease of minority carrier lifetime as resistivity decreases in dendritic-web silicon solar cells is addressed. This variation is shown to be consistent with the presence of defect levels in the bandgap which arise from extended defects in the web material. The extended defects are oxide precipitates (SiOx) and the dislocation cores they decorate. Sensitivity to this background distribution of defect levels increases with doping because the Fermi level moves closer to the majority carrier band edge. For high-resistivity dendritic-web silicon, which has a low concentration of these extended defects, cell efficiencies as high as 16.6 percent (4 sq cm, 40 ohm-cm boron-doped base, AM1.5 global, 100 mW/sq cm, 25 C JPL LAPSS1 measurement) and a corresponding electron lifetime of 38 microsec have been obtained. Thickness effects occur in bifacial cell designs and in designs which use light trapping. In some cases, the dislocation/precipitate defect can be passivated through the full thickness of web cells by hydrogen ion implantation.

  15. Exosomes from B cells and Dendritic cells: mechanisms of formation, secretion and targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Many cell types, including dendritic cells (DC) and B cells, secrete small vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from immune cells are thought to have immuno-regulatory functions but their precise role remains unresolved. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to get more insight into the

  16. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  17. Bone marrow dendritic cell-based anticancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrová, Marie; Mendoza, Luis; Reiniš, Milan; Vonka, V.; Šmahel, M.; Němečková, Š.; Jandlová, Táňa; Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 495, - (2001), s. 355-358. ISSN 0065-2598 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526; GA ČR GA312/98/0826; GA ČR GA312/99/0542; GA ČR GA301/00/0114; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA AV ČR IAA7052002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HPV16 * dendritic cells * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.513, year: 2000

  18. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in cutaneous lesions of patients with chromoblastomycosis, lacaziosis, and paracoccidioidomycosis: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliari, Carla; Kanashiro-Galo, Luciane; Silva, Aline Alves de Lima; Barboza, Tânia Cristina; Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Xavier, Marília Brasil; Unger, Deborah; Maria Moraes Oliveira, Clivia; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami

    2014-05-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are characterized by expression of CD123 and BDCA-2 (Blood Dendritic Cell Antigen 2) (CD303) molecules, which are important in innate and adaptive immunity. Chromoblastomycosis (CBM), lacaziosis or Jorge Lobo's disease (JLD), and paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), are noteworthy in Latin America due to the large number of reported cases. The severity of lesions is mainly determined by the host's immune status and in situ responses. The dendritic cells studied in these fungal diseases are of myeloid origin, such as Langerhans cells and dermal dendrocytes; to our knowledge, there are no data for pDCs. Forty-three biopsies from patients with CBM, 42 from those with JLD and 46 diagnosed with PCM, were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Plasmacytoid cells immunostained with anti-CD123 and anti-CD303 were detected in 16 cases of CBM; in those stained with anti-CD123, 24 specimens were obtained from PCM. We did not detect the presence of pDCs in any specimen using either antibody in JLD. We believe that, albeit a secondary immune response in PCM and CBM, pDCs could act as a secondary source of important cytokines. The BDCA-2 (CD303) is a c-type lectin receptor involved in cell adhesion, capture, and processing of antigens. Through the expression of the c-lectin receptor, there could be an interaction with fungi, similar to other receptors of this type, namely, CD207 in PCM and CD205 and CD209 in other fungal infections. In JLD, the absence of expression of CD123 and CD303 seems to indicate that pDCs are not involved in the immune response. PMID:24782102

  19. Apoptosis and systemic autoimmunity: the dendritic cell connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Manfredi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has been devoted in recent years to the events linking recognition and disposal of apoptotic cells to sustained immunity towards the antigens they contain. Programmed death via apoptosis indeed provides most of the raw material the immune system exploits to establish self tolerance, i.e. to learn how to distinguish between self constituents and foreign antigens, belonging to invading pathogens. In parallel, events occurring during cell death may enable a restricted array of molecules endowed with diverse structure, function and intracellular distribution to satisfy the requirement to evoke and maintain autoimmune responses. Dendritic cells (DCs, the most potent antigen presenting cells, appear to play a crucial role. Here we will discuss some of the constrains regulating the access of dying cells’ antigens to DCs, as well as censorship mechanisms that prevent their maturation and the full explication of their antigen presenting function.

  20. The influence of infectious factors on dendritic cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicka-Sierszen, Agata; Grzegorczyk, Janina Ł

    2015-10-12

    Pathogens can have a negative influence on dendritic cells (DCs), causing their apoptosis, which prevents active presentation of foreign antigens. It results in a state of immunosuppression which makes the body susceptible to secondary infections. Infected immature DCs have lower expression of co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules, reduced ability to secrete cytokines and an inhibited maturation process and are incapable of effective antigen presentation and activation of T-lymphocytes. In some cases, the ability of DCs to undergo rapid apoptosis is important for the body defense, which is probably because of DCs' ability to cross-present and cooperate with other cells. Apoptotic bodies released from the infected DCs are phagocytosed by other DCs, which then stimulate the effector cells and present antigens more efficiently than infected cells. The aim of this article is to review how the DCs respond to viral and bacterial factors and which biochemical mechanisms are responsible for their apoptosis. PMID:26528349

  1. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens. PMID:23426134

  2. CHI3L1 nuclear localization in monocyte derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rosa, Michelino; Tibullo, Daniele; Saccone, Salvatore; Distefano, Gisella; Basile, Maria Sofia; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Malaguarnera, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    Chitinase-3-like-1 protein (CHI3L1) is a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) highly expressed in a variety of inflammatory diseases at infectious and non-infectious etiology. CHI3L1 is produced by a wide variety of cells including monocyte-derived macrophages cell lines such as polarized M1 and M2 type macrophages, osteoclasts and Kupffer cells. In this study we have examined the expression of CHI3L1 during the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells. Magnetically-isolated peripheral blood monocytes were differentiated toward immature DCs (iDC) and mature DCs (mDCs) through a combination of factors and cytokines. Our result showed, for the first time, that CHI3L1 is expressed during the process of differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells in time dependent manner. Furthermore, the CHI3L1 is evenly distributed in cytoplasm and in the nucleus of both the iDCs and mDCs. These results suggest that CHI3L1 may play crucial role in the DCs immunoresponse. PMID:26466985

  3. Regulatory T cells inhibit stable contacts between CD4+ T cells and dendritic cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tadokoro, Carlos E.; Shakhar, Guy; Shen, Shiqian; Ding, Yi; Lino, Andreia C.; Maraver, Antonio; Lafaille, Juan J.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T (T reg) cells exert powerful down-modulatory effects on immune responses, but it is not known how they act in vivo. Using intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy we determined that, in the absence of T reg cells, the locomotion of autoantigen-specific T cells inside lymph nodes is decreased, and the contacts between T cells and antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs) are of longer duration. Thus, T reg cells can exert an early effect on immune responses by attenuating the es...

  4. Effects of Human Placenta-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Regulation against the Maturation of Cord Blood Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells in vitro%人胎盘源间充质干细胞对脐血单核源树突状细胞体外成熟的调节作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李毅平; 王泳; 金美芳; 刘琳; 张闽; 张学光; 汪健

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study on the in vitro maturation of cord blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mono-DCs) regulated by human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs). Methods Human cord blood monocytes were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and cultured with human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) and human interleukin-4 (hIL-4). Then large amounts of immature DCs were obtained and co-cultured with PMSCs in the presence of LPS for 4 days. The effects of PMSCs on the maturation of DCs were analyzed with inverted microscope, flow cyto-metry and mixed lymphocyte reaction respectively. Results In co-culture group, DCs were scattering around and presented round and smooth round and under inverted microscope. Compared with the control group, co-cultured DCs expressed lower level of CD80, CD86, CD83 and CD40, but higher level of CD14. Allogeneic lymphocytes proliferation assay showed that the stimulatory abilities of DCs from co-culture group were lower than those in the control group (all P <0. 05). Conclusion PMSCs can significantly suppress the maturation of cord blood mono-DCs in vitro.%目的 探讨人胎盘源间充质干细胞(PMSCs)对单核源树突状细胞(mono-DCs)体外成熟的影响.方法 采用密度梯度离心法分离人脐血单核细胞,在人粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子(hGM-CSF)和人白细胞介素-4(hIL-4)刺激下获得大量未成熟DCs.将DCs和PMSCs共培养4d,同时加入LPS刺激,分别通过倒置显微镜、流式细胞仪和混合淋巴反应(MLR)检测DCs的成熟.结果 共培养DCs呈散在分布,细胞边缘圆滑;与成熟DCs相比,其表面CD80、CD86、CD83、CD40的表达明显较低,而CD14的表达较高;共培养组DCs刺激同种异型淋巴细胞增殖的能力在各个浓度均明显低于对照组(均P<O.05).结论 PMSCs可以明显抑制脐血单核源DCs的体外成熟.

  5. Antibodies against Listerial Protein 60 Act as an Opsonin for Phagocytosis of Listeria monocytogenes by Human Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb-Mäurer, Annette; Pilgrim, Sabine; Kämpgen, Eckhart; McLellan, Alexander D.; Bröcker, Eva-Bettina; Goebel, Werner; Gentschev, Ivaylo

    2001-01-01

    Human-monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) are very efficient in the uptake of Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive bacterium which is an important pathogen in humans and animals causing systemic infections with symptoms such as septicemia and meningitis. In this work, we analyzed the influence of blood plasma on the internalization of L. monocytogenes into human MoDC and compared the uptake of L. monocytogenes with that of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocoli...

  6. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in antiviral immunity and autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) represent a unique and crucial immune cell population capable of producing large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) in response to viral infection.The function of pDCs as the professional type I IFN-producing cells is linked to their selective expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR9,which sense viral nucleic acids within the endosomal compartments.Type I IFNs produced by pDCs not only directly inhibit viral replication but also play an essential role in linking the innate and adaptive immune system.The aberrant activation of pDCs by self nucleic acids through TLR signaling and the ongoing production of type I IFNs do occur in some autoimmune diseases.Therefore,pDC may serve as an attractive target for therapeutic manipulations of the immune system to treat viral infectious diseases and autoimmune diseases.

  7. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells in innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Beatriz; Ardavín, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Monocytes have been classically considered essential elements in relation with innate immune responses against pathogens, and inflammatory processes caused by external aggressions, infection and autoimmune disease. However, although their potential to differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs) was discovered 14 years ago, their functional relevance with regard to adaptive immune responses has only been uncovered very recently. Studies performed over the last years have revealed that monocyte-derived DCs play an important role in innate and adaptive immunity, due to their microbicidal potential, capacity to stimulate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses and ability to regulate Immunoglobulin production by B cells. In addition, monocyte-derived DCs not only constitute a subset of DCs formed at inflammatory foci, as previously thought, but also comprise different subsets of DCs located in antigen capture areas, such as the skin and the intestinal, respiratory and reproductive tracts. PMID:18362945

  8. Identification of a novel immunoregulatory signaling pathway exploited by M. tuberculosis in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Janne Marie; Schoof, Erwin; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov;

    highly sophisticated infectious machinery employed by the bacterium. The dendritic cell (DC) plays a crucial role in shaping the nature of the immune response after exposure to pathogens, and the interaction between M. tuberculosis and the dendritic cell is of profound importance for the course of...

  9. Distinct gut-derived lactic acid bacteria elicit divergent dendritic cell-mediated NK cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are abundant in the gastrointestinal tract where they continuously regulate the immune system. NK cells are potently activated by dendritic cells (DCs) matured by inflammatory stimuli, and NK cells are present in the gut epithelium and in mesenteric lymph nodes, but it is...

  10. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, F O; Burg, G; Fäh, J; Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1997-02-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs), cryosections from basal cell carcinomas were immunostained. In basal cell carcinomas, only 1 to 2% of intratumor and 5 to 10% of peritumor APCs expressed CD80 or CD86. In contrast, biopsies of immunological/inflammatory dermatoses revealed that 38 to 73% of APCs expressed CD80 and CD86. To further evaluate their phenotype and function, TADCs were isolated from tissue samples of basal cell carcinomas; they were non-adherent to plastic, displayed a typical dendritic morphology, and expressed high levels of major histocompatibility class II molecules on their surface. When TADCs were compared with dendritic cells from blood for presentation of superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B) to resting autologous T cells, TADCs were consistently weaker stimulators of T cell proliferation than blood dendritic cells. When analyzed by flow cytometry, TADCs expressed high levels of HLA-DR, but only 5 to 10% co-expressed CD80 or CD86. A 3-day culture in granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-containing medium partially reconstituted the TADC expression of CD80 and CD86 as well as their immunostimulatory capacity. Thus, in this common skin cancer, although there are prominent collections of HLA-DR-positive APCs in and around tumor cells, the TADCs are deficient in important co-stimulatory molecules as well as being weak stimulators of T cell proliferation. The paucity of co-stimulatory molecule expression and functional activity of TADCs may explain why

  11. Generation of mature dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes not purified from the PBMCs by calcium ionophore A23187 and GM-CSF in vitro%非贴壁法体外诱导人外周血单核细胞生成树突状细胞的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭卫斌; 饶珈琦; 沙卫红; 容海鹰; 聂玉强; 李瑜元

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨新型诱导剂钙离子载体A23187联合重组人粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子(rhGM-CSF)通过非贴壁法体外诱导人外周血单核细胞(monocytes,Mo)生成树突状细胞(dendritic cell,DC)的可行性.方法 采用密度梯度离心法分离出人外周血单个核细胞(peripheral blood mononuclear cell,PBMC),一组通过贴壁法分离出Mo,再加入rhGM-CSF+A23187,称贴壁法组.另一组直接加入rhGM-CSF+A23187,称非贴壁法组.通过光镜观察细胞形态的变化,流式细胞仪检测DC细胞的表面标志.结果 两组诱导培养的DCs都具有典型的树突形态;与贴壁法比较,DC表面分子CD14-CD83+(39.2% vs40.9%)、CD14-CD1a+(19.6% vs 18.3%)、CD14-CD86+(47.1% vs 46.0%)、CD14-CD40+(30.5% vs 32.8%)的表达无明显差异,P值均大于0.05.结论 新型诱导剂钙离子载体A23187联合rhGM-CSF通过非贴壁法能有效地诱导Mo生成成熟的DCs.%Objection The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of calcium ionophore (CI) A23187 and human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on the cultivation of dendritic cell (DC) from healthy human peripheral blood monocytes (Mo) not purified from the PBMC in vitro. Methods PBMC isolated from peripheral blood of healthy human by Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient separation were separated into two groups. The monocytes purified through adhensiveness from the cells in group A were cultured in the presence of rhGM-CSF and calcium ionophore (CI) A23187. The cells in group B were cultured with additional rhGM-CSF and CI A23187 directly. The cells in both groups were loaded by freeze-thawed K562 cells on the first day and were harvested in 96 hours of cultivation. The morphology of the DCs was observed by microscope all through the process. The surface antigens of the induced cells after culturing for 96 hours were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Results Typical morphological features

  12. Dendritic cells and oral transmission of prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang-Ping; MacPherson, G Gordon

    2004-04-19

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (scrapie, BSE, Kuru) develop as central nervous system (CNS) diseases after long incubation periods, and many of which may arise following the consumption of infected material. The infectious agent is thought to be a misfolded form (scrapie associated PrP (PrP(Sc))) of a normal host protein (cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C))), which is relatively resistant to proteolytic degradation and which serves as a template, directing host prion protein (PrP) to accumulate in the misfolded form. Animal experiments have shown that CNS disease is preceded by a period in which the agent accumulates in secondary lymphoid organs (Peyer's patches (PP), lymph nodes, spleen), particularly follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in the B cell areas of these organs. How the agent is transmitted from the intestinal lumen to the FDCs is largely unknown. Dendritic cells (DCs, cells quite distinct from FDCs) are cells that are specialised to acquire antigens from peripheral tissues and to transport them to secondary lymphoid organs for presentation to T and B lymphocytes. We have shown that DCs can acquire PrP(Sc) from the intestinal lumen and deliver it to mesenteric lymph nodes. In this review we discuss the different stages involved in the migration of PrP(Sc) from the intestine to FDCs and consider the different stages and barriers involved in this process. We conclude that transport of the causative agent, using PrP(Sc) as a biomarker, from the intestine to FDCs is a very inefficient process, which may help to account for the apparent low frequency of individuals who have consumed infected material that go on to develop clinical disease. PMID:15063597

  13. Induction of early Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation by thyroid hormone requires RORα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bois-Joyeux Brigitte

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The active form (T3 of thyroid hormone (TH controls critical aspects of cerebellar development, such as migration of postmitotic neurons and terminal dendritic differentiation of Purkinje cells. The effects of T3 on early dendritic differentiation are poorly understood. Results In this study, we have analyzed the influence of T3 on the progression of the early steps of Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation in postnatal day 0 organotypic cerebellar cultures. These steps include, successively, regression of immature neuritic processes, a stellate cell stage, and the extension of several long and mature perisomatic protrusions before the growth of the ultimate dendritic tree. We also studied the involvement of RORα, a nuclear receptor controlling early Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation. We show that T3 treatment leads to an accelerated progression of the early steps of dendritic differentiation in culture, together with an increased expression of RORα (mRNA and protein in both Purkinje cells and interneurons. Finally, we show that T3 failed to promote early dendritic differentiation in staggerer RORα-deficient Purkinje cells. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that T3 action on the early Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation process is mediated by RORα.

  14. Breast cancer tumor growth is efficiently inhibited by dendritic cell transfusion in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Quoc Pham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of dendritic cells to efficiently present tumor-derived antigens when primed with tumor cell lysates makes them attractive as an approach for cancer treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dendritic cell transfusion dose on breast cancer tumor growth in a murine model. Dendritic cells were produced from allogeneic bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells that were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20 ng/mL GM-CSF and 20 ng/mL IL-4 for 7 days. These cells were checked for maturation before being primed with a cancer cell-derived antigen. Cancer cell antigens were produced by a rapid freeze-thaw procedure using a 4T1 cell line. Immature dendritic cells were loaded with 4T1 cellderived antigens. Dendritic cells were transfused into mice bearing tumors at three different doses, included 5.104, 105, and 106 cells/mouse with a control consisting of RPMI 1640 media alone. The results showed that dendritic cell therapy inhibited breast cancer tumors in a murine model; however, this effect depended on dendritic cell dose. After 17 days, in the treated groups, tumor size decreased by 43%, 50%, and 87.5% for the doses of 5 and times; 104, 105, and 106 dendritic cells, respectively, while tumor size in the control group decreased by 44%. This result demonstrated that dendritic cell therapy is a promising therapy for breast cancer treatment. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(3.000: 85-92

  15. Migratory dendritic cells transfer antigen to a lymph node-resident dendritic cell population for efficient CTL priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Rhys S; Waithman, Jason; Bedoui, Sammy; Jones, Claerwen M; Villadangos, Jose A; Zhan, Yifan; Lew, Andrew M; Shortman, Ken; Heath, William R; Carbone, Francis R

    2006-07-01

    Skin dendritic cells (DCs) are thought to act as key initiators of local T cell immunity. Here we show that after skin infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activation required MHC class I-restricted presentation by nonmigratory CD8(+) DCs rather than skin-derived DCs. Despite a lack of direct presentation by migratory DCs, blocking their egress from infected skin substantially inhibited class I-restricted presentation and HSV-specific CTL responses. These results support the argument for initial transport of antigen by migrating DCs, followed by its transfer to the lymphoid-resident DCs for presentation and CTL priming. Given that relatively robust CTL responses were seen with small numbers of skin-emigrant DCs, we propose that this inter-DC antigen transfer functions to amplify presentation across a larger network of lymphoid-resident DCs for efficient T cell activation. PMID:16860764

  16. Modulation of Dendritic Cells by Nanotechnology-Based Immunotherapeutic Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogrão, Joana; da Costa, Catarina A; Gaspar, Rogério; Florindo, Helena F

    2016-03-01

    In preceding decades, different mechanisms have been proposed to "instruct" dendritic cells (DCs) to induce immune responses against tumor antigens (TAs), thus breaking immune tolerance. Immunotherapy has been, for the last two decades, an attractive and promising therapeutic approach to fight cancer. This review will approach the nature of the immune response during cancer development and its correlation with DC function, as well as cancer vaccine principles and limitations. An overview of several delivery strategies used for in vivo modulation of DCs and direct activation of T cells will be provided, highlighting their advantages, limitations, and optimization strategies. This manuscript also presents a critical and systematic review of recent clinical trials that are investigating the therapeutic effect of these approaches, discussing prognostic outcomes of combined-treatment modalities. PMID:27280242

  17. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  18. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana J Michielsen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  19. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Michielsen, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5) could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  20. Mannosylated biodegradable polyethyleneimine for targeted DNA delivery to dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun X

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Xun Sun, Simu Chen, Jianfeng Han, Zhirong ZhangKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: To establish a potential gene-delivery system with the ability to deliver plasmid DNA to dendritic cells (DCs more efficiently and specifically, we designed and synthesized a low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine and triethyleneglycol polymer (PEI–TEG and a series of its mannosylated derivatives.Methods: PEI–TEG was synthesized from PEI2000 and PEI600 with TEG as the cross-linker. PEI–TEG was then linked to mannose via a phenylisothiocyanate bridge to obtain man-PEI–TEG conjugates. The DNA conveyance abilities of PEI–TEG, man-PEI–TEG, as well as control PEI25k were evaluated by measuring their zeta potential, particle size, and DNA-binding abilities. The in vitro cytotoxicity, cell uptake, and transfection efficiency of these PEI/DNA complexes were examined on the DC2.4 cell line. Finally, a maturation experiment evaluated the effect of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86 on murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs using flow cytometry.Results: PEI–TEG and man-PEI–TEG were successfully synthesized and were shown to retain the excellent properties of PEI25k for condensing DNA. Compared with PEI–TEG as well as PEI25k, the man-PEI–TEG had less cytotoxicity and performed better in both cellular uptake and transfection assays in vitro. The results of the maturation experiment showed that all the PEI/DNA complexes induced an adequate upregulation of surface markers for DC maturation.Conclusion: These results demonstrated that man-PEI–TEG can be employed as a DC-targeting gene-delivery system.Keywords: dendritic cells, DCs, mannose, polyethyleneimine, PEI, gene delivery

  1. DMPD: The role of type I interferon production by dendritic cells in host defense. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17544561 The role of type I interferon production by dendritic cells in host defens...tml) (.csml) Show The role of type I interferon production by dendritic cells in host defense. PubmedID 1754...4561 Title The role of type I interferon production by dendritic cells in host de

  2. DMPD: Heterogeneity of TLR-induced responses in dendritic cells: from innate toadaptive immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15481153 Heterogeneity of TLR-induced responses in dendritic cells: from innate toa...w Heterogeneity of TLR-induced responses in dendritic cells: from innate toadaptive immunity. PubmedID 15481...153 Title Heterogeneity of TLR-induced responses in dendritic cells: from innate

  3. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro. PMID:26590947

  4. PLACE CELL FORMATION BY GRID CELL CONVERGENCE IN THE DENDRITES OF A CA1 MODEL NEURON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Pollali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Place cells are pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus which fire selectively when the animal is located in a particular place in space. CA1 place cells receive synaptic input from CA3 via the Schaffer collateral fibers to their proximal apical and basal dendrites and from the third layer of medial entorhinal cortex to their apical tuft dendrites. Both of these input pathways encode spatial information. Grid cells, which form the entorhinal input to CA1 cells, have a spatial firing field with multiple peaks which displays a regularly spaced, triangular grid pattern that covers the entire space of a given environment. Both grid and place cells are phase-modulated by theta rhythm and this modulation may be important for their spatial properties. Studying the formation of place cells is an important step in understanding how representation of the external environment is coded in neural networks that constitute spatial maps. It is not currently known how place fields emerge in CA1 neurons. An influential model of place cell formation predicts the convergence of various grid field inputs which combine linearly to create the place field output of CA1 cells. In this study, we constructed a model of CA1 place cell formation through the convergence of grid field inputs to the distal dendrites of our model neuron. We created a model of grid cell activity which represents the firing of grid cells modulated be the theta rhythm. We varied the number of different grid fields used as synaptic inputs to stimulate the distal dendrites of a biophysically constrained, detailed compartmental CA1 pyramidal cell model. In addition, inhibition was placed in both the distal and proximal dendrites. These inhibitory pathways are known to be active in different phases of the theta rhythm. We used this model to study the properties of CA1 place cell formation and to assess the output of the CA1 model cell during place cell activity. Additionally, we

  5. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  6. Role of regulatory dendritic cells in allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Omid; Umetsu, Dale T

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient inducers of all immune responses, and are capable of either inducing productive immunity or maintaining the state of tolerance to self antigens and allergens. In this review, we summarize the emerging literature on DCs, with emphasis on the regulatory function of DCs in allergy and asthma. In particular, we summarize recent data regarding the relationship between DC subsets and TH1, TH2, and regulatory T (TReg) cells. The diverse functions of DCs have been attributed to distinct lineages of DCs, which arise from common immature precursor cells that differentiate in response to specific maturation-inducing or local microenvironment conditions. These subsets of DCs induce different lineages of T cells, such as TH1, TH2, and TReg cells, including Th1Reg and Th2Reg cells, which regulate allergic diseases and asthma. Subsets of DCs regulate the induction of a variety of T-cell subtypes, which suppress the development of allergy and asthma, thus providing anti-inflammatory responses and protective immunity. PMID:15659264

  7. Uptake and intracellular trafficking of superantigens in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B Ganem

    Full Text Available Bacterial superantigens (SAgs are exotoxins produced mainly by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS. According to current paradigm, SAgs interact directly and simultaneously with T cell receptor (TCR on the T cell and MHC class II (MHC-II on the antigen-presenting cell (APC, thereby circumventing intracellular processing to trigger T cell activation. Dendritic cells (DCs are professional APCs that coat nearly all body surfaces and are the most probable candidate to interact with SAgs. We demonstrate that SAgs are taken up by mouse DCs without triggering DC maturation. SAgs were found in intracellular acidic compartment of DCs as biologically active molecules. Moreover, SAgs co-localized with EEA1, RAB-7 and LAMP-2, at different times, and were then recycled to the cell membrane. DCs loaded with SAgs are capable of triggering in vitro lymphocyte proliferation and, injected into mice, stimulate T cells bearing the proper TCR in draining lymph nodes. Transportation and trafficking of SAgs in DCs might increase the local concentration of these exotoxins where they will produce the highest effect by promoting their encounter with both MHC-II and TCR in lymph nodes, and may explain how just a few SAg molecules can induce the severe pathology associated with TSS.

  8. Low Counts of B Cells, Natural Killer Cells, Monocytes, Dendritic Cells, Basophils, and Eosinophils are Associated with Postengraftment Infections after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Peter J; Pratt, Laura M; Liu, Yiping; Dharmani-Khan, Poonam; Luider, Joanne; Auer-Grzesiak, Iwona; Mansoor, Adnan; Williamson, Tyler S; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Khan, Faisal M; Larratt, Loree; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Stewart, Douglas A; Russell, James A; Daly, Andrew; Storek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are immunocompromised and thus predisposed to infections. We set out to determine the deficiency of which immune cell subset(s) may predispose to postengraftment infections. We determined day 28, 56, 84, and 180 blood counts of multiple immune cell subsets in 219 allogeneic transplant recipients conditioned with busulfan, fludarabine, and Thymoglobulin. Deficiency of a subset was considered to be associated with infections if the low subset count was significantly associated with subsequent high infection rate per multivariate analysis in both discovery and validation cohorts. Low counts of monocytes (total and inflammatory) and basophils, and low IgA levels were associated with viral infections. Low plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) counts were associated with bacterial infections. Low inflammatory monocyte counts were associated with fungal infections. Low counts of total and naive B cells, total and CD56(high) natural killer (NK) cells, total and inflammatory monocytes, myeloid dendritic cells (MDCs), PDCs, basophils and eosinophils, and low levels of IgA were associated with any infections (due to any pathogen or presumed). In conclusion, deficiencies of B cells, NK cells, monocytes, MDCs, PDCs, basophils, eosinophils, and/or IgA plasma cells appear to predispose to postengraftment infections. PMID:26363444

  9. Study on biological characters of SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Zhang; Peng-Fen Gao; Pei-Wu Yu; Yun Rao; Li-Xin Zhou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect the biological characters of the SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines.METHODS: The suspending living SGC7901 gastric cancer cells and dendritic cells were induced to be fusioned by polyethylene glycol. Pure fusion cells were obtained by selective culture with the HAT/HT culture systems.The fusion cells were counted at different time points of culture and their growth curves were drawn to reflect their proliferative activities. The fusion cells were also cultured in culture medium to investigate whether they could grow into cell clones. MTT method was used to test the stimulating abilities of the fusion cells on T lymphocytes' proliferations. Moreover, the fusion cells were planted into nude mice to observe whether they could grow into new planted tumors in this kind of immunodeficiency animals.RESULTS: The fusion cells had weaker proliferative activity and clone abilities than their parental cells. When they were cultured, the counts of cells did not increase remarkably, nor could they grow into cell clones in culture medium. The fusion cells could not grow into new planted tumors after planted into nude mice. The stimulating abilities of the fusion cells on T lymphocytes' proliferations were remarkably increased than their parental dendritic cells.CONCLUSION: The SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines have much weaker proliferative abilities than their parental cells, but they keep strong abilities to irritate the T lymphocytes and have no abilities to grow into new planted tumors in immunodeficiency animals. These are the biological basis for their antitumor biotherapies.

  10. Allergen Recognition by Innate Immune Cells: Critical Role of Dendritic and Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Fabián; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells (DCs), leading to Th2 polarization, switching to IgE production by B cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. DCs have been demonstrated to play a crucial...

  11. C-type lectin receptors on dendritic cells and Langerhans cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figdor, C.G.; Kooyk, Y. van; Adema, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells and Langerhans cells are specialized for the recognition of pathogens and have a pivotal role in the control of immunity. As guardians of the immune system, they are present in essentially every organ and tissue, where they operate at the interface of innate and acquired immunity. Re

  12. The Comparison of Biologic Characteristics between Mice Embryonic Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Derived Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfeng Liu; Zhixu He; Dong Shen; Jin Huang; Haowen Wang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This research was to induce dendritic cells (DCs)from mice embryonic stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells in vitro, and then compare the biologic characteristics of them.METHODS Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) suspending cultured in petri dishes were induced to generate embryonic bodies (EBs).Fourteen-day well-developed EBs were transferred to histological culture with the same medium and supplemented 25 ng/ml GM-CSF and 25 ng/ml IL-3. In the next 2 weeks, there were numerous immature DCs outgrown. Meantime, mononuclear cells isolated from mice bone marrow were induced to derive dendritic cells by supplementing 25 ng/ml GM-CSF and 25 ng/ml IL-4, and then the morphology, phenotype and function of both dendritic cells from different origins were examined.RESULTS Growing mature through exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), both ESC-DCs and BM-DCs exhibited dramatic veils of cytoplasm and extensive dendrites on their surfaces, highly expressed CD11c, MHC-Ⅱ and CD86 with strong capacity to stimulate primary T cell responses in mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR).CONCLUSION ESC-DC has the same biologic characteristics as BM-DC, and it provides a new, reliable source for the functional research of DC and next produce corresponding anti-tumor vaccine.

  13. Involvement of IRF4 dependent dendritic cells in T cell dependent colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pool, Lieneke; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Agace, William Winston

    genetically susceptible individuals and pathogenic CD4+ T cells, which accumulate in the inflamed mucosa, are believed to be key drivers of the disease. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important in the priming of intestinal adaptive immunity and tolerance their role in the initiation and perpetuation of...

  14. Activated T cells recruit exosomes secreted by dendritic cells via LFA-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte-'t Hoen, E.N.; Buschow, S.I.; Anderton, S.M.; Stoorvogel, W.; Wauben, M.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to secrete exosomes that transfer membrane proteins, like major histocompatibility complex class II, to other DCs. Intercellular transfer of membrane proteins is also observed during cognate interactions between DCs and CD4(+) T cells. The acquired proteins are functi

  15. Effects of Aedes aegypti salivary components on dendritic cell and lymphocyte biology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bizzarro, B.; Barros, M.S.; Maciel, C.; Gueroni, D.I.; Lino, C.N.; Campopiano, J.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Amarante-Mendes, G.P.; Calvo, E.; Capurro, M.L.; Sa-Nunes, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, NOV 2013 (2013), s. 329. ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : dendritic cells * T-cells * Aedes aegypti * saliva * apoptosis Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.251, year: 2013

  16. Efferocytosis promotes suppressive effects on dendritic cells through prostaglandin E2 production in the context of autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Pujol-Autonell

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Efferocytosis is a crucial process by which apoptotic cells are cleared by phagocytes, maintaining immune tolerance to self in the absence of inflammation. Peripheral tolerance, lost in autoimmune processes, may be restored by the administration of autologous dendritic cells loaded with islet apoptotic cells in experimental type 1 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate tolerogenic properties in dendritic cells induced by the clearance of apoptotic islet cells, thus explaining the re-establishment of tolerance in a context of autoimmunity. METHODS: Bone marrow derived dendritic cells from non-obese diabetic mice, a model of autoimmune diabetes, were generated and pulsed with islet apoptotic cells. The ability of these cells to induce autologous T cell proliferation and to suppress mature dendritic cell function was assessed, together with cytokine production. Microarray experiments were performed using dendritic cells to identify differentially expressed genes after efferocytosis. RESULTS: Molecular and functional changes in dendritic cells after the capture of apoptotic cells were observed. 1 Impaired ability of dendritic cells to stimulate autologous T cell proliferation after the capture of apoptotic cells even after proinflammatory stimuli, with a cytokine profile typical for immature dendritic cells. 2 Suppressive ability of mature dendritic cell function. 3 Microarray-based gene expression profiling of dendritic cells showed differential expression of genes involved in antigen processing and presentation after efferocytosis. 4 Prostaglandin E2 increased production was responsible for immunosuppressive mechanism of dendritic cells after the capture of apoptotic cells. CONCLUSIONS: The tolerogenic behaviour of dendritic cells after islet cells efferocytosis points to a mechanism of silencing potential autoreactive T cells in the microenvironment of autoimmunity. Our results suggest that dendritic cells may be programmed to induce

  17. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions patients recognize vaccine antigens in the presence of activated dendritic cells, and produced high levels of CD8 + IFNγ + T cells and low levels of IL-2 when induced to proliferate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Montes Jorge

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most infections with human papillomavirus (HPV are resolved without clinical intervention, but a minority evolves into chronic lesions of distinct grades, including cervical-uterine cancer. It is known that in most cases the immune system mediates elimination of HPV infection. However, the mechanism of immune evasion leading to HPV persistence and development of early cervical lesions is not fully understood. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the potential of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL from low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL patients to be activated ex-vivo by vaccine antigens, the participation of cytotoxic lymphocytes and regulatory T cells, and to determine the secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines mediated by stimulation of T cell receptors. Results We found that PBL from LSIL patients showed a significantly lower proliferation rate to vaccine antigens as compared to that of healthy donors, even though there was not a difference in the presence of antibodies to those antigens in sera from both groups. We did not find differences in either the frequency of CD4 + CD25 + FoxP3+ in PBL, or the levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 in plasma or conditioned media from PBL incubated with TcR agonists in vitro, between the two groups. However, we detected a lower production of IL-2 and a higher proportion of CD8 + IFNγ + cells in PBL from LSIL patients as compared with PBL from normal donors. We also observed that PBL from patients infected by HPV-16 and −18 were not able to proliferate in the presence of soluble HPV antigens added to the culture; however, a high level of proliferation was attained when these antigens were presented by activated dendritic cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that the immunodeficiency reported in LSIL patients could be due to the inability of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes that for some unknown reason are present but unable to mount a response when

  18. Gene expression profiles identify inflammatory signatures in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Torri

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs constitute a heterogeneous group of antigen-presenting leukocytes important in activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. We studied the gene expression patterns of DCs incubated with reagents inducing their activation or inhibition. Total RNA was isolated from DCs and gene expression profiling was performed with oligonucleotide microarrays. Using a supervised learning algorithm based on Random Forest, we generated a molecular signature of inflammation from a training set of 77 samples. We then validated this molecular signature in a testing set of 38 samples. Supervised analysis identified a set of 44 genes that distinguished very accurately between inflammatory and non inflammatory samples. The diagnostic performance of the signature genes was assessed against an independent set of samples, by qRT-PCR. Our findings suggest that the gene expression signature of DCs can provide a molecular classification for use in the selection of anti-inflammatory or adjuvant molecules with specific effects on DC activity.

  19. A Model of Cytotoxic T Antitumor Activation Stimulated by Pulsed Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Marzio; Pappalardo, Francesco; Chiacchio, Ferdinando; Motta, Santo

    2011-09-01

    We present a preliminary ODE model to sketch the immune response of cytotoxic T cells against cancer through the use of pulsed autologous dendritic cells. The model is partially based on data coming from experiments that are presently in progress in the wet lab of our collaborators, but it can be applied in principle to different tumors. To this end, we show the immune response of cytotoxic T cells stimulated by autologous dendritic cells for different cancers.

  20. Distribution of Dendritic Cells in Normal Human Salivary Glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DC) are believed to contribute to development of autoimmune sialadenitis, but little is known about their distribution in normal salivary glands. In this study, DC were identified and their distribution was determined in normal human parotid and submandibular glands. For light microscopy, salivary gland sections were stained with H&E or immunocytochemically using antibodies to DC markers. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to evaluate the ultrastructural characteristics of DC. In H&E sections, elongated, irregularly shaped nuclei were occasionally seen in the striated and excretory duct epithelium. Immunolabeling with anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD11c and anti-S100 revealed DC with numerous processes extending between ductal epithelial cells, often close to the lumen. Morphometric analyses indicated that HLA-DR-positive DC occupied approximately 4–11% of the duct wall volume. Similar reactive cells were present in acini, intercalated ducts and interstitial tissues. TEM observations revealed cells with indented nuclei containing dense chromatin, pale cytoplasm with few organelles, and lacking junctional attachments to adjacent cells. These results indicate that DC are abundant constituents of normal human salivary glands. Their location within ductal and acinar epithelium suggests a role in responding to foreign antigens and/or maintaining immunological tolerance to salivary proteins

  1. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hoss, Mareike [Institute of Pathology, Electron Microscopy Facility, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Wong, John Erik, E-mail: John.Wong@avt.rwth-aachen.de [Chemical Process Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Turmstrasse 46, 52056 Aachen (Germany); DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials Research, Forckenbeckstrasse 50, Aachen (Germany); Hieronymus, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.hieronymus@rwth-aachen.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3{sup +} DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  2. Ginseng Berry Extract Promotes Maturation of Mouse Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Ginseng extract has been shown to possess certain anti-virus, anti-tumor and immune-activating effects. However, the immunostimulatory effect of ginseng berry extract (GB has been less well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of GB on the activation of mouse dendritic cells (DCs in vitro and in vivo. GB treatment induced up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules in bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs. Interestingly, GB induced a higher degree of co-stimulatory molecule up-regulation than ginseng root extract (GR at the same concentrations. Moreover, in vivo administration of GB promoted up-regulation of CD86, MHC class I and MHC class II and production of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α in spleen DCs. GB also promoted the generation of Th1 and Tc1 cells. Furthermore, Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88 signaling pathway were essential for DC activation induced by GB. In addition, GB strongly prompted the proliferation of ovalbumin (OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Finally, GB induced DC activation in tumor-bearing mice and the combination of OVA and GB treatment inhibited B16-OVA tumor cell growth in C57BL/6 mice. These results demonstrate that GB is a novel tumor therapeutic vaccine adjuvant by promoting DC and T cell activation.

  3. Different localisation of cystatin C in immature and mature dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Limited antigen degradation by proteolytic enzymes and their control by protease inhibitors represent a crucial step in generating antigenic peptides inside the endocytic pathway of antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. Methods. Human dendritic cells were used as a cell model in which quantitative immunogold electron microscopy was applied in order to study endogenous protease inhibitor cystatin C. Ultrathin cryosections were prepared from immature and mature dendritic cells and labelled with specific antibody. Under the transmission electron microscope gold particles, bound to specific probe (antibody), pointed the exact localization of labelled inhibitor. Results. Quantification of immunogold labelling and further statistical analysis by chi-squared test emphasized the differences in cystatin C content in different cell compartments. Conclusions. Statistically significant differences in intracellular distribution of cystatin C have been determined between immature and mature dendritic cell population. (author)

  4. Probiotic Bio-Three induces Th1 and anti-inflammatory effects in PBMC and dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man-Chin; Hua; Tzou-Yien; Lin; Chien-Chang; Chen

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the immune response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs)and dendritic cells (DCs)that were stimulated by probiotic preparations. METHODS:PBMCs were isolated,cultured,and stimulated with Bio-Three(a mixture of Bacillus mesentericus, Clostridium butyricum and Enterococcus faecalis;105, 10 6 and 10 7 CFU/mL for 24 h).Cytokine production of (1)circulating PBMCs;(2)PBMCs stimulated by probiotic preparation;(3)monocyte-derived DCs;and(4)DC andT cell co-culture was determined by enzyme-l...

  5. DMPD: Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17142025 Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. Watt...) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. PubmedID... 17142025 Title Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic ce

  6. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence...

  7. White Blood Cell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... where they are needed, and then kill and digest the harmful organism or substance (see White blood ... Patel Hello Everyone! Hello to all of you readers! I know you will be seeing my biography, ...

  8. CXCR4 engagement promotes dendritic cell survival and maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that human monocyte derived-dendritic cells (DCs) express CXCR4, responsible for chemotaxis to CXCL12. However, it remains unknown whether CXCR4 is involved in other functions of DCs. Initially, we found that CXCR4 was expressed on bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). The addition of specific CXCR4 antagonist, 4-F-Benzoyl-TN14003, to the culture of mouse BMDCs decreased their number, especially the mature subset of them. The similar effect was found on the number of Langerhans cells (LCs) but not keratinocytes among epidermal cell suspensions. Since LCs are incapable of proliferating in vitro, these results indicate that CXCR4 engagement is important for not only maturation but also survival of DCs. Consistently, the dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced, antigen-specific in vitro proliferation of previously sensitized lymph node cells was enhanced by CXCL12, and suppressed by CXCR4 antagonist. These findings suggest that CXCL12-CXCR4 engagement enhances DC maturation and survival to initiate acquired immune response

  9. Exploration Of The Dendritic Cell Algorithm Using The Duration Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Feng; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    As one of the newest members in Artificial Immune Systems (AIS), the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) has been applied to a range of problems. These applications mainly belong to the field of anomaly detection. However, real-time detection, a new challenge to anomaly detection, requires improvement on the real-time capability of the DCA. To assess such capability, formal methods in the research of rea-time systems can be employed. The findings of the assessment can provide guideline for the future development of the algorithm. Therefore, in this paper we use an interval logic based method, named the Duration Calculus (DC), to specify a simplified single-cell model of the DCA. Based on the DC specifications with further induction, we find that each individual cell in the DCA can perform its function as a detector in real-time. Since the DCA can be seen as many such cells operating in parallel, it is potentially capable of performing real-time detection. However, the analysis process of the standard DCA constrict...

  10. Role of mucosal dendritic cells in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Hendrik Niess

    2008-01-01

    The gastrointestinal innate and adaptive immune system continuously faces the challenge of potent stimuli from the commensal microflora and food constituents.These local immune responses require a tight control,the outcome of which is in most cases the induction of tolerance.Local T cell immunity is an important compartment of the specific intestinal immune system.T cell reactivity is programmed during the initial stage of its activation by professional presenting cells.Mucosal dendritic cells(DCs)are assumed to play key roles in regulating immune responses in the antigen-rich gastrointestinal environment.Mucosal DCs are a heterogeneous population that can either initiate(innate and adaptive)immune responses,or control intestinal inflammation and maintain tolerance.Defects in this regulation are supposed to lead to the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD),Crohn's disease(CD)and ulcerative colitis(UC).This review will discuss the emerging role of mucosal DCs in regulating intestinal inflammation and immune responses.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  11. 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway, Dendritic Cells, and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Harizi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO pathway is the major source of potent proinflammatory leukotrienes (LTs issued from the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA, and best known for their roles in the pathogenesis of asthma. These lipid mediators are mainly released from myeloid cells and may act as physiological autocrine and paracrine signalling molecules, and play a central role in regulating the interaction between innate and adaptive immunity. The biological actions of LTs including their immunoregulatory and proinflammatory effects are mediated through extracellular specific G-protein-coupled receptors. Despite their role in inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages, LTs may have important effects on dendritic cells (DC-mediated adaptive immunity. Several lines of evidence show that DC not only are important source of LTs, but also become targets of their actions by producing other lipid mediators and proinflammatory molecules. This review focuses on advances in 5-LO pathway biology, the production of LTs from DC and their role on various cells of immune system and in adaptive immunity.

  12. Membrane specializations and endosome maturation in dendritic cells and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Marianne; Cuvillier, Armelle; Ploegh, Hidde

    2004-04-01

    Interest in the cell biology of antigen presentation is centered on dendritic cells (DCs) as initiators of the immune response. The ability to examine primary antigen-presenting cells, as opposed to cell lines, has opened a new window for study of antigen processing and peptide acquisition by Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) products, especially where intracellular trafficking of peptide-Class-II complexes is concerned. Here, we review the dynamics of Class II MHC-positive intracellular structures in dendritic cells as well as B cells. We focus on the generation of multivesicular bodies, where Class II MHC products acquire antigenic peptide, on the endosomal transport of peptide-loaded Class II MHC to the cell surface and on the importance of Class II MHC localization in membrane microdomains. PMID:15066635

  13. Pemetrexed plus dendritic cells as third-line therapy for metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bin Zhang,1,* Rui Li,2,3,* Chun-Xiao Chang,2,3 Yong Han,2,3 Sheng-Bin Shi,2,3 Jing Tian2,3 1Department of Medical Oncology, Shandong Ji Ning First People’s Hospital, 2Department of Medical Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong 3Department of Medical Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of pemetrexed plus dendritic cells (DCs when administered as third-line treatment for metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. All patients in the study group had previously failed first-line treatment with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin-based regimens, as well as second-line treatment with taxane-based regimens. A total of 31 patients were treated with pemetrexed (500 mg/m2 plus DCs on day 1, every 3 weeks. DCs were given for one cycle of 21 days. Thirty patients were evaluated for their response. No patient had a complete response, three patients (10.0% had a partial response, ten patients (33.3% had stable disease, and 17 patients (56.7% had progressive disease. The overall response rate was 10.0%. The median progression-free survival (PFS time was 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.7–3.2, and the median overall survival (OS time was 7.1 months (95% CI, 6.4–7.9. The median PFS and OS times among patients with high and low levels of miR-143 expression in their blood serum were significantly different: median PFS times =3.2 months (95% CI, 2.9–3.4 and 2.7 months (95% CI, 2.4–3.0, respectively (P=0.017, and median OS times =7.8 months (95% CI, 6.8–8.9 and 6.3 months (95% CI, 5.3–7.3, respectively (P=0.036. No patient experienced Grade 4 toxicity. Combined third-line treatment with pemetrexed and DCs was marginally effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced ESCC. Serum miR-143 levels are a potential

  14. Structured Dendritic Inhibition Supports Branch-Selective Integration in CA1 Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Erik B; Cembrowski, Mark S; Karsh, Bill; Colonell, Jennifer; Fetter, Richard D; Spruston, Nelson

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal circuit function is governed by precise patterns of connectivity between specialized groups of neurons. The diversity of GABAergic interneurons is a hallmark of cortical circuits, yet little is known about their targeting to individual postsynaptic dendrites. We examined synaptic connectivity between molecularly defined inhibitory interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites using correlative light-electron microscopy and large-volume array tomography. We show that interneurons can be highly selective in their connectivity to specific dendritic branch types and, furthermore, exhibit precisely targeted connectivity to the origin or end of individual branches. Computational simulations indicate that the observed subcellular targeting enables control over the nonlinear integration of synaptic input or the initiation and backpropagation of action potentials in a branch-selective manner. Our results demonstrate that connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal cell dendrites is more precise and spatially segregated than previously appreciated, which may be a critical determinant of how inhibition shapes dendritic computation. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26898780

  15. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Winning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate immunity.

  16. Effects of inactivated porcine epidemic diarrhea virus on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells and intestinal dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Zhao, Shanshan; Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is a serious infection in neonatal piglets. As the causative agent of PED, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) results in acute diarrhea and dehydration with high mortality rates in swine. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly effective antigen-presenting cells to uptake and present viral antigens to T cells, which then initiate a distinct immune response. In this study, our results show that the expression of Mo-DCs surface markers such as SWC3a(+)CD1a(+), SWC3a(+)CD80/86(+) and SWC3a(+)SLA-II-DR(+) is increased after incubation with UV-PEDV for 24h. Mo-DCs incubated with UV-PEDV produce higher levels of IL-12 and INF-γ compared to mock-infected Mo-DCs. Interactions between Mo-DCs and UV-PEDV significantly stimulate T-cell proliferation in vitro. Consistent with these results, there is an enhancement in the ability of porcine intestinal DCs to activate T-cell proliferation in vivo. We conclude that UV-PEDV may be a useful and safe vaccine to trigger adaptive immunity. PMID:27234553

  17. Infected splenic dendritic cells are sufficient for prion transmission to the CNS in mouse scrapie

    OpenAIRE

    Aucouturier, Pierre; Geissmann, Frédéric; Damotte, Diane; Saborio, Gabriela P.; Meeker, Harry C.; Kascsak, Regina; Kascsak, Richard; Carp, Richard I.; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies display long incubation periods at the beginning of which the titer of infectious agents (prions) increases in peripheral lymphoid organs. This “replication” leads to a progressive invasion of the CNS. Follicular dendritic cells appear to support prion replication in lymphoid follicles. However, the subsequent steps of neuroinvasion remain obscure. CD11c+ dendritic cells, an unrelated cell type, are candidate vectors for prion propagation. We found a ...

  18. Synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles for tracking of stem cells and dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate delivery of cells to target organs is critical for success of cell-based therapies with stem cells or immune cells such as antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC). Labeling with contrast agents before implantation provides a powerful means for monitoring cellular migration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we investigated the uptake of fully synthesized or bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into hematopoietic Flt3+ stem cells and DC from mouse bone marrow. We show that (i) uptake of both synthetic and biogenic nanoparticles into cells endow magnetic activity and (ii) low numbers of MNP-loaded cells are readily detected by MRI.

  19. Synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles for tracking of stem cells and dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Sebastian [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Fernandes, Fabiana [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Department of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Sanroman, Laura [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hodenius, Michael [Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Lang, Claus [Department of Microbiology, Ludwig-Maximillians-University of Munich, Maria-Ward-Str. 1a, 80638 Munich (Germany); Himmelreich, Uwe [In-vivo-NMR-Laboratory, Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleueler Str. 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Biomedical NMR Unit, MoSAIC, Faculty of Medicine, KU Leuven, Onderwijs en Navorsing 1, bus 505, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Schueler, Dirk [Department of Microbiology, Ludwig-Maximillians-University of Munich, Maria-Ward-Str. 1a, 80638 Munich (Germany); Hoehn, Mathias [In-vivo-NMR-Laboratory, Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleueler Str. 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Accurate delivery of cells to target organs is critical for success of cell-based therapies with stem cells or immune cells such as antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC). Labeling with contrast agents before implantation provides a powerful means for monitoring cellular migration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we investigated the uptake of fully synthesized or bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into hematopoietic Flt3{sup +} stem cells and DC from mouse bone marrow. We show that (i) uptake of both synthetic and biogenic nanoparticles into cells endow magnetic activity and (ii) low numbers of MNP-loaded cells are readily detected by MRI.

  20. Mouse dendritic cells pulsed with capsular polysaccharide induce resistance to lethal pneumococcal challenge: roles of T cells and B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Cohen

    Full Text Available Mice are exceedingly sensitive to intra-peritoneal (IP challenge with some virulent pneumococci (LD50 = 1 bacterium. To investigate how peripheral contact with bacterial capsular polysaccharide (PS antigen can induce resistance, we pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC of C57BL/6 mice with type 4 or type 3 PS, injected the BMDC intra-foot pad (IFP and challenged the mice IP with supra-lethal doses of pneumococci. We examined the responses of T cells and B cells in the draining popliteal lymph node and measured the effects on the bacteria in the peritoneum and blood. We now report that: 1 The PS co-localized with MHC molecules on the BMDC surface; 2 PS-specific T and B cell proliferation and IFNγ secretion was detected in the draining popliteal lymph nodes on day 4; 3 Type-specific resistance to lethal IP challenge was manifested only after day 5; 4 Type-specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in the sera of only some of the mice, but B cells were essential for resistance; 5 Control mice vaccinated with a single injection of soluble PS did not develop a response in the draining popliteal lymph node and were not protected; 6 Mice injected with unpulsed BMDC also did not resist challenge: In unprotected mice, pneumococci entered the blood shortly after IP inoculation and multiplied exponentially in both blood and peritoneum killing the mice within 20 hours. Mice vaccinated with PS-pulsed BMDC trapped the bacteria in the peritoneum. The trapped bacteria proliferated exponentially IP, but died suddenly at 18-20 hours. Thus, a single injection of PS antigen associated with intact BMDC is a more effective vaccine than the soluble PS alone. This model system provides a platform for studying novel aspects of PS-targeted vaccination.

  1. Targeting dendritic cells for improved HIV-1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    As dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique capacity to activate antigen-naive T cells they likely play a critical role in eliciting immune responses to vaccines. DCs are therefore being explored as attractive targets for vaccines, but understanding the interaction of DCs and clinically relevant vaccine antigens and adjuvants is a prerequisite. The HIV-1/AIDS epidemic continues to be a significant health problem, and despite intense research efforts over the past 30 years a protective vaccine has not yet been developed. A common challenge in vaccine design is to find a vaccine formulation that best shapes the immune response to protect against and/or control the given pathogen. Here, we discuss the importance of understanding the diversity, anatomical location and function of different human DC subsets in order to identify the optimal target cells for an HIV-1 vaccine. We review human DC interactions with some of the HIV-1 vaccine antigen delivery vehicles and adjuvants currently utilized in preclinical and clinical studies. Specifically, the effects of distinctly different vaccine adjuvants in terms of activation of DCs and improving DC function and vaccine efficacy are discussed. The susceptibility and responses of DCs to recombinant adenovirus vectors are reviewed, as well as the strategy of directly targeting DCs by using DC marker-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to an antigen. PMID:22975879

  2. Generation of immunogenic and tolerogenic clinical-grade dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Tahereh; Kamali-Sarvestani, Eskandar; Ciric, Bogoljub; Karimi, Mohamad H; Kalantari, Mohsen; Faridar, Alireza; Xu, Hui; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2011-12-01

    Immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DCs), which have been manipulated ex vivo to become immunogenic or tolerogenic, has been tested in clinical trials for disease therapy. DCs are sentinels of the immune system, which after exposure to antigenic or inflammatory signals and crosstalk with effector CD4(+) T cells express high levels of costimulatory molecules and cytokines. Upregulation of either costimulatory molecules or cytokines promotes immunologic DCs, whereas their downregulation generates tolerogenic DCs (TDCs), which induce T regulatory cells (Tregs) and a state of tolerance. Immunogenic DCs are used for the therapy of infectious diseases such as HIV-1 and cancer, whereas tolerogenic DCs are used in treating various autoimmune diseases and in transplantation. DC vaccination is still at an early stage, and improvements are mainly needed in quality control of monitoring assays to generate clinical-grade DC products and to assess the effect of DC vaccination in future clinical trials. Here, we review the recent work in DC generation and monitoring approaches for DC-based trials with immunogenic or tolerogenic DCs. PMID:22105838

  3. Follicular dendritic-like cells derived from human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters J Hinrich

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs play a central role in controlling B-cell response maturation, isotype switching and the maintenance of B-cell memory. These functions are based on prolonged preservation of antigen and its presentation in its native form by FDCs. However, when entrapping entire pathogens, FDCs can turn into dangerous long-term reservoirs that may preserve viruses or prions in highly infectious form. Despite various efforts, the ontogeny of FDCs has remained elusive. They have been proposed to derive either from bone marrow stromal cells, myeloid cells or local mesenchymal precursors. Still, differentiating FDCs from their precursors in vitro may allow addressing many unsolved issues associated with the (patho- biology of these important antigen-presenting cells. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that FDC-like cells can be deduced from monocytes, and to develop a protocol in order to quantitatively generate them in vitro. Results Employing highly purified human monocytes as a starter population, low concentrations of Il-4 (25 U/ml and GM-CSF (3 U/ml in combination with Dexamethasone (Dex (0.5 μM in serum-free medium trigger the differentiation into FDC-like cells. After transient de-novo membrane expression of alkaline phosphatase (AP, such cells highly up-regulate surface expression of complement receptor I (CD35. Co-expression of CD68 confirms the monocytic origin of both, APpos and CD35pos cells. The common leukocyte antigen CD45 is strongly down-regulated. Successive stimulation with TNF-α up-regulates adhesion molecules ICAM-1 (CD54 and VCAM (CD106. Importantly, both, APpos as well as APneg FDC-like cells, heterotypically cluster with and emperipolese B cells and exhibit the FDC characteristic ability to entrap functionally preserved antigen for prolonged times. Identical characteristics are found in monocytes which were highly expanded in vitro by higher doses of GM-CSF (25 U/ml in the absence of

  4. Mechanisms of mouse spleen dendritic cell function in the generation of influenza-specific, cytolytic T lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    We have evaluated the capacity of dendritic cells to function as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for influenza and have examined their mechanism of action. Virus-pulsed dendritic cells were 100 times more efficient than bulk spleen cells in stimulating cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) formation. The induction of CTLs required neither exogenous lymphokines nor APCs in the responding T cell population. Infectious virus entered dendritic cells through intracellular acidic vacuoles and directed the s...

  5. Dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguey, Ignacio; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rojo, Concepción; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of the structural design of cortical microcircuits is essential for understanding how they contribute to function in both health and disease. Since pyramidal neurons represent the most abundant neuronal type and their dendritic spines constitute the major postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the neocortex largely depends on the available knowledge regarding the structure of pyramidal cells. Previous studies have identified several apparently common rules in dendritic geometry. We study the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers to further shed light on the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells. We find that the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells from layers II-VI of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex suggest common design principles, despite the particular morphological and functional features that are characteristic of pyramidal cells in each cortical layer. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2567-2576, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850576

  6. Molecular characterization of antigen-peptide pulsed dendritic cells: immature dendritic cells develop a distinct molecular profile when pulsed with antigen peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy X Yang

    Full Text Available As dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, they are being tested as cancer vaccines for immunotherapy of established cancers. Although numerous studies have characterized DCs by their phenotype and function, few have identified potential molecular markers of antigen presentation prior to vaccination of host. In this study we generated pre-immature DC (piDC, immature DC (iDC, and mature DC (mDC from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC obtained from HLA-A2 healthy donors, and pulsed them with human papillomavirus E7 peptide (p11-20, a class I HLA-A2 binding antigen. We then characterized DCs for cell surface phenotype and gene expression profile by microarray technology. We identified a set of 59 genes that distinguished three differentiation stages of DCs (piDC, iDC and mDC. When piDC, iDC and mDC were pulsed with E7 peptide for 2 hrs, the surface phenotype did not change, however, iDCs rather than mDCs showed transcriptional response by up-regulation of a set of genes. A total of 52 genes were modulated in iDC upon antigen pulsing. Elongation of pulse time for iDCs to 10 and 24 hrs did not significantly bring further changes in gene expression. The E7 peptide up-modulated immune response (KPNA7, IGSF6, NCR3, TREM2, TUBAL3, IL8, NFKBIA, pro-apoptosis (BTG1, SEMA6A, IGFBP3 and SRGN, anti-apoptosis (NFKBIA, DNA repair (MRPS11, RAD21, TXNRD1, and cell adhesion and cell migration genes (EPHA1, PGF, IL8 and CYR61 in iDCs. We confirmed our results by Q-PCR analysis. The E7 peptide but not control peptide (PADRE induced up-regulation of NFKB1A gene only in HLA-A2 positive iDCs and not in HLA-A2 negative iDCs. These results suggest that E7 up-regulation of genes is specific and HLA restricted and that these genes may represent markers of antigen presentation and help rapidly assess the quality of dendritic cells prior to administration to the host.

  7. Exploiting the role of endogenous lymphoid-resident dendritic cells in the priming of NKT cells and CD8+ T cells to dendritic cell-based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels R Petersen

    Full Text Available Transfer of antigen between antigen-presenting cells (APCs is potentially a physiologically relevant mechanism to spread antigen to cells with specialized stimulatory functions. Here we show that specific CD8+ T cell responses induced in response to intravenous administration of antigen-loaded bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs, were ablated in mice selectively depleted of endogenous lymphoid-resident langerin+ CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs, suggesting that the antigen is transferred from the injected cells to resident APCs. In contrast, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were primed predominantly by the injected BM-DCs, with only very weak contribution of resident APCs. Crucially, resident langerin+ CD8α+ DCs only contributed to the priming of CD8+ T cells in the presence of maturation stimuli such as intravenous injection of TLR ligands, or by loading the BM-DCs with the glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer to recruit the adjuvant activity of activated invariant natural killer-like T (iNKT cells. In fact, injection of α-GalCer-loaded CD1d-/- BM-DCs resulted in potent iNKT cell activation, suggesting that this glycolipid antigen can also be transferred to resident CD1d+ APCs. While iNKT cell activation per se was independent of langerin+ CD8α+ DCs, some iNKT cell-mediated activities were reduced, notably release of IL-12p70 and transactivation of NK cells. We conclude that both protein and glycolipid antigens can be exchanged between distinct DC species. These data suggest that the efficacy of DC-based vaccination strategies may be improved by the incorporation of a systemic maturation signal aimed to engage resident APCs in CD8+ T cell priming, and α-GalCer may be particularly well suited to this purpose.

  8. The Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Alpha Herpes Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Schuster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, two independent groups identified plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC as major type I interferon- (IFN- producing cells in the blood. Since then, evidence is accumulating that PDC are a multifunctional cell population effectively coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses. This paper focuses on the role of different immune cells and their interactions in the surveillance of alpha herpes virus infections, summarizes current knowledge on PDC surface receptors and their role in direct cell-cell contacts, and develops a risk factor model for the clinical implications of herpes simplex and varicella zoster virus reactivation. Data from studies involving knockout mice and cell-depletion experiments as well as human studies converge into a “spider web”, in which the direct and indirect crosstalk between many cell populations tightly controls acute, latent, and recurrent alpha herpes virus infections. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses more extensively than previously thought.

  9. Decrease in Circulating Dendritic Cell Precursors in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kretzschmar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery disease (PAD is a common manifestation of atherosclerosis. Inflammation is important for initiation and progression of the disease. Dendritic cells (DCs as antigen-presenting cells play an important role in the immune system. Therefore, we hypothesize that, in patients with PAD, DCPs might be reduced in blood due to their recruitment into the vascular wall and induce a proinflammatory response. The numbers of myeloid DCPs, plasmacytoid DCPs, and total DCPs were analyzed by flow cytometry in blood of patients with PAD (n=52 compared to controls (n=60. Femoralis plaques (n=12 of patients who underwent surgery were immunostained for CD209 and CD83 (mDCs as well as CD304, CD123 (pDCs, and HLA-DR. In patients with PAD, a significant decrease in mDCPs, pDCPs, and tDCPs was observed. In immunostaining, markers indicative for mDCs (CD209: 16 versus 8 cells/0.1 mm2, P=0.02; CD83: 19 versus 5 cells/0.1 mm2, P=0.03 were significantly elevated in femoralis plaques compared to control vessels. We show for the first time that mDCPs, pDCPs, and tDCPs are significantly reduced in patients with PAD. Immunohistochemical analysis unraveled that the decrease in DCPs might be due to their recruitment into atherosclerotic plaques.

  10. Generation of functional CD8+ T Cells by human dendritic cells expressing glypican-3 epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Farzin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glypican 3 (GPC-3 is an oncofoetal protein that is expressed in most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC. Since it is a potential target for T cell immunotherapy, we investigated the generation of functional, GPC-3 specific T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Methods Dendritic cells (DC were derived from adherent PBMC cultured at 37°C for 7 days in X-Vivo, 1% autologous plasma, and 800 u/ml GM-CSF plus 500 u/ml IL-4. Immature DC were transfected with 20 μg of in vitro synthesised GPC-3 mRNA by electroporation using the Easy-ject plus system (Equibio, UK (300 V, 150 μF and 4 ms pulse time, or pulsed with peptide, and subsequently matured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Six predicted GPC-3 peptide epitopes were synthesized using standard f-moc technology and tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A2.1 molecules using the cell line T2. Results DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA but not control DC demonstrated strong intracellular staining for GPC-3 and in vitro generated interferon-gamma expressing T cells from autologous PBMC harvested from normal subjects. One peptide, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, fulfilled our criteria as a naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL epitope: i it showed high affinity binding to HLA-A2, in T2 cell binding assay; ii it was generated by the MHC class I processing pathway in DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA, and iii HLA-A2 positive DC loaded with the peptide stimulated proliferation in autologous T cells and generated CTL that lysed HLA-A2 and GPC-3 positive target cells. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that electroporation of GPC-3 mRNA is an efficient method to load human monocyte-derived DC with antigen because in vitro they generated GPC-3-reactive T cells that were functional, as shown by interferon-gamma production. Furthermore, this study identified a novel naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, which can be used to

  11. Characterization of canine dendritic cells in healthy, atopic, and non-allergic inflamed skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Meret Elisabeth; Roosje, Petra; Summerfield, Artur

    2010-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis in humans and dogs is a chronic relapsing allergic skin disease. Dogs show a spontaneous disease similar to the human counterpart and represent a model to improve our understanding of the immunological mechanisms, the pathogenesis of the disease, and new therapy development. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency and phenotype of dendritic cells (DC) in the epidermis and dermis of healthy, canine atopic dermatitis lesional, and non-allergic inflammatory skin to further validate the model and to obtain insights into the contribution of DC to the pathogenesis of skin diseases in dogs. We first characterized canine skin DC using flow-cytometric analysis of isolated skin DC combined with an immunohistochemical approach. A major population of canine skin dendritic cells was identified as CD1c(+)CD11c(+)CD14(-)CD80(+)MHCII(+)MAC387(-) cells, with dermal DC but not Langerhans cells expressing CD11b. In the epidermis of lesional canine atopic dermatitis and non-allergic inflammatory skin, we found significantly more dendritic cells compared with nonlesional and control skin. Only in canine atopic dermatitis skin did we find a subset of dendritic cells positive for IgE, in the epidermis and the dermis. Under all inflammatory conditions, dermal dendritic cells expressed more CD14 and CD206. MAC387(+) putative macrophages were absent in healthy but present in inflamed skin, in particular during non-allergic diseases. This study permits a phenotypic identification and differentiation of canine skin dendritic cells and has identified markers and changes in dendritic cells and macrophage populations related to allergic and non-allergic inflammatory conditions. Our data suggest the participation of dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of canine atopic dermatitis similar to human atopic dermatitis and further validate the only non-murine spontaneous animal model for this disease. PMID:20676740

  12. Clinical research of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in advanced renal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant disease that demonstrates resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Yet Active immunization using genetically modified dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of malignancies to eradicate or control residual disease. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of effector CD8+ T cells with diverse TCR specificities, possessing non-MHC-restricted cytolytic activities against tumor cells. Clinical studies have confirmed benefit and safety of CIK cell-based therapy for patients with malignancies. This clinical trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cell (gmDCs-CIK) treatment of patients with RCC. 28 patients with advanced renal cancer were admitted to Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences from December 2010 to March 2012 and treated by gmDCs-CIK. Clinical efficacy and safety between pre- and post-treatment were compared. This analysis showed an objective response rate (ORR) of 39% and a disease control rate (DCR) of as 75%. There is no significant relationship between clinical efficacy and whether metastasis occurred or not (P > 0.05). There is no significant relationship between ORR and cycles of treatment (P > 0.05), but DCR was significantly related with cycles of treatment (P < 0.05). No clinically significant side effects were observed. There were no significant changes of T cell subsets including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells except Th1 in peripheral blood between day 30 after immunotherapy and 1 day before immunotherapy in 11 patients. DC-CIK is feasible and effective in treating advanced renal cancer and thus provides a new approach. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01924156. Registration date: August 14, 2013

  13. Completely resected follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the posterior mediastinum: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Ryo; Sonobe, Makoto; Miyamoto, Ei; Date, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm originating from follicular dendritic cells, and most of them develop in lymph nodes of the head and neck. One third of follicular dendritic cell sarcomas occur in the extranodal sites such as the tonsils, mesentery, and retroperitoneal organs, but those of mediastinal origin are rare. Here, we present the case of a 16-year-old female with a large follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of posterior mediastinal origin. The tumor was found by a chest X-ray mass examination at her high school, and she had no subjective symptoms or significant past medical history. The tumor was diagnosed as a follicular dendritic cell sarcoma by computed tomography-guided needle biopsy. Although the tumor compressed the mediastinal organs and showed moderate uptake in 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging, it was completely resected through posterolateral incision. Histological examination revealed that spindle-shaped tumor cells formed fascicular or storiform pattern with cellular pleomorphism. By immunohistochemical examination, the tumor cells were found to be positive for CD21 and follicular dendritic cell antigen. Two years after surgery, the patient remains alive with no signs of tumor recurrence. PMID:27001632

  14. Feedback control of regulatory T cell homeostasis by dendritic cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Mouquet, Hugo; Victora, Gabriel D.; Eisenreich, Thomas; Yao, Kai-Hui; Masilamani, Revati F.; Dustin, Michael L; Rudensky, Alexander; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells (T reg cells) maintain self-tolerance and suppress autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition to their effects on T cells, T reg cells are essential for maintaining normal numbers of dendritic cells (DCs): when T reg cells are depleted, there is a compensatory Flt3-dependent increase in DCs. However, little is known about how T reg cell homeostasis is maintained in vivo. We demonstrate the existence ...

  15. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

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    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  16. On dendritic cell-based therapy for cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Morikazu Onji; Sk. Md. Fazle Akbar

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most prevalent antigen-presenting cell in vivo, had been widely characterized in the last three decades. DCs are present in almost all tissues of the body and play cardinal roles in recognition of microbial agents,autoantigens, allergens and alloantigen. DCs process the microbial agents or their antigens and migrate to lymphoid tissues to present the antigenic peptide to lymphocytes. This leads to activation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. Initially, it was assumed that DCs are principally involved in the induction and maintenance of adaptive immune responses, but now it is evident that DCs also have important roles in innate immunity. These features make DCs very good candidates for therapy against various pathological conditions including malignancies. Initially, DC-based therapy was used in animal models of cancers. Data from these studies inspired considerable optimism and DC-based therapies was started in human cancers 8 years ago. In general,DC-based therapy has been found to be safe in patients with cancers, although few controlled trials have been conducted in this regard. Because the fundamentals principles of human cancers and animal models of cancers are different, the therapeutic efficacy of the ongoing regime of DC-based therapy in cancer patients is not satisfactory. In this review, we covered the various aspects that should be considered for developing better regime of DC-based therapy for human cancers.

  17. Dendritic Cells and Multiple Sclerosis: Disease, Tolerance and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a devastating neurological disease that predominantly affects young adults resulting in severe personal and economic impact. The majority of therapies for this disease were developed in, or are beneficial in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. While known to target adaptive anti-CNS immune responses, they also target, the innate immune arm. This mini-review focuses on the role of dendritic cells (DCs, the professional antigen presenting cells of the innate immune system. The evidence for a role for DCs in the appropriate regulation of anti-CNS autoimmune responses and their role in MS disease susceptibility and possible therapeutic utility are discussed. Additionally, the current controversy regarding the evidence for the presence of functional DCs in the normal CNS is reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CNS DCs and potential routes of their intercourse between the CNS and cervical lymph nodes are considered. Finally, the future role that this nexus between the CNS and the cervical lymph nodes might play in site directed molecular and cellular therapy for MS is outlined.

  18. Dendritic Cells as a Pharmacological Target of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Chen; Lu Yang; O. M. Zack Howard; Joost J. Oppenheim

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a central role in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. There is considerable evidence that DCs can be used as therapeutic targets for pharmacological modulation of immune responses. Traditional Chines emedicine (TCM) has a long-standing history of using herbal medicine in the treatment of variety of human diseases.Many of the clinical effects of TCM have reportedly been attributed to the up- or down-regulation of immune responses. Accumulating evidence indicates that TCM and its components can interfere with immune responses at the earliest stage by targeting key functions of DCs. Here, we review those published studies of TCM with respect to their effects on immunobiological functions of DCs. Investigations based on both chemical entities derived from TCM as well as TCM herbal mixtures are presented. These studies suggest that various TCM herbal medicines have the capacity to inhibit or promote major functions of DCs, such as differentiation, maturation, cytokine production, survival, antigen uptake and presentation as well as trafficking. These studies have revealed novel biological effects of TCM and documented the utility of this approach to discover novel biological modifier of DC functions derived from natural sources.

  19. The effects of gliadin fragments on human dendritic cells migratory capacities and cytoskeletal remodelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecharová, Barbara; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Kamanová, Jana; Tučková, Ludmila

    Amsterdam : Springer, 2009. s. 71-72. [International Coeliac Disease Symposium 2009 /13./. 06.04.2009-08.04.2009, Amsterdam] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : dendritic cells * gliadin Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  20. Distinct activation of primary human BDCA1(+) dendritic cells upon interaction with stressed or infected β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, B M; Kers-Rebel, E D; Bottino, R; Piganelli, J D; Galama, J M D; Engelse, M A; de Koning, E J P; Adema, G J

    2016-06-01

    Derailment of immune responses can lead to autoimmune type 1 diabetes, and this can be accelerated or even induced by local stress caused by inflammation or infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) shape both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we report on the responses of naturally occurring human myeloid BDCA1(+) DCs towards differentially stressed pancreatic β cells. Our data show that BDCA1(+) DCs in human pancreas-draining lymph node (pdLN) suspensions and blood-derived BDCA1(+) DCs both effectively engulf β cells, thus mimicking physiological conditions. Upon uptake of enterovirus-infected, but not mock-infected cells, BDCA1(+) DCs induced interferon (IFN)-α/β responses, co-stimulatory molecules and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Notably, induction of stress in β cells by ultraviolet irradiation, culture in serum-free medium or cytokine-induced stress did not provoke strong DC activation, despite efficient phagocytosis. DC activation correlated with the amount of virus used to infect β cells and required RNA within virally infected cells. DCs encountering enterovirus-infected β cells, but not those incubated with mock-infected or stressed β cells, suppressed T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines and variably induced IFN-γ in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Thus, stressed β cells have little effect on human BDCA1(+) DC activation and function, while enterovirus-infected β cells impact these cells significantly, which could help to explain their role in development of autoimmune diabetes in individuals at risk. PMID:26888163

  1. Herbal preparation (HemoHIM) enhanced functional maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells mediated toll-like receptor 4

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Jin; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Hwang, Yun-Ho; Jeong, Gil-Yeon; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Hae-Ran; Yee, Sung-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background HemoHIM, which is an herbal preparation of three edible herbs (Angelicam gigas Nakai, Cnidium offinale Makino, and Peaonia japonica Miyabe), is known to have various biological and immunological activities, but the modulatory effects of this preparation on dendritic cells (DCs)-mediated immune responses have not been examined previously. DCs are a unique group of white blood cells that initiate primary immune responses by capturing, processing, and presenting antigens to T cells. R...

  2. Immunophenotyping of lymphocyte, monocyte and dendritic cell subsets in normal rhesus macaques by 12-color flow cytometry: Clarification on DC heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Autissier, Patrick; Soulas, Caroline; Burdo, Tricia H.; Williams, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring changes in rhesus macaque immune cell populations during infectious disease is crucial. The aim of this work was to simultaneously analyze the phenotype of rhesus macaque lymphocyte, monocyte and dendritic cell (DC) subsets using a single 12-color flow cytometry panel. Blood from healthy non-infected rhesus macaques was labeled with a cocktail of 12 antibodies. Data were compared to three smaller lineage specific panels and absolute and relative percentages of cells were compared. ...

  3. The function of dendritic cells from allergic pregnant women's cord blood:through the perspective of cytokine secretion%从细胞因子的分泌探讨过敏孕妇脐血来源树突状细胞的功能特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂晶; 程茜

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the generation of interleukin 12p70 and interleukin 10 by the dendritic cells (DCs) deriving from cord blood of allergic pregnant women was different from that of normal pregnant women, and lay a foundation for cytological study on allergic disease. Method In vitro, immature DCs were induced by monocyte cultured in granulocytes macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CM-CSF) and interleukin-4. On the 7th day,the immature DCs from allergic pregnant women were exposed to LPS (1 μg/ml);the negative control group was only added with the GM-CSF + IL-4. The supematants were collected on the 9th day, and the levels of interleukin 12p70 and interleukin 10 were detected by Enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Result The levels of IL-12p70 and IL-10 secreted by DCs derived from pregnant women were obviously lower than those from normal pregnant women. Conclusion The dendritic cells from allergic pregnant women might have some functional defects.%目的 通过分析过敏孕妇脐血单核细胞来源树突状细胞(Dendritic cells,DCs)分泌细胞因子水平与正常孕妇来源DCs的差异,了解过敏来源树突状细胞功能的特点,为过敏性疾病的细胞学研究奠定基础,并为防治过敏性疾病寻找最佳时期.方法 分离过敏及正常孕妇脐血内单核细胞,在GM-CSF及IL-4的作用下诱导生成未成熟DCs,在培养的第7天加入LPS(1 μg/ml)诱导细胞成熟,阴性对照组仅加入细胞因子及培养基.于培养第9天收集培养上清,用ELISA法检测培养上清中IL-12p70及IL-10的分泌水平.结果 过敏孕妇来源树突状细胞分泌细胞因子IL-12p70及IL-10的能力明显低于正常孕妇组.结论 过敏孕妇来源树突状细胞可能存在功能上的缺陷,这可能是导致有过敏家庭史婴儿易患过敏性疾病的细胞学基础,孕期可能为防治过敏性疾病发生的最佳时期.

  4. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CD141(+)XCR1+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, K M; Silk, J D; Ichiryu, N; Davies, T J; Nolan, K F; Leishman, A J; Carpenter, L; Watt, S M; Cerundolo, V; Fairchild, P J

    2012-10-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) have been widely used in cancer immunotherapy but show significant donor-to-donor variability and low capacity for the cross-presentation of tumour-associated antigens (TAA) to CD8(+) T cells, greatly limiting the success of this approach. Given recent developments in induced pluripotency and the relative ease with which induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines may be generated from individuals, we have succeeded in differentiating dendritic cells (DC) from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A(*)0201(+) iPS cells (iPS cell-derived DC (ipDC)), using protocols compliant with their subsequent clinical application. Unlike moDC, a subset of ipDC was found to coexpress CD141 and XCR1 that have been shown previously to define the human equivalent of mouse CD8α(+) DC, in which the capacity for cross-presentation has been shown to reside. Accordingly, ipDC were able to cross-present the TAA, Melan A, to a CD8(+) T-cell clone and stimulate primary Melan A-specific responses among naïve T cells from an HLA-A(*)0201(+) donor. Given that CD141(+)XCR1(+) DC are present in peripheral blood in trace numbers that preclude their clinical application, the ability to generate a potentially unlimited source from iPS cells offers the possibility of harnessing their capacity for cross-priming of cytotoxic T lymphocytes for the induction of tumour-specific immune responses. PMID:22071967

  5. Rapid Stereology Based Quantitative Immunohistochemistry of Dendritic Cells in Lymph Nodes: A Methodological Study

    OpenAIRE

    van Hensbergen, Yvette; Luykx‐de Bakker, Sylvia A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Pinedo, Herbert M.; Paul J. van Diest

    2001-01-01

    This study was done to arrive at a fast and reliable protocol for assessment of fractional volumes of immunohistochemically stained dendritic cells in lymph nodes. Twenty axillary lymph nodes of patients with locally advanced breast cancer were immuno‐histochemically stained with an S100 antibody. Fractional volumes of dendritic cells were assessed by stereology based quantitative immunohistochemistry using an interactive video overlay system including an automated microscope. The gold standa...

  6. Two Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccinal Lipopeptides Follow Different Cross-Presentation Pathways in Human Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieu, Muriel; Desoutter, Jean-François; Loing, Estelle; Gaston, Jésintha; Hanau, Daniel; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Hosmalin, Anne

    2003-01-01

    An efficient vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) must induce good cellular immune responses. To do this, it must be processed and presented by dendritic cells, which are required for primary T-lymphocyte stimulation. We have previously shown that a model lipopeptide containing a short epitopic peptide from HIV-1 was endocytosed and presented in association with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules by human dendritic cells to specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, but the cr...

  7. Paraneoplastic Pemphigus Associated with Follicular Dendritic Cell Tumor in the Mediastinum

    OpenAIRE

    Prakasan, Aparna Mullangath; Prabhu, Anne Jennifer; Velarasan, Kanmani; Backianathan, Selvamani; Ram, Thomas Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic Pemphigus (PNP) is an autoimmune bullous disease characterized by severe stomatitis, polymorphous skin eruptions, and underlying neoplasms. Diagnosis of cutaneous paraneoplastic disorders requires high index of suspicion. We describe a patient with PNP associated with follicular dendritic cell (FDC) tumor in the mediastinum, a rare neoplasm originating from follicular dendritic cells. Its management requires identification of underlying malignancy and treatment of the same. Our...

  8. Apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells induce immune tolerance by specifically inhibiting development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells play an important role in induction of autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory responses; however, regulatory mechanisms of CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. Here we show that apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells inhibit development and differentiation of CD4(+) effector memory T cells in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, intravenous transfer of apoptotic T cell-induced tolerogenic dendritic cells can block development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in C57 BL/6J mouse. Our results imply that it is effector memory CD4(+) T cells, not central memory CD4(+) T cells, which play a major role in chronic inflammatory responses in mice with EAE. Intravenous transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells induced by apoptotic T cells leads to immune tolerance by specifically blocking development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells compared with results of EAE control mice. These results reveal a new mechanism of apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cell-mediated immune tolerance in vivo. PMID:26111522

  9. Cigarette smoking increases white blood cell aggregation in whole blood.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, A B; Hill, A; Belch, J J

    1993-01-01

    We studied the effect of chronic cigarette smoking on white blood cell aggregation, increased aggregation predisposes to microvascular occlusion and damage. Current smokers had significantly increased white blood cell aggregation when compared with non smokers. The presence of chronically activated white blood cells in current smokers may be relevant in the pathogenesis of ischaemic vascular disease.

  10. IRF8 Transcription-Factor-Dependent Classical Dendritic Cells Are Essential for Intestinal T Cell Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luda, Katarzyna M.; Joeris, Thorsten; Persson, Emma K.; Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Demiri, Mimoza; Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Pool, Lieneke; Holm, Jacob B.; Melo-Gonzalez, F.; Richter, Lisa; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Kristiansen, Karsten; Travis, Mark A.; Svensson-Frej, Marcus; Kotarsky, Knut; Agace, William Winston

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in intestinal immune homeostasis remains incompletely defined. Here we show that mice lacking IRF8 transcription-factor-dependent DCs had reduced numbers of T cells in the small intestine (SI), but not large intestine (LI), including an almost complete absence of......-derived MLN DCs, and inefficient T cell localization to the SI. These mice also lacked intestinal T helper 1 (Th1) cells, and failed to support Th1 cell differentiation in MLN and mount Th1 cell responses to Trichuris muris infection. Collectively these results highlight multiple non-redundant roles for IRF8...

  11. CD1-mediated γ/δ T Cell Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, David S; Vincent, Michael S.; Spada, Franca M.; Das, Hiranmoy; Sugita, Masahiko; Morita, Craig T.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Immature myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) express only low levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II but express high levels of CD1 a, b, and c antigen-presenting molecules at the cell surface. As Vδ1+ γ/δ T cells are the main tissue subset of γ/δ T cells and they are known to recognize CD1c in the absence of specific foreign antigen recognition, we examined the possible interaction of these T cells with immature DCs. We show that CD1-restricted γ/δ T cells can mediate the matura...

  12. Dendritic cell function and antigen presentation in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Ian A; Zavala, Fidel

    2016-06-01

    Due to the diverse roles T cells play in protection against malaria as well as pathogenesis it is critical to know which cells present antigen and the nature of the antigens they present. During pre-erythrocytic stages of infection, cutting-edge imaging studies have shown how Plasmodium antigens are presented during both the priming and effector phases of the protective CD8+ T cell response. During blood stages, pathology is in part due to the loss of DC function and the action of pathogenic T cells in the brain. Recently endothelial cells presenting malaria antigen to cognate T cells have emerged as critical players in malaria pathogenesis. Manipulating these processes may inform both vaccine design and the development of therapies for cerebral malaria. PMID:26845735

  13. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells accumulate and secrete interferon alpha in lymph nodes of HIV-1 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Lehmann

    Full Text Available Circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC decline during HIV-1 infection, but at the same time they express markedly higher levels of interferon alpha (IFNalpha, which is associated with HIV-1 disease progression. Here we show an accumulation of pDC in lymph nodes (LN of treatment-naïve HIV-1 patients. This phenomenon was associated with elevated expression of the LN homing marker, CCR7, on pDC in peripheral blood of HIV-1 patients, which conferred increased migratory capacity in response to CCR7 ligands in ex vivo functional assays. LN-homed pDC of HIV-1 patients presented higher CD40 and lower BDCA2 levels, but unchanged CD83 and CD86 expression. In addition, these cells expressed markedly higher amounts of IFNalpha compared to uninfected individuals, and were undergoing faster rates of cell death. These results demonstrate for the first time that in asymptomatic, untreated HIV-1 patients circulating pDC up-regulate CCR7 expression, accumulate in lymph nodes, and express high amounts of IFNalpha before undergoing cell death. Since IFNalpha inhibits cell proliferation and modulates immune responses, chronically high levels of this cytokine in LN of HIV-1 patients may impair differentiation and immune function of bystander CD4(+ T cells, thus playing into the mechanisms of AIDS immunopathogenesis.

  14. Effects of low-dose irradiation on phenotype and function of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of low-dose irradiation on antigen presenting capacity, phenotype and stimulatory activity of immature dendritic cells (DCs). Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from healthy volunteers. DCs were induced from monocytes with granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) for 5 days. Immature DCs were harvested and exposed to various irradiation doses (0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 Gy) from X ray for 24 hours. The variation of phenotypes was analysised for the irradiated cells antigen presenting capacity and stimulatory activity was analysised for the irradiated cells in vitro. Results: The expressions of costimulatory molecules, such as CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, and antigen presenting capacity of mature DCs cells irradiated at a dose of 0.2 Gy was higher than that in the non-irradiated DCs (P < 0.05). However, the stimulatory activity of immature DCs irradiated at higher doses reduced in vitro. Conclusion: Low-dose irradiation can augment antigen presenting capacity and reduce T cell-activation capacity of DCs. (authors)

  15. The Mechanisms of Human Renal Epithelial Cell Modulation of Autologous Dendritic Cell Phenotype and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sampangi

    Full Text Available Proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTEC of the kidney line the proximal tubule downstream of the glomerulus and play a major role in the re-absorption of small molecular weight proteins that may pass through the glomerular filtration process. In the perturbed disease state PTEC also contribute to the inflammatory disease process via both positive and negative mechanisms via the production of inflammatory cytokines which chemo-attract leukocytes and the subsequent down-modulation of these cells to prevent uncontrolled inflammatory responses. It is well established that dendritic cells are responsible for the initiation and direction of adaptive immune responses. Both resident and infiltrating dendritic cells are localised within the tubulointerstitium of the renal cortex, in close apposition to PTEC, in inflammatory disease states. We previously demonstrated that inflammatory PTEC are able to modulate autologous human dendritic cell phenotype and functional responses. Here we extend these findings to characterise the mechanisms of this PTEC immune-modulation using primary human PTEC and autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC as the model system. We demonstrate that PTEC express three inhibitory molecules: (i cell surface PD-L1 that induces MoDC expression of PD-L1; (ii intracellular IDO that maintains the expression of MoDC CD14, drives the expression of CD80, PD-L1 and IL-10 by MoDC and inhibits T cell stimulatory capacity; and (iii soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G that inhibits HLA-DR and induces IL-10 expression by MoDC. Collectively the results demonstrate that primary human PTEC are able to modulate autologous DC phenotype and function via multiple complex pathways. Further dissection of these pathways is essential to target therapeutic strategies in the treatment of inflammatory kidney disorders.

  16. Effect of growth hormone on the immune function of dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiu-liang; WANG Yi-sheng; WANG Jia-xiang

    2010-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are one of the most important antigen presenting cells in the human body, and DCs at various stages of maturation possess different or even opposite functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of growth hormones on the functional status of cord blood-derived DCs encompassing immunophenotype, ability to excrete interleukin (IL)-12 and provoke autologous leukomonocyte.Methods Mononuclear cells were isolated from fresh cord blood, with IL-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) used to induce and stimulate the mononuclear cells. Growth hormone at different concentrations was used to modify DCs, and then DCs morphology, number and growth status were observed. The immunophenotype of DCs was detected with a flow cytometer. The concentration of IL-12 in the DCs supernatant was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and DCs functional status was evaluated by autologous mixed lymphocyte reactions. Results Mononuclear cells from cord blood can be differentiated into DCs by cytokine induction and growth hormone modification. With the increase in growth hormone concentrations (5-100 μ g/L), the expression of DCs HLA-DR, CD1α, CD80 and CD83 were significantly increased (P<0.05). The ability of DCs to secrete IL-12 was significantly improved (P <0.05), and the ability of DCs to activate autologous lymphocytes was significantly enhanced (P <0.05). Pegvisomant was able to ablate the effects of growth hormone on DCs.Conclusions Growth hormone may facilitate DCs induction and maturation, and improve the reproductive activity of autologous lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Growth hormone may serve as a factor of modifying DCs to achieving maturity.

  17. Dendritic Cells and Monocytes with Distinct Inflammatory Responses Reside in Lung Mucosa of Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Saskia; Rankin, Gregory; Lepzien, Rico; Pourazar, Jamshid; Behndig, Annelie F; Ahlm, Clas; Blomberg, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Every breath we take contains potentially harmful pathogens or allergens. Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are essential in maintaining a delicate balance of initiating immunity without causing collateral damage to the lungs because of an exaggerated inflammatory response. To document the diversity of lung mononuclear phagocytes at steady-state, we performed bronchoscopies on 20 healthy subjects, sampling the proximal and distal airways (bronchial wash and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively), as well as mucosal tissue (endobronchial biopsies). In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, we identified subpopulations of monocytes, myeloid DCs (MDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs in the lung mucosa. Intermediate monocytes and MDCs were highly frequent in the airways compared with peripheral blood. Strikingly, the density of mononuclear phagocytes increased upon descending the airways. Monocytes from blood and airways produced 10-fold more proinflammatory cytokines than MDCs upon ex vivo stimulation. However, airway monocytes were less inflammatory than blood monocytes, suggesting a more tolerant nature. The findings of this study establish how to identify human lung mononuclear phagocytes and how they function in normal conditions, so that dysregulations in patients with respiratory diseases can be detected to elucidate their contribution to immunity or pathogenesis. PMID:27183618

  18. Immune receptors involved in Streptococcus suis recognition by dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier Lecours

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent of septicemia and meningitis. Knowledge on host immune responses towards S. suis, and strategies used by this pathogen for subversion of these responses is scarce. The objective of this study was to identify the immune receptors involved in S. suis recognition by dendritic cells (DCs. Production of cytokines and expression of co-stimulatory molecules by DCs were shown to strongly rely on MyD88-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting that DCs recognize S. suis and become activated mostly through Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling. Supporting this fact, TLR2(-/- DCs were severely impaired in the release of several cytokines and the surface expression of CD86 and MHC-II. The release of IL-12p70 and CXC10, and the expression of CD40 were found to depend on signaling by both TLR2 and TLR9. The release of IL-23 and CXCL1 were partially dependent on NOD2. Finally, despite the fact that MyD88 signaling was crucial for DC activation and maturation, MyD88-dependent pathways were not implicated in S. suis internalization by DCs. This first study on receptors involved in DC activation by S. suis suggests a major involvement of MyD88 signaling pathways, mainly (but not exclusively through TLR2. A multimodal recognition involving a combination of different receptors seems essential for DC effective response to S. suis.

  19. Regulation of Dendritic Cell Function by Dietary Polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cornò, Manuela; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Masella, Roberta; Gessani, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Marked changes in socioeconomic status, cultural traditions, population growth, and agriculture have been affecting diets worldwide. Nutrition is known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases, and the use of bioactive food compounds at pharmacologic doses is emerging as a preventive and/or therapeutic approach to target metabolic dysregulations occurring in aging, obesity-related chronic diseases, and cancer. Only recently have data on the effects of specific nutrients or food on the immune system become available, and studies regarding the human immune system are still in their infancy. Beyond providing essential nutrients, diet can actively influence the immune system. Understanding how diet and nutritional status influence the innate and adaptive arms of our immune system represents an area of scientific need, opportunity, and challenge. The insights gleaned should help to address several pressing global health problems. Recently, biologically active polyphenols, which are widespread constituents of fruit and vegetables, have gained importance as complex regulators of various cellular processes, critically involved in the maintenance of body homeostasis. This review outlines the potential effects of polyphenols on the function of dendritic cells (DCs), key players in the orchestration of the immune response. Their effects on different aspects of DC biology including differentiation, maturation, and DC capacity to shift immune response toward tolerance or immune activation will be outlined. PMID:24941314

  20. Simian immunodeficiency virus interactions with macaque dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleshova, Natalia; Derby, Nina; Martinelli, Elena; Pugach, Pavel; Calenda, Giulia; Robbiani, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes advances in the following areas: (1) dendritic cell (DC)-mediated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission, (2) role of DCs in innate and adaptive immunity against SIV, and (3) approaches to harness DC function to induce anti-SIV responses. The nonhuman primate (NHP) model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in rhesus macaques and other Asian NHP species is highly relevant to advance the understanding of virus-host interactions critical for transmission and disease pathogenesis. HIV infection is associated with changes in frequency, phenotype, and function of the two principal subsets of DCs, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. DC biology during pathogenic SIV infection is strikingly similar to that observed in HIV-infected patients. The NHP models provide an opportunity to dissect the requirements for DC-driven SIV infection and to understand how SIV distorts the DC system to its advantage. Furthermore, the SIV model of mucosal transmission enables the study of the earliest events of infection at the portal of entry that cannot be studied in humans, and, importantly, the involvement of DCs. Nonpathogenic infection in African NHP hosts allows investigations into the role of DCs in disease control. Understanding how DCs are altered during SIV infection is critical to the design of therapeutic and preventative strategies against HIV. PMID:22975875

  1. The Influence of Ouabain on Human Dendritic Cells Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although known as a Na,K-ATPase inhibitor, several other cellular and systemic actions have been ascribed to the steroid Ouabain (Oua. Particularly in the immune system, our group showed that Ouabain acts on decreasing lymphocyte proliferation, synergizing with glucocorticoids in spontaneous thymocyte apoptosis, and also lessening CD14 expression and blocking CD16 upregulation on human monocytes. However, Ouabain effects on dendritic cells (DCs were not explored so far. Considering the peculiar plasticity and the importance of DCs in immune responses, the aim of our study was to investigate DC maturation under Ouabain influence. To generate immature DCs, human monocytes were cultured with IL-4 and GM-CSF (5 days. To investigate Ouabain role on DC activation, DCs were stimulated with TNF-α for 48 h in the presence or absence of Ouabain. TNF-induced CD83 expression and IL-12 production were abolished in DCs incubated with 100 nM Ouabain, though DC functional capacity concerning lymphocyte activation remained unaltered. Nevertheless, TNF-α-induced antigen capture downregulation, another maturation marker, occurred even in the presence of Ouabain. Besides, Ouabain increased HLA-DR and CD86 expression, whereas CD80 expression was maintained. Collectively, our results suggest that DCs respond to Ouabain maturating into a distinct category, possibly contributing to the balance between immunity and tolerance.

  2. Dendritic cells loaded with killed breast cancer cells induce differentiation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early clinical trials, mostly in the setting of melanoma, have shown that dendritic cells (DCs) expressing tumor antigens induce some immune responses and some clinical responses. A major difficulty is the extension to other tumors, such as breast carcinoma, for which few defined tumor-associated antigens are available. We have demonstrated, using both prostate carcinoma and melanoma as model systems, that DCs loaded with killed allogeneic tumor cell lines can induce CD8+ T cells to differentiate into cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for shared tumor antigens. The present study was designed to determine whether DCs would capture killed breast cancer cells and present their antigens to autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We show that killed breast cancer cells are captured by immature DCs that, after induced maturation, can efficiently present MHC class I and class II peptides to CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes. The elicited CTLs are able to kill the target cells without a need for pretreatment with interferon gamma. CTLs can be obtained by culturing the DCs loaded with killed breast cancer cells with unseparated peripheral blood lymphocytes, indicating that the DCs can overcome any potential inhibitory effects of breast cancer cells. Loading DCs with killed breast cancer cells may be considered a novel approach to breast cancer immunotherapy and to identification of shared breast cancer antigens

  3. Dendritic cells induced by IFN-α combined with GM-CSF from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of gastric cancer patients%IFN-α联合GM-CSF诱导胃癌患者外周血单个核细胞分化为树突状细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛超; 许建婷; 徐东升; 李薇; 崔久嵬; 金浩范

    2013-01-01

    目的:探索干扰素-α(interferon-α,IFN-α)联合粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子(granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor,GM-CSF)体外诱导胃癌患者外周血单个核细胞(peripheral blood mononuclear cell,PBMC)向树突状细胞(dendritic cell,DC)分化的可能性.方法:10例胃癌患者PBMC分别用GM-CSF 100 ng/ml联合IFN-α 500 IU/ml(命名为IFN-α DC)或GM-CSF 100 ng/ml联合50 ng/ml IL-4(命名为IL-4 DC)体外培养,然后用CD40L、LPS诱导DC成熟.Giemsa染色法观察IFN-α DC和IL-4 DC的形态,流式细胞术分析IFN-α DC和IL-4 DC表面CDla、CD80、CD83、CD86和HLA-DR的表达情况,同种异体混合淋巴细胞反应(mixed lymphocyte reaction,MLR)检测不同的成熟DC刺激同种异体T淋巴细胞增殖的能力.结果:IFN-α DC和IL-4 DC均呈现典型DC形态.IFN-α DC和IL-4 DC分别在诱导第3天和第5天时,细胞表面CDla、CD80、CD83、CD86和HLA-DR表达达到较高水平,成熟IFN-α DC表面CD83[(78.25±15.36)%vs (50.14±10.24)%,P<0.05]和CD86[(84.84±10.12)% vs (62.93±15.12)%,P<0.05]的表达均高于成熟IL-4 DC.成熟IFN-α DC刺激异体T淋巴细胞增殖能力强于未成熟IFN-α DC(P<0.05).在DC与T细胞数量比为1:40和1:20时,成熟IFN-α DC刺激同种异体T淋巴细胞增殖的能力明显强于成熟IL-4 DC[(39.43±9.21)% vs (27.34±10.63)%,(60.31±7.86)%vs(48.63±6.25)%;均P<0.05].结论:相比常用的IL-4联合GM-CSF诱导方法,IFN-α联合GM-CSF可以在更短时间内将胃癌患者PBMC诱导成具有更强刺激同种异体T淋巴细胞增殖能力的DC细胞,这可能与其表面CD83和CD86表达增高有关.%Objective:To investigate the possibility of inducing dendritic cells (DCs) by interferon-α (IFN-α) combined with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in gastric cancer patients.Methods:PBMCs from 10 gastric cancer patients were cultivated using granulocyte macrophage

  4. On/off TLR segnaling decides immunogenic or tolerogenic dendritic cell maturation upon NKT cell contact

    OpenAIRE

    Caielli,

    2009-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer (iNK)T cells play opposite immune functions. They participate in the innate immune response to promote anti-microbial and anti-tumor immunity and they are crucial to maintain T cell tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases. While it is well known that the adjuvant function of iNKT cells is mediated through maturation of dendritic cells (DC), the mechanism underlying the tolerogenic function of iNKT cells remains unclear. We performed co-culture experiments with immat...

  5. Effect of calcium ionophore A23187 plus IFN-γ on dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells%A23187联合IFN-γ诱导人外周血单个核细胞生成树突状细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟娟; 彭大为; 左学兰

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究钙离子载体(calcium ionophore,CI)A23187联合γ-干扰素(IFN-γ)诱导健康人外周血单个核细胞(PBMNC)生成树突状细胞(DC),探索DC扩增的新方法.方法:分离健康人PBMNC,分别加入GM-CSF +IL-4,A23187,A23187+IFN-γ.体外培养72h后,分别于光镜、电镜下观察细胞的形态,流式细胞仪检测细胞表面标志,MTT比色法检测其对同种异体T细胞的刺激增殖作用,ELISA检测IL-12和IFN-γ的水平.结果:健康人PBMNC在A23187+IFN-γ的条件下培养72h后,与GM-CSF +IL-4组,A23187组比较,能迅速获得典型的树突状细胞形态;CD40,CD83,CD86分子的表达较均明显升高(P<0.01),但CD1a分子的表达明显下降(P<0.01);具有明显刺激同种异体T细胞增殖的能力;IL-12,IFN-γ的水平比其他组明显增高(P<0.01).结论:A23187联合IFN-γ诱导健康人PBMNC能更快速、有效地诱导生成成熟的DC.%Objective: To explore the effect of calcium ionophore (Cl) A23187 plus IFN-y on dendritic cells (DC) from healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC).Methods: PBMNC from healthy donors were treated with GM-CSF plus IL-4, A23187, and A23187 plus IFN-y, respectively. After culture for 72 h, the change of cellular morphology was observed under light microscope and electron microscope. Surface markers on DC were analyzed by flow cytometry. MTT colorimetry was used to detect the proliferation of allogeneic T cells. Plasma concentrations of IL-12 and IFN-y were measured by ELISA. Results: PBMNC treated with A23187 plus IFN-y for 72 h presented DC with typical morphology effectively. The surface markers CD40, CD83, and CD86 were obviously increased in group A23187 plus IFN-y (P<0.0l), but decreased in CDla (P<0.0l). In addition, it evidently stimulated the proliferation of allogeneic T cells. The levels of IL-12 and IFN-y were significantly increased campared with other groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: A23187 plus IFN-y can effectively enhance marked transformation

  6. Canine PHA-stimulated adherent cell enhance interferon-gamma production and proliferation of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Kaori; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2005-03-01

    Dendritic cells are specialized antigen-presenting cells with immuno-modulating functions that are attractive for clinical applications for cancer immunotherapy. This study examined immunostimulatory functions of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated adherent cells (PHA-Ad cells) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in dogs. PHA-Ad cells enhanced interferon-gamma from autologous PBMC in vitro. PHA-Ad cells also stimulated antigen-independent proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results suggest that PHA-Ad cells from PBMC possess a stimulatory function to evoke anti-tumour immunity and that they demonstrate potential for therapeutic applications in dogs. PMID:19379211

  7. The antitumor immunologic effect of exosomes secreted by human umbilical cord blood dendritic cells loaded with breast cancer antigen%负载乳腺癌抗原的脐血树突细胞外泌体抗肿瘤免疫作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王英丽; 张阳; 徐广伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the antitumor immunologic effect of exosomes secreted by human umbilical cord blood dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with breast cancer antigen.Methods:The mononuclear cells were abstracted from fresh umbilical cord blood,and then they were induced to differentiate to DCs; tumor antigen of breast cancer MCF-7 cells were abstracted to shock umbilical cord blood DCs,LPS was added to induce maturity of DCs,flow cytometry was used to detect phenotype; supercentrifugation method was used to collect exosomes of DC in umbilical cord blood loading tumor antigen; MTT method was used to detect proliferative reaction of T lymphocytes induced by exosomes and lethal effect of activated CTL on breast cancer cells.Results:The numbers of CD34,CD80,CD86,and CD11 c positive DCs in umbilical cord blood were statistically significantly higher than those of fresh mononuclear cells (P < 0.05) ; the results of Western-Blot showed that exosomes of umbilical cord blood DCs loading breast cancer carried MHC-Ⅱ,CD40,CD80,and CD86 cytokines; the exosomes of mature umbilical cord blood DCs and umbilical cord blood DCs loading breast cancer antigen had obvious promoting effects on allogenic T lymphocytes; umbilical cord DCs loading breast cancer antigen and CTL activated by the exosomes had significantly lethal effects on breast cancer MCF-7 cells (P < 0.05) ; when the ratio of effect cells to target cells was 100∶1,the lethal effect of exosomes was statistically significantly higher than that of umbilical cord blood DCs loading breast cancer antigen (P < 0.05).Conclusion:Umbilical cord blood DCs loading breast cancer antigen secret a great deal of exosomes,which can promote proliferation of allogenic T lymphocytes and induce specific immunological effect of breast cancer.%目的:探讨负载乳腺癌抗原的人脐带血树突状细胞(DCs)分泌的外泌体的抗肿瘤免疫效应.方法:提取新鲜脐血单个核细胞,体外诱导分化为

  8. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  9. Selective transport of internalized antigens to the cytosol for MHC class I presentation in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A; Regnault, A; Kleijmeer, M; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Amigorena, S

    1999-01-01

    In order for cytotoxic T cells to initiate immune responses, peptides derived from internalized antigens must be presented to the cytotoxic T cells on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here we show that dendritic cells, the only antigen-presenting cells that initiate immune r

  10. 基因修饰树突状细胞诱导前列腺癌患者外周血T细胞亚群重排的研究%Gene-transducted dendritic cells induce T lymphocyte subsets repopulation in peripheral blood of patients with prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋浩杰; 涂小玉; 严晓; 尤长宣; 罗荣城; 吕成伟

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of rAAV/PSA-transducted dendritic cells (DCs) to induce T lymphocyte subsets repopulation in peripheral blood of patients with prostate cancer, and its clinical significance. Methods 30 patients with prostate cancer were included in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells ( PBMC, the DC precursor cells and lymphocytes) were isolated from prostate cancer patients by density gradient centrifugation and infected with rAAV/PSA virus. Maturation of the DC precursor was induced by series of cytokine. On day 6, the DCs were collected and mixed with T cells to induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). The proportion of T lymphocyte subsets and regulatory T cells (CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg) in peripheral blood were analyzed by flow cytometry before and after mixed culture. Results The DCs transducted with PSA gene stimulated high proliferation of T cell populations. After mixed culture for 6 days, the percentage of CD8+, CD8+ CD69+, CD8+CD28+T cells, the CD8+:CD4+ ratio were significantly increased (P0.05). Conclusion The rAAV/PSA loading of DCs can effectively activate the CD8+antigen-specific CTL, decrease immunosuppressive T cell and improve the cellular immunological function in patients. These findings may provide a potent immune therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer patients.%目的 探讨以腺相关病毒(AAV)为载体,前列腺特异性抗原(PSA)基因转染树突状细胞(DC)诱导前列腺癌患者外周血T细胞亚群变化特点及临床意义.方法 抽取30例前列腺癌患者外周血,采用密度梯度离心法分离外周血单个核细胞,以rAAV/PSA感染DC前体细胞,采用系列细胞因子诱导DC前体细胞成熟.第6天收集成熟DC并与T细胞按比例混合培养,诱导细胞毒性T淋巴细胞(CTL).分别于DC与T细胞混合培养前后应用流式细胞术分析外周血T细胞亚群及调节性T细胞( CD4+CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg)的表达水平.结果 PSA基因转染DC刺激T淋巴细胞爆发

  11. Biodistribution of radiolabelled human dendritic cells injected by various routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biodistribution of mature dendritic cells (DCs) injected by various routes, during a cell therapy protocol. In the context of a vaccine therapy protocol for melanoma, DCs matured with Ribomunyl and interferon-gamma were labelled with111In-oxine and injected into eight patients along various routes: afferent lymphatic vessel (IL) (4 times), lymph node (IN) (5 times) and intradermally (ID) (6 times). Scintigraphic investigations showed that the IL route allowed localisation of 80% of injected radioactivity in eight to ten nodes. In three cases of IN injection, the entire radioactivity stagnated in the injected nodes, while in two cases, migration to adjacent nodes was observed. This migration was detected rapidly after injection, as with IL injections, suggesting that passive transport occurred along the physiological lymphatic pathways. In two of the six ID injections, 1-2% of injected radioactivity reached a proximal lymph node. Migration was detectable in the first hour, but increased considerably after 24 h, suggesting an active migration mechanism. In both of the aforementioned cases, DCs were strongly CCR7-positive, but this feature was not a sufficient condition for effective migration. In comparison with DCs matured with TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and PGE2, our DCs showed a weaker in vitro migratory response to CCL21, despite comparable CCR7 expression, and higher allostimulatory and TH1 polarisation capacities. The IL route allowed reproducible administration of specified numbers of DCs. The IN route sometimes yielded fairly similar results, but not reproducibly. Lastly, we showed that DCs matured without PGE2 that have in vitro TH1 polarisation capacities can migrate to lymph nodes after ID injection. (orig.)

  12. Lung Dendritic Cells Facilitate Extrapulmonary Bacterial Dissemination during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alva eRosendahl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DC-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DC-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection.

  13. Rotavirus activates lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic mice by triggering toll-like receptor 7 signaling and interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Pane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD mice provide a model for the human disease. Infection of adult NOD mice with rhesus monkey rotavirus (RRV accelerates diabetes onset, without evidence of pancreatic infection. Rather, RRV spreads to the pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes where its association with antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, induces cellular maturation. RRV infection increases levels of the class I major histocompatibility complex on B cells and proinflammatory cytokine expression by T cells at these sites. In autoimmunity-resistant mice and human mononuclear cells from blood, rotavirus-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute to bystander polyclonal B cell activation through type I interferon expression. Here we tested the hypothesis that rotavirus induces bystander activation of lymphocytes from NOD mice by provoking dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. NOD mouse splenocytes were stimulated with rotavirus and assessed for activation by flow cytometry. This stimulation activated antigen-presenting cells and B cells independently of virus strain and replicative ability. Instead, activation depended on virus dose and was prevented by blockade of virus decapsidation, inhibition of endosomal acidification and interference with signaling through Toll-like receptor 7 and the type I interferon receptor. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells were more efficiently activated than conventional dendritic cells by RRV, and contributed to the activation of B and T cells, including islet-autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Thus, a double-stranded RNA virus can induce Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, resulting in lymphocyte activation. Our findings suggest that bystander activation mediated by type I

  14. Primary stimulation by dendritic cells induces antiviral proliferative and cytotoxic T cell responses in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We used well-gassed hanging drop (20 microliters) cultures with high concentrations of purified T cells from normal BALB/c mice to examine whether dendritic cells (DC) can induce primary antiviral proliferative T cell responses and generate virus-specific CTL. We found that DC exposed to infectious influenza virus in vitro or in vivo in small numbers (0.1-1%) resulted in strong proliferation of responder T cells within 3 d, and this was strongly inhibited by antibodies to class II MHC molecul...

  15. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: benefit or burden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auletta, JJ; Devine, SM; Waller, EK

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) bridge innate and adaptive immune responses and have important roles in hematopoietic engraftment, GvHD and graft-versus-leukemia responses following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In addition, pDCs mediate antiviral immunity, particularly as they are the body’s primary cellular source of type I interferon. Given their pleiotropic roles, pDCs have emerged as cells that critically impact transplant outcomes, including overall survival. In this article, we will review the pre-clinical and clinical literature, supporting the crucial roles that pDCs assume as key immune effector cells during HCT. PMID:26642333

  16. Intestinal lamina propria dendritic cells maintain T cell homeostasis but do not affect commensalism

    OpenAIRE

    Welty, Nathan E.; Staley, Christopher; Ghilardi, Nico; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Igyártó, Botond Z.; Kaplan, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) in the intestinal lamina propria (LP) are composed of two CD103+ subsets that differ in CD11b expression. We report here that Langerin is expressed by human LP DCs and that transgenic human langerin drives expression in CD103+CD11b+ LP DCs in mice. This subset was ablated in huLangerin-DTA mice, resulting in reduced LP Th17 cells without affecting Th1 or T reg cells. Notably, cognate DC–T cell interactions were not required for Th17 development, as this response was inta...

  17. Dendritic cells in dengue virus infection: Targets of virus replication and mediators of immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Schmid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are sentinels of the immune system and detect pathogens at sites of entry, such as the skin. In addition to the ability of DCs to control infections directly via their innate immune functions, DCs help to prime adaptive B and T cell responses via antigen presentation in lymphoid tissues. Infected Aedes aegypti or Ae. albopictus mosquitoes transmit the four dengue virus (DENV serotypes to humans while probing for small blood vessels in the skin. DENV causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans, yet no vaccine or specific therapeutic is currently approved. Although primary DENV infection confers life-long protective immunity against re-infection with the same DENV serotype, secondary infection with a different DENV serotype can lead to increased disease severity via cross-reactive T cells or enhancing antibodies. This review summarizes recent findings in humans and animal models about DENV infection of DCs, monocytes and macrophages. We discuss the dual role of DCs as both targets of DENV replication and mediators of innate and adaptive immunity, and summarize immune evasion strategies whereby DENV impairs the function of infected DCs. We suggest that DCs play a key role in priming DENV-specific neutralizing or potentially harmful memory B and T cell responses, and that future DC-directed therapies may help induce protective memory responses and reduce dengue pathogenesis.

  18. HIV/SIV infection primes monocytes and dendritic cells for apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Laforge

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Subversion or exacerbation of antigen-presenting cells (APC death modulates host/pathogen equilibrium. We demonstrated during in vitro differentiation of monocyte-derived macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs that HIV sensitizes the cells to undergo apoptosis in response to TRAIL and FasL, respectively. In addition, we found that HIV-1 increased the levels of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak molecules and decreased the levels of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and FLIP proteins. To assess the relevance of these observations in the context of an experimental model of HIV infection, we investigated the death of APC during pathogenic SIV-infection in rhesus macaques (RMs. We demonstrated increased apoptosis, during the acute phase, of both peripheral blood DCs and monocytes (CD14(+ from SIV(+RMs, associated with a dysregulation in the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic molecules. Caspase-inhibitor and death receptors antagonists prevented apoptosis of APCs from SIV(+RMs. Furthermore, increased levels of FasL in the sera of pathogenic SIV(+RMs were detected, compared to non-pathogenic SIV infection of African green monkey. We suggest that inappropriate apoptosis of antigen-presenting cells may contribute to dysregulation of cellular immunity early in the process of HIV/SIV infection.

  19. Production of Antibodies against Multipass Membrane Proteins Expressed in Human Tumor Cells Using Dendritic Cell Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiko Tamura; Joe Chiba

    2009-01-01

    Antibody mediated therapeutic strategies against human malignant tumors have been widely authorized and clinically applied to cancer patients. In order to develop methods to generate antibodies reactive to the extracellular domains of multipass plasma membrane proteins specifically expressed in malignant tumors, we examined the use of dendritic cells (DCs) for immunization. DCs were transduced with genes encoding the human six transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate 1 (STEAP1), STEAP4, a...

  20. Immunotherapeutic efficacy of vaccines generated by fusion of dendritic cells and HPV16-associated tumour cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Reiniš, Milan; Indrová, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl. 1 (2005), s. 101. ISSN 1107-3756. [World Congress on Advances in Oncology /10./ and International Symposium on Molecular Medicine /8./. 05.10.13-05.10.15, Hersonissos] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/04/0492; GA MZd(CZ) NR8004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV16 * dendritic cells * vaccines Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  1. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and neutrophils : underestimated cell populations during the onset of atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Döring, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the understanding of the pathophysiological role of neutrophils and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is now agreed to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the vessel wall driven by intense immunological activity, of both, innate and adaptive immunity. Whereas monocytes/macrophages are of paramount importance, polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMN) have recently also been implicated in lesion formation. Given the expansion of these...

  2. Cigarette Smoke Decreases the Maturation of Lung Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes; Sánchez-López, Verónica; López-Ramírez, Cecilia; Tobar, Daniela; López-Villalobos, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Cesar; Blanco-Orozco, Ana; López-Campos, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting data exist on the role of pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and their maturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Herein, we investigated whether disease severity and smoking status could affect the distribution and maturation of DCs in lung tissues of patients undergoing elective pneumectomy or lobectomy for suspected primary lung cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 75 consecutive patients were included. Spirometry testing was used to identify COPD. Lung parenchyma sections anatomically distant from the primary lesion were examined. We used flow cytometry to identify different DCs subtypes—including BDCA1-positive myeloid DCs (mDCs), BDCA3-positive mDCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs)—and determine their maturation markers (CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86) in all participants. We also identified follicular DCs (fDCs), Langerhans DCs (LDCs), and pDCs in 42 patients by immunohistochemistry. Results COPD was diagnosed in 43 patients (16 current smokers and 27 former smokers), whereas the remaining 32 subjects were classified as non-COPD (11 current smokers, 13 former smokers, and 8 never smokers). The number and maturation of DCs did not differ significantly between COPD and non-COPD patients. However, the results of flow cytometry indicated that maturation markers CD40 and CD83 of BDCA1-positive mDCs were significantly decreased in smokers than in non-smokers (P = 0.023 and 0.013, respectively). Immunohistochemistry also revealed a lower number of LDCs in COPD patients than in non-COPD subjects. Conclusions Cigarette smoke, rather than airflow limitation, is the main determinant of impaired DCs maturation in the lung. PMID:27058955

  3. Quantitative measurement of blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We are observing and measuring the varying development reaction stages of blood cells to different saline solutions. The imaging process is based on a common path interferometer which is realized with a spatial light modulator (SLM) in the Fourier plane after the microscope objective. With the SLM we can shift the phase of the transmitted light with respect to the phase of signal wave. This principle is used for the phase contrast microscopy method where we take four pictures of the same image with different phase shifts in order to calculate the complex field of the measured cell. This microscope technique obtains quantitative data about the blood cell's surface in different development stages, amplitude and phase differences inside the cell itself. (author)

  4. Blocking junctional adhesion molecule C enhances dendritic cell migration and boosts the immune responses against Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Ballet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1 response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2 response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response.

  5. Ebola Virus Failure to Stimulate Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Interferon Responses Correlates With Impaired Cellular Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Lawrence W.; Martinez, Osvaldo; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the ability of the Ebola virus to elicit an antiviral response from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Exposure of pDCs to Ebola virus did not result in significantly higher levels of interferon-α production than the levels in mock-infected cells. After inoculation with Ebola virus under the same conditions, conventional dendritic cells expressed viral proteins whereas pDCs did not, suggesting that the latter cells were not infected. Assessment of the entry of Ebola virus–like p...

  6. DENDRITIC CELL-BASED VACCINE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Nosov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the efficiency and tolerance of autologous vaccine therapy based on dendritic cells (DC in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and to examine changes in immunological parameters and their association with the efficiency of the therapy. Subjects and methods. Twenty-nine patients with RCC received autologous vaccine therapy based on DC in 2002 to 2008. Therapy was performed in the induction mode in 16 patients before disease progression and in the adjuvant mode (8 vaccinations in 13 patients after radical nephrectomy (grade III or radical metastasectomy. Peripheral blood monocyte-derived DCs treated with autologous tumor lysate were used to prepare the vaccine. Results. In a group of 16 patients with distant metastases, partial regressions were recorded in 2 (12.5% patients and long (> 6-month stabilizations of a tumor process were observed in other 2 (12.5% patients. The median time prior to progression was 3 (range 1.5-12 months. Thirteen patients on adjuvant treatment did not achieve the median time to progression: 4 patients showed no signs of disease progression ?12 to ?25 months after metastasectomy. Patients with a clinical effect (disease regression or long stabilization showed a significant increase in the populations of CD3+CD8+ and CD3-CD16+ T lymphocytes (natural killers (NK cells after 3 vaccinations from 23.3 to 27.2% (p = 0.018 and from 15.17 to 20.3%, respectively (p = 0.03. Prior to vaccine therapy, the count of CD3+CD16+-NK cells was thrice greater in patients with the progressive disease than that in the donor group - 11.2 and 3.5%, respectively. The baseline count of CD4+CD25+ Т lymphocytes in patients with progressive disease was also significantly higher than that in patients with the clinical effect - 12.01 and 5.6%, respectively. Conclusion. In patients with RCC, DC-based vaccine therapy is able to induce a specific anti-tumor immune response that is transformed into the clinical effect in some

  7. Limited niche availability suppresses murine intrathymic dendritic-cell development from noncommitted progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Ziętara, Natalia; Föhse, Lisa; Puchałka, Jacek; Diestelhorst, Jana; Witzlau, Katrin; Prinz, Immo; Schambach, Axel; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-01-15

    The origins of dendritic cells (DCs) and other myeloid cells in the thymus have remained controversial. In this study, we assessed developmental relationships between thymic dendritic cells and thymocytes, employing retrovirus-based cellular barcoding and reporter mice, as well as intrathymic transfers coupled with DC depletion. We demonstrated that a subset of early T-lineage progenitors expressed CX3CR1, a bona fide marker for DC progenitors. However, intrathymic transfers into nonmanipulated mice, as well as retroviral barcoding, indicated that thymic dendritic cells and thymocytes were largely of distinct developmental origin. In contrast, intrathymic transfers after in vivo depletion of DCs resulted in intrathymic development of non-T-lineage cells. In conclusion, our data support a model in which the adoption of T-lineage fate by noncommitted progenitors at steady state is enforced by signals from the thymic microenvironment unless niches promoting alternative lineage fates become available. PMID:25411428

  8. NKG2D-Dependent Activation of Dendritic Epidermal T cells in Contact Hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Milek; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Schmidt, Jonas Damgård;

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between keratinocytes (KC) and skin-resident immune cells plays an important role in induction of contact hypersensitivity (CHS). A specific subset of γδ T cells termed dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC) are located in mouse epidermis, and we have recently shown that DETC become a...

  9. IL-10 and TGF-β Control of Dendritic Cells at Environmental Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.H. Girard-Madoux (Mathilde)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Dendritic cells (DC) are necessary to maintain homeostasis and are essential in regulating immune responses. DC induce effector T cell responses to invading pathogens and promote regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation to harmless antigens. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and t

  10. Lactotransferrin-Cre reporter mice trace neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Boris; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea; Fischhuber, Katrin M; Leitner, Nicole R; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Casanova, Emilio; Sexl, Veronika; Müller, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to identify genes that account for myeloid lineage commitment and development. However, currently available non-invasive mouse models utilize myeloid-specific reporters that are significantly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as lymphoid compartments. Here, we describe a myeloid-specific marker that is not shared by any other lineage. We show that lactotransferrin mRNA is expressed by Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) cells in the bone marrow, as opposed to hematopoietic stem cells or any peripheral cell population. To follow the progeny of lactotransferrin-expressing bone marrow cells, we generated a mouse model in which a reporter gene is irreversibly activated from the lactotransferrin-promoter. We found that lactotransferrin-reporter labels a majority of neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells, while excluding T, B, natural killer cells, interferon-producing killer dendritic cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, erythrocytes and eosinophils. Lactotransferrin-reporter(-) bone marrow cells retain lymphoid, erythroid and long-term repopulating potential, while lactotransferrin-reporter(+) bone marrow cells confer only myeloid, but not lymphoid potential. We conclude that lactotransferrin represents a late stage differentiation marker of neutrophils, macrophages and distinct subtypes of dendritic cells. PMID:24561791

  11. 初治肺结核患者外周血树突状细胞免疫功能的体外研究%Study of immune function of dendritic cells in peripheral blood of tuberculosis patients after initial treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许怡; 杨莉; 赵磊; 曹金凤; 韩玮; 张志; 高会霞; 刘玉珍; 戴二黑

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate expressions of surface maturation markers, secreting cytokines and the stimulat⁃ing effect on T lymphocytes in the dendritic cells (DC) from peripheral blood of tuberculosis (TB) patients after loading dose treatment. Methods TB patients who received initial treatment (n=68) were collected at the fifth hospital of Shijiazhuang from 2013 June to 2014 January. Base on clinical diagnosis and treatment guidelines of tuberculosis, they were divided into sputum smear-negative group (35 cases) and sputum smear-positive group(33 cases). Forty cases of healthy adult were se⁃lected as control group. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood and were cultured in medium to differentiate into DCs. Expression levels of CD83 and CD86 on DCs were examined by flow cytometry. The proliferation of allogeneic mixed lymphocyte stimulated by DCs was dectected using MTT assay. Contents of IL-12, IL-10 and INF-γin the cultural supernatant of DCs and blood serum from TB patients were detected by ELISA. Results Compared with controls ,the ex⁃pressions of CD83 and CD86 on DCs in TB patients after loading dose treatment decreased obviously(P0.05). Conclu⁃sion The expressions of maturation markers of DC cells of the peripheral blood in TB patients after initial treatment de⁃creased. The ability of stimulating mixed lymphocyte proliferation is also significantly reduced while secretion of IL-12 was enhanced.%目的:研究初治肺结核患者外周血树突状细胞(DC)表面成熟标志的表达、分泌细胞因子以及对T淋巴细胞的刺激作用。方法收集初治肺结核患者68例,其中菌阴组35例,菌阳组33例。收集健康体检者40例作为对照组。分离外周血单个核细胞,诱导其分化成DC。流式细胞术检测各组DC的表面标志CD83和CD86的表达率;MTT法检测DC促进同种异体T淋巴细胞的增殖能力;ELISA法检测DC培养上清中白细胞介素(IL)-12、IL-10、干扰素

  12. Sensory-Driven Enhancement of Calcium Signals in Individual Purkinje Cell Dendrites of Awake Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Najafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Climbing fibers (CFs are thought to contribute to cerebellar plasticity and learning by triggering a large influx of dendritic calcium in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell (PC to signal the occurrence of an unexpected sensory event. However, CFs fire about once per second whether or not an event occurs, raising the question of how sensory-driven signals might be distinguished from a background of ongoing spontaneous activity. Here, we report that in PC dendrites of awake mice, CF-triggered calcium signals are enhanced when the trigger is a sensory event. In addition, we show that a large fraction of the total enhancement in each PC dendrite can be accounted for by an additional boost of calcium provided by sensory activation of a non-CF input. We suggest that sensory stimulation may modulate dendritic voltage and calcium concentration in PCs to increase the strength of plasticity signals during cerebellar learning.

  13. Geranylgeranyltransferase I is essential for dendritic development of cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kong-Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During cerebellar development, Purkinje cells (PCs form the most elaborate dendritic trees among neurons in the brain, but the mechanism regulating PC arborization remains largely unknown. Geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGT is a prenyltransferase that is responsible for lipid modification of several signaling proteins, such as Rho family small GTPase Rac1, which has been shown to be involved in neuronal morphogenesis. Here we show that GGT plays an important role in dendritic development of PCs. Results We found that GGT was abundantly expressed in the developing rat cerebellum, in particular molecular layer (ML, the region enriched with PC dendrites. Inhibition or down-regulation of GGT using small interference RNA (siRNA inhibited dendritic development of PCs. In contrast, up-regulation of GGT promoted dendritic arborization of PCs. Furthermore, neuronal depolarization induced by high K+ or treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promoted membrane association of Rac1 and dendritic development of PCs in cultured cerebellar slices. The effect of BDNF or high K+ was inhibited by inhibition or down-regulation of GGT. Conclusion Our results indicate that GGT plays an important role in Purkinje cell development, and suggest a novel role of GGT in neuronal morphogenesis in vivo.

  14. Human intestinal dendritic cells decrease cytokine release against Salmonella infection in the presence of Lactobacillus paracasei upon TLR activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bermudez-Brito

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria have been shown to modulate immune responses and could have therapeutic effects in allergic and inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the signalling pathways that are engaged by probiotics. Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen-presenting cells that are involved in immunity and tolerance. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs and murine DCs are different from human gut DCs; therefore, in this study, we used human DCs generated from CD34+ progenitor cells (hematopoietic stem cells harvested from umbilical cord blood; those DCs exhibited surface antigens of dendritic Langerhans cells, similar to the lamina propria DCs in the gut. We report that both a novel probiotic strain isolated from faeces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human intestinal DCs challenged with Salmonella. Interestingly, the supernatant was as effective as the bacteria in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In contrast, the bacterium was a potent inducer of TGF-β2 secretion, whereas the supernatant increased the secretion of TGF-β1 in response to Salmonella. We also showed that both the bacteria and its supernatant enhanced innate immunity through the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR signalling. These treatments strongly induced the transcription of the TLR9 gene. In addition, upregulation of the CASP8 and TOLLIP genes was observed. This work demonstrates that L. paracasei CNCM I-4034 enhanced innate immune responses, as evidenced by the activation of TLR signalling and the downregulation of a broad array of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The use of supernatants like the one described in this paper could be an effective and safe alternative to using live bacteria in functional foods.

  15. Simian virus 40 inhibits differentiation and maturation of rhesus macaque DC-SIGN+-dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong G

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DC are the initiators and modulators of the immune responses. Some species of pathogenic microorganisms have developed immune evasion strategies by controlling antigen presentation function of DC. Simian virus 40 (SV40 is a DNA tumor virus of rhesus monkey origin. It can induce cell transformation and tumorigenesis in many vertebrate species, but often causes no visible effects and persists as a latent infection in rhesus monkeys under natural conditions. To investigate the interaction between SV40 and rhesus monkey DC, rhesus monkey peripheral blood monocyte-derived DC were induced using recombinant human Interleukin-4 (rhIL-4 and infective SV40, the phenotype and function of DC-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN+ DC were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Results showed that SV40 can down-regulate the expression of CD83 and CD86 on DC and impair DC-induced activation of T cell proliferation. These findings suggest that SV40 might also cause immune suppression by influencing differentiation and maturation of DC.

  16. Toso regulates differentiation and activation of inflammatory dendritic cells during persistence-prone virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, P A; Meryk, A; Pandyra, A A; Brenner, D; Brüstle, A; Xu, H C; Merches, K; Lang, F; Khairnar, V; Sharma, P; Funkner, P; Recher, M; Shaabani, N; Duncan, G S; Duhan, V; Homey, B; Ohashi, P S; Häussinger, D; Knolle, P A; Honke, N; Mak, T W; Lang, K S

    2015-01-01

    During virus infection and autoimmune disease, inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) differentiate from blood monocytes and infiltrate infected tissue. Following acute infection with hepatotropic viruses, iDCs are essential for re-stimulating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and therefore contribute to virus control. Here we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system to identify novel signals, which influence the recruitment and activation of iDCs in the liver. We observed that intrinsic expression of Toso (Faim3, FcμR) influenced the differentiation and activation of iDCs in vivo and DCs in vitro. Lack of iDCs in Toso-deficient (Toso(-/-)) mice reduced CD8(+) T-cell function in the liver and resulted in virus persistence. Furthermore, Toso(-/-) DCs failed to induce autoimmune diabetes in the rat insulin promoter-glycoprotein (RIP-GP) autoimmune diabetes model. In conclusion, we found that Toso has an essential role in the differentiation and maturation of iDCs, a process that is required for the control of persistence-prone virus infection. PMID:25257173

  17. Evidence for lipopolysaccharide-induced differentiation of RAW264⋅ 7 murine macrophage cell line into dendritic like cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajiv K Saxena; Val Vallyathan; Daniel M Lewis

    2003-02-01

    Effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on RAW264.7 macrophage cell line was studied. LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells increased in cell size and acquired distinct dendritic morphology. At the optimal dose of LPS (1 g/ml), almost 70% RAW264.7 cells acquired dendritic morphology. Flow cytometric studies indicate that the cell surface markers known to be expressed on dendritic cells and involved in antigen presentation and T cell activation (B7.1, B7.2, CD40, MHC class II antigens and CD1d) were also markedly upregulated on LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Our results suggest the possibility that LPS by itself could constitute a sufficient signal for differentiation of macrophages into DC-like cells.

  18. Role of dendritic cells in the induction of regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushwah Rahul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs play a key role in initiating immune responses and maintaining immune tolerance. In addition to playing a role in thymic selection, DCs play an active role in tolerance under steady state conditions through several mechanisms which are dependent on IL-10, TGF-β, retinoic acid, indoleamine-2,3,-dioxygenase along with vitamin D. Several of these mechanisms are employed by DCs in induction of regulatory T cells which are comprised of Tr1 regulatory T cells, natural and inducible foxp3+ regulatory T cells, Th3 regulatory T cells and double negative regulatory T cells. It appears that certain DC subsets are highly specialized in inducing regulatory T cell differentiation and in some tissues the local microenvironment plays a role in driving DCs towards a tolerogenic response. In this review we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DC driven regulatory T cell induction.

  19. Suppression of adaptive immunity to heterologous antigens during Plasmodium infection through hemozoin-induced failure of dendritic cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips R

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are central to the initiation and regulation of the adaptive immune response during infection. Modulation of DC function may therefore allow evasion of the immune system by pathogens. Significant depression of the host's systemic immune response to both concurrent infections and heterologous vaccines has been observed during malaria infection, but the mechanisms underlying this immune hyporesponsiveness are controversial. Results Here, we demonstrate that the blood stages of malaria infection induce a failure of DC function in vitro and in vivo, causing suboptimal activation of T cells involved in heterologous immune responses. This effect on T-cell activation can be transferred to uninfected recipients by DCs isolated from infected mice. Significantly, T cells activated by these DCs subsequently lack effector function, as demonstrated by a failure to migrate to lymphoid-organ follicles, resulting in an absence of B-cell responses to heterologous antigens. Fractionation studies show that hemozoin, rather than infected erythrocyte (red blood cell membranes, reproduces the effect of intact infected red blood cells on DCs. Furthermore, hemozoin-containing DCs could be identified in T-cell areas of the spleen in vivo. Conclusion Plasmodium infection inhibits the induction of adaptive immunity to heterologous antigens by modulating DC function, providing a potential explanation for epidemiological studies linking endemic malaria with secondary infections and reduced vaccine efficacy.

  20. HIV and mature dendritic cells : Trojan exosomes riding the Trojan horse?

    OpenAIRE

    Nuria Izquierdo-Useros; Mar Naranjo-Gómez; Itziar Erkizia; Maria Carmen Puertas; Francesc E Borràs; Julià Blanco; Javier Martinez-Picado

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are secreted cellular vesicles that can induce specific CD4(+) T cell responses in vivo when they interact with competent antigen-presenting cells like mature dendritic cells (mDCs). The Trojan exosome hypothesis proposes that retroviruses can take advantage of the cell-encoded intercellular vesicle traffic and exosome exchange pathway, moving between cells in the absence of fusion events in search of adequate target cells. Here, we discuss recent data supporting this hypothesis, whi...

  1. Macrophage and dendritic cell subsets in IBD: ALDH+ cells are reduced in colon tissue of patients with ulcerative colitis regardless of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, M. K.; Brynjólfsson, S. F.; Dige, A.;

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of the homeostatic balance of intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MQs) may contribute to inflammatory bowel disease. We characterized DC and MQ populations, including their ability to produce retinoic acid, in clinical material encompassing Crohn’s ileitis, Crohn’s colitis......) activity, reflecting retinoic acid synthesis, in UC colon, both in active disease and remission, were reduced compared to controls and inflamed Crohn’s colon. In contrast, no difference in the frequency of ALDH+ cells among blood precursors was detected between UC patients and non-inflamed controls. This...

  2. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  3. Brucella beta 1,2 cyclic glucan is an activator of human and mouse dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    A Martirosyan; Perez-Gutierrez, C. (Camino); Banchereau, R; Dutartre, H; Lecine, P.; Dullaers, M. (Melissa); Mello, M.; Pinto, S; Muller, A; Leserman, L; Levy, Y.; Zurawski, G; Zurawski, S; Moreno, E; Moriyon, I

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cyclic glucans are glucose polymers that concentrate within the periplasm of alpha-proteobacteria. These molecules are necessary to maintain the homeostasis of the cell envelope by contributing to the osmolarity of Gram negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that Brucella beta 1,2 cyclic glucans are potent activators of human and mouse dendritic cells. Dendritic cells activation by Brucella beta 1,2 cyclic glucans requires TLR4, MyD88 and TRIF, but not CD14. The Brucella cyclic glu...

  4. The Application of a Dendritic Cell Algorithm to a Robotic Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Oates, Robert; Aickelin, Uwe; Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Kendall, Graham

    2010-01-01

    The dendritic cell algorithm is an immune-inspired technique for processing time-dependant data. Here we propose it as a possible solution for a robotic classification problem. The dendritic cell algorithm is implemented on a real robot and an investigation is performed into the effects of varying the migration threshold median for the cell population. The algorithm performs well on a classification task with very little tuning. Ways of extending the implementation to allow it to be used as a classifier within the field of robotic security are suggested.

  5. Role of cellular prion proteins in the function of macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Kayako; Sakudo, Akikazu; Masuyama, Jun; Xue, Guangai; Sugiura, Katsuaki; Onodera, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    The cellular isoform of prion proteins (PrPC) is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells, granulocytes, T and B lymphocyte natural killer cells, platelets, monocytes, dendritic cells, and follicular dendritic cells, which may act as carrier cells for the spread of its abnormal isoform (PrPSc) before manifesting transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). In particular, macrophages and dendritic cells seem to be involved in the replication of PrPSc after ingestion. In addition, information on the role of PrPC during phagocytotic activity in these cells has been obtained. A recent study showed that resident macrophages from ZrchI PrP gene (Prnp)-deficient (Prnp-/-) mice show augmented phagocytotic activity compared to Prnp+/+ counterparts. In contrast, our study suggests that Rikn Prnp-/- peritoneal macrophages show pseudopodium extension arrest and up-regulation of phagocytotic activity compared to Prnp+/+ cells. Although reports regarding phagocytotic activity in resident and peritoneal macrophages are inconsistent between ZrchI and Rikn Prnp-/- mice, it seems plausible that PrPC in macrophages could contribute to maintain the immunological environment. This review will introduce the recent progress in understanding the functions of PrPC in macrophages and dendritic cells under physiological conditions and its involvement in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:19275736

  6. CCR6/CCR10-mediated plasmacytoid dendritic cell recruitment to inflamed epithelia after instruction in lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisirak, Vanja; Vey, Nelly; Vanbervliet, Béatrice; Duhen, Thomas; Puisieux, Isabelle; Homey, Bernhard; Bowman, Edward P; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Dubois, Bertrand; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Lira, Sergio A; Puisieux, Alain; Blay, Jean-Yves; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie

    2011-11-10

    Absent in peripheral tissues during homeostasis, human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are described in inflamed skin or mucosa. Here, we report that, unlike blood pDCs, a subset of tonsil pDCs express functional CCR6 and CCR10, and their respective ligands CCL20 and CCL27are detected in inflamed epithelia contacting blood dendritic cell antigen 2(+) pDCs. Moreover, pDCs are recruited to imiquimod-treated skin tumors in WT but not CCR6-deficient mice, and competitive adoptive transfers reveal that CCR6-deficient pDCs are impaired in homing to inflamed skin tumors after intravenous transfer. On IL-3 culture, CCR6 and CCR10 expression is induced on human blood pDCs that become responsive to CCL20 and CCL27/CCL28, respectively. Interestingly, unlike myeloid DC, blood pDCs initially up-regulate CCR7 expression and CCL19 responsiveness on IL-3 ± CpG-B and then acquire functional CCR6 and CCR10. Finally, IL-3-differentiated CCR6(+) CCR10(+) pDCs secrete high levels of IFN-α in response to virus. Overall, we propose an unexpected pDCs migratory model that may best apply for mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues. After CCR7-mediated extravasation into lymphoid tissues draining inflamed epithelia, blood pDCs may be instructed to up-regulate CCR6 and/or CCR10 allowing their homing into inflamed epithelia (in mucosae or skin). At this site, pDCs can then produce IFN-α contributing to pathogen clearance and/or local inflammation. PMID:21937703

  7. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  8. Dendritic Cells from Oral Cavity Induce Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells upon Antigen Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Maruyama, Akira; Okada, Kohei; Matsumoto, Misako; Morita, Akimichi; Seya, Tsukasa

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that dendritic cells (DCs) from the intestines have the capacity to induce Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (T-regs) and regulate immunity versus tolerance in the intestines. However, the contribution of DCs to controlling immunity versus tolerance in the oral cavity has not been addressed. Here, we report that DCs from the oral cavity induce Foxp3+ T-regs as well as DCs from intestine. We found that oral-cavity-draining cervical lymph nodes contained higher frequencies ...

  9. Adipose Tissue Dendritic Cells Enhances Inflammation by Prompting the Generation of Th17 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yanhong; Tian, Jie; Tian, Xinyu; Tang, Xinyi; Rui, Ke; Tong, Jia; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Shengjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity has become a global challenge for public health. It has been reported that obesity is associated with chronic inflammation. However, the mechanism for the chronic inflammation contributes to obesity remains elusive. Methodology/Principal Findings In our study, we found a novel CD11c+ dendritic cell subset existed in murine adipose tissues which was immature phenotype. Moreover, as compared to the lean controls, the number of CD11c+ DCs and CD4+IL-17+T cells were higher in a...

  10. Preconditioning Vaccine Sites for mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cell Therapy and Antitumor Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batich, Kristen A; Swartz, Adam M; Sampson, John H

    2016-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA)-transfected dendritic cell (DC) vaccines have been shown to be a powerful modality for eliciting antitumor immune responses in mice and humans; however, their application has not been fully optimized since many of the factors that contribute to their efficacy remain poorly understood. Work stemming from our laboratory has recently demonstrated that preconditioning the vaccine site with a recall antigen prior to the administration of a dendritic cell vaccine creates systemic recall responses and resultantly enhances dendritic cell migration to the lymph nodes with improved antitumor efficacy. This chapter describes the generation of murine mRNA-transfected DC vaccines, as well as a method for vaccine site preconditioning with protein antigen formulations that create potent recall responses. PMID:27076169

  11. 'Introducing Dendritic Cells as a Novel Immune-Inspired Algorithm for Anomaly Detection'

    OpenAIRE

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe; Cayzer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform the role of coordinating T-cell based immune responses, both reactive and for generating tolerance. We have derived an algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, and have used the signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial immune system. We present our...

  12. Introducting Dendritic Cells as a Novel Immune-Inspired Algorithm for Anomaly Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe; Cayzer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform the role of coordinating T-cell based immune responses, both reactive and for generating tolerance. We have derived an algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, and have used the signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial immune system. We present our algori...

  13. Introducing Dendritic Cells as a Novel Immune-Inspired Algorithm for Anomoly Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe; Cayzer, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform the role of coordinating T-cell based immune responses, both reactive and for generating tolerance. We have derived an algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, and have used the signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial immune system. We present our algorithm...

  14. Another Armament in Gut Immunity: Lymphotoxin-Mediated Crosstalk between Innate Lymphoid and Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Spits

    2011-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are novel players in innate immunity. Tumanov et al. (Tumanov et al., 2011) demonstrate that crosstalk between ILCs and dendritic cells involving membrane-bound lymphotoxin in ILCs and its receptor is critical for protection against colitogenic bacteria

  15. Physiological Role of TNF in MucosalImmunology: Regulation of Macrophage/Dendritic Cell Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivollier, Aymeric Marie Christian; Marsal, J.; Agace, William Winston

    Intestinal mononuclear phagocytes, comprising macrophages(Mϕs) and dendritic cells (DCs), play important roles in the generation and the regulation of immune responses to intestinal antigens, and alterations in the development and/or the function of these cells are thought to contribute to the pa...

  16. Rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3L exhibit distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'diaye, Marie; Warnecke, Andreas; Flytzani, Sevasti; Abdelmagid, Nada; Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja; Harris, Robert A; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells are professional APCs that play a central role in the initiation of immune responses. The limited ex vivo availability of dendritic cells inspires the widespread use of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells as an alternative in research. However, the functional characteristics of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared functional and phenotypic characteristics of rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3 ligand bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. A comparison of surface markers revealed that FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD103, and CD4 and baseline levels of MHC class II, CD40, and CD86, which were highly up-regulated upon stimulation. Conversely, GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells constitutively expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD11c, and CD11b but only mildly up-regulated MHC class II, CD40, or CD86 following stimulation. Expression of dendritic cell-associated core transcripts was restricted to FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells . GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were superior at phagocytosis but were outperformed by FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells at antigen presentation and T cell stimulation in vitro. Stimulated GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more TNF, CCL5, CCL20, and NO, whereas FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more IL-6 and IL-12. Finally, whereas GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants added to resting T cell cultures promoted forkhead box p3(+) regulatory T cell populations, FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants drove Th17 differentiation. We conclude that rat GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functionally distinct. Our data support the current rationale that FLT3

  17. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell dynamics tune interferon-alfa production in SIV-infected cynomolgus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée Bruel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IFN-I production is a characteristic of HIV/SIV primary infections. However, acute IFN-I plasma concentrations rapidly decline thereafter. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC are key players in this production but primary infection is associated with decreased responsiveness of pDC to TLR 7 and 9 triggering. IFNα production during primary SIV infection contrasts with increased pDC death, renewal and dysfunction. We investigated the contribution of pDC dynamics to both acute IFNα production and the rapid return of IFNα concentrations to pre-infection levels during acute-to-chronic transition. Nine cynomolgus macaques were infected with SIVmac251 and IFNα-producing cells were quantified and characterized. The plasma IFN-I peak was temporally associated with the presence of IFNα(+ pDC in tissues but IFN-I production was not detectable during the acute-to-chronic transition despite persistent immune activation. No IFNα(+ cells other than pDC were detected by intracellular staining. Blood-pDC and peripheral lymph node-pDC both lost IFNα(- production ability in parallel. In blood, this phenomenon correlated with an increase in the counts of Ki67(+-pDC precursors with no IFNα production ability. In tissues, it was associated with increase of both activated pDC and KI67(+-pDC precursors, none of these being IFNα(+ in vivo. Our findings also indicate that activation/death-driven pDC renewal rapidly blunts acute IFNα production in vivo: pDC sub-populations with no IFNα-production ability rapidly increase and shrinkage of IFNα production thus involves both early pDC exhaustion, and increase of pDC precursors.

  18. Reduction of dendritic cells by granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitz, Grit; Petermann, Sebastian; Liebe, Stefan; Emmrich, Joerg; Ramlow, Wolfgang

    2008-09-01

    The influence of the granulocyte/monocyte apheresis (GMCAP) on cell populations participating in mechanisms of tolerance, e.g. dendritic cells (DCs), is still not very clear. In a first step, we aimed to investigate changes in the DC population of patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC) (n = 13) compared to healthy subjects (n = 9). In a second step, we studied the changes in peripheral DCs in a small group of patients with active UC before and after Adacolumn apheresis (n = 7). For this purpose, plasmacytoid and myeloid DCs and their maturation markers CD40, CD80, and CD86 were measured using four-color flow cytometry in the peripheral blood. After apheresis, and in acute flare-ups, we identified a significantly lower number of lymphocytes, plasmacytoid, and myeloid DCs. In conclusion, the additional removal of peripheral DCs by GMCAP, which otherwise would contribute to the inflammatory process in the gut, may lead to a higher tolerogeneic status towards luminal antigens. PMID:18253828

  19. The low efficiency of dendritic cells and macrophages from mice susceptible to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in inducing a Th1 response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Almeida

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we evaluated T cell proliferation and Th lymphokine patterns in response to gp43 from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis presented by isolated dendritic cells from susceptible and resistant mice. T cell proliferation assays showed that dendritic cells from susceptible mice were less efficient than those from resistant mice. The pattern of T cell lymphokines stimulated by dendritic cells was always Th1, although the levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma were lower in T cell cultures from susceptible mice. To determie whether different antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells stimulated different concentrations of Th1 lymphokines, the production of IFN-gamma and IL-2 was measured. It was observed that dendritic cells were more efficient than macrophages in stimulating lymphoproliferation in resistant mice. However, no significant difference was observed for IFN-gamma or IL-2 production. When cells from susceptible mice were used, macrophages were more efficient in stimulating lymphoproliferation than dendritic cells, but no difference was observed in the production of Th1 cytokine. Taken together, these results suggest the lower efficiency of dendritic cells and macrophages from B10.A mice in stimulating T cells that secrete Th1 lymphokines in vitro, an effect that may be involved in the progression of the disease in vivo.

  20. IgA production requires B cell interaction with subepithelial dendritic cells in Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboldi, Andrea; Arnon, Tal I; Rodda, Lauren B; Atakilit, Amha; Sheppard, Dean; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-13

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) induction primarily occurs in intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs). However, the cellular interactions necessary for IgA class switching are poorly defined. Here we show that in mice, activated B cells use the chemokine receptor CCR6 to access the subepithelial dome (SED) of PPs. There, B cells undergo prolonged interactions with SED dendritic cells (DCs). PP IgA class switching requires innate lymphoid cells, which promote lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR)-dependent maintenance of DCs. PP DCs augment IgA production by integrin αvβ8-mediated activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). In mice where B cells cannot access the SED, IgA responses against oral antigen and gut commensals are impaired. These studies establish the PP SED as a niche supporting DC-B cell interactions needed for TGFβ activation and induction of mucosal IgA responses. PMID:27174992

  1. CD103+ Dendritic Cells Control Th17 Cell Function in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Zelante

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Th17 cells express diverse functional programs while retaining their Th17 identity, in some cases exhibiting a stem-cell-like phenotype. Whereas the importance of Th17 cell regulation in autoimmune and infectious diseases is firmly established, the signaling pathways controlling their plasticity are undefined. Using a mouse model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, we found that lung CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs would produce IL-2, dependent on NFAT signaling, leading to an optimally protective Th17 response. The absence of IL-2 in DCs caused unrestrained production of IL-23 and fatal hyperinflammation, which was characterized by strong Th17 polarization and the emergence of a Th17 stem-cell-like population. Although several cell types may be affected by deficient IL-2 production in DCs, our findings identify the balance between IL-2 and IL-23 productions by lung DCs as an important regulator of the local inflammatory response to infection.

  2. Myeloid Cell Nuclear Differentiation Antigen (MNDA) Expression Distinguishes Extramedullary Presentations of Myeloid Leukemia From Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ryan C; Kim, Jinah; Natkunam, Yasodha; Sundram, Uma; Freud, Aharon G; Gammon, Bryan; Cascio, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms constitute one of the most common malignancies in adults. In most cases these proliferations initially manifest in the blood and marrow; however, extramedullary involvement may precede blood or marrow involvement in a subset of cases, making a definitive diagnosis challenging by morphologic and immunohistochemical assessment alone. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, aggressive entity that frequently presents in extramedullary sites and can show morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with myeloid neoplasms. Given that BPDCN and myeloid neoplasms may both initially present in extramedullary sites and that novel targeted therapies may be developed that exploit the unique molecular signature of BPDCN, new immunophenotypic markers that can reliably separate myeloid neoplasms from BPDCN are desirable. We evaluated the utility of myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) expression in a series of extramedullary myeloid leukemias (EMLs) and BPDCN. Forty biopsies containing EML and 19 biopsies containing BPDCN were studied by MNDA immunohistochemistry. The majority of myeloid neoplasms showed nuclear expression of MNDA (65%). In contrast, all cases of BPDCN lacked MNDA expression. These findings show that MNDA is expressed in the majority of EMLs and support the inclusion of MNDA immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic evaluation of blastic hematopoietic infiltrates, particularly when the differential diagnosis is between myeloid leukemia and BPDCN. PMID:26796502

  3. Nogo receptor is involved in the adhesion of dendritic cells to myelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Roland

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nogo-66 receptor NgR1 and its structural homologue NgR2 are binding proteins for a number of myelin-associated inhibitory factors. After neuronal injury, these inhibitory factors are responsible for preventing axonal outgrowth via their interactions with NgR1 and NgR2 expressed on neurons. In vitro, cells expressing NgR1/2 are inhibited from adhering to and spreading on a myelin substrate. Neuronal injury also results in the presence of dendritic cells (DCs in the central nervous system, where they can come into contact with myelin debris. The exact mechanisms of interaction of immune cells with CNS myelin are, however, poorly understood. Methods Human DCs were differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes and mouse DCs were differentiated from wild type and NgR1/NgR2 double knockout bone marrow precursors. NgR1 and NgR2 expression were determined with quantitative real time PCR and immunoblot, and adhesion of cells to myelin was quantified. Results We demonstrate that human immature myeloid DCs express NgR1 and NgR2, which are then down-regulated upon maturation. Human mature DCs also adhere to a much higher extent to a myelin substrate than immature DCs. We observe the same effect when the cells are plated on Nogo-66-His (binding peptide for NgR1, but not on control proteins. Mature DCs taken from Ngr1/2 knockout mice adhere to a much higher extent to myelin compared to wild type mouse DCs. In addition, Ngr1/2 knockout had no effect on in vitro DC differentiation or phenotype. Conclusions These results indicate that a lack of NgR1/2 expression promotes the adhesion of DCs to myelin. This interaction could be important in neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis in which peripheral immune cells come into contact with myelin debris.

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 352 352 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 361 361 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  6. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 361 361 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 350 350 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 350 350 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation ( ...

  11. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 351 351 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  12. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 351 351 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  13. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 360 360 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  14. Signal Propagation in Oblique Dendrites of CA1 Pyramidal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Migliore, Michele; Ferrante, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2005-01-01

    The electrophysiological properties of the oblique branches of CA1 pyramidal neurons are largely unknown and very difficult to investigate experimentally. These relatively thin dendrites make up the majority of the apical tree surface area and constitute the main target of Schaffer collateral axons from CA3. Their electrogenic properties might have an important role in defining the computational functions of CA1 neurons. It is thus important to determine if and to what extent the back- and fo...

  15. Using magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Ferguson

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy with antigen-loaded dendritic cell-based vaccines can induce clinical responses in some patients, but further optimization is required to unlock the full potential of this strategy in the clinic. Optimization is dependent on being able to monitor the cellular events that take place once the dendritic cells have been injected in vivo, and to establish whether antigen-specific immune responses to the tumour have been induced. Here we describe the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a simple, non-invasive approach to evaluate vaccine success. By loading the dendritic cells with highly magnetic iron nanoparticles it is possible to assess whether the injected cells drain to the lymph nodes. It is also possible to establish whether an antigen-specific response is initiated by assessing migration of successive rounds of antigen-loaded dendritic cells; in the face of a successfully primed cytotoxic response, the bulk of antigen-loaded cells are eradicated on-route to the node, whereas cells without antigen can reach the node unchecked. It is also possible to verify the induction of a vaccine-induced response by simply monitoring increases in draining lymph node size as a consequence of vaccine-induced lymphocyte trapping, which is an antigen-specific response that becomes more pronounced with repeated vaccination. Overall, these MRI techniques can provide useful early feedback on vaccination strategies, and could also be used in decision making to select responders from non-responders early in therapy.

  16. Identification of a novel immunoregulatory signaling pathway exploited by M. tuberculosis in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Janne Marie; Schoof, Erwin; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov;

    The causative agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has infected over a third of the world's population and poses a massive burden to health care systems and human well-being. Most M. tuberculosis infections are latent and are not cleared fully by the host immune system due to the...... highly sophisticated infectious machinery employed by the bacterium. The dendritic cell (DC) plays a crucial role in shaping the nature of the immune response after exposure to pathogens, and the interaction between M. tuberculosis and the dendritic cell is of profound importance for the course of...

  17. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma of the Omentum: Multidetector Computed Tomography Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report computed tomography (CT) findings for a rare case of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the greater omentum from a 47-year-old female patient. The tumor presented ash a palpable mass lesion in the umbilical region for the last two months. Multidetector CT scan of the abdomen showed a 14-cm soft-tissue mass with calcification and necrosis within the greater omentum. As a result, a follicular dendritic cell sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a solitary omentum mass, especially one with coarse and chunk-like calcifications

  18. Paraneoplastic Pemphigus Associated with Follicular Dendritic Cell Tumor in the Mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakasan, Aparna Mullangath; Prabhu, Anne Jennifer; Velarasan, Kanmani; Backianathan, Selvamani; Ram, Thomas Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic Pemphigus (PNP) is an autoimmune bullous disease characterized by severe stomatitis, polymorphous skin eruptions, and underlying neoplasms. Diagnosis of cutaneous paraneoplastic disorders requires high index of suspicion. We describe a patient with PNP associated with follicular dendritic cell (FDC) tumor in the mediastinum, a rare neoplasm originating from follicular dendritic cells. Its management requires identification of underlying malignancy and treatment of the same. Our patient showed remission of PNP upon excision of the tumor and remained disease-free for 8 years. PMID:27190659

  19. Interleukin 20 regulates dendritic cell migration and expression of co-stimulatory molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Rikke; Jalilian, Babak; Agger, Ralf; Iversen, Lars; Erlandsen, Mogens; Otkjaer, Kristian; Johansen, Claus; Paludan, Søren R; Rosenberg, Carina A; Kragballe, Knud; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease characterized by leukocyte skin infiltration. Interestingly, recent works suggest that the migration of dendritic cells (DCs) is abnormal in psoriatic skin. DCs have significant role in regulating the function of T lymphocytes, at least in part...... influenced by the local environment of cytokines. In psoriatic skin lesions the expression of IL-20 is highly up-regulated. It is unclear if this cytokine has any influence on DCs. METHODS: Here, we investigated the influence of IL-20 in monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MDDCs) in vitro. This work addressed...

  20. Rapid antibody responses by low-dose, single-step, dendritic cell-targeted immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Griffiths, Michelle N.; Burton, Dennis R; Ghazal, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We have compared the kinetics of antibody responses in conventional and dendritic cell-targeted immunization by using a model antigen in mice. Targeting was achieved by linking the reporter antigen (polyclonal goat anti-hamster antibody) to N418, a hamster mAb that binds to the CD11c molecule on the surface of murine dendritic cells. Intradermal injection of submicrogram quantities of goat anti-hamster antibody complexed to mAb N418 elicited goat antibody-specific serum IgG in mice. Antigen-s...

  1. DMPD: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18641647 Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases... (.csml) Show Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases....iral infection andautoimmune diseases. Authors Gilliet M, Cao W, Liu YJ. Publication Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 A

  2. Osteopontin promotes dendritic cell maturation and function in response to HBV antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui GY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guangying Cui,1,2 Jianing Chen,1,2 Jianqin He,1,2 Chong Lu,1,2 Yingfeng Wei,1,2 Lin Wang,1,2 Xuejun Xu,3 Lanjuan Li,1,2 Toshimitsu Uede,4 Hongyan Diao1,2 1State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 2Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, 3Department of Oral Orthodontics, Affiliated Stomatology Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 4Molecular Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Purpose: Dendritic cells (DCs play critical roles in promoting innate and adaptive immunity in microbial infection. Functional impairment of DCs may mediate the suppression of viral-specific T-cell immune response in chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients. Osteopontin (OPN is involved in several liver diseases and infectious diseases. However, whether OPN affects DC function in hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is unknown.Methods: Twenty CHB patients and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited. OPN secreted by DCs was compared. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured with OPN antibody were examined to study the costimulatory molecular expression and interleukin (IL-12 production of DCs after HBV antigenic stimulation. OPN-deficient mice were used to investigate the influence of OPN on DC maturation and function after HBV antigenic stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous OPN was administrated to further verify the functioning of DCs from CHB patients upon HBV antigenic stimulation.Results: We found that OPN production of DCs from CHB patients was significantly lower than those from healthy volunteers. The absence of OPN impaired IL-12 production and costimulatory molecular expression of DCs upon stimulation with HBV antigens. Defective DC function led to reduced activation of Th1 response to

  3. Early myeloid dendritic cell dysregulation is predictive of disease progression in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viskam Wijewardana

    Full Text Available Myeloid dendritic cells (mDC are lost from blood in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection but the mechanism for this loss and its relationship to disease progression are not known. We studied the mDC response in blood and lymph nodes of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected rhesus macaques with different disease outcomes. Early changes in blood mDC number were inversely correlated with virus load and reflective of eventual disease outcome, as animals with stable infection that remained disease-free for more than one year had average increases in blood mDC of 200% over preinfection levels at virus set-point, whereas animals that progressed rapidly to AIDS had significant loss of mDC at this time. Short term antiretroviral therapy (ART transiently reversed mDC loss in progressor animals, whereas discontinuation of ART resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in mDC over preinfection levels only in stable animals, approaching 10-fold in some cases. Progressive SIV infection was associated with increased CCR7 expression on blood mDC and an 8-fold increase in expression of CCL19 mRNA in lymph nodes, consistent with increased mDC recruitment. Paradoxically, lymph node mDC did not accumulate in progressive infection but rather died from caspase-8-dependent apoptosis that was reduced by ART, indicating that increased recruitment is offset by increased death. Lymph node mDC from both stable and progressor animals remained responsive to exogenous stimulation with a TLR7/8 agonist. These data suggest that mDC are mobilized in SIV infection but that an increase in the CCR7-CCL19 chemokine axis associated with high virus burden in progressive infection promotes exodus of activated mDC from blood into lymph nodes where they die from apoptosis. We suggest that inflamed lymph nodes serve as a sink for mDC through recruitment, activation and death that contributes to AIDS pathogenesis.

  4. T-Bet Mediated Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Dendritic Cell-Cytokine Induced Killer Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Miao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying T-bet mediated anti-neoplastic effects of cytokine induced killer (CIK cells.Methods: Lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood of leukemic children were induced with γ- interferon (IFN-γ, CD3McAb and interluki-2 (IL-2, and co-cultured with dendritic cells (DCs to generate DC-CIK cells. The morphology and immunophenotype of these cells were determined by a light microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. IL-2 and IFN-γ levels released by DC-CIK cells were quantified by ELISA. Cytotoxicity of DC-CIK cells against leukemia cell lines was measured by MTT assay. FCM was used to detect CD4+CD25+Treg cells, while RT-PCR and Western blot were used to determine mRNA and protein expressions of Foxp3 and GATA3 in DC-CIK cells treated with T-bet monoclonal antibody.Findings: Induced DC-CIK cells were regular, round and transparent with variable cell volume and cellular aggregation. The main effector cells in this population were CD3+CD8+ cells and CD3+CD56+ cells. We demonstrated a time dependent increase in IL-2 and IFN-γ levels after induction. DC-CIK cells were cytotoxic to B95 cells, Jhhan cells and M07e cells, with the highest cytotoxicity towards B95 cells. Treatment with mouse anti-human T-bet monoclonal antibody resulted in an increase in the proportion of CD4+CD25+Treg cells and elevation of Foxp3 and GATA3 mRNA and protein levels.Conclusion: DC-CIK cells induced with cytokines were strongly cytotoxic towards a number of cancer cell lines. Foxp3 and GATA3 were implicated in the T-bet mediated anti-neoplastic effects of DC-CIK cells via activation of the Th1 pathway and suppression of the Th2 and Treg pathways.

  5. In situ vaccination with CD204 gene-silenced dendritic cell, not unmodified dendritic cell, enhances radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Chunqing; Yi, Huanfa; YU, XIAOFEI; Zuo, Daming; Qian, Jie; Yang, Gary; Barbara A Foster; Subjeck, John R.; Sun, Xiaolei; Mikkelsen, Ross B.; Fisher, Paul B.; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Given the complexity of prostate cancer progression and metastasis, multimodalities that target different aspects of tumor biology, e.g., radiotherapy (RT) in conjunction with immunotherapy, may provide the best opportunities for promoting clinical benefits in patients with high risk localized prostate cancer. Here we show that intratumoral administration of unmodified dendritic cells (DCs) failed to synergize with fractionated RT. However, ionizing radiation combined with in situ vaccination...

  6. Reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplant for treatment of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Lokare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is a rare, aggressive tumor characterized by skin and/or marrow infiltration by CD4+ CD56+ cells. Historically, the tumor was variably thought to arise from either monocytes, T cells or NK cells giving rise to terms such as CD4+/CD56+ acute monoblastic leukemia, primary cutaneous CD4+/CD56+ hematodermic tumor and blastic NK-cell lymphoma. Whilst considerable progress has been made in understanding the histogenesis, the best modality of treatment remains to be defined. We are therefore reporting this case which was successfully treated with a T-deplete allogeneic transplant and the patient is currently alive and in remission 4 years post transplant.

  7. Impact of CD200-Fc on dendritic cells in lupus-prone NZB/WF1 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yufeng; Zhao, Lidan; Zhang, Fengchun; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal expression of CD200/CD200R1 may contribute to the immunologic abnormalities in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to assess the function of CD200/CD200R1and impact of CD200-Fc on dendritic cells in lupus-prone NZB/WF1 mice. Female NZB/WF1 mice were treated with CD200-Fc or control for 4 weeks. Plasma samples were collected to measure autoantibody levels. The expression levels of CD200/CD200R1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and splenocytes were examined. The percentage of CD200/CD200R1-positive cells in splenocytes from NZB/WF1 mice was lower than that of C57BL/6 mice (p lupus. PMID:27545083

  8. Dendritic cell maturation and survival are differentially regulated by TNF receptors 1 and 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maney, Nicola J.; Reynolds, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DC) to regulate adaptive immunity is controlled by their maturation state and lifespan. Although TNF is a well-known maturation and survival factor for DC, the role of the two TNF receptors (TNFR), TNFR1 and TNFR2, in mediating these effects is poorly understood. By using unique TNF variants that selectively signal through TNFR1 and/or TNFR2, we demonstrate differential functions of TNFR in human monocyte-derived and blood CD1c+ DC. Activation of TNFR1, but not TNFR2, efficiently induced DC maturation, as defined by enhanced expression of cell surface maturation markers (CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR) as well as enhanced T-cell stimulatory capacity. In contrast, both TNFR1 and TNFR2 significantly protected DC against cell death indicating that innate signals can promote DC survival in the absence of DC maturation. We further show differential activation of NFκB signaling pathways by the TNFR: TNFR1 activated both the p65 and p52 pathways, whereas TNFR2 triggered p52, but not p65 activation. Accordingly, the p65 NFκB pathway only played a role in the pro-survival effect of TNFR1. However, cell death protection through both TNFR was mediated through the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL pathway. Together, our data show that TNFR1-, but not TNFR2-signaling induces DC maturation, whereas DC survival can be mediated independently through both TNFR. These data indicate differential but partly overlapping responses through TNFR1 and TNFR2 in both inflammatory and conventional DC, and demonstrate that DC maturation and DC survival can be regulated through independent signaling pathways. PMID:25288570

  9. BDNF over-expression increases olfactory bulb granule cell dendritic spine density in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDole, B; Isgor, C; Pare, C; Guthrie, K

    2015-09-24

    Olfactory bulb granule cells (GCs) are axon-less, inhibitory interneurons that regulate the activity of the excitatory output neurons, the mitral and tufted cells, through reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses located on GC spines. These contacts are established in the distal apical dendritic compartment, while GC basal dendrites and more proximal apical segments bear spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the olfactory cortices. This synaptic connectivity is vital to olfactory circuit function and is remodeled during development, and in response to changes in sensory activity and lifelong GC neurogenesis. Manipulations that alter levels of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in vivo have significant effects on dendritic spine morphology, maintenance and activity-dependent plasticity for a variety of CNS neurons, yet little is known regarding BDNF effects on bulb GC spine maturation or maintenance. Here we show that, in vivo, sustained bulbar over-expression of BDNF in transgenic mice produces a marked increase in GC spine density that includes an increase in mature spines on their apical dendrites. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that changes in spine density were most notable in the distal and proximal apical domains, indicating that multiple excitatory inputs are potentially modified by BDNF. Our results indicate that increased levels of endogenous BDNF can promote the maturation and/or maintenance of dendritic spines on GCs, suggesting a role for this factor in modulating GC functional connectivity within adult olfactory circuitry. PMID:26211445

  10. Branching angles of pyramidal cell dendrites follow common geometrical design principles in different cortical areas

    OpenAIRE

    Concha Bielza; Ruth Benavides-Piccione; Pedro López-Cruz; Pedro Larrañaga; Javier DeFelipe

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling pyramidal cell structure is crucial to understanding cortical circuit computations. Although it is well known that pyramidal cell branching structure differs in the various cortical areas, the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells are not fully understood. Here we analyzed and modeled with a von Mises distribution the branching angles in 3D reconstructed basal dendritic arbors of hundreds of intracellularly injected cortical pyramidal cells in seven differen...

  11. Promoting tolerance to proteolipid protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through targeting dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stern, Joel N. H.; Keskin, Derin B.; Kato, Zenichiro; Waldner, Hanspeter; Schallenberg, Sonja; Anderson, Ana; von Boehmer, Harald; Kretschmer, Karsten; Strominger, Jack L.

    2010-01-01

    In T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, self-reactive T cells with known antigen specificity appear to be particularly promising targets for antigen-specific induction of tolerance without compromising desired protective host immune responses. Several lines of evidence suggest that delivery of antigens to antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in the steady state (i.e., to immature DCs) may represent a suitable approach to induce antigen-specific T-cell tolerance peripherally. Here, we repo...

  12. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Günther eSchönrich; Raftery, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently estab-lishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing V...

  13. Dendritic cells as Achilles’ heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZ...

  14. Self-antigen presentation by dendritic cells and lymphoid stroma and its implications for autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Turley, Shannon J.

    2010-01-01

    The induction and maintenance of T cell tolerance is essential to prevent autoimmunity. A combination of central and peripheral mechanisms acts to control autoreactive T cells. In secondary lymphoid organs, dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigen were thought to play a major role in the induction of peripheral T cell tolerance. Multiple recent studies have demonstrated that DCs are not absolutely essential to induce and maintain tolerance. Furthermore, it has also been recently shown th...

  15. Aminopeptidase N (CD13) Is Involved in Phagocytic Processes in Human Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Mónica I. Villaseñor-Cardoso; Dulce A. Frausto-Del-Río; Enrique Ortega

    2013-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN or CD13) is a membrane ectopeptidase expressed by many cell types, including myelomonocytic lineage cells: monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is known to regulate the biological activity of various peptides by proteolysis, and it has been proposed that CD13 also participates in several functions such as angiogenesis, cell adhesion, metastasis, and tumor invasion. We had previously reported that, in human monocytes and macrophages, CD13 modulates the phagoc...

  16. IL-10 and TGF-β Control of Dendritic Cells at Environmental Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Girard-Madoux, Mathilde

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Dendritic cells (DC) are necessary to maintain homeostasis and are essential in regulating immune responses. DC induce effector T cell responses to invading pathogens and promote regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation to harmless antigens. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) are anti-inflammatory cytokines displaying potent tolerogenic abilities. Both cytokines are secreted by and act on a plethora of (non-) immune cells including T c...

  17. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the large intestine: A rare presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Samira Kumar Behera,; Sridhar Epari; Rajesh Kumar Bhola

    2014-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell tumors are very rare neoplasms that often occur in lymph nodes. We report here a case in the colon, second in the series to be reported, in a 40 year male. The differentiation from gastrointestinal stromal tumor is emphasized. Tumor was involving the ascending colon without any obstructive feature. Microscopically, tumor cells are arranged in a pattern-less pattern, focal short fascicles. Tumor cells are large cells with varying shaped nuclei and ill d...

  18. Pattern and inhibition-dependent invasion of pyramidal cell dendrites by fast spikes in the hippocampus in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Buzsáki, G.; Penttonen, M; Nádasdy, Z; Bragin, A.

    1996-01-01

    The invasion of sodium spikes from the soma into dendrites was studied in hippocampal pyramidal cells by simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings in anesthetized rats and by simultaneous extracellular recordings of the somatic and dendritic potentials in freely behaving animals. During complex-spike patterns, recorded in the immobile or sleeping animal, dendritic invasion of successive spikes was substantially attenuated. Complex-spike bursts occurred in association with popula...

  19. Dendritic cells are defective in breast cancer patients: a potential role for polyamine in this immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that are currently employed in cancer clinical trials. However, it is not clear whether their ability to induce tumour-specific immune responses when they are isolated from cancer patients is reduced relative to their ability in vivo. We determined the phenotype and functional activity of DCs from cancer patients and investigated the effect of putrescine, a polyamine molecule that is released in large amounts by cancer cells and has been implicated in metastatic invasion, on DCs. The IL-4/GM-CSF (granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor) procedure for culturing blood monocyte-derived DCs was applied to cells from healthy donors and patients (17 with breast, 7 with colorectal and 10 with renal cell carcinoma). The same peroxide-treated tumour cells (M74 cell line) were used for DC pulsing. We investigated the effects of stimulation of autologous lymphocytes by DCs pulsed with treated tumour cells (DC-Tu), and cytolytic activity of T cells was determined in the same target cells. Certain differences were observed between donors and breast cancer patients. The yield of DCs was dramatically weaker, and expression of MHC class II was lower and the percentage of HLA-DR-Lin- cells higher in patients. Whatever combination of maturating agents was used, expression of markers of mature DCs was significantly lower in patients. Also, DCs from patients exhibited reduced ability to stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocytes. After DC-Tu stimulation, specific cytolytic activity was enhanced by up to 40% when DCs were from donors but only up to 10% when they were from patients. IFN-γ production was repeatedly found to be enhanced in donors but not in patients. By adding putrescine to DCs from donors, it was possible to enhance the HLA-DR-Lin- cell percentage and to reduce the final cytolytic activity of lymphocytes after DC-Tu stimulation, mimicking defective DC function. These putrescine-induced deficiencies were reversed by

  20. Chicken interleukin-21 is costimulatory for T cells and blocks maturation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Lisa; Hu, Tuanjun; Wu, Zhiguang; Kaiser, Pete

    2012-02-01

    In mammals, interleukin-21 (IL-21) is an immunomodulatory cytokine with pleiotropic effects on the proliferation, differentiation and effector functions of T, B, NK and dendritic cells. A cDNA encoding the chicken orthologue of IL-21 (chIL-21) was cloned by RT-PCR from RNA isolated from activated chicken splenocytes and consists of 438 nucleotides, encoding an open reading frame of 145 amino acids (aa). Chicken IL-21 has 20-30% aa identity to its orthologues in mammals, Xenopus and fish, but is more highly conserved within Aves (50-80%). The four alpha-helical bundle structure of mammalian IL-21 appears to be conserved in the predicted chicken protein, as are the four cysteine residues required for the formation of two disulphide bridges. A glutamine residue in aa position 129, which has been implicated in the binding of IL-21 to the IL-2 receptor γ-chain in mammals, is also conserved. ChIL-21 is expressed in most lymphoid tissues, predominantly by CD4+ TCRαβ+ T cells. As in mammals, chIL-21 synergistically enhances T-cell proliferation and inhibits maturation of dendritic cells. PMID:21911004